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The Ladysmith Chronicle Jul 3, 1909

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 THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
With WhTch Is Amalgamated the Ladysmith Standard.
ii
V
Vol. I.
v
Ladysmith, B. C, Saturday, July 3, 1909.
No..^^
The   Dominion   Day   Celebration
Glortdujlweather and an attractive under
proeramm i wcro tho features of  thc presented
for the gold watch and chain
by Mr, A. J. McMurtrlo,
most suci; ssful Dominion Day   eclc-j Besides thc regular programme there
bratlon ever, held in the city of La-, wcro a few extra events, for prizes
dyamith. Ffom the starting of
ChlldrVin's sports, in tho morning
til tbe completion of tho dance at
tho opera house at night, there was
no^ the sligi*teat hitch in tho -events
that constituted tbe programme of
the day. Visitors came pouring into
the city early in the morning some
by the first tiains and hundreds more
in carriages. The firBt of the visitors to arrfvc was the Lieutenant-
Governor and a party of friends on
his yacht, on Wednesday evening.
His Honor and his guests, enjoyed
the sports immensely and left Thursday evening, after having witnessed
nearly every important event in thc
'day's programme. Thc Nanaimo.people turned out in great numbers, an-.l
in the evident enjoyment of the day's
doings torgot all trivial differences
with regard to 'sport in the past.
Many, came up from Chemainus attracted particularly on account ot
thc baseball match. His Worship
Mayor Nicholson and the aldermen
were busy looking after the comfort
and enjoyment of the guests and the
committee, with Mr. Theodore Bryant, the secretary, up to his eyes in
business all the time, kept things
moving. Right here, lt should be
said, that there were many ffatterint
remarks by the visitors as to the ex>
cellent arrangements made by the
committee; . Every event was called
cJuHaae.^Kl i • i- were none ot those
)a}j!t staitaffw £ « 3 so exasperating
to spectator*!.. ,.*"
And a word of praise to the citizens tor t^ajr hospitality would not
be out ot place. Everyone was welcome, and nothing was left undone
that would contribute to the enjoyment of out-of-town visitors...
The children's sports were one ot
the most enjoyable features of tbe
day. The youngsters enjoyed the arrangements that had been made for
their entertainment,,,bub not more so
than the spectators and those who
were instrumental in making provision lor their sports.
At the sports ground a large crowd
assembled to witness the games.
The baseball match was a good
one, and every point was vigorously
contested. The Chemainus team was
strong, but they did not appear to
te able to score enough runs to win
the game.
Tne lacrosse match was Won on
its merits, Nanaimo bad the strongest team, but Ladysmith at least
made it Interesting for their opponents. In certain positions Ladysinith
was strong, but they could not find
the Nanaimo net. However, the Ladysmith team have tbe consolation
that lt is not so many years when
the team representing the city thnt
is now the home a! the championship
ot the world was not much superior
to the local players. Time and pruc
tice will win out. Now that Interest
has been aroused in the gamo, all
that is required Is to keep on playing.
The different events on the grounds
were Interesting from many points of
view. The participants entered tha'
contests with genuine sportsmanlike
spirit, and all they asked was a fair
field and no favors.
It was an ideal day for a regatta.
The water was like glass, and lt surprised many visitors that Ladysmith
ln a tew years had bo many fine
boats and had developed such a keen
nautical spirit. There wero many Ink
terestlng contests, and the opinion
was freely expressed that thU was a
form ot sport that should be encouraged.
The dance in the evening was most
enjoyable and concluded one ot the
beat celebrations ever held on Vancouver Island. The band contributed
good music, and added greatly to
th* enjoyment ot tbe day.
The day's programme Blurted with
the inarch Irom the school to Iho
Esplanade, headed by tbe band, The
children looked very attractive, and
many of thorn carried the flags of
the Dominion. The band played patriotic airs. On tbe arrival at tbo
Esplanade the sports began. Every
event was keenly contested, and In
some cases it took two or three preliminaries to decide who should take
tho'contributed by    Messrs.  John StoW-
nn-|art, P. G. Noot, II. Thornley   and
J. E. Smith.
CHILDREN'S SPORTS.
Thc following were the events and
prize wlnnors:
9,20 a. m.—1.—Girls' race, 10 years
and under—1st prize, value $3.00; 2nd
prize, value $2.00; 3rd prize, valuo
$1.00.
1st, A. Gibbons; 2nd, M. BomberroJ
3rd, M. White.
9.30 a. m.—2—Boys' race, 10 years
and under—1st prize, value $3.00;
2nd prize, value $2.00; 3rd prize,
value $1.00.
1st, W. Laudcrbach; 2nd, II. Cou-
lin; 3rd, L. Greaves.
9.40 a, m.—3—Three-legged race for
boyB 16 years and under, 100 yards
—1st prize, value $3.00; 2nd prize,
value $2.00; 3rd prize, value $1.00.
1st, Laudcrbach and McMurtrtc;
2nd, Inkster and McMillan; 3rd, E.
Johnny and Fred.
9.50 a. m.—4—Girls' race, 14 years
and under, 100 yards—1st prize, value $3.00; 2nd prize, $2.00; 3rd prize,
$1.00.
1st, M. Gaftney; 2nd, A. Bombcrroj
3rd, A. Robertson.
10 a. m.—5—Boys' race. 14 years
and under, 100 yards—1st prize, value, $3.00; 2nd, prize, $2.00; 3rd prize,
$1.00.
1st, I. McMurtric; 2nd, H. Walton;
3rd, S. Sinclair.
For girls, 14 years and under, gold
watch and chain, presented by Mr.
A. J. McMurtrlo—Won by MIsb M.
Gaftney.
(On FirBt Avenue)
10.25 a. m.-Wheelbarrow race,  10o|and qul<*ly carried it down to "the
all McDowell.  In tho .quarler-inilc W bio scull   race for men- 1st  prize,
made thc fastest   timo yet recorded
on tho Ladysmith grounds,
2 p. m —100 yardB foot race, amateur—First prize, value $10.00; ind
prize, vanfo, $5.00.
1st, n. Vaio, Y. M. C, A., Victor-
la; 2nd, S. Wirisby, J.U.A.A., Virtpr-
iu.
2.50 p. m.—Unit mile foot race, sm
ateiir^-lst prize, value $15.00; 2nd,
prize value $7.50.
1st, Wm. McDowell, L.F.O., Ludy-
smith; 2ml, L. Good, N. A>- A., Nanaimo.
3.45 p. m.—Relay race, amateur,
450 yards (three men in team)--
Prizes, valuo $30.00.
1st, Y.M.O.A.; Victoria, toam; 2nd,
Ladysmith Football Club.team.
3.55 p. m,—Ladies' race (ovcr 20
years of age)—1st prize, valuo $5.00;
2nd prize, value $3.00..
1st, Mrs. W. Watts; 2nd, Mrs. D.
Davies.
4.10 p. m.—Quarter-mile foot race,
amateur—1st prize, gold watch, value $16.00, special given by P. G.
Noot; 2nd prize, valuo $5.00.
1st, Wm. McDowell; 2nd, L. Good.
LACROSSE.
The lacrosse match waB one of tho
most interesting events of the celebration and was a good exhibition of
tho national game. Tho play was
particularly clean, not a single man
on either team coming in for the referee's displeasure. The gamo was a
few minutes late in starting as a result of the time taken in setting up
the goal posts and nets, which is a
difficult task ln so hard a  ground.
His Honor Lieutenant-Governor
Dunsmuir faced off the ball. 'Ladysmith secured the ball on the   draw
yards—1st prize,   value    $6.50;   2nd
prize,  $3.25.
1st, Laudcrbach Bros.; 2nd, M. Edgar and R. Peterson.    ,
SPORTS GROUND.
In a fast ball game between Ladysmith and Chemainus the former won
out by a score bf 3 to 2, three fast
double plays and the pitching of
Sanderson being the features of thc
contest. Errors by O. Delcourt and
M. Kerr resulted in giving Chemainus two runs, spoiling Sanderson for
a shut out. The players who were
prominent for Chemainus wero J.
Dcwltt on first base, whose playing
was a feature and Oabori, who
pitched good ball, but a Wild throw
to third and a passed ball gave Ladysmith .two runs, the third run being scored by a smashing single between second and third bases that
brought Morrison home with thc winning run. Timo was remarkably fast
for. an amateur ball game. Time,
1 hour 20 minutes.
Tho tcnmB wero Us-follows:
LADYSMITH.
8.   Kerr,   catcher;    J. SandcrBon,
pitcher, M. Taylor, lnt bnse;i M. Kerr
2nd banc; I). Delcourt, 3rd base;   A.
Simpson, shortstop; A. Morrison, left
field; C. Delcourt and Gerard, centre
Held; M. Metro right field.
CHEMAINUS.
C.   George,    catcher;     .1. Oabori,
pitcher; J. Dovlll, 1st bnsc; D. Dev-
itt, 2nd bnsc; W. Hooeboom, 3rd bnBc;
A. Erb, shortstop; D.  McClain,   lelt
field;   Amdycdlcm,   centre    field;   A.
Crosslin, right field.
Score by  Innings.
12 3 0 5 6 7 8 0
Chemainus     1 1 f> 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ladyemith  10000020x
Umpire— J. Gillespie; scorer, P.
Ptolemy.
BMALL TALK.
Keep tho good work going; thero 1b
nothing llko getting utartcd right.
Now to buckle down tor that Cum
bcrland series. A Utile moro ginger
iu needed for tho infield to iniiktf good
team work. Duncan nnd Chcinuinus
will Bond men down next week to organize a smalt league for tho summer. It is up to Nnnalmo to gel together and make It a four club circuit. A lew ot tho boosters nro going to got a team together aud show
Ladysmitli how to play bnoebsll next)
Wednesday night. Anything to keep
thc bnll rolling,
The programme nt tho sports
grounds was decidedly Interesting,
and carl-led out on schedule timo.
Tho 100-ynrdn  race  and   tho   retny
Nanaimo goal, where the defence of
tho visitors cleared. Again tbe ball
was taken into Nanaimo's territory.
Nanaimo breaking away travelled up
thc field and scored the first goal of
the game from a glance blow on tbe
goal-keeper's protecting pad. The
quarter ended with Nnnalmo in the
lead with this goal.
In the next period of play Ladysmitli again took the ball and carried it down the field with some pretty combination, Morris scoring one
minute after play. The play from
this on was fast and furious with
the credit of play being with the local team. No other goal ensued, the
quarter ending cne all.
In tho third quarter some very
pretty lacrosso was played, the Ladysmith homes shooting repeatedly
but being unable to find thc not. Indeed once thc Nanaimo - goal-keeper
missed thc bnll, but recovering himself saved a goal with but a narrow
margin of a few inches.
In thc Inst .(Barter thc Ladysmith
I cn m plninly showed the cflect of tha]
value $20.00; 2nd prize, value $10.00;
3rd prize, valuo $5.00. •
1st, Walker and Lawrence; 2ud,
Martin and Blank; 3rd, iRobinsou and
Barton.
4.46 p. m.—2—100-jnrdB swimming
race for boys, 16 yeura and under—
1st prize, value $5.00; 2nd prize, value, $2.50.
1st, 0. Lauderbach; 2nd, J. Johnson,
4.50 p. m.—3—11-paddlc Iudiun ca-
iioo iacc--lst prizo, $5.00 per paddle;
2nd prize, $2.50 pcr paddle.
1st, Valdcz Islulid; 2nd, Kupcr Island.
5.10 p. m.—1—100 yards swimming
race for men—lBt prize, value $10.00;
2nd prize, value $5.00.  '
1st, George Johnson; 2nd, John
Drake.
. 5.20 p. m.—5—Single scull race, one
mile, for men—1st prize, value $10.00;
2nd prize, value $5.00; 3rd prize, value, $2.50.
1st, J. Martin; 2nd, W. Sanderson;
3rd, W. Blank.
6.30 p. m.—6—Peterborough canoe
race, double—1st prize, value $10.00;
2nd prize, value $5.00.
1st, Walker ''"and Lawrence.
5.45 p. m.—7—440-yards swimming
race for men—1st prize, value $15.00;
2nd prize, value $10.00.
1st, Geo.  Johnson; 2nd, A.  Deanc.
6.10 p. m.—8—Launch race, local
boats.  Three classes.
1st, 18 foot and under, prizo $10.00
1st, J. A. Knight; 2nd, R. Wilson;
3rd, F. W. James.
2nd, 21 foot and under, prize $10.00
1st, F. Thick; 2nd, J. A. Knight/ 3rd,
R. Wilson.
3rd, 30 foot and under, prize $10.00
1st, R. Frcethy; 2nd, R. Brydon.
6.45 p.m.—9—Upset cauoe race, Indians—1st prize, $5.00; 2nd prize,
$2.50.
1st, Kuper Island.
The log-rolling contest did not fill
and there was no competition.
Thc extra 2-paddle canoe race wns
wpn by Valdcz Island; 2nd, Kuper Is
land; 3rd, Nanaimo.
TYEE GUN CLUB.
1st, C. Martin and C. Dickinson,
tio with 9 each; 2nd, lt. liogan, 8;
3rd, six tics with 7 each; 4tb, W.
Mills; 5th, M. Duitko; 6th, M. Hopkinson.
FIFTH EVENT.
15 Singles.
1st prize, $7.00; 2nd prize, $6.00
3rd prize, $5.00 value, P. G. Noot;
4th prize, set of military brushes, W.
E. Morrison; 5th prize, $4,00; 6th
prize, hut,.value $3.00, O. E. Jeffs.
1st, Geo.' Hepple, 14; 2nd, C. Brown
and 11. Hogan, with 13 each; 3rd, C.
Dickinson, W. Mills, Dr. Dlcr and A.
Martin, tie with 11 each; 4th, Frank
Young, C. Martin und Joseph Tas-
sin, tio with 10 each; 0th, J. Tassin;
6th, J. Macdonald.
SIXTH EVENT.
10 Singles.
1st prize, $M0; 2nd prize, »'<.00;
3rd prize, $5.00; 4th prize, $4.00; ith
prize,"pants length, value $3.50,, W.
G. Fraser.
1st, T. White, Frank Young, Geo.
Hepple   and R.   liogan, tie with   1)
Anxiety Concerning
Mr. John Stewart
Last Thursday, Mr.. John Stewart
ualod at what is known as lhc Slavonian Camp. He had his dog and
left on a visit to sonic claims, situ-
riflc with him, and reached-his, . ;-
dilution some time in the afternoon.
Ho remained thero nil night, and
started early yesterday morning ior
homo. Not arriving during the day,
bis friends become alarmed and tbo
police wero notified. A young man,,
who had loft the camp long uttc*' '**S
Stewart, arrived iu the city but mid
not seen him any place ob tlio trail.
Three other mcu wcro scut out in
search of Mr. Btcwurt und at 12 o'clock today tbey reported that they
had not been able to lcaru anything
aVout blm. One noticed footprints! tn
the snow, where Mr. Stewart bad
left the trail. The citizens arc thoroughly aroused and Mr. Watson organized    u body   of searchers,  who
each; 2nd, C. Brown and M. McCulBbJ started out at two o'clock  this  al-
tic with 8 each; 3rd, eight tics;, nil,  tbrnoon, all armed with rlllcs.   At -I
C. Dalton, A, Martiu and M. McKln-     , ,   ,    ,.      ...      ,.„.,,„„  ;,   .,„ „,
,      ,,       .,  ,.       ,.   r..    ..   .. ,r,     o clock,  it  nothing  further  Is  heard
ley, tic with 6 each; 5th, M. McKln-,
I iu the   meantime,    Mayor Nicholson
CONSOLATION PRIZES. will cull the council together to   do-
Silvrrware, value $7.00, Ladysmitli  cidc upon    n   systematic search.   It
Hardware Co.; $5.00 value, given   by.
R.  11.  Dier;  Simon Leiser Company, J
$5.00 value. ^^^^^^^^
In thc consolation prizes, Alex. Al.
len won thc Ladysmith Hardware
Company's prize; grand average, T,
White; A. Martin thc prize given by
S. Leiser & Co.
THE DANCE.
The dance in tbe evening at the
apera house concluded tbe day's
events. There were a large number
present and all enjoyed themselves.
'Pile music wan all that could be da-
sired, and the arrangements were perfect iu every detail.
MEETING  LAST NIGHT.
The   general committee   met    last
evening at the city hall to wind up
the  financial end of the celebration.
is feared by bis friends that Mr.
Stewart may have received an Injury, otherwise lie would have been
able to reach one ol tho camps in
the neighborhood.
At 2.45 this afternoon Mayor Nicholson notified the attorney-general's
department of Mr. Stewart's absence!
and the provincial police has been
notified to organize a systematic
search.
Everyone felt satisfied with tbe result! var(11 anjl jjlQ8 Lottie Maffeo,
of his   efforts,   but   when   it    was'
__^^^_____^^__. learned that there would be a   bal-
The Tyee Gun Club shoot was* not' ance after all bill** had teen paid the
by uny means   the least Interesting1 committee felt that they had anoth-
event of the day's programme.  The cr reason   for   congratulation.  The
day waB favorable fpr good Bhooting,  secretary   and  treasurer   bad  their | by her   sister,   Miss Annie Mafleo,
and   there wns   an unusually   large books an(j \_ was shown tnat nearly
crowd on  the  grounds.    There were all mils   had been liquidated.  There
A pretty wedding ceremony was
solemnized in the Wallace ftiu.-t
Methodist Church this city, on Sat-
day 'last, when the Rev. Robson united in marriagi.'" Mr. August Schl-
^^^^^^^^^^^^^ both
residents of Extension. The bride,
who was attired in a handsome
gown oi cream Panama trimmed
with black   buttons,   was supported
vlaitors and contestants trom many
of the neighboring towns. Nanaimo
and Chemainus were well represented,
and   there   were   quite a   few trom
Oabrlola Island. The arrangements' treasurer.for the work they had done
were perfect, and the marksmen were | nnQ many pieaslng references were
delighted with the day's sports. The, ma(lc to Lieutenant-Governor Duns-
following is a list of the events and J,„„„, tor tBe lntcre8t hc mBnlIeBt.
tho prizc-wir.iers;     .
FIRST EVENT.
are a tew outstanding accounts but
these will be settled when presented to the proper person. Tbe committee   thanked   the   secretary and
gowned in cream serge. Tbe groom
was supported by lits cousin, Mr.
Joseph Romona, and after the ceremony the party rode out to Extension by auto, where an elegant supper was served at thc home ot the
bride's uncle, Mr. Joseph Fontana.
Mr. and Mrs. Schlvardi   left   on   a
1st
10 Singles,
prize,    $8.00   cash; 2nd
prize,
tirrlllc pnee they had played tho pro>|$6.00 cash; 3rd prize, $4.00 cash; 4th
part In the final.  One of the keenest [ race were keenly contested.  In   the
citing sictli ns of lhc gnmc. Tho Nn-
niiiino team, however, seemed to
come up iu this quarter with greater
vim than they hud yet shown and
succeeded In getting another goal and
then fulling buck played a defense
gamo till the filial whistle, the final
score being:
Nanaimo   2
Ludysmlth   1
It is useless going Into the details
ot tho game. Sufficient lo say each
player put up a good Individual
gnmc but on the home division an
absence of combination was noticeable, due, no doubt, to a lack of
practice together.
REGATTA.
The regatta was n fitting termination lor the day's iiportiv Tne water
was favorable to good lime, and the
spectacle was one thai will long be
remembered. Tlio Lieutenant. Governor's yacht wan anchored just outside
ot the launch race course, and tho
visitors had n splendid view of the
dlflorcut events, Mr. Frank, Thick,
chairman of tho rcgnllu committee,
hud tin- course properly surveyed, and
everything wns In perfect order.
In ..!« 30 foot clues Ills Honor tho
Lieutenant •.•ovcr.nor entered, on the
understanding that If ho won tho
first prize, It would bo handed over
to the nest winner, and he won it.
The Indian lanoo ruecs wero quite an
interesting us In years gone by, and
nn extra race for two puddle canoes
was added, which brought out n field
of seven canoes,
prize,    hat  value  $3.50,   Walters   &
Akenhead; 5th prize, $2.00.
1st, W. Keserich, Geo. I topple and
T. McGargle, tic with 10 each;- 2nd,
T. White, 0, Martin nnd R. Hogan,
tied with 9 each; 3rd, J. Wargo nnd
Dr. Dier, lie with 8 each; 4th, A.
iMiirtiii) 5th, J. Giuliani, M. Hopkinson aud Flunk Young, tio with 6
each,
SECOND EVENT
15 Singles.
1st prize, $8.00 cash; 2nd prize,
$6.00 cash; 3rd prize, pair shoes, value, $5.00, Blair & Adam; 4th prize,
$4.00 cash; 5th prize, hat, value $3,
John Bicklc; 6th, $2.00 rush.
1st, A.Murtlu, 13; 2ud, T.Whltc, W.
Keserich, R. MeCulsh and J. McDonald, tic with 12 each; 3rd, J. Wargo;
4th, O. Brown, 0. Hepple, M. ilop-
klnuon, E. Dalton and W. Mills, lie
with 10 each; Cth, J. Tannin; 6th, C.
Martin aud M. McKinlcy
each,
THIRD EVENT.
Team Shoot of Six Mcu, 15 Singles.
II moro than three teams compete
second prlzo given.
1st prize, $30.00; 2nd prize, $12.00
1st, Uepplc'u team, 76 out ol  possible 90; 2ud, C, Martin's team  and
F. Young's team tie with 53.
FOURTH EVENT.
10 Singles.
lot prize, $7.00; 2nd prlzo, pair of
shoes, $5,00, Geo. Cavin; 3rd prlzo,
$4.00; 4th prize, pipe, value (3.50,
Harry Hughes; 6th prize, cigar bolder, $2.60,    Grant Jessup; 6th
ed in the city by being presenTand >IU'ymoon trip to Scattlc and other
taking part in thc celebration. Re-1 Sound cities nnd on their return will
gret was expressed that the kindness I *<*** "P thcir residence in Extension,
of Mr. Watson   had been bo wilfully ] -Nanaimo Herald.
abused   by a horde of   savages who! *	
broke into Ills premises and diimngrd,
bis   luwn.  The mayor, who wns   in -
the chntr, sent for Constable O'Con-
.nell  in the hope of getling informs- j'
Hon thai would reveal tho identity  WWlng, July 5th, from 6 p. m. to
of the trespassers,   It.   was learned] 10 p. m. at the home of Mr. W. Gll-
thut they were not residents ot Lndy : chrlst, Fourth avenue.   All members,
smith, and a further effort will   bo| especially the members that do   not
made to locate thcin, so tbey   may, attend rcgulnrly. arc requested to he
bo dealt with by the proper author! ! present,   when a full   report ol   the
tics.   In lhe meantime IMayor Nichol-  convention held nt Vancouver,   Julio
•| Thc locnl Union of the W. a J. U.
' will hold its last social gathering
] for the summer months next Mondny
son und Secretary Bryant will convey the rcgrctu ot the commit tec to
Mr. Watson. After several unimportant matters relating to lhc eclcbra
lion had been discusBcd, II, was de
elded to hold another meeting on
July 14th, when lhc flnul report will
be presented.
15 17 will be read. Gentlemen members nre Included, lee cream will be
served free.
For   Dominion   liny   the   Novelty
Chariot) 8. Horutcck, who confessed
to tlio killing of Mrs. t>ewls James,
who was murdered nt her home nt
Winnipeg on April 22, hoo been ad-
jddged Insane nnd committed to Scl-
Ihcntic   put on several   shows   iind|k„.|t ,,,,,,,,„,„   .,.,,,, p,aicr bUIo   thal
judging from the attendance at cueh
tic wllh 8' show the programme must have becu
very    popular.    Tonight   the    programme of Thursday will ho repcatee); mystery gi
and (or Monday and Wednesday ncxti ,
week an Interesting entertainment Is
being provided for the patrons ot
this theatre.
they have no frer.li evidence In connection wllh lhe murder, and nppcnr
to bo ns far from a solution of the
ever.
Kev, Mr. Shatford, ot Montreal,
will orrKe here this evening, and occupy the pulpit ln St. John's church1
tomorrow.
The Ladysmith tootball team   lelt! ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
last   evening   for New Westminster, '
where they will play todoy lor the! Private sales ol Prince Rupert Iota
championship ol British Columbia. ; amount to nearly n million dollars,
Tho line-up will be practically the! bringing the total up to about two
sumo as In the laBl match wllh tbe,' mllllonn.
exception ol Christian.
prlzo, |   Harmony Lodge, I.O.O.F., will In
Mr.  nnd Mrs.  William  Jones lelt
lor Kansas this morning on a   two THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
$500 CASH
For a First Class House on a Good Corner,
did Soil, Good Stables, Etc.
This Is a  bargain.
And $200 at $10
Per Month
Splen-
A life Drama.
JOHN STEWART
Notary Public , Conveyancer
LADYSMITH, B.,0.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Head Office   -   *  Toronto
CAPITAL $10,000,000: REST $6,000,000
Bonk Money Orders
ISSUED AT THE FOLLOWING RATES!
Sr. ami under         -         - 3 cents
Over |5 and not exceeding $10, 6 "
"   flO      "      "          m. 10 "
'•   $30      "       "           1J50. 15 "
These orders are payable at par st any office In
Canada of a Chartered Bank, except in the Yukon
and at the principal banking points in the United
States.
They ar> negotiable at $4:00 to the £ sterling in
Great Britiin and I-eland. They form an excellent method of remitting small sums of money
v ith safetv ahd at small cost and may be obtained without delay at any office of the Bank.
LADYSMITH BRANCH   L. M. de Gex, Manager
THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
Published by Carley & Carley at LadyBmith, B.C.
•very Wednesday and Saturday.
$1.50 a Year in Advance, 25c Per Meatli
AdmHIalnn R»t«s on iralletflfm.
Editorial Comment.
Hilbert & McAdie
PRACTICAL EMBALMERS
First class Hearse supplied in Ladysmith.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
Telephone No. 262 and 180
P.O. Box 735    -      -    Nanaimo
they removed to a Bmall town in an- ]
other part of Massachusetts, but sub-
se-iuently returned to the metropolis
of the state. When he was, about 14
years of age his grandmother died,
and in a very short time his .grandfather married again. The new wife
did not take kindly to her step-
ird to conceive a morei sranfooh and, unable to tolerate Jiei
heart-touching htiman! mat-treatment and that of his grand-
■ father, he resolved to run away. Misleading statements' concerning his
parentage had been made to him by
his grandfather, and the youth was
under the impression that he was
hcmoless and along in the wide world.
With a view chiefly ot having the
companionship of lads of his own age
he joined the navy and served the
full six years as a common sailor,
first serving on board a training
ship and latterly on a man-of-war.
All the while his heart was burdened with   tho ycarningB for   a   home
Down at the Union Depot at Ottawa last week, in the faint grey of
early morning, there was enacted tha
finale of a life drama than which
'twould be hard to conceive a more
profoundly
story—a story of paternal love and
filial affection long held aloof by a.
great abyss of adversity and ill fortune, a Btory of hope deferred, of
heart yearnings through many, many
years, and finally a story of the realization of fond hopes ofttimes
thwarted. There were but two characters in that aflecting little scene
on the station platform, there at
that early hour of the summer morning. A man might have been seen on
the platform in the gloaming before
the sunrise., His hair was whltc-with
tlie sunrise.,  m» mm  nun nHlwrn,..,
tlie frosts of many winters, time had  n,,(1 Parentl*'
written its lines unmistakably    '   0n lcavlllS
upon
the navy ho journeyed
to Mexico and wandered aimlessly
I around the southern mountains with
a party of prospectors. Booh tiring
of this, he secured a position on a
railroad, but soon deserted it in
favor of i a life on the prairie ranches
of far Arizona. Hence he went to
California, and from there back to
the southern prairie lands. The
young man states that the desire for
a home, the craving for friends whom
he could call'his own, never once de*
serted him even out on the fastnesses
cf the wilds of Texas.
It was one night last November
that he rode out into the prairie of
an Arimna ranch, alone in the moon-
John W.  Coburn,
President and Managing Director.
The Ladysmith Lumber Co.,
Limited.
MANUFACTURERS OP, ALL  KINDS OK
Rough and Dressed Fir Lumber,
Red Cedar, Shingles and Lath
LADYSMITH, BRITISH COLUMBIA
secretary and treasurer,'the committee were only marking their appreciation of officials who had faithfully
fulfilled their duties. The cclqliration
is now over, and It is the. duty of
all citizens to turn their attention
to the more' serious. obligation—that
of building up a prosperous and iri-
jdustrious city.
bespoke advancing age. From three
o'clock until five he paced the platform in the crisp morning air—wait-
iiiL"*, waiting, waiting.
At length the train arrivod. A
young man alighted briskly from one
of the coaches, as fine a young fellow
ts cue could wish to sec—upright of
figure, frank and manly of countenance, strapping and muscular, his
face bronzed by a hot sun's rays.
Simultaneously the elderly man and
the young fellow caught sight ot each',
other. They paused only a moment
for a word of mutual inquiry and
then followed a long embrace,
in the course ot which, both broke
down nnd wept—the tears were tears
ot joy.
This was the little drama of the
station platform—trivial and uninteresting to the casual and emotionless observer, but to the strapping
youth and the elderly man of tbe silvery hair it meant much. The two' ,...,,, , . . „
principals were tather and son. The w°u!d flnd lli8 lon«-loBt '»«-«•'.
father was MaO.ll' Valentine, who , For ma,ny weeks he ™ited-waited
has been employed at the government '°r * ■*$ ^T ,the°"awa ^si'
'-*&.   w™,,    for 22 vears;   the' maSt'er' to whom ho   nad wrltten in"
quiring whether a man ramid Valentine was still alive and living   in
Th*  people   ot   British   Columbia
who   know   Mr.- W.   J. Taylor, the
Victoria barrister, and appreciate hla
a'tUlty as a lawyer, were surprised to
learn   that   the   council of Victoria
had sought J,he advice of a  Vancouver practitioner as to certain, mat
t.ers In which tbe city .was interest
ed.   Mr.   Taylor's   advice   on   legal
matters is regarded as equal to that
ot any man in Western Canada, and
wh>' thc council should overlook their
own   barrister   was a   mystery.    It
now transpires that the council knew
nothing about   the transaction,   hut
that it was engineered by the city
solicitor, whose opinion on the teclwl
nlealittts of the law is not considered ns being infalluble.   It is reported that when the matter came up bet
tore the Victoria council nt its   last
meeting, many ot the aldermen were
surprised   that   City Solicitor Mann
should have arrogated to himself an
authority he did not possess.     Mr.
Taylor   was present   and he had   a
heart-to-heart   talk with Mr.   Mann'
and those who were present unite in
Baying that    when Mr. Taylot   got
through, the city solicitor was atjout
-tbe cheapest   and   smallest   man in
Victoria.   Mr. Taylor "took him to
his bosom" and then reasoned with
him in a manner at once convincing
'   though gentle;
Do You Want A Summer Suit?
I carry one of the largest stocks of SUMMER
SUITINGS on the Island. ,    , ' !
We Guarantee FIT and the PRICES are RIGHT
D.J. Matheson
MERCHANT TMIOR
Oatacre st.,   Ladysmith, B. C.
liU -■'-iieuim ittuui, aivu. ... i,..^ ,*uwu»
light, utterly alone amid thc solitude
of the plains. On that night the
memories of childhood came back to
him with wondrous vividness. He remembered his father, ne remembered
Canada—he remembered all. Then
and there it occurred to him that he
had been deceived by his abiuctorB.
He   would   write   to   Ottawa,  He
Lieutenant-Governor Dunsmuir en-
Toys the "reputation of being a modest and undemonstrative man, but
thc Chronicle is convinced that if
His Honor heard even half ot tbe
pleasant remarks that have been
made concerning his visit to Ladysmith on Dominion Day he would
experience the emotion that moves
u man ' when he realizes that
his generosity! lias been Tevealed and
repaid with gratitude.
printing bureau for 22 years; the
young man was Frank C. Valentine,
his son, who was taken trom his father's home in Ottawa here 19 years
ago, and had never since been seen
by his father.. The sop rejoices today ln that he is no longer a fatherless and homeless wanderer, thc father is overjoyed this bright June day,
for has his long-lost son not been
restored to him. Can he not say
with the father ot the parable—"My
son waB lost and is found, He was
dead, and be Is alive again."
The story reads more like a tale
woven trom tlie brain of u true novelist rather than an extinct from the
pages of life's stern reality, but the
tacts are repruduccd   herewith   prc-
•*.«*«.*.«*«.l«.*«.*.»*..*«.*«»*..;..*«.*..*«.*..*.^
AN INFERENCE.
that city.
It waa on Christmas morning that
Frank C. Valentine walked ten miled
to the nearest post office with the
joyous expectation of receiving good
news from tho postoffice. A village
church-bell pealed forth as ho neared
the village and he felt that there
awaited him a letter telling him all
wap well,
And he received a letter—no, not
cne, but two. The first waB signed
"J. A. Gouln, postmaster of Otta-
waf" It informed him tbat hie fa
ther wns alive and well, waiting and
anxious to see his son. The, second
letter wus from the young man's In
Two Good Local Buys
House and Lot on Roberts St. and 6th Ave.   $525.
Store on Roberts  St.,   near 4th  Avenue.   $400
McKELVIE BROS.,   I
Real Estate      , |
| First Avenue, Ladysmith J
.*M2««^*«.*«.*«.*.«*.»*.«f«»*««*M*..*.«*M*..*^
IllCm    Ui^    ti.1iiu«»-v-         j rcvbvi    nun   i.um   my   juwih   .....,.»   ....
elsely as they come from W'e father. tjlcr hjmfieif, impl'iritis;  him to come
"Pa," said Bobble, "kin I go fiBh-
!n'?" ;
"No, you can't," retorted t|ie old
gentleman from behind bis newspaper
Pause.
"Pa, kin I go in swimmln'?"
"I've told you several times already."
Pause.   *
"Say, ma, kin I go out and play
with the hose?"
"No, Bobbie; you'll get yourselt
soaked," replied the mother.
Pause.
"Ma, .'tin I go acrost to Willie
Smith's for a little while?"
"No, my son, you can't. Willie
Smith is not a fit companion tor a
boy like you."
Pause.
"Pa, kin I cut the pictures out o'
the Sunday papers?"
"No/alree;. you can't. I'm not going to have this house littered up
with scraps of paper."
"Ma, kin I—"
"No, Bobbie; you can't! Don't have
me to tell you that again."
Pause.
"Say, pa, 1b this a prohibition
country?"
The citizens ot Ladysmith are to
be congratulated on the success attending the celebration of the forty-
second anniversary of Confederation.
It is doubtful if a more successful
celebration was; ever held in British
, Columbiu, although there have been
irtoTo elaborate obstrvaiicea ot national holidays. Everyv dollar expended
was made to count in the general remit, an| the conj^tt^JBr^inly Av-
erlookett nothing that weSuld contribute   to the enjoymont   of all   who
;•-,,..   -THE-BORNLUNATIC.
"Professor, you say you are an expert at solving riddles, don't you?"
"I claim that I am, my boy,"
"Weil, then, can you tell me why a
man who has seen London on a foggy j
day and a man who has not' seen
London on a foggy day are like a
ham sandwich?"
''the prbfessot Btudied for a' long
time.' Finally, at big'wit's end, he
said:   "I give it up."
"Why," was the reply, "one hag
Been the mist" and the other' has
missed   the   scene,   Ha, hat     Catch
■oil?"       " '
* *"et/e6ilf8e!i"do,"you lunatic!  But
what hns the sainlwlch to do   with
i |tr'   ' ■■■-.!' ;>_&
and son themselvep
Twenty-live years ago a son
born to Mr. and Mrs. McOill Valen
tine, who were then living tn Boston, Mass. Shortly afterward Mr.
Valentine received and accepted an
offer of employment in the government printing bureau, Ottawa. When
the boy was five years of age the
mother was stricken with u fatal
illness. - When shc was appraised ot
the fact that she could not recover,
she went to Boston, with hcr only
son, to die at hcr parent's homo, and
the scenes of her childhood, Hef
death whs not long delayed,
The mother's parents sought tho
sorrowing husband's permission to
keep their grandson with them. Atter consultation with a parish priest
the father granted their roquest.
Borne two years later, Mr. Valent
tine communicated with*hls former
wife's parents requesting that the
child he sent to Ottawa, as he had
married again, and had a comfortable home for the boy, He was told
in anything but a courteous manner
that the boy would not be given up
until tbe complete bill ot expenses
for bis maintenance was paid, Mr.
Valentine immediately despatched his
brother to Boston to And the child
and bring him back at any cost.
When the brother arrived at Buptw
he had found that the old people had
left for parts unknown the previous
week, taking the,boy with them. Everything poggtble was done to find
them, but to no avail,
The father frequently made Inquiries concerning his son'g whereabout*, hut they were futile, He
could find no trace of the boy. Only
once did he receive an inkling o( him
from a very vague and indirect
source—he heardt that the lad had
joined the American navy and' had
been killed in the Spanish-American
tear.' Worn that time on Mr. Valentine abandoned all hope ot ever Boeing hie eon again; he mourned him
as dead.
Such is the father's story. The
son's story is even more touching.
From beginning to ena it Is lull of
path'ng, nnd It Is not without Its elo<
homo Immediately,     That   was   his
*M| Christmas gift,
Thc young man would not write lot?
the money which his father offered
Ii.m to pay his expenses to Ottawa.
And so he toiled away on thc ranch
until he had saved sufficient money
to buy a ticket (or' Ottawa, Tbe trip
was made via Hcaltlo, Vancouver and
Winnipeg.
Needless to say, a hearty welcome
awaited him here, a welcome not less.
cordial from his step-mother i\nd two,
step-brothers than from bin tather,
There Is rejoicing in that household
today,
A SURPRISE FOR .HM.
A mission worker in New. Orleans
was visiting a reformatory near that))
city not long ngo when she observed
among the inmates an old acquaintance, a negro lad long thought to
he a model ot Integrity.
"Jim!" exlalmed the mission worker, "Is it possible I flnd you hero?"
. ."Vnasum," blithely responded the
backslider. "I's charged with stealin'
a barrel ot sweet pcrtaters."
The viator sighed, "You, Jim!"
sho repeated, "I am surprised."
"Yasgum," said Jim, "So was I,
cr I wouldn't he here,"
Hens for Sole
One Hundred Hens for
sale. Apply D. Davies,
Rancher,  near Ladysmith.
Leave orders at Robert's
Butcher Shop.
Novelty TTieafre
Masonic Building, Ladysmith
New Programme       ;
Monday ind "
Thursday
PERFORMANCES AT 7:30 AND 8:45 P.M. :
, ___  ' T  ■ . T,. ■■.■■■:; H—       i
Admission: IOc and 15c
Matinee Prices Sc and I Oc   '£?
ittysmith
AT.f- THF, STAPLK DRUGS
ALWAYS IS STOCK.
PREJCIUPTIONS PROMPTLY
ATTENMDTO.
Lands for Sale
"""•   "" *"     ... |    After the youngster had recovered;pai.no»,Hnii fvio i,
took part in the day's entertainment. from ft .gpe„ o, .Rn)iiltel.. no chuck,- ment of adventure.
In passing a   vote of thanks to  the ed;
"Oh, that's what you bite <in."     When Wb grandparents lctt Boston,
Agricultural, Timber and Suburban Lands for sale.
For prices and location apply to the Land Agent at
Victoria or the District Land Agent at Duncan.
Town Lots and cleared Suburban acreage for Sale
at Ladysmith. Apply Land Agent, Victoria, and
Townsite Agent, Ladysmith. THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
BEAD!   CONSIDER!  ACT!
^xteiwlve advert-Bin* tn lariro N«fWBparers, In
Icr ;e Cities coats large Bums of n onay. We are
Stftianed with smalt advertising, in a small paper,
f.r small money. This enables us to place our
goods before our customers at a price to match
most Income..
CHAS. PETERSON
Furniture Store
Ladysmith
Transfer
Stables
Light and heavy teaming.
Furniture and piano moving
a specialty.
Nicholson & Weaving
PROPRIETORS
Telephone 1.
Wagons
I Sill T. 1. Tripp t Co's
Celcbtated Wagons
During the season we have sold a lam* number
of wagons, Implements and logging trucks.
Everything carries a guarantee.
R. WRIGHT
Duller Strut
4
4
I
•?
X
4
4
4
9
4
9
•I*
DRINK
U. B. C.
AND BOHEMIAN
BEER
I UNION BREWING CO., Ltd |
T
♦:•
•j..j.»j».j.»2».*..j
4
v
NANAIMO, B. C.
John Chinaman at Home in China
Mrs. T. A. Robinson, (nee Miss
Mercuttyl, well-known in this city, dei
livered a lecture on China in Snm-
merland, one evening last .week.
Instead of the .lecturer confining
herself to explaining the views as
thrown upon tbe canvas as upon
former occasions, she took halt an
hour at tbe outset in which to develop her subject, and the result was
all that could be deaired and gave
Mrs. Robinson afar,better chance to
demonstrate her splendid ability as
a lecturer.
China with her four hundred million inhabitants was a problem
which at present no one could solve.
In these days of progress it waa
strange that so little was really
known of China. There were many
misconception as to what her people were like and many judged the
whole race by the representatives
that made their homes in Canada.
That was a great mistake as only
tho lowest class, and those driven
by force of circumstances from their
homes ever emigrated from tbe land
of their ancestors.
The Immigrants were frequently thc
victims of the white man's greed,
and when the Chinese spoke of the
white people as foreign devils, it
was not to be altogether wondered at and the blame must be
placed where it belonged, and that'
waB upon the white people them-l
selves who bad regarded the Chinese I
as simply a nation to be raided and[
abused in order to fill their pockets
with ill gotten gains.
Tho Chinese were among the
world's oldest peoples; ages betore
ihe British had emerged from barbar-
lsml the Chinese were in tbe flood of
highest civilization.
They placed a high premium on
morality and total abstinence; 4000
years ago it was recorded that one
of their number had made an intoxicating wine from rice and the Emperor as soon as he discovered it expelled him from the land, never to
return. In the old country when a
man made sufficient whiskey, tbe
powers that be usually made him a
lord.
Tho people ot China were still very
crude and superstitious. They believed in ghosts, evil spirits, charms
and transmigration of souls. They
wero a conservative people and did
hot welcome innovations. In 1883
an Anglo-American company put in ia
plant for winding silk from tbe cocoons of the silk worms. After ex-
aming the contrivance, the government" banished it from the land .as it
would deprive thousands of women
and children of the means of .a livelihood.
Thc Chinese were a docile, industrious people, desirous of minding
their own business and being left
alone. They were stubborn and willing to fight to the finish in defence
of their own rights. They saw the
west continually changing systems,
and disapproved of it, desiring no
change.   They were determined!  that
China should not be exploited for
the purpose of filling the pockets of
foreigners.
The lecturer spoke in an impassioned
manner of the way in which the
Shanghai railway was foisted on the
people and the trickery resorted to
at the time of its promotion and also of the lniifuitloug opium wars
which Great Britain befouled her
fair name by forcing upon the Chinese.
The Chinese were practically divided into four classes, which ranked in
the order named, 1st the Literati! or
educated classes, 2nd the Farmers,
3rd the Mechanics and 4th the Merchants.
Great value was placed upon education anil the educated classes were
those who filled all the highest positions in the Empire, rising, not as
a result of birth but of their person-,
al attainments. The greatest men of
China had all risen from thc ranks
There were three educational degrees, the examinations for which
must all bo written off in the sacred
city of Pekin, after successfully passing the three degrees the name oi
the student was enrolled on thc
books of Pekin. There were three degrees obtainable, the first called Budding flower, ^ the second, Enlightened
man and the third, Enrolled scholar.
Many died striving after thc third.
Ii a man tried for the last degree
faithfully but unsuccessfully for many
years; after he passed 90 years of
age, the degree of Enlightened Man
was conferred upon him.
Put a little
'Sunshine"
in your
home
An old-fashioned,
ill-working furnace is a non-
producer.
V       It consumes the coal, but through leaks and
cracks wastes th" heat.
It is not economy to have such a furnace in
your own home, or in your tenant's home.
If you are thinking of building you should be interested in Sunshine Furnace. It adds 100 per cent, to
home comforts.
As soon as you let the contract for your house decide
on your furnace.     The "Sunshine" man will be
pleased to tell you just how the rooms ought to be
laid out with an eye to securing greatest heat from
the smallest consumption of coal.
If you want to experiment with the question don't
specify " Sunshine."
If you want to settle the question .specify " Sunshine.1'
MXIaryfc
2 -»
A Woman's Notebook.
For Sale Ey Ladysmith Hardware Co., Ltd., Utipitli
ARE YOU READY
TO PAINT OR
PAPER?   WHEN YOU ARE
READY WE ARE.
PICTURE FRAMING
A SPECIALTY.
S. ROEDDING
Paperhanrjer and Art Decorator.
High Street.
il.
Jeremy Taylor tells us of a young for the constant complaint that falls
man who threw a Btone at bis dog ] from his lips, even if we do not   go
whom I heard Bay
to a man with whom sho was dining,
and who bad complained tbat this
and   that did   not agree with him:
Ice  Cream
AT
Ciller's Store
Ice Cream lOo a plate.
Express and Teaming
Woodlfor Sale.
P. INKSTER, PHONE 06
D I. Jenkins successor to HE. Hilbirt
Hllbert Undertaking Patlcr:
1,3 and S,Bastion St.,Nanalmi
Phone 124     P. 0. Box lj
so," tho chronicler quaintly adds, "it
a great deal more in this little incident than merely its humor. It
was not altogether loBt." There is
shows us now in trying to hurt a
person—or even to punish them Justly perhaps- -we may sometimes unwittingly hurt someone else, and I
(eel constrained to add one other
thought evolved from thlii'.iiig over
another side of the Incident. Since,
in attempting to bit anyoue, and In
case we miss them, would It not he
wiser to cease even from Inflicting
that which we consider a necessary
blow—abovo all, perhaps, a "letter"
blow? I myself have never written
an impulsive letter of condemnation,
however deserved by tbe person to
whom lt was sent, without the afterthought, "I wish I had not sent that
letter." After all, it is so much tetter sometimes not to put ourselves
In tbe right. What does lt matter?
Petty misunderstandings are so very
email and so often put, themselves
right in time, and, lt we only leave
those who have wronged us alone,
circumstances will often tench them
how deeply they have mUanderstood
us. Moreover, however much In the
right wo may be, we shall seldom
convince anyone that they have done
is an injustice, so why try to do so?
"Doesn't it? Well, for goodness'
Bake, don't say so, because I can't
bear people with whom things disagree." There is no doubt that nervous dyspepsia is largely added to
by tear, and I am not sure tbat the
ever-lasting reiteration, "I dare not
eat this," nnd "I never dare take so-
and so," might easily become contagious in timo, and even give us
dyspepsia, too.
The City Market
R. WILLIAMSON,   Prop.
Wholesale and Retail.
MEATS and VEGETABLES
Ladysmith, B. C.
A. Litt
AND
CLBANINU,   PKKSS1MJ
RKVA1H1NO.
Charges moderate,
 at   McCallum'i and
Many and many a heartburning
would be saved us if we were only
as patient with others, as we nre with'
ourselves and if we said a little less
in even Just reproach, and, ln (act,
put up with slight injustices and only complained when absolutely forced Into doing bo. It is always wise
to keep an angry letter until tbe
noxt day. I once heard a well-
known clergyman say that much misery would be saved it we only wrote
eur unpleasant letters and put them
under the pillow and read them next
day. How lew would be postod with-'
out at least being rewritten and a
softening   sentence   added   here and
there or a harsh one taken out again!,
•  «  .
Whence have arisen the modern all-,
meats of nervous prostration and
nervous dyspepsia. Partly, I really
believe, through constant and. reprehensible ailment conversations, Our
great-grandfathers might nave been
coarser and rougher in their modes .ot
expression*, but at least.they did not
talk ot their digestions, and were
apparently not sufferers Irom nervous
dyspepsia or nervous anything, tor
that matter. Some ol our ancestors
must, Indeed, have had digestive organs that vied in strength with those
ot the ostrich, lor ln "Pepy's Diary"
I see he one day says: "This day.
Mrs. Shipley and I did eat our/break
last at Mrs. Harper's upon a cold
turkey ple-and a goose." Happy
IVpys and Mrs. Shipley—what a meal
with which to start a day, even II
partaken of at a late hour ln the
morning!  I think we women  should
m_Mmmmi^^__mUm*M
"If a woman is young and pretty,
I think you can see her good looks
all the better tor her being plainly
dressed. It seems to me as a woman's face doesn't want flowers; it's
almost like a flower itself." So saya
one ot our great writer's characters;
but I must disagree with this somewhat severe restriction on the manifold delights of feminine dress and
ornamentation. A pretty woman is
doubly pretty in lovoty clothes, anl
too plain-dressing, unlesa the attractive simplicity ol Quakerism, detracts trom even the greatest beauty. A lovely woman is lovely perhaps in ill-made clothes, but a thousand times lovelier in gossamer draperies. Moreover, every pretty woman
should study colors, for one will enhance and another take away trom
her charm; and, as to wearing flowers, what can be moro beautiful than
a very young girl ln white with a
touch of crimson or vivid flames-colour or purple? And the red-haired
beauty's loveliness is surely greatly
added to by a bunch of Neapolitan
violets or heliotrope. To carry tho
analogy a little further, this writer's
character adda: "It's like when a
man's singing a good tune, you don't
want t'hea bolls tinkling and interfering wi' the sound." Quite true!
I should* greatly dislike bells and
singing mixed, but, when a man
sings, his voice is brought out and
emphasised by tbe accompanying piano. In any case, it is pleasing tor
the woman, whether plain or pretty,
to feel she 1b elegantly rather than
"plainly" dressed, and, to my mind,.'
pleasanter for those who look on
her.
* • .
I add a story about a little girl,
told me by a friend, This friend was
giving a dinner-party, and she sent
her sister, who was staying in the
house downstairs, shortly before the
guests were due to arrive, to give a
last, glance at the table. The sister
was standing by the window for a
moment, when sho heard a sudden
sound of pattering leet, and, turning, saw the little daughter ol the
house coming across the hall in her
nightgown only. She drew back, very]
much astonished, Into the shadow ot
the curtain, and the child pattered
Into the dining room, and, going up
ill and hleh table where the
up into a chair and took a peach,
which she clasped on both hands as
she went oil Into the hall a,gain. Th4
girl who waB watching felt puzzled
as to whether to tell her sister cr
not, or whether to follow the child
upstairB. She decided on the latter,
but waited to rearrange the (lowers
on the table for a moment. She waa
Just about to leave thc room, when
she heard the little pattering feet
again, and drew back once more into
tho shadow of the curtain. The bacbj(
camo lo, looking very solemn,- the
peach still in her hand, and, going
straight up to thc little tattle, labor-/
lously clambered up again on a chair.
Waa she going to take another
peach?. If so, if wns really
time to interfere; but, ns the girl
waited a moment to see, the baby,
leaning forward, laid the peach shc
had first taken on the top of thc
others on the dish, nnd saying In a
loud, triumphant voice, "Done againt
ole devil!" she clambered down and
pattered happily out of the room up
to bed.
ROSALIE NEISH,
SEVERELY REPRIMANDED.
ARE YOU GOING TO BUILD
a fence or a bouse, if so consult me
as I can save you money on lumber.
Having purchased a low truck. I
am prepared to move furniture and
planoB.
For any teaming consult
THORNLEY
XADYSMITH     -     -     PHONE 6,
ESQUIMALT AND
NANAIMO RAILWAY
Double Train
Service
i
2        4
Portland Hotel
GOOD    BOARDING.
BILLIARDS AND POOL.
Barclay  &  Conlin,
Proprietors
Shoe Repairing
I am
Shoes.
ready to repair Boots   and
Satisfaction  Guaranteed
FRANK    SP1NATO,
Corner Third ave. and High street,
near Queen's Hotel.
tar-x-wus simply great In relay jT
*ut," boustcd tho   boy (rom   col- I
a ,*c, "Good enough, son.   We'll make   '
10.00 9.00 VICTORIA 12.0S 18.55
18.45 1157 LADYSMITH 9.00 14.58
19.23   12.35     NANAIMO      8.15   15.15
D. CHETHAM,
Dist. Pass. Agt.
Victoria, B. C.
Ladysmith Bakery
Company
Cakes of every; description, fano
and plain. Candies of all kindl
Fruit of all kinds. Fresh bread ever
da}.
Reasonable prices. Come and ss
our lines and leave your orders. W
give careful attention.
Hop Lee, Prop.
Esplanade street,   Ladysmith.
r
Gen. Stawes   was a   martinet;
stickler for etiquette, a man with aic ot them talents.   Your ma   will
prodigious sense of his own dignity, |0n be ready to relay the carpets.
to relay the carpets."  If
Pure Ice Cream
Constantly
On Hand
and when Private S. Weigh, the bugler, one day failed to honor him in
passing .with  the customary salute,     y stur*lj'   "'fl, gradfatlicr
he flew— internally - ln a towering I"1' '» tlio   steerage,   Forty!
years
rage.
V'Knutt," he said that afternoon to
the colonel. "Private Weigh failed
to salute me this morning. A breach
ol etiquette, sir! A piece of impertinence—my dignity—haw! See that
tho man is severely reprimanded."
Colonel Knutt trembled and nodded and next day spoke to the Captain.
"Eisket," he said, "Private Weigh
tailed to salute tho General yesterday. Please soe that he is severely
reprimanded." —s,
"Right, sir," said Capt. Biskct,
and the next day he spoke to the
sergeant. "Sergeant," he said, "Private Weigh didn't salute the General.
Soo that he iB severely reprimanded."
"Look here, Binks," said the Ber-
gcant next day to the corporal bugler, "give Weigh a good talking to,
will you. Ho didn't salute tho old
General the other day."
Finally the corporal bugler communicated with Private Welgh.^
"Look here, tunny lace," said he,
"lt you don't salute old Pokerback
next time you meet him, what-ho
young teller, you'll get a blooming
c'o.it on the oar 'ole!"
f-trtnuwraflMntttt 1b the Lnsttgnia;"
PUBLIC NOTICE.
' This is to notify thc public that
I, Jnmes Rowo, will not be responsible tor any debts contracted by my
wife, on and.otter this date, without
my written permission. Ahy accounts against mc should be sent in
at once.
JAMES ROWE,
Ladysmith, June 16, 1909.
Tobaccos, Cigars, Etc.
Bestquality of Confectionery
Miss Bardozona
"LAND REGI8TRY ACT."
Lot 4, Block 29 (Map 703   A)
tn the matter of an application tor
a Duplicate Certificate of Title to
Town of Ladysmith.
Notice is hereby given that lt   is
my intention  at  the  expiration  of
one month from the date of the first
publication hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate of Title to said land
issued   to   William Beverldge   and
Henry Beifel on the 3rd day ot November, 1902, and numbered 8203 C.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Rtglstrar-General  ot Titles.
Land   Realstry   Office, Victoria, B
n.. th* Uth dav o« Aoril. 1909.
Get Ready for the Summer by
Having Your House Panted
Best materials only used.
Big stock of wall paper on
hand.
PRICES THE LOWEST
J. E.~Smith
Roberts St. -      Ladyimith, B. C.
TRANSFER OF LICHNSH.
A Bcloit wemnn ot tho
family friend type addressed a widower whom she had not seen tor a
long time, and who was also deafl
"I see you have burled your wife
since I have been away," she repeated several times.  He finally replied:
Notice Is hereby   given   that it is
„u *i-.Jmy intention to mak.> application to
old-time t\,_, n„„.j „t   ,-,..__
the Board of Commissioners of the
City of Ladysmith at their next regular meeting for a transfer of the
retail liquor license now held by me
ln respect 'to tho premises known as
the Pilot Hotel, situate on Lot 9,
Block 126, tn the City of Ladysmith,
from myself to Alexander Thomas.
J. R. THOMAS.
■■
AU kinds oi Clock and Watch
,A.'-'«Z     Si**.*.*,tion Wuarsnt.-
Reasonable Prices.
English Watches a Specialty.
]. R. Easton
PraetHl Watchmaker.
will m<*~ »>'~
H. Mitch*.'
»   •♦.ti«t.V»>
Chong Kee
Laundry
Wishing and Ironing p. *mptly attended
to.
IMM   11 THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
And $200 at $10
Per Month
For a First Class House on a Good Corner.    Splen"
did Soil, Good Stables, Etc'.
This Is a Bargain.
JOHN STEWART
Notary Public Conveyancer
LADYSMITH, B. C.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Head Office  •  • Toronto
CAPITAL $10,000,000: REST $6,800,000
Bank Money Orders
ISSUED AT THE FOIiLOWINti RATES;
$5 and under         -         - 3 cents
Over 15 and not exceeding $10, 6 "
"   flO      "       "           $30, 10 "
'•   (30      "       "           *50, 15 "
These orders are payable at par at any office in
Canada of a Chartered Bank, except in the Yukon
'and at tha principal banking pointa in th. United
They ar« negotiable at «4:K> to the £ sterling in
Great Britfin and I-eland. They form an excellent method of remitting small Bums of money
v ith aafetv and at amall coat and may be obtained without delay at any office of the Bank.
LADYSMITH BRANCH X. M. de Gex, Manager
THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
Published by Carley £ Carley at Ladysmith,'B. C.
•very Wednesday and Saturday.
Hilbert & McAdle
PRACTICAL EMBALMERS
First class Hearse supplied in Ladysmith.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
Telephone No. 262 and 180
P.O.Box 735 '."i    . •    Nanaimo
A Life Drama.
$1.50 a Year in Advance, 25c Per MMtk
Advertising Bates on application.
Editorial Comment.
Th« people ol BritUh Columbia
who know Mr.--W. J. Taylor, the
Victoria barrister, and appreciate hie)
aLUity as a lawyer, were surprised to
learn that the council ol Victoria
had sought Jhe advice of a Vancouver practitioner as to certain, matters In which the city.was Interested. Mr. Taylor's advice on legal
matters is regarded as equal to that
ut any man ln Western Canada, and
why the council should overlook their
own barrister was a mystery. It
now transpires that the council knew
nothing about thc transaction, but
that it was engineered by thc city
solicitor, whose opinion on the techv
Dtcalltles ot tbe law is not considered as being inlalluble. It is reported that when the matter came up bet
tore the Victoria council at Its last
meeting, many of the aldermen were
surprised thnt City Solicitor Mann
should have arrogated to himself an
authority he did not possess. . Mr»
Taylor was present and he had a'
heart-to-heart talk with Mr. Mann(
and those who were present unite in
saying that when Mr. Taylor got
through, the city sqlfc'tor was atfrut
--the cheapest and smallest man in
Victoria. Mr. Taylor "took him to
his bosom" and then reasoned with
him In a manner at once convincing
though gentle!
secretary and treasurer, the committee were only marking their appreciation of officials who had faithfully
fulfilled their duties. The colouration
is now over, and it is the' duty of
all citizens to turn their attention
to the more' serious. obligation—that
of building up a prosperous and industrious city.
Lieutenant-Governor Dunsmuir enjoys the reputation of being a modest und undemonstrative man, but
thc Chronicle is convinced that if
His Honor heard -even half of tbe
pleasant remarks that have . been
made concerning his visit to Ladysmith on Dominion Day he would
experience the emotion that moves
u man "when he realizes that
his generosity has been Tevealed and
repaid witli gratitude.
AN INFERENCE.
The citizens of Ladysmith are   to
be congratulated on the success   attending the celebration of the forty-
second anniversary of Confederation,
ft is doubtful if   a  more successful
celebration was ever held in British
. Columbia, although there have  been
moro elaborate observances of nation-,
al'  holidays.  Every % dollar expended
was made to count In the general re-'
ault," an*) tin eoirjaiiitt»Jferjtalnlyiv,-
erlopked nothing tBat Would contrl-J what nas the aafriwlch'to do  with
"Pa," said Bobble, "kin I go fish-
in'?" ;    .
""No, you can't," retorted the old
gentleman from | behind his newspaper
Pause.
"Pa, kin I go in swlmmln'?"
"I've told you several times already."
Pause.   *
"Say, ma, kin I go out and play
with the hose?"
"No, Bobbie; you'll get yourself
soaked," replied the mother.
Pause.
"Ma, .'.tin I go acrost to Willie
Smith's for a little while?"
"No, my son, you can't. Willie
Smith is not a fit companion tor a
boy like you."
Pause. -•'■■-
"Pa, kin I cut'the pictures out o'
the'Sunday papers?"
' "Ko,'8lree;,,yoii can't. I'm not going to have this house littered   up
with scraps of paper,"
"Ma, kin I—"
"No, Bobbie; you can'tl Don't have
me to tell you that again."
Pause.
''Say, pa, is this a prohibition
country?"
-      .THB-80RN LUNATIC.
"Professor, you say you are an e»
pert at solving riddles, don't you?"
"1 claim that I am, my boy,"
"Well, then, can you tell me why a
man who has seen London on a foggy
day and aman who has not' Been
London on a foggy day are like a
ham sandwich?"
'The professor;studied for a' long
time.' Ftnaliy,. at hi^'wlt'ij['end,' hie
said:   "I give it up."
"Why," wbb tlie reply, "one has
seen the' mist "and the other "has
missed the scene. Ha, ha I Catch
on?« ;" '•""'   '•'"<
•Bf touin!< i'**do,7bu lunatic!  But
bute, to the enjoyment of all who
took part ln the day's entertainment,
ln passings  vote of thanks to
lt?"
After the youngster had recovered
, from a  spell of laughter., he cbuckt-'
the ed: "Oh, thaTs what you bite on."'
Down at the Union Depot at Ottawa last week, ln the faint grey of
early morning, there was enacted the
finale of a life drama than which
'twould be hard to conceive a more
profoundly heart-touching human
story—a story of paternal love and
filial affection long held aloof by a
great abyss of adversity and ill tor-
tune, a story of hope deferred, ol
heart yearnings through many, many
years, and finally a story of the realization of fond hopes ofttimes
thwarted. There were but two characters in thnt aftectlng little scene
on the station platform, there at
that early hour of the summer morning. A man might have been seen on
the platform in the gloaming before
the sunrise., His hair was whlte-with
the frosts of many winters, time had
written its Hues unmistakably upon
his face, and his drooping shoulders
bespoke advancing age. Prom three
o'clock until five he paced the platform in the crisp morning air—waiting, waiting, waiting.
At length the train arrived. A
young man alighted briskly from one
of the coaches, as fine a young fellow
£.s cue could wish to sec—upright ot
figure, franlt and manly of countenance, strapping and muscular, his
face bronzed by a hot sun's rays.
Simultaneously the elderly man and
the young fellow caught sight of each'
other. Tbey paused only a moment
for a word of mutual inquiry and
then followed a long embrace,
in the course of which, both broke
down and wept—the tears were tears
of joy.
Thic was the little drama of the
station platform—trivial and uninteresting to the casual and emotionless observer, but to tbe strapping
youth and the elderly man of the silvery hair it meant much. The two
principals were father and son. The
father was McGill Valentine, who
has been employed at the government
printing bureau for 22 years; the
young man waB Frank C. Valentine,
his son, who was taken from his father's home in Ottawa here 19 years
ago, and had never since been seen
by his father., The son rejoices to
day in that he is no longer a fatherless and homeless wanderer, thc father is overjoyed this bright June day,
for has his long-lost son not been
restored to blm- Can he not say
with the father of tUe parable-"My
son was lost nnd Is [ouml, He was
dead, and he Is alive again."
The etory reads more like a tale
woven from the brain of a true novelist rather than an extract from the
pages of llfels stern reality, but the
facts are reproduced herewith precisely as they Cftme from the father
and son themselves,
Twenty-five yearB ago a son was
born to Mr, and Mrs, McQiU Valentine, who were then living In Boston, Mass. Shortly afterward Mr.
Valentine received and accepted an
offer of employment in thc government printing bureau, Ottawa. When
the boy was five years pf age th?
mother was stricken with a fatal
Illness. - When she was appraised of
the tact that shc could not recover',
she went to Boston, with hcr only
son, to die at hcr parent's home, and
the scenes of her childhood, Hef
death w&s not long delayed,
The mother's parents sought the
sorrowing husband's permission to
keep their grandson with them. Atter consultation with a parish priest
the father granted their request.
Some two years later, Mr. Valem
tine communicated w!th"hls former
wile's parents requesting that the
child be sent to Ottawa, aB he had
married again, and had a comfortable home for the boy, He was told
in anything but a courteous manner
that the boy would not be given up
until the complete bill of expenses
for his maintenance waB paid, Mr
Valentine Immediately despatched hia
brother to Boston to And the child
and bring him back at any cost,
When the brother arrived at Boston
he had found that the old people had
left for parts unknown the previous
week, taking the.boy with them. Everything possible, was done to flnd
them, but to ho avail,
The father frequently made inquiries concerning his son's whereabout*; but tbey were futile, He
could Ond no trace of the boy. Only
once did ht receive an inkling ol htm
from a very vague and indirect
source—he heard# that the lad had
joined the American navy and" bad
been killed in' the Spanish-American
Wa?'.' fTom'that ttn.6 on Mr. Valentine abandoned alt hope of ever toeing hla eon again; he mourned him
as dead.' .'■
Such is tlie father's story, The
Bon's story Is even more touching.
-From' beginning to ena It is full of
patl'iBs, and It Is not without ltsele*
tnent of adveiitSfo. ■■.-,'■
When his grandparents left Boston,
they removed to a small town in another partnof Massachusetts, but sub-
se.iuenUy returned to the metropolis
of tho state. When he was. about 14
years of age his grandmother died,
and in a very short time his .grandfather married again. The new wife
did not take kindly to her step-
grand-son and, unable to tolerate hcr
mal-treatment and that of his grandfather, he resolved to run away. Misleading statements' concerning his
parentage had been made to him by
his grandfather, and the youth was
under tho impression that he was
hcmeless and atom" in the wide world.
With a view chiofly of haying the
companionship of lads ot his own ago
lie joined the navy and served the
lull six yearB as a common sailor,
first serving on board ' a training
ship and latterly on a man-of-war.
All tho while bis heart was burdened with tho yenrnings for a home
and purents. f .,
On leaving the navy ho Journeyed
to Mexico and wandered aimlessly
around the southern mountains with
a party of prospectors. Soon tiring
of this, he secured a position on a
railroad, but soon deserted it in
favor of i a life on the prairie ranches
of far Arizona. Hence he went to
California, and from there back to
the southern prairie lands. The
young man states that the desire for
a home, the craving for friends whom
he could call his own, never once deserted him even out on the fastnesses
cf the wilds of Texas.
It was one night last November
that he rode out into the prairie of
an Arizona ranch, alone in the.moonlight, utterly alone amid thc solitude
of the plains. On that night the
memories of childhood came back to
him with wondrous vividness. He remembered bis father, ne remembered
Canada—he remembered all. Then
and there it occurred to him that he
had been deceived by his abductors.
He would write to Ottawa. He
would find his long-lost father..!
For many weeks he waited—waited
for a reply from the Ottawa postmaster, to whom ho had written inquiring whether a man named Valentine was still alive and living in
that city.
It waa on Christmas morning that
Frank 0, Valentine walked ten miled
to the nearest post office with the
joyous expectation of receiving good
newB from thc postoffice. A village
church-bell pealed forth as ho neared
the village and he felt that there
awaited htm a letter telling him all
was well,
And be received a letter—no, not
cne, but two. The first was signed
"J.- A. Gouin, postmaster of Otta-
wat': It informed him that hiB father was allvo and well, waiting and
anxious to see his son. The. second
letter was from, the young man's dither himself, imploring htm to come
home Immediately, That was his
Christmas gift,
The young man would not write tot!
the money which bis father ottered
him t» pay his expenses to Ottawa.
And so ho toiled away on thc ranch
until he had saved sufficient money
to buy a ticket for' Ottawa. The trip
was made via Boattle, Vancouver and
Winnipeg.
Needless to say, a hearty welcome
awaited him here, a welcome not loss,
ccrdlal from his step-mother nnd two
step-brothers than from hie father,
There is rojoioing in that household
today.
John VV. Coburn, President and Managing Director.
The Ladysmitli Lumber Co.,
Limited.
MANUFACTURERS  OF. ALL  KINDS OF
Rough and Dressed Fir Lumber,
Red Cedar, Shingles and Lath
LADYSMITH, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Do You Want A Summer Suit?
I carry one of the largest stocks of SUMMER
SUITINGS on the Island.
We Guarantee FIT and the PRICES are RIGHT
D.J. Matheson
MERCHANT
Oatacre st.,   Ladysmith, B. C.        ,'. '■"'
'44144444444444444yyrf4444444449999994944444
Two Good Local Buys
House and Lot on Roberts Stand 6th Ave.   $525
Store on Roberts St.,   near 4th Avenue.   $400 |
d :—:—r X
McKELVIE BROS.,   j
Real Estate |
First Avenue, Ladysmith %
449994*9999994994444994444944444994444444444,
A SURPRISE FOR JIM.
A mission worker In New Orleans
was visiting a reformatory near that)
city not long ago when she observed
among the inmates an old ntuiunin
tnnee, a negro lad long thought to
be a model of Integrity.
"Jim!" exlalmed the mission worker, "Ib lt possible I find you hero?"
..."Vaasum," blithely responded the
backslider. "I's charged with stealln*
a barrel of sweet pertaters."
The vistor sighed, "You, Jim!"
she repeated, "I am surprised."
"Yassum," said Jim, "So was I,
or I wouldn't be here,"
Hens for Sale
One Hundred Hens for
sale. Apply D. Davies,
Rancher,  near Ladysmith.
Leave orders at Robert's
Butcher Shop.
Ladysmitli   pharmacy
ALL THE STAPLE DRUGS
ALWAYS IN STOCK.
.PRESCRIPTIONS PROMPTLY
.     ATTENDED TO.  .
R. 0. JESSUP, Prop.
TT
Masonic Building, Ladysmith
New Programme
Monday, and,
Thursday
PERFORMANCES AT 7:30 AND 8:45 P. M.
■—; : ii—»„—___l -'"■■      " ,-
Admission: I Oc and 15c
Matinee Prices 5c and IOc   ,
ESQUIMALT & NANAIMO RAILWAY COMPANY
Lands for Sale
Agricultural, Timber and Suburban Lands for sale.
For prices and location apply to the Land Agent at
Victoria or the District Land Agent at Duncan.
Town Lots and cleared Suburban acreage for sale
at Ladysmith. Apply Land* Agent, Victoria, and
Townsite Agent, Ladysmith. THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
HEAD!   CONSIDER!   ACT!
Extensive advertising In larjre Newspapera, in
Itr ;e Cities costs large sums of n onay. We ue
ihtiafted with small ativertistnK, in a small paper,
f.r small money. This enables us to place our
goods before our customers at a price to match
most income..
CHAS. PETERSON
Furniture Store
Ladysmith
Transfer
Stables
Light and heavy teaming.
Furniture and piano moving
a specialty.
Nicholson & Weaving
PROPRIETORS
Telephone 1.
Wagons
I Sill T. I. Trapp t Co's
Ctlebiated Wagoas
During the season we have sold a large number
of wagons, implements and logging trucks.
Everything carries a guarantee.
R. WRIGHT
Duller Street
l****!*****t* •J••^•^*J•♦^•J*•1J••5•-,^ •j»»*«»j»»j«j«»j»»
4
«
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
DRINK
U. B. C.
AND BOHEMIAN
4
4
4
4
X
t
V
1      BEER     jf
1 UNION BREWING CO., Ltd |
Z          NANAIMO, B. G.          4
4                                              9
Ice Cream
AT
Carter's Store
Ice Cream lOo a plate.
John Chinaman at Home in China
Express and Teaming
WoodlorSale.
P. INKSTER, PHONE 66
D I. Jenkins successorto A.E. HHfaert
I, 3 md 5,Bastion St., Natulan
Phone 124     P. 0. Boxlj
Mrs. T. A. Robinson, (nee Mica
Mercuttjl, well-known ln this city, de-i
livered a lecture on China in Sum-
merland, one evening last week.
Instead of tbe .lecturer confining
herself to explaining the views as
thrown upon the canvas as upon
former occasions, she took half an
hour at the outset in which to develop her subject, and the result was
all that could be desired and gave
Mrs. Robinson a far |better chance to
demonstrate her splendid ability as
a lecturer,
China with her four hundred mil
lion inhabitants was a problem
which at present no one could solve.
In these days of progress it was
strange that so little was really
known of China. There were many
misconception as to what her people were like and many judged the
whole race by the representatives
that made their homes in Canada.
That was a great mistake as only
tho lowest class, and those driven
by force of circumstances from their
homes ever emigrated from the land
of their ancestors.
The immigrants were frequently the
victims of the white man's greed,
and when the Chinese spoke of the
white people as foreign devils, it
was not to be altogether wondered at and the blame must be
placed where it belonged, and that'
was upon the white people them-l
selves who had regarded the Chinese
as simply a nation to be raided and [
abused in order to fill their pockets
with ill gotten gains.
The Chinese were among the
Wurld's oldest peoples; ages before
iho British had emerged from bnrbar-
ism, the Chinese were in the flood of
highest civilization.
They placed a high premium on
morality and total abstinenco; 4000
years ago it waB recorded that one
of their number had made an intoxicating wine from rice and the Emperor as soon as he discovered it expelled him from the land, never to
return. In the old country when a
man made sufficient whiskey, tbe
powers that be usually made him a
lord.
Tho people of China were still very
crude and superstitious. They believed in ghosts, evil spirits, charms
and transmigration of souls. Tbey
wero a conservative people and did
hot welcome innovations. In 1883
an Anglo-American company put In ;i
plant for winding silk from the cocoons of the silk worms. After ex-
amlng the contrivance, the government" banished it from the land .as it
would deprive thousands of women
and children of the means of ,a livelihood.
Tho Chinese were n docile, industrious people, desirous of minding
their own business and being left
alone. They were stubborn and willing to fight to the finish in defence
of their own rights. They saw the
west continually changing systems,
and disapproved of it, desiring no
change.   They were determined   that
China should not be exploited lor
the purpose ot filling the pockets of
foreigners.
The lecturer spoke in an impassioned
manner of the way in which the
Shanghai railway was foisted on the
People and the trickery resorted to
at the time ot its promotion and also of the inlquitious opium wai'B
which Great Britain befouled her
fair name by forcing upon the Chinese.
The Chinese were practically divided into four classes, which ranked in
tho order named, 1st the Literati! or
educated classes, 2nd the Farmers,
3rd the Mechanics and 4th the Merchants.
Great value was placed upon education and the educated classes were
those who filled all the highest positions in the Empire, rising, not as
a result of birth but of thoir person-,
nl attainments. The greatest men of
China had all risen from the ranks.
There were three educational degrees, tho examinations for which
must all bo written off in the sacred
city of Pekin, after successfully passing the three degrees the name of
the student was enrolled on thc
books of Pekin. There were three degrees obtainable, the first called Budding flower,; the second, Enlightened
man and the third, Enrolled scholar.
Many died striving after the third.
if n man tried for the last degree
faithfully but unsuccessfully for many
years; after he passed 90 years of
age, the degree of Enlightened Man
was conferred upon him.
Put a little
Sunshine1
in your
home
An old-fashioned,
ill-working furnace is a non-
producer.
It consumes the coal, but through leaks and
cracks wastes the heat.
It is not economy to have such a furnace in
your own home, or in your tenant's home.
A Woman's Notebook.
Jeremy Taylor tells us ot a young tor the constant complaint that fulls
man who threw a stone at his dog' from his lips, even if we do not  go
il.
bo," the chronicler quaintly adds,
a great deal more in this little
cident than merely its humor.
was not altogether lost." There Is
Bhows us now in trying to hurt a
person—or even to punish them justly perhaps—we may sometimes unwittingly hurt someone else, and I
feel constrained to add one. other
thought evolved from thinking over
another side of the incldcut. Since,
In attempting to hit anyone, and in
case we miss them, would it not be
wiser to cease even trom inflicting
that which we consider a necessary
blow—above all, perhaps, a "letter"
blow? I myself have never written
an impulsive letter ot condemnation,
however deserved by the person to
whom it was sent, without the afterthought, "I wish I had not sent that
letter," After all, tt is so much {tetter sometimes not to put ourselves
In the right. What does it matter?
Petty misunderstandings are so very
small and so often put, themselves
right in time, and, if we only leave
those who have wronged us alone,
circumstances will otten teach them
how deeply they have misunderstood
us. Moreover, however much ln the
right we may be, we shall seldom
convince anyone that they have done
us an injustice, so why try to do so?
"it to a man with whom sho was dining,
in- and who bad complained that this
It and tbat did not agree with him:
"Doesn't it? Well, for goodnoss'
sake, don't say so, because I can't
bear people with whom things disagree." There is no doubt that nervous dyspepsia is largely added to
by tear, and I am not sure that the
ever-lasting reiteration, "I dare not
eat this," and "I never dare take bo-
and so," might easily become contagious in timo, and even give no
dyspepsia, too,
»-s .
"If a woman is young and pretty,
I think you can see her good looks
all the better for her being plainly
dressed. It seems to me as a woman's face doesn't want flowers; it's
almost like a flower itself." So says
one of our great writer's characters;
but I must disagree with this somewhat severe restriction on the manifold delights of feminine dress and
ornamentation. A '-pretty woman is
doubly pretty in lovely clothes, 'on.l
too plain-dressing, unless tho attractive simplicity of Quakerism, detracts from even the greatest beauty. A lovely woman is lovely perhaps in ill-made clothes, but a thousand times lovelier in gossamer draperies.  Moreover, every pretty woman
The City Market
R. WILLIAMSON,   Prop.
Wholesale and Retail.
MEATS and VEGETABLES
Ladysmith, B. C.
A. Litt
CLBANINO,   PKKSSlliU   AND
RMPAIUINU.
Charges moderate,
^AU work   lift _at. McOallum's Sad
Many and many a heartburning
would be saved us if we were only
as patient with others, as we are with'
ourselves and if wo said a little less
in even just reproach, and, ln tact,
put up with slight Injustices and only complained when absolutely forced Into doing so. It is always wise
to keep an angry letter until the
next day. I once heard a well-
known clergyman say that much ml
sery would be saved If we only wrote
our unpleasant letters and put them
under the pillow and read them next
day. How few would be posted with-i
out at least being rewritten and a
softening   sentence   added   here and
there or a harsh one taken out agalnH
...
Whence have arisen the modern all-,
ments ol nervous prostration and
nervous dyspepsia. Partly, I really
believe, through constant and, reprehensible ailment conversations, Our
great-grandfathers might nave 'been
coarser and rougher in their modes .ot
expression*, but at least they .did not
talk ot their digestions, and were
apparently not sufferers trom nervous
dyspepsia or nervous anything, tor
that matter. Some ot our ancestors
must, indeed, have had digestive or-
should study colors, for ono will en-' gler, one day fulled to honor him In
up into a chair and took a peach,
which she clasped on both hands as
sho went off into the hall again. Th*
girl who was watching felt puzzled
as to whether to tell her slBter cr
not, or whether to follow the child
upstairs. Sho decided on the latter,
but waited to rearrange the flowers
on the table for a moment. She was
just about to leave thc room, when
she heard the little pattering feet
again, and drew back once more {ntu
tho shadow of the curtain. The babjf
camo io, looking very solemn,- the
peach still in her hand, and, going
straight up to thc little table, labor/
iously clambered up again on a chair.
Was she going to take another
peach?. If so, if was really
time to interfere; hut, ns the girl
waited a moment to see, the baby,
leaning forward, laid thc peach she
had first taken on the top of the
others on tho dish, and saying In a
loud, triumphant voice, "Done ngnlni
ole devil!" sho clambered down and
pattered happily out of thc room up
to bed.
ROSALIE NEISH,
SEVERELY REPRIMANDED.
Gon. Stawcs was a martinet/ a
stickler for etiquette, a man with a
prodigious sense of his own dignity,
and when Private 8. Weigh, the bu-
If you are thinking of building you should be interested in Sunshine Furnace. It adds 100 per cent, to
home comforts.
As soon as you let the contract for your house decide
on your furnace.     The "Sunshine" man will be
pleased to tell you just how the rooms ought to be
laid out with an eye to securing greatest heat from
the smallest consumption of coal.
If you want to experiment with the question don't
specify "Sunshine."
If you want to settle the question specify "Sunshine."
McCIary$  .
For Sale Ey Ladysmith Hardware Co., Ltd., Utlpiili
ARE YOU READY
TO PAINT OR
PAPER? WHEN YOU ARE
RKADY WE ARE.
PICTURE FRAMING
A SPECIALTY.
S. ROEDDING
Paperlmnger and Art Decorator.
High Street.
ARE YOU GOING TO BUILD
a fence or a house, if so consult me
as I can save you money .on lumber
Having purchased a low truck. I
am prepared to move furniture and
pianoB.
Por any teaming consult
THORNLEY
LADYSMITH     -     -     PHONE  6
Portland Hotel
GOOD    BOARDING.
BILLIARDS AND POOL.
Barclay  &  Conlin,
Proprietors
Shoe Repairing
I am ready to repair Boots   and
Shoes.     Satisfaction  Guaranteed.
FRANK   SP1NATO,
Corner Third ave. and High street,,
near Queen's Hotel.
ESQUIMALT AND
NANAIMO RAILWAY
Double Train
Service
3 1                               2
10.00 9.00 VICTORIA 12.05 18.(i5
18.15 1157 LADYSMITH 9.00 J5.58
19.25 12.35 NANAIMO 8.15 15.15
D. CHETHAM,
Dist. Pass. Agt.
Victoria, B. C.
Ladysmith Bakery
Company
-Calos of every, description, fans
and plain. Candies ot all kind!
Fruit ot all kinds. Fresh breed ever
da}.
Reasonable prices. Come and >•
our lines and leave your orders. V?
give careful attention.
Hop Lee, Prop.
Esplanade street,   Ladysmith.
hance and another take away from
her charm; and, as to wearing flowers, what can be more beautiful than
a very young girl in white with a
touch of crimson or vivid flames-colour or purple? And the red-haired
teauty'B loveliness is surely greatly
added to by a bunch of Neapolitan
violets or holiotrope. To carry tbe
analogy a little further, this writer's
character adds: "It's like when a
man's singing a good tune, you don't
waut t'hea bolls tinkling and interfering wi' the sound." Quite truel
I should greatly dislike bells and
singing mixed, but, when a man
sings, his voice Is brought out and
emphasised by the accompanying piano. In any case, lt is pleasing for
tbe woman, whether plain or pretty,
to feel she Is elegantly rather than
"plainly" dressed, and, to my mlnd.i
pleasanter tor those who look on
ber.
...
. I add-a story about a little girl,
told me by a friend. This friend was
giving a dinner-party, and she sent
her slater, who was staying in tbe
house downstairs, shortly before the
guests were due to arrive, to give a
.with  the customary salute,
- internally — in a towering
gans that vied ln strength with those last, glance at the table.  The  sister
of the ostrich, tor in "Pepy's Diary"
I see be one day says: "This day
Mrs. Shipley and I did eat our (break
fast at Mrs. Harper's upon a cold
tunkey pie—and a goose." Happy
Pcpys and Mrs. Shipley—what a meat
with which to start a day, even 11
partaken ot at a late hour In the
morning!  I think we women  should
was standing by the window lor a
moment, when sho heard a sudden
sound of puttering feet, and, turning, eaw the little daughter ot the
house coming across the hall ln her
nightgown only. She drew back, very)
much astonished, into the shadow ot
the curtain, and the child pattered
Into the dining-room, and, going up
passing
he flew
rage.
\"Knutt," he said that afternoon to
the colonel. "Private Weigh failed
to salute me this morning. A breach
of etiquette, sir! A plcco of impertinence—my dignity—haw i See that
tho man Is severely reprimanded."
Colonel Knutt trembled and nodd
ed and next day spoke to the Captain.
"Bisket," he said, "Private Weigh
failed to salute tho Oeneral yesterday. Please see that he is severely
reprimanded." —s
"Right, sir," said Capt. Bisket,
and the next day he spoke to tho
sergeant. "8ergeant," ho said, "Private Weigh didn't salute the General.
Seo that he Is severely reprimanded."
"Look here, Binks," said the ser-
goant next day to the corporal bugler, "give Weigh a good talking to,
will you. He didn't salute the old
General the other day."
Finally the corporal bugler communicated with rrlvate Weigh..
"Look here, funny lace," said he,
"If you don't salute old Pokerback
next time you meet him, what-ho
young feller, you'll get a blooming
c'o'jt on the oar 'ole!"
PUBLIC NOTICE.
Pure Ice Cream
Constantly
On Hand
' This is to notify thc public that
I, James Rowo, will not be responsible for any debts contracted by my
wife, on and,after this date, without
my written permission. Any accounts against me should bo sent In
nt once.
JAMES ROWB,
Ladysmith, June 16, 1909.
"LAND REGISTRY ACT."
Lot 4, Block 29 (Map 703   A)
tn the matter of an application for
a Duplicate Certificate ot Title to
Town of Ladysmith.
Notice is hereby given that lt   is
my intention  at  the  expiration  ol
one month from the date of the first
publication hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate of Title to said land
issuod   to   William Beverldge
Henry Ileifel on the 3rd day of November, 1902, and numbered 8203 C.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
ltoRistrar-General  ot Titles.
Land   BeirtBtry   Office,  Victoria,  B
a. th« ttt.h iIm o' Anril. 1909.
Tobaccos, Cigars, Etc.
Bestquality of Confectionery
Miss Bardozona
a-—-.. .. _, , ...    .„_ ,    „.     ,     mm,^
Get Ready for the Summer by
Having Your House Painted
Best materials only used.
Big stock of wall paper on
hand.
PRICES THE LOWEST
J. E.~Smith
Roberts St. Udyimith, B. C.
AU kinds ot Clock and Watoh p-
nnd!?--^     B-*:"'—»'on «uar»nt»«
Reasonable Prices.
English Watches a Specialty.
]. R. Easton
PractKl Watchmaker.
ivr. nwfiMt the dvSMn- to a small nnd high tahla where the
A Bololt woman ot tho
family Irlend type addressed a wld
ower whom she had no^ seen for a
long time, and who was also deaf)
"I Bee you have burled your wile
since I have been away," she repeated several times.  He finally replied:
TRANSFER OP LICENSE,.
Notice iB hereby given that it is
ni,! ii™. mv Intention to make application to
om-ume ,he  Boftrd of   Commissioners of the
City of Ladysmith at their next reg
ulnr meeting for a transler ot the
retail liquor license now held by me
in respect 'to the premises known as
the Pilot Hotel, situate on Lot 9,
Block 126, In the City of Ladysmith,
trom myself to Alexander Thomas.
J. R. THOMAS.
AM -m-i- •-"  -
Will tm*~ «•<«•
M. Wii»ti«o'
>   ««.to«ti«»
Chong Kee
Laundry
Washing and Ironing p. -mptly attended   '&
u^l^B^LauMt^^^mJ THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
jf -—*---..■■-
New Story of Bill Miner, the Train Robber
"I believe that ii oyorytklng were
known concerning the exploits of
•Willy' Miner—the noted highwayman
—for whom tlie police of two countries searched unsuccessfully for
some years, and who was only recently captured in Canada, after an
exciting cliuse, participated in by the
Northwest Mounted Police, provincial
police, local detectives, railroad employees nnd Indians, it would \bc seen
tnat lie had established a record of
crime and daring never before paralleled (and perhaps never again will
he) in the history of thnt branch of
crime on this continent."
So remarked one of Pinkerton's
men the other day.
"But sufficient is kuown of his doings to make a readable story," he
added.
Continuing, he said: "Miner, who,1
has been known by many aliases,
was born in Western Canada (and,
by tho way, he will afso end his days
there) only a little better than fifty
years ago, and adopted the profession of a 'road agent' very early in
life. In fact, he bad scarcely celebrated his twenty-first birthday ere
he was dndergoing imprisonment at
San Quentin, California, .-■ for taking
part in a stage robbery in that section of the country.
"Released from jail in the spring
of 1880, he Journeyed to Denver, Colorado, where he became acquainted
with Bill Leroy, one of the most
daring of the Rocky Mountain highwaymen.
("Together the pair did all the principal towns of Colorado, and early
in tho month of November, 1880, heli)
up thc Del Norte stage, securing ,12,-
G00 in gold coin for their trouble.
Leroy was soon afterward captured
nnd hanged, not for the Del Norte
robbery In particular, but for a1
lurge number of previous misdeeds
iii a similar nature. Miner, however,
got safely uwuy with all the booty.
POSING  AS A CAPITALIST.
"Making good his escape from Colorado, and thinking It would bo
well tor him to keep away trom that,
state tor a tew months, the subject
cd and next day spoke to the   Cap-
cugo, where lie purchased Bovcral
suits of fashionable clothes. A lew
days later he arrived in tlio town of
Onoiidagc., Michigan.
Possessing naturally an ensy, graceful carriage, Miner (or as he now
styled himself, W. A. Morgan), with
his Chicago-cut clothes, soon made
himself a conspicuous object among
the good people of tho town. Ho
proclaimed to all that he was *a
California capitalist, that he was
the owner of great blocks of houses
in Sacramento and San Francisco,
was the possessor of rich gold mines
without number, and that he was in
the east for thc purpose of winding
up an estate of which he was the
sole surviving heir. His faultless attire, and the generous manner with
which he dealt out apparently untold
wealth, made plausible all of his
statements and at once gained for
him admission into thc best society
of the town.
He was a great favorite with   the
ladies, and   the   rustic   swains    became sore at heart over the advent
of  such  a distinguished  rival.     One
young    lady who nad become   dazed
at his dashing manner and 'immense'
wealth,   became   engaged   to   marry
him, and as a matter of course deenjt
ed   herself most   especially favored.
But   all that   is, must cease to he!
Hip constant extravagant outlay wns
rapidly depleting the proceeds of his
last robbery,   and it was inevitable!
that the brilliant social season,   in'
which a noted highwayman posed   as'
the   most   prominent   figure,   should I
come to a sudden termination. J
"It was during the latter part   of'and   robbed   a store.     Near   Villa
February,   1881,   that   he   told his' Grovo   they stole   two more horses
[many confiding friends that it   was'and outfits, and a fourth horse
', nesessary for him to return to Call-' saddlo within a   mile of "Sagauche
(fornla immediately; his aged mother j    "By   this   time   the   country was
was   in   feeble   health, and he  was well aroused, W. A. Brpnau'gh, sheriff
anxious to see her again before   she  of Hagauchc county, nccompanlcd by
pnssed to the Great Beyond.   On the' James   Good ven, started in pursuit,
eve of his   departure the prominent  following them through the foothills
townspeople gave him a   banquet, at  in the direction of Del Norto.
which the mayor presided;  and 'Bil-  n tedious   search lasting four
ly' was.the hero of thc hour.   It was the robbers wcro seen at about dusk,
with the most sincere reluctance that riding leisurely across ry bridge about
thc  good  people' allowed  their   (lis- forty  miles from Del  Norte.     They
tinguished guest to depart.  But   he were armed; but were fhuilly covered
by
solemnly promised to velum as cioou
us lie had performed the lust, net of
lilinl duty to his aged parent.   Bidding his betrothed a tearful ,and nf
fected goodbye,   'VV.  A.   Morgan,   of
California,'  journeyed  again to  Den
vev.
BROADCLOTH FOR FIREARMS\
"At    the   metropolis   ot Colorado
Miner fell in with Stanton T. Jones,
I formerly of Chillicothe, Ohio.^  whom
he   soon discovered   to be a    companion suitable to  his calling.   The
raiment that had played such a conspicuous   part   in the   recent social aroused
season   was  sold to   a  secondhand
dealer, and with tho money thus secured Miner purchased a Winchester
rifle, two pistols and a   knife..
"Together Jones ancTMiner started
for the Rio Grande and Sagnache
counties on a pillagting expedition. In
the latter part of March, 1881, they
again stopped the Del Norte stage;
but the booty they secured paid them
poorly for the risk they had run.
Stealing two horses near Del Norte
they fled north, closely pursued by
Lew Armstrong, sheriff of Rio Grande
county. They abandoned their horses near the town of Saganche and
crossed the mountain range on foot
through Marshall's Fass into Gunnison county, where they went to'
work for a week or two on the Denver and Rio Grande railroad, i About
the first of May they quit work and
again started on a pillaging expedition, taking with them a green
rnwk ot a fellow named James East.,
Going back over Marshall's Pass towards Sagauche they stole   a horse
and
After
days
l
What is
Weight
Of the Large Cake of White Swan Soap Shown
in the Ladysmith Hardware Co's Window?
stand
take
take
open
'   The
gavo
Valuable
Away FREE
In order to further* WAP and WHITE SWAN WASH
ING POWDER into el Bnost interesting contest.   All that
is necessary for you to M Hge cake of White Swan Soap down
on a piece of paper, attfl Washing Powder Coupon to it, and
send or mail it to the \W we °i Ladysmith Hardware Com
pany. ^^^^^
To Solve this problem, the best way to do it is to take an ordinary bar of White
Swan Soap, measure its size, and get its weight; The size of the large cake is 4 ft.
2 and J in. long; 2 feet 10 in. high by 1 foot 1 in. wide. How much does it weigh?
In order to get the correct weight we have arranged to have the large cake cut up
in slabs in the window and weighed before the public. Should any person desire to
come in and superintend the weighing, they are at liberty to do so, as the prizes will be
awarded to the persons whose answers come nearest to the weight as shown by the
scaie3, this being considered correct.
Remember all answers must be accompanied by a White Swan Soap or Washing
Powder Coupon.
Should there be more than one correct answer, or nearest correct answer, they will
be put in a box and drawn for, the first one out being considered the winner, and so on.
Here is the List of Prizes:
For Prizes we will give a Ladies' Handsome Fifteen-Jeweled Gold Watch, valued at $20.00
To the Second, a Beautiful Eight-Day Clock, valued at  10.00
To the Third, a Lovely Silver Baking Dish, valued at    5.00
And to the Next 5 we will give a Genuine 14 Karat Gold Point Fountain Pen, value 3.00
Remember that the decision of the manufacturers of WHITE SWAN SOAP, (B. C.
SOAP WORKS, Victoria), will be filial and binding; contestants entering this contest
do so on this understanding. The closing aate will be in about two weeks, and will be
announced in the papers.   Put your answer in early.
Prizes on View at Ladysmith Hardware Company
lhc officers' rlllco, und captured,
OAl'TUKH AND HBOAFJB; ,
"Kronatigli and Uoodvcn tied the
chree prisoners with baling wire,
and, putting them on a freight wagon, started for Del Norte the same
evening. They were compelled to
camp at a placc called Wagon Wheel
Clap for tho night, Uronaugb aud
Goodven were so completely exhausted that they fell into a deep sleep
nlout 11 o'clock, leaving the teamster in charge of the thrco prisoners,
"About 1 a. m. tbe officers were
by the loud cries of the
teamster. Springing from their bed
they were startled by the sharp report of a bullet. The shot broke.
Goodvcn's arm. Bronaugh at once
realized that Miner and Jones had;
succeeded "in untying themselves, and
with a pistol that had been overlooked in the search, wero making' n desperate attempt to escape. Tho second shot broke the sheriff's right
arm at tho shoulder, and the third
and fourth shots struck Goodven ini
the left arm, completely disabling
him. Thc two desperadoes then dash
ed away in the darkness and were
seen no more. Bast, who had been
unable to untie the cords that bound
him, did not escape. He was convicted of horse-stealing and sentenced to five years ini the Colorado penitentiary.
AGAIN IN CALIFORNIA.
"Those who have traveled by stage
from Sonora,   Tuolomne county, to
Milton, will remember the two miles
of steep grade   which the stage   is
forced to climb before reaching Cop-
pcropolis.  It was near the summit
of this hill, in the early morning ot
November 7, 1881, thnt tour highwaymen were secreted behind a huge oak
tree.  As   the   stage    from   Sonora
came   toiling  up   the hill   the tour
men, with masked faces, appeared in
tho road, each armed with a   shotgun.   The   louder    of   the quartette
cried out, 'Haiti'  The order was in
stnntly obeyed.  Then taking up   r
commanding position on the hillside
he gave these orders:   'No. 1
in front of thc   horses.   NoH,
care of the passengers.   No. 3
lhc sledge hummer and break
lhc iron bos inside the conch.
heavy blows fell upon the box
in a few   moments the spring
way, the lid (lew open and ?8200 In
gold coin Was placed in the hands of
the loader.
"One ot thc passengers had hidden
a sack containing $500 in gold dust
under one of the seats in the stage;
but this was not overlooked. Tho
leader ot the highwaymen, when the
work was finished, ordered the passengers to get into tho stage, and
with many cxprcssloos of regret at
thc delay tbey had suffered, bade the
driver move on. Tho entire robbery|
did not consume more than ten minutes. Thli was one ot thc most successful holdups ever committed in
California. Not nn article was left
behind that would in any way lead
to the discovery of thc perpetrators
of the affair.
SEARCHING FOR THE ROBBERS.
"Capt. Charles Aull, then at Modesto, was at once telegraphed to
take charge of the search, in
place ot J. R. Hume, then engaged
ln a similar hunt in Shasta county.
Capt. Anil, in company with Sheriffs Yancy, of Tuolomne, Ben Thorn
of Calaveras, and Tom Lane of Modesto, was soon at tbe scene of the
hold-up. Atter a careful review of
the situation, Aull decided that the
leader of the gang was none other
than 'Billy' Miner, although it was
not known at the time that the notr
ed highwayman was on the Pacific
coast. But who Miner's companions
wcro was a puzzle to the officers.
"On the day after thc robbery,
John W. Thnckcr nnd Sheriff Cunningham arrived troi.i San Joaquin,
and offered their aid. Cunningham
suggested thnt Jim ('rum, nn ox-con-]
vlct nnd noted horse -thief, was most
probably ouo ol the gnng. Subsequent events proved Hint ho was
right. A trip through Culavoras
county wuh fruitless, so loo wits a
search through Htanllnus, although
in thc latter county It was learned
that Miner and Crum had passed
through thero on their way to San
Francisco, It was also learned that
somo wcoks prior to the hold-up, a
rather dashing young man had
slopped lor u time at Chinese Camp,
nine mllcit below Hoimra. Ho
suffering from chills and lover,
placed himself under thc euro
doctor. Ills glib tongue and polished
manners made a favnrnblo Impression on the people uf tho placo,, both
male and leninle.  He gave the name
that Anderson und Miner were one
uiul Hie uniuc person.
CUPID CUTS FIGURE IN CASE.
"On the Friday night previous ito
the robbery, John Currie gave a ball
at his new house, nineteen miles below Sonora, on the Knights Ferry
road. Anderson was there, tho lion
of thc evening. During thc evening,
Anderson promised to send a young
lady, to wlioili he had been paying a
good deal of attention, some music
from the city. A couple of weeks
later the music arrived, furnishing
tho first definite clue as to the course
pursued by the robbers. After the
holdup   Miner and Crum made   for
cceded ill deceiving them ho bade
litem good uftoriioon, und "returning
to the buggy, drove rapidly to Borne
barns nearby, aud presently caught
sight of them about 125 yards distant from him. He then commenced
firing at them. At almost the first
round Millet threw down his gun and
came running back with both hands
high in the air. Miner kept on for a
short distance, but was pursued by
Aull aud finally made to surrender.
They were both taken to Sacramento, and the three that night slept
under one roof.
PLEADED GUILTY.
"The confession of Crum made the
caso an easy    one.  When arraigned
Han Francisco, traveling the entire.             _. ..                               .
„ . ■ .    _ .   '   ,.   ,.  ...   T .„„„_ . ,1 they pleaded guilty, Miner and Miller
distance on horsuliack, via Livermore\ ____,_. % x_ „ ___v     ,
and Oakland, arriving at their destination five days later. Miner at
once visitod a fashionable tailor and
purchased an $85 suit of clothes and
a $50 overcoat, and at a  pawnbrok
er's ho bought a gold watch and
chain, evidently intending to return
to Chinese Camp, and with thin stylish apparel clinch thc conquest so
favorably begun. But he was frustrated ln his plans by learning that
Aull was on his track, the latter
having learned that another ex-convict, Bill Miller, had figured in thc
robbery. As Miller's mother owned
a ranch near Woodland and as Crum
and Miller were known to be warm
friends Capt. Aull turned his attention in that direction.
THE CAPTURE OF CRUM.
"Early one morning Officers Thac'ty
er, McCoy and Rohcn drove out   in
the vicinity of Miller's ranch to taka
observations.    As   they . approached
the farm house they saw two men,
carrying   arms, running away from
the rear of tho house in the direction
oi a small creek.  They whipped   up
their horses and drove down the lane
to a   gate tbat entered the field  In
which they   had seen thc   two men.
As   they   opened tho   gate, another
man   was discovered  behind  a   tree
with a shot-gun pointed at them and
menacing any further advance. Alter
u parley lasting several minutes the
man behind Hie tree concluded that
thc odds were against him and   sur-
condoled,   lie proved to be the   no-
lui'lous Jim Crum,   lie lind   on   bis
nnd! person $000 In'gold coin, two pistols
j and a   uliot gun;  and   in the stable
was found Ills favorite horse, Flora,
Hint wns noted fur mid near [or cn.
durance    and speed.   His two   com
panibns, whom: the officers rightly do
tcrmincd    were   Miner    and   Miller1
made good thr.lr escape, but left behind them their horses and saddles..
MINER AND MILLER SURRENDER
"Captains Aull and Hume, and
Sherlfls McQuaid nnd Cunningham
were telephoned (or and wero soon in
pursuit ot tho highwaymen. About 1
o'clock in the afternoon, Cnpt. Aull
and Police Officer Arlington, ol Sacramento, were returning to Sacramento in a buggy. They hnd follow
(d the river about two miles whon
they caught a glimpse ol two mcu
getting oh tho high levee down next
the rivet. When they disappeared
from view, Capt. Anil got out ot the
buggy and went up tho lovoe to sec
what had become ot them, taking
with htm a short shot-gun. Ho did
not seen anything at first, but on
looking around discovered Miner and
Millet within 30 feet of him, each
with a double-barreled shot-gun nt
full cock, covering him completely
' An attempt to fight would have
meant Aull'n Instant death.
"'Tho captain, apparently not noticing their warlike attitude, addressed
them pleasantly and succeeded tn
throwing them oft their guard, notwithstanding that Miner must have
recognized him, having served a four
years sentence under him at San
Quentin. Aull gravely told the robbers that ho had been duck-hunting,
nnd had mistaken thorn lor some ol
the party from whom he had become
separated.   Finding lhat he had sue
I getting twenty-five years each, and
Crum' twelve years. Tho fourth party to thc holdup was knoWn to be
Stanton T. Jones; but he was never
captured.
"In 1901 Miner was released from
San Quentin and immediately began
work at his old profession. His exploits in Western Canada since then
are too well known to need elaborating on here."
A3 TO WHALE'S MILK.
A scientist oyer in Germany confidently informs us that whales' milk
| is the ideal human food. He wants
us to understand that, having once
tasted it the children are certain to
blubber for it.
Of course it will be apparent to
parents that several husky difficulties
are likely to stand in the way ot securing this delectable liquid, and it
might be well to remember this before permitting the child to cultivate
a passionate tasto• for it.
The fond mother mustn't expect to
hand little Mary the pall and say:
"Run over to Schmldecke's, dear, an',
get n pint ot whale's milk, an' tell
Mr. Schmldeckc that thc last he sent
us was a little fishy."
This is going to bo thc trouble
with the new food. A gentle Jersey
whale will be a delightful adjunct to
n well-kept estate, but It takes a fair-
sized lake to pastdro It. And tho
milkmaid will have to bo a professional diver.
A.JARV1NEN
Photographer
First Class   rhotos.
fJnllorv nn First Avmiio.
T. E. Sullivan
Plumbing, Gas and Steamfittini-
Prices Rtasonabli.
First Avenue, near New West-m hotel
Singer and Wheeler & Wilson
SEWING MACHINES
If you are thinking of buying a sewing machine call
and see uur steel; cf ch:p
soiled machines at reduced
prices to clear.
A. E. PALMER
FIRST AVENUE
F. C. Fisher
TEACHER OF MUSIC
Studio in Williams' Block.
wan
uiul
nf   a
E. &. IN. RAILWAY
Special Excursions
ACCOUNT OF
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition
of  William   Anderson.   After -discussing the matter, the officers decided
Round Trip Tickets will be issued to Victoria June 16,
return limit June 20th. July 4, return limit 7th, rate
$2.80.
L. D. CHETHAM,
D. P. A. THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
Boots and
if he Celebrated
AHRBNS BOOTS  AHD  SHOES, "
"Uvery Pair Giiafhnteed or will be
... replaced with, another pair. In Men's
J~Boy!s ,aid;_(JJrl!Sj  The Best   School
Shoes in Town. Also Children's Wash
,    ing  Suits and  Sailor Blouses,   and
Strachan Hats. . . - - ■  _
DON'T FORGET THE STORE!
J. J. Thomas
.--. ..HIGH STREE-T..'.-.   .
Made to Order
I sell the
Promotions at Public School
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«>♦♦♦♦♦♦■♦♦♦♦♦«>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«>♦♦♦♦♦♦
Every piece is guaranteed
ty fit, and the price no
higher'" than ready made
w©ihing»i
B. L> WOOD
-First Avenue
Boxi73
Phone 43' '
For Meats
OF ALL KINDS, SAUSAGE A
-SPECIALTY, LEAVE ORDERS
AT
Geo. Roberts'
MeatMarket
Cor. First Av*. and,Roberts .Street.
LADYSMITH.
CM)
aiii:',l
lor tne Holiday
White Underskirts,  95c,
$1.00, $1.25 to $2.85.
Black Underskirts, $1.35,
$1.50 to $3.50.
A few Blouses left, going
cheap.
-AT-
MisSUren's
LIVERY STABLE
v    ;t. B. *#ei.l.$, flWorletor
■ v.—'  ~f Li   U :. a   v -.
Hack, Express, Livery and Feed  Stable
DRAY WORK AND FURNITURE
MOVING.   , WOOP FOR SALE
Phone 62
First Arennt ■        Ladysmith, B. C
3 Dlgaifl
Grown by White Labor
.;;,.; preen;Ompns, Spinach,
.v££ttuce<, Rhubarb.
E. Panhell
Lending
Library
ALL THE LATEST NOVELS.
We carry a large. Btock of   Fancy,
.Stationery.   ■ - ■■ ,
HARRY HUGHES
The public schools of, the city closed at noon on Wednesday, tho '30th
ult. Below will be found a summary of promp.tions—complete for all
divisions above the seventh and partial for those below! 'for the latter
the list it..:--_es those entering new
divisions; in other Word6, those passing from room's 9, 8 alia 7. Following the published promotions for
each division appear the names of
those, to. whom .hojior^rolls have been
awarded, excepting thc name oil tho
wltfner'of the "proficiency roll iff thc
first division, which will be' awarded
to the candidate making tho best total at the entrance examination.'
SENIOR GRADE. '
Of the entrance"'candidates some
have faced the tost under recommendation with assuranco ot .fighting
chances; others under recommendation qualified with warning. It has
seemed advisable to thus encourage
pupils to - test their - strength and
learn, if noed be, from failure.
The following pupils will enter the
final class next year; <
Gordon Cavin, Eva Peterson, Heleil,
Bird, , Grncie Michie,, Gracie Hawes,
together with those who may . find
it ,r>eecssary to make a second trial,
and parents who value the efficiency
of public school education are urged
to see that the standards set by thc
education department are approached
by their children. Unpopular aB this
view may seem it is nevertheless a
very practical one.
.•Honor Rolls.
Proficiency—"
Deportment—Katherin O'Conneil.'
• Regularity and, Punctuality— Janet
Dunse.
Promoted from Class A. Division
II. to Class B. Division I. in order
of merit.   T.  A.  McMarfin, teacher.
Annie SlBko, John Dunsmuir; Eva
Wilson, William Beattie, Herman
Hooper, Mary Glenn, Vara Mclntyre,
Lionel Greaves, Dorothy WUliamBon,
Ebeneier. Hunter, Catherine Hunter,
Mildred McKinnell, Nellie Pannell,
Anna Fisher.
Promoted from Class* B; Division
II. to Class' A. Division il) in oTder
of merit; .*"
* John Berto,: Alexander Hunter,
Martin Dunsmuir, Fannie Michie,
Mary Celle, Leopard Ryan, Mary Malone,' Margaret Austin.
Honor Rolls.
.Proficiency— Annie Sisko.
Punctuality  and   Regularity— Mildred McKinnell.
■  Deportment— Vara Mclntyre.
INTERMEDIATE)   GRADE - DIVISION III.    .
Teacher, Ethel Weismiller.
'   Promoted' from Class A; Dlv. III.
to Class B Div. H. (Senior tirade),!*
Empy Koski, Walter Hunter,''John
Sisko, Cecil Mulholland, Leopold Lei
pas, Jessie Prbvis, Annie Fcrrcro,
Honry Conlin, Harold Jones, Albort
Bagattin, Robert Ross, Frank Bal-
agno, Elsie Pannell.
Promoted from Class B to Class
A:
Valda Smith, John Robertson, Lillian Mikola, William Kerr; Evelyn
Crossan, Watford Torkko,' James
Wallace, George Mrus, Margaret
White, Frank Wargo.
Honor Rolls. " -
.. .Proficiency— Walter .Hunter.
Deportment— Jessie Provls.
Regularity and Punctuality— Robert Ross, Miko'*Zboyoesky, Albert
Bagattin. '    >
J-a.Sj   -.DiyisioN.iv.
Teacher, Gwendolyn A. Thomas.
Promoted from Class A. Div, IX
to Class B Div. 111.
Samuel Inkster, Ella Bauld, Theodore Bryant, Prina Batie, Annie
Dunse, Beatrice Shaw, Aina Tantar-
ri, Alexander Christie, William Bui-
agno, Peter Balagno, Lyyll Tantar-
rl, Pauline Gill, Isabella Conway,
Geprge Fptrest, JJames Deeming,
Jack Johnson, Ian McMurlric, James. Black.
promoted from Class B to Class A:
William Rafter, Janet Whisker,
Wilson Armstrong, William Skilling,
Jean Whisker, Peter Hunter, Charlotte ' d'Coriiiell,' Caroline Gaftney,
George Johes, Mary Armstrong, Alice Popovich, Alice Andrews,. Mary
Bomberro. •
,, Honor Rplls.
Proficiency-- Samuel Inkstor.
Regularity and' Punctuality—George
Forrest,       '
Deportment—. Lyyli Tanttarl.
JUNION    GRADE-DIVISION' V.
Teacher, M, Anderson.     .
■ [promoted from Class A to Class B
Div. iV, Intermediate Grade;   ,   .,   .
Angelina Untie, Charles Bourn, Isu'
bella Brown, Elizabeth Brown, Herbert Gardner,,, Jpsopli. Lnpsansky,-
Harry Lee, Isabella Little, Laura
Moitlard, Lilian Mottlsluuv, Antony
Mcdrlch, Joseph Mayousky, Adolph
Pogofiey, Jessie Ross, Agnes Rouse,'
Peter Sabiston, Jane Simpson, John
Frcsock,   Thomas    Wilkinson,   Nina
Wright.
Promoted from Class B to Class A
Division V.:
John AnsderBon, Archibald Allsopjp
Muriel Beattie, George Oartwrlght,
Ieadoro Defranc, Jane Gordon, Elsie
May James, Elsie James, Edith Jam
es, Gwon Jones, Kate McLennan,
Lila McKane, Frank Michel', William
Nankivcll, William Peterson, Jessie
Thomsick, Kate Timothy, Lena Van'
chrolT,. William- Wright, Peter Whisker.
Honor Rolls,
!Proucicm*y-- Nina Elian Wright's'
Deportment— Isabella Little.
Regularity tthd runetuulity— Lilian
Mottisliaw.
-     DIVISION VI. /
Teacher, Henrietta Hutchison,
Promoted from Class A to Class B
Div.' V.:
, Joseph Berto, James Hinckley, Hon
,ry Burke, Minnie Conway, Evelyn
Fielding, Norman Harrap, Barbara
Mayousky, Bfllo Mikola,'Harold Mi-
kola, George Patterson, Violet Prov-
is, Nora R. Roberts, Elizabeth Simp-
sen, Hilma Smitha, Albert Torkko,
Michael Trescock, Ltllic Wargo.
prompted, to Class A'.;,
Jennie Bolkky, David Bryden, Eth.
cl Camilbcll, Thomas Conway, ThonW
as Davidson, Dorothy Greaves, Douglas Gregson, Robert Hutchison, Arch-
bald Kerr, William Keserich, Georgo
Patterson, Vivian Sabiston,- Eva
Shaw, Florence Wier, William Wilkinson, Mary Zizac.
- Honor Rolls.
Deportment— Douglas Gregson.
iPunctuality and Regularity—Harold
Mikola.
Proficiency— Evelyn Fielding.
DIVISION VII.
Teacher, Mabel McDowell.
Promoted from Class A to Class
B Div. VI.:
Harry Angell, Bessie Andrews,
Georgo Bomberro, William Odrrie;
Arthur Delcourt, James Duncan,
Laura Ellis, Arthur Fielding, Joseph
Gibbons, Mary Gordon, Horace Jes-i
sup, Ira Lowe, Norah Pollard, Willie
Simpson, Lily Torkko, Httldah Turner.  .
Honor Rolls.
Deportment— Wilhemina McKinnell.
Regularity and'punctuality— Leslie
Mottisliaw.
Proficiency— Harry Angell.
DIVISION VIII.        -,
■Teacher, Nora J. Hill.
Promoted from Class A to J21ass 0
Div. VII.:
Ethel Armstrong, Bernice Angell,
Irene Dunn, Joseph Defranc, Ethel
James, Kill Kallao, Robert Kerr,
Eva Meale, William Orr, Elizabeth
Portrey, Clifford Pollock. Jane Pollock, Robert Rouse, Edith Rlzzano,
Irene Smith,. David Bhoaror, Claudo
Sabiston, Thomas Strang, Jenny
Torkko, Frank Thomsic, Mary
Wright, George Zbyovsky, Ethel Oilman, Robert Simpson.
Honor Rolls. ,
rtollcicncy- Claude Sabiston.
Deportment— Bcrnlco Angell.
Regularity uud Punctuality—George*
Zbyovsky.- -
DIVISION IX.
■ Teacher,- Jcanncttc Meblus.
Promoted trom Class A to Class C
Dlv. VIII.:
Ernest Inkster, Harry Auclilnvolc,
Ilninr Tantarri, Clifford Jones, Robert Courlny, Frank Barera, Francis
Douiiiont, Alice Berto, Kathleen
Campbell, William Gordon, Charles
Smith, Arvo Hover, Florence Nicholson, Etta Robertson, George Bryant,
Surah Noon, Mary Wilkinson, William Luwsoii, John Wurgo, Fred An-
drewB, Daniel lUdfortt, Kate Dou-
mont.
Honor Rolls.
Proficiency—Ernest Gilbert Inkster.
Regularity and Punctuality— Victor Michekr "
Deportment— Ilmar Tantarri.
lOOPairs
toaPairsH;
100 Pairs of Trousers!
To Be Cleared Out at GREATLY REDUCED
PRICES.      $1.75   PER  PAIR and up.
G. O, ROSS, First Avenue
100 Pairs
lOOPairs::
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
NEW BREED OF CHICKENS.
While in town lost Friday closing
up some, real estate transactions, B.
V. Peckcnpnugh, the farmer real estate, man, placed an order with this
office for a lot ot printed stationery.
"Feci" is now a full-fledged hayseed,
and can give many of the .old-timers
pointers on1 up-to-date farming:" For
instance, he' has invented a breed of
chickens with one leg longer than the
other, so that they can wander about
his hilltop farm without fear ol falling oft. Just what would happen.
should theso chickens take a notion
to go ln tho opposite direction he
does not ciplnln.   -Ex;
It
Surprises
Her
when tho housewife visits our store and sees the array of delicacies for her
table that Bhe'can procure for such a small amount of money at ono store,
Fresh canned fruita, vcgetales, and toothsome hams, bacon and everything in
fancy and staple groceries ab prices to suit the economical,       \,        „. '
GEAR'S IDEAL GROCERY
Scott's Building, First Avenue.	
In CLASSIFIED ADS Ir
"■tf =       pen word•"-       IU
■ Ailvert'tsomontB. vundct' this head
one cent per word per isijuc, payable in advance.
r JPRSffo       •>
NORSh, BROWN i6 prepared for Maternity or general engagements. Apf
ply at Mr. ErWilsoh's Second av-
Tnpe, between Roberta and Gatacre.
EOR RENT.
FOR RENT-Chcap to Suitable Tenant—3 Bedrooms and Large Ij ving
Room and Pantry. Apply at Vclc-
phoue office.
"pound,
KOtJND-A • Sed Ciliie Dog: Owner
can have eame hy applying to
Frank Torest, Gatacre sttect, and
paying Ior this ailvertia-avwt.
LOST.
LOST — Between RobcrtB street,
Third avenue and High street,
book, entitled "Fun ' Doctor."
Please return to Mrs. Kwart, High
street.   11,00 Reward. '    .
fOBSALC.     V
FOR BALE-BrpWn onii White Rabbits. Fifty cuts each, lipply Mrax
John  Stfiww*.
 1 , i.
FOR SALE-White Leghorn'eggs for
setting. Buff Leghorns and Black
Minorcas. $2.50 a setting] Apply
Mrs.  Laird.   .     .
FOR SALE—Express wagon in perfect order and harness. Apply Arthur Howe,  Chemainus.   *»'
FOR SALE-rl'our- -roomed- house in
good locality iii Extension, B.
C.   Apply-Tke, Storey.     >
MEMORIAL .TO MARTYRS.
Soma - mopths ago the news was
given out of the discovery ot the re
mains of Father Aulneau Jean Bte
Vcrandyre, and of nineteen other
French-Canadian -voyageursi in the
Northwestern^Territories, who1"* wero
tortured and murdered by Sioux ilb-
dians in the 17th century at- Fort
St. Charles.. Word has neon received
by Father Blain, of St. Boniface col<
lege, Winnipeg, from the. chief "representative of the Aulneau family in
France, that he desires to subscriqe
$400 towards a permanent memorial
to the memory of the brave missionary and his companions, to be erected on the site of Fort St. Charles,
where the remains were discovered..
Mr. Aulneau has expressed a wish to
roceivc Borne of the relics that were
found, and Rev. Father Blnin is forwarding to .him n small box containing sonic, including otic of tho deadly long flint arrows of the Sioux,
The question of a permanent memorial to the martyrs is shortly to be
considered by the church authorities,
and very probably the Manitoba An
scmbly or thc Dominion Cabinet will
be petitioned for a small graut lo
wards thc monument.
We have just received another shtp-
lent ol those .   --
WHISKERS IN  LAW  SUITS.
The tricks of lawyers in court to
win cases was tho topic of Willard
M. McEwcn, judge of the superior
court, before the Illluois State Attorneys' association meeting
cnga.
"No Jury Iu fnlr," he said, "because no man Is fair. Wc may all
want to bo fair, but wc arc bound up
by prejudices wc cannot get awny
from. For this reason unscrupulous
and i even scrupulous attorneys can
play on thc emotion of Jurors nnd
win cases where thc law docs not
warrant it.
."Whiskers play a great part in lawsuits. At present the prejudice ln
Chicago is againBt jurors with whiskers. It formerly was the other way*
I know a, judge who thought he was
without prejudice and who thought
only men with long whiskers; made
.good jurors. The prejudice now is
the, other way, and attorneys here
generally reject men with long whiskers. "  i
"Attorneys ore lull of trifles to de.1
celvo jurors. One ot the chiet tricks
is that ot bringing babies Into «ourt.A
"No, Willie, you know I told' Vod
not to go ln swimming, and yet you
huvo bcon ill.tho water. "1 know It,
ma,, but Satan tomptpd., mc.'' ''And
why did you not tell Satan to got
behind you?" "I did ahd'ho klckod'
pie tnT:;'
A very lmiiortant: move in the up-'
building of Prince Rupert was- consummated this week in the decision
nfrlyod at ■ to eroct a {12,000 buBi-
noijB I))00"", ,ott Third avonuc, botween
Sixth and Sovonth streets. Tho eix
lotB cover n frontage of lGo toet.
The now, structure- will bo thrco
storeys- - high, nnd IwlU contain
stores, with otHccB above.
Colorings Iti Wall Paper
Call 'ahd seo'theta. "Thiy are go-
mg'fast: "       '■' -'   - ~	
• ■ A full .line, of, Paints and Varnishes
in stock. --'   -
Picture -'Framing done on shortest
notice. JJr.ing.your pictures-and lock
over our mouldings.
HARRY KAY, SSL
Painter and Paperhanger.
..   THE. ALLEGED HUMORISTS.
Tender-hearted Young Lady—"Oh,
you cruel, heartless littio wretch, to
rob those poor birds ot their eggs!"
Wicked Little ltoy-"Ho! that's the
mother ol thc one' you've got on
your iionnct.   Guess she won't care."
PIANO FOR SALE.—Upright Grand
Dominion -Piano in .Ijxst class condition. In use only a abort time.
Apply Mrs. Bernard, Union Brewery, Ladysmith.
FOR SAiE-My"'S'oiith'African Vet-
'"erah 'BohnTy~L~anTcTIHTffinite issued
by the Department of thc Interior,
Ottawa; pood lor 320 acres of any
Dominion Land open for,entry in
Altierta, Saskatchewan', or Manitoba,. An" person ovt!r the a'gc of 18
years, Man or Woman, can acquire
this .land ,with . this certificate.
Write or wire, -h.- E. Telford, 131
Shuter Street, Toronto, Ontario.
%  \ wantHd.   ..""\
WANTED—A girl'.to assist iu light
housework. Apply Mrs.'i Mulholland, Fifst avetVuc'; tsdyafhith.
S. J. GIFFORD
Livery, Peed and Sale
Stables
EXPRESS WORK k SPECIALTY
WOOD FOR SALE
First Avenue.
Phone 58.
"Dad, I wus Bimply great in relay
event," boustcd tho boy from college, "Good enough, son. We'll make
use of them talents. Your ma will
soon be ready to relay the carpets.','
"My sturdy old, gradfathcr came
over in tho steerage. Forty years
■rater-ho wont back firth* Lnsltanln.'"
at Clil^^NorVotimMrTYriow-Ora'n effete-
duke who accomplished the Bunic
trick ln four weekn."
Dr. R. B. Dier
Surgeon Dentist
ALL  WORK GUARANTEED
Ladysmith Waterworks
NOTICE
water
Mrs. Yuungwcd—"This, is the first
bread I over made, darling." Mr.
Youngwcd-"'Wcll, dear, you ought to,\
build up an excellent .reputation ns it
housekeeper on it;" Mrs.. VoUflgwcd
—"Why?" YoungWed—"Because yOu
have started with an almost indestructible foundation."
Hpiel^^.Proprietor/— "What's that
you have here?" Guest— "That's
a rope. It may save my liie in case
the hotel catches. fia*£ in the night."
Proprietor—"H'ml ^H'ml ] Very .good
idea. But I think that guests who
carry, around tire .oacapes bad better
pay in advance."
i,.,.     . .   -   /
"I'm introtfticing a brand new 'in-
^ention—a (lom|ined talking machihe
carpet sweeper aid letter opener-;"
said the agent, stepping briskly into
an. • office',-. "Got one already,"- answered thc proprietor. "I'm married.
The following conversation was overheard between two boys, aged sev-
and five -yews'- *'.Ioo, why can't
chicken talk?" "Aw, tltoy don't havo
to; wjtcn tbey wantB-anything they
sill Just pull thoir wlBhboncs and they
I gets their wish."
and after this date
consumers must not
sprinkle streets or roads.
The following rules will
govern gardens and lawns:
' Below 3rd Avenue-In the
morning from 7 to 10 o'clock.
Above 3rd Avenue—In the
evening from 5 to 8 o'clock.
Dated June 9th 1^09.
J.J. Bland,
Superintendent of Waterworks
Have Your Houses Plastered
i '
-   • For Terms apply to   '
0. H1NG, Plasterer,etc., Ladysmith, P. 0.
Cement Sidewslks a specialty.
COOKED PRESSED
Corn Beef
Chicken and Veal at all times
J.
R.  Ryan
BUTCIIEJ* ]
■ THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
W.$.;..XK"M«H"W"><"K^W«>*."^
|
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4
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4
9
4
9
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X
SUMMER
DRINKS
Nice assortment of coo] Summer Drinks,
the time for them.
Montserrat Lime Juice, per bottle	
Stower's Pine Lime Juice, per bottle	
Orange Syrup, per bottle	
Grenadine Syrup, per bottle....'	
Nectar Syrup, per bottle	
Strawberry Syrup, per bottle	
Pineapple Syrup, per bottle	
Persian Sherbet, per tin.	
Eiffel Tower Lemonade, per tin	
Now
• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a* 1 *M«H"H~.-M-!-H~H'
I Simon Leiser &Co.y Ltd
I   Specialists in Corsets
3ASKETS-Chip Baskets, suitable for picnicing,
15c 25c, 35c, 40c, 50c.   Fancy Jap Baskets, 25c, 50c
and 75c.
Fancy imported Willow Baskets, from $1.25 to $3.00.
BLAIR & ADAM
Wo make a specialty
~     -OF-
CORSETS
-FOR-
Stoul Figures
SEE OUR NEW.
* Try a jar of Hartley's famous Jelly Marmalade 25c jar |
t*M*M^*«*««*<^
Just arrived
A nice Assortment of
Suit Cases
The verv thing for persons
taking a trip to the fair.
We have them in Solid
Leather, Steel Frame, Canvas and Jap Matting, with
leather binding, all spring-
locks.   Prices from $2.25 up.
Also a nice line of trunks,
Jill prices with or without
straps.
The Vancouver Island Cigar
W. E. Morrison
Tor Holiday Goods
Formerly Gold & Johnston, ol Victoria, are introducing a new brand
ot Cigars to be known   as tbe
"V.  I."
Try Them.
Local and General
News Notes
Get a  Box of Bee Jelly Powders—
5 pkts. lor 25c.   Blair & Adam.       *
Finest Ice Cream in the city at
Hooper's, the most select jn.-lor
on the Island. Everything of the
best quality in Uontecu.incry.       «
5 pkts.  Jelly Powder (Bee Brand)
for 15c.   Blair & Adam. *
DECEOfl CORSETS j
Guaranteed to Give Satisfaction •
SIMON LEISER & CO., LTD. |
Agents for the Crompton Corsets   j
Large -Box ol Jelly Powders with
i assorted flavors for 25c, at Blair
& Adam. •
T.i mcet your friends and be right
at home, while in Victoria, stay at
the Rainier Hotel, George .Ui.'gy
iroprtetor. •
i) mcet yoar triends and be right
nt home, while in Victoria, stay-at
the Rainier Hotel, George 3uri;gy
proprietor. •
Tea rooms for ladles or gentlemen. Short order or sandwiches
always ready at Hoop :•'.*. •
Sovereign
Brand
Clothing
It is Good
When you want a real good suit,
buy Sovereign Brand. It pleases old
friends and keeps making new ones.
C. E. JEFFS
The Up-to-date Men's Wear Store
Local and General
News Notes
The many triends ot Aid. Haworth
will be pleased to learn that he is
improving in health. He 1b now at
the hospital in Chemainus.
Mrs. Rose Campbell, Henry B. JepV
son nnd Frederick Jepson, carrying
on business at Nanaimo under the
arm name ot the Nanaimo Book &
Music Company, has dissolved partnership, | and the business will be continued by the Jepson Brothers.
There will be a meeting ot Socialists in Gould's hall Saturday evening at 8 o'clock. John Harrington,
provincial organizer of thc Socialist
party of Canada, will addreBS the
meeting, discussing questions ot ln-
tir:Bt to the working classes alone.
The sewer debentures have been
signed by the mayor and forwarded
to William Brent at Toronto, On
their arrival the money will be tor-
warded through the bank.
Thc tenders for the building ot the
electric light plant will'be opened at
the meeting af the city council t next
Monday evening, and the contract
awarded. There will be a largcnum-
W ot tenders, and lt is quite likely
the work will begin within p. tew
weeks.
Mr. Hugh Macdonald, the Victoria
contractor, arrived in Ladysmith today and will discuss sewer matters with the council. Mr. Morley,
who has made application for the pes'
sltlon of engineer, will also attend
the meeting of the council Monday
evening, . .
Some of the Indians who curac into town to celebrate Dominion Day
indulged too Irccly and yesterday cnJ
gftged In a free light. One of the Indians was badly brulned, but bis
friends put him in a boat and started for home before the extent of his
injuries could be discovered.
There was ft slight accident on the
K. ft N. train which lett Victoria at
llo'clock Wednesday morning with
a party of excursionists tor Gold-
stream. The bolts holding the flange
ol one of the rear wheels oI_thc tender became loosened, and the result
was considerable damage to the engine and the roadbed.
Flags
Flags
Hags
FOR SALE AT
Jchn Houston, who established Thq
Empiro will leave Prince Rupert next
week, after living here two years. He
intends making a trip to Dallas ami
Galveston, Texas, cities in which he
lived and carried on business 35 years
ago, and will afterwards go to Old
Mexico, where he may pass his remaining days—Prince Rupert Empire;
Dr. G. H. Martin, of Portland,
Ore., waB a visitor to Ladysmith last
Saturday, Dr. Martin owns considerable real estate in Ladysmith, and he
was delighted to note tho progress
the city has been making the past
year. He believes that it will be only a matter of a few years until Ladysmith has a population of 25,000.
Unless the directors of the Nanaimo Agricultural and Horticultural
Society receive more financial encouragement, there is likely to be no
Fall Show of the Society this year.
Fcr several dayd the Society has had
a collector out canvassing the eity
for funds and he has met with poor
success. The grant from the government as regards the amount depends
entirely on the amount raised'locally
and it would be a pity il the show
should tall through simply on account of tho lack ol interest shown
by the citizens. An exhibition- is one
ot thc best advertisements a city can
have, and no better way can be Iound
to show to the public the resources
ot the district, nnd it would be a
serious loss to the city should the
proposed Fall Exhibition lall
through, owing to the lack ot Interest in the nftair by tho citlsens of
Nnntrlmo—Nnnalmo Herald,
i:   We carry in stock the leading sizes f
: suitable for Camping.
HAMMOCKS!      HAMMOCKS!
Complete Stock.
FISHING TACKLE
Our stock is well assorted in all the::
I leading lines suitable for these wa-::
::ters, etc. We are offering special |
| values in Fishing Rods.
,he Ladysmith Hardware Co., u.
The Holiday Season Is Here
Call nn.l seo onr assortment ot Ladies'Belt Pins in Sterling and Hard Enamel, also
Cull Tins,  Waist Sets, Hat l'ins,   Ash Trays, Etc., Etc.
For the Month of July we will give IU per cent discount for all Cash Purohases made
Our Watoh repairs are Daily increasing.    Remember we furnish estimates before ,
doing tlie work.    All work Guaranteed.
P. G. NOOT
WATCHMAKER
AND
JEWELKR
Dr. Frost has had his handsome
residence painted a delicate green,
and the work is a credit to the artist, Mr. S. Rocdding.
Judge Young arrived this morning
trom Atlin. He reports that .district
as meeting witn a most discouraging
set hack in the breaking ol the Surprise Lake dam, trom which water
was obtained to work claims on Pino
creek, The company that built the
dam hoped to make a good cleanup
this year, tho first they had a chance
to make ln nearly six yearB. However, the company's manager, Mr.
RuNner, is already at work on another dam, and seems to take tne
bad luck as merely an Incident ln
mining.—Prince Rupert Empire.
BASEBALL GAME TOMORROW.
Sunday at 2.30 Nanaimo and LMy-
smith meet for the flrst time this
season in a baseball match on the
sports grounds.
The teams line up as follows*.
LADYSMITH.
S. Kerr, J. Sanderson, M. Taylor,
M. Kerr, O. Delcourt, A. Simpson,
M. Gogo, Garrard, T. White, D. Alt-
ken.
NANAIMO.
Fatty Aitken, catcher; Trilby, pitch
er; F. Aitken, 1st base; Shorty Graham, 2nd base; Bumpy Gordon, 3rd
bnsc; Bruce Ashman, shortstop; Mike
Wilkinson, lett Held; Ramsay, centre
Held; Hurst, right Held.
Church Services.
CHURCH OF ENGLAND.
U a. m.- Matins and Holy Communions,
2.30 p, m.— Children's service.
7 p. m.— F.vensong.
Subjects: Morning and evening,
"The Functions ol floral and Physical Pain."
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Sunday Services at 11 a. m. and J
p. m.     Bible   Class   and   SuntUy
School at 2 p. m.   Prayei   meeting
Wednesday at 7 p. m
METHODIST CHDROH.
Bpworth League meets at the cloie
ol the Sunday evening service.
Prayer meeting Wednesday at T.»0
p. m.
Sabbath Services: Morning, XI a.
m; evening, 7 p. m.; Sabbath school
and Bible class, 2.30 p. m..
R. WILKINSON, PMtot
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Sunday services: At 8 a. m., law
nans. At 10:80 a..m., high man
tt 3 p, m,, Sunday school At 7
i. m., evening servlct  and  Btneatc
Warm Weather
Specials
Mils' Simmit Vntt
Reg. 15c
25c
35c
Spe. 10c
15c
25c
Mils' Mi Wnr
Corset Covers,   35c,
40c, 45c to $1.50.
Ladies' Drawers, 35c,
40c, 45c to $1:75.
Ladies' Night Dresses
75c, 85c, $1.00 to $3.00.
Ladies'  Skirts,   75c,
$1.00, $1.25 to $5.75.
20 doz. Mil's Cams lib,
good, value $1.00, Special 75c; ,
Mil's liilriuii Miraur
Zimmer Knit, Silk finish, Special 50c.
,   Sift Niilim SMrts
with or without collars,
65c to $2.00.
Iithiif Jilts
any kind you wish can
be found here.
Walters & Akenhead
Por Sunshades

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