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Kamloops Wawa Oct 1, 1895

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No. 133
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Vol. IV. No. 10.        KAML00PS; WAWA.        October, 1895.
THE WAWA SHORTHAND I.
The simplest system of Shorthand in the world. The easiest to
learn. A hundred times easier
than the old writing...
Two million people (2,000,000)
throughout the world already
practising this system of phonography. It is adapted to over
twenty different languages.
Can be learned without teacher
in one to three hours. .
If you are a stranger to Shorthand, take this paper and become
acquainted with this useful art.
If you have failed to learn
-ShGrthand^owing-to-the-compli^
cation of the system you adopted,
or from want of time, do not give
up, but try this system, and wonder at its simplicity.
Time is precious. You will save
time as soon as you are acquainted with this phonography.
THE KAMLOOPS WAWA!
SHORTHAND AMONG INDIANS
A   Newspaper   in   Shorthand  Circulating
among the Natives.
Two Thousand Indians reading and
writing Phonography	
The Plainest Proof of the Simplicity
of the System.	
A  NOVEL  IDEA TO  TEACH  THE
INDIANS SHORTHAND.
HOW CAN INDIANS LEARN SHORTHAND ?
Because Shorthand is a hundred, nay
a thousand times simpler than the old
writing. Any one can learn it in a few
hours, and become expert in it in a
few days. Many of our Indians learned
it in two or three days.
If you are a lover of curious specimens, you must have this paper, it is
"The Queerest Newspaper in the World."
Subscribe for this paper, and help to
civilize our Indians, to enlighten those
who were sitting "in darkness"and
the shadow of death."
Your Subscription Solicited. Only One Dollar per Annum.
ADDRESS: "EDITOR WAWA, KAMLOOPS, B.C." .
,>,■
■iv,.■    i, •,,   -• '' Hammond'' Work the Criterion of'' Hammond'' Superiority
LI
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>
I
O
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01
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100   HAMMONDS   USED   EXCLUSIVELY   IN   THE   PUBLIC
SCHOOLS OF CHICAGO.
THE LARGEST ORDER  FOR  EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES  EVER GIVEN.
fc
Why the HAMMOND is absolutely unrivalled for School use:
PERFECT and PERMANENT ALIGNMENT and UNIFORM IMPRES-
., .. .    ,        , ...... of the
depres-
,     . .   .. ,   r, .       . . es5 hence, practice
only in  manipulation  and  fingering is required to become a skilful
operator.      In   VARIETY  of WORK   it  exceeds  that of all  OTHER
WRITERS COMBINED.    In SIMPLICITY if is easily first.
Write for catalogue and prices, and then judge whether a letter written
on? a "Hammond" is not the finest specimen" of typewritten work vou
have ever seen. ■
THE   HA
Y D TYPE WRITER CO ■
403 & 405 East 62nd. Street, NEW YORK.
MOLD FUR TRADERS, Established 16?ft.
- -*y*-y.»-\*£F?\—&y-i-yi' yyir*^^\ys&'y^y~'.—
&~y Suit ->i s-*y, $><<,<, b^^y.9 <^,
HUDSON'S BAY CO. - Kamloops, B.C.
DUPLOYAN SHORTHAND
AdajHcd to English,
'One Shilling and Seven Pence, or
40 cents.
Address, E. DUPLOYE, Sinceny,
AISNE. FRANCE.
LA LUMIERE STENOGRAPHIQUE,
now m its 24th year.   Issues
monthly.    40 cents per annum.
Address, B. DUPLOYE, Sinceny, 1MB, Franee.
LEGR ATNIT ST£ NOTG. R^TPH ET^867
rue   Lafayette, Paris, France.
The leading paper of the Duployan   Stenography.     Issues
monthly.   $1.00 per annum.
LA PLUME STENOGRAPHIQUE
LIMOGES-PfiRIGUEUX.— 2,
Cours Montaigne, Perigueux,
Dordogne,France. M.F.Cariet,
Directeur. Issues monthly. 75
cents per annum.
L'ECLAIR STENOGRAPHIQUE
ILLUSTRfL-Maurice L. Lous-
sort, 60, rue du Loup, Bordeaux.
France. Bi-monthly. $1.00 per
annum.
L'ETOILE STENOGRAPHIQUE DE
FRANCE.—Bi-monthly. 9, rue
National©, Lille, France. $1.00
per annum. I
,*
EX O. Prior & Co.
<
LIMITED   LIABIL
ity)
IMPORTBIkl'S     OP
Iron. Steel' and General Hardware,
AGRICULTURAL    IMPLEMENTS,
WJ^GOIsTS,   BUGGIES,   ETC.
VICTORIA. VANCOUVER. KAMLOOPS.
Z»T7ZVSS    ^-LTAH    WINES.
West Glendale Winery and Vineyards, CHAS. B. PIRONI, Propr.
p. o. Box 15, sta. c.    LOS AMES, CALIFOMIA. Office: 340 n.main St.
COMPLETE STOCK OF  LIQUORS	
Specialty: WHITE ALTAR WIWES.
E5CTR A  ■     "SPECIAL CUCAJVIONGA BrAiXD" made from the  MISSION  GRAPE,
"" -*~  ■   ■* ** ■    originally brought from Spain by early Franciscan Missionaries.    Of exquisite taste, secured by special care in.allowing- a small percentage of grape sugar to remain after
fermentation.    Kept in cellars THREE YEARS before placing on the mark~et.    Has given the
best satisfaction to the Rev. Clergy all over the union.
Orders promptly attended to. Send for Price List.
R.   E.   SMITH,
Established   1383,
DEALER IN
Dry Goods, Groceries,
Boots and Shoes,
Clothing, Millinery,
 ^Carpets,—"	
House Furnishings, Etc.
KAMLOOPS, B.C.
019 Mon's 3fome,
KAMLOOPS, B.C.
-C10>-
JOS.   RATCHFORD,
Superin ten dent.
QuHchena 3fofel,
Near the Center of
NIC0LH    LIKE,
50 Miles South of KAMLOOPS,
Health and     *
■•  Summer Resort,
Beautiful  Scenery
and Climate.
K>D.   O'ROURKE,
Proprietor.
INLAND SENTINEL,
IN TOUCH WITH THE
Mining, Ranehing £ Oommercial Interests
OE THE
INTERIOR OF B. C.
Subscription, $2.00 per Year.
SEND FOR SAMPLE COPY FREE.
Kamloops, B.C. Established 1880.
J.    R.   HULL  &   CO.,  (Successors to HULL BROS. & CO.)
JP Utt VEYOJRS OF ME A. T,
Contractors;, and General Dealers in JLive Stock,
KAMLOOPS,   B.C.
COSMOPOLITAN  HOTEL,
The oldest established house in
KAMLOOPS/B.C.
J. H. MUSSEL, Prop.
KAMLOOPS, B.C.
Dealer and manufacturer in
Stoves, Tinware. Plumbing, Hardware, Paints. Oil and Glass.
go to
KAMLOOPS, B.C.
For FTTMJSriTJTME, CARPETS,
WINDOW-SHADES, Etc.
M.  GAGLIETTO,
eneral Merchant,
KAMLOOPS, B.C.
-^s>   STATUARY    DEPARTMENT
-OF-
D. & J. SADLIER & CO.
Gathplic Publishers, Booksellers and Stationers,
IMPORTERS OF
123   Church   Street,
ft
1669 Notre Dame St.,
TORONTO.
MONTREAL.
We have the Best European Artists, and Skilful Painters,
working on our Statues, and we can supply immediately, or on
short notice, a great variety of statues of Saints and Religious
Groups, in all sizes, in Plaster, Plastique, or Cement, with plain
or rich decorations artistically finished; also a large and varied
assortment of models for drawing.
All orders are given our personal attention, and we are
daily in receipt of highly complimentary letters from all
parts of the country.
..-«■
Id
l'li-
w^.Tf.nrv.w'^' Yd. iv. ¥0.10.       KAMLOOPS WAWA.
October, 1895.
WHAT IS SAID OF THE "WAWA"
SHOKTHAND.
"This style of phonography is the
easiest learned of all that I have seen,
and I think 1 have seen nearly all of
them." — From Yreka, California,
May, 1895.
-A"
"Four days ago I began to examine
the elements of shorthand you sent
me. and in three hours I learned eVerisign it included. The next day I went
to work and began to decipher the
meaning- of the 'Kamloops Wawa,'
and went through in one day. Now I
can read it pretty readily, and write
it faster than I can. read it. I am
proud of my success, because I thought
that I was too old to have the patience
and memory to master it. And Imust
thank you for having been the means
of my learning- it. I am proud of enlisting myself as one of your pupils.
Though my hair is white as snow, I
see one is never too old to learn."—
From Troy, N. Y., May 1st, 1892.
..'-■yd'.,  ■..■■..  *** ■
" One of the most curious and interesting of all the curious attempts
which have been made to instruct
and benefit the Indians by means of
written characters, is that known as
the ' Kamloops Wawa.' . . Written
in an international language, 'setup'
in stenographic characters, and printed on a mimeograph by its inventor,
editor, reporter, printer and publisher,
all in one, this little paper seems to
leave nothing in the way of novelty to
be desired."—From the Smithsonian
-InstitricierBiblioorciph/i/ofthe^Ghi/nooli^
an Languages, by Jas. C. Pillin g.
"The Salish Indians in British Columbia are the first nation which has
adopted a truly short method of writing, which is at the same time quite
philosophical, as the national means
of representing spoken language. By
this system the Chinook tongue is
spelled exactly as it is pronounced,
and thus all the great difficulties of
learning to read which exist in most
modern languages, and especially in
English and French, arc avoided, and
the BritishColumbialndia.ns educated
in this manner are enabled to read and
write their own language in an incredibly short time. It is admitted by
all scholars that the phonetic representation of any language removes
the difficulties of learning to read and
spell; and it is just this that the B. C.
Indians are taught to use.   And not
only are they able, when instructed
by this method, to read and spell in a
few days, but they are able in a short
time to" write as quickly as they think,
and to keep pace with the fastest
speakers."— Catholic Record.
Do not think that, because this phonography is so readily learned by the
Indians, that it is only a savage shorthand. This system of shorthand has.
already sold over 300,000 methods in.
England; it is now taught in 500
schools and colleges in the United
States; and it is becoming general
throughout France.
This system in ph onography has now
adaptations in French, English, German, Armenian, Chinook and Salish
languages in British Columbia, Danish, Flemish, Italian, Latin, Spanish,
Portuguese and Turkish. The German Method has already reached its
fourth edition, and the Flemish its
second. The French Method Complete
has already exhausted sixteen editions, and the Abridged Method seventeen. * .*
" It was in July, 1890, that the following remark was made: 'Why not
teach the Indians to read in short-.
hand?—it is so simple !' The first trial
was a success.   At the end of September, 1890, a poor Indian cripple, named
Chalie Alexis Mayous, from the Lower
Nicola, saw the writing for the first
time,  and   got  the   intuition of the
system at first sight.   He set to work
to decipher a few Indian prayers, and
in less thanj}wo montlis had. learned
the whole method fliorouiginj^^nTrhe-
soon began to communicate his learning to his friends and'relatives.- From
this time the Indians took up the sys-
tenij and were anxious to learn on all
sides. When once a few Indians know
the system in one camp, their ambition is to teach it to others.   During
the summer the progress is slow, but
when winter comes they spend whole
nights at it.   One young Indian, especially   bright,   took   interest   in   the
writing   as  soon  as  he saw  it.    He
spent the whole night in repeating
the lesson over and over again with,
two or three companions, and in two
or  three   days   more   completed   his
studies.     In   less  than   a.  month  he
could read  the Indian language   as
well as the Chinook,  and  soon  was
able   to   read   and write  English  in
shorthand.  Not only do little children
learn to read and write readily, but
even old people study with success. 146
WHAT   IS   SAID   OF   THE   ' WAWA7   SHORTHAND.
"After 600 or 800 Indians had learned the system, it became necessary
that their interest should be kept up
by placing instructive matter before
them. Then came the idea of editing
the 'Kamloops Wawa,' the strangest
little newspaper in America.
"The 'Wawa' is really a full-fledged
newspaper, and it first saw the:light
of  day in the month of  May, 1891.
* Wawa' is a Chinook word, meaning
* talk, speak or echo.' Hence the title
signifies 'Kamloops Echoes.' Kamloops, the name of the town in which
it was inaugurated, is a Shushwap
word, meaning 'the forking together
of rivers,'—in this instance, the north
and south forks of the Thompson
River.
"The 'Kamloops Wawa" was first
printed on the mimeograph, at 100
copies^ from May, 1891, till March,
1892. From that date, till December
of the same year, 200 copies were
issued, four pages weekly. From
January, 1893, it was issued at sixteen
pages monthly, with covers, instead
of four pages weekly. • In March following the number of copies issued
had to be increased to 500, in June to
1,000, and later on to 1,200. Since
January, 1895, it has issued 2,000
monthly, and the number will soon
be increased to 3,000, and more.
"The printing of the paper is marvellous. At first the news was autographed, then duplicated on the mimeograph by Indian women. The
first volumes of this wonderful little
paper have been bound, and copies
sent to the Smithsonian Institution,
to the British Museum, to the Astor
Library, to the Library of the University of the State of New York, etc.
"There still remain in stock a few
copies of the original volumes. These,
—in-arfew^yearsras welLasin-the^prcr^
sent, may be considered valuable curiosities.
"Now the old process of mimeographing has been abandoned, and
the paper is produced by photo-engraving, at 2,000 copies per month.
It costs fifty dollars a month to issue
the paper as it now is, which sum it
is rather difficult to find readilj'-
among the Indians alone. The object
in issuing these sample copies is to
obtain from the outside resources
enough to let subscribers have their
paper at a nominal figure."
[Most of the above items were
published in the "Chicago Sunday
Herald," of November 25th, 1894, from
the pen of Miss Maibelle Justice.]
* *•
*
Besides Chinook  and Indian  phonography, this paper contains, every
month, three or four pages of English
reading, on topics connected with the
Chinook,—its origin, etc.; concerning
the system of shorthand employed;
its progress among the natives, as
well as in the world abroad, etc.;—
so as to be of continual interest to all
its readers.
No. 122 of the "Wawa"gives the
rudiments of the "W;awa" shorthand
as used for the Chinook alone. The
explanation is given in English, as
well as in French and Chinook. Price,
Ten cents.
. y ■ ***
No. 124 gives, condensed in three
pages, the "Wawa " shorthand, English method — alphabet for English
complete.   Ten cents.
•'■ ***
No. 129 gives, in  typography, the
first Chinook lesson, with grammatical notes, in two pages.   Ten cents.
***
Pages 4 and 5 of the specimen issue
reproduces the ''Sugar Cane Tintin,"
a paper got up in manuscript at the
William's Lake Mission last winter,
and sent for reproduction in the
"Wawa." No. 126 gives an English
version of the same.
■ '*** ;'.
On pages 6 and 7 of the specimen
issue will be found some of the illustrations published in the "Wawa."
There are a few engravings, half-tone
and others, in every number, to make
the paper more desirable to our Indian readers, and to amateurs as .well.
***  :"
On page 8 of  the  specimen  issue
there is a reproduction of  the first
=nxim-.ber=of===the=^iW-a-war^in-the-same—■-
words as the first issue, May 2nd, 1891.
IMPORTANT NOTICE.
With  the   January (1896) number,
will begin a new exposition of  the
"Wawa" shorthand, English method,
which will be continued in the following numbers until complete.    It
will  be done up in   clear, readable
type,   with  the  phonographic  signs
at   the  right,   in   photo - engraving.
Those who have already studied the
"Wawa" phonography from the mimeographed    papers,    or   from   the
plates of last year, are unanimous in
stating that it is  the  simplest and
easiest to learn that has ever been
seen. OUR   INDIAN   CATECHISM
147
ft"
XIII.
105. What do you do ivhen you ivant
to receive the Sacrament of Penance ?
When I want to receive the Sacrament of Penance, I do five things:
1st. I examine my conscience; 2nd. I
excite myself to contrition and firm
purpose; 3rd. I confess my sins to the
Priest; 4th. I receive absolution ;
5th. I perform the Penance of Satisfaction imposed by the Priest.
106. What do you do when you want
to examine your conscience ?
When I want to examine my conscience I repair to the Church, where
I kneel down, and after making the
Sign of the Cross, I pray to God to enlighten my souLthat I may know my
sins." -"■'■
107. How do you examine your conscience?
To examine my conscience, I first
repass in my mind all the places where
I have been since my last Confession ;
then I examine myself on the Ten
Commandments of God, the Precepts
of the Church, the Seven Capital Sins,
and the duties of my state ; last of all
I find out how many times I committed each of my sins.
108. After you have examined your
conscience, luhat do you do ?
After I have examined my conscience, I excite myself to a lively
contrition of my sins, and to a firm
purpose to sin no more.
109. What do you do to excite yourself to a lively contrition and to a firm
purpose ?
To excite myself to a lively contrition pfjny sins, and to a firm purpose
to sin no more. 1st. I pray God to
grant me the grace of contrition and
firm purpose; 2nd. I consider heaven,
which I have lost by my sins; 3rd. I
consider hell, which I have deserved ;
4th. I consider the goodness of God,
whom I have offended; 5th. I consider
the sufferings of Jesus Christ, and His
death upon the Cross, caused by my
sins, then I say the act of contrition,
and I recite the Confiteor.
110. How do you confess your sins
to the Priest?
I kneel down by the side of the Priest,
and after making the Sign of the
Cross, I say: " Bless me, Father, for 1
have sinned. I confess to almighty
God and to you Father." Then I tell
the Priest how long it is since my last
confession, whether or not I received
absolution and performed my penance,
then I confess my sins.
111. After confessing all yoivr sins,
xohat do you say ?
After confessing all my sins, I say :
"For these and all the other sins I do
not remember, and all the sins of my
past life, I am heartily sorry, and
numbly ask pardon of God, and of
you Father, penance and absolution."
112. What do you do when the Priest
speaks to you in confession ?
I answer simply and clearly all his
questions ; I listen in silence, with
great attention and respect to his advice and directions; I see what penance heimposesuponme, and whether
or not he gives me absolution.
113. What do you do whenthePriest
gives yoil absolution?
When the Priest gives me absolution I bow down my head, I recite the
act of contrition, and make the Sign
of the Cross.
114. What do you do when the Priest
tells you "-Go in peace and pray for
me?"
I go and kneel down at some distance, where I return thanks to God;
I renew my resolution to resist the
temptations and avoid all occasions of
sin; I remember what advice the
Priest gave me, and how I am to conform myself to it; I ask God to help
me Avith His grace; then I make the
penance the Priest imposed upon me ;
I then leave the Church, and keep
myself for some time yet in recollection.
115. What is the absolution which
the Priest gives at confession ?
Through the power which he received from Christ, the Priest gives
me absolution, by which my sins are
forgiven, my soul is healed, and the
grace of God jjg conferred upon me.	
116. Does the Priest always give
absolution ?
The Priest cannot always give absolution ; only to those whom he sees
well disposed does he give absolution ;
but to those whom he does not consider wrell disposed he cannot give absolution ; he dismisses them with his
blessing.
117. What do you do when the Priest
does not give you absolution ?
When the Priest does not give me
absolution, I excite myself to a greater
sorrow for my sins, and I follow the
advice the Priest gives me, that I may
soon enter into the true dispositions
required to receive absolution.
118. Is it a great sin to conceal a
mortal sin in confession ?■
Yes, it is a great sin to conceal a
mortal sin in confession ; the confes- 148
OUR   INDIAN   CATECHISM
sion becomes null, and the sins that
have been confessed are not forgiven.
All subsequent confessions are also
null, and the sins are not forgiven,
until the mprtai sin which has been
concealed, has been confessed, as well
as the number of confessions made
since the sin was concealed, which
confessions must be all made over
again.
119. Is it a sin to neglect to diligently examine one's conscience before confession ? '■■
Yes, it is a sin to neglect to diligently examine one's conscience before
confession ; it is a contempt of the
Sacrament of Penance, it exposes one
to omit sins in confession, in which
case it is equal to the concealing one's
sins in confession.
120. Is it a great sin not to excite
oneself to true contrition and firm
pxirpose of amendment ?
Yes, it is a great sin not to excite
oneself to contrition and to a firm
purpose of amendment, and to avoid
the occasions of sin; it is a sin of contempt of the Sacrament of Penance,
it is equal to the concealing of one's
sins in confession.
121. What do you do if you forget
a sin in your confession ? .
• If I forget a sin in confession without any fault of mine, it is forgiven
with the other sins which have been
told in confession, but I confess it to
the Priest in my next confession.
122. Does the Priest make knoxon to
anybody what he hears in confession ?
The Priest can tell nobody what he
hears in confession ; 'he must keep it
an inviolable secret.
123. What is that penance which
the. Priest OAVes yon^ivhen you .goJto_
confession?
That penance is sacred which the
Priest gives me in confession; we
should not forget that it is a sin to neglect it, but we should be anxious to
perform it as soon as possible, and in
the manner prescribed by the Priest.
124. Why does the Priest impose a
penance in confession ?
The Priest imposes a penance in
confession as an atonement for our
sins. God wants- it'; it is the will of
God that we should atone for all our
sins.
125. What becomes, after, death, of
those who, have not f idly atoned for
their sins in this world ?
When those who have not fully
atoned for their sins in this world die,
they go to Purgatory, where they
finish the atonement for their sins.
126.    Will they remain for ever in
Purgatory?
They  will not remain for ever in
Purg
atory
When they will
completed the atonement for
sins they will go to Heaven.
XIV.
have
their
127. What is Extreme Unction ?
Extreme  Unction   is   a   sacrament
instituted for the spiritual and corporal relief of the sick in danger ;of
death.
128. What are the effects of Extreme
Unction on the soul ?
Extreme Unction cleanses the soul
from the effects of sin, and strengthens it against the last assaults of the
devil.
129." What are the effects of Extreme-
Unction on the body ?
It soothes the pain of the patients,
and restores them to health, if it be
expedient for their salvation.
130. How should we p?'e^a?'(? for
Extreme Unction ?
We should be truly sorry for our
sins, and make a good Confession, if
it be possible.
131. Hou) docs the Priest administer
Extreme Unction ?
The Priest anoints, with the Holy
Oil.of the Sick, the eyes, ears, nostrils,
mouth, hands and feet of the person
in danger of death, asking God to
remit him the sins which he may
have committed through each of
those senses.
'V     '■   XV.    ' -V"'. /:"':/■'
132. What is Holy Orders ?
Holy Orders is a Sacramen t by which
Priests are ordained, and recciveJihe „
"power and grace toUispense the Word
of   God   and administer  the   Sacraments, and perform their other sacred
duties.
133. When did Jesus Christ institute Holy Orders?
When He instituted the Holy Eucharist, Jesus Christ instituted, also,
Holy Orders when He said, "Do this
in commemoration of Me."
134. Who confers the Sacrament of
Holy Oj'ders ?
Only the Pope and Bishops confer
the Sacrament of Holy Orders.
135. How does a man become a
Priest?
He receives the Sacrament of Holy
Orders at the hands of the Bishop';
there he receives the power and grace
to dispense the Word of God and administer the Sacraments. OUR   MONTHLY   BUDGET
149
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