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Kamloops Wawa Feb 1, 1898

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No.  161.
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Vol. VIL, No. 2.
KAMLOOPS WAWA.
February, 1898.,
THE WAWA SHORTHAND!        THE  KAML00PS'"WAWA.V
- The simplest system of Shorthand in the world. The easiest;to
learn. A hundred times "easier
than the old writing.
Two million people (2,000,000)
throughout the world alieady
using the same shorthand. It is
adapted to over twenty different
languages.
.    Can be learned without a tea-
cher in one to three hours.
_ .     —7.—._      _ . .—^_
If you are a stranger to Shorty
hand,, take this paper and become"
acquainted with this useiul art.
* If you have failed to learn
Shorthand owing to the complication of the system you adopted,
or from want of time, do not give
up, but try this system, and. wonder at its simplicity.
Time is precious. You will save
time as soon as you are acquainted with this phonography.
SHORTHAND AMONG INDIANS
A   Newspaper  in   Shorthand   Circulating
Among the Natives.
Two Thousand Indians reading and
writing Phonography.   ,   .   .
The Plainest Proof of the Simplicity of the System. ;. -.';. :.-.'.■ .
a   MAxri?T    mi? A. Tr\ tit artr tvut?
V     INDIANS SHORTHAND
: HOW CAN INDIANA LEARN SHORTHAND ?
Because Shorthand is a hundred, nay a
thousand times simpler than the old writing. Any one can learn it in a few hours,
and become expert in it in a few days.
Many of our Indians learned it in two or
three daj'S.
If you are a lover of curious specimens,
you must have this paper.   It is
"The Queerest Newspaper in the World"
Subscribe for this paper, and help to
civilize our Indians, to enlighten those
who were sitting "in darkness and the
shadow of death."
Your Subscription Solicited.
Only One Dollar per Annum.
Address:  "EDITOR  WAWA,   KAMLOOPS,   e.G."
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8   f    O vol. vii., No. 2.      KAMLOOPS WAWA.
February, 1898.
The Indian Prayer Book     The Wawa Shorthand Instructor
Mentioned on Page 5 of this
issue is now ready, and
makes-a curious and interesting publication, which
shonld find place on the
shelves of your library. It
is a
POLYGLOTT MANUAL
in eleven languages, and can
be had in parts as follows :
1. English, Chinook and
Latin, 192 pages, blue cover,
post paid, 50 cents. I wish
you to send at least for this
very unique specimen of
Bibliography.    It shows in
"detail what our Indians are
taught in the w;ay of Christ-
ianityf A Key. to the Chinook jargon will be sent free
to those ordering this " Chinook Manual."
2. The same, bound in
cloth, $1.00.  ^uv n-,^v_.
Sr^PolygiottMahual^com—
plete, containing the above
English, Chinook and Latin
Manuals and eight Indian
languages besides, bound in
cloth, $1.50. ''no'Huj-uu
4. The same, bound kin
calf, $2.00.  to£fa&6&fi*fr
Shorthand-Chinook Rudiments
A 16-page leaflet, giving at
the same time Key to the
Shorthand and the Chinook,
it5 cents.
Can still be had for J^cents
per copy. _ This ''-little" pamphlet is quite sufficient for
the learning of our system
of Shorthand, and over one
thousand; people have availed themselves of^it during
1897.  -■ ; /
The    Wawa
First   Reading
For fuller information
concerning "the system : of
Shorthand, we recommend
a perusal of the Wa\Nra
setts of 1896 and 1897,. and :
more particularly tha latter, which contains a most
useful table of 200 words,
the commonest English
words, with their phonographic ^forms^a tabllf-
worth many times its
weight in gold.
4  The Wawa setts of 1895,
1896 and 1897,  $1.00 each,
Remittances for . small
amounts accepted in U.S.
or, other postage stamps.
Address
EDITOR WAWA,
Kamloops, B.C.
- V WHAT IS SAID OF THE " WAWA "SHORTHAND
"This style of Phonography is the
easiest learned of all that I have see ,
and I, think I have seen nearly all of
them."—From Yreka. California. May.
1895.  . '■■■-•'.
"Fourdays ago I began to examine
the elements of shoithand you sent me,
and in three hours I learned every
sign it included. The next day I went
t • work and began to decipher the meaning of the 4 Kamloops Wawa,' and went
through it in one day. Now I can read it
pretty readily, and write it faster than
Lean read it. I am proud of my success,
because I thought that I was too old
to have the patience and memory to
master it. And I must thank you for
having been the means of my. learning
it. I am proud .of enlisting myself as
one of your pupils. Though my hair is
white as snow, I see one is nev. r too old
to learn."—From Troy, N. Y., May 1st\
1892.    ,   .... .       - "
*
* *
V One of the most-curious and interesting of all the curious attempts which
have been made to instruct and benefit
the Indians by means of written characters, is that known as the 'Kamloops
Wawa.' ... Written in an
1, ternational language, 'set up' in
stenographic characters, and printed
on a mimeograph by its inventor, editor,
reporter, printer arid publisher, all in
one, this little" paper -seems to leave
nothing in the way of novelty to be
desired."— From the Smithsonian Institute, Bibliography of the Chinookan
Languages by Jas. O. Pilling.
•  .   * "   -•
"The Salish Indians in British Col-
Junliia_are_the_flrst_i!a,tlon__which_has—
adopted a truly short method of writing, which is at the same time quite
philosophical, as the national means
of representing spoken language. By
tliis system the Chinook tongue is spelled
exactly as it is pronounced, and thus
all the great difficulties of learning
to read which exist in most modern
languages, and especially in English
and French, are avoided, and the British
Columbia Indians educated in this
manner are enabled to read and write
their own language in an incredibly
short • time. It is admitted by all
scholars that the phonetic representa: "
tion of any language removes the diffl-
cu ties of learning to read and spell;
and it is just this that the British Columbia Indians are taught to use. And not
only are they a'rte, when instructed by
this method, to read and spell in a few
days, but they are able in a short time to
write as quickly as they think, and to keep
pace with the fastest speaker."—Catholic
Record,
Do not think because this phonography
is so readily learned by the Indians, that
it is only a savage "shoithand. This system of shorthand hasalready sold over 300,-
000 methods in England ; it is now taught
in 500 schools and colleges in the United
States; and it is becoming general throughout France. - .
*
* *
. This system in Phonography has now
adaptations in French, English, German, Armenian, Chinook and- Salish
languages in British Columbia, Danish, Flemish, Italian, Latin, _ Spanish,
Portuguese and" Turkish.- The German Method has already reached its
fourth edition and the, i lemish its
second. The French-Method. Complete
has already exhausted sixteen editions,
and the Abridged Method seventeen.
—July, 18.95. ;
* *
"It was in July,  1890, that the   following remark was made:    'Why  not
teach    the   Indians  to   read  in   shorthand ?—it is so simple ! '   The first trial
was a success.   At the end  of September, 1890, a poor Indian cripple, named
Chalie Alexis Mayous, from the Lower
Nicola,   saw   the   writing   for  the   first
time, and got the intuition of the system
at   first   sight.     He   set   to    work    to
decipher a few Indian prayers,  and in
less than two  months had learned the
whole method thoroughly,  and he soon
began to communicate his   learning  to
his  friends   and   relatives.     From   this
time the Indians took   up   the   system,
and were anxious to learn on all sides.
When   once  a  few   Indians   know   the
- system-in-one -eamp^their- ambitionHte^
to teach it to others.   During the summer   the   progress  is   slow,   but   when
winter comes they spend whole nights at
it.   One young Indian, especially bright,
took interest in the writing as soon as he
saw it.     He spent the   whole night in
repeating the lesson over and over again
with    two   or  three   companions,    and
in   two   or   three days more completed
his studies.   In less than   a   month he
could    read   the    Indian   language   as
well  as  the   Chinook,. and   soon   was
able    to    read   and   write   English   in
shorthand.     Not    only   do   little   children  learn  to read and write readily,
but  even   old  people  study  with   success.
"After 600 or 800 Indians had learned
the system, it became necessary that
their interests should be kept . up by
placing instructive matter before them.
Then came the idea of editing the 4 Kamloops Wawa,' the strangest little newspaper in America." s
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WHAT IS SAID OF THE "WAWA" SHORTHAND
u The * Wawa» is really a full-fledged
newspaper, and it first saw the light
of day in - the month of May, 1891.
• Wawa * is a Chinook word, meaning
'talk, speak or echo.' Hence the title
signifies k Kamloops Echoes.' Kamloops,
the name of the town in which it was
inaugurated, is a Shushwap word, meaning ' the forking together of rivers '—in
this instance, the north and south forks
of the Thompson River. ,
"The 'Kamloops Wawa' was first
printed on the mimeograph, at 100 copies,
from May,. 1891, till March, 1892. From-
. that date,* till December of the same
year, 200 copies were issued, four pages
weekly. From January, 1893, it was
issued at sixteen pages"monthly, with
covers, instead of four pages weekly. In
March following the number of copies
issued had to be increased to 500 in -J une
. to 1,000, and later on to 1,200. Since
January, 1895, it has issued 2,000 monthly, and the number will soon be increased
to 3,000, and more.
"The printing of the paper is marvellous.^ At first the news was autographed, then duplicated on the mimeograph by Indian women.. The first
volumes of this wonderful little paper
have been bound, and copies pent to
the Smithsonian Institution to the British
Museum, to the Astor Library, to the
Library of the University of the State of
New York, etc. ..■■;.-, , .
"There still.remain in stock: a few
copies of the original voluhies. These,
in a few years, as well as in the present, may be considered valuable curiosities. '•   •''•"     .•■■. .-..- V
"Now the whole, process of mimeographing has ' been abandoned, and
the paper is produced by photo-engray-
_i-, g_at,-2,'0OO—cQpies_per_month. lt_
costs sixty dollars .a month to issue the
paper as Hi now is, which sum it is
rather1'difficult, to find readily, among
the Indians alone. The object in issuing
these sample' copies is to obtain from
the outside a-esources enough to let subscribers have their paper at. a nominal
figure.?'.. ,K, „ .. ...,'.".
[Mostof the above items were published in the."Chicago. Sunday Herald," of
November 25th, 1894, from the pen of
Miss Maibelle Justice.]
*
Besides Chinook and Indian phonography, this paper contains, every
month, three or four pages of English
reading on topics connected with the
Chinook,—its origin, etc.; concerning
the system of shorthand employed;
its progress among the natives, as well
as in the world abroad, etc.:—so as
to be of continual interest to all its
readers.
One of our distinguished Prelates in the
United States, after referring to the
complications of a Shorthand Phrase
Book, writes : "How different with your
system! It so plain and simple. lam
extremely thankful to you for bringing
this system of shorthand to my observa- *
tion. It was a revelation to me. The
more I see of it, the more I like it."
* it-
Mr. Edward Seigneur,  born in Paris,
France, June 16, 1879, has always been
victorious in all contests for speed in
reporting into which he has entered. He
writes easily 150 words a minute, in full
style, using dots and accents. The
system he uses is exactly the same as in
the Wawa.
* *
On the cover of the Wawa Shorthand
Instructor and Exercise book is found a
table " Shorthand Versus Longhand,"
which proves to evidence that this style
of shorthand, without any:abbreviations, ,,
is five times shbrt^vtl\1^;commojl;lo!^j>;.
hand, so that if yipi^w\;ptii£X49^f^&&
minute in longhandVyo^vwifre^
150 words a minute, inithis style pffshort? ;•
hand, when you have acquiriedythe^saihe^;
natural ease in ^icltofe/sdiprthji^,iw^o.u-.>
now have in lonjg^^^^;;-^-^';^^^^:;1^
•'•"■"'Vf*„' ■'•'•■'k.. ^e'b^vi.•J.^V7!kWiJ/.'.<;^i;.k.,,
We have Indians in British Columbia
who can write 45 to 50 Chinook words a
minute, which is equal to double the
number of English words, seeing that in
Chinook the words are long and cut into
Syllables.
* *
A prayer book for our Indians is now
under preparation. It will contain the
—jf rayersi—xiy inn a— auu-cavcuiuo*".—"»-«.b«—
among our Indians in 10 different languages, about 60 pages of shorthand,
equal to 120 pages of typography each.
Viz: English, Chinook, Shushwap;
Okanagon, Thompson, Lillooet, Stale,
Skwamish,'"6heshel and Slayamen, besides  sixty -pages "of   Latin   chant  and
music, each language separate: 30 cents.
i.
A few Libraries and Private persons
have airead^ secured complete sets of the
" Wawa-,** >A few are still on hand and
will be''delivered for the following
prices:''0
Kamloops Wawa, 1891 $ 1 50
«»•...       **       1893  1 50
«••.. "       1894 1 50
»*  •• "       1895.." 1 00
" tl       1896  1 00
Indian Prayer Book, mimeographed 1 50
' Chinook Vocabulary, u 25
The Kamloops Phonographer, 1892... 1 00
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