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The Kootenay Star Mar 11, 1893

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VOL. IV.
REVELSTOKE, B. C, MARCH 11, 1893.
No. 39.
NOTICE
Is hereby given, that application
will be mude to the Parliament of
Canada, at the next session thereof,
for an Aet to incorporate a Company
to construct, equip, maintain and
operate a lino of railway iu tho Province of British Columbia from a
poiut at or near Nakusp, on Upper
Arrow Lake, Kootenay District, to
the forks of Carpenter- Creek, with
power to oxtend to Bear Lake and to
Cody Creek.
GEMMILL k MAY,
Solicitors for the Applicants.
Ottawa, December 28th, 1892.
WANTED.
AGENTS to sell our choice and
hardy Nursery Stock. We have many
new special varieties, both in fruits
and ornamentals, to offer, which are
controlled only by us. We pay commission or salary. Write us at once
for terms, aud secure choice of territory.���Mat Brothers, Nurserymen,
Rochester, N.Y.
CENTRAL HOTEL.
ABRAHAMSON BROS., Prop's.
Charmingly situated on the bank of
the river, on the principal street,
close to the post-office and
Government buildings,
and nearest to the
Steamboat
Wharf.
First-class Table, good Beds,
Telephone.
FIRE-PROOF SAFE.
'BUS MEETS ALL TRAINS AND
STEAMERS.
Fresh Milk.
I am now prepared to supply
Families and Hotels with Milk at
lowest prices.
PARTIES  DESIRING
First Class  DAIRY COWS
will do well to address
F. FRASER,
Box 217, Revelstoke, B.C.
0. & H. LEWIS,
BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS.
SUFFERS and BALLS
Catered for.
WEDDING CAKES A SPECIALTY.
REVELSTOKE, B.C.
THE
MADDEN HOUSE,
HUGH MADDEN, Prop'r.
Beautifully situated on the Lake
shore at the entrance to the best and
shortest road to the Sloean mines and
New Denver, The best fishing and
hunting in the district, with grand
boating and sketching facilities for
tourists aud artists.
Tue Bab is supplied with the
Best brands of wines.liquor s
and cigars.
The accommodations of the Hotel are
of the best.
W. A. JOWETT,
MINING AND REAL ESTATE BROKER,
NELSON, B.C.
Lardeau and Slocau Prospects
Wanted.
A. H. HOLDICH.
Assayer and Analytical Chemist,
REVELSTOKE,     B.C.
Nearly seven years assayer at Morfa
Works, Swansea, and for over seventeen
years chief analyst to Wigan Coal k Iron
Co., Wigan.
Assays and analyses of every description undertaken ou the most reasonable
terms.
Special experience in coal, coke, iron,
ferro - manganese, steel, silver, copper,
lead and ziuo.
HULL BROS.
REVELSTOKE.
BUTCHERS
AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS
IN
BEEF. PORK, Etc.
Stockholm House
JOHN STONE, Prop.
The Dining-room is furnished with the
best the market affords,
The bar iB supplied with a choice Btock
of wines,liquore and cigars,
THE
COLUMBIA  HOUSK.
REVELSTOKE B.C.
The largest and most central Hotel in
the city ; good accommodation ; everything new; table well supplied ; bar and
billiard room attached ; fire proof safe,
BROWN k CLARK,
Proprietors.
FREE 'BUS AT ALL   TRAINS
A NAD IAN
'.PACIFIC
REVELSTOKE TIME TABLE.
Atlantio Express, arrives 10.10 daily
Pacific        " "      16.52   "
Choapest, most reliable and safe
route to Montreal, Toronto, St, Paul,
Chicago, New York and Boston.
Rates $5 to $10 lower than any other
other route,
Specially fitted Colonist Cars, in
charge of a Porter, for the accommodation of Passengers holding second
class tickets. Passengers booked to
and from all European points at
Lowest Rates.
Low Freight Rates. Quick despatch. Merchants will save money
by having their freight routed via
he O.P.R.
Full and reliable information given
by applying to
GEO. MoL. BROWN,
AsBt. Gen'l Freight Ag't, V'ncouver.
or to I. T. BREWSTER,
Ag't F��� P. II. Depot, Revelstoke.
t    a* 1   *V��
REVELSTOKE.
F. MoCabthv  - ���   -    Pbop.
First-class Temperance House.
Board and Lodging $5 Per Week.
MEALS, 25c.      UEDS 25c.
This hotel is situated convenient to the
station, is comfortably furnished, and
affords first class accommodation.
OCEAN STEAMSHIPS.
Royal Mail Lines.
CHEAPEST & QUICKEST ROUTE
TO THE OLD COUNTRY.
Proposed Sailings from Halifax.
CARTHAGINIAN... Allan.... Feb. 18
MONGOLIAN    "   ....M'rch4
NUMIDIAN     "   ....    "   18
LAURENTIAN    "   .... April 1
PARISIAN    "   ....    "   15
LABRADOR.DominionLine.. Feb. 25
VANCOUVER        " ..M'ehll
SARNIA  " ..    "   25
LABRADOR.. " ..April 8
VANCOUVER        " ..    "   22
Cabin Un, 850, $60, 870, 880 and
upwards.
Intermediate, 830; Steerage, 820.
Paseeugers ticketed through to all
points in Great Britain and Ireland, and
at specially low rates to all parts of the
European continent,
Prepaid passages arranged from all
points.
Apply to nearest steamship or railway
agent; to
I. T. Brewster,
A oent, Revelstoke;
or to Robert Kerii, General Passenger
Agent, Winnipeg.
Ripans Taluks euro bad breath.
>lanl
Ferry's]
Seeds
nnd reap t rich
harvest Thfy are always reliable,
always In demand, always tbe beat
JERRVSSEED ANNUAL]
For 1S93 Is In val uaMc Ui evert-Planter. I
It li on enryclevrdia of tbe latest farming t
i iDfuruiallonfrumtbebliihestautborltlea./
1 Mailed   . Free. '
kD. M. FERRYjk WINDSOR^
,* CO^mawWm^ Ont^
Ripans Tabules cure constipation.
liipaus Tabuliw euro colic
LOOAL_NEWS.
The Lardean & Kootenay Railway bill
introduced by Mr, Kellie has passed its
second reading.
Mr. Moxley, of Hall's Landing, came
up for supplies last Sunday and returned
Monday morning.
Rev. J. P. Hioks, of Enderby, will
preach in tbe Mothodist church next
Sunday morning and eveuing.
Gus Lund returned to Revelstoke
from Big Bend Monday morning on
business connected with his gold claims
at McCnllough Creek.
Mr. Paton will conduct service in the
Presbyterian churoh to-morrow at 7.30.
Sabbath school at 2.30 p.m, in the
churoh. Wednesday prayer meeting in
Mr. Paton's house at 8 p.m,
Mr. Joseph McLean, of Vancouver,
brother of Mrs. O. H. Allen and Miss
McLean, who is on his way to Ontario,
stopped off here on Tuesday for a visit
to his sisters and left again Wednesday
morning,
Sheriff Redgrave was in town Tuesday and Wednesday on business connected with the sule of materials at the
smelter. The Sheriff is just as full of
anecdote as ever, aud had a large oircle
of listeners on Tuesday evening.
Onr new school teacher, Mr. Laing, is
well and favorably known in Victoria,
where he worked as reporter on the late
Daily News, and more recently on the
Colonist, He is desirous of teaching
shorthand and bookkeeping evenings.
We are glad to be able to state that
Mrs. Redgrave, wife of our genial
sheriff, is oonvaleecing, after a very
serious illness of several weeks, The
report of her death last week brought
ont a great deal of sympathy from all
parts of the distriot.
The railway committee reported on
the bill to incorporate the Nakusp and
Slooan Railway Company. Tbey drew
attention to olause 5 which asked for
privileges not mentioned in the petition,
bnt the oommittee recommended that
the privileges be allowed.
The Second Annual Ball of the Revelstoke Quadrille Club will be held in
Bourne's Hall on Friday, 17th March
(St. Patrick's Day). Two hundred and
fifty invitations have been issued and
tbe ball promises to be the most brilliant ever held in Revelstoke,
In tbe railway oommittee the Kootenay Central Railway bill was amended.
The line will not bs allowed to parallel
tbat of the Kaslo and Slooan railway, or
in other words it will be required to
make its present terminus at Kaslo.
There were a hard and protraoted fight
over the bill in committee,
Rube Allyn, America's great humorist, and Chas. Kelly, a well-known basso
and gnitar soloist, are attractingorowded
bouses wherever tbey appear. They
are now visiting the larger towns in the
Northwest, and will be in Revelstoke on
Wednesday, Maroh 22nd. No one
should miss this intellectual treat. For
partionlars see advertisement.
The death is announced of the Hon.
Hugh Nelson, late Lieut. Governor of
British Columbia, which took place in
England last Friday. The deceased
had been in rather delioato health for
many years past, and had gone to
Europe in the hope of being benefited.
He was appointed Lieut. Governor in
1887, and was succeeded last year by
Hon. E. Dewdney.
GEORGE SHIEL,
Taxidermist
OLD  POST  OFFICE,
REVELSTOKE, B.C.
-:o:-
All kinds of specimens of Animals,
Birds and Fishes carefully and naturally
mounted. Several local Specimens on
view und for Hide.
DEEII AND  CARIBOO  HEADS A SPECIALTY.
ON TRIAL POR 90 DAYS.
The finest, completest nnd latest Hue (if I"W
trical apDllancea In the world. Tber have novel
failed to cure. We aro so positive of It that we
will back our belief and send you any Electrical
Appliance now in the market and you oan try II
TorThree Month*. Largest list of tutlmonlall
oa tarth. Send for book and journal Free.
W. V, B��cr Ic Co., WlBd��or, Ont..
Dave Ferguson, Andrew Hunker, Sam
Hill and Pete Levecque arrived down
from Big Bend on Monday. They report that things are ull right at Smith
Creek, and the success in the placer
mine has been very variable, As high
as $16 a day for euoh man has been
taken out, but at present the ground is
not so good, several slides intervening
between the present workings and some
rich ground, When these are out
through it is believed some rich deposits will be met with. Mr. Mason,
one of the owners writes very hopefully,
and Bays he fully believes they will
strike a bonanza in a week or two.
Rev. Dr. Roliortnon, superintendent
of Presbyterian Missions, who has been
attending tho Syund in Viotoria, oon-
dnoted services in Ilovelstoke on Sunday week. These services were especially interesting in oonsequenoe of
the fact that actiou has beeu taken in
the Church Courts towards forming a
Presbyterian church in this town, and
Dr. Robertson was directed to formally
constitute such church. Fifteen members were admitted���somo by oertifioato,
others by profession. Four haptisms
took place and tho Lord's Supper was
oelebrated, Thro members were then
ohoseu as eldors���Thos, Lewis, Thos.
Graham and Henry Hay, and at the
evening servioe these were solemnly ordained to tbeir office, The first annual
congregational meeting will be held in
the church next Wednesday, when
managers will be elected and general
business transacted.
Revelstoke Lumber Co. on Thursday
shipped east tbeir first oarload of lumber sinoe the fire.
Mrs. Robert Howson, acoompanied by
her two little boys, left on Wednesday
morning for a two months' visit to her
relatives at Elkhorn, Man.
Tbe Nelson Miner has again changed
hauds, the purchasers being Capt. Clive
Phillips-Wolley and Mr. R. A. Ren wick,
wbo will conduct it on independent
lines.
A good oook is wanted at the Tappen
Siding sawmill, the wages offered being
$50 a month. Twenty men are also required at the same plaoe to load ties, at
$2 00 per day.
The sheriff's sale at the smelter has
again been adjourned to Monday, Maroh
27th. It is mainly owing to Sheriff
Redgrave's action that thu time has been
extended to allow the defendants an opportunity of settling the case.
A. H. Harrison, A. Abrahamson and
J. O. Piper started ont about 2 o'olook
Tuesday morning for Trout Lake City,
but after going a few miles they turned
baok on acoonnt of the snowstorm then
prevailing,   They will leave to-morrow.
Tbe Revelstoke Lumber Co.'s tender
for timber berths 112 and 113, on tbe
west side of the Columbia River and extending for six miles along the river
front abont 20 miles south, has been
accepted by the Dominion Government.
The timber is of excellent quality. A
notiee is published by the company in
this week's Star prohibiting the outting
of timber on said berths.
Owing to the severe weather this
winter tbe wolves have oome quite close
to the town. A seotion hand saw two of
them on the track a short distance west
a few days ago, and Messrs. Robinson
and David, returning iroui Qt.ll s Landing last Friday, were followed a long
distance by three or four, bnt as the two
gentlemon were aocompanied by the
Nondescript tbey were safe from wolves
or even grizzlies. This W6ek a very
large wolf was shot at Sam Crowle's
ranch, and is now being stuffed and
mounted for Morgan David by Mr. G.
Sbiel, taxidermist, who has commenced
business in the old post-office, Tbe
animal is a very fine specimen of the
British Columbia mouutain wolf, and
haa a magnificent tail. It stands 2 ft.
10 in. high and measures 5 ft. 11 in. iu
length. It must have been starving, as
its ribs and backbone are almost protruding. Mr. Sbiel has some very fine
specimens of his work on view.
Frank Bourne, Alex. Lindqnist and
Charley Holden arrived here from Nakusp on Monuay afternoon, doing the
distance from Hall's Landing in 9J-,
hours���the best time yet. Leaving Nakusp early Sunday morning, thoy had
to drug their ounue over the ice for a
few miles up the lake before they oame
to open water, and then, launching their
canoe, they rowed to within two or three
miles of the mouth of the river, where
they again met solid ice. Thinking it
extended all the way they left the cauoe
and walked on, but after going a short
distanoe they found they were on a large
floe, with clear water ahead. They then
went ashore and were compelled to moke
a detour of ten mileB over the mountains
to reach Hall's Landing. Things at
Nakusp have been very quiet all winter.
Having good music and half a dozen
ladies, danoing parties and othcr social
events have been frequent. Messrs,
Bourne, Lindquist and Holden leave tomorrow on thu return journey.
Tho Carpenter Creek Land Dispute.���Report of the Select
Com in it tee.
The seleot oommittee appointed by
the Provincial Legislature to enquire
into the Carpenter Creek (New Denver)
land dispute, of which Mr, J. M. Kellie
was chairman, has presented it report,
stating that Angus McGillivray had
staked out the laud in question on
Ootober Otb, 1891, and had it surveyed;
also published notioe of the sumo iu the
Gazette of Ootohor 17th, 1891. Tho report concludes:���
"Wo also tind that A. ti. Farwell and
Josiah Fletcher had practically the sitine
land staked off by agents on Ootober 21,
1891; that the notice written on the
stake was not the samo as the noticu
published iu thu Gazette; that no correction appears to have been mude towards making the notices correspond;
that Messrs. Farwell aud Fletcher uover
had tho land surveyed;
"We therefore oonsidor, from the ovi-
denoe given, that Angus McGillivray
has a just claim to tho laud iu question,
"(Signed.)     J. M. Kellie,
"Chairman."
WANTED.
A Good COOK at Tappen Siding.
Wages $50 per month.���Apply to
Genelle Bnos., Tappen Siding.
WANTED.
TWENTY MEN to load ties at
Notch Hill. Wages ��2.00 per day.
Board ��4.50   per week ���Apply to
Genelle Bros., Tappen Siding.
NOTICE
Is hereby given, that all persons
nro prohinited from cutting wood on
Timber Berths Nos. 112 and 118,
situated on the west side of the
Columbia River, commeuciug at tho
margin of the railway belt, about
twenty miles south of Revelstoke, nud
fronting ou the said river six miles
north by one mile in depth. Any
person cuttiug or taking timber from
these berths after this date will be
prosecuted.
DANL. ROBINSON.
Revelstoke, March 8th, 1893.
R. TAPPING
Is prepared to supply GARDEN
PLANTS in great variety, such as
Cabbage, Cauliflower, Tomatoes, etc.,
all guaranteed to be first-class stock.
Orders may be left at once, and
purchasers will be notified by letter
when the plants are ready for removal.
THE
Revelstoke Pharmacy
WILL BE
OPEN FOR BUSINESS
ON
Saturday, March 18th.
TO CORRESPONDENT.
Salmon Arm.���Aooording to Whit-
aker's Almanack,which is reckoned
a standard authority, a "stone" of
butcher's meat is 8 lb., but the
weight of a jookey, or indeed of
any other person, is reokoned by
the stone of 14 lb, Coal, potatoes,
onions, salt, bran and many other
articles are sold by the stone of
11 lb. in maacy p^.iU of  Engltaud,
it being the eighth part of 1 cwt.
Silks and Satins ranging from 35c.
to $2 per yard at H. N. Coursier's.
The weather is very mild, and the
snow shrinking fast. Thermometer,
45 deg.
R. Tapping is prepared to supply
first-class garden plants this spring.
Orders should be given at once.
Tbe sole agenoy for Geo. T. Slater
& Son's well-known ladies' footwear
has been given to H, N. Conrsier.
Next Thursday's dauce of the Revelstoke Quadrille Club is postponed
on aocount of the St. Patriok's Day
ball.
Peterson's Hall. ��� Mortimers's
famous Panorama will be exhibited
for tbe last time to-night. Prices
only 25 cents.
Bourne Bros, desire to state that
they always have in stock a large
supply of T. k B. tobacco, in plugs,
packets and tins.
Messrs. MoKiunon and Hay have
built six boats this winter, all of
them serviceable and handsome. No
doubt there will be a great demand
for them as soon as the ice clears.
Trout Lake City lots are going off
rapidly. Those who want to have
the choice of position will do well to
got a move on. The prioe fur the
next two weeks is 8130 for corners
and $100 for insides,
Lottie Birch, a colored woman,
became very sick on Mouday ni^ht
after eating somo preserves. Suspecting poison she telephoned for
Dr. McLean, who quiokly arrived,
and after taking remedial measures
pronouucod the woman out of danger. The jam contained fulminate
of glass.
Mr. D. A. Lamey, who was injured
in the faoo by the accidental discharge of his gun at Lardeau City
two days beforo Christinas, has so
far recovered as to be able to leave
the Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, whore
he went fur treatment, He will remain at the const until navigation
opens on the Columbia, in order to
recruit his health in tho beautiful,
balmy weather prevailing there,
Salmon Arm Athlotic Club held its
first moetiiig last Saturday, Mr. A.
Paul in the chuir. Tbo membership
fee was Used st 25 cents a mouth.
Mr. F. S Smith was appointed boxing instructor, aud it was decided
there should bo a monthly contest in
the manly art, under the Marquis of
Quounsbery's rules. A pulilio meeting will bo held at Salmon Arm tonight at eight o'clock lu unroll uow
members, Honorary members are
also needed, Salmon Arm in already
I a noted placo for boating, fishiug,
shooting, etc. Other sports are uow
being added, a  nemarKduitJ uneiuai cxperitJiiut!.
A Thrilling Story of Chinese Treachery.
CHAPTER VII.
Ti ��� i, Wil ���' '-/.���Which of the two
will arrive Iirst���the Chinese guide, for
whose return I wait in Tientsin, or this
man Chin-chin-wa ? Fverytliing seems to
oonspire to hinder my progress, lam, in
reality, no UOarei my goal than I was a
month ng'i, so far as I can see.   I have ar
rived at a stago of miud bordering upon de-
'. had come
I the thread still left. I may find tho carter.
The guide was of impression that, as the
I carter disappeared, and as he has never
eome across him since, hoth men hid heen
j made away with; but my views rather
I tend lo this -that both may indeed have lieen
I seized at the first, hut the carter, in all proba-
I bility, liberated after some weeks or months;
| for though it  might lie advisable and ad-
, ,   , i vantagcous to  keep  the  Englishman in
spair. Absurd as a may seem, I had come | captiv,ty it is searccly likel that th(!
to place my hopes m the acceptance ol the cartor (a type of the lowest caste of lho
terms which Dicey is, by my wish, to put Chine-ao me) would be ;,, ilMy way ,l8ef���i
before the exile.
In a word, I have arrived at such a stage
in any way
as a prisoner. So it seems to me extremely
likely either that the man has been liberated by his captors, who still keep his
master in confinement, or that he has been
killed ; and as the carter would not be the
sort of creaturo to convoy information lo
' j any one as to what had happened somo time
yet  I regret that 1 did not write more j Mme> ,; conioo:i��r�� that there i.s the mob.
strongly to Shanghai, that 1 did not talu> ftU|*ty lhlll he may *,��� ,-.��������� iiving ,'���i]u,
tho matter moro seriously���that I aid not
urge upon my friends that immodiato action
of low spiriledness, owing to tbo delays
thrust upon me, that 1 seem lo look to the
arrival of Cliin-chin-wa in Tientsin as tho
only light which breaks upon tho darkness
of my thoughts.    I can do nothing wore;
only could satlsly me.
|i is curious that bnl livodaysagol look-' ^"}
od up ni th i news   I   had  rocontly  from
Shanghai as  nimportant, and now i feel as
though I had perhaps casl aside whal might
havo bi in a chance.
Certainly 1 wrote to Dicoy ; but I might
lmvs done moro���1 might also have written
to Chin-chin-wa i mnl as it stands now, 1
fuel it would be al surd to do so, for the
question ns to whether ho will er not join
mo or assist me will have been decided before my letters could now roach Shanghai,
Frederick Dicey is not the sort of man to
have written mo thus strongly on the subject had he not been prompted to do so by
some very deep feeling,
Why should 1 not move on to Pekin ?
I struggle against the double reason that
now  keeps mo hore, for my impatience
would hurry me on, notwithstanding that I
know ii is right ior me to stay,
I dim
where iu the interior of China���that la to
ay, if he returned to his home,
liut my conjectures arc but wild upon
....is and other matters relative to iny search.
' "'** | Only I think I am in tho right in endeavoring to trace Ihis carter, who (even if I find
him), may rtill,alas! provo to have forgotten all thai iiasoccurrc I.
I can not account for the man's disappearance inloloexoept in the way I have already done���imprisonment for a season,
and then llhertod or killed ; which was it,
I wonder?   The former 1 trust.
1 forsoe a very lengthy search and a prolonged stay In the city of I'ekin.
My guide is to have all in readiness for a
start at daybreak. I travel in a mule-littor,
Tientsin, 16-17th July (midnight).-It is
many hours since I ceased my writing,
somewhat abruptly, it is true.
1 penned the last linos above in the afternoon, and 1 am continuing at midnight, in
j order to record the event which broke in
I upon my dairy, and to those which sucoeoi
si'les, ins story may sir.'e to pass away thc
weary hours of tho journey between Tientsin and Pekin, if, as I hope, you arc still
awaiting my reply In your last.
"Believe in our very deep interest in
your expedition, and our heartfelt wishes
for its ultimate success."
1 had scarcely finished this letter when a
knock upon my door sent a wild hope
through me that my future comrade had
actually ai rived.
I was seated behind my tabic,
facing the door. My guide stood
on the threshold; but I did not attend to his words, for there was another
behind him whom 1 knew instantly to be
the man, Chin-chii'-wa. I do not think 1
have ever felt my heart beat so wildly at
meeting any of my fellows as it did now. I
am not a nervous man by any means, but I
confess that the arrival of the mail after so
prolonged a quietness ss had been in the
Jays past, had somewhat excited me, and
tho immediate arrival of this strange man
added to the disturbed feelings which tilled
inc.
1 rose instantly lo welcome him, and approached him with outstretched hand, with
the single word, as I did BO���
" Chin-chin-wa 'f
Ho bowed in answer, and tool; my hand
a clasp, the firm warmth of which oamo
as n surprise to me; for I did not at onto
remember that he hul been un exile for seventeen years, and that before thon he had
been a Chinaman, so that be had forgotten
the flimsy way in which we Englishmen
give, on n first acquaintance, palm to palm.
Bill it struck me then that tho grasp
meant truth and firmness, and I can see
now it must tlie more have done so, in that
no emotion of the heart was concealed in the
hand-clasp of the man who had uot given
hand to a fellow-man, for many, many
years.
CHAPTER VIII.
Nothing has occurred 1 dine out, or dine i B,j thereafter "j for it seems to me that I may
qmotly with my host. 1 spoilt somei days henceforth havo considerable difficulty iii
routing thiough the native city, and then I [ k    , d,      w ^ j m ^.^ (o
return, vainly hoping and believing that write up as far as  possible, before I leave
this guide will rave come during my short | 'pic.llsi��� ;���
absence from iny temporary home.
Tientsin, Kith duly.���My patience has
been rewarded, and yet not rewarded.
1 am thoroughly sick of Tientsin, The
very quietness of the place clings around
me in monotony, and at 1 tst I am to break
away from it. I am writing these lines
preparatory to packing the volume I call
my diary. A singularly scrappy affair it
has always been.
The less there is to do and see in a place, j concluding" the last of lho" three, to
the more time I should have to record my ; eliect :
few doings; but it is one thing to ponder "To como to thc point, Chin-chin-wa
upon writing up u few days that have gol agrees to join you. Whether it was or not
behind, and another to do so. fbis after-! his intention to proceed to Pekin I did not
noon I havo resolutely determined to record j inquire, It was enough forme when he
what has occurred, for some thing has act- conformed with my views. I spoke of re-
ually occurred at last. _ ward, and wish indeed that I had not men-
I he guide who accompanied Norris to ' tionei! this. The man appears to be ex-
Pekin has returned, And this return serves I tromoly proud. If heisof service to you
chiefly one object, that I am now free to pro-, I fancy the only thing in this way will
I am myself moderately lull; but Chin-
chin-wa, still in tho prima of his life, appeared to lower above me, and his breadth indicated a great strength which I have never
seen so clearly stamped upon tho figure.
His face seemed to speak tho same, but
lo speak also of a strength that was as
great intellectually as it was bodily.
One could hive told instinctively that
order that I may truthfully his past had boon a strange one, and that
record my first impressions upon meetin
with the man whom the Chinese call Chin-
chin-wa.
1 was busy writing this afternoon when
my guide entered the room with, to my delight, a parcel of letters from Shanghai:
one from my hanker there, another from
James Dicey, and a third from Frederick
Dicey.
i  i i only  necessary to give an extract
this
lie alone could have lived through it, by
reason of his mental and bodily power,
without having to succumb. 1 could understand iiow Dicey had been carried away by
thc enthusiasm of lhe Chinese crowd. I am no
hero-worshipper, and neverjwas ; but I could
feel that, if one did wish to look upon a
hero, ho had hut to look upon Chinchiii-wa;
and it is none the less strange that I should
have felt thus when it is remembered that,
to all appearance, lhe nan is a Chinaman,
ile wears the Chinese dress���somewhat
richer in ils silks than any I have heretofore
seen���and his head is bare like a Chinaman's, except for tha pigtail which, interwoven with colored silk, almost trails upon
the ground, But there is still a dim some-
thii.g whioh, to an Englishman, would give
a suspicion of iiis [rationality upon his face,
and it must not he forgotten thai I looked
upon him as upon an Englishman from tiie
ceed, knowing that nothing further is to be j he will admit of, even if he goes so far, will i |*rst moment we met.
Iirst place to myself and then to Dicey,
namely, that the writer, William Norris,
spoke of more than himself as being imprisoned, sinoe he used the word "us."
I put before him at some lengl h the reasons which led to my thinking otherwise;
but he disagreed with me, for, as ho says
with regard to the point that I make of the
absence of the room for the inclusion of tho
letter "s" at the end of the word " prisoners," the writer can not be look d upon as
able to exercise extreme care; the last letters of the word may have beon crushed,
and this is reasonable to suppose.   Again,  the"latter's" favourite "suiijeet!   Esmonds
\ Hun Throws Ills Friend Inlo n ���*> me
ol I m-iiiiiisuess.  lull Falls lo Be-
Blttl'O Him.
A despatch from New York says;���
Thomas Esmonde, who lives at 222 Christie
street, New York, was hypnotised by bis
friend, Robert Krecmer, 224 East 85th
street, the other niglit iu the hitter's room.
Kreemer has for a long time believed he
was a born hypnotist, and bo became a
pupil of Prof. E.G. Johnson. Esmondewas
a bosom friend of   Kreomor's, and   was
the word "in" would correctly lill up the
space left after tho word "us"and Chin-
Iiin-wa concludes, from thc fact of lhc disappearance of tho carter, that this word
us"  refers  to William Norris and his
carter.   Hut how, then, was my arpumont,
Io we have room to insert the name���a description of where the two men are'! He fell
back upon my idea that it is ill the Imperial
grounds they may be confined ; and this is
the way we have tilled up the blanks i
"lu (lod's name rescue ns:
Lose no tlm?, we are prisoners
in the Palace,   Seek for us in
Pekin. Ily the Chinese Tenth Swallow.
William Norris, September, 18���
May God help us!
(To BI! rovriSTI'Ii.)
WAR RUMORS AND ilGUfiES-
... HI1.    J M^V-IH
working wit     c,and       ting i h his  Bell un\i      ;to    roa y  pii   m     latever Then he i
advi   . is !'   Icri k  Dicoy .  -*' i.   He is much inten sled in  could havi
���'    ' ���     --���.���--
'li
haii
I .r ��� de ���
and, e is no hei] en���much of a Cii naman at
Time has in a sense, almost perfected the
change of race to the outward eye his brown
features might well deceive the eye ; and,
iu a wonl, lie strikes mc as being as like a
wbieh
erners do, and not treading so heavily upon
the heel.
I drew a seat forward for my guest, and
expressed to him, as brielly yet as fully as
w,x< possible, my thanks for Ids haste in
joining me.
He waited until I had concluded, which 1
did speedily, being curious to hear his voi
: prolong-
-.allied Iiy otaylng here.    'J'iioru io, Indeed, I uo to to  ntlow you to   pay Ins  expenson
Iho hope of a reply from the Dioeys, but I but at ihe first   mention  of such a thin*
have quite mado up my mind that! must j he gave ino a look   which spoke  volumes,
face wliat seems to me now to be inevitable ' ife   did  not   speak,   but   I felt   some
-the re-fun I of I he ex-exile to mix himself j how indescribably small.    It is  well to llortnel.n (jhiriese as any of the race,
up in tlio ttlliur.   Clueliy  for  this reason mention this to you, that you may know     But there is one noticeable thins
have 1 como to this cm. lesion -that the the point is a delicate one, and difficult of provc8 that his Chinese origin has been
man who has been an exile once will in no | approach. I so,ne southcn) 0M| namel     ,',;, w.llk . -,���,
way risk becoming S3 a seoond liine! ,   "I am glad, indeed, to have secured this he walks on tho ball of his foot, more or loss
Besides, I do not yot know how far he man s services (perl ips services is scarcely not leaning backwards so muoh as tho north-
hai thc pardon ol the Govornment, oven the word), for I feel sure you wiil be the1
supposing he were willing to assist me. No! hotter of ids assistance. I did no; dally
In in not ho fn to uch an extent that ho with the matter in hand at all, I told Chin-
would e able to act for ino quito iudepeud- chin-wa clearly the facts o: the case. He
entlyofoth . msidcrations, so 1 am per- ig led wil i mi that it might he pos ibh
haps better wi il Norris is confined ii imperial grounds;
Anj yet 1 would much   the ;    -      reas ns for l    ' lie would not
;- i a freo man i ... ,��� : indeed,   . ressed him-
answered mo in a lone such as 1
.���.ve imagined to have growu habitual
ttter, and, i        l linking, grasp?, as   to a man eo lined in solitude for
iShang- itw nity ol      ng against e,1 period.
;    ' -      me of justice     I    ffis English, marvelous as it may soom, was
pel feci -as perfect ns I believe bis Chinese
to be���his voice low, and yet clear-sounding
and firm, a contrast in one way to the man
who spoke, and yet seeming to be the only
voice which could have belonged to such a
om-as he.   " Do not thank me, Mr, Vans-
for as yet nothing has been done.
You may find my power but small"; there
wan i touch of bitterness in the words.   "I
am mil what by right I should have beon."
I 'iid not answer, and be continued in a
few moments:
"Mr. Dicey im given mo certain parol your i'earoll.   I shall accompany
" Pardon me," I said, somewhat perhaps moved by curiosity, "havo you calculated whal you risk'.' It would be wrong
in leetl   tor   me   to   ask    j on   to   join
me in tho search of a man whose life may
Honsel's friti    - I
thai city.
'���'���  en 1       [i - -        ind
utter iguoru
the Chiui
which I und
Bpoi
er his years of captiv
', ��� ily       ������, y un
ne. Chin-chin-
letting  oul   imo edial   / to
i i : me on to Pekin,
yoa, in
w   ti the swallov to me .
In Brusse lonsel to this i
dispal
.. ty be advised of I
nearly as I oa
eut a ' earner rs tha
moh pigeon ��� I . . ears th is 11
, Bo   i
'     ���    I . vritingto-
u ,  ps
��� i o write yoi
the ma
'*'���*   d* taken, il this search in any way
���pent ing , tve heard of I       ndangei   your future   J camo to China to
I it tho G       Hotel thi ... ,
'
i
:
I t   1
id.   As far a> 1
. ���
i
. ���
.....
'
��� '    ie,   Whether I shall ever
I oi mc 1 cannot tell,   Bul I do not
���.-.  .������  .' po ition you il .nd in to the
o littli nt, ine '
Francoand ItitMln as llio Terrors ofEuroiio,
The continued increase of the war rumors
In Europe gives room for the consideration
of a few facts and figures. Although Hie
North I lerman (lunette declares that "in the
judgment of high ollicial circles there i.s no
cause for alar.n, at least for the present, "
the concentration of troops in Alsace and
Lorraine Is daily reported, and appoals in all
shapes and forms poinl ing out the dangers
which threaten the Fatherland and the
necessity for the passage of the new army
bill, are found in Germany journals, pamphlets, and reviews, and often signed by men
of high standing in the empire, (ine of
theso appeals comes from (.en. Yonder
Goltz, a well-known writer of military affairs. In the Deutsche Ruudschan he says
that France, with he.'thirty-eight millions
of inhabitants against (lermany's forty-nine
millions, possesses in men, olliccrs, artillery,
and horses an army considerably stronger
than that of Germany, Every year under
the new military laws she has beeu adding
4*2,00(1 men to that army, and in a very
short lime she will be able to put into the
field half a million of trained soldiers more
than Germany can boast of to-day. He
takes a rather gloomy view of lhc future of
his country, dwelling upou tho fact lhat
the French army in 1881) was exactly live
times as strong as her army of 1N70, and
that it must soon become seven times as
trong,
In addition to tiie increase of the forces in
Alsace-Lorraine, we are told that Mayenco
is to be converted into in entrenched camp,
Tht. Mayenee-Strashiirg line of fortifications
is to bo extended towards Bale, with the
view of covering the numerous railway
bridges aerosi the 'thine. These br'dgos
wero built expressly for the purpose
of facilitating the rapid transport of troops
from eouth in Gormany into upper Alsaoo.
Moreover, Mayenee forms tho principal
basis of supplies for the German armies on
the left of the Rhine, and, notwithstanding
its enormous strength, it is now decided to
make it still stronger, in view of the extraordinary growth of tlie French forces.
According to the most careful estimates
so far nude, Russia on the outbreak of 1km.
tilitics could put in line 25 army corps,
which, added to the French forces, make all
told 17 army corps. The army corps of the
Triple Alliance arc as follows: Gormany,
20; Austria, 13; Italy, 10; total 43. Con-
sequently France and Russia have four
army corps more than the Triple Alliance.
Even tinder the new military law and the
a*.plioatian of lhe two years' service in all
its force, thcTriplice would still be numerically inferior to France and Russia. To be
sure, it may bo that the Gorman troops and
the German Generals and olliccrs are vastly
superior to tho French and Russians; but
nobody can say that for a ceriainty, and
Ccn. Yon dor Goltz expresses grave doubts
upon th; Etibject. Unfortunately the thing
remains to be tested. But the most serious
thing of all in the present military situation
of Europe is that in case of war this spring
or slimmer���and lhe possibility of it scorns
by no means remote���the bulk of the forty-
seven French and Russian army corps could
be hurled against lhe twenty German corps,
and the first and most toi'illlo blows of the
contest squarely delivered before the Italians or Aust.rians could come to llie assistance of their principal ally. Indeed, the
first groat, shocks of war might be decisive ;
and, should the Germans be defeated iu the
beginning, it is feared that tho Italians and
the Aiislrians might, after all, 1)0 disposed to
leave her in tliolurch. However, if the German troops should be fortunate enough to
beoommonded by a great General and the
French and Russians sufficiently unlucky
tube without, oue, the advantage of numerical superiority would bo considerably diminished,
called on Kreemer last niglit, bringing a
friend with him. Kreemer was anxious to
exhibit his wonderful power over Esmonde, and after some hesitation the
latter consented. The amateur hypnotist
placed bis subject in a chair a id then facing bim passed his hand over Esiuondo's
faco, Gradually Esmonde became passive.
He was pinched, pricked with a needle,
his hair pulled, and be was otherwise
maltreated without giving any indication
that he experienced pain. Kreemer was
delighted. He had never Icforo been so
successful. "Now I'll bring bim to,"he
said. He made more passes, but Esmonds
continued to stare vacantly boforo him.
Kreemer became frightened and redoubled
his efforts, but with no result. After half
an hour of vain effort Kreemer, frightened
almost out of his wits, sent lor Dr. Loewen-
good. Tiie physician hastened to Kreomcr's
room where he found Esmonde completely
prostrated. He was breathing heavily and
in an alarming condition, his body being
rigid and his hands and feet as cold as ice.
While lhe doctor worked over the young
man Kreemer summoned his teacher, John-
Son, Johnston quickly arrived, but bis efforts to restore Esmonds wcre no more successful than bad been those of Kreemer and
the physician. At, one o'clock tl's morning Esmonde was still partly unconscious
though bis condition had improved slightly. Esmmde was restored to consciousness
early next morning hy Prof. Johnson.
I    '
���
;
'. . '
W
i. iver
trace of him o
A  '
In an v
I .
Pel
lo 1 h
v from ..',.,,
ri        ��� < wo go along,
the .ni1 ifti rail is a
���    ��� ��� bo disco
I i, ive found tho o ill I
nol   ' i  ' in furthoi m l fin I thi
Au 1 if I find  tho cartor, sitrolj that will
moan tli t1 I sh ill find his lato mn iter,
How far tho guide h is boon to n! imo in
tho los n | ol hi i m i iter I o n I dotarrnino.
Thore si oma to h ivo ho in a utrange tl   i
of mfsfortunos cast around Norris, for tho
guide sl lies that o >,y thread was broken
by whioh ho mighl li ivo tn d tho missing
nun.   Ho nny no right, but to mo thore is
��� I
plivily may i
ii   i,   .    i, an ipprised ���
1 Uu
I have   ild, tho    in ... ���
vorj poi on to go to,    V on hn     H
in on the one sido, and CI Inn
U   I. llll   llll    Oil  Q| .    Hid      I   .llll
will mako a "ry muoh  mon1 |ndh iott i de
io ion iii ihi, matter than I could.
"��� liiiioliin was oxperioncol I leave to
his poi ond narration, as, howovorlntoroll
mil It point out to yon at
��� lial my sol ion   m ty, for all I
��� oo inter to I ho interests
tjhii   b ]   vers i for it Is
ou       ild I ������" ���  ��� . idly thai I
i :  'i 'no as n
.    in  which   I
i ii pare i to for-
eatteni]
..i
!' '
ng to I
i
,     '     ,'   vor, with  n
1   i n
n I   i    i    i
,   i   up till  no
!'
'     ,    ���
���   .   -   |o Ii   ���  ���      uativi
[ ajthong [ahinil
no,  i jiven mo (lie
that I    ��� no In all   i      vi ry much
lo  tl    ,   i i   truth  through   I o
!ii"  i" -'  i n     illy, ' . in    nn ',vn, who m
A TERRIBLE TOBOGGAN HIDE-
��� i!  i" upoak, an hi' m ither'  I
in "i   ������ -���' i ii I ��� 11 j i - - ��� ���. than I should do
rough   thc   ' i i     pi      i  I ngli i
u in ' Is, a' vo. only pai ll)     ti ...
n e, though Hon ioi spoaks ll (rooly,
To i iiin-i'liin wa, upon showing him tl i
ii i no, ui  ni  iho swallow's mossago,  tin
\ voini: l.iily From Windsor killed ill
ll.iiiii'i'iil.
A Moniio.il dispatch says;���A terrible
logrni i a id lent occurred near thia city
n/hi by wllioll Miss dalle Crawford, ay ig lady Hi years of ago, from
\\ uidsor, Ont , was instantly killed.
i rawford, n icoinnanlod by hor older
��� ���, ' i   , M try Crawford, and ei i ortoil
In    young o ii tlcm in friend, Ju s \l mill Montreal, vlsltedthe Park lohog-
,,, dido boliin i tho mountain, whore llioy
it ii  i ih "''.in ;,   Ho thoir
,, v   'i '' 1 10 go down ihe Cote
,.   .    Kill, ti very sleep public thor-
il in- li , ling fro n the i intain Into
i,,. oil , i oting Montgomery who was
nlooring, I- ��� -��� mtrolol tho lobo gan, which
���. m going with lightning rapidity, and al n
lum in tho road the toboggan ran into a
,      '   ipll  pole.
j     '.ni,. Crawford, who was sitting in
, ,;,, ol lho tol i ��� (an, was dashod herd
[on ,1, ig| ii-im-' tli1 tolograph pole and no
u ,|.  killed.   Her skull  was  terribly
f| u 'mod.
II,,|- iwocompani : iped unhurt. The
youii r woman's h uly was removed to hi r
rn ithor's apartments, Miss Crawford with
hor mothor and sitter i amo from Wind* i
Ont.i last fall to p is* I he winter in Monti'' al,
One of her brother! Is proprietor of lho
Crawford House at Windsor, Out.
Noitli Greenland-
Professor Angelo Hoilpiiu recently gave
a very interesting address on "The Scientific Results of the Peary Expedition," illustrated by photographs projooted by the
lantern, before the Engineers' Club ot Phil
ttdolphia.
Tbo expedition under Lieutenant Peary
did not have for its object, as many erroneously supposed, a nearer approach to tho
North Pole than had yet been reached, hut
was planned with a definite object, the determination of the northern boundaries of
Greenland, which was carried out with unusual fidelity. The basis of operation was
not, as usual, the .steamship, but, the mainland, and the trip extended from McCormick 1 lay northeastwardly across the
ice cap. The entire return distance���-1,.'100
miles���was accomplished on foot, sledges
being used only to carry supplies, etc.
The country was found to be bounded by
a chain of mountains on Intli the eastern
and western shores, and the trip started at
the western shore at an elevation of from
2,500 to.'j,(I'll) test, and continued rising lo
the apex of the Humboldt Glacier. The
ice cap terminated aboutS'2' north latitude,
nnd open country followed it northward.
Tiie. northeastern coast was reached in
latitude si 37', about -I.I' further north
than had yet been discovered. From I Iiis
' point the directions and general character
of the coast in both directions woro established for a considerable distance, although
it could not bc closely explored, on account
of the rugged basaltic bowlders with whioh
it was everywhere covared. The physical
features were found to bo quito uniform
throughout the country. The mountain
ranges averaged about, 5,000 feel in height,
occasionally reaching 10,000 loot or higher.
The basaltic bin fife and bowlders on the
coast, and the numerous fiords, made it
very similar to t':at ol Norway. Inland,
between the mountain ranges, there is an
apparently endless sea of ice, entirely covering and hiding llie true topography.
The expedition solved tiie problem of the
northern termination of Greenland, by
showing that it docs not extend so near the
pole, or northeastwardly, as has been generally supposed. It was also found that
glaciers were projected northward toward
tlie pole, and therefore Greonland oould
hardly have bad any connection with the
American ice of the great Ice Age, as has
often been supposed by geologists.
A narrow border country, having a good
vegetable growth and an animal liio identical on the east and wott sides, extends all
around Greenland. The summer temperature thore is about lho same as that of a
mild winter here; the winters are much
colder than in this locality, but not more so
than in somo of our Western States.
There is a very perfect, but very diminutive, forest growth of birch and willow.
Poppies, iineiiiones, buttercups, and other
bright colored llowers bloom iu favored local-
ties, and butterflies and mosquitoes are
abundant.
Thc country, up to the 73', belongs to
Denmark ; north of that is No Man's Land,
probably because its resources have not made
it worth an official claim and protection.
Tho true Esquimaux aro found north of
Melville Uny, and now number approximately 250, They seemingly observe no religious
forms whatever ; they live largely upon uncooked food, arc quick of perception and in
adapting moans lo ends, and arc absolutely
honest.
Tho expedition to bo undertaken next
season will attempt to completely looute the
northern boundary of tho country and lo
study the open sea beyond.
Uso of the Stoam Engine io Oyster Culture.
Cortain varieties of the oyster are very
sonsitive to extreme cold, nnd the recent
severe frost so seriously threatened the
20,1 ,000 oysters store) for tho winter In
the ponds al llayling Island that for
Bovnral days a steam engine was employed
in keep the ponds thawed and supplied
wil li water, .'ind largo' coal and cuke tiros
were kept, burning night and day upon tho
banks.
The Princess Victoria Melita of Edinburgh is only just sixteen years old, yot her
betrothal Is to he shortly announced.
Though so young, she has a more womanly
look than hei sister tho (now) Princess of
Roiimiinia, aud her bright, bluo eyes get,
more winning every day, She is a capital
singer, and, likelier fallicr, loves music.
Measure not men by .Sundays, without
regarding what they do all the week after, UUftlUBJLTY UULUMJN
Soma StaUM Oonditioaj.
Tli:' tenant ofa lar^o farm nt Broadhouso
Langsett, County of York, England, holds
tlio right Id tho property an long as ho
shall pay a yearly rental of "a snowball a
Midsummer and a red roan at Christmas"
to ihe owner, Gddfroy Bosvillo, Esq.
One of tho Scottish Dukes relinquishes
Iiis rights to his lands if il should ever
got warm enough to molt the snow from
the highest peak of the highest mountain in
Seo'land.
William do Albemarle and heirs hold the
manor of Leaston " by the norvice of lind-
ing for our lord, the King, two arrows and
one loaf of oat bread whenever the Sovereign shall hunt in tlio forest of Eastmoor."
Altoiigh the forest ia no longer a hunting
ground and arrows have long sinoo {given
way to rifles and shotguns., still the heirs of
Leaston Manor, keep thc arrows and oat
loaf ready lor any stray king thai may happen thai way, thus holding good the title
to their ostates.
Solomon Atlelield and heirs, or, rathe-,
the heirs of Solomon At-ofleld, old Solomon
having went the way of all the world 'J.'li
years ago, hold lands both at Heplandand
Atlerten, upon condition " thai as often as
our lord, '.!,���' K ng, shall cross thosea, Solo,
mon or his heirs shall aocompany him to
hold the royal head in case ot soa sickness."
John Compos had the Manor of Finoh-
field given him (and his heirs still hold ii)
for the service of "turning the spit al the
coronation of Edward tho Third.
Geoffrey I'Tiimbrand and heirs hold sixty
acres of land in Suffolk on condition that
they pay the King an annual rental of two
white dovos.
The fling of the Cheops.
Tin1 must curious and remarkable rein of
antiquity in the world, the Holy Coat and
the iron Crown not excepted, now lies
among the treasures of the Abbott collection whioh is temporarily deposited in thc
museum of the New York Historical So-
niid-3 Ut W'ttiJUSBI-.
Sixty.four governments issue patents.
Earthquakes in Japan average 500 a
year.
A Baltimoro lady has a pet dog that wear?
diamond ear-rings.
St. Louis, Mo., is not a part of any county,
neither is Baltimore, Md.
Last year Arizona pro luced $3,000,000 in
go'd, and $'2,000,000 in silver.
The initials of an express messenger in
Atchison, Kansas, are ('. (i. ll.
It costs ��100,000,000 annually to maintain the criminals in the United Stales.
A three-winged goose struts around the
yard of Mrs. Samuel Lu'.z, of Worcester,
Pa.
A rooster with horns one and one-half
inches long, is a pel in the house of E. F.
Walker, of Morganton, X, C.
S. I.'. Wilcox, of Pes Moines, Iowa, has
a keen eye. lie has carved nn the bowl of
a souvenir spoon the whole of the Lord's
prayer.
On lhc death of a jorson in Madrid it is
the genera1 custom to close for nine days
one of the outer doois of that person's late
rosidonco,
The college endowments of Massachusetts
amount lo $10,050,000: and tho value oi
collage grounds and buildings iu that Stale
Is $5,013,000.
Wines produced iu years when comets arc
vlliblo aro said to be superior in flavor to
the vintage of other years, and command
higher prices.
Edison thinks that his new phonograph
will register sounds inaudible to the human
ear. His instrument will intensify then,
so that they can bc distinctly heard when
reproduced.
A St. Louis inventor thinks he has almost solved the problem of aerial navigation. He has coustruoted an air-ship which
sails on the water, 'lo make it sail on the
air is ail that bothers him just now.
In eleven years past the number of deaths
ciety. This unique memento of tho distant In Franoe has ex leodod the births. In 1891
past it nothing less than the signet, ring once \ the excess of deaths over births was 10,01:0.
worn by Ciieops, tho builder of thc largest An actual decline in population has been
of the great Egyptian pyramids.
The rinding of this ring waa the crowning
effort of the great Dr. Abbott's life of research among lhe musty tombs of the cradle
of the human race.
As noted abovo, Cheops was the builder
of the pyramid which bears his name, and,
as though it were his intention to make the
structure lieai witness to his greatness
down through all the ages, the very stones
and bricks of which it is composed are
stamped with his name Cheops lived
nearly 2500 years ago, his great pyramid
being a lclie of the days when the great
nations of antiquity were in their youth,
yet wc, of the last decade of the nineteenth ��� no attention to the muskrats, but the kit-
century, can have the supreme satisfaction j tens occasionally cull' them,
of gazing upon thc very ring he woro so     A trial for murder was on in Northamp-
proudly upon his royal ringer. ton, England.   The jury, at recess, were
The hieroglyphics are very minute yet permitted to have lunch served in their
very ac .".irately and beautifully executed, \ room. One of the jurors bolted his food,
the ring itself being of finest gold and'and then hurried out to post a letter. His
weighing nearly an ounce. The oval signet conduct came to the ears of the judge, and
bears the name of Cheops, which is in fie not only severely rebuked the juror, but
hieroglyphics in perfect accord with the | fined him ��50, dismissed the entire jury,
only prevented by immigration.
A Buffalo clergyman lately preached an
impressive sermon to a lot of poor children. Mo3t of them were without warm
clothing, and some without underclothing
or stockings. Yet the clergymen spent
three-quarters of an hour in advising them
to renounce the luxuries and empty pleasures in life.
A pair of muskrats emerged from a drain
in thc house of Mrs. Sarah Howard, of
Ht niton, Me., and made a nest in the kitchen. They take milk from the cat's saucer,
by dipping their claws in the fluid, and then
licking tbe milk from the fur. Tiie cat pay.
stamp on the bricks of the inside walls of
the Great Pyramid. This remarkable relic
was totmd in a tomb at Ghizeh,
A Curiosity in Verse-
The following poem of three stanzas of
four lines each has often been referred to
as one of the most unique literary curiosi-,        . , .    .   .       ,
ties iu existence.    Each stanza contains  wore ���'''3t two wolves in tho circle, and even
every letter in the alphabet except the let
and impaneled anew one.
Lots of fun attended the efforts of *2."i0
farmers near Virginia, 111., who had started
out on a wolf drive. They formed themselves in a circle, which they gradually narrowed, thinking they would kill or wound
at least 100 wolves. When the cunning
hunters came in sight of each other, there
niAUUiJ HUlYIlflli UUiYmBTS.
t Winter Sporl in iokhc'u Wcslcrii Neigh
lioiiiuoris.
Remote though tho d sellers on tho Western prairie may be from the headquarters
of culture, they arc not wiihout pleasure,
Grand opera, fancy dress balls, and receptions there arc none, but of the hearty,
cheerful, out-of-door sport that makes the
pulses throb faster and the cheeks glow with
ruddier hue there ia abundance. Winter is
a time for jollity and good cheer in llie prairie settlements, and il brings in its train a
long line of unique amusements as al tractive
in their essential features as tbey are healthy
and gleeful.
Chief among these winter sports are thc
neighborhood hunting contests, where whole
communities join in a generous rivalry, and
enjoy lho keen sport of bagging the diverse
species of game with whicli the West
abounds.
Two of the mightiest nimrods of the settlement "choose sides,'1 selecting the men
and boys of tho neighborhood alternately
until all ar.- enlisted in one army or the
other. Then a scale of points is agreed upon
and given over to a committee. On the
printed programme of a hunt, in which '.'"ill
membora ofa western Kansas community
look pari a few days ago, tho scale was":
Quail, 2 points: rabbits, E : jack rabbits, 10;
squirrels, 1">; prairieohii ken, 25; partridge,
30 ; duck, -in ; gray squirrols, 50 : coyotes,
75; wolves, lull; antelope, "oil; hawks,
30; wild geese, (I'l; and prairie dogs, In.
At early daylight on the appointed dato
heller skelter over plain and ravine the
rival parties go, singly, by twos, threes,
and quartets, hanging away desperately at
whatever may come within thc range of
their guns. All is grist for their hunting
mill, and excitement grows as the day's end
approaches. .Sometimes, one party wiil surround a few hundred acres of laud that
promises rich game rewards, nnd, in the
manner of " whipping" the preserves of old
Eusdish estates proceed lo drive in tho
small game of the section, slaughtering the
creatures rapidly as thc circle closes.
As night draws near the hunters come
straggling into the settlement, weary and
hungry, bringing their harvest with them.
There has been no stopping for dinner, as
something belter is to come later.
Tlie game heaped in two great, piles attest the prowess of the opposing forces. At
the hunt referred to above there were
twenty coyotes, three antelope, fifty pair of
chickens, quail, squirrels, rabbits, and
ducks almost beyond counting. The abundance of game made the hunters fairly beam
with satisfaction. The committee gravely
figured 3,000 ou the other.
Then comes the reward. In the largest
hall of the settlement cooks have been btify
all day, and when the result is annoiuc-
ed, amid cheering and jollity, thc contestants sit down to a steaming hot dinner, upon
the bill of fare of which appears some of the
choicer varieties of game first brought iu.
Venison, duck, prairie chicken, squirrel, all
make the meal one to remember, and with
the bright-eyed wives and daughters of the
hunters to serve, it becomes tlie nearest approach to a state banquet that many neighborhoods ever enjoy.
And after the banquet the dance, a real
Western fandango, with ils fiddlers perched on boxes, its earnest and energetic
swains in broad collared shirts and pantaloons in high boot tops, its gay ciilicoedand
brightcheeked lassies, and the peculiar tread
of the dancers. Western dancers move the
shoulders more thin they do the feet, and
the result is a Bwaying motion, rhythmical
and attractive.
' Uii E3TN UTS'
lliilVou I'an'l llelp.ltcadliin Tliein.
A revolver is no large weapon, but it can
bc mado to cover a very largo man.
About thc hardest crop to raise on a firm
nowadays is the boys iu lhe family.
Husband���" Did.nt you promise lo obey
mo at the altar';" Wife���" Yes ; but we're
not there now''
Miss Quigg���"Haveyou a cure for corns?"
Drug Clork���"Hard or soft';" Miss Quigg���
" Medium, please.
" She���" Vou know you broke your
promise to tne." He-"Never mind,I can
make another just as good."
You may freeze, you may bust the gas
meter if you will, but at tho ond of the
month, just the same, there's the bill.
One day of sickness will do moro to convince a young man that his mother is his
best fiiend than seventeen volumes of proverbs.
Sheer eng i
then?"
both."
" There is no fun in being married
;ed." He���"But when is there fit
She���"When you are anticipating
SCOURING THE COASTS F0S MEN-
The ('ouro Itnllront]  Una Fouud ii Very
Hard lo Uei.. I orccof Workmen.
The Congo Railroad Company, in ils la ���
report, throws light upon the great difficulties it has met in .securing workmen. The
company has scoured most of the coast regions of Africa for native labor. The Congo
natives engage in thc porterage service,
but thoy are not valuable as yet for railroad making, und very few of them consent
to do that sort of work. So the company
curly in ils operations sent lulor agents to
Sierra Leone, the l\ru const, Accra Lagos,
Whydah, and a half dozen other well-known
pons along thc west coast. Efforts were
also made to secure workmen on the east
coast, but only au inconsiderable number of
Zanziliaris were obtained. In spite of every
effort tho enrollment of men wus still insufficient, Small reinforcements were obtained
from the West Indies and Barbadoes, and
finally, a couple of months tgo, a force of
several hundred Chinese were landed on the
lower Congo, where they are now at work
on lhe railroad.
Many causes have interfered   with the
slice s   of the 1 lijnr rcTnitii .' ugenis.     I lie
Banks���" Rivors, how do you suppoBO | moil patent has been thai tho colonial nu.
that wonderful bird, ths pluunix, ever I thorities through Africa have tried to pre-
caughl lire';" Rivers-" Probably adefoot-; vent men from ongoging with the railroad
ive new,
A difference between a knife-blade losing
ils temper nn;: a woman is that the former
becomes duller and the latter more cutting.
Suitor���" Mein fraulein, I love vou I'
Rich young lady (pointing with her fan to
her father)���" Excuse me, yonder Is my
business manager."
Blobkins- " Ymir wife at the Old Guard
Ball looked likoaperfoot dream to-night."
bocauso they desired io retain all labor at
homo, Then all through lho iirst year of
the work the black poi'80nuo! wus terribly
dei im 'icil by disoase, It was many mouths
before thooomjany could supply tho common comforts, There was almost complete
lack of fresh food. Medical aid was inadequate. The work on the railroad was enormously difficult. Tho workmen were engaged for months in the Mposo Valley and
the Leopold ravine, both particularly un-
Chapton���" Very likely. You know dreams j healthy places.   The mortality was, there-
go by contraries." fore, excessive. From the beginniug of 1890
I  love  Until March, IS!)'.', the company
Cholly���" O, Ethel, I love you
you, madly, devotedly, wildly���"
" That's all right, Mr. Summers,
would you like to marry me ?"
"Don't you think," asked the customer of
tho Bostonesc saleslady, " that, your prices
are pretty steep ';" " Candidly," was tho
reply, the declivity is rather precipitous."
" Il is tho active man we wanl   in life ;
mployed
Ethel��� j 4,000 black workmen, of whom 000 died.
but how  Many others were sent home in poor health
j to recuperate, and many more deserted. So
the company lost fully half of all the black
workmen it engaged, and the news did not
encourage other workmen to enlist.
Not a few workmen in their eagerness to
return home asked the company to retain all
the wages they luul earne 1, and  give them
not   the   dreamers,"   sul   the   lecturer I only passage tickets home. In Decemer 1891,
" Yes," replied a man  in the body of tho j there was a riot among the natives of Sierra
hall,   "people who  dream  arc  likely to   Leone, 300 in number, who suddenly threw
snore," down their implements, and with sticks and
" You always wear line collars and cuffs, ' stones as weapons started for Matadi, with
Mr. Kink," remarked tho colonel to the I the avowed intention of embarking forcibly
old  darkey.     "Yessir,"   replied   Kink;  upon a steamer which was to leave on the
"dat'a ono advantage  ob  pahinittin' yoh   following morning.
wifo to tek in washin'sah." Tho company considers thot it has now
!,',.���   ,,.,, t ������ i .,', i,..��� L.i  fairly emerged from this trying period,   Tor
Katie���"All, Laura, you don t know what:,.    ���'   ,,  *>, .,    .    ; , , ,', ,   ,
you miss by not coming to dance?" Laura I th,e.Past hj*   *����� rUie heal hfu lness ot the
-"Don't 1-. I've had five proposals already I whites andblacks has left little to be desired.
this season through sitting out dances in the I ^l   '  , W��TUnmaTa^I "TT I���"
���������������,���.������, i,   �� the Barbadoes have died, but there lias been
conservatory, i , ,. ,   -a, ,
* . I scarcely any mortality among the laborers
"Charley     said  the aftcctionate little roorntted on the west coast.   The work has
wife, " dun t you tell me these blue chips  lm, ]mm cim.i(,j       tu tho p,.Ueau above
cost a d..ll,r apiece?     "Yes.   _     >yeU^ | the deadly atmosphere of the valleys, und
under the changed conditions the company
tor e, whioh all printers know to he the
most indispensable of all the letters, its
relative proportion of use being 120 times to
j -t, k S, g 17, and I, 40,    The letter which
these managed to escape
Mr. A. H. Apgar, of Marlborough, N Y.,
bought a new patent carbonized fuel stove,
and Iiis family we.e delighted. As they sat
around it one evening, suddenly one after
comes next to e in the number of times of j another dropped to the floor unconscious-
all but a son, Anion Apgar, who managed
to crawl to the door and summon assistance.
Physicians declared that tho victims had
been asphyxiated by gas from the carbonized fuel.
A petition signed by several Bishops and
a great body of thc clergy of the Church of
England has been presented to the Archbishop of Canterbury calling attention to
the increasing financial difficulties ot the
rural clergy. It has been computed " that
there are now 3,000 benefices under ��100
per annum, and 400 under ��00." While
tiie income of the clergy decreases their enforced expenditure increnses; the value of
tithe and globe land goes down and tuxes on
the land go up,
Sir Andrew Clarke, acting Agent-General
in England of tlie Australian colony of
Yictoria, recently expressed the remarkable
view that "cables have been a curse to commerce." The occasion was au interview
concerning the scheme for a Paciflo cable,
fix in Australia to the western coast of this
continent. All tho Agents-General of the
several Australasian colonies were asked
for their views on the project.   All wcre in
use is a, which is used SO times on an average while e is being used 120 times. Here
is the famous " e"-less poem : ���
Bold Nassau quits his caravan,
A hazy mountain grot to scan;
Climb- jaggy rocks lo spy his way,
Hoili tax lilsslght still far doth stray.
Xot work of man nor sport of child,
Finds Nassau in thai mazy wild;
Lax grows hi.-joint-, limbs toil in vain-
Poor Wight I Why dtdst thou quit that plain?!
Vn inly for succor Nassau calls 1
Knows Zillah that thy Nassau falls!
Hut prowling wolf and fox may joy
To Quarry on thai Arab boy.
Curious Facts About the Pump.
The common water pump of to-day is
but an improvement on a Grecian invention
which first enme into general use during
tiie reign of the I'tolemics, Philadelphos,
and energetes, 283 to 221 B. C. The name
which is very similar in all languages, is
derived from the Greek word " l'cmpo," to
send or throw. Tlie most ancient description we have of the water pump is by Hero
of Alexander. There is no authentic account of its general uso outside of Egypt j favor of the general idea, but none thought
previous lo its introduction inlo the tier- ' the colonies would bc willing to incur any
man provinces at about thc opening of the material expense to effect the object, Sir
Sixteenth Ce ittiry, Pumps with plungers ' Andrew Clarke said the existing cables
and pistons were invented by Morland, an I were adequate for all trallic, and the pro-
Englishmen, in 1074; the double acting! posed cable would be of no strategical
pump by De la Hire, the French acadomi-  value.   He "thought'' cables had been a
ciau, some twenty years later.
The Three Oldest Pieces of Iron-
Tlie three oldest known pieces ot wrought
curse to commerce," but he would favor
lhe scheme on the principle of "letting dog
cat dog.   They  would play  ugainst one
another " The Australian colonics, he snid,
had work enough I eforo them to get bread,
iron in existonoo are tho siokle blade that was I even without butter, and they wonld not
found by lielzoni under tho base ofa sphinx | support any new schemes to spread a ourse,
in Karn.ic, near Thebes; the blade found  Sir Andrew did not afford any explanation
by Colonel Yyse imbedded iu the mortar or elucidation of his somewhat unique views
of one of the pyramids, and a portion of a concerning telegraphic com municalion.
cros -cut saw which Mr Layard exhumed
at Nimrud���all of which are now in the  -���""*������	
British Museum, ,, .r,                 , ,   , ,             ���   ,
.,,,-       . ., ���   ������ ������          - "the most graceful of domestic anurias
Another piece ol iron, an  account of -  ,,            . .,��� .               ,      , ������ , ���
i >    , i��� ;     ' ���     ���    ,, - h tlie cat, wm e the most awkward bird is
hi not be inappropriate in this
D.xmas-
ol iron,
winch might not be inappropriate
connection, is the wrought bar of
oils steel which King Porus presented to
Alexander the Great. This bar, which
is of unknown antiquity, is still carefully
pre orved in lho National Turkish Museum
ui Constantinople.
If wo may credit tho report ofaGorman (
dn mist tho human stomaoh finds in cheese They arc watching . imin
a prclly lough morsel, the best known varieties occupying from four to ton hours in
digestion in healthy stomachs, hi view of
tlle fuel thai thousinds of men and wnme-
eat cheese, believing that it facilitates digestion, this roport is Interesting, to say the
least.
Few things nro brought to a successful
issue by impetuous desire, but most by calm
ami prudent torothoilgllt.���[Tlllioydidos.
the duck,"saya an  observer of  nature;
"but it won't do to use  these facts for a
basis if  you  want to call  s woman pet
i names,"
In London, as in every other capital of
Europe, there aro foreign offie rs mingling
with thc ordinary police, but who take their
orders from the Consuls or Ministerial rep-
esentatives of their respective nations,
ds who have es-
capeii from the jurisdiction of their own
country.
When the Queen dies, her mortal remains
will rost in the grey graniteearcophag us with
late lamented Prince Albert's  nshes,
tin
Underneath the Anna of the Queen and
Prince Albert, on the monument, is inscribed " Farewell, well beloved, Here at last
1 will rest with thee, With thee in Christ
I will rise again."
The Ra-j-Pickors of Paris-
The wealth of Paris is so boundless tlmt
tho rubbish and refuse of the city aro worth
millions. There arc more than fifty thousand persons who earn a living by picking up
what others throw away.
Twenty thousand women and children
exist iiy sifting and sorting the gatherings
of the pickers, who collect every day in the
yearabout 1,200 Ions of merchandise, which
they sell to the wholesale rag dealers for
some 70,000 francs,
At night you see men with baskets strapped on their backs, a lantern in one hand,
and in the other a stick with an iron hook
on the end.
They walk along rapidly, their eyes fixed
on thc ground, over which the lantern
Hings a sheet of light, und whatever they
find in the way of paper, rags, bones, grease,
metal, ke,, they stow away in their baskets.
In tho morning, in front of each iotiso,
you see men, women, and children sifting
the dust-bins before they nro emptied into
the scavengers' carts.
At various hours of the day you may remark isolated rag-pickers, who seem to
work with less method than the others and
with a more independent air.
The night pickers arc generally novices;
men who have been thrown out of work, are
obliged to hunt for their living like the
wild beasts.
The morning pickers nre experienced and
regular workers, who pay for the privilege
of sifting the dust-bins of a certain number
of houses, and oi trading with the results,
The rest, tho majority, nre thc ooureurs,
the runners, who e.verci-e thoir profession
freely and without control, working when
lliey please and loafing when they please,
They arc the philosophers and adventurers of the profession, nnd iheir chief object
is to enjoy life and meditate upon its
problems,
hero's a whole box full of three colors that
bought at the bargain counter for seventy-
five cents."
" Why are you so naughty, Johnnie 1 It
seems to me that with mamma worn out and
papa with a broken arm, you might try to
be good." " Hoh ! " said Johnnie, " That's
just thc time lo bo bad. No ouo can lick
me."
finds it not
laborers.
difficult to retain  its black
Ostrich-Famine;-
It is best to draw the feathers at molting
time as then less pain is given to tbe birds,
lu Soulh Africa it was originally the cus-
Caller-" So you mean  to be an M. P. jtom oi tlle keeper to coax tho ostrich to
when yougrow big, Tommy? " Politician's ! como l0'ra.ra >��'? lj>' throwing to it
Youngest���" Yes ;   like   pa."    Caller-
nip your nund to do a
;';'' Politician's Young-
" Then you've mad
great deal of talkin
est���" Yes ; like ma."
There was a young girl from the Hub,
Who had heard of Diogenes'tub ;
To thc kitchens he hied her,
Where her ma quickly spied her,
And ob, how she made that girl scrub.
Willis���" I hear she is going to enter the
lecture field.   Hus she evei had any experience? "   Wallace���" Oh, yes ; her husband
has been a member of a  club  over ten
years."
Round and round the slippery track
Thc shivering race horse goes,
A frozen jockey clings to his hack
And icicles to his nose.
Bella���"I don't believe a word of this
talk about steaming boing good for the com.
ploxion." Stella -" Why?" Bella-"Well,
just look at Mr. Luckless. What a horrid-
looking creature he is I and papa says he is
always in hot water.'.
Eslelle���" And aro you going to leave me
so soon, Augustus? " Augustus���" My love,
.1 would willingly give ten years of my life
if I could stay longer. But if I don't go 1
shall bc fined a dime for being late at our
debating society."
"What was that Dawson story you told
the other day, Hicks?" "Why, I pleased
Mrs. Dawson very much by asking her if
she was herself or hor daughter. Couldn't
tell 'cm apart." " Well, it's slrange, but I
WOIkod tno same scheme on the daughter
and she didn't like it a bit."
Patient���" As we have known each othe1'
so long, dootor, I do not intend to insult
you by paying your bill. But 1 have left
you a handsome legacy iu my will," Physician���" Vciy kind of you, I am sure. Allow me to look at that proscription again,
1 wish to nuke a slight alteration in it."
I corn and then when thc bird had its head
j down, the keeper would catch it by the
neck, At the same moment several men
would lake hold of it by the feet and legs
and compel il to squat down. Then its tail
and wing feathers would bc plucked. Another practice was to give lhe ostrich some
dainties and while it was engaged iu eating
them, the keeper with a sharp kniie would
cut the feathers close to the skin.
Subsequently in Algiers a box was devised with movable sides into which the ostrich
was driven and the leathers then extracted.
The directions given were that the feathers
must be caught as near the skin as possible
and pressed gently as if to stick them
farther into the flesh, then twisted half
way around. This movement removes the
feather from its socket easily and without
wounding the ostrich.
A slill later improvement ia the plucking
box now used in Cape Ci lony. It is a very
solid wooden box, in whicli, though there is
just room for one ostrich tostand, he oannot
possibly turn around, nor oan he kick, as the
sides of the box are too high. At each end
of the box there is astoiit door, the one opening inside and the other outside the inclos-
ure. The birds are dragged up in succession to the first door, and, after more or less
of a scuffle, pushed in and llie door shut.
There the two operators standing one on
each side of the box have the ostrich completely in their power : and with a few rapid
snips of the shears remove thc long white
plumes from his wings.
A New LumlnouB Cloinpaas.
The luminous compass recently introduce 1 in the French navy consists of an ordinary Thompson compass, During the
day it is employed in tho usual way, but at
night a vertical lino of light is thrown from
the binnacle light upon lho interior side of
ih npass box, botwec I the card nnd the
ghi'.s, by means of a combination of lenses
und mirrors. This line is, ior the time being, n fixed line, nnd bears u known relation to the direction of tho ship's keel.
From another combination of lenses and
mirrors above tlio center of tho cord, a second ray of light, is thrown upon thc interior side of tho compass box, and this, aftor
suitable adjustment, moves around ns the
card moves. This line being of different
length, is easily distinguishable from the
other, and it may be temporarily set so as
to bear any desired relation to any point on
thc card, hi steering, the helmsman has
simply lo move his wheel so as to keep the
'wo luminous lines in the same straight
lino.
Mr. (-Haditone at Home-
When relieved from the affairs of state,
Mr, Gladstone finds 110 pleasure so great us
his home lifo at Hawardon.   There his
family ure gathered together, and tllOgreal
man roups and plays with his grandchildren as though he never knew what it was to
bo blamod for everything that wont wrong
in all Groit Britain and hor colonies. Mr,
Gladstono is it wonderful scholar, a busy
writer and speaker, but the little Gladstone
children know him best us a good, kind
grandfather who is fond of fun. lie, too,
would prefer to enjoy their company rather
than to be Btirroundod by Unglands great
men nt an all-night session of Parliament.
His other recreations are walking, and���
this is really very funny���chopping down
trees, Mr. Gladstone, Isan expert woodman, and though he doesn't destroy valuable cherry-trees, he goes out with his axe
and takes the keenest pleasure 111 felling
trees in Hawarden Park. A visitor to the
castle one day noticed an axe behind tlle
door iu the great hall, where it had been
left by the statesman after ono of his chop
ping expeditions, A curious ornament for
such a place, ilsceins. It may be out of
compliment tu the boy (ieorge Washington
and his hatchet that the "Grand Old Man''
prefers to use an American axe.���[Harper's
Young People.
THE MIDDLE CAR 13 SAFE-jT.
���low a Commercial Traveler Secures n
Mi ii iinu m or Risk.
A certain commercial traveler says that
hois very particular as to the car he selects,
"1 navel thousands of miles a year." he
says, "nml have made it a rule to observe
in the accounts of railroad acoi lente which
i irs of tho trains nre most often demolished.
I Tho result of my oxperiem���for I have
b ui in a dozen smash-upa and observation
i thai the un i lie cars aro the s ifest, I
ii vi i under any cirouinsl in ion ri io in the
rear ear, I avoid hei li i i ���,' to tho bigg igo
i ir, though this i- soleote I by m . j ai tha
ifi ���'. 1 he gi t dai ;��� al pres nt in
railroa 1 traveling i : ��� piug, \\ hen a
man has I icn in . wrc :k an ; ifl ���.. u , n
tho ' ngine of iic colli ling train h ilfn iy
inside of the u ir ��� .:. or rathei ,'hat's ��� fi
of it, it impresses him in   I Toe
hagg igo ear is ui ily I       I, and
in the collision its wi i with
the ponderous bi ���:  _��� i ���  ill;    i  tshes
the next ��� m to   philters, ��������� entral
cars i paratively uninjun i.   When
the train is derailed the baggage ��� irand
ncxi coach, as n i lie, i over, I lie road-
bods of our greal transcontinenl il lines nre
eo solid, each Bcction is so :arcfully examined, the rolling stock is so muoh improved, that a broken rail, broken wl eel or
axle nml like mishaps arc reduced to a
minimum,
Hemstitched handkerchiefs for men having tiny-worked figures on the hem.
Impertinence, silly talk, fooli'h vanity
and vain curiosity are closely allied ; thty
are children of one family. -[Fontaine. (Li)<> aootenau star
SATURDAY, MAHCH 11,18H3.
The Kaslo Exnniiuer has beeu used
as a " tool" by lowusite boomers at
tbo northern eud of Kooteuay Lake,
and, at their prompting,  bus published   some   " indisputable   facts"
which are ns far from the truth as
Kaslo is from tbe Lardeau mines.
Tbe only excuse that can bo offered
iu its behalf is its extreme youth and
the fact that, having been in this
country about five miunteB, tlie smart
Alec wbo penned those " indisputable
facte'' has uever visited tbe Lardeau
proper nud knows nothing whatever
about it, nor of tbe Northeast Arm,
which ho so glibly attempts to describe.   He has simply beeu stuffed
by those whose interest it is to delude
the public iuto buying their townsite
lots before the superior facilities and
natural iidvautngeB of  Trout Lake
City become kuown.   One of these
boom townsites still hangs on to the
minio of "Lardo"���even after the
Registrar-General 1ms refused to record it under that name���simply to
connect the place in the mind of the
public with the rich Liirdoun mining
country,   But the Examiner's attack
ou Kevelstoke is just as usoless and
uncalled for as Don Quixote's attack
*m the windmill,   Our article, which
Beems to have hit the boomsrs right
iu tbeir vital part (i.e. the pocket),
mnde  no  mention  of  ltevelstoke's
distance from tbe  mines, but wns
written with a desire to give British
fair play to Trout Lake City nnd
Lardean City, the former right in the
heart of the mining district, which
towns were entirely ignored iu tbe
Examiner's former article iu wluch it
claimed the whole of the Lardeau���
coming even us far up as the Great
Northern ledgo in its desire to grub
the whole district.    But since the
young man from over the border has
given such nn exhibition of spread-
eagleism we feel compelled to contradict his "indisputable facts" nnd ask
him to obtain a map of tbe Lardeau
and find out where the mines really
are.   Only one group (Haskins) is
situated at the south-east end of
Trout Lake, 35 miles from "Lardo"
nnd 63 from Kuslo.   The richest nud
best miues lie north and north-east
of Trout Lake���-20 miles further away
from Kaslo nnd 20 miles nearer Iievelstoke. The railway from Eevelstoke
to the North-east Arm, as surveyed,
is 25 miles; from the Arm to Trout
Lake 18���43 miles;  from Kaslo to
tbe Lardeau mines, 80 mileB.   The
Examiner is "cute" enough to make
the Haskius group tbe base of ite
measurement, thus adding the whole
length of Trout Luke (21 miles) to
tbe actual distance of Iievelstoke from
the mines proper. Tbe "perpendicular
rock bluffs thousands of feet high"
nre there right enough, but there are
passes behind them, in front of them
and all round them, so that they present no barrier to ingress to the Lardeau, its will soou be illustrated by
��� the extension of the Kevelstoke and
��� Arrow Lake Ry. through to Kooteuuy !
Lake. Our little contemporary should
have mude itself acquainted with this
fact before publishing such "indisputable'1 bunkum at tbe instigation
of parties who have no use for truth
except to twist and pervert it for their
own particular benefit.   We huve an
idea that the Examiner is making n
Yankee boast when it says the steam- i
boats there make tbe 28 miles between !
Kuslo uud "Lardo" in "just one hour
and a half."   It lias always been the ;
rule in this country to send a copy
of a new paper to the papers published iu the distriot,    This the publisher of the Examiner Dever had tbe
courtesy to do, aud the first copy of
the hybrid production winch found
its way to Kevelstoke was so heavily
weighted with "indisputable facts"
that it is a wonder it ever reacbe.1
here tit all.   We are asked to " let
Kaslo and Nelsou alone."   Willingly.
Our little contemporary should not
make its  imported   impudence  too i
���conspicuous. The situation is galling '
enough as it is.   If you want us to
���speak   plaiuer, Mr.  Examiner,   just
give us a few "indisputable facts''
on the benefits to be derived from
"soaking one's hw.'l in a wrwbtub."
RevelStokfl Townsite Dispute
In the Provincial Legislature last
���week Mr. Kellie moved that whereas
no satisfaction can be obtained relating to the purchase or pre-emption
of lands in the twenty mile lelt; and
whereas the inactive policy of tlie In,.
minion (lover, ment is retarding the
settlemectof lands in Kootenay; ami
whereas purchasers of lots made
Bt-ven yeurs ago in the Revelstoke
townsito have been unable, through
litigation, to perfect titles toaaid lota;
therefore, bo it resolved, that an
humble address be presented to Hin
Honor tho Lieut-Governor, praying
him to tako snch steps as will best
promote the settlement of Haid lands,,
Bud allow purchasers to perfect
titles to said lots in Rovelstoke.
The mover said tho question involved
was a serious matter and anything
the Government did wonld be of interest to the peoplo of Revelstoko.
Hon. Mr. Davie said the Dominion
���Government hud assumed tho status !
kit -n freeholder aod granted land in ,
HAS RECEIVED A SUPPLY OP
FIRST-CLASS FLOUR
From the Western Milling Co. of Regina.
1 his company at present, find themselves compelled to DOUBLE tiie sizr
of THKii! mill, tlie demand for their Hour having so largely increased.
The wheat reaped ou the Regina plains Inst harvest wns pronounced the
best BETWEEN Winnipeg and the Mountains, special Samples beiug
secured for tho World's Fair nt Chicago.
Flour mudo from this quality of wheat is the article Mr, Eobson is now
offering to tbe inhabitants of Eevelstoke and district.
Patent Hungarian, Strong Baker's. Oats, Shorts, Bran,
Chopped Feed, Rolled Oats Granulated
Oatmeal, Wheat, Hay, &c.
Always eeo Robsou's prices before buying elsewhere.   They will be the
LOWEST 1'OSSlIILU Kill! CASH.
Revelstoke. He had no doubt that
the Dominion Government was
wrong in assuming that' they had
that power, More light would be
thrown on the subject whon judgment ivas given in the case of the
Domiuion Government vs. Farwell.
The parties who had been granted
land from the Dominion Government would have to go to tbe Dominion Government to have their cases
settled. The Provincial Government having granted the land to
one party cannot recognize the
claims of other parties.
Hon. Mr. Beaven had nodonbttbut
the grant made to Mr. Farwell was
made unadvisedly. He believed in
upholding provincial rights, but hu
did not believe in doing wrong. The
Provincial Government had no right
to deal with the lands which were
under reservation at the time. There
were some ugly rumors flying about
in regard to the issuing of those
orown grants. The Provincial Government had a very poor case in their
disput with the Dominion Oovern-
ment. The papers in reference to
the disputes should be laid before
the House.
The resolution was withdrawn.
From Mr. Davie's remarks it would
appear that any more communications from our citizens to tbe Provincial Government on this matter
will be so much waste time, Mr.
Kellie has done his best, and deserves our heartiest thanks, bnt it in
evident the Provincial Government
will not give way. We must make
persistent application to tbe Dumiu-
ion Goverument until the townsite
case is again moving in the courts.
Tom Reed's boat is fast approaching completion, and she is a model,
Her length over all is 23 feet, on a
20-foot keel. She is cauoe shaped,
and will be used for up river work.
She can be unloaded and carried
around the Death Rapids. The trip
down from Big Bend will be accomplished in C or 8 hours.
NOTICE OP
SALE BY  SHERIFF.
PURSUANT TO
THE "EXECUTION ACT."
IN THE SUPREME COURT OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
JOHN CAMPBELL
AND
THE KOOTENAY B.C. SMELTING
k TRADING SYNDICATE (Ld.).
RUBE ALLYN,
America's Famous Humorist, accompanied by
CHARLES   KELLY,
the well and favorably known Basso-
Cantanto ami Guitar Soloist,
will appear in
PETERSON'S HALL,
on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH  22nd.
Admission, 50c.; Reserved Seats, $1]
Children half price.
Entertainment at eight o'clock.  Free
'bus will leave station at 7.30,
Tickets on Bale at Post-office and at
Railway Station.
W. J. LAW,
Merchant Tailor,
(Near C.P.R. Station)
REVELSTOKE,    B.C.
A sonny STOI K of
English Worsteds, Scotch und
Iri-li Tweeds and Sei'tfCH
AT PRICES THAT WILL CATCH
you.
FIT AND MAKE-UP OI ARAN fEED.
In obedience to a writ of Fi Fa issued
out of the Supreme Court of British
Columbia, dated the llth day of
February, 1893, and to me directed
iu the above-named suit for the sum
of $10,481.23, and $3.50 for costs
of execution, etc., and also interest
on $10,458.34, ut 6 per cent, per
annum, from the 20th day of January, 1893, until payment, besides
sheriff's fees, poundage, and all
other expenses of this execution,
I have seized nnd will SELL by
PUBLIC AUCTION the following
GOODS on THURSDAY, tbe 2nd
day of March, 1893, at the Kooteuay
(B.C.) Smelting & Trading Syndicate
(Limited) works, near Revelstoke,
B.C., at 12 o'clock noou, to satisfy
the judgment debt aud costs in tbis
action, if the said amounts are uot
sooner paid.
list of goods SEIZED.
1 stationary hoisting engine and
hoisting gear.
1 stationary engine and fixtures in
lower engine-room.
1 fan blast and fixtures.
1 Gnruey scale, capacity 3,500 lbs.
1 large stationary engine,
1 steam pump.
5 iron wheelbarrows.
2 large oil tanks, with pumps.
2 jack screws.
50 feet rubber hose.
50 feet band iron.
200 feet hemp rope,
5 boxes window glass.
17 slag pots, small.
2    "     "    large.
lfi moulds, quantity crushed ore,
wire rope, charcoal and coke, number
metal castings, pulleys, belts, 200
pigs bullion, etc.
S. REDGRAVE,
Sheriff of Kootenay.
Revelstoke, Feb. 20th, 1893.
Tbe above Sale is adjourned till
Wednesday, the 8tl. day of March,
1898, at same place and hour.
ti. REDGRAVE, Sheriff.
Tin- above sale is further adjourned
to M0NDA7. the 27th day of March,
at the uni"'' place and hour,
S. REDGRAVE, Sheriff.
CAVEATS,
TRADE  MARIO,
DESIGN PATENT8,
00PYRI0HT8,   eto.
For Informatlnn and i��� Handbook write to
MU.v.v 4 co., am Broadway, nw Vou*.
Oldest bureau for uonurlnK patent! in Ariicrim.
Evnry pntpnt Iftknn out by un Ih lirmiKtit. huf.irn
tbe publio Iiy a notice given freo of cbargo in tho
Jtontift ��nwton
Leriort circulation of nny nclrnitlflo papor In (be
world. Siiloriillilly 111'intrutod. No liitplliitont
man nbonM be without It, Weekly, 83,00 a
year] 11,60��H months. Addreai .Mf'VN * OO,
l-i, iiij.i.iui i, ,i(.i ���Jroaclw��y, m.iw vork city.
Do you Write for the Papers ?
If you do, you should havo THE
LADDER OF  -JOURNALISM,
a Text Book for Correspondents, Re.
porters, Editors and General Writers.
PRICE, 50 CENTS.
SENT ON IIK'.'KIPT e,f PRICE, 11V
ALLAN   FORMAN,
117 Nassau Street, New York, N. Y.
Stat* whirs yon maw ttall anil yon will re-
Rolve'ati&iidaornfl lithograph for framing
(i. TERRYHERRY,
1 GENERAL BLACKSMITH
REVELSTOKE.
Wagons and all kinds of
Vehicles Repaired.
Shoeing a Specialty.
pricks main'.
iNew Lrooas.
Just, arrived, a splendid assortment of delicate shades iu Shot, Pongee, Surah
and Bengaline Silks, Satins aud Velvets,
Millinery.
We will open up in a few days nn extensive range of Hats, Ribhons and
Laces.   Also Whiteweur, Underwear and Hosiery.
Boots and Shoes.
We have purchased these lines from tho best manufacturers iu Canada, and
can furnish special widths in any style.
H. N. COURSIER.
BOURNE BROS.
Revelstoke Station Post Office.
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES,
HM1WA1E�� aOTHUGi
BOOTS & SHOES,
GENTS'    FURNISHINGS.
FLOUR, OATS, SHORTS AND ALL RINDS OF FEED.
Stoves, Tinware, Crockery, Glassware. Carpets.
Doors, Windows, Builders' Hardware, Paints, Oils, Varnishes.
MINERS' AND  SPORTSMEN'S  SUPPLIES.
WALL  PAPER,  STATIONERY,  Etc.
CHBISTIE, BROWN & CO.'S BISCUITS AND CONFECTIONERY.
Bakery in connection with Store,
Messrs. C. B. Hume k Co,,
Revelstoke Station*
GROCERIES
PROVISIONS
BOOTS & SHOES
FLOUR
FEUD & OATS
AMMUNITION
HARDWARE
CLOTH INO
MINERS' TOOLS
Consignment of Butter and Eggs received every week.
MINERS' AND HUNTERS' SUPPLIES.
ALL KINDS  OF   FURS BOUGHT  AND  SOLD
Railway Men's Requisites.
GOODS LOADED ON CAR AND STEAMBOAT FREE OF CHARGE.
T. L. HAIG,
NOTARY PUBLIC : : REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Mining and Real Estate Broker and General
Commission Agent.
FIRE, LIFE k ACCIDENT INSURANCE.
CONVEYANCING:   RENTS   AND   ACCOUNTS   COLLECTED.
MINING CLAIMS Bought and Sold.
REPRESENTATIVE OF THE KOOTENAY SMELTING AND TRADING
SYNDICATE.
agent for TROUT LAKE CITY, KASLO CITY, NAKUSP and other
TOWNSITES.
Furniture & Undertaking.
R.  HOWSON,
Has a large Stock of Household Furniture, Coffins, Caskets,
Shrouds, &c.
REVELSTOKE,    B.C TOU SEIMTI'S 10W.
Among the most respectable and reliable
Texo-Mexican citizens during the Garza
raids was ono Sonor Don Camillo, whose
ranch was tucked away in a bend of the
Rio Grande, about half-way botween
Brownsville and Laredo. This ranch was a
cozy enough placo when the Gulf breezes
sang through its peach orchards and the
mcsquito grass grow green to tho doorstep,
and tho bluejuys and mocking-birds swam
and sang iu the sunshine. A fit setting,
indeed, it seemed, for old Camillo's motherless daughter, tho handsomo Margarita.
A strange, new phase of life was old Camillo's talk of war to the innocent Margarita whose only conception of battle was
the bold raid of the rangers after a horso
thief, a fonco cutter or a road agont. Sho
listened to the grave talk of her father and
the padre, as bIio ground her tortillas,
or sat m tho sunshine stringing the long
pods of chile iuto scarlet festoons, and her
Spanish heart thrilled at the mention of such
high-sounding words as "right," "liberty,"
" adventure" and "booty. She almost
wishod that sho were a man, so sho might
Bwell the rank of the demanding people.
As it was, sho would wait till Sunday and
toll Philipe about it. Philipo was her lover,
a young shoep herder, whom because of his
empty purse and lowly calling, old Camillo
thought not a worthy suitor for his
daughter's hand.
Philipe Uncndez was the lypcofa.pecul-
iar class of men in tho West, Though not
educated, his mind was stored with the
very best kind of knowledge���the knowledge which comes of experience, independence of thought and reflection. Hording
his sheep on the still mesas, alono with
oreatttres dumb only as to human speech,
communing with tho wind, the sun and
stars, reading of thc great writers, ho had
arrived at conclusions and defined meanings
which could not bc false, having nature and
mind at their base.
Having been drilled in the public schools
in the foundation of language, ho was enabled to appreciate books, which, as he had
them not in superabundance, were to him
treasures not to be lightly thought of. Yet
he lived on simply and crudely, Ho had
tried when he was younger to livo In town,
clerking in a dry goods store, and availing
himself of " society " as it is in a border
Texas town, but he could not endure it. It
was during this attempt at "civilization
that he had met Margarita Camillo, a shy
little maiden attending the convent in the
same town, spending her Saturdays and
Sundays at thc house where Philipe was
** boarding. ..'���'���;,
The two untamed ��� iyoung hearts had
leaped Warm to each other, and both had
gone back gladly to the prairies, the herds,
the freedom and beauty of ranch life.
Camillo's disapprobation of licr lover was
the one wrinkled leaf in the rose bed cf the
happy Margarita's life, and quick leapt her
eager, loving little heart to a plan of revealing her Philipe iu his true light to her father.
She could scarcely await the passage of each
long sunny Spring day till Sunday should
bring her lover. But at last the day came.
She helped old Margo about her work all
the morning, in order to kill timo ; then she
strolled off, languid of foot, but eager of
heart, toward the river. As soon as she
was out of sight of the house she ran, skimming along the trail by the river, to the place
whereshe was in the habit of meelingjPhilipe.
Soon she heard the sound of his horse's ieet,
keeping time to his voice as he was singing
" La Golandrina," the song which to the
Mexicans is the same as our "Home, Sweet
Home " to us;
Adonda ira vel oz y fauizoda,
Lagolamlrina que da aqui sl val
0' si en el aire gomora cxtraviada
Buscando abigo y no lo escountrara,
She hid behind a tree and waited till he
was just opposite her; then springing forward, caught his bridle rein and demanded
in mock bravado: " Quien vivo 1"
" Margarita 1" exclaimed Philipe, dismounting aad taking her in his arms.
"No, senor I" she went on teasiugly, trying to free herself from his clasp. " Not
Margarita, but a friend of Garza I The pies
word of your life 1"
"That and that!" said Philipe, kissing
her on each cheek. " Now tell me what
you know about Garza 1"
"Everything," she answered, proudly;
" even that on this revolutionary ladder of
Garza's favor you, my Philipe, must rise to
the less honorable but to us more important
favor of my father."
" Why, what a little plotter you aro!''
exclaimed Philipe, kissing her again.
"Where and when have you learned all
these State secrets?"
" At home from my father and the padre.
They talk Garza and la libertad all the day
snd night, Philipe. 1 listen and resolve
'now shall my Philipe prove to them
what a brave and noble map he is I Now
���hall he join the revolutionary forces, and
by gallant deeds rise up, up���captain,
colonel, general, commander-in-chief, who
knows ?���till my father will be proud tn
take his hand and say; here is my poor little
Margarita, Don Philipe Ornendez, take her
if she be good enough for thee.1 And then
the dear padre will bless us and make us
one."'
Philipe looked proudly and tenderly into
her eyes. Then folding her again to his
heart said:   "No!"
" No, what, dearest!" she asked, looking
up at him.
He sighed and answered. " Never mind
little one," then went on more practically
as they walked side by side, one of his arms
around her waist, and the other linked
through the pony's bridle: " 1 know all
about Garza's revolt, sweetheart, and am
heart and soul with him. My only fear is
concerning you. 1 fear that entering the
service will take me entirely away from you.
We do not know how long it will last, nor
what it may bring forth���exile, imprisonment, death perhaps. Then, shall I tell you
the truth ? 1 fear Si Murdock, I know he
loves you, and hates me, and that your
father favours his suit."
" But myself, Philipo 1 Can my father or
tho padre either forco me to marry a man
whom I hate���especially when I love another!"
" No, darling, but thoy can take advantage
of my absonco���ordoath���to persecute and
worry you "��� He broke off suddenly, and
bitterly : " I wish to Ood, Margarita, your
father would look at tills matter in a reasonable light and let us be married nt once.
1 could then take you to my friends in the
interior, whero you would bc safe, and I
could plunge heart and soul inlo the revolution."
"He will not." sighed Margarita.
" No, he will not," echoed Philipe.
They had turned oil'Up main trail and
had reached a litlle nook in the brush
where they wcre wont to have these meetings. Seated upon the ground they chatted
and made lovo, as happy, heedless l"vers
ever did and over will. It was near sunset
when thoy parted; he to gallop back to
,aredo and she to stroll by a renter's cabin
n her way homo, so that her conscience no
less than her face might be at ease when
she told her father that she had been to see
Benevides' sick child.
So thc border war raged, covert it is true
and striking in the dark and from the
thicket, yet striking hard enough to make
its blows felt by two great nations. Vague-
ly it was felt by the United States, and especially so es it occurred at a time when
the entire country was up in arms against
Chili and her affront to the American flag.
Scarcoly more keenly was It felt in old
Mexico, where Diaz sat not quite so comfortable on his throne called chair, and his
people scowled and whispered in the secrecy of their adobe walls of insurrection
against tyranny. Still more keenly was
this little rancorous war of tho chaparral
felt on the border of Texas, the hospitality
of whoso soil had been abused by making it
the battlefield of a nation at war with itself.
Down hi the bond of the Rio Grande the
littlo ranch was all out of tune with its
mocking birds and peach blossoms. Old
Camillo was solicitous for his daughter's
safoty ; the padre was his adviser, and Si
Murdock pushed his Biiit unblusliingly,
whilo his more patriotic rival was iu the
field.
Murdock was a scout, a white man of
good family and some money. His father
was a well-to-do ranchman, and Si had
been sent to St. Louis to school, but book
learning had passed through his head as the
tone of a love song passes through unsympathetic ears. Ho was born of ond for the
prairies, the chapsaral, and tho cactus, Ho
knew every inch of Southern Texas, from
the Rio Grande to the Sabine. Yet when
it came to putting his knowledge into
practical use for his country's good Si
weakened. He was simply a vain, boastful
fellow, fond of sporting firearms and " cutting a figger." For the Bake of gratifying
this vainglory of his he had gone to Austin
and got out special ranger papers, signed
duly by the Adjutant-General of Texas,
which papers authorized him to wear arms
aud take a hand in the well ordering of his
country whenever and wherever thc occasion
demanded it. On thc strength of this
authority he proceeded to buckle on his six
shooter and bowie knife, and to strut about
very importantly among his neighbors. He
had come over to old Don Camillo's. this
afternoon, more to "show off" to Margarita
than for any better purpose.
The girl had grown thin and pale, but a
new-born hope or resolution shone iu her
eyes.
" I wish not to see thee, Si Murdock, nor
to speak to thee," she said, dropping into
the use of the old-fashioned pronoun as she
spoke English.
Si ignored her repulse. "But, Margarita," he urged, "oneof two things has
happened to Philipe. He is either dead or
cares no more to see you."
"Neither has happened, Si Murdock,"
she answered wearily.
"Then why has he not come to see you,
or written or sent a message?"
"Because he is too busy liberating his
country, which will not await his pleasure
as I do."
"You shall marry me 1" said Si, seizing
her hand.
"Father!" she cried, wrenching her hand
away, and springing up with flaming eyes
and cheeks.
Old Camillo came hobbling from the
house, querulous and drowsy.
"How long, senor, am I to be persecuted
by this man ?" she asked excitedly.
"Just so long as he pleases, my daughter
and you are so foolish as not to encourage
him."
The girl turned and walked slowly away
from them.
"What is to be done, senor?" asked
Murdock, as though some refractory colt
had refused the girth and bridle.
" Leave her to me j 1 will send for the
padre and set him to work on her. She
fears and respects the holy church as she
never will man, be he father or husband."
Margarita walked down the river trail,
Sho had no real hope of meeting Philipe
there, for she had been there every afternoon for the past three weeks and no
Philipe had come to meet her. As she
pushed the brush away with both hands
she was startled by a horse's head thrust
over hers. She looked up, and behold I It
was Stranger, Philipe's own pony, and
there was Philipe lying face downward on
the earth. Was he dead! Merciful heaven !
She sprang to his side and he started and
looked up. Then they were weeping in
each other's arms.
" It was my first and probably last chance
to see you!" he said. " 1 have
been ordered to the interior, and am now on
my way to the lower Rio Grande."
"I will go away with you, Philipe," the
said suddenly.
"You, darling!  You cannot.   We are
watched and hunted like wild beasts,   We
are spied upon and betrayed,and shot down
without mercy.   A woman along! It is out
of the question."
" But I will not be a woman !"
" What dn you mean !"
" That 1 will be a man; a Mexican patriot, as you are.   See how tall and strong I
am,   I can shoot, ride, endure.   1 must go!
Then you do not know what you would
leave me to,  Philipe.   Si Murdock is now
closeted with my father.  The padre, too,
is against me.   1 would rather die with you
in the war than to, to"���
" You are right, Margarita!" he cried,
his eyes flashing and his heart burning to
ride up to the house and shoot down in his
tracks the villain who would rob and outrage him in his absence. " I will at least
take you to a place of safety with my
friends."
" You shall see," she cried, "Stayhere,
I will Ily" -an 1 the chaparral closed behind
her before he could answer, In and out ��he
wont through the tangled, flesh-tearing
brush, as sure footed and keen sighted as a
deer to Benevides' house.
The little family was at supper. Bene-
vides.his wife,and a little pale-faced'2-year-
old chihl which Margarita had nursed back
to life. In a rough cradle Iny another child,
a '..'.week's old "baby. Margarita, quickly
explaining lhc situation, instruoted Benevides to hurry to her home and bring her
own pony from the corral.
While the wife brought the clothes Mai-
garita sioo 1 before the litlle cracked mirror
and cut off her beaulilul long hair just even
With tlie nape of the neck, as the "Greasers"
wear theirs. The clothes fitted her admirably, except an extra length to the toes of
her boots, which the wifo filled out with
cotton. When the costume was complete
the two women had a hearty laugh, notwithstanding the serious nature of the undertaking, Hurriedly belting on her pistol aud
cartridges,Msrgarltakissed the wite and the
littlo ones and started for the rendezvous.
They arrived thore at almost the same minute. Benevides had taken his own saddle,
which ho had hid iu the brush on tho roadside, while he wont up to the house to get
the horso, so all was ready for tho mount.
The pony shrank from Margarita's hand on
tho bridle, until she said, " Why Mio Bon-
ito, dost though not know thy mistress!''
Then the pony rubbed his head against her
shoulder as much as to say; "Ah, iny
Udy, mon may he misled by strange clothes
and cropped hair, but not a horse.
Philipe was almost speechless at tho suocess oi the transformalion. "Wo must
hurry Margarita," was all he said. " 1 must
be in Rrownsville by to-morrow noon." He
wrung Benevides' hand. " I will Bee that
yon are paid full prico for your outfit, my
friend," he said gratefully, and away went
the two gay caballeros to the war.
"Where is Senor Garza?" asked Margarita, as thoy rode along in the .lusk,
"In Mexico."
" What is ho doing there !"
" Mustering secret troops in the capital."
" But suppose they should capture him ?"
Margarita asked.
"He'll never be taken alive, and if they
should kill him a hundred capable men
would spiing up to take his place."
So these two free lances rude along, too
much absorbed in the issues of the war to
think of each other and their mutual danger.
The night grew dark and threatened
rain. Toward midnight Margarita grew
very tired and faint, hut Philipe cheered
her up and persuaded her to lake occasional sips of tho whiskey which te had in his
canteen,
About;) o'clock in the morning Philipe
said: " I see that yon arc utterly worn out,
darling. We will stop and let you have a
little rest before daybreak, for then we can
not afford to stop a minute, but must push
on as fast as we can, trying to avoid both
the regular army troops and the Rangers."
" I wouldn't mind the Rangers,'' the girl
answered and smiled.
" Things are different with us, now, my
dear," Philipe answered, sighing. Turning into the thicket, he soon mado her comfortable with the two blankets and his_overcoat. .-
" Sleep sweetly, little one, he said kissing her and tucking the coarse covering
about her neck. " I will keep guard, and
'the ponies are ready ' to mount at an
instant's warning."
She was asleep in a few moments, her
fair, sweet face gleaming like a flower
against the thicket.
Philipe sat with his back against a tree
and his eyes fixed on her, while his keen
ears took in overy fall of a leaf or flutter of
a bird in thc thiikct.
In the meantime Si Murdock had left the
Camillo ranch without waiting for Margarita, beiug in truth afraid to be out alone
after dark.
Old Camillo had returned to his chair on
the veranda, supposing that Margarita had
gone to Benevides1 as usual, and would be
back for supper.
Dusk came. The cows camo up and lowed outside the pen ; their calves set up a
plaintive bleating outside, and old Margot
waddled down to them with her tin pails
and calf rope. The cackling chickens sought
their roosts, and great droves of Paradise
birds settled down in the trees for the night.
The long red lines of the setting sun fell
slanting along the parched fields,land peach
tree aisles, and the murmuring voice of the
river came clear and soothing on the twilight
air. Creak, creak, creak, went old Camillo's
rocking chair, and nod, nod, nod, went his
drowsy head, Once he thought he heard
footsteps about the fence, but they were
dim, and the air was so soft, and the birds'
chatter was so monotonous, and the river's
song was so sweet, he slept on, and reoked
not of war or treachery.
Si Murdock rode briskly, but had sot
gone more than three miles when he heard
the tramp of many horses' feet and the
sound of voices. His first impulse was to
run, his second to hide his arms, his third
to pat his breast pocket containing the
papers, and put en a look of loyal citizenship.
"Who goes there?" called the voice of
Capt. J. 8. McNeel of the State Rangers.
"Acithsenof Texas," was the calm answer.
"Your name, friend!"
"Si Murdook."
"By what authority are you carrying
fire-arms, Mr. Murdock!"
Nervously Si drew his precious papers,
and handed them to the captain. McNeel
examined them carefully, at the same time
taking in the appearance and character of
the bearer.
"All right, Mr. Murdock," he said, "we
are juet hunting a man like you. I see
you are a reliable scout. We want to get
to the nearest safe crossing on the river.
Just fall in and lead the way."
" But-er"- Si began.
" Never mind about your clothes, oryour
not having had a shave. No apologies
needed. 1 ve seen gentlemen like you before, Mr. Murdock ; mostly in towns, however.   Fall in, please I"
"That's the way to doit, Cap's," laid
some one in the rear.
" Yes, it ain't every man that gets greatness thrust upon him in that style, said
another.
Si had to take this chaff with the best
grace possible, but ho sadly wished that
he had been content with plain citizenship
and not got out those special service papers,
Away in the lonesome chaparral Marga
rita slept,hcr dreamless slumbers undisturbed by memory of Si Murdock. Kven in her
sleep she felt Philipe near and waB comforted.
The dawn camo faint in the east, yet
Philipe had not thc heart to waken her.
But his judgment stopped in to bias the
decrees of love, and leaving his post ho laid
his lips on her forehead. " Waken, dearest," ho said softly, " ll is daylight, and
we must be going."
She sat up self-posscssod and greatly refreshed.
"Poor fellow!" she said, nestling hor
head on Philipe's shoulder, "You have
had no rest, and are shivering for thc need
of your coat.   How selfish and thoughtless
I am."
Sho held his coat while ho put it on, then
buttoned it up, giving him a kiss for each
of the three bullous.
"That warms me !" he aaid smiling, and
turned to help her on her horse, but she
stopped him as she said laughingly : ' Whut
would the Rangers think if they should soo
one Greaser helping another on his pony?"
She sprang to her saddlo and ho followed
suit. They travelled quite briskly for about
an hour and a half. This brought thom
into the country of Hidalgo, near a place
called Four Comers.
While Margarita chattered on, merry in
spite of her danger, Philipe kept his head
partially turned,and seemed to be listening
to something behind them.
" Suppose we turn off hore a little, Margarita," ho said, leading the way almost at
right angles to that they had been t ravel-
ling.
" That is out of our course,if you want to
reach Santa Juanita," sho said,
" Not much, and it is lesa liablo to bo
traveled."
"You aro unoasy, Philipe," sho said.
"You aro not wise to keep things from me;
I've boen watching your face, and I know
you are worried,   What is it!"
"Well, I think 1 heard horsos'feet���a
good many of them, It may bo a herd of
cattle, it may be the troops or lUngers,and
it may be our own men,"
By this timo tho sound was drawing so
near that Margarita herself could hear it.
" It is not onr men,'' Philipo continued.
" How do you know!"
���' The horses are large footed, and I can
not quite tell which way they arc coming."
They had  left what might bo called a
trail in that traillcss country, and  were
huddled out of sight in a denser growth off
to ono side,   The  tramp of hoofs grew
nearer, and there soon came in view a band
of rangers following the course they had
taken,
" They arc tracking us," Philipo said.
" Holy mother, direct me what to do I"
The'scction they had just crossed from
the trail was thickly grown with low brush
and mesquite grass. It was possible that
the Rangers might nol notice tho break in
the tracks and continue their forward
courso. The minutes seemed hours to Philipe, and he grew almost an old man in those
terrible seconds of anxiety. Like a succession of flash lights there darted through
his mind tho hundred different and equally
perilous things to do. Ho thought of the
girl's peaceful and protected life at
home, aud for the first time blamed himself
for bringing her away. He feared to continue into the jungle, for fear tho sound of
tho cracking brush would attact.attcution.
If he had been alone he Would have given
up to thom, depending upon the plausibility
of his appearance as a harmless traveler, together with such corroborating evidence as
he was sure to get from any of tho Mexicans
in that section.   But the girl���
The Rangers hesitated, slopped and looked to theright and left. In two minutes
they came galloping that way.
"Now to run for our lives!" he said,
quickly tightening the girth of Mjjr   ' -j
saddle, ,���,.
t a ai. i    v..,      i      .d��theyre-
Into the brush they plungc.,g 0j rj     a
itssnapping drowning in their.h . ^ ft
of their pursurers. On and on blindly am.'
desperately they plunged, the sensible
horses choosing the clearest way, while thc
riders dogged the brush. Once turning his
head Philipe saw the blood trickling down
Margarita's face, where a thorn had scraped
the tender skin clean across the cheek. That
in itself hurt him worse than a pistol shot.
The girl's face was white. Yet her lips were
firm and she whispered something cheering
to him as they came side by side.
They must have run this way fully a mile
when they heard the brush cracking close
behind them, and knew that the Rangers
wore upon them.
Wheeling his horse sidowise in front of
hers, Philipe prepared to sell their lives as
as dearly as possible, Yet, thinking of the
sweet life in his charge he weakened, and
called out clearly, "We surrender I"
The Rangers halted, thoir rifles lowered
and the captain said something to him, but
as he spoke a form darted from the rear, and
Philipe saw Si Murdock's murderous face
before him. Bang! went a gun and Philipe,
stunned, terrified, heard a cry and a gurgle
behind him.- He whirled around and caught
Margarita in his arms as she fell from her
saddle shot through the breast. Drawing
her from her horse to hispommel, he heldher
against him and emptied every Bhot of his
revolver into the ranks of the enemy. They
would have made short business of his life
had not their captain commanded "cease
firing."
Bight in the muzzle of Philipe's pistol
Capt. McNeel rode quiokly and alono to
his side.
"There is some mistake here," he said.
"I beard you offer surrender."
But Philipe was not listening. He had
dismounted and laid the dying girl on the
ground. He longed to throw himself beside her and put a bullet through his own
heart, but he dared not arouse suspicion as
to her sex.
"Leave me alone I It is all the mercy you
can show me now," he pleaded, as he
forced some whisky between Margarita's
lips, while her pony came nearer, neighing
and trying to touoh his mistress.
Capt McNeel turned to his men and said :
" There wm no need of firing that shot.
Who did it!"
No one answered.
"Who shot this boy!" the captain again
asked, and this time the new scout answered: "I did."
"What did you do it for!"
" The other one was aiming at me. 1 returned his fire. I did not mean to kill that
one."
" You're a liar!" broke in one of the men
" He was aiming at no one. He intended to
surrender, 1 behove you know thc men and
had some personal grudge against them 1"
They were interrupted by a pioroing
shriek, which cut the hearts of even those
death-familiar men.
" Dead! dead ! my darling I my Mar
garita! Murdered by him 1" At thia Si Mur
dock throw himself from his horse. Philipe
had torn open the girl's clothing to stanch
tho wound, and hor beautiful white breast
waa exposed, clotted with the still oozing
blood.
"Damn you!" he hissed, turning on Murdock and plunging at him with drawn
knife, which tho captain seized, having already taken possession of hia pistol and
rifle,
Palo and trembling Si Murdock sank
upon the ground,
"My God, what have I done," ho
cried.
".Murdered a woman, you brute," answered the captain.
Philipo and Murdock each refusing to
givo any further information on the subject, the former was arrested and the latter
given to understand that he would have to
account for firing without orders.
" Continue the march I" commanded the
Captain, and they pushed on into Brownsville Philipe sullenly holding the dead girl
in his arms, and apparently oblivious to
everything else, until his eyes fell upou
Murdock,
Then his face became purple with raje
and agony, and he said :
" We'll meet in a fair field before this war
is over, and when we do neither man nor
God shall keep me from killing you 1"
SNAEING A BULL 0AK1B0U-
ii Was Unsportsmanlike, imtTiien Jsirs
Tii'tfim Wiih Hail.
Well, I'm sorry we missed that caribou,"
taid my guide, " but I bet we can cane
one."
I wason a hunting trip wiih .lules Tristan in thc neighborhood of Kagle Luke.
The third day out ho had struck the track
of a caribou, sighted it once or twice, but
never came near enough to get a shot,
though for eighteen hours wo tramped and
ploughed our way through the thick woods
and treacherous undergrowth on the trail
"Goahead," I said, though I was a trifle
Incredulous, having never trapped anything
larger than a rabbit myself, But if it
could be done 1 certainly wished to seo tho
trick.
Our camp wis pitched on the shore of a
small pond, and the country around it was
thickly timbered. A couple of miles to the
north J tiles had noticed a caribou run, leading iu from the foothills to the water, and
it was along this pathway winding in and
out among'the trees like a clearly defined
mule trail that he proposed to put his plan
into operation.
I shall not forget the morning we started
out. It was intensely cold, tho thermometer having fallen from ten dcgr.es above
to ten below zero.
By way of appliances, Jules carried au
axe, and a coil of stout wire : and selecting
a spot where the trees wcre thickest and
the most regular he was soon nt work. His
scheme was simple, and looked effective, if
the denizen of the wood would only help
play Iiis hand, which was asking, 1 thought,
a good deal.
It was to erect a barrier immediately
across the run,leaving an opening in it about
four feet from the- ground and adjust a
nooso, fastened to a sapling, in such a manner that a caribou, In'attempting to forco
his way through, would get hung like ajack
rabbit.   , . . ,  ,
The barrier was built of freshly cut branches, woven in and out to give tlie appearance
ofa natural hedge, yet stout enough to oiler
considerable resistance to an animal at-
templing to pass it. A hole was left in it
about in th". "ddle large enough for a Ctrl', 'get its antlers through. Thc
size of the opening, ctin
'J"I'll? ' "slze 0I lne ��Penl"g>
POcnaicd from view, and tlie young
���*���'��� '-ptoppin'
Mrs. P. /s t,
Mr. &
Crage, Mr,ch it was attached stood some
\ta. Bih^Y'itck, liko a tall executioner,
tou.ol-.a.id strong.
Two hours was J idea -no more, no less���
in constructing his extempore gallows, then
turning to me he offered to bet that inside
of threo days it would have an occupant. I
took him up, and a new hat hung on the
banging of that caribou.
On the way back Jules explained thatthe
efficiency of the trap rested on the fact that
animals of the horned species once accustomed to a run can not l>e easily turned out
of it, but will try to effect a passage
through anything in their way, ami as the
hole seems the weakest part it is into this
they plunge���only to feel the tightening
noose.
Early next morning we were both on hand,
as the guide said, to pick up the pieces,
but to my surprise and hia disgust, the
hedge was broken and wire noose gone. The
caribou had been caught round the antlers
instead of round the neck, and with a desperate jerk had freed itself, This Jules said
he had never known to happen betore, and
it was with more than usual care that he repaired the trap and readjusted it for a second attempt.
The day following found it untouched,
but on the third day a noise of tremendous
thrashing among the trees told us as we approached that the noose had done its work,
and a captive awaited ub. Nor were we
mistaken for, sure enough, there swung a
bull caribou, a beauty, pulling for all he was
worth and choking to death as the noose
tightened and cut into his throat.
A ball from my rifle soon put the animal
out of its misery, and Jules had won hii
bet.   The caribou weighed 480 pounds.
On the whole, though, f am not anxious
to see another caribou caught that way. In
the first place 1 think it cruel, and In the
second place unsportsmanlike.
a* ���      a
Tnnnel between Ireland and Seo t land.
A proposition is made to connect Great
Britain and Ireland by a tunnel driven under the North channel of the Irish sea at its
narrowest part, between County Antrim in
Ireland and Wigtown in Scotland. The
length of the tunnel would be some twenty-
seven miles. A number of eminent engineers declare the project entirely-feasible. It
is admitted the tunnel would not be commercially profitable, but much is claimed for
it in the way of natural advantages, and th*
proposition is that it should be a national
undertaking.
Bhe Can't Help Iti
Misleading statements have been printed
concerning Lady Henry Somerset's ownership of licensed shops and inns where intoxicating liquors were sold, which seemed
rather inconsistent with her zeal io the temperance cause, It is now some 10 years
since Lady Somerset inherited her father's
property, and though she has closed eight
of the licensed houses at the expiration of
the leases, several othcr landlords still hold
ground leases which have not as yet expired, with the licenses of which Lady Henry
has no right to interfere.
The Halo Didn't Tit.
Firat Commuter���They've doubled the
number of afternoon trains : that's good !
,-iecond Commuter���I don't know���it
doubles the chances of missing a train, you
know. HY)! Kootenay btar
SATURDAY, MAHCH 11, 1893.
The Kaslo Examiner hue beeu used
88 ii " tool" by townsito boomers at
the northern end of Kooteuuy Lake,
and, at their prompting, has published some " indisputable facts"
which are as fur from tbe truth as
Kaslo is from the Lardeau mines.
The only excuse that cau be offered
iu its behalf is its extreme youth mid
the fact that, having been in this
country iibout five minutes, the smart
Alec who penned those " indisputable
facts" has never visited tbe Lardeau
proper and knows nothing whatever
about it, nor of tbe Northeast Arm,
which ho so glibly attempts to describe. He has simply been stuffed
by those whose interest it is to delude
the public into buying their townsite
lots before the superior facilities and
natural advantages of Trout Lake
Oity become kuown. One of these
boom townsites still hangs on to the
name of "Lardo"���even after the
Registrar-General has refused to record it under that name���simply to
connect tho place in the mind of tbe
public with the rich Lardean mining
country. But the Examiuor's attaok
on Rovelstoke is just as useless and
uncalled for as Don Quixote's attack
im the windmill. Onr article, which
seems to have hit the boomers right
iu their vital part (i.e. the pocket),
made no mention of Revelstoke's
distance from the mines, but was
written with a deBire to give British
fair play to Trout Lake City and
Lardeau City, the former right in the
heart of the mining district, which
towns were entirely ignored in the
Examiner's former article in wliich it
claimed the whole of the Lardean���
coming even as far np as the Great
Northern ledgo in its desire to grab
tbe whole district. But since the
young man from over tbe border has
given such an exhibition of spread-
eagleism we feel compelled to contradict his "indisputable facts" and ask
him to obtain a map of the Lardeau
and find out where the mines really
are. Only one group (Haskins) is
situated at the south-east eud of
Trout Lake, 35 miles from "Lardo"
nnd 63 from Kaslo. The richest and
best mines lie north aud north-east
of Trout Lake���20 miles further away
from Kaslo and 20 miles nearer Revelstoke. The railway from Revelstoke
to the North-east Arm, as surveyed,
is 25 miles; from the Arm to Trout
Lake 18���43 miles; from Kaslo to
the Lardeau mines, 80 miles. The
Examiner is "cute" enough to make
the Haskius group the base of its
measurement, thus adding the whole
length of Trout Lako (21 miles) to
tbe actual distance of Revelstoke from
the mines proper. The "perpendicular
rock bluffs thousands of feet high"
nre there right enough, but there nre
passes behind them, in front of them
nnd all round them, so that they present no barrier to ingress to the Lardeau, as will soou be illustrated by
��� the extension of the Revelstoke anil
��� Arrow Lake Ry. through to Kootenay
Lake. Our little contemporary should
have made itself acquainted with this
fact before publishing such "indisputable'' bunkum at the instigation
of parties who have no use for truth
except to twist aud pervert it for their
own ]-.articular benefit. We have an
idea that the Examiner is making a
Yankee boast when it says the steamboats there make tbe 28 miles betweeu
Kaslo ami "Lardo" in "just one hour
and a half," It has always been the
rule iu this country to send a copy
of a uew paper to the papers published iu the distriot. This the publisher of the Examiner never had tbe
courtesy to do, and the first copy of
the hybrid production which found
its way to Kevelstoke was so heavily
weighted with "indisputable facts"
that it is a wonder it ever reached
���here at all. We are asked to " let
Kaslo and N'elsou alone." Willingly.
Our little contemporary should not
make its imported impudence too
���conspicuous. Tbe situation is galling
enough as it is. If you want ns to
speak plaiuer, Mr. Examiner, jus*
give us a few " indisputable facts "
on the benefits to be derived from
"soaking one's head in a washtub."
It.   KUliiSUIN
HAS RECEIVED A SUPPLY OP
FIRST-CLASS FLOUR
From the Western Milling Co. of Regina.
This company at present, find themselves compelled to DOUBtK the size
of TiiKiii mill, tlie demand for their flour having so largely iucreased.
The wheat reaped ou the Regina plains last harvest was pronounced the
best BETWEEN Winnipeg and tiie Mountains, Bpeciul Samples being
secured for the World's Fair at Chicago.
Flour made from this quality of wheat is the article Mr. Robson is now
offering to the inhabitants of Revelstoke nnd district.
Patent Hungarian, Strong Baker's, Oats, Shorts, Bran,
Chopped Feed, Rolled Oats Granulated
Oatmeal, Wheat, Hay, &c.
Always see Robsou's priceB before buying elsewhere.   They will be the
LOWEST 1'OSSlllLl'  FOB CASH.
Revelstoke. He had no doubt tlmt
the Dominion Oovcrnmont was
wrong in assuming that they had
that power, More light would be
thrown on the subject whon judgment was given in the case of the
Dominion Government vs. Farwell.
The parties who had been granted
lund from the Dominion Government would have to go to the Dominion Government to have their cases
settled. The Provincial Government having granted the land to
one party cannot recognizo the
olaiins of other parties.
Hon. Mr. Beaven had no doubt that
the giant made to Mr. Farwell was
made unadvisedly. He believed in
upholding provincial rights, but he
did not believe in doing wrong. The
Provincial Government had no right
to deal with the lands wbioh were
under reservation at the time. There
were some ugly rumors flying about
in regard to the issuing of those
orown grants. The Provincial Government had a very poor case in their
disput with the Dominion Government. The papers in reference to
the disputes should be laid before
the House.
The resolution was withdrawn.
From Mr. Davie's remarks it would
appear that any more communications from our citizens to the Provincial Government on this matter
will be so much waste time, Mr.
Kellie has done his best, and deserves onr heartiest thanks, but it ia
evident the Provincial Government
will not give way. We must make
pers'stcnt application to the Dnmiu-
ion Government until the townsiie
case is again moving in the courts.
Tom Reed's boat is fast approaching completion, and she is a model.
Her length over ull is 23 feet, on a
20-foot keel. She is canoe shaped,
and will be used for np river work.
She cau be unloaded and carried
around the Death Rapids. The trip
down from Big Bend will be accomplished in C nr 8 hours.
RUBE  ALLYN,
Amebica's  Famous Humobist, accompanied HY
CHARLES KELLY,
the well and favorably known Basso-
Cantanto and Guitar Soloist,
will appear in
PETERSON'S HALL,
on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22s*n.
Admission, 50c.; Reserved Seats, $1;
Children half price.
Entertainmf-nt at eight o'clock,  Free
'bus wil] leave station at 7.30.
Tickets on sale at Post-office and at
Railwav Station.
ReveUtokfl Towii8lte Dispute
In the Provincial Legislature last
week .Mr. K<dlie moved that whereas
no satisfaction can bo obtained relating t<> tbe purohase or pre-emption
of lands in the twenty mil"'1 elt: and
whereas the inactive policy of the Do.
minion Gover ment is retarding thn
settlementof lands in Kootenny; and
whereas purchasers of lots made
Beven years ago in the Revelstoke
townsite have been unable, through
litigation, to perfect titles to said lots;
therefore, be it resolved, that an
bumblo address be presented to (lin
Honor tlio Lieut-Governor, praying
him to take sneb steps as will Imst
promote the settlement of said lands,
Bnd allow purchasers to pcrfeot
titles to said lots in Revelstoke,
The mover said tbo question involved
was a serious matte.r and anything
the Government did wonld be of in- j
tereat to the people of Rovelstoke,
Hon. Mr. Davie said the Dominion
���Government hud assumed tho status '
M ���** freeholder and granted laud in t
W. J. J,AW,
Merchant Tailor,
(Near C.P.R. Station)
REVELSTOKE,    IS .fi.
A   ROBB?   -T'tt K   Of
EngllHli Worsteds, Scotch and
Iri-h Tweeds and 8er*reH
AT PRICES THAT WILL CATCH
Vol .
CAVEATS,
AOE   MARKS,
DESIGN PATENTS,
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NOTICE OF
SALE BY  SHERIFF.
PURSUANT TO
THE "EXECUTION ACT."
IN THE SUPREME COURT OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
JOHN CAMPBELL
AND
THE KOOTENAY B.C. SMELTING
k TRADING SYNDICATE (Ld.).
In obedience to a writ of Fi Fa issued
out of the Supreme Court of British
Columbia, dated the 14th day of
February, 1893, and to me directed
in the above-named suit for the sum
of $10,481.23, nnd $3.50 for costs
of execution, etc., and also interest
on $10,458.34, at 6 per cent, per
onnum, from the 20th day of January, 1893, until payment, besides
sheriff's fees, poundage, and all
other expenses of this execution,
I have seized and will SELL by
PUBLIO AUCTION the following
GOODS on THURSDAY, tbe 2nd
day of March, 1893, at lhe Kooteuay
(B.C.) Smelting k Trading Syndicate
(Limited) works, near Revelstoke,
B.C., at 12 o'clock noon, to satisfy
the judgment debt aud costs in this
action, if the said amouuts are not
6ooner paid,
LIST OF GOODS SEIZED.
1 stationary hoisting engine and
hoisting gear.
1 stationary engine and fixtures in
lower engine-room.
1 fnu blast and fixtures.
1 Guruey scale, capacity 3,500 lbs.
1 large stationary engine,
1 steam pump.
5 iron wheelbarrows.
2 large oil tanks, with pumps.
2 jack screws.
50 feet rubber hose.
50 feet baud iron.
200 feet hemp rope,
5 boxes window glass,
17 slag pots, small.
2    "     "    large.
16 moulds, quantity crushed ore,
wire rope, charcoal and coke, number
metal castings, pulleys, belts, 200
pigs bullion, etc.
ti. REDGRAVE,
Sheriff of Kootenay.
Revelstoke, Feb. 20th, 1893.
Tbe above Sale is adjourned till
Wednesday, the 8tl. day of March,
1893, at same place and hour.
S. REDGRAVE, Sheriff.
Tbe above sale is further adjourned
to Moniiav. the 27th day of March,
at l lift samn place and hour.
S. REDGRAVE, Sheriff.
Do yoa Write for the Papers?
If ynu do, you should have THE
LADDER OF   JOURNALISM,
a Text Hook for Correspondents, Reporters, Editors and General Writers.
PRICE,  50  CENTS.
HY.r,t OH itK'T'.lPT <>? rniCK, nv
ALLAN   FORMAN,
117 Nassau Street, New York, N. Y.
State wlioro you taw thin anil yon will re-
c/ilvna)iaudi<oiri��Jlt)i',Krapli for framing.
G, TKRKYBERRY,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
REVELSTOKE.
Wan-rms and all kind's of
Vehicles Repaired.
Shoeing a Specialty.
PRICES RIGHT.
iNew trooas.
Just arrived, a splendid assortment of delicate shades in Shot, Pongee, Surah
and Bengaline Silks, Satins and Velvets.
Millinery.
We will open up in a few days nn extensive range of Hats, Ribbons and
LaceB.   Also Whitewear, Underwear aud Hosiery.
Boots and Shoes.
We have purchased these lines from tho best mannfnctnrers in Canada, and
can furnish special widths in any style.
H. N. COURSIER.
BOURNE BROS.
Revelstoke Station Post Office.
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES,
HAHDWaJJUEi GLOTHIIGi
BOOTS & SHOES,
GENTS'    FURNISHINGS.
FLOUR, OATS, SHORTS AND ALL RINDS OF FEED.
Stoves, Tinware, Crockery, Glassware, Carpets.
Doors, Windows, Builders' Hardware. Paints, Oils, Varnishes.
MINERS' AND  SPORTSMEN'S  SUPPLIES.
WALL  PAPER,  STATIONERY,  Etc.
CHRISTIE, BROWN & OO.'S BISCUITS AND CONFECTIONER!.
Bakery in connection with Store.
Messrs. C. B. Hume & Co.,
Kevelstoke Station,
OROCERIES
PROVISIONS
BOOTS & SHOES
FLOUR
FEED & OATS
AMMUNITION
HARDWARE
CLOTHING
MINERS' TOOLS
Consignment of Butter and Eggs received every week.
MINERS' AND HUNTERS' SUPPLIES.
ALL KINDS  OF   FURS BOUGHT   AND   SOLD
Railway Men's Requisites.
GOODS LOADED ON CAR AND STEAMBOAT FREE OF CHARGE.
T. L. HAIG,
NOTARY PUBLIC : : REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Mining and Real Estate Broker and General
Commission Agent.
FIRE, LIFE & ACCIDENT INSURANCE.
CONVEYANCING:   RENTS   AND   ACCOUNTS   COLLECTED.
MINING CLAIMS Bought and Sold.
REPRESENTATIVE OP THE KOOTENAY SMELTING AND TRADING
SYNDICATE.
agent for TROUT LAKE CITY, KASLO CITY, NAKUSP and other
TOWNSITES.
Ul
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0
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Tl    .
I    �� tl
I "* 2
0 bo
1 nl J)
al tl
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til
a
Furniture & Undertaking.
R.   HOWSON,
Has a largo Stock ol* Household Furniture, Coffins, Caskets,
Shrouds, &c.
REVELSTOKE, B.C. TIIE SEIRITA'S M.
Among the most respectable and reliable
Texo-Mexican citizens during tbe Garza
raids was one Senor Don Camillo, whose
ranch waa tucked away in a bend of the
Rio Grande, about half-way between
Brownsville and Laredo. This ranch was a
cozy enough placo when the Gulf breezes
sang through its peach orchards and the
mesquite grass grew green to tho doorstep,
and the bluejays and mocking-birds swam
and sang in the sunshine. A fit setting,
indeed, it seemed, for old Camillo's motherless daughter, tho handsome Margarita.
A strange, new phase of life was old Camillo's talk of war to the innocent Margarita whose only conception of battle was
the bold raid of the rangers after a horse
thief, a fence cutter or a road agent. She
listened to the grave talk of her father and
the padre, as she ground her tortillas,
or sat in the sunshine stringing the long
pods of chile iuto scarlet festoons, and her
Spanish heart thrilled at the mention of such
high-sounding words as "right," "liberty,"
" adventure" aud "booty, She almost
wished that she were a man, so she might
swell the rank of the demanding people.
As it was, sho would wait till Sunday and
toll Philipe about it. Philipo was her lover,
a young sheep herder, whom because of his
empty purse and lowly calling, old Camillo
thought not a worthy suitor for his
daughter's hand.
Philipe Onendezwas the type of a. peculiar class of men in the West. Though not
educated, his mind was stored with the
very best kind of knowledge���thc knowledge which comes of experience, independence of thought and reflection. Herding
his sheep on the still mesas, alono with
crea!.:rcs dumb only as to human speech,
communing with tlio wind, the sun and
stars, reading of the great writers, he had
arrived at conclusions and dclined meanings
which could not be false, having nature and
mind at their base.
Having been drilled in the public schools
in the foundation of language, he was enabled to appreciate books, which, as he had
them not in superabundance, were to him
treasures not to be lightly thought of. Yet
he lived on simply and crudely. He had
tried when he was younger to live in town,
clerking in a dry goods store, and availing
himself of " society " as it is in a border
Texas town, but he could not endure it. It
was during this attempt at " civilization "
that he had met Margarita Camillo, a shy
little maiden attending the convent in the
same town, spending her Saturdays anil
Sundays at the house where Philipe was
" boarding. ''*.���!. ' '
Tho two untamed ��� :young hearts had
leaped warm to each other, and both had
gone back gladly to the prairies, the herds,
the freedom and beauty of ranch life.
Camillo's disapprobation of her lover was
the one wrinkled leaf in the rose bed cf the
happy Margarita's life, and quick leapt her
eager, loving little heart to a plan of revealing her Philipe in his true light to her father.
She could scarcely await tho passage of each
long sunny Spring day till Sunday should
bring her lover. But at last the day came.
She helped old Margo about her work all
the morning, in order to kill timo ; then she
strolled off, languid of foot, but eager of
heart, toward the river. As soon as she
was out of sight of the house she ran, skimming along the trail bytheriver, to the place
whereshe was in the habit of meetingiPhilipe.
Soon she heard the sound of his horse's feet,
keeping time to his voice as he was singing
" La Golandrina," the song which to the
Mexicans is the same as our "Home, Sweet
Home " to us:
Adonda ira vol oz y fauizoda,
La golandrina quo da aqui si va?
0' sl nn el aire gomora oxtraviaua
Busoando abigo y no loescountrara,
She hid behind a tree and waited till he
was just opposite her; then springing forward, caught his bridle rein and demanded
in mock bravado: " Quien vive I"
"Margarita!" exclaimed Philipe, dismounting and taking her iu his arms,
"No, senor!" she went on teasiugly, trying to free herself from his clasp. "Not
Margarita, but a friend of Garza ! The pass
word of your life 1"
"That and that!" said Philipe, kissing
heron each cheek. "Now tell me what
you know about Garza !"
" Everything," she answered, proudly ;
"even that on this revolutionary ladder of
Garza's favor you, my Philipe, must rise to
the less honorable but to us more important
favor of my father."
"Why, what a little plotter you are!"
exclaimed Philipe, kissing her again.
" Where and when have you learned all
these State secrets?"
" At home from my father and the padre.
They talk Garza and la libertad all the day
and night, Philipe. I listen and resolve
-now shall my Philipe prove to them
what a brave and noble man he is! Now
���hall he join the revolutionary forces, and
by gallant deeds rise up, up���captain,
colonel, general, commander-in-chief, who
knows!���till my father will be proud to
take his hand and say; here is my poor little
Margarita, Don Philipe Ornendez, take her
if she be good enough for thee.' And then
the dear padre will bless us and make us
one.
Philipe looked proudly and tenderly into
her eyes. Then folding her again to his
heart aaid:   "No!"
" No, what, dearest ?" she asked, looking
up at him.
He sighed and answered. " Never mind
little one," then went on more practically
aa they walked side by side, one of his arms
around her waist, and the other linked
through the pony's bridle: "I know all
about Garza's revolt, sweetheart, and am
heart and soul with him. My only (ear is
concerning you. 1 fear that entering the
service will take me entirely away from you.
We do not know how long it will last, nor
what it may bring forth���exile, imprisonment, death perhaps. Then, shall I tell you
the truth ? I fear Si Murdock, I know he
loves you, and bates me, and that your
father favours his suit."
" But myself, Philipo ! Can my father or
tho padra oither forco me to marry a man
whom I hate���ospooially when I love auothor?"
"No, darling, but thoy can take advantage
of my absonco���or death���lo persecute and
worry you "��� He broke off suddenly, and
bitterly : " I wish to Ood, Margarita, your
father would look at this matter in a reasonable light and let us lie married at once,
1 could then take you to my friends iu the
interior, where you would be safe, and 1
oould plungu heart and soul into lho revolution."
" He will not." sighed Margarita.
" No, he will not," echoed Philipe.
They had turned off thi main trail and
had readied a little nook in the brush
where they were wont to have these meetings. Seated upon the ground they chatted
and made love, as happy, heedless lovers
ever did and ever will. It was near sunset
when they parted; he to gallop back to
Laredo and she to stroll by a renter's cabin
on her way home, so that her conscience no
less thau her face might be at ease when
she told her father that she had been to see
Benevides' sick child.
So the border war raged, covert it is true
and striking in the dark and from the
thicket, yet striking hard enough to make
its blows felt by two great nations. Vaguely it was felt by the United States, and especially so ?s it occureed at a time when
the entire country was up in arms agamst
Chili and her affront to the American flag.
Scarcely more keenly was it felt in old
Mexico, where Diaz Sat not quite so comfortable on his throne called chair, and his
people scowled and whispered in the secrecy of their adobe walls of insurrection
against tyranny. Still more keenly was
this little rancorous war of tho chaparral
felt on the border of Texas, the hospitality
of whose soil had been abused by making it
the battlefield of a nation at war with itself.
Down id the bond of the Rio Grande the
little ranch was all out of tune with its
mocking birds and peach blossoms, Old
Camillo was solicitous for his daughter's
safety ; the padre wa6 his adviser, and Si
Murdock pushed his suit unblushingly,
while his more patriotic rival was iu the
field,
Murdock was a scout, a white man of
good family and some money, His father
was a well-to-do ranchman, and Si had
been sent to St. Louis to school, but book
learning bad passed through his head as the
tone of a love song passes through unsympathetic ears. He was born of ond for the
prairies, the chapaaral, and tho cactus. He
knew every inch of Southern Texas, from
the Rio Grande to the Sabine. Yot when
il camo to putting his knowledge into
practical use for his country's good Si
weakened. He was simply a vain, boastful
fellow, fond of sporting firearms and "cut-
ling a figger." For the sake of gratifying
this vainglory of his he had gone to Austin
and got out special ranger papers, signed
duly by the Adjutant-General of Texas,
which papers authorized him to wear arms
aud take a hand in the well ordering of his
country whenever and wherever the occasion
demanded it. On the strength of this
authority he proceeded to buckle on his six
shooter and bowie knife, and to strut about
very importantly among his neighbors. Hc
hail come" over to" old Don Camillo's. this
afternoon, more to " show off" to Margarita
than for any batter purpose.
The girl had grown thin and pale, but a
now-boru hope or resolution shone in ber
eyes.
" I wish not to see thee, Si Murdock, nor
to speak to thee," she said, dropping into
the use of the old-fashioned pronoun as she
spoke English.
Si ignored her repulse. "But, Margarita," he urged, ''oneof two things has
happened to Philipe. He is either dead or
cares no more to see you."
"Neither has happened, Si Murdock,"
she answered wearily.
"Then why has he not come to see you,
or written or sent a message?"
"Because he is too busy liberating his
country, which will not await his pleasure
as I do,"
'You shall marry me!" said Si, seizing
her hand.
'ather!" she cried, wrenching her hand
away, and springing up with flaming eyes
and cheeks.
Old Camillo came hobbling from the
house, querulous and drowsy.
"How long, senor, am I to be persecuted
by this man ?" she asked excitedly.
"Just so long as he pleases, my daughter
and you are so foolish as not to encourage
him."
The girl turned and walked slowly away
from them.
"What is to be done, senor?" asked
Murdock, as though some refractory colt
bad refused the girth and bridle.
" Leave her to me; I will send for the
padre and set him to work on her. She
fears and respects the holy church as she
never will man, be he father or husband."
Margarita walked down the river trail.
Sho had no real hope of meeting Philipe
there, for she had been there every afternoon for the past three weeks and no
Philipe had come to meet her. As she
pushed the brush away with both hands
she was startled by a horse's head thrust
over hers. She looked up, and behold ! It
was Stranger, Philipe's own pony, and
there was Philipe lying face downward on
the earth, Was he dead? Merciful heaven !
She sprang to his side and he started and
looked up. Then they were weeping in
each other's arms.
"It was my first and probably last chance
to see you!" he said. " I have
been ordered to the interior, and am now on
my way to the lower Rio Grande."
"I will go away with you, Philipe," the
said suddenly.
"You, darling?  You cannot.   We are
watched and hunted like wild beasts.   We
are spied upon and betrayed,and shot down
without mercy.   A woman along I It is out
of the question."
" But I will not be a woman!"
" What do you mean !"
" That I will be a man; a Mexican patriot, as you are.   See how tall and strong I
am,   I can shoot, ride, endnre.   I must gol
Then you do not know what you would
leave me to,  Philipe.   Si Murdock is now
closeted with my father.   The padre, too,
is against me,   I would rather die with yoa
in the war than to, to"���
" You are right, Margarita I" he cried,
his eyes flashing and his heart burning to
ride up to the house and shoot down in his
tracks the villain who would rob and outrage him in his absence. " I will at least
take you to a place of safety with my
friends."
" You shall see," ahe cried. "Stay here.
I will Ily" -an I the chapair*! dosed behind
her before he could answer. In and out she
went throuuh the tangled, flesh-tearing
brush, as sure footed and keen sighted as a
deer to Benevides' house.
Tho little family was at supper, Bene-
vidcs.his wife,and a little pale-faced'.'���year-
old child which Margarita had nursed back
to life. In a rough cradle hy another child,
a '.'-week's old baby. Margarita, quickly
explaining the situation, Instrusted Benevides to hurry to her home und bring her
own pony from the corral.
While the wile brought the clothes Margarita stoo 1 before the little cracked mirror
and cut off her beaulilul long hair just even
with the nape of the neck, as the " Greasers"
wear theirs. The clothes fitted her admirably, except an extra length to the toes of
her boots, which the wife filled out with
cotton. When the costume was complete
the two women had a hearty laugh, notwithstanding the serious nature of the undertaking. Hurriedly belting on her pistol and
cartridges, Margaritakissed the wile and the
little ones and started for the rendezvous.
They arrived there at almost the same minute. Benevk'.cs had taken his own Baddle,
which he had hid in the brush on the roadside while he wont up to the house to get
.ho horse, so all was ready for the mount.
The pony shrank from Margarita's hand on
tho bridle, until she said, " Why Mio Bon-
ito, dost though not know thy mistress?"
Then the pony rubbed his head against her
Bhoulder as much as to say; "Ah, my
lady, men may be misled by strange clothes
and cropped hair, but not a horse.
Philipe was almost speechless at the success oi the transformation. "We must
hurry Margarita," was all hesaid. " I must
be in Brownsville by to-morrow noon." He
wrung Benevides' hand. " I will see that
you are paid full price for your outfit, my
friend," he said gratefully, and away went
the two gay caballeros to the war.
"Where is Senor Garza?" asked
rita, as thoy rode along in the iuak
"In Mexico."
" What is hc doing there?'1
" Mustering secret troops in the capital."
" But suppose they should capture him?"
Margarita asked.
"He'll never be taken alive, and if they
should kill him a hundred capable men
would spring up to take his place."
So these two free lances rode along, too
much absorbed in tlie issues of the war to
think of each other and their mutual dan-
How selfish aud thoughtless
ger.
The niglit grew dark and threatened
Toward midnight  Margarita grew
rain. ,^__^_^^^__^__^_
very tired and faint, but Philipe cheered
her up and persuaded her to take occasion
al sips of the whiskey which be had in his
canteen,
About ,'i o'clock in the morning Philipe
said : " I see that you are utterly worn out,
darling. We will stop and let you have a
little rest before daybreak, for then we cannot afford to stop a minute, but must push
on aa fast, as we can, trying to avoid both
thc regular army troops and the Rangers."
" I wouldn't mind the Rangers,'1 the girl
answered and smiled.
" Things are different with us, now, my
dear," Philipe answered, sighing. Turning into the thicket, he soon made her comfortable with the two blankets and his_ overcoat. -    ���.
; " Sleep sweetly, little one, be said kissing her and tucking the coarse covering
about her neck. " I will keep guard, and
the ponies are ready' to mount at an
instant's warning."
She was asleep in a few moments, her
fair, sweet face gleaming like a flower
against the thicket.
Philipe sat with his back against a tree
and his eyes fixed on her, while his keen
ears took in overy fall of a leaf or flutter of
a bird in the fchioket.
In the meantime Si Murdock had lelt the
Camillo ranch without waiting for Margarita, being in truth afraid to be out alone
after dark.
Old Camillo had returned to his chair on
the veranda, supposing that Margarita had
gone to Benevides' as usual, and would be
back for supper.
Duak came. The cows camo up and lowed outBide the pen ; their calves set up a
plaintive bleating outside, and old Margot
waddled down to them with her tin pails
and calf rope. The cackling chickens sought
their rooat8, and great droves of Paradise
birds settled down in the trees for the night.
The long red lines of the setting sun fell
slanting along tho parched fields,"and peach
tree aisles, and the murmuring voice of tho
river came clear and soothing on the twilight
air. Creak, creak, creak, went old Camillo's
rooking chair, and nod, nod, nod, went his
drowsy head. Once he thought he heard
footsteps about the fence, but they were
dim, and the air was so soft, and the birds'
chatter was so monotonous, and the river's
song was so sweet, he slept on, and recked
not of war or treachery.
i Murdock rode briskly, but had not
gone more than three miles when he heard
the tramp of many horses' feet and the
sound of voices. His first impulse was to
run, his second to hide his arms, his third
to pat his breast pocket containing tho
papers, and put en a look of loyal citizenship.
Who goes there?" called the voice of
Capt. J. S. McNeel of the State Rangers.
"A citizen of Texas," was the calm answer.
"Your name, friend!"
"Si Murdook."
"By what authority are you carrying
fire-arms, Mr. Murdock I"
Nervously Si drew his precious papers,
and handed them to the captain. McNeel
examined them carefully, at the same time
taking in the appearance and character of
the bearer.
"All right, Mr. Murdock," he laid, "we
are just hunting a man like you. I aee
you are a reliable acout. We want to get
to the nearest safe crossing on the river.
Just fall in and lead the way."
" But-er"��� Si began.
" Never mind about your clothes, or your
not having had a shave. No apologies
needed. I ve seen gentlemen like you before, Mr, Murdock ; mostly in towns, however.   Fall in, please I"
"That's the way to doit, Cap'n," laid
some one in the rear.
" Yet, it ain't every man that geta greatness thrust upon him in that style, said
another.
Si had to take this chaff with the best
grace possible, but ho sadly wished that
he had been content with plain citizenship
and not got out those special service papers.
Away in the lonesome chaparral Margarita Blcpt.her dreamless slumbers undisturbed by memory of Si Murdock. Even in her
sleep Bhe felt Philipo near and was comforted.
The dawn cair.o faint in the east, yet
Philipe had not thc heart to waken her.
But his judgment stopped in to bias thc
decrees of love, and leaving his post he laid
his lips on her forehead. " Waken, dear-
eat," he said softly. " It is daylight, and
wo must bo going."
She sat up self-posBesaod and greatly refreshed.
"Poor  lellow !"  sho said,   nestling her
ead on  Philipe's Bhoulder.   "You have|
had no rest, aud arc shivering fur the need I uPon Ul�� ��round'
of your coat.
1 am."
She held his coat while he put it on, then
buttoned it up, giving him a kiss for cadi
of the three buttons.
" That warms me I" he said smiling, and
turned to help her on her horse, but she
stopped him as she said laughingly: ' What
would the Rangers think if they should see
one Greaser helping another on his pony?"
She sprang to her saddle and he followed
suit. They travelled quite briskly for about
an lour and a half. This brought thom
into the country of Hidalgo, near a place
called Four Corners.
While Margarita chattered on, merry in
spite of her danger, Philipe kept his head
partially turned,and seemed to bc listening
to something behind them.
" Supposo we turn off here a little, Margarita," he said, loading the way almost at
right angles to that they had been travelling-
"That ia out of our course,if you want to
reach Santa Juanita," sho said.
"Notmuch, and itis less liable to be
traveled."
"You aro unoaay, Philipt," sho aaid.
" You aro not wise to keep things from me;
I've boon watching your face, and I know
you are worried.   What is it ?"
"Well, I think 1 heard horses'feet���a
good many of them. It may bo a herd of
cattle, it may be the troops or lUngers.and
it may be our own men,"
By this timo thc sound was drawing so
near that Margarita herself could hear it.
" It is not onr men,'' Philipo continued.
" How do you know?"
" The horses are largo fooled, and I can
not quite tell which way they aro coming."
They had  left what might be called a
trail in that trailless  country,  and  were
huddled out of sight in a denser growth off
to ono side.   The tramp of hoofs grew
nearer, and there soon came in view a band
of rangers  following the course they had
taken.
" They arc tracking us," Philipo said.
" Holy mother, direct mc what to do I"
The* section they had just crossed from
the trail was thickly grown with low brush
and mesquite grass. It was possible that
the Rangers might not notice the break in
the tracks and continue their forward
course. The minutes seemed hours to Philipe, and he grew almost an old man in those
terrible seconds of anxiety. Like a succession of flash lights there darted through
his mind the hundred different and equally
perilous things to do. Ho thought of the
girl's peaceful and protected life at
home, and for the first time blamed himself
for bringing her away. He feared to continue into the jungle, for fear the sound of
the cracking brush would attact.attention.
If he had been alone he' would have given
up to thom, depending upon the plausibility
of his appearance as a hatmlcas traveler, together .with such corroborating evidence as
he was sure to get from any of thc Mexicans
in that section.   But the girl���       i
The Rangers hesitated, slopped aud looked to theright and left. In two minutes
tbey came galloping that way.
"Now to run for our lives!" he Baid,
quickly tightening the girth of Sta" ��������'���'
saddle,
Into the brush they plunge.'
itisnapping drowning in their%- ^   |.ia
of their pursurers.   On and on blindly ana1
desperately   they   plunged,   the  sensible
horses choosing the clearest way, while the
riders dogged thc brush.   Once turning his
head Philipe Baw the blood trickling down
Margarita's face, where a thorn had scraped
the tender skin clean across the cheek. That
in itself hurt him worse than a pistol shot.
The girl's face was white.   Yet her lips were
firm and she whiapered something cheering
to him as they came side by side.
They must have run this way fully a mile
when they heard the brush cracking close
behind them, and knew that the Rangers
were upon them.
Wheeling his horse Bidowise in front of
hers, Philipe prepared to sell their lives aa
as dearly as possible, Yet, thinking of the
sweet life in his charge he weakened, and
called out clearly, "We surrender 1"
The Rangers halted, thoir rifles lowered
and the captain said something to him, but
as he spoke a form darted from the rear, and
Philipe saw Si Murdock'a murderous face
before him. Bang! went a gun and Philipe,
stunned, terrified, heard a cry and a gurgle
behind him,- He whirled around and caught
Margarita in his arms as she fell from her
saddle shot through the breast. Drawing
her from her horse to hispommel, he heldher
against him and emptied every shot of his
revolver into the ranks of the enemy. They
would have made short business of bis life
had not their captain commanded "cease
firing."
Right in the muzzle of Philipe's pistol
Capt. McNeel rode quickly and alono to
hii side.
"There is some mistake here," he said.
"I beard you offersurrender."
But Philipe was not listening. He had
dismounted and laid the dying girl on the
ground. He longed to throw himself beside her and put a bullet through hia own
heart, but he dared not arouse suspicion as
to her soi.
"Leave me alone I It is all tho mercy you
can ibow me now," he pleaded, aa he
forced somo whisky between Margarita's
lips, while her pony came nearer, neighing
and trying to touch hii mistress,
Capt McNeel turned to hii men and laid :
"There was no need of firing that shot,
Who did it?"
No one answered.
"Who shot this boy?" the captain again
asked, and thia time the new scout answered: "I did."
"What did you do it for?"
" The other one waa aiming at me. I returned his fire. 1 did not mean to kill that
one."
" You're a liar 1" broke in one of the men
"He was aiming at no one, He intended to
surrender, I believe you know tho men and
had some personal grudge against them I"
They wero interrupted by a piercing
���hriek, which cut the hearts of even those
death-familiar men.
" Dead! dead! my darling I my Margarita! Murdered by him I" At this Si Murdock threw himself from his horse. Philipe
had torn open the girl's clothing to stanch
the wound, and her beautiful whito breast
was exposed, clotted with the still oozing
blood.
"Damn you !"he hissed, turning on Murdock and plunging at him with drawn
knife, which the captain seized, having already taken possession of his pistol and
rifle.
"'ale and   trembling  Si   Murdook  Barns
"My G)J, what have I done," he
cried.
"Murdered a woman, you brute," answered tlie captain.
Philipe and Murdock each refusing to
give any further information on the subject, the former was arrested and the latter
given to understand that he would have to
account for firing without orders.
"Continue the inarch I" commanded the
Captain, and they pushed on iuto Brownsville Philipe sullenly holding the dead girl
in his arms, and apparently oblivious to
everything else, until his eyes fell upon
Murdock.
Then his face became purple wilb raje
and agony, and he said :
" We'll meet iu a fair field before this war
is over, and when we do neither man nor
God shall keep me from killing you I"
SNARING A BULL 0AK1B0U-
It Was I naiiorlaiiiaiilikc, bill Then Jules
TrIalMll Win Mad.
Well, I'm sorry we missed that caribou,"
eaid my guide, " but I bet we can cane
one."
I wason a hunting trip with Jules Tristan in the neighborhood of Eagle Lake.
Thc third day oul hc had struck the track
of a caribou, sighted it once or twice, but
never came near enough to get a shot,
though for eighteen hours we tramped and
ploughed our way through the thick woods
and treacherous undergrowth on the trail
"Goahead," I said, though I was n trifle
incredulous, having never trapped anything
larger than a rabbit myself, But if it
could be done I certainly wished to see the
trick.
Our camp wis pitched on the shore of a
small pond, and the country around it was
thickly Umbered. A couple of miles to thc
liorth Jules had noticed a caribou run, leading iu from the foothills to t'ie water, and
it was aloug this pathway winding in and
out among'the trees like a clearly defined
mule trail that he proposed to put his plan
into operation.
I shall not forgjt the morning we started
out. It was intensely cold, the thermometer having fallen from ten degr.es above
to ten below zero.
By way of appliances, Jules carried au
axe, and a coil of stout wire ; and selecting
a spot where thc trees were thickest and
the most regular he was soon st work. His
scheme was simple, and looked effective, if
the denizen of the wood would only help
play his hand, which waa asking, 1 thought,
a good deal.
It waa to erect a barrier immediately
across the run.lcaving an opening in it about
four feet from the ground and adjust a
nooso, fastened to a sapling, in snch a manner lhat a caribou, in attempting lo force
his way through, would get hung like a jack
rabbit,   . . ,  ,
The barrier w.13 built of freshly cut branches, woven in and out to give the appearance
ofa natural hedge,yet stout enough to oiler
considerable resistance   to an  animal  attempting to pass it.   A hole was left in it
about in the **��iddle large enough for a car-
*���*'��." a^oppin , 'get its antlers through. The
it" Jnt *"* s'ze ��' '',e opening, cuu-
���""cnaicd from view, and the young
���Jfch it was attached stood some
. ��v��Jjack,  like a tall executioner,
tou��a..--(a**id stlong.
Two hours was Jules���no more, no less���
in constructing bis extempore gallows, then
turning to me he offered to bet that inside
of three days it would have an occupant. I
took him np, and a new hat hung on the
hanging of that caribou,
On the way back Jules explained thatthe
efficiency of the trap rested on the fact that
animala of the horned species once accustomed to a run can not lie easily turned out
of it, but will try to effect a passage
through anything in their way, and as the
bole seems the weakest part it is into this
they plunge���only to feel the tightening
nooac.
Early next morning we were both on hand,
aa thc guide aaid, to pick up the pieces,
but to my surprise and hia disgust, the
hedge was broken and wiro noose gone, The
caribou had been caught round the antlers
instead of round the neck, and with a desperate jerk had freed itself. This Jules said
he had never known to happen before, and
it was with more than usual care that he repaired the trap and readjusted it for a second attempt.
The day following found it untouched,
but on the third day a noise of tremendous
thrashing among the trees told us as we approached that the noose had done ita work,
and a captive awaited us. Nor were we
mistaken for, sure enough, there swung a
bull caribou, a beauty, pulling for all he wai
worth and choking to death as the noose
tightened and cut into hii throat.
A ball from my rifle soon put the animal
out of its misery, and Jules had won hii
bet.   The caribou weighed 480 poundi.
On the whole, though, I am not aniioui
to see another caribou caught that way, In
the first place I think it cruel, and in the
second place unsportsmanlike.
a* ���      a
Tunnel Between Inlaid and Soot land.
A proposition is made to connect Great
Britain and Ireland by a tunnel driven under the North channel of the Irish wa at iti
narrowest part, between County Antrim in
Ireland and Wigtown in Scotland. The
length of the tunnel would be some twenty-
seven miles. A number of eminent engineers declare the project entirelyfeasible. It
is admitted the tunnel would not be com.
mercially profitable, but much ii claimed for
it in the way of natural advantages, and the
proposition is that it should be a national
undertaking.
She Can't Help lb
Misleading statements have been printed
concerning Lady Henry Somerset's owner,
ship of licensed shops and inns where intoxicating liquors were sold, which seemed
rather inconsistent with her zeal in the temperance cause, It is now some 10 years
lince Lady Somerset inherited her father's
property, and though she has closed eight
of the licensed houses at the expiration of
the leases, several other landlords still hold
ground leases which have not aa yet expired, with thc licenses of which Lady Henry
has uo right to interfere.
Tne Halo Didn't Pit.
First Commuter���They've doubled thc
number o; afternoon trains ; thatV good !
Second Commuter���I don't know���it
doubled the cbai.cei of missing a train, you
know. TROUT
���       La r\ lY t
CITY
WEST KOOTENAY, B.O.
The above town site will be placed on the market shortly.  It is
situated at the north end of Trout Lake, in the famous
ClBDEAU COUNTRY
which is going to be one of the RICHEST MINING REGIONS in
.America. NUMEROUS RICH CLAIMS have been found close to this
town site, which will make it the DISTRIBUTING POINT for an
IMMENSE TRACT OP COUNTRY. It is the only level land at the
north end of the lake. The owners intend to expend money on streets
and other improvements in the Spring. The trail from Lardeau City,
on Arrow Lake, to Kootenay Lake, runs through the town site. The
first hundred lots will be sold at $200 for corners, and $150 for insides
i .
For further particulars apply to
C. E. PERRY & CO.,
at the Head Office, Nelson, B.C., or to
HAIG,
Local Agent,
REVELSTOKE, B.C.

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