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The Saturday Chinook Feb 12, 1916

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Array ���"���**���
SATURDAY
VANCOUVER
BRITISH
CHINOOK
COLUMBIA
Vol. IV, No. 40���Established 1911
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1916
CANADA
Price Five Cents
From Victoria ma\
tomes ill which are ki
���EDITORIAL OPINIONS!
��� ���i
4JEORGK   M.   IHOBBAY
Kdlti.r
"The truth at all tlmm firmly xtuniln
And almll from age to aire endure."
THE PACIFIC AND GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY
REQUESTS
IN view of the organized raid to be made upon the trea-!
sury of the Province of Hritish Columbia by the Pacific
and Great Eastern Railway crowd at the session of the
Legislature to he held next month, Mr. Patrick Donnelly's '
reference to the  question  of  Provincial  aid  to  railways
made at a recent public meeting will be of wide interest.
Mr. Donnelly's revelations regarding the agreement j
which exists between the Province of Hritish Columbia and j
the Pacific and Great Eastern Railway arc startling in j
the extreme. They seem to prove thai the hands of the I
people arc tied and that all the power rests with Messrs. !
Foley, Welch and Stewart so far as further negotiations
are concerned.
* * *
While a great many responsible men feel that the Pacific
:;'id Great Eastern should be pushed forward and that
aid should be given Messrs. Foley, Welch and Stewart
lhat they may be pulled nut the hole in which they claim
Ihe war has placed them, there are many people who would
he very glad lo see the road taken over as a Government
owned route to the  Peace River district.
In the Peace River District is the only hind which is
worth while in this Province which has not fallen into
the maw of the speculator. Here is Government land
and thc chance for a government-owned road leading!
thereto. If Messrs. Foley, Welch and Stewart are in a
parlous financial position, in spile of llieir $25,000,000
capitalization and government guarantee of a bond issue i
of $20,160,000���il" they are up against it with only a small
part of the line complete and open to traffic���how   much
money will they need to finish, the road?
* * *
It is a known fact that the Pacific and Great  Eastern
Railway   people   have   put  very  little   actual  money  into'
the road.   They have followed thc same tactics employed j
by Mackenzie and Mann in the Canadian Northern Pacific  transactions and  any one  who  criticises  tlie  Government's position in regard to the Canadian Northern  Pacific  promotions,  must  logically refuse  to submit  to any |
further subventions to Messrs. Foley, Welch and Stewart.
* * *
ompletc?
inquiry answer
these  ques
' lecured from time to time great
t the records of things which happen at thc Legislative Assembly which must be kept track
of. These records ar,- not such as may appeal to tlie ordinary man in the street. It takes either a lawyer or a
I man of John Oliver's experience to dig things out of these
j great, dry books which come at two dollars and a half
each.
How then were the bonds of the Pacific and Great Eastern disposed of?
At what discount were they sold'
What did thc road actually cost per mile?
To whom were thc bonds sold?
How much per mile was paid for building the great grade
at North Vancouver which a wave washed right into the
sea, rails and all?
When will the mad be
Will   Mr.  Flumerfelt's
tions?
Turn with Mr. Donnell-  to one of those dusty volumes.
Look up Sec 283 of the Railway Act, Chap. 194, R.S.B.C.
1911. Under this sensational head may be found the part of
the agreement which enables the Conservative party, including Mr. Bowser, who drew that agreement up as lawyer for the  company and as lawyer for the  Government.
Mr. Tisdall who helped railroad it through the house, and |
Mr.  Flumerfelt,  the  financier, to come out and agree  to !
a full and  complete  investigation  of  Pacific  and  Great j
Eastern matters before granting thc six and a half million }
dollars being sought at ihc present moment
Here is'the joker which helps the politicians round tlie j
corner on a single wheel, as Mr. Donnelly pointed out;
ll  is   the   saving   clause.     It  is   the   feature   of   the   whole'
act  which  marks  it as  the  most  hold and  brazen  bit of
spread  upon   thc  statute  books  of  any
mmunity,      This    section     gives    the
Railway    the    absolute  right,
into    teh    affairs      of      the j
legislation   ever
self-governing   i
Pacific and Great  Eastern
tn    refuse    any    enquiry
How the cards were stacked against the people is a
matter which has not received wide,publicity. Mr. Donnelly's speech dealt in no uncertain language with this
phase of tbe question. In view of the organized raid upon the treasury to take place shortly, it was quite in
order lo dig into some of the records at Victoria, with a
view of finding how thc Pacific and Great Eastern agreement was drawn up. The Government promise to give
Messrs. Foley, Welch and Stewart another six and a half j
millions of the people's money.
* * * '
For the past three days no train has entered Vancouver'
Irom the east.   Were this tie-up of transportation to con-,
tinue for any length of time, the people of this city would '
suffer ere long fur food.    Should nature's blockade bc ex  '
tended to the sea, we in tlie city of Vancouver would starve j
to death  within a  \cry  short  time.    Therefore,  as  Mr.
Donnelly says, we had planned the P. & G, E. Railway and
the Kettle Valley Railway���lo he food routes from the agricultural hinterland of Iiritish Columbia to the metropolis.
That the  promoters  of tlie   Pacific  and    Great    Eastern
should prostitute such a noble plan lo the milking of the
money out of the pockets of ihc citizens of Hritish Columbia, makes tlieir work all the more evil in all its aspects.
Twenty-five millions of dollars was the capitalization of
the Pacific and Great Eastern Railway and the capital stock
was to be divided into shares of $100 denominations. The
agreement between the Government of Hritish Columbia
���Mr. W. J. Bowser, Attorney-General, scrutinizing all
such agreements���and thc Pacific and Great Eastern Railway���Mr. W. J. Bowser, lawyer, handling thc company's
legal work���provided that the capital stock of the company, the bonds of the company or thc debentures of the
company might be used, as the officers of the company
saw fit, to pay engineers, contractors or others and for
the purchasing of rolling stock, right-of-way and materials
of all kinds needed by thc company.
After the organization of the concern had been completed, the Pacific and Great Eastern Railway then asked for
a guarantee from the Government of a bond issue which
would enable them to proceed with the building of the
road. The agreement between the company and the Government, covering this feature, was the same as the agreements made in former years with Mackenzie and Mann on
the Canadian Northern Pacific. The Government guaranteed the company to the extent of $35,000 a mile. In 1914,
when actual construction had been undertaken, they came
back for another guarantee and got another $7,000 a mile.
The original agreement called for a length of 450 miles.
This was later increased to 480 miles. So that the Government, up to the present, has placed its name on $20,-
160,000 worth of bonds alone���bonds issued by a concern
���with $25,000,000 worth of watered stock.
The -question of the actual investment by the directors
of the Pacific and Great Eastern Railway is one which
has never been answered. It has been stated tliat the owners of thc road have not put in more than a few thousand
dollars in actual cash. Some say that it is $10,000; and
others say that they have put in $100,000 in real money.
Mr. Flumerfelt, the new finance minister, promises that
he will make a complete investigation of the affairs of the
company, and if SUCH A THING AS AN INVESTIGATION OF THE AFFAIRS OF THE COMPANY WERE
NOT PROHIBITED IN THE PACIFIC AND GREAT
EASTERN ACT WE MIGHT FIND JUST HOW
MUCH ACTUAL MONEY HAS GONE INTO THE
ROAD.
company. The public may put up ils millions to buy for
Messrs. Foley, Welch and Stewart this railroad to the
Peace River, hut lhe public has no right whatsoever to
any information whatsoever regarding thc affairs of the
Pacific and Great Eastern Railway, and it is so specified
in the railway act.
* * *
���
The Vancouver PROVINCE printed an inspired article
some days ago in which it said that Flumerfelt and the
gang were prepared to grant an investigation of the affairs of thc company hy a "non-partisan" tribunal. This
article was a sort of challenge to the other side.
Section 283 of the Railway Act says that the Minister
may from time to time serve the company with notice to
furnish him with a statement of assets and liabilities, etc.,
and a statement of stock or bonds sold for other consideration than cash���a statement of the cost of construction or
any other such information.
BUT SUB-SECTION 3, SEC. 283, CHAP.194, R.S.B.C.
1911, SAYS: THAT WHEN ANY SUCH INFORMATION IS FURNISHED Till-: MINISTER OR ANY
EVIDENCE TAKEN BY HIM IN CONNECTION
THEREWITH, SUCH INFORMATION OR EVIDENCE TAKEN HY HIM IN" CONNECTION THEREWITH, SUCH INFORMATION OR EVIDENCE
SHALL NOT BE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC OR PUBLISHED, BUT SHALL BE FOR THE INFORMATION OF THE MINISTER ONLY.
Supposing Mr. Flumerfelt should make an investigation
of thc affairs of the concern known as tbe Pacific and
Great Eastern Railway, as Mr. Donnelly pointed out,
it would he necessary fur him to keep all his
findings secret. He could not publish anything
regarding the company or its workings, fur the law
prohibits him from so doing. This law, let us remember,
was put into effect hy Mr. Bowser, Attorney-General, who
is tlie same Mr. Bowser whn was Attorney-General for thc
Pacific and Great Eastern promoters. Mr. Tisdall helped
by voting for the agreement just as he voted to put
through the charter for a certain financial corporation
which also took money from the public and never made a
truthful statement of the expenditure of lhat money.
Follow the Railway Act further, anil you will find that
iu Sub-SCCtiOll Four of lhe same section it is stated that
when thc Minister has received all the information possible from the "thorough and complete" investigations
planned by Mr. Flumerfelt, "the Lieutehant-Govcrnor-in-
Council may require the minister to communicate tu the
Licutcnant-Governor-in-Council any or all information.'
But thc goings on in the council is supposed 1" lie tlie
King's business and information that is communicated to
the Lieiitenant-Governor-in-Council is usually of a secret
character.
* * *
That the dismal secrets of the Pacific and Great Eastern
may be further guarded from the people who are bleeding
the money to enable the promoters of the concern to go
ahead, as Mr. Donnelly put it. Sub-section five generously allows that thc minister may authorize
any part of such information to be made public
when and insofar as there may appear to the minister
to be good and sufficient reasons for so doing. IF THE
INFORMATION SO PROPOSED TO BE MADE PUBLIC BY THE MINISTER IS OF SUCH A CHARACTER THAT THE COMPANY WOULD IN THE OPINION OF THE MINISTER OBJECT TO PUBLICATION THEREOF, THE MINISTER SHALL NOT
AUTHORIZE SUCH INFORMATION TO BE PUBLISHED WITHOUT NOTIFYING THE COMPANY
AND HEARING ANY OBJECTION THE COMPANY
MAY MAKE TO SUCH PUBLICATION.
Here then are merely a few excerpts from the provisions
under which the Pacific and Great Eastern Railway people
have received aid from the Provincial Government up to
date.
These people who have thc power to place upon the law
books of this company what legislation they deem fit, now
seek six and a half million dollars further to support the
lottonng structure from beneath which they have already
prepared to withdraw. Six and a half million dollars is
the sum they seek and so far the Government has given
them every consideration,
"We will have an enquiry." the Government glibly promises, "an enquiry into the whole situation of tbe Pacific
and Great Eastern Railway."
HUT MR. BOWSER'S LEGISLATION ALREADY
(iX Till-: LAW HOOKS OF TIIE PROVINCE SAYS
THERE CAN BE NO ENQUIRY, SAVE SUCH AN
ENQUIRY AS IS DICTATED BY TIIE PROMOTERS
OF TIIE RAILWAY. And Mr. Bowser put this legislation on the law books and in it he was supported by Mr.
Charles Tisdall, who wishes to become a cabinet minister
in a "business man's Government." Here let it be staled
tha if all business men were contractors doing business
with tin government of British Columbia, then it would
be a business man's Government.
Mr. Donnelly points out how the game of the
clique owned by the railroad contractors has been
to fool the people by means of marked cards.
Mr. Flumerfelt's promise of a complete and full investigation is alright for the unwary. Should it work and should
the railroad ticket be elected, then Mr. Flumerfelt. suddenly awakening up to the true state of affairs, might plead
that before he ever became a minister, an agreement was
signed between thc Government and the railway which
makes a complete and full investigation an utter impossibility. Ile could lay the blame upon Sir Richard McBride,
Price Ellison, Dr. Young, or others not present, and immediately proceed to divide six and a half million dollars
iif the people's money among Messrs. Foley, Welch, Stewart, tlieir lawyers, lobbyists and retainers.
* * *
ONE COURSE WHICH MIGHT HE FOLLOWED
IN" TIIE INTERESTS OF Till-: PEOPLE OF THIS
COUNTRY IS FOR THE PEOPLE TO ELECT A
NEW GOVERNMENT AT VICTORIA WHO would
GO INTO OFFICE PLEDGED TO WIPE OFF THE
STATUTE HOOKS THE CROOKED RAILROAD
LEGISLATION ENACTED HY THE VASSALS OF
Till'. PACIFIC AND GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY.
FOR THE LIKE OF IT PROBABLY HAS NEVER
BEFORE DEFACED THE RECORDS OF ANY HRITISH PROVINCE.
line ol" the big issues before the people of Hritish Columbia today is tlie policy to be  followed in  the h-ndling
of the   Pacific and  Great  Eastern   Railway.    Thc  road  to
Fort George is in length 480 miles.    From Fort George
onwards tu the Peace is another stretch of more than five
hundred  miles.    If the contractors are allowed  to have |
their  own   way  on   the  Vancouver-Fort  George  division. |
ynu   may  rest   assured   that  they   will   go  right  after  the |
contract for the road from Fort George onward.
THUS ll; THEY GET HY WITH THEIR DEMANDS THIS YEAR TIIIC ENRICHED HAND OF
RAILROAD LOBBYISTS WILL FOLLOW UP
THEIR ADVANTAGE, WILL SEEK AND SECURE
A STRANGLE HOLD ON THE REMAINDER OF
THE LINE, Ik' THEY HAVE NOT ALREADY GOT
SUCH A HOLD.
* * *
In Alaska the United States Government is building its
own mads and transportation utilities. We in British
Columbia should not lag behind and follow thc spendthrift
policies of the years that have gone hy���policies which
have placed a railroad debt around the necks of the people for several generations to come.
The present war will cost the Canadian people a vast
sum of money. But. that sum will only he small as compared with the colossal debt the Canadian people will he-
called upon to pay in collection with Grand Trunk Pacific,
Canadian  Northern and other railroad promotions.
* * *
There are people in British Columbia
who are prepared to rush into the arms
of messrs. foley, welch   and   stewart
WITH \S MANY MILLIONS OF OTHER PEOPLES
MONEY \S Till'. INTREPID RAILROADERS DEMAND.
North Vancouver; Mr. J. Bailey, Sardis; Mr. William
Townley, the manager, Vancouver; Mr. J. A. Catherwood,
Mission,  ami  Alderman   McAdam,   New  Westminster.
Mr. Berry referred to the great attention which glib-
tungued city men develop every three or four years ill the
great cause of agriculture. Ile didn't think much of the
politicians, lie was strong for the farmer learning to
help himself. Tbe success of thc -Mutual was only one
example of what the farmers of British Columbia might
do if they put their minds to it.
In lhe speech of Mr. Bailey, of Sardis, a glimpse was
given of the inner working of the milk business. If a farmer gets four cents a quart for his milk and the city man
paid ten cents for his milk, where did the six cents go
to? A fair question, producers and consumers will admit.
The way to save the six cents on every quart was to organize things as the farmers had organized on tlie insurance problem.
Mr. Kidd had a few remarks regarding the landlords of
the old country who had given their broad acres over to
raising deer and grouse and rabbits. Had they been raising BRITISH MEN on those acres and tilling HRITISH
ACRES there would be less of a problem before the War
Office in filling thc ranks fur the front, Mr. Kidd hoped
the day would come when Canada would have 160 acres
for cvery worthy man landing < n those -!i"res and in allotting this land, he would give the Britishers a chance
before other nations.
Of those who sat down together at the feast of the
Mutual Fire Insurance Company to as good a meal as
Mr. Spencer ever provided, the following names might
be mentioned: John Hall, Jubilee; George Rumble, Jubilee; Capt. W. F. Stewart, Eburne, Vice-president; E. N.
Brown; Thomas C. Usher, Eburne Station; W. S. McLean; W. R. Stewart; II. J. Gray: Pte. T. A. Clegg, 72nd
Batt C.E.F.; J. A. Catherwood, Mission City: J. Bailey,
Sardis: J. W. W. Berry, Langley Prairie; W. McAdam,
New Westminster: George M. Murray, Vancouver; D. A.
McKie, Ladner; J. B. Elliot, Ladner; Wm. Townsley,
manager. Winch Building, Vancouver; G. S. Willson,
Eburne; Rev. John II. Wright, R.R. No. 1. Eburne; Thos.
Kidd. president, Steveston, B.C.; B. W. Garratt. Eburne
Station; Alex. Philip, North Vancouver; J. Macintosh,
Eburne; W. T. Easterbrook, Eburne; Geo. Eastcrhrook,
Eburne: James Thompson:-Mr. R. Wells; 1 J. Thompson;
W.  G.   Easterbrook;   R.   McBride,  South Vancouver.
D
BY THE WAY
M
THE REAL CITIZENS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ON'ly ut the most solid Institutions in the Province of
British Columbia is the co-operative farmers' insurance society, which was organized ill 1902���the
Mutual  Fire  Insurance Company oi British Columbia,
Upon the invitation uf that sterling citizen and stout
champion oi agriculture, Mr. Thomas Kidd, of Lulu Island, lhe editor of the SATURDAY CHINOOK was given a place at lhe banquet hoard which was spread, following the annual meeting uf the society, Wednesday evening of this week, at the dining-liall of the firm oi David
Siiencer, Limited, Vancouver.
Our eyes were opened to many things which hear upon
the development of British Columbia. There were fifty
men at lhe board and cvery man bore the appearance of a
substantial and progressive citizen. Here was a more
honest hand of men than it is usual to meet in this country. In fact it seemed to us that at last we had discovered
at least a fork of the root from which must grow the
great, solid and substantial British Columbia of the future.
More than three thousand farmers in British Columbia
have policies with the Mutual Fire Insurance Companies.
Within the past two years, Manager Townsley reported,
the volume of business written increased one million dollars.
Some say that the farm doesn't pay in British Columbia.
Some say that the farmers are losing money.
Now the Mutual does not belong to the board companies, which set a rate for one section of Vancouver of
SEVEN DOLLARS AND A HALF A HUNDRED.
Tbe Mutual, like all things worth while, is independent in
spirit, it is non-board. It gives the farmer A RATE OF
FORTY CENTS A HUNDRED.
If a man have a mortgage on his farm, the mortgage
company will force him to insure his buildings with a
board company. That is an accepted rule. Here then
are three thousand farmers iu British Columbia who insure their buildings with the company that pleases them
and serves them and gives them a chance to participate
in the profits ��� a company which gives them protection
against fire at A RATE OF FORTY CENTS A HUNDRED.
HERE ARE THREE THOUSAND BRITISH COLUMBIA FARMERS WHO ARE ABLE TO LAUGH
IN THE FACE OF THE MORTCAGE COMPANIES.
During the evening there was an oration by Mr. G. S.
Willson, of Eburne. and speeches by Mr. Thomas Kidd;
Rev. Mr. Wright, Eburne; Mr. John W. Berry, Langley
Prairie; Captain W. F. Stewart, Eburne; Mr. Alex. Philip,
NAPOLEON'S RETREAT FROM Moscow and the return of B. C.'s "Little Nap.'s" bodyguard from Kamloops
were made under similar adverse weather conditions.
* * *
CONSIDERING SOME  OF the freaks and  fossils who
represent  us  at   Ottawa,   the   selection   of   thc   Museum
building as a place to hold the session of Parliament was
a hap*py thought.
* * *
CITIZENS WITHOUT FUEL do not see anything particularly heroic about being close to the firing line.
* * *
COMMANDER FORD of the First Expeditionary Dove.
Corps has a new plan for world peace. It will be released
at the same time as his 1917 models���when thc war is
over.
***���������
IT IS NOT SURPRISING that the wing plows of die
B. C. Electric should make the snow fly.
* * +
"Till-'. TRAIL OF thc Lonesome Pine" is a broad and
busy thoroughfare compared t" some of the uarrow-guage
paths in the residential district.
* * *
WE GATHER FROM ihe local newspaper extras tiie
night ol the Ottawa fire that next lu the loss of 11. H.
Steven.-' overcoat the destruction oi the House of Commons was an incident of the national disaster.
* * +
Till'. PROPOSED honey trust ought lo prove a hive of industry. Dominion investors who have been stung before
look arkance at anything that suggests cells.
* * *
OWNERS OF CORNER lots who have tu shovel off the
snow in front of their property consider the tunnelling
of Rogers Pass a small job in comparison.
* * *
AFTER THE AVERAGE citizen has contributed his
mite to the scores of worthy causes that make demands
on him his bank account is mighty small.
* * *
THE NEWS-AD. laments that more local interest is
taken in the reports of a hockey match than a battle in
Europe. As a late cabinet minister would remark, "Both
is Hell."
* * *
WHAT IS GOING to happen the Appam is a question
that is now causing the experts in naval law much concern
* * *
PRESIDENT WILSON'S SPEECHES on "Preparedness" appeals with the cold logic of facts to the man who
neglected to provide himself with an overcoat.
* * *
AS FAR AS Vancouver is concerned any time "Old
Probs" feels like having a melting mood he is quite at
liberty to melt. No unprejudiced citizen would object to
the melting process starting on the white mounds in front
of his residence.
* * *
GOVERNMENT CIRCLES fear that too many Cookes
will spoil the pap broth.
* * *
IN LOCAL RAILWAY circles snow* plows are regarded
as blockade runners.
* * *
THE NEW CITY COUNCIL does not believe in taking
or allowing anybody else to take chances���not even on
an automobile drawing or a bowling alley sweep. ^^^^
TV/0
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY  12.  1916
Sri?��>i>i>i}SJ".^S^^^^^
THE SATURDAY CHINOOK
Published every Saturday at the Chinook Printing; House.
420 Homer Street. Vancouver.
Telephone   Seymour 470
Registered   at   the   Post   Office   Department,   Ottawa,   as
Second Class Mall Matter.
SUBSCRIPTION   RATES
To all points 111 Canada, United Kingdom, Newfoundland,
New Zealand and other British Possessions:
$1.00
Postage to American. European anu olher foreign countries
11.00 per year extra.
The Saturday Chinook  will  be delivered to any address
In Vancouver or vicinity at ten cents a month.
Member of the Canadian Press Association.
The Saturday Chinook circulates throughout Vancouver
and the cities, towns, villages und settlements throughout
British Columbia. In politics the paper Is Independent
Liberal.   We do not accept liquor advertisements.
Publishers Greater Vancouver Publishers, Limited.
NAUGHTY, NAUGHTY GRITS!
The country is going to be stampeded into thinking
that the manufacturers of Canada are a band of robbers
on tbe say so of Carvell and Pugsley. We are all bad
enough without being painted any blacker than tlie truth
warrants.���Toronto Saturday Night.
NOT B. C; BUT MANITOBAHI
After the reign of riotous expenditure in this province
and thefts running into millions, the ship of state, freed
from pirates and barnacles, is preparing to start on a new
journey. There are positively acres of unnecessary public
buildings, tens and hundreds of thousands of dollars virtually thrown away and worse. This money is gone, and
wasted, never to return. But the opportunity remains to
save hundreds of thousands of dollars in the cost of running thc machine.���Winnipeg Tribune.
John Stuart Mill said that "to have a voice in choosing
those by whom one is governed is a means of self-protection due to every one."
Sir Robert Stout, for a long time premier of New Zeal-
ami���a very shrewd Scotsman, by the way���said the effect
Of woman suffrage in this country was beneficial. It interested women in questions of State.
In woman suffrage countries, none of the predicted evils
from franchise extension have arrived. Much positive
good has resulted.
The deed is done in Manitoba. A long-sustained and
just agitation has home fruit. From Knox church pulpit,
nearly twenty-five years ago, Hull. Joseph Martin, then
a member of the Manitoba Legislature, publicly declared
his strong belief that women should be enfranchised.
One of the women leaders, after the passage of the
Bill yesterday, declared tllat franchise extension would
ne far from a panacea for all our ills. Thousands of women, granted a most sacred privilege, are just as ignorant, and, worse still, just as heathen in their politics, because of their partisanship, as thousands of men. The
campaign of education on the exercise of the franchise
must now begin.���Winnipeg Tribune.
A HARD HIT FOR JOSEPH
Some years ago it was the "Hon. Joe," when one spoke
of that stormy petrel of politics, Joseph Martin. His
most recent exploit was running for mayor of Vancouver.
Of course, when the ballots were counted, Joey was
among the also ran. It is a chunk of chalcopyrite to an
Okanagan apple that Joe has worn his welcome out as
a public man in British Columbia.���Trail News.
CAME FROM VANCOUVER!
Tbos. Parker, inspector of weights and measures, has
been making things interesting for some merchants in
the Kootenays of late. Unwittingly, they have been selling a certain salad oil for the pure stuff, but on being
analyzed at,Ottawa it proved to be mostly cotton seed oil,
the selling of which without being so labeled is in contravention of thc Adulteration Act. It required months
to bring the matter to a head, but recently the deed was
accomplished, and vendors of the commodity were mulcted
of about fifty bones each in Rossland, Trail, Nelson and
other places, which included costs.
Of course the victims will simply "pass the buck" up
tjo the wholesaler who supplied them with the oil, this time
a Vancouver concern of usually good reputation, and will
probably get a refund. It is a good comment, however,
on the fact, that it docs not pay for manufacturers to monkey with the Adulteration Act. Doubtless there are
scores of merchants throughout thc province who have
this brand of oil on their shelves���and Bro. Parker will
also get them if they don't watch out.���Trail News.
in future to profit by the monopoly at thc expense of tin-
souls and bodies of the people. Tbe net profit to the state
from the sale of vodka in a single year has risen as high
as $290,00(1,000 at least.- The vodka bottle had become a
household god among the peasants, and was tlie most conspicuous furniture of every parish feast. The reason was
not far to seek. It contained from 4(1 to 57 per cent, of
alcohol, distilled from potatoes or rye. Its autograph
was writ large iu an enfeebled neurasthenic population
and the partial paralysis of industrial efficiency. It was, of
mrse, the spur to crime and uncontrollable excess of every sort. To change vodka into such useful substances
rubber and fuel is a triumph comparable with that of
healing swords into plowshares. ��� Philadeplhia Public
Ledger.
THE OCTOPUS THAT KILLS
The pioneers are the backbone of any community. The
men who go into a district and risk tlieir all in business
ventures which contribute to the building up and development of the community aer the men upon whom the
sparsely-setled districts of Canada have depended and
must depend.
Thus writes the Enderby Press in a strong and able
article urging people to patronize the stores in their own
town, and the advice applies equally well to Merritt.
Without these men, it continues, there could b no trading points in out-of-the-way districts���no small towns
and community centres which make possible the development of the outlying districts. It is upon these small
towns���these community centres���that Canada has had
to depend iii the past to see that the districts have developed, In years past there have been many prosperous
small towns situated along thc great highways which
reach across this vast Dominion. In years past in each
of these towns was a trading centre for a large community
of prosperous farmers. Today a decided change has taken
place. Towns which a few years ago were thrifty trading centres have become stale, dried-up, dead. Where business used to be good, is today dead. Why? Because of
the octopus that kills���thc mail-order house. Unless
some way is found to combat this evil the Canadian
Northwest will have no centres of prosperity outside of
Toronto and Winnipeg.���Nicola Valley News.
hold the honor of the great British Empire. That honor
is wrapped up in a mere scrap of paper which guaranteed
the neutrality of Belgium. We chose to uphold that honor. We are paying seven million pounds per day to do it.
If necessary we will pay more. No sacrifice is too great
lo make in this cause." Mr. Craig is known to the valley and won universal respect and admiration for his
courageous opinions and hard bitting when doing his
duty here in his ministerial capacity, a year or two ago.
lie has offered himself fur active service, but has been
turned down for bad eyesight. Perhaps Comox can produce a recruit in his place.���Coiirtenay Review.
A FIGHTING PARSON, THIS
The Rev. J. R. Craig of Westminster Presbyterian
Church, South Vancouver, in a recruiting sermon recently,
said, "Wc are fighting to uphold our homes and lo up-
WOMEN WOULD FIGHT
On Friday lhe French chamber of deputies had a charming little invasion. A half dozen young persons, like
a part oi a regiment, filed into the hall. They were ir.
uniform; very short petticoats, closely fitting coats very
much cut up as to the tails, gaiters that went almost v
tlie knees. On each head was a broad-brimmed soft felt
hat, neatly turned up on one side. Each carried in her
hand a small switch and divers kinds of leather belts sustained a variety of money pouches.
At a distance one would have taken them to be Boy-
Scouts with particularly small feet. A nearer view shbw-
ed that they were women, each with a serious and martial
air. One could not have hesitated to say that they were
Canadiennes or Australicnnes led hither hy a spirit of adventure.
Not at all. They were Frenchwomen, beautiful and
good, who desired to take part in the war, to serve the
country as combatants. Their proceeding had no success
except to excite curiosity. The deputies to whim they
had sent their names and made known the object of their
visit told them that no provision had been made for such
service.
Thc captain, beautiful brtmnette that she was, voiced
her disappointment quite loudly. "If they don't want t'>
go," she said, "we will go and we'll show them that we
know what to-do. Wc are 20,000 ready to march as one
man."���Le Cri de Paris.
POOR SIR RICHARD!
Seattle is selling lumber to France and Great Britain
while B. C. lumber is a drug on the ���market. What is the
matter with that $.10,000 a year agency-general office in
London getting busy. If Sir Richard McBride cannot sell
the war department B. C. lumber in preference to Seattle
lumber he ought to be fired quick.���Omineca Herald.
PANTAGES  THEATRE
B. C. CITIZENS ENDORSED THESE NOTES
The Canadian Northern Railway Company has been
successful in raising a loan of two and a half million dollars in New York. As security to these five per cent,
notes, Canadian Northern Pacific four and a half debenture stock guaranteed by British Columbia, and other Canadian Northern debenture stock guaranteed hy Saskatchewan has been placed on deposit with the Central Trust
Company of New York. The loan will doubtless enable
tbe Canadian Northern to carry forward some improvements to the British Columbia section of thc system, and
probably New Westminster may benefit from the expenditures which the capital thus obtained will make possible.���New Westminster Columbian.
LAND MONOPOLY THE BREEDING GROUND
It is a too common delusion that the capitalist is a
mere parasite, who takes an unearned toll of the product
of labor.���London Times.
WHAT B. C. NEEDS
B. C. needs a government that is big enough to forget
Vancouver for a little while and build up the province.
Vancouver wants the government to build wooden
ships to carry B. C. lumber to market. Why not use
those McBride submarines?
This shipbuilding game is started by tlie lumber merchants of Vancouver who cannot sell their goods, yet
Seattle and Portland lumber merchants are selling millions of dollars worth of lumber to France and Great
Britain, and the Allies furnish their own ships to carry
it. There is something wrong with the selling department
of the B. C, lumber merchants.���Omineca Herald.
A rollicking, live musical comedy
is to be presented to Pantages patrons next week. The Dairymaids is
one of the best miniature musical
comedies, and with Eddie Foley and
Lea I.eturer are sure to score a hit.
The Mystic Birds, a novelty act
by Master Paul, the boy violinist, is
something in the way of a musical
offering.
Yalcs  and  Wheeler  create  quite  a
FISHIN' FOR VOTES, EH?
Mr. Tisdall, the new Minister of Public Works, measured thc snow with a fishing pole up at Prince George,
in an endeavor to find the terminal of the P. G. E. railway grade. Surely a mistake. There arc no voters residing near the end of the P. G. E. grade near Prince George.
���Merritt Herald.
LORD FISHER'S SERVICE
A number of British papers have for some time been
demanding the return of Lord Fisher to the board of
admiralty, which, as characterized by James Douglas, in
London Opinion, is, without him, a piece of "wooden-
headed stupidity." He thus catalogues a few of Fisher's
achievements, which testify to his "dazzling genius." lie
says that the first stroke was to send to the scrap heap
162 warships which could neither fight nor run away;
(2) the system of nucleus crews, "which put into each ship
brains, leaving the beef to conic along when it was wanted"; (.1) the adoption of the water tube boiler; (4) the
adoption of thc Parsons turbine; (S) the introduction of
oil fuel into the navy "in the teeth of authority"; (6) the
concentration of the navy in the North sea; (7) the creation of the dreadnought, "which has converted thc Kiel
canal into a useless ditch"; (8) the creation of the battle
cruiser, the "graybound wilh thc big guns"; (9) the hunting down of German submarines, "thc collapse of submarine piracy was due directly to Fisher's daring initiative"; (10) his protest against "the Dardanelles gamble,
which has now come to a disastrous close," and "the new-
year will open auspiciously if thc nation demands the recall of Lord Fisher.���Exchange.
A SHIVER FROM THE SLOCAN
The weather in B. C. for the past five weeks has been
the worst in the memory of. the oldest and most truthful
inhabitants, and Slocan district has had its share. In New-
Denver the waterworks is out of business and the electric
lighting plant on the blink, in other parts of the district
the mines have reduced forces or closed down owing to
shortage of water. The province has had exceptionally
cold weather, ami even Victoria has had a heavy fall of
snow without a previous similar occurrence in London, a
most astounding and unprecedented departure from "good
form" by Victorians.���Slocan Record.
furore of laughter that appeals lo
everyone in their delightful comedy,
"Who's  Who?    Which?"
Wright and . Davis, a pretty maid
with a clever partner, have an act
called, the   "Live   Insurance   Agent."
Angclo Arniento and Brothers style
themselves as the world's greatest
tumblers. Feats of strength are
nothing lo these brawny sons of the
earth.
A first-class picture comedy starts
a very pleasing bill.
SUNDAY SERVICES AT
WESTMINSTER CHURCH
Next Sunday evening a combination
of the illustrated sermon with Ian
tern slides on the. Heroes of the
Faith will be delivered hy the pastor.
Rev. J. Richmond Craig, at the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 26 tli
ami Sophia Street. The large attendance last Sunday and the interest
shown warranted this continuation on
this  splendid  subject.
Headquarters for fine Printing
B. C. BRIEFS
Prince Rupert recently made a shipment of 25 tons of
halibut and salmon lo Honolulu.
* * *
The P. G. E. has discontinued its service between
Squamish and Clinton, owing to the snow. The line cannot be operated without a snow-plow.
* * *
Mrs. Coward who killed her husband at Stuart Lake-
last summer will spend the rest of her life in Kingston,
Out., Penitentiary instead of hanging in Kamloops jail
yard.���Omineca Herald.
The Oldest Printing Office in
Vancouver, fl Formerly the Vancouver World Printing House.
1[ Located at 426 Homer Street (the
old World Building), in the heart
of the city, fl Open day and night,
fl TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 470
WHAT'S IN A NAME?
John Jones didn't make enough selling ham and eggs
at 25 cents a plate to send his son through Harvard.
So he put a crest on bis bill-of-fare, labeled his H. & E.
"sugar-cured ham and selected eggs," tacked 15 cents more
on the price, and married his daughter to a French baron.
���Natal, B.C., Reporter.
WOMEN ENFRANCHISED
Tbe women of Manitoba are now on an equality, so far
as provincial matters go, with their sisters in Australia,
New Zealand, Norway, Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, and a large section of the United States. In England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales women vote in all elections except for members of parliament.
Henry George put the whole matter in a nutshell many
years ago: "The natural right of a woman to vote is just
as clear as that of a man, and rests on the same ground.
Since she is called on to obey the laws, she ought to have
a voice in making them."
COMMODORE TISDALL, ATTENTION!
Not always was a bottle of wine used in christening a
ship. In the days of sacrifice to thc gods, it is said, it
was customary to sacrifice a human being when a boat
was being launched and to cut his throat ovei the prevv,
so that his blood baptized it���Toronto Saturday Night.
THIS IS NO JOKE
If the politicians at Ottawa were more interested in
boosting the Canadian shell industry and less interested
in obtaining party advantage by tearing it to pieces, we
would all be in a position to contribute more freclv to the
Canadian Patriotic Fund and the Red Cross.���Toronto
Saturday Night.
DRAINING A SEA OF VODKA
The Russian government, as a result of thc prohibition
of tbe sale of vodka, has on band 260,000,000 gallons of
that liquor. Various uses arc proposed for it. One inventor has devised a process for converting the liquor into
india rubber. Others have found it of utility as a fuel oil
for motor cars. The finance minister is in favor of destroying it altogether, lest thc storage of so great an amount
prove a temptation to some impoverished administration
Chinook Printing House
FOUNDED 1886 -""IB
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SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY   12,  1916
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
THREE
&
OFFICE SPACE
In a modern, up-to-date fire-proof building. These are bright,
warm, vell-vcntilated offices, linoleum on floors. Excellent service,
including light, heat, Janitor, hot and cold  water.
North West Trust Company, Limited
S09  Richards  Street Seymour 7461'
m
IB
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Ijiljlfli.
Illllli
Bond Investments
u
Those having funds available will find our list of Municipal
Securities a guide to safe investment, We offer a variety of
thoroughly safe-guarded bond issues sold to net bl/i per cent, to
7 1-8, being a charge on ail properties within each respective municipality.    Consult our Bond Dept. by mail or in person.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
Head Office: 839 Hastings Street West. Vancouver, B. C.
P. Donnelly, General Manager.
llBUg'i;,;. -.:������::,���.:   : :; ,-V. ��� ��� "    "   * ���       '""y*'"'"' r' ""���'
Cut Freight Rates
Household Goods packed and shipped to all parts of the world at a saving to
you of from 25% to 45'/">, owing to our improved method of packing and
superior shipping facilities. For "Fireproof" Storage, Removals in "Car
Vans," High Grade Packing, or Shipping at "Cut Rates," see us ��� prompt
reliable, and courteous service.
"WE   KNOW   HOW"
Campbell Storage Company
Oldest and Largest in Western Canada
Phone: Seymour 7360 Office: 857 BEATTY ST.
fiiii i yyyy' li-i '��� ' �����'" '      T7~      ���������:i:i-r..!- "���"��� i- ��� >i-   ���   ' ��� ������������/->������'��� unm;;:-.���'
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Telephone
Vancouver
TO
Montreal
WONDERFUL   TRANSCONTINENTAL
TELEPHONY
To be demonstrated at
GLOBE THEATRE, 851 Granville Street,
February 14th, 15th, and 16th
m
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���Cf:
ABSOLUTELY   FREE   TO   EVERYONE
You are cordially invited to sec motion pictures of the building of the Transcontinental
Telephone Line, to see and hear talking motion
pictures descriptive of the invention of the Telephone, to listen to talking and music from MONTREAL, 4,000 miles away.
Two demonstrations on the 14th at 8.30 and 9.30
p.m. Three demonstrations on the 15th and
16th at 7.30, 8.30 and 9.30.
By Courtesy of
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
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Those Who Run May Read
The Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.'s machine-made Sewer
8      Pipe, put under test by The Robt. W. Hunt Co., Ltd., a pipe, 10
inches internal diameter, being subjected to two days' drying in an
U     oven, then immersed in water for 24 hours.   Result���
W Weight before immersion 105*4 pounds
Weight after immersion 106     pounds
Difference equals J^-pound of water, or .48 of 1 per cent.
CRUSHING TEST
On the same pipe after being subjected to the above���crushed
J     at 29,200 pounds.
DOMINION GLAZED CEMENT PIPE CO., LTD.
Office: Dominion Building. Vancouver, B.C. Phone Sey. 8286
Champion & White
Best South Wellington Coal     j
DELIVERED NORTH OF 2STH   AVENUE
Lump $6.��0       Nut $5.50 j
PHONE 9570 1083 MAIN STREET    ���
���PiillllillBBIliiPiMlillHIillMIIillllii
I NORTHERN CROWN BANK
Some weeks ago the impression was
general thai the Northern Crown
Bank would be absorbed by one of
the larger banks, but ii has now been
decided by the directors'and shareholders to continue the bank as a
separate institution, and the iirst step
with a view I" gerater strength was
taken al the adjourned annual general
meeting, when a reduction of '50 per
cent in the paid-up capital was authorized. The amount of capital paid
in stands at $2,860,000 and will, consequently, bc reduced to $1,430,000.
* * *
Of tin- 50 per cent taken from capital account, one-half, namely $715.-
000, will bc placed in reserve account,
and the balance will be used to writedown bank premises, depreciation in
assets, and to place a sufficient sum
iu contingent account to provide for
possible losses in secured loans, the
security for which is not readily realizable. This step naturally entails a
loss to shareholders, of which the directors are among the largest. At the
same time, the reduction of the bank's
capital by 50 per cent reduces the
double liability of the shareholders to
that extent also; and that is a very
important consideration.
* * *
All things considered, and in view
of the steps to improve its position
the report of the bank for the past
year may bc considered as fairly satisfactory.
* * *
The balance at credit of profit and
loss account on November 30th, 1914,
was $14,792: and the net profits for
the year ended November 30th, 1915.
after deducting expenses of management, payment of taxes, and making
necessary provision for interest due
to depositors, are $100,789, This sum
of $115,582 was apropriated as follows: war tax on bank note circulation. 18,952; reserved for depreciation
in stocks and bonds $15,000; and transferred to contingent account, $60,000.
This left a balance to be carried forward at credit of profit and loss account of $21,630.
* * *
During the year the total assets increased $1,100,000, and loans decreased $1,000,000. Liquid assets are 51
per cent, of the liabilities to the public
and 6,1 per cent, of deposits.
* * *
The bank has had an expensive lesson in the matter of unwise dividends
and doubtful loans, but doubtless
with the beginning of a new era in its
history il will meet with more substantial success. The passing of the
dividend was too long delayed in the
interests of the bank, and iu this connection the remarks of Sir II. II. McMillan, president of the bank, will
prove interesting.    He said in part:
"If we had a sufficient sum in Reserve, or a substantial Contingent Account, these doubtful debts would have
been taken care of without any embarrassment.
"It may be claimed ihai we should
have established a sufficient Reserve
to meet such a contingency, and I am
prepared to admit that such would
have been the best policy, but il musl
be remembered that we Have only
been in business for nine years. 11
we had taken our profits to establish
a reserve, we could not have paid in
dividends, as we have done, over a
million dollars. We may have erred
in trying to give a good return to the
Shareholders.
The action taken by the authorities
in this respect uill lie welcomed by
the majority of citizens, and particularly by the retail business houses.
The practice has become altogether
too prevalent, and it is satisfactory
o- note ils discontinuance before il
had really assumed large proportions.
"I which abundance of promise was
given during the past month.
TRUST COMPANIES' ACT (British
Columbia)
The following companies lia-c recently changed their articles and memorandum of association to comply
with the act:���
Heaps  Commercial  Company,  Ltd.
The   Hose   Investment Company, Ltd.
Pacific Lime Co., Ltd.
Quathiaski Canning Company, Ltd.
Ymir-Wilcox  Development Co.,  Ltd,
Hendry Land Co., Ltd.
A HEALTHY INDICATION
The general condition of business
in any community is always to some
extent shown in the increase or decrease of the telephone business of
Ihe particular locality under consideration. Jn this connection it is interesting to note that the numbers
of new phones being installed in Vancouver has shown a very healthy increase during the past two months,
which would indicate that general
business conditions arc improving,
At the outbreak of the war the 13.
I C. Telephone Company had 42,418
I telephones installed throughout the
province. This number fell away
during the progress of the war to 39,-
965, but is now increasing again. In
December the total net increase was
210 telephones, of which there was
an increase of 119 in Vancouver
alone. Victoria showed an increase
of 45, Xew Westminster 7 and North
Vancouver 6. For January the total
net increase in the system was 165
telephones. Vancouver showed an increase of S3, Victoria 29, Kamloops
11, Xew Westminster 13 and North
Vancouver  5.
OFFERING PRIZES TO PURCHASERS ILLEGAL
The practice of offering tickets for
valuable prizes by storekeepers to
purchasers of goods up to a certain
value as an inducement to purchase
must henceforth come to an end in
this city, according to Chief of Police MacLennan.
This practice has been found illegal in the courts, owing to decision
handed down recently in a case of
Rex versus The Hudson Bay Company. Thc court decision held that
the advertising and conducting of
any scheme whereby the purchaser of
goods to the value of one dollar received a coupon corresponding to one
previously selected, and which entitled the holder thereof to one
chance of winning a motor car, constituted an offence within the meaning of section 236 of Criminal Code.
Such a scheme constituted a lottery
notwithstanding the fact that the
price of the goods purchased was the
regular price.
PEACE PROSPECTS
Every few weeks a shiver goes
through finance and business in this
country when somebody yells
"Peace," or notes the illness of a
European ruler as likely to bring sudden termination to the European conflict.
Once and for all, American industries must realize that this is a war
of government, and not of crowned
heads. It is fundamentally a battle
of peoples. A hundred lintisli cabinets may fall, but the war for the
defense of the Hritish empire goes
on, A hundred kaisers, kings or emperors may be laid in the dust, but
their passing will mean nothing for
the interests of peace.
Germany may secretly promote q
Ford or any other peace propaganda, but there will be no result.
Two irreconcileable systems ol
government have met in conflict,
and the fight must be to a finish,
Either Prussian system and German
efficiency will rule the world, or democracy promoting peace and individual development will be the ruler.
Two systems of irreconcileable social order met in conflict 55 years
ago, and within this nation was settled a world issue.
One side bad to go down to defeat.
Now another world issue is to the
front in the drama on this planet.
One side or the other must go down
to defeat. There is no possible compromise. It is on both sides the peoples'   war.���Wall  Street  Journal.
Jingle Pot
coal
Always Mined by Union
White Labor
Coast Lumber & Fuel Co., Ltd.
Phone Fair. 2500    Phone High. 226    Phone Fraser 41
MUTUAL INSURANCE IN
SCHOOLS
Consul Kelley reports from Rome
that in many of the elementary
schools of Rome, and of some other
cities in I taly, a system of mutual
benefit insurance lias been established among the pupils. The pupils pay
small weekly contributions to the general fund and in return receive certain
payments in case of sickness, accident
or death, and at the same time lay
thc foundation for old-age benefits.
While the plan is still in its infancy,
so far as Rome is concerned, it has
been adopted in many of the public-
schools of the city, and this system of
insurance appears to be growing rapidly. Pupils are encouraged to continue the insurance until they may
join an adult society.���Bradstreet's
Review.
^mmmmammamasm- mmm
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Northern Securities Limited
Established 1906
529 PENDER STREET WEST
Seymour 1574    'CM
FINANCIAL AGENTS. ESTATE MANAGERS    JJ
INSURANCE AGENTS
FIRE   ::   LIFE  :: ACCIDENT  ::   SICKNESS   ::   GUARANTEE   j��
AUTOMOBILE  :: PLATE GLASS
MONEY TO LOAN
We have a few sums of $500 to $3000 to loan on approved first-class    U
property ji
B. GEO. HANSULD Manager   |
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Cold Weather Poultry Hints
These cold mornings feed Warm CHICKEN CHOP mixed with
JOHN BULL or PRATT'S EGG PRODUCER.
Our special "DRY MASH" is excellent to keep fowls healthy.
(See our window for home made dry mash hopper).
MANGELS are a good substitute for green food, only 60c per
100 lbs. ���.  ; 1 ,   '
Keep your fowls busy and healthy by a plentiful supply of Dry(
Straw, Shell, Bone, Charcoal, Beef Scrap,  and  clean  cold water.
THE VERNON FEED CO!
THREE STORES-
MOUNT PLEASANT      49TH and FRASER        COLLINGWOOD
Phones: Fair. 186���878      ���        Fraser 175 Coll. 153
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH  TICKETS   ISSUED
FROM  VANCOUVER TO
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The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
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Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
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J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D.T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BROD1E,  Gen.  Pass.  Agent, Vancouver.
TRUHK
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General  Agency Transatlantic  Steamship  Lines
C. E. Jenney, G. A. P. D.
Phone:   Sey. 8134
W. G. Connolly. C. P. F. A.
927  Granville  Street
Eating between Meals is perfectly Natural for
Healthy, Active Children
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The BETTER Breads
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Made of Canada's most nutiitious flour and pure water in British
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5c
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HAMPTON-PINCHIN
Bakers of BETTER BREAD
60 LANSDOWNE AVE. WEST PHONE FAIR. 443���1013
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^
FOUR
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
SATURDAY.  FEBRUARY   12.   1916
Women's  Work for Vancouver Women
*******       *
HOUSE WORK PROBLEM
In a receiil issue of the "Woman's Home Companion" there appears an
arliele on "House Work." It Interested me and I would like to write a few
words mi the subject. Of course I am not a "Houseworker." and mavb��si
do nol know- bit they say ever) one lias a righl to his own opinion. All
wr the city the women seem to be having a difficult time to get a girl nr
,. ������;,��� for housework. I can'l see why girls do not want to do house wdrk,
because I believe the house girl is the girl thc "fellows are looking for."
******
There will be some girls that will read ihis and say they do not intend to
marry.   Oh, well, I've heard that before, too, but down deep in their hearts
they will be sadly disapointed ii they da not net a chance,
******
Many a girl thinks she can make more money being a counter girl or an
. ffice girl, or factory girl. They will come out ahead if ihey go in for housework, l'i course the houseworker does not have so much time to herself as
the others, neither does she have a  place in which to receive any company,
ami usually  has In sleep in the back bedr n, hut  tliat is in a home  where
she has a little light and air. The office or factory girl stays in a boarding
house mii the last floor iu a room with perhaps one little window, and that
of frosted glass.
******
Yes. I say again, lhal I rather envy lhe houseworker, am! there is no
necessity for her to feel "beneath" anyone. Her duties are noble. Domestic
work should be a pride ami a joy. One who engages therein, should be clcva-
ted rather than cast down.
******
An eight-hour day, or at least hours so arranged thai a girl may have
some social life, and use lhe opportunities for advancement she craves; a
place lo entertain her friends; consideration, kindness and politeness in treatment, more privileges, those are the main suggestions. If these things were
possible in housework lhe conclusion that 1 at least arrive at is that there
are multitudes of self-respecting, ambitious girls who would train themselves for domestic work, and who believe that they can make that calling
one In be looked up to.
******
May it not be that the women will try to meet half way the grievances
which are keeping the best type "f girl out of domestic work. She will learn
she has caught a new and inspiring conception of democracy and greatly
increased efficiency in the economy of the household.
******
I would like to advise everyone who wants to rid the house of unspeakable Chinamen and employ white girls, to plan to do so on a business
basis. Try in arrange an eight-lioiir-a-day scheme. See how it will work.
Arrange the work so the girls may come at a certain time and go at a certain
time. Try them like human beings. Give them holidays to themselves and
encourage them to help themselves.
MISS CHINOOK.
*
THE FIGHT AGAINST
TUBERCULOSIS
The Vancouver Association for the
Pfevention-and Relief of Tuberculosis
held their annual monthly meeting for
the election of officers in the Board
of Trade rooms, mi Friday, Feb. 4,
1916. The minutes of the previous
meeting \\-ere read by the secretary,
Miss  Seymour.     ( Passed).
A letter was read from .Miss Gill-
man stating her resignation. The
club decided to have placards printed
and put in conspicuous places to advertise the Vancouver Association for
the Prevention and Relief of Tuberculosis.
Next followed the election of officers: President. Mrs. Harrison (by
acclamation); Vice-president, Mrs.
Edward Malum; 2nd Vice-president,
Mrs. Julius Griffiths; Secretary, Miss
Seymour: Treasurer, Miss London;
Press Correspondent, .Mrs. Gradwine
Gibson; Executive Committee, Mrs.
P.ultar.  Mrs.   Farquhar,
A special vou- of thanks was extended to tlu- Rotary Club for the assistance ihey kindly gave to lhe V.
I'. of T. Association,
An abstract account of lhe treasurer's ace.mills, were read and lhe V.
I', oi T. Association found to In- in a
better financial condition than they
were al  lhe year eliding iu  19t4.
Mis.  Harrison's rcporl  (verbatim);
"Ladies. I bring you |,���la> a report
not replete with expansion and increased activities, bul one which deals
wilh iln steady growth of the work
already undertaken.
"We have shared in common with
other organizations the financial trials
contingent to this lime of stress; we
have weathered the storm and come
through with a small balance in the
bank. Our nurses' work greatly increased and our clinic doing good service.
"Before proceeding to ihe actual report of work accomplished, there are
a few thoughts I wish lo present you
lo help us in doing our share in this
war we are waging against tuberculosis.
"As spring ami summer are approaching, ilu- possibility lhal the
germs of tuberculosis may be carried
by means of flies and dust, suggests
that greater precautions be exercised
���in lhe handling and exposure of all
fooil sniffs, and that we each, personally and collectively, wage an active fly campaign.
"Let us urge by education and otherwise that all milk not derived from
tuberculin tested cattle be pasteurized or scalded.
"Let us pay attention lo the housing problem and work towards the
enactment of laws which will prohibit
the renting of houses unfit for human
habitation and
"Let us realize the importance of
proper hygiene in homes, schools, play
grounds,  etc.,  and  help  in  all  public
aiu ays received from Dr. L'm'.erhill
ami his staff. Our work would often
have been hampered had il not been
fur them,   I thank you.
"(Signed i
"Mis. Catherine  Harrison."
health work which will raise the standard of health and living conditions
in our community.
"Let us remember two things���
"That the keynote of this war a-
gainsl tuberculosis is education.
"That in our prevention work, especially among children, the beginning of the end of tuberculosis is the
protection of the child in the home.
"During the year we have had regular monthly meetings with an average of twelve members in attendance. 1 trust in the coming year
we may find means of increasing the
average.
"Our nurse, Miss Hill, has been on
duty almost continuously throughout
the year. Miss Hill's loyal and able
assistance has made my work a pleasure during the years of her service,
and her excellent methods of work
among our tuberculosis families in
the city must commend itself lo all.
"When Dr. Thomson, our clinic
physician, left for the front last summer, we felt the bottom dropping oul
of things but Or. Proctor came lo
our aid and under his direction the
clinic was moved to the C. P. It. station  and very excellently  conducted.
"A month or so later we were unfortunate in also having Dr, Proctor
leave for the front, bul he very kindly
arranged for Dr. dimming to take
his place and since lhat time Dr.
(.'uniining has ably carried on lhe
work begun by Dr. Thomson.
"Al   this   time   let  me   speak   of  the
Importance of this clinic, especially
for to urge upon you iis enlargement
in tlie coming year.
"Ill June, thanks to your generosity
your president attended tlu- llth annual meeting of the National Association for the Study and Prevention
of Tuberculosis, which was held in
Seattle. This privilege proved of inestimable value. I cannot express
what that meeting meant to me and
can only hope that that something I
gained may show in my work.
"Our report of cases shows an increase  over last  year, as  follows;
"Cases reported, all forms, 1914, 198;
1915, 246.
Deaths reported from all forms.
1914. 126; 1915. 143.
Death rate per KK!0 population, 1914,
1.1; 1915, 1.35.
"These figures show an increase in
the death rate in 1915 over that of
1914. I am* not sure that this increase
may in a measure be due to the fact
that our efforts are proving their
value by finding the cases and having
them properly reported to tlie health
department.
"Before closing, I wish personally
to thank the retiring officers for their
work during thc year and to express
my thanks to all for the honor you
have done me in wishing me to lie
your president for another year. 1
shall do my best to warrant the honor.
"At this time T would like to speak
of  the  wonderful assistance  wc have
ST. PAUL'S HOSPITAL
Iweill OUt to Sl. Paul's Hospital
the other day and was graciously received by the Sisters. One of them
showed me all around the institution
antl I was pleased to find a cheerful
atmosphere.
* * *
l-'irsi we went to lhe chapel and
there saw a number of nurses haling prayers, anil the scene brought
back sweet memories, fof I was once
a nurse and trained in a general hospital.
* * *
There wc almost forgot the name
of our beloved Saviour. I think I was
as good as any one, generally speaking, but very seldom did I study my
bible or pray. I was of the opinion
that I had too much to do and when I
was off duty it was the time for recreation and fresli air. Hut up at St.
Paul's it's different; they have time
for all things. They take time and
their nurses are more efficient and
have better health ill the long run.
* * *
Hut I am getting away from the
hospital again. Wc next went into
the surgical department. There had
just been'an operation, and you would
have been surprised to see how spick
and span every thing looked. They
have three large operating rooms and
one small one out of doors. Tlieir
sterilizing apparatus is of the latest
model and quite complete.
* * *
Next we went to the babies nursery,
where very few people have admittance, and saw all the babies. Hut
they were not expecting company and
cried so 1 did not slay very long.
Next we went to the general wards
and found these very inviting and in
good order too and all  filled up.
* * *
Taking the whole into consideration
I thought St. Paul's very comfortable,
and if one were a'convalescent pat
ient and up and around I fancy it
would bc a fine place to stay.
conducting classes. The pupils progressed rapidly under her instruction.
Owing to ill-health Miss lligney was
forced  lo  resign   her  position.
Mrs. \\. II. Maclnnis, an experienced oral teacher, later look charge
and upon her resignation on January
I. 1916, Mr. F. W. Ilobson. a very
competent and experienced man who
has taught for sis years in England,
one year in Halifax, .VS.. and three
years in the .Indiana Slate School for
Deaf and Dumb. Tlie pupils are
making remarkable progress under
his instruction, and the parents of
the children are taking great interest
ill  iheir work.
Mr. Cordon, the school inspector,
says their attendance is the most
regular of any school in  Vancouver.
Mr. Cordon mentioned one member
of the class who spends practically
his whole time in tlie manual training department and he thinks that
boy's work the best of any in tile
city.
There are eight pupils attending
this school at present, and it is hoped lhal if there are other deaf and
dumb children ill the Province, they
may become pupils at this splendid
school.
The pupils are taught to speak a-
lond. After a course at the school,
.many are able to understand the
words of others by observing the
movements of the lips. I once heard
a party saff they were in a certain
moving picture theatre and noticed
a row of "dummies" sittiiig in the
front row. The picture was���what
every one thought���quite sad, but
the "dummies" laughed because they
could understand yvhat the actors
were saying. They could read the
actors' lips.
Even more successful was the excerpt from "II Trovatore," consisting
of the scenes outside and inside the
prison. Ik-re, Madame de Ponti excelled as Leonora, adding to the beauty of her singing the charm and appeal of her picturesque personality.
Mr. Baird surprised even his greatest admirers by the ease and effectiveness of hi.s acting and singing as
Ihe Conic di Luna, while Mdlle. Dell'
Oro gave an appealing vividity to the
small bul exacting role of "Azircena."-
Mr. Ivor Jones, save for an inclination lowards lhat popular tenor
throaiiness, Jiang with feeling and
real artistry as "Maurico," and Mr.
G. Stanley earned a special word of
praise for his singing as "Rintz."
The only musical weakness of the
production arose from an apparent
insufficiency of rehearsals with tlie orchestra, which acquitted itself admirably, despite the few momentary
lapses of the performers, which were
too small and infrequent to mar the
success of the production. It was. indeed, a noble venture, nobly done;
and one which on any repetition
should command crowded houses at
each performance. The operatic synopsis on the programmes were written as well as they were designed,
while both the dresses and stage settings were worthy the occasion.
Phone Highland 137
Grandview  Hospital
1090  VICTORIA   DRIVE
VANCOUVER     -     B.C.
Medical : Surgical  : Maternity
Rates   from   $15.00   per   week
-^
Canada's Contribution
Grand Opera in Vancouver
V:=
WINTER FEEDING OF WILD
BIRDS
MEMORIAL SERVICE
A special memorial service was held
in Christ Church on Sunday morning
in memory of thc late Lieut. Harold
Owen, son of the rector. Rev. C. C.
Owen. Rev. C. S. Mcfiaffin, the rector in charge, preached the* sermon.
Many kindly references were made
to the young soldier by Rev. Mr. Mc-
Gaffin.
Tile Vancouver Association for the
Prevention and Relief of Tuberculosis
have postponed the bowling tournament they were giving in the Pender
Alley on Wednesday afternoon and
evening, February 9.
The Vancouver Woman's Suffrage
Meeting arranged for the celebration
of the Manitoba woman's franchise to
be held on Tuesday, February S. ll
was postponed on account of inclement weather,
TELEPHONE LADIES DANCE
The It. C. Telephone ladies are giving their annual dance ill l.esler
Court on February 29. from 9 till 2.
Invitations may be obtained upon application to the committee. The secretary. Miss llendrick, and convenor.
Miss Molyueux. Music will be supplied by tlie Morgan and Guild orchestra.
THE LIP READING SCHOOL
IN VANCOUVER
Until March 1915 there was no lip-
reading school in Vancouver and the
Provincial Government was endeavoring to send deaf and dumb children
to Winnipeg for education. The cost
was in the nighhorhood of $40(XI a
year.
At the beginning of the school year
in 1915 the Provincial Education Department took the matter up and
it was decided to have a lip-reading
school.
The first of March saw Miss liig-
ney,  a  very  competent  oral   teacher.
Phone Seymour 4223
Mrs. A. CLARK
The Ladies'  Agency
DOMESTIC.   EDUCATIONAL   AND
BUSINESS   OPENINGS
20-22 LEIGH SPENCER BLDG.
VANCOUVER. B.C.
Also al SJ6 Sayward Bldg., Victoria, B.C.
Local Professionals Score Notable
Success in Ambitious Offering at
the Avenue
To do Madame de Ponti justice one
is templed to paraphrase Master
Shakespeare iu suggesting tllat, when
she first projected last Thursday's
performance at the Avenue, she must
have said, "I dare do all that may become a woman) wdio dares do more
is none."
1 only know two men in Vancouver,
both brilliant musicians, who dare even contemplate putting on grand opera in B. C. Hut neither succeeded in
doing it. Verily, angels come in
where wise men fear to tread!
So Madame de Ponti succeeded
where even llagen (no, I won't give
away tlieir names!) failed. She would
not even be content with finding a
cast for one opera: she had to find
two!
Fortified by Oscar Zeiglcr as musical director and his well-chosen and
delightful symphony orchestra (led by
Madame Carapata and Mr. Ceo. Red-
fern) and flanked by two such accomplished professionals as Walter
Baird and T. l.eith Rettie, Madame de
Ponti at least secured herself against
artistic failure and won a large audience's unstinted enthusiasm. Hut
that these artistes should have received such splendid vocal support from
principals who were for Ihe most
part Madame's pupils, speaks volumes
for her capacity as a teacher as well
as for her admitted reputation as a
singer.
I'..ilh "Faust" and "11 Trovatore"
were rendered with scholarship and
intelligence, as well as with fine feeling. What deficienccs there were
came from the inexperience of most
of the performers in acting. These
were mostly overcome by the clever
stage direction of Mr. Marc Gold-
stone. The more important vocal
and instrumental sides of the performance, however, was an unequivocal
triumph for Mr. Oscar Zeigler, the
brilliant young musical director, who
also executed a special orchestration
of Gounod's and Verdi's inspiring music for this production.
The garden scene from "Faust,"
while dramatically deficient, was admirably sung by Madame de Ponti as
Marguerite, whose beautiful high
high notes were sung in the open
Italian style, which strikes and rings
on the note in pleasing contrast to
the German school, that climbs and
reaches up to them. Mr. Rettie as
"Faust," Miss Lignc Engbloom as
"Siebel," Mrs. C. Page as "Martha,"
and Mr. Walter Baird as "Mephisto-
pbeles" all acquitted themselves well
���the last-named gave a surprisingly
good rendering oi" his Satanic majesty,
his acting being quite effective and
unforced. Mr. Rettic's rich-toned tenor was heard to advantage in his artistic rendering of "Salve, dimora,"
while both the quartette and the duet
finale, "Thc Horn is late," were admirably sung.
Hospitality to wild birds is most
appreciated by them in winter and
early spring, when food is scarce.
To put birds at ease when they come
near, whistle or sing something. Repeat this every time, always using the
same air or tune. It becomes a sort
of signal between them and their
friends which will in time completely
win the birds' confidence. liy all
means keep the cat out of sight.
If there be a tree in the yard, it
can be made into the best kind of a
food station. Tie a chunk���about a
pound���of suet securely on one of the
biggest limbs near the trunk. Wind
strings of peanuts around the trunk.
Food displayed on objects that are
familiar to the birds will attract them
more quickly than when it is shown
by artificial means. Hut in the absence of tree or pole, make a table
with a lower tray in which to protect food from rain and snow. Fasten
strings of peanuts across the edge of
the table and put suet in the. tray
below. Or, set up a post and nail a
board on it which has long nails driven into it from beneath, to hold cars
of corn, suet, doughnuts, shredded
wheat and other foodstuffs.
Hairy, Downey and Red-headed
Woodpeckers, Chickadees, Nuthatches, Brown Creepers, Cardinals and
other desirable birds can be attracted
by means of the foods mentioned.
From early March on the returning
slimmer residents will also appreciate them, and may thus bc induced
to stay.
Birds need water at all times of
tlie year. In winter, during long periods nf freezing, they often suffer
much from lack of it.
Food and water stations should be
well away from any fence, building,
or other object whence a cat would
have access to the birds.���The American Boy.
phonei aav. eoo
MacDONALD & HAY
Barrister!, Solicitor!, Etc.
1012 Standard Bank Bldg.
Vancouver, B.C.
Classified Advertising
FLORISTS
Canadian born!   To the Allies be true!
Raise plenty of wheat and good meat
for the  stew;
Put on thc right harness���no duties
lo shirk,
And rival the German by system iu
work.
Get wise to the grafters, take some
out and shoot,
"Put fear of the Lord"���cause the
stopping of loot;
Leave white-feather officers "short"
in their pay;
Be faithful to those who by duties do
stay.
Look out for the fellows appointed
by "pull";
And tighten the rope on those "'peddling the bull."
Select some straight fellows to manage canteen
And furnish an audit each month to
bc seen;
Be fair to the privates who willingness prove.
No doubt they're most anxious to be
on  the move.
'Tis serious business  this  death-dealing war,
Besides borrowing much, sacrificing to
Thor;
Reform is required���economy's sake,
All  ranks  and all ages  in   hand  you
should  take.
I'he  wage  of  the  worker  or  salaried
man,
The   profits   of  bosses���on   equalized
plan;
Cut the middleman out, as he doesn't
produce,
No   longer   for   grafting   be   any   excuse.
Where party demands some "friend's"
wish gratified.
Give  your   problem   to  him   and  ask
him to decide;
Then  liis own  common-sense  be his
guide and his judge,
If his meanness remain  you have no
right to budge.
And promise or token those only we
keep
To the active or helpless e'en those in
last  sleep.
Then let us be patient, my dear brother "Jack,"
Though comment be caustic, no need
to hit back;
The man who is shouting 'bout Canada's sliare
Is acting like Paddy when Biddy
killed bear.
The native-born sons who are fighting today
Are as good as they've got, let it be
what it may.
And time will bring others as full of
quick wit
As soon as department is ready with
kit.
Now it takes four or five to fit one,
for a fight.
And if each does his duty success
seems in sight.
Provisions, munitions, attention and
care,
The patriots at home have a bard load
to bear;
Decide right away then, which part
you will play,
Stick to it like beavers though nigh
or away.
���V. VIDF.TTE.
Vancouver, Feb. 7, 1916.
BROWN BROS. & CO.. LIMITED,
Seedsmen, Florists, Nurserymen, 48
Hastings St. E��� and 782 Granville
Street, Vancouver, B. C.
WATCHMAKER
10,000 WATCHES and CLOCKS
wanted to clean and repair at the
factory, 438 RICHARDS STREET.
MONEY TO LOAN
MONEY LOANED, DIAMONDS,
Jewelry, etc. A quiet, respectable,
reliable ��� place to borrow money.
Old gold bought. Established 1905.
Star Loan Co., 812 Hastings West.
STOVE   REPAIRS
DON'T THROW YOUR OLD
Stove away. We handle castings and
repairs to fit any stove or range.���
FRANKS, 44 Water Street.
Phone Seymour 9086
Keep Your
Papers
and Valuables safe and secure in
A Private Deposit Box
in our Safety Vault
$2.50 PER ANNUM
Less than one cent a day
DOW FRASER
TRUST CO.
122 HASTINGS STREET W.
and McKay Station, Burnaby
���Hits''*,...   - SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY  12,  1916
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
FIVE
V
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Mr. Patrick Donnelly, one of the
Liberal candidates for Vancouver,
speaking at Ward 4 Liberal Association,   Wednesday   night,   attacked   the
Government on the question of the
Pacific and Great Eastern Railway.
Mr. Donnelly iu a speech iu which he
expressed thc belief that Mr, Macdonald and (he other candid
would come out victoriously in
coming election, spoke in part as
follows ���
I   am   indeed   pleased   to     appear
on   tlie   platform   lu   support   of   the
candidature of  Mr.  M. A.  Macdonald,
because   he   is   lhe   type   of   man
need   in   public   life,     regardless
ing all in ils power to keep money
from leaving the country and the
stock exchange refuses to quote new
issues of Canadian or oilier colonial
securities!' Neither can it be men
that our "business government" hopes
| to attract because ihe British Government  is  refusing  lo allow all  men of
military age in le
age to leave lhe country, and
lhe, is encouraging individual investors to
""   keep  their money at  home.
The  United States is our source of
financing   and   if   money   can   be   se-
|cured  any  place   (for  Canada al   lh
present time), il can be secured there
we i That being the case, why doesn't on
of | "business  government"   send   its   bil
lions  which  made  han
not '���) -     -I   which   wa- ;
the :    -eminent.
Miscellaneous  Grafts
I
iven i
Mr
lime   tonight   to       	
Bowser's  "business   gov-
:t" iu the past has robbi d the
in its condui i of the coal -it-
ilher branches
f  the  natural
when
ernmi
I'eopl    ^^^^^^
Uation or in any   if iii.
of the administration
which party he supports, anil particularly do we need a man of his calibre in the opposition at Victoria at
the present time when (he opposition
lias been reduced almost to the vanishing point. The two members constituting tlie opposition are working
faithfully iu their endeavor to protect the public treasury, but neither
of them being lawyers, the opposition would bc greatly strengthened
by another member who is a brilliant
lawyer.
Mr. Bowser in his inaugural address published in the "Province" of
December 15th, 1915, announcing liis
new cabinet,  said:���
"'Wc propose to have a business
administration by business men. I
believe this is what the people want
and I believe that the men selected
in this new cabinet will give il to
them, We arc experiencing a time
in our Provincial history when we
need an administration conducted a-
loiig the lines of solid thorough-going
husiness. The members of the new
cabinet have been selected with this
end in view. I believe they are qualified to fill the bill.'
in London
McBride. who is a
s business agent for
government."   is   evi-
Agent-General
Sir    Richard
graduate   and
this "business ^^^^^^^
dently more willing to face Zeppelin
raids than the outraged public opinion in British Columbia, which is
thoroughly aroused hy the business
methods of this self-styled "business
government." Why should Sir Richard lie sent to London for money
when  the  Hritish  Government  is- i'.o-
i siness   agent   there   where     there   is
sonic possibility of his succeeding?
Cost of Coal
Docs this "business government"
take credit for the advance of $1.1)11
per Pm in the price of coal in a country where there is a little empire of
coal which is fast being displaced by
oil? In Great Britain the government
fixes the price of coal but here the
coal companies fix thc price, which is
fixed no doubt on a basis of paying
handsome dividends on watered
stock. The capitalization of the
Canadian Collieries Limited (Dunsmuir) is $21,000,000 which, allowing
even the enormous price of $11,000,-
000 which is supposed to have been
paid for the mines, includes $9,000,-
(XX) of watered stock on which the
coal consumer is expected lo pay dividends, which accounts for the high
price that he is forced to pay. These
arc ��� the mines that Canadian mihiia
were called out to protect.
Coal Commission
This "business government" appointed a coal commission which cost
tlie Province $10,1 IS and the commission found after they had concluded
their arduous labors that, if tlie coal
was delivered in bulk instead of being
delivered in sacks, a saving would
be effected because some of the coal
dust stuck to Ihe sacks, thereby pre-
venting the unfortunate householder
from receiving his full quantity, anil
also that each consumer should have
a little chute of his own. No doubt
this commission was equally as satisfactory to this "business government" as the other thirteen  comniis-
Here Are the Standardbearers
Complete List of Candidates Thus Far Nominated
for Provincial Election.
Below will be found a tabulated list of all the constituencies which
have   nominated   their   candidates   for   the   coming   provincial   parliamentary elections, along with the names of the gentlemen who are
represent their different parties
to
Constituency.1;    Liberal.
Conservative.
Labor & Ind.
Conservative.
A. Gaskell
I. Fisher
Alberni    I H. C. Brewster
Atlin    | Frank Mobley
Cariboo J- Yorston
Chilliwack   -JE. D. Barrow
Cowichan     --   	
Columbia [John Buckam
Comox Hugh Stewart
Cranbrook   _. Dr. J.  H.  King
Delta A.  D.  Patterson
Dewdney  _��� John Oliver
Esquimalt	
Fort George���
Fernie   	
Greenwood       ^^^^^^^
Grand Forks. J-  !'- Thompso.
Islands M,  B. Jackson
Kamloops F. W. Anderson
Kaslo John Keen
Lillooet    |J.  B.  Bryson
Nelson A. M. Johnson
Nanaimo ' ���        ,,_.      ���-,,���
No.Okanagan   Dr. K. McDonald.Pr.ee  E lison
So.Okanagan ! Leslie V.  Rogers Mayor  Jones
Newcastle    -J  Dr* Do,cr
N.Westminster David Whiteside
Omineca A.  M.   Manson
Revelstoke   .-Dr.   Sutherland
Rossland   ���! W. D.  Willson
Richmond ... G. G. McGeer
Saanich    F. A.  Pauline
Similkameen--R- S. Conkling
Skeena T. D. Pattulo
Slocan ! Chas.   F.   Nelson
No. Vancouver Mayor   Hanes
So. Vancouver | J. W. Weart
Ij. g. c. Wood
| H.   E.  Young
J. A. Fraser
S. A. Cawley
W.   II.  Hayward
|Dr.   Taylor
M.   Manson
| r. D. Caven
| F.  J.  Mackenzie [
I W. J. Manson
R. H. Pooley
1 G. A.  Hamilton j
W. R. Ross
H. W. Maynard
Dr. C. D. McLean J. R. Jackson
E.  Miller
W. W. Foster
J.   P.   Shaw
Neil  Mackay ---
Archie McDonald
W.  R-  Maclean
A.   E.   Planta
J. H. Haw'waite
Basil Gardom
F. M.   Dockrill
Hon.   T.   Taylor !  -
L.   A.   Campbell! _.
W. J. Baird -
D. M. Eberts
L. W. Shatford       -
Wm.  Manson
W.   Hunter
G. H. Mordcn.       ���
Comm'r Campbell R.
H.  Neelands
Trail "Michael  Sullivan  Jas.  A. Schofield
Vancouver  ._,Ralph Smith W. J-  Bowser
!M. A. Macdonald [C.  E.  Tisdall
Vict
ona	
Yale
P. Donnelly
Dr. Mcintosh
S. Cowper
J. W. deB. Farris
H. C. Brewster
John Hart
George Bell
H. C. Hall
Joseph  Walters
A. J. Welsh
[Walter  Leek
A. H. Macgowan
JThos. Duke
IMr. Flumerfelt
W. R. Trotter
J. W. Wilkinson
J. H. McVety
J. E. Wilton
F. A. Hoover
F. Welsh
Alex. Lucas
J. H.
A.  J
Haw'waite
Morley
T. O'Connor; Vancouver. J. Hairing on, J- ��!%USiamJ'
A. Pritchard. J. Kavanagh. W. W. Lefeaux;Victor*. P. W.lhams.
Social Democratsin South Vancouver. Emest Burns.
resources; neither  will
land   frauds,  the  cattle
ter   for   cabinet   minisl
Dominion  Trust   swim
disasters, the  persecutii
fortunate   miners   (they
boy to die in  Burnaby
lie had a trial), the buying of  Indian
Reserves   by   political   heelers,     the
Provincial University scandal, hor the
Royal   Commission   epidemic,   which
has   resulted   in ' Royal   Commissions
in   this   Province  being  held   In   contempt.
1 will, however, discuss certain phases of the railroad policy of this "business government," a policy which
means the enslavement of the people
of Hritish Columbia with taxes for
generations to come, enslavement of
the people for the benefit nf Messrs.
Mackenzie and Mann and Messrs. Foley, Welch and Stewart. You know
of the Canadian Northern Pacific
scandals which have been discussed
by the Canadian press for years, for
the building of which this "business
government" has been generally condemned because this road (which parallels the C. P. R. through tlie mountains) saddles us with a tremendous
and needless debt.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Let us consider particularly
Pacific Great Eastern Railway
road which the Hon, Mr. l-'bun
is going to investigate, the '
method   of   prom, .ting  and
of  which  is  so  decidedly
able.
Route of Pacific  Great Eastern
This  road  is  to  run  from  Vancouver   to   Fort   George.     The   distance
was   originally   450   miles.     This   no
doubt  was   the   measurement  given
by  the   Company's  engineers,  but  in
constructing the  road, apparently so
many   curves  and   so  many  ups  and
downs were made that when the line
was finally located, it was found that
j they were thirty miles short in  their
j estimation.     This   thirty  miles   short
| made the price to the Province along
to the  extent of $1,260,000,    If this
means  that  there are  thirty miles of
| curves  and  angles,   we  must  have  a
! perfect   "boa-constrictor"   of  a   road,
compared to  which  the "rocky  road
to Dublin" is as level as the sea.
Cost to the Public
The amount of the pot which has
already been won from the people of
British Columbia by the Pacific and
Great Eastern Railway Company
croud is $20,160,000, and the cash security the company a.-iced to furnish for the construction and equipment of the road was only $250,000.
Mow thc cards were stacked against
the people is a matter which has not
received enough publicity.
In view of the organized raid upon
.the treasury (to take place shortly),
'it is in order to dig Into some of the
records at Victoria with a view to disclosing how the Pacific Great Eastern Act is framed before Messrs. Fo-
ley. Welch and Stewart are given another $6,5(10,000 of the people's money.
Sir  Richard   Meliride was going to
give  $6,500,000   to   this  concern  bul
Mr.   Bowser,   sparring   for   the    applause of the gallery, quarrelled with
Sir   Richard  on   this   subject,  and  we |
believe  that  he  was  even   prepared,
or did engage in mortal combat with
thc bad Sir Richard in order that the I
public   treasury   should  bc   protected.
i'fhc   public   welfare   was   ignored   for;
the  nine  months  during which,  with
locked   horns,    Bowser     fought     Sir
Richard   out   of   thc   Province,   thus
making way for himself to reach the
premiership.
What a  shock  to  the  publi
to   find   that   after   the   Hon.
Bowser succei
miership, and
100 Negligee Shirts for Men
Regular $1.00 and
$1.25 Values
to sell for
39c
���Because they are slightly counter-soiled, and because they
are odd lines. Made of nice washing materials, in sizes 14,
14'j, 15, 15'J and 16. They are good fitting, wasli nicely,
and are in very neat patterns. Splendid shirts for Spring wear
and will give excellent satisfai tion.
EACH      39C
pe Budsons Bw (Tompiiny
INCORPORATED 1670
HtMtKTl.SURIIMt STOP'SC0MMISSI0NCR
GRANVILLE  AND GEORGIA  STREETS
w he
lllis:
:  mind
_______  W*   I
:ded to thc coveted pre-
  duly thanked the people for the "honor conferred upon
him in placing the premiership in his
hands." he should make thc announcement that the Pacific Great
Eastern would bc completed and aid
would be forthcoming following an
enquiry which would he impartial,
very fair and non-partizan. This enquiry would be made by Mr. Bowser's
new minister in the "business government," the Hon. Mr. Flumerfelt.
But if Mr. Flumerfelt, the successor
to the Hon. Price Ellison and member of this "business government"
should break the law by bringing in a
report lo the public (I will show-
how later"), the report might be treated by Mr. Bowser as he treated the
last report made by Mr.  Flumerfelt
he was on the Forestry Comin during the year 1909. This
commission com the Province $8,328,
Mr. Flumerfelt's share being $1.0.17.
This report was apparently thrown
into the waste-basket. In any case
it was not acted upon although Mr.
Flumerfelt evidently took himself seriously, addressing numerous public
jbodies on its merits. Possibly Mr.
Flumerfelt's action in so lamely submitting to having his report treated
with contempt was responsible for
his present appointment, as it is pretty generally understood that Mr. Bowser prefers "rubber slumps" in his
government to men with independent
individual opinions, which no doubt
accounts for the ruthless manner in
which Sir Charles Tnppcr. Mr. Geo.
II. Cowan, and many other prominent
Conservatives were excluded from the
party in British Columbia.
Some Facts
Here are facts which will startle
the average man interested in the
future of this Province who may have
been persuaded by the Machine that
further assistance should be given
to thc Pacific Great Eastern Rai'-
way. So far as the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is concerned. Mr. Bowser has tied the people's bauds. We
had hoped that the Pacific Great Eastern Railway and the Kettle Valley
Railway would he food routes from
the agricultural hinterland of British
Columbia to the metropolis. That
the promoters of this mad should
prostitute   such  a  noble  plan  to  the
AN ELECTRIC HEATER
WILL KEEP YOU WARM
It will take the chill off the bathroom or make the bedroom comfortable in the morning while you are dressing.
Radiant Electric Heat is pure and clean and vitalizing
like sunshine. A small portable electric radiator can be
attached to any lamp socket in any part of the house and
will instantly throw out a genial heat and bring both comfort and satisfaction. Wiil quickly provide added heat for
baby's bath or comforting warmth for the sick or infirm.
Costs but a few cents an hour to operate, weighs only
four pounds, and is durable, convenient, and a comfort
bringer to the entire household.
Visit any salesroom of the company and see the various types of electric beaters in operation, they will both
surprise and please you by their efficiency and ready adaptability.
Phone Seymour
5000
Salesrooms
1138 Granville St., near Davie
Carrall and Hastings Sts.
milking of the money out of the
pockets of the citizens of British
Columbia makes their work all the
more evil in its aspects.
Sec. IS of the Pacific Great Eastern Incorporation Act fixes the capital stock of the Company at $25.-
000,000. The unsuspecting public
would conclude that this authorized,
capital   would   not   be   issued   unless
the railway company received full
value for same. But bear in mind,
however, that Messrs. Foley, Welch
and Stewart are the Railway Company as well as the contractors. Section 31 reads:���
"The   provisional   directors   or   thc
elected directors may pay or agree to
ii
j.,
ft
Ij
5i
ii
(Continued on page 6) SATURDAY CHINOOK
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1916
Our First
Complete  Showing
of New Spring Clothing
Suits from
$15.00   to   $35_00
WM. DICK LTD.
TWO BIG STORES  33 and 47 HASTINGS ST. E.
" Your Money's Worth or Your Money Back. "
PACIFIC GREAT  EASTERN
RAILWAY
(Continued from page 5)
" Safe Milk for the Babies
That Means TURNER'S MILK
Turner's Milk in the home is better than an insurance policy
which only indemnifies���BECAUSE Turner's Milk on account
of its absolute purity and wholesomeness PROTECTS your
health and the health of your babies.
ORDER YOUR SUPPLY TODAY
PHONE  FAIR. 597 AND  OUR DRIVER WILL CALL
TURNER'S DAIRY
SEVENTEENTH  AVENUE  AND  ONTARIO  STREET
SUNDAY SCHEDULE-LATE CARS
FAIRVIEW INNER BELT
I,v. Bdwy-Main      11.24 11.35 12.10     I.v. P.O. for Bdwy 11.38 11.49 12.24
Lv.  Bdwy-Main
Lv.   Engi   Hay
Lv. 25th Ave.
FAIRVniW OUTER BELT
11.24 11.30 12.00     Lv. P.O. for Bdwy 11.40 11*58 12.22
davie^stTlTne"
11.30 11.42 11.54   Lv.  I'.O. forlC. By 11.19 11.31 11.43
11.00 11.12 11.24     Lv. I'.O. for 25th    11.41  11.53 12.05
ROBSON STREET LINE
Lv.   Eng,   Hay      11,36 11.48 12.00     Lv. P.O. for K. By 11.25 11.37 11.49
Lv. Coml.  Dr.       11.06 11.18 11.30     Lv. P.O. for Co Dr.! 1.47 11.59 12.11
GRANDVIEW and 4TH AVE.
Lv.   Alma   St.     11.48t I2.00f 12.1-5+     Lv. P.O. for 4th A.11.25 11.37 11.52
Lv. Ced. Cot.      11.03   11.15   11.30      Lv. P.O. for Ced. C. 11.22 11.37 11.52
Cars marked (t) go to 4th and Granville only.
FRASER-SHAUGHNESSY LINE
.Lv. Oak St. 11.04 11.16 11.28    Lv. P.O. for Oak 10.42 10.54 11.06
Lv.  River Av.       11.40 12.04 12.28     Lv.P.O. for Rv. Av.l 1.02 11.26 11.50
VICTORIA  ROAD LINE  __
Lv.  Stanley  Pk.    10.54 11.06 11.18Lv. P.O. for S. Pk 10.46 10.58 11.10
Lv.  56th  Ave.        11.12 11.36 12.00     P. O. for Vic. Rd. 10.37 11.01 11.25
KITSILANO HASTINGS PK. LINE
Lv.  Kitsilano 11.55 11.15 11.35     Lv. P.O. for Kit. 10.41 11.01 11.21
Lv. Hastings Pk.   11.10 11.30 11.50     P.O. for Has. Pk. 10.49 11.09 11.29
HASTINGS EAST BROADWAY WEST LINE
Lv. Bdwy. West 11.00 11.13* 11.30     P.O. for Bdwy W. 10.38 10.53 11.08
Lv. Has. E. 11.30t 11.45+12.15+     P.O. for Has.  E.  11.05 11.20 11.50
Cars marked (*) go to Granville and Broadway only.
Cars marked (t)  go to Main and  Hastings only.
P. O. Indicates Post Office.
Subject to Change Without Notice.
Cut Out and Preserve for Reference.
LAND   ACT.
Form No. 11.
FORM OF NOTICE
Vancouver Land District, District of Coast,
Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that William 1'. Maichaiit
of, Victoria, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends
to apply for permission to lease the following
described lands:���
Commencing at a post planted on the
North-west shore of Schooner Passage, Rivers
Inlet, distant about three-quarters of a mile
in a Northerly direction from tbe north end
ol Pendleton Island; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains cast; thence south to shore
of Schooner Passage; thence following the
shore-line to place of commencement.
WILLIAM   P.   MARCIIANT,
Name of Applicant (in full).
December 22, 1915.
J.  G. Johnston, Agent.
Pioneer Printer of City is Dead
A pioneer printer of Vancouver and
one of the most highly respected and
best known members of the craft in
British Columbia, passed away at his
late residence, 4522 Quebec Street,
South Vancouver, yesterday afternoon, in the person of George Filmer
Pound, aged 70 years, of the printing
firm of Ward, Ellwood and Pound,
318 Homer Street. Death was due
to uraemic convulsions.
Funeral takes place at 3 p.m. today
to  Mountain View Cemetery.
pay in paid-up stoek or in bond-, or
debentures of the Company such
sums as they may deem expedient to
engineers or contractors, or for
right-of-way or material, plant or
rolling stoek. Any stock issued as
paid-up in respect of any of lhe matters aforesaid shall be fully paid up
capital  stock  of  the  Company."
In   other   words,     Messrs.    Foley,
Welch  and   Stewart   as    a     Railway
Company  could give   Foley,  Welch
and  Stewart,  as  contractors,  all  this
stock  for little  or no consideration.
There is the same identity of persons and interests between the owners of thc road and the contractors
for building it as in the Canadian
Northern Pacific case. The number
of profits raked off in tlie course of
construction is legion, and it is safe
to say in one case as iu thc other,
that the actual cost of building the
road will only be a fraction of what
the contractors get as the cost and
profit. In a case heard in Vancouver
where some workmen sued for money
due, it was elicited that station men
got 35c a yard on certain classes of
work. The sub-contractor was forced to reveal that he got 75c a yard or
over 110 per cent, profit for his wits
or possibly "for friendship's sake."
11" this can be taken as a sample, the
road will cost mure than twice as
much as it should.
The lion. Mr. Bowser said tliaf'if
there is anything wrong with the
Railway Policy, the people of B.C.
are to blame, having re-elected the
Government twice on that issue." So
if the people elect his cabinet ministers in the bye-election, he will no
doubt claim that the people have endorsed cvery. act of the Government
and insist that his Government, having the entire confidence of the people, is entitled to an extension of its
life, and that a general election is not
necessary.
When  thc  organization   was  under
way the  Pacific  Great  Eastern  Railway  Company asked  for' a guarantee
from  the  government  of  a  bond  issue which would enable them to proceed  with   the   building  of  the  road.
The   act   incorporating   the     Pacific
Great   Eastern   Railway  Company   is
almost identical with thc Act of Incorporation  of  the   Canadian  North-!
em  Pacific  Railway  Company,  passed in 1910 by this "business government" for Mackenzie and Mann.   Thc
Government guaranteed the bonds of
the   Pacific   Great   Eastern   Railway
Company to the extent of $35,000 per
mile.    In 1914 when actual construction had been undertaken, they came
back for another  guarantee and got
$7,000 more per mile.    The time limit for completion was July 1st, 1915,
How much stock was issued under
thc  provisions  of  Section 31  of the
Pacific   Great  Eastern   Act  and  for
wdiat  consideration?
How then were the bonds of the
Pacific   Great  Eastern   Railway  disposed of?
At what discount were they sold?
What   did   the   road   actually   cost
per mile?
How much per mile was paid for
building the great grade at Xorth
Vancouver which a wave washed
right into the sea, rails and all?
When will the road be completed?
Will Mr. Flumerfelt's enquiry answer  these  (picstions?
These are all most important questions and the taxpayers have a right
to have them answered. Suppose any
person should ask these questions,
what would be the result? For enlightenment on this subject I refer
you to Section 283 of the British Columbia Railway Act, which is incorporated with and forms part of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Act.
I have just referred to the joker
which helps the politicians and the
Railway Contractors around the corner on a single wheel. It is the saving clause. It is the feature of the
-"hole act which marks it as the most
bold and brazen bit of legislation ever spread upon the. statute books of
any self-governing community.
I find that this most important information can be demanded from the
Railway Company by the Minister
of Railways only. But Sub-section 3,
Section 283, Chapter 194, R.S.B.C.
1911, says:���
"Any information furnished to the
Minister by any such return, or any
evidence taken by the Minister in
connection therewith, shall not be
open to the public, or published, but
shall be for the information of the
Minister only."
Following the Railway Act further,
you will find that Sub-section 4 of the
same section 283 is as follows:���
"The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may nevertheless require the Minister to communicate to him in Council any or all information obtained
in manner aforesaid."
Note the words "in Council." Every one knows that information com
municated  in   council   is  not   for  the |
public.
Xow wc come to the most humiliating feature of this legislation. Subsection 5 of Section 2*t3 is as follows
"The   Minister   may   authorize   am
part of such information to be mad
public when and in so far as the! ���
may   appear   to   the    Minister   to   1-
good   and   sufficient   reasons   for   r
doing; provided that if tlu* Informs
tion so proposed to be made puhli-
by  the  Minister is of such character ii
HERE'S
YOUR OPPORTUNITY,
MR.
READER
w,
that the Company would, iu the opinion nf the Minister, be likely to object to the publication thereof, the
Minister shall not authorize such information to bc .published without
notice to the Company and hearing
any objection which the Company
may make to such publication."
Secrets of the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway Company
The dismal secrets of the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway are thus se-
c'lrcly guarded from the people who
are being bled for the money to enable the promoters of the Company
to succeed. Sub-section 5 generously allows that thc Minister may authorize any part of such information to
bc made public only after the Railway Company has been consulted.
However, these are merely a few
excerpts from the provisions under
!cli the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company's promoters have received aid from Provincial Government up to date. . Messrs. Foley,
Welch and Stewart appear to have
the power to place upon the law books
of this Province any legislation they
deem tit ��iid are now asking for $6,-
500,000 more to support the tottering structure from beneath which they
are already preparing to withdraw,
and this "business government" is
apparently encouraging them in tlieir
effort. Messrs. Foley, Welch and
Stewart never intended to operate
thc road, but only to promote and
construct it.
"Wc will have an enquiry," the
government glibly promises; "an enquiry into the whole situation of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company." Mr. Bowser puts legislation
on the statutes of this Province to
prevent thc public from getting at
the facts without the consent of the
Railway Company, and in doing so
was supported by Mr. Tisdall and Mr.
Campbell, both of whom have rince
been appointed cabinet ministers in
the "business government.- The
game of the clique controlled by the
Railway Company has been to fool
the people a 'd Mr. Flumerfeit's promise of a full and comnlcc investigation may well be taken as a bluff.
The main idea of the framers of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Act
seems to be to draw a curtain around
the whole jug handled transaction so
as to effectually screen the details
from the public, and secure a snap
endorsation before the public arc
fully informed as to their real objects.
No wonder Mr. Flumerfelt, in his
speech accepting the nomination for
Victoria, persistently referred to the
government as the "late government."
Who could blame him for wishing to
escape responsibility for the sins of
this government with which he wishes to be identified? But like "Banquo's
ghost," they will not be downed but
will reappear for several generations
to come and in the disagreeable form
of interest to be paid on the bonds
by  this  "business   government."
One course which should bc followed in the interests of the people
of the Province is for the people to
elect a new government at  Victoria
COME
AND HELP
YOURSELF
TO OUR
$30,000
STOCK
BOOK BARGAINS
Xcver mind the weather! Come and get your share of the
bargains wc are offering. Our entire stock of books, slightly,
soiled by smoke and water, is being cleared at the following
prices���
10c and 15c values for    St
20c and 25c values for  10e
30c and 45c values for  15C
50c and 95c values for  20c
$1.00 and $1.50 values for  25��
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
942 Granville Street
HALF BLOCK SOUTH OF OLD STAND
who would go into office pledged to
wipe from the statute books the unfair legislation 1 have referred to this
evening, substituting therefor legislation enabling the people to have
some control of thc expenditure of
their own money.
Evidently it is the Government's
intention not to hold a general election until they have drawn tlieir last
breath, therefor we should elect all
three opposition members in the bye-
elections which they are compelled to
have. These three new members with
the two already in the house, will bc
just sufficient to enforce thc demand
that the accounts be produced, which
demand has been repeatedly refused
in the past because there was not the
requisite number of opposition members to enforce it, and the forty government members were so well "lined
up" that not even three of them had
independence enough to join the opposition in making this reasonable
demand.
With five members in the opposition  some  restraint  could be  placed
on the reckless pledging of the conn
try s credit for the primary object i
assisting the country's exploiters.
PANTAGEC
UNEQUALLED %J
VAUDEVILLE
Phone S��ymour 3406
"WEEK OF FEB. 14TH
ROLAND WEST'S
Dairy Maids
A  ROLLICKING,  MUSICAL
COMEDY
Three times daily, 2.45, 7.1S, 9.1S
Matinee, 15c; Night, 15c & 25c
I
"Never Touched by Human Hands"
Are You Sure
About Your
MILK?
Do you know -the simple facts regarding your milk���the conditions under which it is produced, the methods
of handling it, the pasteurizing process, the cans, the bottles?
Are you perfectly satisfied as to its
PURITY. FRESHNESS    '    AND
CLEANLINESS?
Housewives
become acquainted with these facts,
Make perfectly sure of thc milk you
serve In the member!* of the house-
��� hold. The health and welt being of
every family depends to a great extent upon GOOn PRUSH MMILK as
It is used at every meal and for so
many   purposes.
Mothers
Take no chances at all with the milk
you give your babies and the younger
ohildren. You can not he any too
careful, as milk is so liable to contamination and Impurities, when carelessly handled. I ne hest thing to
do is to investigate the exceptional
merits of SOU-VAN MILK���Til K
SAK1C CLKAX, PRESH MILK for
babies, adults and all domestic purposes,
Sou-Van Milk
is tbe product of clean, healthy cows.
It comes from ranches operated by
careful farmers ind in its long journey from the cow to your table it is
scientifically pasteurized hy modem
methods, sent to your home in sterilized bottles. It is impossible to handle milk with greal er care than we
take with SOU-VAN MILK.
Rich, clean, fresh and wholesome���
uniform and of long keeping quality. Phone Fair. 2624 and order a
trial bottle.
South
Vancouver
Milk Co.
29TH  AND  FRASER
Phone  Fairmont  2624
FAITH and WORKS
The law forbids the sale of liquor and cigarettes
to minors, but it does not restrain newspapers from going into respectable homes and soliciting the patronage of the boys and girls with
flaring and alluring advertisements.
Careful firesides must rely, therefore, upon newspapers that voluntarily banish liquor and cigarettes, those great
enemtM of youthful strength and purity, from their columns.
In the campaign for saloonless state it is vital that
the forces of temperance cast the entire weight of their influence
against the wets.
Their subscription order for a newspaper is a vote
for or against liquor, according as the advertising columns of that
newspaper are for or against liquor.
The Saturday Chinook is against the selling and
distributing of liquor and cigarettes to minors through its advertising
columns.
For true temperance should begin at home and
with the Home Newspaper.
Delivered at
your door for
10 cents a month.
Phone Seymour 470.
The Saturday Chinook
llllluUilMnill liii'U: il
Hill

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