BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Saturday Chinook Oct 30, 1915

Item Metadata

Download

Media
gvchinook-1.0315614.pdf
Metadata
JSON: gvchinook-1.0315614.json
JSON-LD: gvchinook-1.0315614-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): gvchinook-1.0315614-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: gvchinook-1.0315614-rdf.json
Turtle: gvchinook-1.0315614-turtle.txt
N-Triples: gvchinook-1.0315614-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: gvchinook-1.0315614-source.json
Full Text
gvchinook-1.0315614-fulltext.txt
Citation
gvchinook-1.0315614.ris

Full Text

Array SATURDAY
n
f^
CHINOOK
Vol. IV, No. 25���Established 1911
VANCOUVER, B. C. CANADA.   SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1913
Price Five Cents
A   MODERN   WEAPON OP WAR
* mine-thrower which wa* of very material aid to
the French army In Ihe recent hlH drive near
Champa <cno
iM-*--.;-pj,r-^t':��� ���,/.���:'*'���-���'���/.*$���>-������ .'v---,-:.-m:-:.-���?<������>:���
"������'���.���' i'       >"-i> **"*.,1"��� '*\*   y ��� ������ "'.vv-.A'.T'-' ���***,*   ..,,���,*��� - 'i******"*,* ������,     5*^* Tti.    '.'^
^^-^Vi^^^-   ^--^V-;-'-' V":.""~ -.V,.:  ;*'r*   ,-���
HiihmIhii cavalry (roups twite hceii much   more active In this war than the cavalry of the weMtern natlouM    ThU Ih a body   of   iln-   celebrated  Rukm   horxenien
counter-moving iiii'iilns<  tile German ravnlry which (tied  to cut oil the retreat of the RuHtltm arm leu in the vicinity of Dvlnttk, after the capture of Vilna
Scenes from
Various Battle
Fronts of Europe
With Canadians
Participating in
Most Sanguinary
Fighting of the
Great War
*p*i*
DARDANELLES  lll'H OI'S IN  ENGLAND
>llss Ada Reeve, the English Actress, haa turned her charming house  In the Isle ol Wight Into 11 convalescent home for   Vustrnllan Tommlei
Here she Is seen With some of her  quests
���
lift w.
f, 4'.��' >
5��J��s��-*' **-*8��F
I
IN THE WAR Z ONE  OP EUROPE
Hclitliin   aviator-)  caaferrlaa;   .������ether after a  reeeait  flight aver the enemy's trenches
A ROYAI. REVIEW AT TORONTO
II  R. H.  the Gevrrnor-Ueaeral  inspecting; the 3Sth and   37th Battalias.*.     Hla   Royal  Highness  I*  accompanied
hy   I.leat.-Uaveraor  Headrle.   Mayer  Inarch,  Gtural Lessard, Col. W. A. Lagle, Sir Jean Eatoa and other* TWO
SATURDAY    CHINOOK
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1915
\>
SATURDAYyCHINOOK
GEORGE   SI,   MI'HRAV
���The Iriilh nt all limes firmly Stands
Ami sliiill from ace to aye endure."
THE MURRAY LIBEL ACTION
THE Fall Assizes concluded Wednesday, when
the jury  in  the criminal lihel action against
George  M.   Murray  failed to come  to  any
agreement  and  were  dismissed  by   His   Lordship
Justice Gregory.
of parts of British shrapnel���their deadliness thus! life positions���just like positions in the Senate oil PASSING OF A CANADIAN POET
preserved for a more worthy cause. 'Canada. ;r ��� il-|�� following verses were written many years
1     ago by a well-known newspaperman of East-
The SATURDAY CHINOOK agrees to make
the first contribution of zinc and copper from ils
If hall the men in the Canadian forces returned
to Canada with their lives left there could be found
i place for all in the service of the Federal Govern
"morgue," and has sent the following letter to Gen- mcnt> provjncja] Governments and Municipal Gov
eral Sir Sam Hughes, Minister ol'Militia at Ottawa :,ernmenls of this Dominion���places that tr
! rnlilfl   fill   rlmililv   npllnr  man
��� Ictober _'.;. I9J5.
Gi lie ml  Sir S:i in   I lughes,
Minister of Militia,
' Ittawa, Canada.
Dear Sir.���
In the present conflict ii is the duty oi Canadians
to make every sacrifice in behalf of thc Empire, and ii ii
with a desire to render some little assistance that I wish l
em Canada.    Hiram I.add Spencer, who died
at St. John, New Brunswick, a few days ago, at the
: advanced age of 87 years.    It is interesting to recall
lese men  that a dispute as to the authorship of this famous
'could fill doubly better than lhe present incumbents poem occurred, but Mr. Spencer was able to prove
: of office. | it to be his property, much to the chagrin of some
It is really a joke to hear the wise observations! ambitious writers in the United States and Canada.
ol  supposedly  public-spirited citizens and officials | The beauty and haunting melody of "A Hundred
when they turn to the subject of what to do with i Years to Come" have made it one of the immortals
returned soldiers. I jn the realms of Canadian and American verse.
Edward Gold.     It was a private prosecution
Crown refusing to prosecute.
the
It is quite popular these days lo suggest putting;     Mr. Spencer published several volumes of poems
The action was launched against Mr. Murray, by j P��* l'1'1'"'   >'"�� n plan wherein the newspapers of Canada,  lhe "brave fellows" uPon tne lancl*   Tlley llave had|and his work was marked by genuine ability and
and indeed of the Empire, might lend further man rial and  enough of the land in the trenches.   Let us give these charm of expression.    He deserves a place on the
������'",l support, boys a fit and proper reward.   Let's make the sleek, j honor role of Canadian writers.    It is time for Can-
the newspaper rJusiiu-H j lazy office holders of this Dominion lay over.   Bet-; adians to give more heed to the writings of their own
ter than that, let us make them get up, cast the cob-' people,
webs from their eyes and go to work.
The article complained of was published in the yourself, you may know that in thc
columns of this paper on May 22 of ihis year, and  .
' mgs.     1 hese i*nt> are made
was based upon a statement made by Mr. Gold at
Meantime every train from the east brings in a,
average newspaper
na- ni nlil cuts and cngrav-
cut* are made of  cupper  or  zinc, and alter
being used arc retired to the "morgue."   It occurred to me
a South Vancouver council meeting on March  19;lhat **" ll,is material might be gathered up and sent along crippled hero and further than being gone over and
ime central depot and forwarded to the proper, cjuar- questioned by the inquisitive and the morbidly cur-
melted down and used fur whatever j0us, no attention is given or preference shown.
A HUNDRED YEARS TO COME
in which Gold was alleged to have said that "people
came from England where they had lived upon the
smell of an old rag." i
statement and had written in the allegedly libellous t-
article words to the effect that Mr. Gold was an
"impudent, contemptible and disloyal cad."
The case was followed with a great deal of interest. Mr. Murray had been out on bail of $6,000.
He was ably defended by Mr. Joseph Martin. K.C.,
while the lawyers for the prosecution were Mr. Alex
ander Henderson, K.C., and Mr. R. R. Maitland
K.C.
ters, where it might In
purpose deemed besl by the authorities,
In this way every city in Canada of ;
oils of metal, and if the
thc wholi Empire, unnamed.
able to supply
sue would be
emc ��,re ex-\THE LAND SETTLEMENT QUESTION
aterial adv
Mr. Murray had taken Mr. Gold to task upon this;
i tended   throil���.. .
IN one or the leading American weeklies, a writer
In giving you this suggestion, I have in mind the moral* JL dealing with the land settlement question, said:
value of such a movement rather than the material side. "You know what the Mormons did away back
It might be possible to (Mend such a scheme to the | >n the seventies.   They preceded civilization.    Rail-
great advertiser-, theatrical houses and publicity bureaus,  roads caught up with them.
:   ** PJ��" wWch would appeal to the newspaper people, j     "A colony of a hundred families on good lancl,
1 forty miles from a present road will bring a railroad
lo them in five years.
"Railroads want tonnage."
"SATURDAY CHINOOK" TO DONATE
BULLETS
WITH a view to assisting in the great cause of
the  allied  forces,     the    SATURDAY
CHINOOK has brought forward a plan
whereby the newspapers of Canada and the newspapers of the Empire may render further material
assistance.
The editor of the SATURDAY CHINOOK
has communicated with General Sir Sam Hughes
upon the subject, and the plan briefly is that all
copper cuts and metal engravings used in the press
of Canada be donated by newspaper owners to the
proper authorities, who will forward this very precious metal either to the Minister of Munitions or
the authorities whose duty it may be to deal- with
such matters.
It is estimated that in every newspaper office or
printing office there usually may be found hundreds
of pounds of copper and zinc in the shape of cuts
and engravings, which have been used in the pres?
and are now of no great value save for the metal
they contain, and the possibility of sometime or other
coming in as useful.
The plan of the SATURDAY CHINOOK is
that lhe newspapers and those identified with newspapers���the large advertisers, theatrical people, publicity bureaux���set aside a day when all metals
such as those described, metals of copper and zinc,
may be collected, crated, and sent forward for the
use of the Munition Manufacturing Department.
Thus a cut which has appeared in the paper and
which, for instance, depicts a wedding scene of some
prominent young Canadian couple, might find its
way to the firing lines in the shape of jackets for a
hundred British bullets.
Some other engraving which has appeared in the
Canadian papers, showing General Hughes mounted on a grey charger, may find its way to the front
in the shape of a million percussion caps for British
bombs.
By the same token, a great zinc plate which in its
day showed Sir Wilfrid Laurier addressing the
ratepayers of St. Linn, may find its way into the
interior works of a torpedo tube, headed accurately
for jthe bottom of a German war vessel���as accurately as ever attacks from the great Liberal leader's
lips directed themselves at the weak spots in the
armor of the government. It is suggested further
by the plan that the costly zinc plates which have
seen their day, bearing the political cartoons of both
parties, may eventually find themselves as millions
the advertising men. and theatrical talent,    h  would encourage  the use of illustrations in onr  newspapers, and,
would be putting to a worthy use a vast quantity of material which today lies in dusty compartments.
Engravings of political cartoons; cuts illustrating current events, depicting sports, celebrations; cuts of wives,
mothers, sweethearts, of soldiers embarking, of battle
scenes, of fireside scenes���all could be melted in thc one
pot. Jn short there is a record of the progress of the Empire since copper and zinc were first used in newspaper
work engraved on sheets of metals which today lie among
thc cobwebs in newspaper offices around the world.
Might I suggest that thc contents of this communication
be given the newspaper men in Ottawa?
Should thc suggestion meet with your approval, I will
take the initiative by offering thc best part of a ton of such
metal on hand in my own office.
Respectfully yours,
GKORGK M. MURRAY.
Editor "Saturday Chinook."
HOW WE WOULD HANDLE THE
RETURNED HEROES
HAT shall we do with our returned sol
diers?
This is the new problem puzzling the char
ity organizations, the municipal government, and
even the Provincial and Federal Governments.
w
Despite the pilfering and fraud practiced in the
administration of the public lands of British Columbia, there are left hundreds of thousands of acres���
away back from the railroads a bit, perhaps���of
land which will make the very best homestead properties.
We people in Western Canada are too anxious
for parlor car accommodation in all we do. We have
been taught to be by the railroad magnates who
made us drunk with our own money.
Back a piece the virgin land still awaits the hand
of the tiller. It may be had free and all that a family need to suffer is a little bit of hardship, fleabites
of privation as compared with the hardships our ancestors suffered when they settled in the east, and
they may go straightway and possess themselves of
a small portion of the heritage which is theirs in this
beautiful Province of British Columbia.
A
Where, where will be the birds that sing.
A hundred years lo come?
The flowers that now in beauty spring,
��� A hundred years to come?
The rosy cheek, the lofty brow,
The heart that beats so gaily now?
Where, where will be our hopes and fears.
Joy's pleasant smiles and Sorrow's tears,
A hundred years to come?
Who'll press for gold this crowded street.
A hundred years to come?
Who'll tread yon aisles with willing feet,
A hundred years to come?
Pale, trembling Age and fiery Youlh.
And Childhood, with its brow of truth;
The rick, the poor, on land and sea;
Where will the mighty millions be,
A hundred years to come?
We all within our graves shall sleep,
A hundred years to come;
No living soul for us will weep
A hundred years to come.
But others then our lands will till.
And others then our homes will filf.
And other birds will sing as gay,
And bright the sun shine as today,
A hundred years to come.
���Hiram LadJ Spencer.
READ THIS MONTH'S "INDUSTRIAL
PROGRESS" AND CHEER UP
GLANCE through the pages of a copy of
this month's issue of the INDUSTRIAL
,     , , ,     , , , PROGRESS, official organ of the B. C.
there should be lots of employment for the re-U/i      r   ,        ���  A       ��� . i_    u       i     a
1 I Manufacturers   Association, should make the most
turned soldiers who are in anywise   fit to work.      j downhearted citizen* of British Columbia sit up and
If we ran the Government of British Columbia j take a new grip.
every man who comes back from the war zone after!     The publication is one which Mr. J. H. HamiU
doing his duty, would have a job.   First proposition ton* tne e*-*'tor- anc"- Mr. W- N. Code, manager,
would be to find out what the returned soldier's par- jhaVe br0Ught up to a high stanc)ard- and this month's
,     i ,f-   ,.     -....- issue is one of which the publishers, the members of
ticular qualifications were. . .   . .    -���
! the association under whose auspices the magazine
If he were fit to do janitor work, the janitor wholj, produced,  and the people of British Columbia
put through the submarine deal for Sir    Richard | generally, should feel very proud,
would get his walking papers directly and Mr. Re- j     For the first lime in the history of the Province
turned Soldier would be installed as Lord High a comPlete illustrated story is given of the British
T
Official Janitor at the Parliament Buildings.
If he were able to read and write, he would be
immediately introduced to the petty offices in the
civil service and Mr. Civil Service man would have
to hie him back to the land.
We would take all the jobs in the civil service at
present filled by party heelers, cousins and brothers-
in-law, blackmailers and pests, and render them vacant.
We would retain the services of only the competent members of the civil service of this Province
and there are many such officials, and we would
put these men in the executive places and fill the
civil service up with returned soldiers.
Having placed the names of several thousand re-
Columbia industrial world. Every branch of industry is touched upon from the making of aerated
waters to the shipbuilding activities of Yarrows,
Limited. There is even an article from the pen of
Sir Richard, himself. And it might be said right
here that in this issue INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS surpasses any publication ever issued by the
Government with the idea in view of setting before
the world the exact industrial position of British Columbia���and that without flamboyancy and boom-
ism.
HOW THE P. AND C. E. "HELPS" THE
NORTHERN SETTLER
HE   Provincial   Government   carried   their
wildcat policy too far," says the OMINECA HERALD��� and the OMINECA
HERALD is the best authority we know of upon
the situation in Northern British Columbia.
"They allowed many settlers to go where the
Government had no roads and Where the govern
ment knew lhat there was little chance to get either
form of transportation for many years. Anothei
blunder was in building the Pacific Great Eastern
railway from Vancouver to Prince George, instead
of from Prince George to the great farming country
of the Peace River. The idea of that was to help
Vancouver at the expense of the new districts. The
Pacific Great Eastern would now be a feeder for
the G. T. P. had it been built north first. As it is
lhat railway is of little service to the people and of
less to th political party in power. At the same time
all those settlers who went into the Peace River
country a few years ago with money, stock and implements are in a bad way. They have stock and
implements and lots of grain and produce, but cannot get any market, and they have no money left.
Has not the McBride government treated every section of settlers in the north in the same way? If
the settlers like it, they will vote for the McBride
government, and this is the only excuse they can
offer for voting that way."
JOHN J. CASHION, DECEASED
N the death of Mr. John J. Cashion last week
the community loses one of its most    valuable
citizens.    Mr. Cashion was prominent in business, in politics, in church and fraternal circles.    In
I
all his dealings he was upright and honest. He is
turned soldiers firmly and permanently in the public survived by a wife and one child to whom the sym-
accounts,    IF WE WERE SUPREME DIC-jPatny of tne community has been extended.    He
TATOR OF THIS PROVINCE, we   would iwas one of a large family who settled in Eastern
���������. , (     ���     .i 1V    ,       '.-: ,.   r,    i Ontario in the early days and he inherited those
pass an act forcing the municipalities to put Mr. Re-    .- i- i- ���       t  i      ��� ����    ^   .
........ sterling qualities of the pioneer.    Mr. Cashion was
turned ooldier, with one leg or one arm or one eye,'     j���,     . d r u. r       j *      . ���     i
�� 3 ��� i a devout Koman Catholic and was prominent in the
his honorable scars, in every city, hall and municipal j   "rder.of Catholic Foresters.   He, was a Liberal in
hall in the country���and we'd make their positions   politics, but in all things he was tolerant and broad.
SOMETHING WRONG SOMEWHERE
ACCORDING to the government's own statements $22,000,000 annually is sent    away
from British Columbia for the purchase of
farm products which might be grown within    the
boundaries of the province.
From the Ladysmith CHRONICLE we reprint
the following article which is typical of complaints
being made in nearly every weekly paper throughout the Province of British Columbia, regardless of
party stripe:
The Ladysmith CHRONICLE says: "The
transport yesterday morning brought over fifteen
cars loaded with produce for Vancouver Island.
Every article could just as well have been produced SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 191 =
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
THREE
nn this island as elsewhere, and yet we are import-  boy and here is a rule for thee:
ing for consumption when we might better be pro-j Tobacco is an Injun vv
And from the devil doth proceed:
It picks your pockets and burns your clothes.
And makes a chimney out of your nose."
While objecting to the plan to totally prohibit
ducing and thus be self-sustaining. The papers of
Vancouver Island have been for years trying to encourage home production, and while a little has
been accomplished in this way, the producers are
far from the point when they are able to supply the the use and sale of tobacco, we would welcome leg-
local demand. Prices for farm produce are all | islation which would put a check on the cigarette
that can be desired, and in fact a little higher than; evil.
any place else in the province, and we have land ^ The cigarette sinks in boy's chests, dirties their
enough to more than supply the local wants, yet al- i fingers, and constant use of cigarettes develops in
most every day in the week the barges bring over'a boy the hang dog look. It has a soothing influence
fifteen cars of produce to supply a demand that upon the nerves of a jaded man and is a craze pro-
rould be met by the home farmers and others who ducer for the women. One of the bad features of
should be tilling the soil instead of eking out a miser-1 this war is that it has placed a mark of approval upon
able existence in other ways. A campagn in favor! the cigarette. The cigarette is an Oriental institu-
of home production might remedy this condition of' tion which should have been left in the Orient,
affairs. if if. if
"THE RICH MAN in Hell���Who is he and
When Will He Get Out?" This was the subject
of a recent lecture given in Victoria. All the real
estate agents in the Capital graced the meeting by
their attendance.
let   .   nn������!  be implanted by a ���  '    '* journalism
- certified by a  Regent's  examination.    The newspaper
epl d the public examination every tinv    I
i   in time might nnd its office filled wilh
���harpers.��� Si ��   York  Herald.
A BRICK-BAT FROM REVELSTOKE
THE MAIL-HERALD and the SATURDAY CHINOOK have declared Revel-
stoke's national park to be a crazy scheme,
a sop to the electors and "a mountain overhanging
the town six or seven thousand feet high."
"The REVIEW has time and again suggested
that our esteemed contemporary be interned along
with the Vancouver paper that has scandalized our
national institution.
"With these two brainy moulders of public opinion on the business end of picks and shovels on the
automobile road, it would soon be done and finished
to the future delights of millions of tourists who will
pass over it to enjoy the beauties of nature from the
top of Mount Revelstoke.
"The REVIEW will enlist as guardsman to see
that these worthy editors of reputable journals do
their work in a proper manner. Now is the time
for the proper authorities to get busy and do their
bit for the good of mankind."
We clip the foregoing from a icxent issue of the
Revelstoke REVIEW. To say the least this attack upon the editor of the SATURDAY CHINOOK arouses our ire. We call upon the little
chap at the REVIEW lo choose his weapons. Only
upon the field of honor could it be possible for us
to gain satisfaction.
BRITISH AND GERMAN GOLD
\s one studies the continuing revelation- of tl i
:, M or ni the people in this country who have beet
mg and so loudly about "British gold" and its
. , in influi ncing the American pr -- and through.
it American public sentiment, there gradually assumes
i iiir in the mind something between a suspicion and a
conviction, The chief if not the only object of this talk
ma) hue been to start flowing toward certain empty pockets here  a  stream of German  gold.
It is evident that the German go|d has come, and in large
Quantities. It has produced a sudden and hitherto inexplicable prosperity among thc German propagandists, but
ivhal they have propagated, except their i ivn fortunes
... ���,- to be merely a few little plots, some of them sufficiently annoying and irritating, but not one affecting public sentiment in the slightest degree or the pre- to any
mcasureable extent.���New York Times.
WILSON DIPLOMACY
MISS CAVELL'S EXECUTION
A \ OTHER ASPECT OF THE LIQUOR
EVIL
FROM the Courtenay REVIEW we clip the
following:
The sentencing of the young man O'Brian
to two months in gaol last week is proving a very
costly one to the city, as the following bill of costs
will show:
Auto hire  ���	
Meals   	
Fares to Victoria 	
Auto to gaol	
Flotel bill for constable 	
Meals for constable 	
The execution
Belgium has  sent a  wave of horror
world. This lady, an Englishwoman, was head of a ~urni-
cal institute in Brussels. She had devoted her life to alleviating the suffering of others. Many of thc nurses now
serving in Germany had been trained by her and since the I
war began she had treated German soldiers as tenderly and
efficiently as she had ministered to Britons, Frenchmen
or Belgians, She was not charged with espionage but with
assisting British and Belgian soldiers and civilians to escape from the country, an act "he frankly admitted. This
is an offence against military law, it i- true, but only by
the pitiless ruffians of Germany would it havt met with the
extreme penalty. The American and Spanish ambassadors
who lab ued tirelessly in tin unhappy lady's behalf point-1
id out to the military governor of Belgium that a capital
sentence was out of all proportion to ihe nature of tin
offence and that the noble services rendered by the accused
in  the
were
Diplomacy is -till a potent influence in a world given
over to war and devastion when such results can be accomplished by the simple process of patient and steadfast negotiation. From the jingo point of view it would be much
more desirable, doubtless, to go to war with both Germany
and Great Britain in order to obtain our rights. To wm by
peaceful diplomacy may seem to much like a base surrender to mollycoddles and college sissie; yet there is something to bc said for it. For one thing, it i, the old-fl -h
wiicd American way, which.
I, j and   bluster,   has   kept   us   out
h the planking on tot; of a layei felt paper
to   ward  off the   blow - There   i-      i
small army of workmen doing all  tb< at once,
roes  in tiie immediate vicinity is one
industry.    Tin    thud     '   I Iking   mallet  is   mint;
ihe compn 1 air pipe and thi
Carpenters  climb al!  over the half-finished cabin, hammering,    twing and fitting mouldings. The ,
impres I   well ordered  confusion, with
i lan doing the right  thil
The [vanhoi i- not what would be regarded a- a small
vessel but rath.r a large tug. When standing under her
on  the  ways,  however,   the  seems  to  be  extraordinarily
and   the   nun   working  on   her  look   very   -mail   in-
Everything   aboul   hei   seems  massive  and   strong
to a degree,    No one would credit her with any feverish
;n ..I   bul   shi    look-   like   a   remarkable   healthy   tug.   or
rather a healthy  tug  convalescing from a severe illness.
At one of the wharf- there ar. lu i weary looking steamers, rusted and old. which have been through some exciting experiences in their time. One of them was a
blockade runner in the Spanish-American sqabble, and was
captured by the American fleet under Admiral Dewey, ac-
cording to the historian- of the waterfront. Admiral Dewey needed a steamer about that time, and paid her owners a cool million dollars for her, which seems quite enough
in the light oi her present condition. Hut in those days
she was probably a proud \es-el plowing the seas with
diligence, if not speed. The Wallace people bought her
some years ago and took the engines out, and now she
lies waiting the scrap heap or another charitable admiral.
However, if one is anxious to have a ship or two built
right away it is not necessary to go farther than North
Vancouver. That big marine ways looks very empty.���
Summerside Journal.
HOMELIKE TRENCHES
I
spite  ot  occasional  brag
f  much   trouble  with  our
f Mi-- Edith Cavell by the Germans .
,ver all  the civilized   neighbors during the last hundred years without the sacrt
��� f national interest.���Xew York World.
lice
A GRAVE ISSUE RAISED
y concerned,
llifeie'    "I
neiic
rhich Gei
d for cli
lU'ill   s-
Not
their etiorts ot mer
were tricked, deceived an
formation obtained from
the g i\ erni a- an admissior
The cas! of Mi-. Cavel
ti in In cause ���-:' t' i  pi   mi
larl
tint
il   on   iii-
wrt
::l;    froll
It  a
���tu.i
slat
��� oi
iffairs,
ittn
ctei
wor
d-W|
le atten-
Thi- is not thc time to discuss the political disclosures
which have been made in the important mining ease now
being heard in the Supreme Court because they may have
,u intimate bearing upon the merits of thc dispute. They
have raised, however, an issue upon which, in its broader
sense tin- particular litigation has nothing to do and i
which the people of this province are profou
Crave charges have been made agains't
the crown which must be shown to be either true or false.
If this point and its attendant circumstances cannot be
tl oroughly investigated in connection with the present case,
searching inquiry must he held in which all the facts
must he brought out no matter whom they may involve.
I Li, i- due not mly to the public but to tin minister whose
none ha.- become prominently associated with the matter.--
Victoria Daily Times.
THE SUBMARINE ISSUE
at   VVashin
To speak of the "comforts of home" in connection with
life in the trenches seems a glaring misuse of language,
yet that is the term that a correspondent of the Associated Press applies to the quarters ol the Bavarian soldiers
in northern France. He made a round of tbe trenches, accompanied by a Bavarian colonel, and says:���
"It is certain that the trenches tllat I saw had not their
equal on many of the fighting fronts. Every conceivable
comfort that is available for a trench has been supplied,
from shaving mirrors to a four-post bedstead. Tbe fighting trenches differ from the connecting runway only in
being wider; and they arc reinforced in front and rear with
bags of sand or plates of steel, through openings in which
the soldiers can use their telescopes without being seen.
"To the rear of these trenches, far underground, are so-
called. Unterstande, .or shelters, where the soldiers live
when inn on duty.   These places are surprisingly-comfort-
ttn
:d
 $ 4.00 s
2.10
4.10
3.00
pain to
save liev
m,t a lone example of tin1 t,
women by the uniformed br
editions have  taken place
, months  for offences  of th
4.UU : arc authorized oul of sheer
I ,L\J  most German
pr,
liu*
ti
Total
And to be added to this yet is the pay for the.
magistrate; city clerk and board of the prisoner at
the provincial gaol. And all for what? Made irresponsible by over indulgence in intoxicants he
walked off with a shot gun and a pair of boots, belonging to the hotel where he got the liquor, which
lie declares upon his honor as a man, since sobering
up, that he had not the slightest recollection of doing. It would appear that the pumdiment more than
fits the crime, and it is the innocent who are paying
the piper.
$28.40 ^''Ml��ng tl,
Main- ,,f ll
a magnificent s
one bound the.'
of their rapaei
noeents i.- . -it,-
ttcers i-
ystem tin
chaste ai
earn to i
,,-imen ot
have rev<
ancesti
the in n
,',
ins
ercusc and justify.   German;
Lusitania.
These crime - are not act
'violation of all the rec
punishment aside froi
when it loses a war.
many of them may be
discussed. The delivery
bc one of those terms a
nstrous punislimcnt.    I,
atemetit meted out to h
���utc; of Prussia.    Xumeri
iu  Belgium \* ithin the la
:��� most trivial character.
wanton cruelty.    Srul   ':'
econd nature.    It  is the
which they are tr'iine.
leautiful arouses their
oy it no matter wheth
or a children's hospitti
I fo the manners and c
A wholi -ah- massacn
,-ities they are nn isl r,
celebrated the sinking
���i iin.
Th,
l",
<>|
���1. !
They demand.
emptory  with
Gott! but w e must
the  while Ihe War
ade was defeated I
commodating reply
ier.
muses  are  in
hing them���a.
bamboozling
|.    Washing!.
i���presently ���
gland   over   '!
have thai  ci
Lord know!
so forth.    II
chuckles  tlu
K;i
chant-
laughs
-er   to
The
n swells up. We concede,
atch Washington get per-
ie cotton question. Mein
tton, and copper. And all
tibinarine block-
that
the English before  hi' wroti
o the United States.���Canad
thai
by the officers arc pri
Many have clocks, an,
all have a crucifix, ot
Bavarians' conduct tlu
shelters  is  almost  invi
''Included   in   the   'ci
the trenchi - is a bathing
of   the   front,   v
spring water,
in   front   an.1,
chance  to ba
ni, ives���whib
It  is inter!
certain   Coloi
derground life led by soldi
believes that, as a result ,
population of Europi wi
The trenches, when pro]
am! the peasant and the c
healthful and comfortable
go back from the
houses bore them
-1'.   h'..  Island A
wit
carp,ts
little al;
circumstances.    Most  of  tie...-,   occupied
ided with big four-post bedsteads.
he  floors, and  nearly
t  which  tbe  "terrible
r devotion-.    The approach to tbe
riably  decorated   with   flowers.
mforts   of  home'   thai   are   part  of
j establishment, a little to the rear
that   are   filled   with   heated
customarily spend some days
[  v a   like  time, thus  gi I   a
- I. ���often,-r.  if  'Jn,   spirit
-ting
,���1   "if;
remember in this
-ieff.  who had  se,
onnection  lhat  a
much of th" tin's and refugees alike iu Poland,
the war, no  small part of the
actually   revert   to   cave   life,
rly   ', nilt.   ar,    dry   and   warn},
y 1 ip, ii, r alike  find them more
than   their   own   abodes.     They
ront on  furloughs, but the towns and
they  tire  homesick   for  their   trenches.
culturist.
ARE READY  TO BUILD MADE IN B.C. SHIPS       H0WEVER   MR.   ROCKEFELLER  DANCED  WITH
of  war.     They  are
I rule- of War.    They
punishment  a   nation
gin/,.
��� the
The   perpetrator
living when tern
f their persons
1 they -hould I,
i inter
ill for
suffers
n.  and
to the allies
e punished.
BY THE WAY
MR. BOWSER DIDN'T tarry long at New Haz-
elton on his recent trip through that country.    The
Conservatives of  the  town have  decided  to vote],
against him and his government, and the local paper j
observes that "thc Provincial dictator's only friend j
is the road superintendent" of that particular district. \
V   H*   ��
IF IN HANDLING the cattle from the Colony
Farm, Price Ellison had followed the eugenic theory, he would have been much more successful.
SIR RICHARD McBRIDE is writing a new
song to be entitled: "I didn't raise my Cabinet to
Populate a Gaol."
��    T    T
A MAN IN PORT MANN suggests that as the
���carrying of watches upon the wrist is now considered
to be a standard style, the idea should be carried
further so that the wrist might also cany tooth
trashes, combs, razor, shaving brush, cigars and
matches.
THE SON OF A poor postman has become His
Holiness the Pope of Rome. We print this for the
encouragement of the boys who trudge through the
mud of the suburbs delivering the mail from the Vancouver Post Office.
��� * *
SOME OF THE CRANKS propose to have the
use of tobacco prohibited. We are reminded of the
scoldings of a certain old Quaker lady who caught
us in a fence corner, a long time ago, experimenting
with a clay pipe.    Said she: "Thee art a naughty
-ilotllll
lol ac-
I cording to military law, beyond which their hideous crimes
have placed them, but according to the civil laws of the
nations to which they are delivered. Thc time will come
I when the allies will be in a position to back up their demands by pressure upon the German people, and that
pressure never should be relaxed until these demand- have
been compli d with. Germany learned nothing from the
fate of Napoleon, but if every surviving officer or official
professor win. perpetrated or inspired any of the unspeakable atocities which have made the reputation of the
German empire the most hideous thing in history were
punished iu accordance with lhe nature of his crime, thc
lesson never would be forgotten. Let justice be administered by tbe allies to those assassins as relentlessly a- il is
administered for capital- crimes at home. Whatever may
be the disposition of their governments, upon this point the
people of the allied states should insist with inflexible de-
| termination.���Victoria Daily Times.
The \
s.cenc , i1
were ��. i
men ar,
thc yar
building
NEWSPAPER MEN
Vallace Shipyards in North Vancouver are not the]
activity they were a year ago. when -tail workmen
nployed round the plant. At present about 130
��� given employment in the. various departments of
ds, which are devoted chiefly to the repair and;
of ship-. Thc most conspicuous feature ,d the
establishment is the large marine ways, that can be seen
from the Vancouver Ferry wharf, and which can lift a
vessel ol" 2,300 tons deadweight. Between lhe two ways
and running out from the end of the machine shop is a
wharf 400 feet long, with a 60-ton crane on th.   end.
The machine shop, where the iron and steel
used   in   the  building  of  ships  is   fabricated,   is
equipped  with  some  fine  machinery,  lathes.  bori
planes,  and  other   things  needful.    There   i-
of steel about fifteen feet square and aboul -;\ in
with  holes aboul  two inches square and about  t\
punched through it- whole surface.    N"carby al- n
heats bars to a red heat, plugs are placed in tin
the plate  of design  of the finished  work  and  th,
bars are bent around the plugs to the required shape.    In
the  case of a  stem  post   for  a vessel,  the   roped  circle  i-
made with a wooden frame arranged on the plate, and the
plugs placed accordingly.
Since its  founding the  firm  has built many
eluding the North Vancouver ferri
Terminal   Steamship   Company's
THE  MINERS'  DAUGHTERS
The new- plan whereby John D. Rockefeller has soupht to
lacify  the  miners  of  Colorado is one  which would  seem
to make
Fuel am
its surfa
lit!
rell.
I Iron
,rk to be
impletely
ng mills.
discover tl
Thc new a:
and it allows
every 150 of
c mps -ire ; i
the president
an equal numl
pany   managi
tl
Co.. t
ration-.
i   effect,   puttin
it- crying and
re i- nothing
ng, iiu-nt  is  c
I-  v orkers to
cir   number,
divided into
the  comp II
of repn -
nt.      The-e
resided   over
with  thc  power  of  the  Colora
ugh the miner seems merely to <
but
ailed
elec
tae  stopper
r a short tim
������n th.
in   the   ba
bab'
elegatc.    Th
tricts -md al
lelegaj -
ppointed by
t.
1>
mining
le-   11
:d ho
ele
cpmmittec ol si
Conciliation; S,
and Housing, ai
firsl   committee
men for In-
ety and Ac-
l for Recrca-..
las  power  to
Dr. Taleott Williams, head of tbe Pulitzer School of
Journalism, has interested the profession which he adorns
by making a speech in which Ile intimates that soon or late
there will be an examination of reporters, copy readers
and editors by the state as a prerequisite to employment by
a newspaper. There is now an examination for horse-
shoers and plumbers as well as cliaffettrs. But it is much
to be doubted whether schools of journalism will ever be
able to make themselves the exclusive factory for producing
writers of news and comment.
The newspaper man is not "turned out" as is a bookkeeper or a typist or as is a speech prepared from an encyclopaedia. First there must be a natural adaptation,
which is difficult to descr...- hut which is an essential, and
then there must be character. No newspaper worthy of
the name will have any use for a reporter who accepts largess or who shapes his writings so as to gain appointment
to lucrative office. No newspaper that is worthy of public
support will employ a reporter or an editor who uses his
position to promote his social ambitious, to influence speculations or to curry favor with classes or parties.
This means that above all things the reporter, if of capacity, should also have a high sense of duty to the public.
pointec, w
,hist rial Co-operation and
cidents; Sanitation. Health
lion  and  Education.    The
take up "any matter pertaining to the prevention and set-
tlemenl of industrial disputes, terms and conditions of employment, maintenance of order and discipline in the camps,
company's stores, etc."
It has the advantarge of giving tbe men a chance to air
their grievances but there is a curious preponderance of
power on the company's side inasmuch as tbe delegates
of the men are all employees of the company and can be
deprived of their jobs at any time or for any cause.
Tn other words, the unfortunate delegate must represent
his fellows and come in conflict with the men who have it
in their power to deprive him of his living.
"The first requirement of any representative government
is the safety and independence of the representative"; this
plan places the representative in the hands of his opponents who have a virtual life and death grip on him industrially, therefore, the men have no one free who can fight
their cause. They are tied together as closely as ever
in an inextricable mesh, for it is expressly stated that
"the right to hire or discharge, the management of the
steam or sail power, up to a length of 350 feet if   properties, and the direction of the working forces, shall
be vested in the company, and this right shall not be abridged by anything contained herein."
What is meant by "industrial representation" then, is
merely an agreement to listen to grievances which can be
turned down or ignored as the company sees fit, the men
to remain suppliants and helpless.
Against the power of discharge, the miners have nothing to offer, and with conditions such as have heretofore
existed, what reason can there be to expect a peaceful
solution of the Colorado problem?���Detroit Times.
ssels. in-
munber 1 and 2. the
steamer Britannia, the
Dominion Government tug Point Grey, thc ltydrograpbic
Survey schooner Xaden, and thc steamer Kestrel, built
for the fisheries department, and later going to the South
Seas as a trader, and having all sorts of peculiar adventures there.
Beside the ship repairing done from time to time, the
firm also does the repairing for the Union Steamship Company of B.C., the Grand Trunk Pacific Steamship Company, the C P. R., and the Union Steamship Company of
Xew Zealand, and views with equanimity an occasional uncharted reef hereabouts.
Speaking of the present cry for tonnage from this port,
and the lack of British Columbia-owned ships, an official
of the firm states that they are ready and equipped to commence immediately on the construction of vessels, steel or
wood
the funds are forthcoming.
On the smaller ways is at present the tug Ivanhoe. which
was badly damaged some time ago by coming into contact
with one of the many uncharted reefs mentioned. Many
of her timbers were smashed and had to bc replaced. The
machinery had also to be taken out, which necessitated the
tearing up of the after part of the deckhouse. The planks
have been shaped and put in the hull where required,
caulked, and a filling of cement putty inserted in the
cracks on top of the caulking.    Sheet galvanized steel is 1
FOUR
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 19':
**���]''-.'' ���--��������� :.-i ���.,,'   '>'>" |i      ; .-,-a ,'f-'!'.;.,��� ip ���,;,���"���'; ii;; if i�� ,s-.;'.-.- :���.    nli;.;      '-',;" ���; .-o-.f:,,- > ; .a.i.i'ioMi.'iifiii;!!;^;!!!-:,;];!;^
PROHIBITION
;-,
a
Our Essay
w:   Competition
m
:. :   !'-,!:,:-',.,'
IN CARRYING THE FIGHT INTO THE CAMP OF
John Barleycorn, the SATURDAY CHINOOK wishes
to enlist the aid of all the boys of 15 years of  age or
under.
WHY SHOULD WE HAVE PROHIBITION?
WE WANT THE BOYS TO ANSWER THIS QUES-
tion���to answer it in an article of five hundred words. We
have started a competition, and every boy who wants to
grow up to be a good man, and a valuable member of the.
community, is asked to take part in this competition. It
will last until Christmas, and every week the SATURDAY
CHINOOK will publish the articles written by the boys.
For the best article we will give a prize of Five Dollars
($5.00) in gold and a gold medal. For the second best article we will give a prize of Five Dollars ($5.00) in gold
and a silver medal. The third prize will be a silver medal,
and the fourth prize a bronze medal, and a fifth will be Two
Dollars ($2.00) in cash. The next five prizes will be One
Dollar ($1.00) each in cash and a year's subscription to the
SATURDAY CHINOOK, sent free.
WE HAVE ASKED   PRINCIPAL  JOHN   MACKAY, j
D.D., to name a committee to judge these articles, and select the prize winners.
WHY PEOPLE SHOULD VOTE FOR PROHIBITION
People should vote againsl having all alcoholic drinks
in their municipality, town, or village, so if one place should
get rid of it the next would follow in their tracks, and in
time the whole country will have abolished such an injurious habit. Alcoholic drink does not only help to make
criminals out of young men. Today the man of a surpassing nature would feel very much hurt if you should ask
him if [ie drank. Yesterday, as long as he had a little whiskey in him he would not have cared if you had turned the
whole world against him.
As 1 said, it docs not only make criminals out of men,
a man that has a little whiskey in him is ready for anything.
Life is a delirium of delight, he feels richer, generous, genial. While he is drunk the present seems radiant and rosy,
and the future is always bright. But in the end when habit
has him in her grasp, he is no longer free, he experiences
horrors of remorse. I le is not the only one, there are thousands in the same army as himself.
A man gels drunk, he goes home and abuses his wife,
the wife endure*- it for years, and never complains.   I lis dull
mind, made so hv ihe use of liquor, never sees anything
.   .. ' . i..       .        "
wmng. and il finally ends up wilh the wile going brokenhearted In the grave. The children suffer too, although
ihey do not realise how had it is. Drink has caused the loss
lol ambition, to slaves nf it. A man who is well up iii busi-
DR. MACKAY WILL CALL TO HIS ASSISTANCE; nesV takes to drink, and in a few months or so his business
two competent men when the judging commences. Wo, starts to decline, he does not care, all his ambition is gone,
particularly ask pastors, school teachers, parents, and older | and finally he ends up in some place at a very low wage.
brothers and sisters to assist in making this competition a > man about to commit a crime*; who in ordinary life
rousing success.   The cause of prohibition is a worthy one, j would nol have nerve enough, lakes a lew drinks anc"
and if it is going to be successful, all the forces must b.i.
mustered against old John Barleycorn.
Coal
=VaIue=
NO   PRIZES
NO   BONUSES
WMKN you pay MONEY
;i legitimate expenditure,
IJ  together   mak
Common icr
out ol your purw for COAL you fed that it if
a*- long ai you K��t full VAI.l K fur that money.
rdinary caution tell
iUHiicMiit*-    of   cu
at vot' h��ip tc . ^^^^^^
ur money li k��-"K into these prizes Instead of into COAL VAl.l'l
U thiil lotteries ami coal business 'lo not go
you BUipicioui of coal with which prises arc offered.
lyi that   YOU  h�� l\> to pay for bonuies and  prizes   that
D
IKTMKR SOITH WELLINGTON COAL, proved hy scientific govern
meat tests to he highest in heal value of all Pacific Coast coals, needs no
prize or honus to commend it. The Vancouver housewife has learned that
the KULL VAl.t'K for her money lies in the COAL, thc price of which was
established ;it the inception of (he businesi last year and has not heen changed.
She has also learned to appreciate the promptness and cleanness of "DIethcf
Service" and the fullness of "IMcther Weight.''
TiiLi- no chanrrH.    Buy ��*onl ami n*t the value of your money In unit.
Pea - $4.00
Nut - $5.50
Lump- $6.50
Per Diether Ton
4&&tm\
v -553 *
sqme uf the other learned professions,!
but ynu will find ten lawyers to one
writer in any community,
Such   a   condition   should   be    improved.    We  urge  all   readers    win.
have ideas up.ni matters of public in-.
terest i" set tln.se ideas upon paper!
and have theih published in these col-1
limns���ami so help in the forming of
a healthy organized public opinion.
One other matter which should be
borne in mind is thai the SATURDAY CHINOOK comes af a dollar
a year, only, li is worth ten di liars
a year.
On
the fi
Mr. I
Jnlm
"QUALITY   TELLS"
It> like
getting groceries
for nothing
���well almost
MR. JACK PEACH
ni the local bo*
..ni during the pi
ick Peach, s..n ol
Peach,  of  Main
;t fortnight is
Mr and Mrs.
'Street,      Mr.
WALLACE
iu fad  how
priced?     I
stand by tl i
v. full weiri I,
>!<
THE BOYS CAN DO A GREAT DEAL.  BY WRIT
.. . ,     it ��� ,, ��� .        , .. , I ready lui* anvthiin
ing these articles they can materially assisi, and through |, .    " ,  '
the medium of the SATURDAY CHINOOK increase pub
lie interest in the movement.
earn in clo anything, It kills his conscience. A man lias
no will after becoming a slave to drink, it destroys ii all.
Ik* ends in the asylum, or the grave, where if he had left
drink alone he would have been still in good health.    Me is
Peac
jc i ment
I listcl   with
his liohesty is gone, honor is lost to I
EVERY BOY OF FIFTEEN SHOULD BE ABLE TO
express himself in clear, simple language. He should have
definite ideas upon matters of public interest, and the ability and self-confidence to put them forward.
EVERY BOY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA IS INVITED,
indeed, urged to participate in this competition. We agree
to publish every communication and to do our share in
making the competition one which will assist in the great
campaign now before the public of British Columbia.
BOYS, IT WILL COST YOU NOTHING TO ENTER
this competition. So take your pencils in hand and give us
your views in favor of Prohibition in about five hundred
words.
HERE IS THE FIRST COMMUNICATION FROM A
boy only fourteen years of age, whose name is E. Brown,
5809 Ontario Street, Vancouver, B.C. Brown sets forth
his ideas in very good style. Turn in now and see if you
cannot improve upon Brown's article. Have a trial anyway.
urn, passions take the place of others, and lie becomes selfish.    I le is dune for,
A man who drinks often leaves behind in his sons or
daughters a person who is not quite right in his or her mind.
()r one who is likely to foil
Other times it helps him on to committing suicide, or he 01
i\as engaged in the fire depart-
f South Vancouver, and lias en-
the Pioneers. He is a
popular young man, who will bc greatly ini-sc'l in the community, and
whose future will be closely watched
by a host of friends;
��� r-��st���a	
JOHNSON  ON A  SOLDIER'S
DEATH
PUHF'TANTIAL   SAVING''   FOR
CAREFUL   HOUSE  WIVES
A Toronto man has directed atten-jc
tion to a letter written by Dr. Samite
Johnson,   and   reprinted   in   Boswcll'
j "Life." to a young friend sympathis
ikciY to follow the same path as their father. |ing with him on the death of his uncle,  Major-General   Alexander   Dury,
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_^^^^_^^_^_^ivhi> near St. Cas nu
nc is infected with melancholia.    It is sometimes hanclec'
down for three or four generations.
This article above does not refer only to a few, but il
takes in many thousands of cases of the same kind, and
some of which are worse.   I hope that this article may hei]
some in the abolishing of all intoxicating liquors.
14 years (nearly 15).
E. DROWN,���
5809 Ontario Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
Special service on Sunday, Rev.
Mr. Craig will speak in the morning
and evening. The sermon for the evening, which will be Illustrated by
seventy-five Btcreoptical view*, will he
..ii the lift of Jesus, The views extending from the cradle to the crown,
Hirisiian Endeavor mi Monday
night.
*��aturfiay (Eljinmik
PUBLISHED
Every  Saturday  by   the
Greater Vancouver Publishers Limited
Li,
HEAD OFFICE:
Corner Thirtieth Avenue mid .Main St.
.South Vancouver.
TELEPHONE
All departments.
Night Calls	
..Fairmont 1874
Fairmont 19-10 l
Registered   nl   the   Post   Office   De-
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
To    all    points    in    Canada,    United
Kingdom, Newfoundland, New Zealand
and other British Possessions:
$1.00
Postngre to American, European and
other Foreign Countries, $1.00 per year
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
inforrria-
Tho SATURDAY CHIXOOK is
your paper. It is printed fur ynu.
benefit.    It carries articles of
and leading.       ^^o^^^^^^M
It is iittr desire tu open the paper
absolutely to thc public. If you have
an article to print which is of public
interest, send it along and it shall be
printed in the CHIXOOK. If ynu
have written something that ynu are
afraid to send to thc magazines or
literary monthlies, send it to the editor of the SATURDAY CHINOOK.
We will print that part of it fit (P
print, if we do not print the whole
nf it.
It is a strange tiling that there are
si. few writers in tlie average community. Any man seems to lie aide to
fit   himself   fur   medicine   or   law   or
fortunate expedition againsl Franct
of 175S. It is particularly interesting
at the present juncture to peruse
Johnson's utterances on a soldier's
death:
Tu Bennett Langton, Esq., at Lang-
ton, near Spilsby, Lincolnshire:
Dear Sir,���1 should be sorry to think j
that what engrosses the attention of
my friend should have no pari of mine.
Your mind is now full of the fate of
Dury; but his fate is past, and nothing I
remains but to try what reflection will
suggest to,mitigate the terrors'of a
violent death, which is mure formidable at the first glance lalui on nearer.
and inure steady view. A violent
death is never very painful; the only
danger is, lest it should be unprovided' But if a man can lie supposed lol
make no provision for death in war,
what can be the state that would have
awakened him In the care of futtirity?
When would that man have prepared
himself to die, who went to seek death
without preparation? What then car.
be the reason that we lament more j
him that dies of a wound than him
that dies of a fever? A man that
languishes with disease, ends Ins life
with mure pain, but with less virtue:
he leaves no example to his friends, I
nnr bequeaths any honor to his des-1
cendants. The only reason why we I
lament a soldier's death is that we
think he might have lived lunger. Yet
Ihis cause of grief is common to many
other kinds of death, which are not
so passionately bewailed. The truth
is, that every death is violent which
is the effect of accident; every death
which is not gradually brought on by
the miseries of age or when life is
extinguished for any other reason than
that it is burnt out. He that dies before sixty, of cold or cnnsumplinn.
dies, in reality, by a violent death.
Yet.his death is borne with patience,
only because the cause of his untimely
end is silent and invisible. Let us endeavor to see things as they are. and
then enquire Whether we ought to
complain. Whether to see life as il
is will give us much consolation I
know Hot; but the cnnsnlafinn which
is drawn mine. Your mind is full of
the fate of Dury; but from truth, if
any there be, is Solid and durable; that
which may be derived from error,
must be like its original, fallacious j
and fugitive.
I am. dear, dear sir.
Your must humble servant.
SAM JOII.VSO.V    \
Mherla S. ecial [hitter, our di per Hi . 33 1-.-'
���iii.-c  S, I.n   Ki    -   our  in iv.  per doz.,  35c
\   .   Ui Iln       ...  i -i-      -i  .1
V'niher   tar   ol    \sticroft   Potatoes,   1(10   I'.-'.
���'���"���.>l Si.-n-.irirl  K| mr, J* lh   sack  si."5
'murium Choice  Flour,  -l'i II..  sack   S1.35
ileal   Honey.  ���-.-���   i.n-    Wc
1, r   Unit, n-.ii- and St. Charles Milk, 20-oa .
':  1  -.1  V-:::i-     :  II:     .1   1:11*  fif                          .':'.:
'els Nantha Snan,  10 bars for  55c
"oyal Crown Soap, ; liars f..r    ��'c
loyal Crow 11 Oatmeal Soap, mr price, li* bars
f..i-     |9c
'..nil Crown  I ye, 3 this for  35c
Laundry   Starch,   3   packages   for    Uc
Corn Starch, 2 packages for   15c
Ftlce.   7 lbs.   for    25c
>olleil   o..ts.  r,  II,-.   for    25c
Cl""   '   'lim.i-.l-. in r i:-ll. 20c
Shelled Walnuts, per lb., a treat   45c
English   Cob   nuts,   local   grown,   very   fine.
Nice fresh Smoked Kilmers, .1 His. for . .25c
Nice frc-h Kiopereri Salmon, 2 ll>��. for ..2Sc
Finnan   lln.l.li.   2  11.-.   for    25c
'...Ifi-li. boneless, 2 lbs. for  25c
Nice Medium Bacon, i><-r ll> 2U-
|,;cnie Hams,  sugar cured, ner lh I3V5
lams, suir.-ir cured, per II. 18c
FRESH MEAT DEPARTMENT
1... ns ..( Lamb, full, per Ib 30o
Shoulders ..( I.ainli. per 11. 16c
Pork Sauiage, onr own make, -' lbs. for ..-'5c
FREE
To every customer presenting thla cm-
pon on Saturday, 1 will give free ol
charge one cake ol FAIRY SOAP.
Tins i- .1 genuine offer, U.....1 ti 1.111 9 a.-oi.
IO  111 P-111.   f.'llv.
Saturday, with every 1 lb, tin Fry's
Coco', 45c, we will give free 1 bar of mil
chocolate,
BRING THIS  COUPON
S.T. WALLACE
PURE   FOOD    GROCERY    STORE
44    HASTINGS     STREET     WEST
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can   supply  your   needs   at  right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right  at  Station)
A. V. JJ.WIS
Painting   Contractor
4450    COMMERCIAL    STREET
Phone Fairmont 1314 R SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30,  1915
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
FIVE
a
:ffi
Insurance Effected in Best Companies
ESTATES   MANAGED
OUR  RENTAL DEPARTMENT  IS PROPERLY EQUIPPED
TO COLLECT RENTS AND HAVE THE OVERSIGHT
OF RENTAL PROPERTIES
We have had Twenty-five Years' Experience in Vancouver
North West Trust Co., Ltd.
E. B. Morgan, President
509 RICHARDS STREET Phone Seymour 7467
m-
=ffi
*|W!ii1il!1lf;:|!!llP!Ill|l!��|!l(lllll!lllli!l!
| B. C. Municipal Bonds
HAVE PROVED THEIR SAFETY AN'D STABILITY
AS A PROFITABLE INVESTMENT
Send for Latest List
Canadian Financiers Trust ..Company
Head Office���839 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
P.   Donnelly,  General  Manager
liihiilill'lllllllllilllll! III! I llllllSliilllll lllllllililll lllllll;
Phone: Seymour 9086
^SoNc
.-.<
��' P, ,:��� '"
*��� ,  ' ,M/-
Aim
At Independence
OPEN  A SAVINGS ACCOUNT
With  Us Today
ONE    DOLLAR    WILL    DO    SO
We Pay 4</(  Interest
Subject   to   cheque   credited  monthly.
Dow Fraser Trust Co.
122 HASTINGS STREET WEST
and McKay Station,  Burnaby
make up an eight-page section of the
edition.
SIGNS  OF THE TIMES
Those mysterious black and white
sign- at the street corners are nut
secret directions for the convenience
of invading German armies. They are
tin- signs of ihe automobile association, placed there for the direction of
traveller-  over  tlu-   Pacific  Highway.
A black R on a white field stands
for "Head  in to the right."
A black I. on a ivhitt field merel)
means "turn to tin- left "
A heavy black line, cross-wise of
the white field, mean- "Go right a-
head."
An X indicates "Danger, r railroad
crossing."
A sign which looks like a buil's-eyc
indicates that a garage is near al band,
while a black square marks the neighborhood of a hotel
NO   PARTY   LINES   HERE
The  Provincial Progressive Club oi
Vancouver doesn't stick to party lines.
One night the members were pleased
tn   listen   to  an   address   bj   tlie   I loii.
Joseph   Martin   upon   lhe   subject   of
"Free Trade.'' A week after. Sir Char-
It   is  now   up   to  some  enterprising i.       ..... ... .     ,
f., u.  ,. ,   les   Hlbbert    I upper   was   united     to
speak upon and support "Protection."
Tin- Progressives now advertise that a
certain advanced Socialist is to favor
tiniu with a speech, Yel the Progresses are part of the Liberal party
ml semi delegations to .-,11 Liberal
-on,-, ntions and meetings.
RUTH MORTON MEMORIAL
CHURCH
The anniversary services of tin:
Ruth Morton Memorial Baptist
Church, corner 27th Ave. and Prince
Albert Street, will be continued on
Sunday and Sunday   week.
There will be baptismal services on
Sunday evening, and the Lords Supper on the following Sunday morning.
The pastor, Rev. Mr Litch, will conduct the services, and an orchestra
will assi-t in the music.
western paper to take a high and
mighty Stand on the booming of real
estate in and about Ford City, Canada.
At all events, we westerners will
mn go into the market, W'e will not
send our money east unless we have a '
definite idea as to how far Paten Road
Subdivision or Parent Park Subdivision i- from iln- City  Hall.
LOCAL NOTES
'I'h.-   VV.  M.  S.  of  Mountain  V:
Met:, idisl Church met al  ihe pn -
il  4477   Walden   Stn i i.  T
day.   I Icti I" i-   I1',   with  a  (Tool
THE  JITNEY  CULTURE
been I i  iii
Mr. M. A. Beach
Objection 1
us operati >rs
Mr. M.  V
is heard the call
-  enlisted  with
Reinforced
Concrete Pipe
Made in  Canada.
9 9 9
LAID IN  SECTIONS
With Continuous Reinforcement, making Joint as Solid as
Body of Pipe.
*   *   *
APPROVED   BY
Leading Canadian and American
Engineers.
9  *  ���
B. C. Municipal Officials invited to inspect work now going
en  locally.
     *   *   ��
OFFICES:
VICTORIA ��� VANCOUVER
Local Office: 29th and Fraser
Phone:   Fairmont  493
PACIFIC
LOCK
JOINT
PIPE
tlu-i
in mi.     Mr
The  Ladies'  Aid  of  Moutain   View   l? :  '""   "   is  aPP",m,t-  according   to
Methodisl   Church  met  Thursday  af. a statemellt J"s"-'""cd hy the Xational
���,,    .      ,       i Autoiuoliil.   ( hamber    i i   Commerce
Men s   class- ,     .,    .
���  ,i,     ,i  ,    , tha   these are i etaiK for proper reg
the   church   to  arrange   for    . '     v        k
,,;,  , ,  ulation and i" not aiieei  the final di
tuvei sai v   sen ice  and  annual I
termination ol  the question am  mori
in   V
ternooii   in   the    Y
room   of   the   chur
supper, to he held  N'oveniber  12. The
a iii be preached
tnniversary scrim
by Rev. Dr. Seott of Metropilitan
Church, Victoria, NTov. 14th. morning
and evening.
than imp!
in similar
iperatii
its.
twenty yen
idly engagi
lial   time   in
! h-
.lllit   l
3eaf .nli   l-lighla
Keeler's Nursery
Grower and Importer of Plants, Bulbs, Roots and Shrubs
Cul    Flowers   and   Design
Work  a  specialty,
 1  Ornamen-
Spring and
*
|     ���*-
Ot.i   hundred i ari< ties oi
Roses  oi -    Sorts
ndred   iarie-
ties   of   Dahlias.
Fall   planting, ���- Phone Fairmont 8i7
YOU  WILL  riND  OUR  PRICES MODERATE
Co.*  FIFTEENTH AVE. and MAIN  ST   ::  MOUNT  PLEASANT
n. i i
HERE'S A REAL ESTATE BOOM
Judging   from   the   ad
Mr. and Mrs, Grant of 77 ,19th An
Lasi. moved to Lawyer Brown's sum
iiht   house  at   Woodlands,  and    will I
lake  care of their place  for the  wir
si am
i itners   say,
inues, "that   the public has
he  jitney   bus   merely   as
nd   that   the   trend   will   be   back   ti
he   street   ear.     This  may  lie  true   t.
ent,   but  of  the   man-,   w hi
novelty,  can   il   be   expcctei
thai   none  of  them  will  continue  for I inspired   t
preference? | ���nplc.
"On   the   whole,  those  who  are  at
tempting   to   forecast   the   future   o
ithe jitney  bus  to reach  a  sound  con
G.   I..  Greenlay   is    repairing    his elusion, should avoid consideration o
house on .Wih Avenue East, damaged man
if th
the  N'orth'H
the verj
line   .11
Mr. Cram  has bei n on the an -
rc|
Main  Street.
i  to  lies to play the "(
ell     in the Unterlinden, nol in il
future,    lie  has   a   ln>st  of    friends,
whose besl   wishes  will go  with  I im i
to thc trenches, and there are no doubt
many in thc community who will In
low    Mr.   Beach's   ex-
HOUSEHOLD GOODS and OFFICE FURNITURE
CEDAR  COTTAGE   NOTES
i by the fire that destroyed Mr. Royal's  selves or be controlled by local  regtl
In a little all on Victoria  Road am
eia.ls   winch   will   right   tliem-135^ A        ,,u. Ccntra]  South  Vancou
.-ing appearing in copies of Windsor, Ontario
and Detri it papers which have reach-
ril the SATURDAY CHINOOK of
fice during the pasl wc<-k, there i- a
real estate boom nn a certain town in
the east which puts to shame - une of
those booms which we have experienced in  the west. I cabin at 22(1 39th Avenue Lasi. Tues-llation.    It  is  going  10  resolve  its
One  whole  section   of  the   Dctrnit  day night. October  12th. into  a   straighl   business  proposition. I October" 25   by   Mr   Seymour  of  the
TIMES is given over to the advertis-[ . j for. as far-as the public's concerned,  Vancouver  .Red  Cross Society.    Mrs
ing of subdivisions at Ford City, Can-      ,,       ,,,   ,   ,,-    , ,,  ,,        natronao-f  ;s uiulnnhicdlv -i-sm-ed   and H ,,..-, ,     ,
1     Mrs.   (Dr.)   Wark   gave  a   Hallow-11"" ~ unuuuuicurj  nssureu, aim   Ralph   ;,,������!,   was   present   and     her
:I e'en party for her S. S. girls  Friday f�� :i  ��''_''���'u'r  '"' less degree,  accord-1 splendid  address   in   behalf    of    the
evening.   October   29th.     The   invito- inS '" t.lle competition which this new \cmse was |,ear(| wjth enthusiastic audi
tio���s  wen-  in  novelty  form. | service will, have to meet ill the way Uympathetic interest which spoke well I
W m \^j m
society j
was   organized   on   the   afternoon   ot
BY EXPERT PACKERS USING ONLY NEW CLEAN MATERIALS
CAMPBELL STORAGE COMPANYc
MOVING - PACKING- STORAGE-SHIPPING
P PHONE SEYMOUR 7360. OFFICE 857 BEATTY ST. *g|
ada. where they turn out the Ford car.
"Choose your lot in the heart nf
Ford," runs an advertisement. "Choice
location in everything. The Chapman
and   Westcott   subdivi-i. 11   offers   ex
if traction  facilities, and it must not
for   the   success   of   what   promises
���t
ceplional opportunities for homesites..''1     Mrs.   Captain   Price.   68   39l
"Lord  View  Subdivision."  runs  an-|West,  returned   from  Seattle,   Wash., I than  compete  with  trolley  lines.
other   headline,  and  lots   are  offered Wednesday, October 27th .where s|K. j    ^e   qUeS(j0|,   js   whether   autom
frimi $MY.) upwards. j has been visiting friends and relative-. ; |,j|���s- new  ,������ , ,1,-. ;,n<l considering ;
j be overlooked thai in many places the ,)e ,���R. ,������ ������. ,���,,M enterprising bran- I
We. jitney   bus   will   supplement,     rather ghes of the Red Cr05s Society.    In a
brief bul interesting in.inner, Mr. See
inour  explained   the   workings   oi   th
.-���eiety   and   the   Steps   necessary   fo
!������"��� >���"���  i"'--����"i;   ...    equipping    old Organization, after  which  the  follow
small   monthly   payments,"   run-   yet | with   her and   will   spend  the  winter |chassis with mo,-.- suitable bodies, can | jn8  officers were  elected by nomina
another of thc advertisements  which  months with her daughter.
"Ten   per   cent,   down���balance   in j Mrs.  Anderson,   her  mother,  returned  S(
|be furnished at  this stage of the in-1 tion:  Mrs.  Mclntyre, chairman;   Mrs.
dii-try  and  pperated  at  a   cost   that Schroeder,  vice-chairman;   Mrs.   Por-
- win show  a prom, assuming a properitt
cretary-treasurer.
Is Particularly Adapted as a Food
for Babies
Becaur.- in addition to its standardized PURITY it contains
in generous proportions all of the food properties which are
necessary to the healthful nourishment of the "little ones."
Come up to the dairy any afternoon and we will gladly show
you how TURNER'S MILK, "Untouched by Hand," is kept
"Pure From the Farm to the Home."
ORDER YOUR SUPPLY TODAY
PHONE   FAIR.  ��97  AND   OUR   DRIVER   WILL   CALL
TURNER'S DAIRY
SEVENTEENTH   AVENUE   AND   ONTARIO   STREET
��
and reliable service, 'hi tins depends
whether the public will continue to
have this service, which it wants, and
not on any artificial consideration of
its effect- on the earnings and service
of traction companies. If their earnings are impaired il is only because thc public, as a matter of choice,
prefers this new method of transportation, and the traction companies will
get hack their earnings if the) are
in position to meet the competition;
if they cannot do so. their business
will suffer exactly as any other business must take its chances with competitors.
"Interurbau trolley systems are today existing on business which they
have taken from the railroads, and
those interested in the jitney bus will
see to it. so far as obstructive legislation is concerned, that they are given
a fair opportunity to operate just as
the traction systems look after their
similar interests. To some extent the
trolley lines will undoubtedly be able
to hold and regain patronage: this
will dtpeild on local conditions, but it
is certain that iu many cases the flexibility of the automobile as to handling
and new routes can and will both supplement and compete with the regular
trolley lines, and in many cases this
service will be much preferred by
municipalities and the public to a further extension of rails.
'The matter of license fees, routes,
-afety of machines, and ability ol
drivers to properly operate them are
details that will be determined and
regulated in a '\e.isrinahrc- anil proper
manlier.���Toronto Saturday* Xight.
dies at once  signified  their intention
of paying the $2.00 initiation  fee and
becoming members, while many more
promised their  work  and  hearty  -up-'
port.     There   was   a   large   executive
committee appointed to look after the j
various  branches   of  the   work,  enter-j
tainmeiits,   supplies,   sewing,  etc..  and
while   the  Central   South     Vancouver
branch has been a little late in organizing,   il   is  composed  of  women   who
are  very much alive    and    they     ui
doubtless soon make up for lost time
Mrs. Miller, a returned missionary
from India, addressed the Rob-on Memorial missionary study class at their
meeting last Tuesday afternoon, on
thc "Women of India," dealing particularly with subject of child marriage.
Mrs. Miller, having been a resident of
India for fifteen years, was entirely
familiar with her subject and her remarks were based altogether on her
own personal knowledge and experience,  therefore,   full  of interest.
The Political Ecmality League held
theif monthly sewing meeting at the
home of Mrs. Wright on Friday afternoon. There were twelve members
present and a satisfactory amount of
work done.
* * *
The Ladies' Aid oi lhe Robson Memorial Church met at Mrs. Anderson's on Vahncss Ave. on Wednesday afternoon, and sewed for the sale
oi work which will be held sometime
before the Christmas holidays.
When Better Bread can be made
we'll bake it
In the meantime pin your faith to
SMAX and
SUNLIGHT
The BETTER Breads
The big, generous pound loaves that sell   for  only
5 cents
HAMPTON-PINCHIN
Bakers of BETTER Bread six
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, WIS
LET US MAKE YOU FAT
50c Box Free
We Want to Prove at Our Own Expense That It Is
No Longer Necessary to Be    Thin,
Scrawny and Undeveloped
"Gee! Look al flint |����ir uf nUi.ii> ��CJ
This li a generous offer to every tiiiti
man or woman. We positively guarantee
to !i'create your weight to your owu *-'it
isfaction or no pay. Think t lii-�� OVCf
think what it mean--. At our own rlik
wc offer to put 10. 15, yes, 30 poundi
of good, solid "stay there flesh on your
bones, to fill out hollow* in cheeks neck
or bust, to get rid of that "peaked" look,
to do this without drastic diet, "tonics,"
severe physical culture "stunt-.." detention
front business or any Irksome requirements���if  we  fad  it   costs  you  nothing.
We particularly wish to hear from the
excessively thin, those who know the humiliation an��l embarrassment which only
skinny people have to suffer in -ilence.
We want to send a free 50 cent package to
the people who are called "slats" and
"bean poles," to bony Women, whose
clothes never look "anyhow," no matter
how expensively dressed, to the -.kinny men
who fail to gain social or business recognition on account of their starved appearance. We care not whether you have
been thin from birth, whether you have
lost flesh through sicklies-, how many
flush builders you have experimented with.
We take the risk antl assume it cheerfully.
Jf we cannot put pounds ami pounds of
lieal thy flesh on your frame we don't
want  your money.
The new treatment Is used to increase
the red corpuscles in the blood, strengthen
thc nerves and put the digestive tract into
inch shape i!i..' vo tr f'> id is assimilated
and turned ii to good, solid healthy flesh
Instead of passing through the system mi-
irecrdwil Why don't thvy try Sni-ffolf"
I digested and unasatmUated.   It js a thor*
' OUghly scientific principle, this Sargol,  for
: building up the thin, weak and debilitated
! without   any   nauseous   dosing.     In   many
! conditions  it   is   better  than  cod   liver  oil
j and   certainly   i��   much   pleasanter  to   take.
Send   for  the   50-cent   box  today,     ton-
j viucc   us   by   your   prompt   acceptance   of
' this   offer   that   you   are   writing   in   good
faith  and  really desire to gain  in   weight.
Thc   50-cent   package   which  wc  Will   ��end
vou   free  should   be   an   eye-opener  to   you.
We send  it  that  you  may sec its  Simple.
harmless  nature,   how   easy  it   is  to  take,
how you may gain  flesh privately without
knowledge of friends or family.
We could not publish this offer if we
were not prepared to live up to it. It is
only the astounding results of our new
method of treatment that make such an
offer and such a guarantee possible on
our part. So cut off the coupon today
and mail it at once to The Sargol Company, MOK Herald Bldg., I'-iughatnton,
\.V., and please enclose 10c with your
letter to help pay distribution expense-.
Take our word, you'll  never regret   it.
Empire Building, This!!!
How the CNR. Helped Out the Poor - They Wanted 1400 per cent. More to Haul a
Car of Potatoes from Chilliwack for Charity Department than the B.C.E.R. Charged���
Freight Bigger than Cost of Potatoes Right in City :-:
Free Sargol Coupon
TIliM
ertlflcste   with   ti
nts    t��
help pay postage and distribution expenses entitles ihe holder t" one 50
cent package ���>( Sargol, the Plcsli
Rudder. The S;nu..l Co., 880-K Herald
Bldg.,  Binghamton, N. V.
lllllll
COAL        COAL
For the benefit of small consumers, commencing; October 1, we will
deliver coal in single sacks tor tho following prices:
Wellington  Lump Aut Pen Stuck
;;::... 40c       35c       25c        20c
People making their own delivery get n rebate <*f five cents  per
.���sack on above prices.
MACDONALD, MARPOLE
COMPANY  LIMITED
427 SEVMOUIl STIIKKT I'lIOM*. Sr.VllOIlt 210
SERVICE AND
CO-OPERATION
are the two great forces in modern life.
Our attitude is one of service in the spirit of partnership���mutual co-operation.
We want to give you one hundred cents' worth of
service for every dollar you spend with us.
We want and need the co-operation of every customer on our books���large and small.
The mutual advantages to be gained by harmonious
co-operation between our customers and ourselves
are well worth striving for.
Hastings and Canall Sts.
Phone Sey. 5000
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH  TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS, OF THE
WORLD
to
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the Eait.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
J. MOE, C P. A., 434 Hastings St, Vancouver.
C. MILLARD. D.T.A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass. Agent, Vancouver.
"TRUNK
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
C. B. Jenney, O. A. P. D.
Phone:   Sey. B134 S27  Gt.nvllle StrMt
AT last we have the completed Canadian Northern
Railway.
The banquet given by the Board of Trade to Sir
William Mackenzie and his hundred members of the House
of Commons is over, the dishes are cleared away. Let us
observe the first fruits of the completion of this gigantic
promotion���this enterprise the subsidizing of which wrecked the treasury of British Columbia and of the Dominion of
Canada, and placed the people of Canada in a bondage
from which they will not escape during this or the next
generation.
In South Vancouver the wives and children in many
homes are in want. It is necessary for the Corporation to
organize a relief office. In the course of the work of this
department, a group of generous-minded farmers at Chilliwack write to Relief Officer W. Pleming and agree to donate a carload of potatoes free of cost.
The Municipal Relief Department buy large quantities of potatoes and gladly accept the gift of the good farmers of Chilliwack. The farmers dig up the potatoes, sack
them and carry them to Chilliwack. (It cost them time,
money and trouble, but they do the work cheerfully because they are aiding a good cause���the sacred cause of
charity.
Word is received that the potatoes are ready to ship
and the Relief Department communicate with the railways
running through Chilliwack and ask for rates on a car from
Chilliwack to a point in South Vancouver.
Here is the letter which is addressed to the Canadian
Northern Pacific Railway Company, the Mackenzie and
Mann road, the road built by the citizens of Canada, though
owned by Mackenzie and Mann:
September 17, 1915.
Freight Department,
Canadian Northern Pacific Railway,
837 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver, B.C. I
Dear Sirs:���
Please quote mc your lowest inclusive rates on a carload nf
produce from Chilliwack in Vancouver. This consignment is for relief
purposes in South Vancouver.
I understand yon are prepared in give preferential rales in this
regardj and of which we shall lie pleased lo he favored.
Y*ours truly,
\Y. PLEMING.
Relief Officer.   ,
Three days afterwards from the offices of Mackenzie,
Mann & Company, Limited, in the Metropolitan Building,
Vancouver, the following letter is sent to Mr. Pleming,
the Relief Officer:
September 20, 1915.
Mr. '*'. Pleming,
Relief Officer,
Corporation of South Vancouver.
Dear Sir:���
We are in receipt of your letter of the 17lh inst.. asking for rates
on produce in carload lots from Chilliwack tn Vancouver,
There is no differential rate quoted on such traffic, and our rate
iron) Chilliwack lo PORT M.W'X is 10 cents per 100 lbs., minimum
-10.01)0 lbs. To this must he added tlie Great Northern rate front I'l >KT
MANX TO Vancouver of 15 rents per 100 lbs.���making a total of 25
cents per hundred.
In the course of a few week.- these rales will he re-arranged and
if you will communicate with us. say in three weeks time, wc will give
yim a revised quotation,
Yours truly.
CANADIAN .\'( )RTI IKR.N PACIFIC RAILWAY,
per C. Noel Wilde.
Chilliwack, it would cost you $130.00 to sack them and haul
them to a point in Vancouver. If you were intending to
sell them, and allow ten per cent, for commission charges,
you would just be out all your labor and exactly four dollars
by the time you get your car on the switch behind a big
grocery shop.
We are straying from the main feature of the story,
however. Now the farmers were giving the potatoes, the
labor, the sacks, freight on board at Chilliwack. The potatoes were for the poor people of this city. The Canadian
Northern Railway was built by those same poor people.
It was financed by the people of Canada. In the building
of that road Sir William Mackenzie and Sir Donald Mann
and a dozen other railroad contractors were made millionaires many times over. On the easy money from the treasuries of the Provinces and the Dominion, knights were
made, huge fortunes were built up, governments were corrupted.
It would seem that after the building of the road, the
stealing would cease for a time. But, nay, nay. The first
opportunity to soak the people on operation as they had
been soaked on construction of the road, was jumped at
and the charity organization of South Vancouver was to
be the first among the victims.
Astounded at the enormous rate charged by the Canadian Northern Pacific, the Relief Officer communicated
with the B. C. Electric Railway, which has been operating
out of Chilliwack for years���a railway built without subsidy from Ottawa or Victoria, enjoying profit from work
done, a service rendered���we do not know whether profit
or loss.
The same letter sent to the Canadian Northern Pacific,
the Mackenzie and Mann promotion, was forwarded to the
B. C. E. R., and the answer came back promptly and courteously.
"WE WILL HAUL THAT CAR OF POTATOES
TO ANY POINT YOU MAY MENTION IN SOUTH
VANCOUVER FOR TEN DOLLARS."
This was a reduced rate, truly. But the cause was a
worthy one.   It was the sacred cause of charity.
TEN DOLLARS���AND THE CANADIAN NORTHERN WANTED FOURTEEN HUNDRED PER
CENT MORE TO DO THE SAME LITTLE TRICK.
So Mackenzie and Mann, who have hogged it at the
treasuries of the people, now propose to continue the hogging right at the doors of the people.
Well, it must be alright. The Members of the House
of Commons said at the big banquet given by the Board
of Trade to Sir William Macbenzie that he was an Empire
Builder.
Yes, we imagine that the opening of the Canadian
Northern through the Province of British Columbia is
going to mean a great deal to us���bring back prosperity.
If we have to pay as much to haul prosperity back as we
have to pay for hauling free potatoes from Chilliwack over
the Empire builders' lines, better struggle along a bit as we
are.
Let us figure this out together.
Ten cents a hundred pounds to Port Mann
on 40,000 lbs	
Fifteen cents a hundred pounds from Port
Mann to False Creek	
$40.00
60.00
Total, delivered to False Creek      $100.00
Having coughed up a hundred dollars to have this car
of potatoes hauled from Chilliwack to False Creek, the
Relief Department would require to have the car switched.
This would cost another $10.00.
POTATOES ARE WORTH, SAY, $7.00 A TON.
Here are twenty tons of potatoes, worth $140.00, and
the freight upon them to Mackenzie and Mann would be
$110.00.
It costs five cents each for sacks. In the consignment
there would be $20.00 worth of sacks. The cost of sacking
was borne by the farmers, however.
In short, the thing would figure out this way: that if
you had a carload of potatoes given you free of all cost at
THE  SONG   OF  THE  PIPER
By Eleanor Hammack Northcross
Reading one night together a folutn
nf vagrant  rime,
W'e  came  to  the  song of  a  piper���a
lilt nf summer time:
He went down a road of silver that
led  to  the old world's  end.
He sang to linnet and sea flower, and
lie knew each man his friend;
A basket of tunes for luggage, a kindlj
wish for all.
He passed and left men  merry whin
he   heard   thc   summer   call,
'Twas the song of an Irish singer, and
the witching melody
Deepened the voice of the reader with
its subtle harmony.
A voice broke the pulsing silence when
the liquid verse was done;
It came from the floor and his playthings���the voice of our three
years' son.
We had not dreamed of his heeding
���the words were beyond his ken,
But he felt the spell of the music:
"O daddy, sing it again I"
And then again on the morrow he
came from his romping play.
"Please, muddie, sing me the piper,
the one  that went away."
Over and over we read it, awed by
the dream in his eyes;
A moment later the awe was gone,
dispelled by his merry cries,
For our dreaming fay was a romping
boy���and we smiled in our paradise.
lint
nne day Death came trumpcting
he snared li:e old and sad
fall   ffom  his  play  and   hi-  d.nvi:
iiil;  dreams ..in- radiant  little  !:n
Si.  !i.
Ill's
i-h.
wa
the
and
pipe*
ould i:
path,
411'    pm
went
follow
so   strange
r eve- were
t   lollOW   Inn
So   steej
road,
dim.
Our way that of old was
With  hopes and dreams
Is   sombre   and  dull   and  1
want of our little boy.
Is he piping somewhere yonder iu ,i
land of summer and song?
Oh, little lad, our little lad, the gray
years are so long!
-shimmer
if joy
lelv     for
THE ROAD TO MARYKIRK
By Violet Jacob
To Marykirk ye'll set ye forth
An' wlmstle as ye step alang.
And aye the Grampians i' the North
Arc glowerin' on ye as ye gang.
By Martinis Den, through beech an'
birk
A   breith   comes   soughin',   sweet   an'
Strang
Alang the road to Marykirk.
Frae mony a field ye'll hear the cry
O' teuchats, skirlin' on the wing,
Noo East, noo West, amang the kye.
And smell o' whins the wind'U bring:
Aye. lad it blaws a thocht to mock
The licht o' day on ilka thing���
For you that went yon road last spring
Are lyin' deid in  Flanders. Jock. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1915
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
SEVI
ASK YOUR
NEIGHBOUR
How Doc Young's Your Milk
Name May Live  I
In History
Supply
We Sell Stove Wood
Coast Lumber & Fuel Co., Ltd.
Phone Fait, 2500    Phone High. 226   Phone Fra.ei 41
B.C
SEWER PIPE
We are the sole Manufacturers of
Machine-Made Concrete Sewer Pipe
in British Columbia.
DOMINION GLAZED CEMENT PIPE CO., LTD.
Office: Dominion Building, Vancouver, B.C. Phone Sey. 8285
MM
I
POULTRY SUPPLIES
HAY, GRAIN,  CHOP  AND  MIXED  FEEDS
I
A trial will convince you that our trade is built up by
Quality, Service   and Low Prices
Vernon Feed Co.
MOUNT PLEASANT OFFICE, Phone  Fairmont 186���878
SOUTH VANCOUVER BRANCH     -     Phone Fraser 175
THIS may happen in 1950.
A youth in an interior city is being packed off to
the University of British Columbia.
"My boy," says his grey-bearded father, "keep up the
honor of the old school. I was one of the first students enrolled at the University of British Columbia."
"Oh," says the boy, "what splendid traditions the Uni-
: versity of British Columbia must have."
"Yes," says the old man, "when I was a boy the late,
lamented Doc Young was Minister of Education. My father was an oldtimer in Atlin and the Doc sent a copy of the
first University Calendar to my father."
"Was the Honorable Doctor Young a great and good
man, father?. Did he go about doing good deeds? Was he
a great educationist? Was your father really a friend of
! his, and did the Honorable Doctor Young think so much of
your father that he actually sent him an autograph copy of
ihe first Calendar of the great University?"
Here the boy breaks off and ponders for a moment.
"But, dad," says he, "in our history of British Colum-
| bit nothing is mentioned of the Honorable Doctor Young.
j In the Canadian History we read of Egerton Ryerson and
I such men, but in the history of this Province, though mention is made of Captain Tatlow. the Honorable John Oliver,
the Honorable Parker Williams and others who were active
in public life in the early days of the University, I do not
remember of any mention having been made of the Honorable Doctor Young."
"My boy," says the father, picking up his weekly copy
of the SATURDAY CHINOOK, "you pack your grips and
get out of here.   The train will be along in a few minutes
and when you go down to the big city, don't plague every-    ��� i.l]u.l ,,,.,,
one to rleatli with vnnr fnnl nnpctinno " .,,...
HAVE VOL" EVER taken tin i follow from m
to month the record   ol amily dairy?���the purit;
testf that tell the tale of cleanl ��� ness.
How Good is Your
Milkman at His Worst?
THERE IS Xi i NEED lo worry aboul the strong links in
the chain���wc are all good at otir best.
THE BACTERIOLOGISTS' REPORT published in the
"Chinook" on the 9th inst., runs all the wa
bacteria to 235.000.      Such 'erences  must  i
something.    The Medical Milk Commission tin v* thi
we understand, at 10.000 bacteria.   We cannot undertal
say    here iln- danger line i
WHEN WE CONSIDER thc efforts i   uli   to li : ler up
reputations on the -nap judgment of amati u     tin
cup- and diplomas, thc good work of tin  "Chi look" i i
ting the figures before the people cannot be too 1
mended.   The figures referred toabovi  follow:
Imperial    (under) . .5.000
Pioneer      5 "00
Queen's    Own    ....5.000
Annishaw     10.000
Beaconslield     15.000
Turner's     25.000
Pure    Mill:      25.000
1,-anii     40.000
foulh   Vancouver   49.000
Standard    235.000
YOU     CAN     DRAW
YOUR     OWN
CONCLUSIONS
Queen's Own
Dairy
PHONE BAYVIEW 2192
After 6 p.m.��� PHONE BAYVIEW 1327
one to death with your fool questions
Nature Testh"
and skilled
painless service
My "Nature Teeth" which are entirely different from ordinary
artificial teeth, because they are built into the mouth to match
Nature's own in size and shape and exact tint���my skilled service mid modern equipment.���my absolute guarantee of painlessness, both (luring and following all dental work ��� these
things
���cost no more
than ordinary dentistry
B. C. GOVERNMENT CANCELS
CHARTER ISSUED TO
them bit.    Hut no enough fell into
 ������   iW .....  trap.    This journal  has laid  cuni-
GEORGE E. STILLINGS .ninnicaiioiis before thc responsible
heads of the British Columbia Government, asking for action against
Stillings.    Constant publicity
That dangerous promoter, George
E. Stillings, needs not only a new
tring   to   his   bow,   but   a   new   bow
 Bret tine
1 should  be  the  air  of  the  gray  hair...,
wom.���.    Her hats should be carefullyH     QUALITY   TELLS      :-
selected  and in  her. case a  little  ex-J    DELIVER
travagance   in   millinery   is   -linte  cs-  ��   AJAaAjl V L.IX
disable.    Whenever possible, also  sin
should wear a veil, for straggling ?ia*
hair   is   always   trying   to   the      face 	
Veils  are  extremely   fashionable  justK-p  poorly-made,   sloppy  clothes,  but
*^a,nsc|no-A   and  the    gray    haired   jvom n   good qtialitj garments madi  from gen-
THE GOODS
^^^^^^^^���^^^^^^^^^^^^^m, 'he   same   matter.
would  also  be  in  order.     The   Gov-  now   the   charter   issued   t.i  the
eminent of  British Columbia has re.-  vage" company the co-operative
cently cancelled the charter issued t"  concern,  has  been  taken  away.    Stil
Canadian Co-operative  Bond Corpora-   lings is out in the cold.    Everyone ii
tion,   headed  by   Stillings.     The   next   this   country   should   bewart    of   him
. should  select  one of  the  new  black ujne   tweeds,   serges,     cheviots,   etc.,
land white filadora or hexagon  mesh- that   arc   stylish,   up-to-date,   neat   in
"   es. or an all white veil in sonn  daintj appearance, correct in fit, and perfect
vinet design.    Taupe veils ari   brcom- .;u   workmanship.
i��g if the hair he iron gray. STYLISH  SUITS
.nd   tak
Read these Prices
Pull   Set   ol   Nature  Teeth,   upper  or
Lower     $10.00
Gold   Cro-vns      5.00
lliiilge   Work,  per  tootli
Cold   killings,   per   tooth
Ile   give     ^^^^^^^^^^^^
thing.
IU- has made a pretty wreck out of
National Mercantile Company. United States Judge A. Morrow has di
impany bankrupt in thc
jurisdiction of the United States, li
w n !-. be bankrupt in
WM. S. HALL
S, -.   ,.;��� ,   hae  wi'   Wallace-  ; lei ,
g in   Bruce  has often   h d
RV ���             - I   bed.
was already known to be bankrupt  in , )r (|| vlct,irie,
Canada. ^s����^s����������������^s����������������^s��������������l^s����������������^s��i
mighty littli ������! their money back, evidently.- Toronto   Saturday   Xight.
\V
traitor
5.00
2.00
Licentiate   Dental   Surgery
Doctor   Dental   Surgery
^^^^^^_ Member   Royal   College   Dental   Surgeons
Porcelain  Fillings, r" ">nt1'  ������    ���-50     212   STANDARD   BANK   BLDG.
Armalgam Fillings, per tooth ..    1-50 '    '     '    Seymour 4679
Painless  'extraction, per tootli   ..      .an "-J" jiH^^^^^^H
,
iyI\Hi/\lVll-i/\l^lJL/        Comet Twenty-Sixth Avenue
THFATRF and Main Street
logical step is to deport Stillings
a dangerous character. This probably will nut he done, as it is rare to
find one'department oi the law or the
Government co-ioper'ating with any
other .to effect a move similar to this. ! clare'd
It would be a, good thing ii Canada
could he rid of Stillings. I le is. and
always been, a destroyer. He ha'
made money for no one save himself,
and  what   he  personally  gleaned   was
nut prufii^ made in lhe Icgitin'ii.   I ay.    -^^^���^^^^^���^^^���^^^���^^^^_
\i   Stillings   were   up   befon    Ceil mel
Denison, ill Toronto, I know what the      GRAY   HAIR  AS  A   BEAUTY
Colonel  would  term  the process FEATURE
George E. Slelling- has a had r< *..rd '*  ���   Sc itland's  king  and  law
in  Massacliusscts.    He worked one or       Women   are   finding   that   ii   is   the  Freedom's  sword  will   strongly   di
more  fake  companies  in  thai    State,  w*>r!"'   mistake  in   tin-   world   to  dy<   Freeman  stand   ir   'reeman  fa'.
was   arrested,   and   served   his   term  ' STO  h"r     '<  ,"-l>   stnve off  the  evil Lei him on wi' me!
Coming tn Canada several years ago,  (la>' "'* "''* ag? '���"��� a time, but - uinei
he  started  National   Mercantile  Com- or l;il''r llu' artifice  will be discover-   By    ::���   ssion's woes  and pains!
pane, lured people to deposit their sa- ctl :lncl every year make- it more .in"-   Bj   yom   sons in  servile  chains!
vings in thc concern by promises   ���f | ficult  t��    keep    hair    in    uniform | We will drain our dearest veins.
; Havi
  me  nn-asnv.    -.. n   :   :���  ���    ur   new
'S   eVery"  WHAT WOULD "RABBIE" HAVE  suit.     1   guarantee  you   h  nest  treat-
���s*MD ABOUT THE MURDER-       '"""���     l;istln8   satisfaction,   am!   btg
ERS OF HELPLESS WOMEN?  value  for your  money.    1   make  suits
$25.00.
W. CLIFT
TAILOR
FIFTY-SIXTH AV. & FRASER ST.
::  SOUTH     VANCOUVER::
���:
i,   base :.- bi   :
Let him turn
id   lie
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable  Hall for oubtic meetings,   dances,   etc.,   to   Let
Apply  W   J.  STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
%
ALL THE BEST IN MOTION PICTURES
,;.:,:*",',..- I
iiaiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiB'iii
FAIRMONT
THEATRE
llliUII!lllllllilili!i!lilllll>!llllllinill!lillIi!llii
Eighteenth Avenue and
Main Street
%
NEW FEATURES TWICE WEEKLY
IlllllllllllllllllillS'lliJlIil^
I  lilllllliillllllllillllll
niiiifiiiiiii
,. , ,    , nf shade.     \s the deed locks grow    int,
large profits, and spent a huge part "< -
,   ,,        ,   , ���        v ,ii ... -. l   their  unb.  turn   yel low  anil   nils   gives
every  dollai   that  came  in.     i\attonal
., ,       ,       ,,,,,i;..,,.. nf an   unpleasant,   streaky   effect   when
Mercantile was almost a dupln.ite "I ' ���
ii i ,,���,���,     i'.,m   I the   back   o\   the   hair  is  dark.     More
Canadian     Home     Investment    ���.���nn-
,,    ,     , ii,  it  .,   ,i,,,,.,,  and more ol  the dye must  liv applied
panv.     Biilh  these,  and  ball  a  dozen - >
,   , , ���,....   ,���,.  mi    I"  cot.r   these   laded   end-  .is   well   as
more, pretended to possess  some  nu-
i        i      i ��� .i, ..���,-,���,. u-ii,, the  sprouting gray al  the  roots, ami
gie secret through  which anyone u il" , ' .*   , .
paid in $6 per month could secure a ***��� ��ny process ol this sort ,s expen-
loan  of $1,000  with   which  he  could Stve���il   anything   like   a   satisfactory
,     ,ir ,- .,  I,,,,,,,,     'i'l,,.  result  is to be obtained���the coloring
finance the building ol  a  home.     I lie L'
more  remote  the  individual's  chances."'   tlu   hair   soon   becomes   rather   a
of saving $1,000 to buy a home, the heavy financial burden to cany,    lhe
i      i   ,   .,���,-.:  ���   Mi    it   the  victim ol   this burden also looks  well
more  eagerly  that   pet son  bit  at   tne
,. i     ,-   i���,i  ,,,.i'.irions   on v   about  a   week   out   ol   the   three
scheme.    It was clever, out netarious.|
This journal, as every reader. knows,
has campaigned againsl Stilling lor
years, and has more than once suggested that his charter be cancelled
and that he be deported.
Finally, the deluded public lost confidence in Stillings and his National
Mercantile Company, and with that
the endless chain which is the basis ..I
all   such   financial   contraptions,   first
But  they shall be  free.
La-   the  proud usurpers  low!
Tyrants   all in every foe!
Liberty's in < vi ry blow!
Lei n- do or die!
���Robert Burns.
PHONE: SEV. 9O0
MacDONALD
&
HAY
Barristers. Solici
lorn,
Etc.
1012 Standard  Banl
Bid
8-
\
nnco
urer, B.C.
want ads        | Classified Advertising
SOUTH   HILL  PALACE      Three Blocks South of
OF VARIETIES        Municipal Hal1
m
WAR-PICTURES AND COMPLETE
CHANGE TWICE WEEKLY
i iiiiiiiiiiiiB- - -    :i9,a^^
FLORISTS
BROWN  BROS. & CO., LIMITED.
Seedsmen. Florists, Nurserymen, 4S
^^^^^^^^^^^^    Hastings  St.   ���   ���  ���  Granville
charge rates [    Street, Vancouver, B. C.
CASH   RATES
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_,     One   cent   Pcr   word   per   issue.     No
which   elapse.-   between    renewals   of  ttslng for less than 25 cents.   Following issues
tile   dye.     For   the   first   few   days   the i fifteen cenls per insertion,
hair is so dark that its recent doctor-,
ing is  apparent   t"  everybody.    Then One cent per word per issue
for about a  week  ii  looks really  well	
and its possessor rests in peace: after ~ :
that the streaky ends begin to show      WORKING  -  MEN.  ���  GO   TO  ENGLISH   WATCHMAKER   AND
,   . ". i,   i    i Jeweller  when  vou  tnink  of watch.
up and in no time at all little gray  ARTHUR    FRITH|     C0R.     10TH      clock and jewellery    repairs    think
tendrils sprout at ears and temples. I     Appleby, AM Richards St., h tlf block
AVE.  AND  MAIN  STREET,  FOR      -        -���' ......
WATCHMAKER
('���ray   hair   is.   fortunately,   fashio
all   such   iinanca,   contrapuons,   ,.���            :       ^    ���                   -   ^     r
stretched to ils limit, and then snap- '_       . (    ..  ._  .     ._���    _,|
GUM   BOOTS.
,     from Hastings.    All mainsprings and
SPEC! \1       cleaning jobs guaranteed 12 months.
ped. Unless a flood of dollars is kept
pouring into a scheme like this, it
cannot go ahead pretending to be solvent. National Mercantile went into
[.liquidation. Stillings attempted then
to found and did secure a B. C. charter for a new concern, called Canadian Co-operative Bond Corporation,
His idea was to avert having the
plum snatched from his hands by inducing   contract   holders     to     switch
feat
f beauty  il   it  is  well  cared
PRICE.      STORE  OPEN     EVEN-
or   and   is   "dressed   up   to."   as 1^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Woman puts it.    X'o woman with gray! INGS   UNTIL  S   l'.M.      SEE     I i
MONEY TO LOAN
I MONEY I.1'AXED. DIAMOND?.
FOR LECKtE'S BOOTS FOR Jewelry, etc. A quiet, respectable.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^ reliable    place    to    borrow    money.
BOYS.
;;rkhr,:;;h^^
nude them tempting pffeE andfsome | hopelessly out oi  the running.
hair   can   afford   to   let   herself  appeal
in public at les. than her very best.
If smartly frocked and perfectlj
groomed, her face blooming and smil
ing.   she   will   be   charming   atid   tlis
tiucttve with her gray hair, '.nu tli( .���^^^^^^^^^^^^_^^^^_^^^_^_^^^_^^^^_^^^^
moment she looks untidy, haggard. I Lol 26���E. half oi I lis. Lot 738, JDON'T THRC
worried   or   listless,   the   very     sum-1 Lanark   Ave.,  near     Gordon     School. | Stove awayrl  \V<
Old gold'bought."  Established  1905.
Star Loan  Co.. S12  Hastings  West
FOR SALE
STOVE    REPAIRS
Lot   32-33   D.L.   330-331.     Write   and
make.i.sffei.H-BoH. 2o.  'Chinook" Offiev.
.'      Y'H'R      Ol
repairs  to   fit   any   stovi      I    *ang(
ERA.^l*fe--4t'n>>i��0. *recU EIGHT
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
SATURDAY. OCTOBER 30, 1915
COAL
JUST TRY ONE TON OF
MIDDLESBORO B. C. COAL
And you'll be convinced that you have found the one Western
Coal that burns like the kind you had back East.
This one gives off an intense, even heat, holds the fire a long
time, and burns up until all the ashes you have left is a little fine,
powdery dust. ���
Call Sey.  1003 and order one ton to try it
���You'll like it���
go
The Little Corporal
By  Evelyn  Orchard
��
������|f)
The little Corporal had not slept for
twenty-four hours, neither had he eaten Perhaps that in itself is a small
matter in the fighting line, but it disturbed several to whom the Corporal's
j stale of health and consequent temper
were matters of some account. lie
had been known, when in the throes
of   violent   internal   resistance   against
bully beef, for instance, to make things
! very unpleasant for those in the billet
LUMP $6.50
NUT 5.50
PEA        -        4.50
SCREENINGS,  3.00
Middlesboro Collieries Ltd.
    Although   I   u.-e  the   word  billet,  d
SALES DEPOT
1440 GRANVILLE ST.      Phone Sey. 1003
!    '
m>t conjure up tin*- idea of smiu* comfortable bed ami bo:ir<l, meted nut by
[a kindly, perhaps generous, landlady.
There are no landladies of any kind,
I either generous or stingy, ju-t behind
the first-line trenches.
Iltil   there are billets, some uf them
MAPLE LEAF DAIRY
PURE PASTURIZED MILK
We are Milk and Butter Specialists
particular on-
poral  shelter
when he was
out
I head
nn
of them far away. The
in  which  the  little  Cor-
1   with     eleven     mates.
eas so fortunate a- lo come
tlied  oul   of  the  trench  a-
merely the one whole end
A. Tommason, Mgr. Phone Bay. 1417
1935-2nd AVE. WEST
A phone call will have prompt attention
llllllliiSBIIIIIIllllIlllllllllilill
  CLEAN,  RICH  AND  WHOLESOME ���
Vancouver Creamery Butter
Made under scientific conditions in a clean dairy where only
pure sweet cream and ingredients are used, and where cvery
caution is taken to guard against impurities. You'll enjoy
VANCOUVER CREAMERY BUTTER because in addition
to its quality it has a rich, natural butter flavor. Try a pound
today.
YOUR  GROCER   HAS  IT
ASK  HIM
BEING BABY ����r0U!
Just think of it���of how- the health of thousands of innocent
little ones���grown-ups, too���is daily menaced by dirty., unhealthy
cows, ignorant dairymen, filthy bottles and impure milk.
Sou-Van Milk is Rich and Pure
MOTHERS! There's no danger with SOU-VAX MILK, because it's a pure, safe, wholesome milk, produced under strictly
scientific conditions. It's perfectly pasteurized, clarified, cooled and
bottled under conditions that are approved by the health authorities.
Delivered to your home daily.    Phone us for a trial bottle today.
South Vancouver Milk Co.
29TH AND FRASER PHONE FAIRMONT 2624
You are invited to inspect our sanitary dairy at any time
:-i,:, :���".::'..':'Mri^
DIRECTORY
ADVERTISING
Two hundred and twenty-five thousand telephone calls arc made
each day iu Greater Vancouver. A very large proportion of
these messages'are purchasing orders, or relate to buying and selling. This fact is of vital interest to those who have something to
jjj sell. It indicates that the telephone system is the great channel
through which flows a large part of lhe daily trade.
As the telephone directory is referred to at least 200,1X10 times'
j��     a day, doesn't it look as if it would be a good advertising medium?
The telephone and the directory never part company.    Side by
|����     side  with  the  means  of advertising is  the  means  of  making  the
sale.   Every copy goes into the haiids of a possible purchaser.
|p
The next issue of the directory goes to press on the 15th of
���     November.    What about space to advertise your goods?
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
of a cowshed, whose walls were riddled by bullets where they had escaped
the withering hail of the shrapnel or
bursting shell. Il was actually a sort
of lean-to that had been attached to
the gable of the farmhouse, lint th ���
farmhouse was now a heap of imdis-
tingiiishable ruins, behind which the
remnant of the cowshed nestled in perfect safety. It had stood thus a long
time, and had been warm all through
thc bitter cold and the drenching torrents of the rainiest spring ever known
in the world's history. It was proving
cool in summer, too, as the little Corporal found, as he lay flat on his back
on the bunk he had rigged up out of
nondescript materials. He was quite
alone in the place, save for a tailless,
one-eyed black cat, which had been in
the wars too, and bore traces of its
numerous hair-breadth escapes. The
cat's name was Joffre. shortened to
Joff, so as not to give offence. It was
the Corporal's mascot, and he loved it
and fed it with choicest morsels from
his rations, and had sworn an oath to
take it home with him to the little
house facing the estuary of the Humber on which his present thoughts
were fixed. For several days he had
not been able to get away from the
vision of thaf little house and ils inmates. It may be said here that in
the old days���that is, the days before
the war (sometimes we ask ourselves
now whether there were ever any such
days)���the little Corporal had not
been all he might have been as husband and father. A fitter to his trade,
he had spent lavishly on his own appetites, and had withheld his hand
where he ought to have been generous. He had quickly forgotten lhe
vows of his youth, and the woman he-
had sworn to love, honor and cherish
had gone in daily dread of his temper,
his habits, his stinging words more bitter than blows.
He had seen his children shrink a-
way from him, and because of the devil's lure within him had not realised
the depth of that tragedy, nor the magnitude of his own loss. But, like many
another, his spirit had been burned
clear and fine in the fighting line. He
saw himself as he was with a startling
clearness which discomfited him. He
had been asleep there, he fancied, and
iu his sleep he had had a vision, lie
saw Pollie, his wife, with terror on her
face ������ a new terror which he was
powerless to remove. She was in
some danger out of which he could
not help her,
"Coom 'ere, Joff," he said, addressing the cat in rather a thick, tremulous
whisper. "Theere's sunimat wrang,
lad, far wrang; coom 'ere you brute,
or art tha waitin' to be fetched, like
them slackers at home?"
Joff looked round languidly with
that air of supreme indifference which
can aggravate both in th ehunian and
feline race, and then began to wash
his face. The little Corporal kicked
off his boot in Joff's direction, but it
failed to reach; then he rose, and slid
from his bunk to the floor, and stood
up and shook himself.
"1 knaw," he muttered at last. "Aam
to get a dose of Jack Johnson ti)-
neet. A'll write to Pollie an' mekk ma
will."
He had succeeded in covering half
a soiled sheet of not-paper with tl.e
usual platitudes, whet, the door was
shoved open, and a young soldier entered with a bundle of letters in his
hand.
"Anny fur me, lad?" asked the Corporal, with a most unusual eagerness.
William Beazlcy, otherwise Billy,
shook his head.
"Nowt, Jake; but theer's news fra
Hull. Theer's been another Zep. raid
owre the toon. Ma sister Lizzie ses
theer's hoondreds killed."
"Hull I Art sure, Bill, that it istia
Goole?"
"No, Hull reet enuff. Corpril, am!
I.iz/ie ses it were mostl) in the Wave!
district."
"When was it?" asked the Corporal.
thickly  remembering  thai  in  one  "i
Pollie's carelessly read letters she bad
spoken of going for a few days to
visit her mother in Hull.
The Corporal asked whether he
might see the letter, and his tone and
manner were so conciliatory lhat Billy
Beazlcy handed it over without the
smallest demur. It afforded no further information, however, and the
Corporal returned it without comment. Then he proceeded with his letter, saying all sorts of strange things
in it, such as had not occurred to his
imagination since the days when he
had courted Pollie. then a smart housemaid in the establishment of ;i Humber magnate.
Ile did not read il over, possibly a-
ware that if he did mi he might not
send it. Later in the evening, shortly,
indeed, before he had to fall into line
for the march up lo the trenches, he
Weill to the field Post Office and
lropped it carefully in. Somehow he
felt happier after that, and his appetite
returned, so that he was able to in the
supper rations, and he seemed very
cheery when the order to move was
given out.
It turned out to be what is termed
a quiet night in the trenches, and the
little Corporal, conscious of a strange
and extreme weariness, actually dozed
at his post. This is by no means so
uncommon or impossible, as it seems,
though new comers find it difficult to
understand. A few moments before
the dawn, however, things began to
liven up, and the shells began to
burst overhead. As the little Corporal watched the whizzling lights a
cross the sky, and heard the everlasting din, a strange detached feeling
came over him; he felt like a specta
tor, who does not expect to take any
part in the show. His thoughts were
very far away across the blue English
Channel to the shores of the Plumber, where the little bow-fronted bouse
faced the rolling tides. He saw Pol-
lie's face, a little worn and sometimes
sad. It had lost its early bloom, but
her sweet lips had never lost their love
of soft speech nor her desire for peace.
Never ,once had she paid him back in
his own coin when his tongue was ugly
and unruly.
It had never done him good; in fact,
her patience and sweetness had often
aggravated him beyond the verge of
endurance. He remembered it gratefully now; and how distinctly he saw
her! He moved uneasily against the
parapet of the trench and looked
round into the darkness, almost expecting to sec her, so near and real
was her presence.
But instead he saw quite clearly in
the gloom behind the face of a little
child. It was no dream-face this time,
but the round, cherubic features of the
one who had been a little baby when
he enlisted, without so much as saying
to its mother, "By your leave." Queer
that he should remember that now
and be sorry about it. It was exactly
as if his whole life marched in review
in front of him, making him long with
a passionate longing for the chance to
be a better man. Nearer and nearer
crept the dear child-face, with something like a halo about its sweetness.
It was quite light there in the.dark
place, and little hands were outstretched as if beckoning the little Corporal
to come lo some cherished and desirable  place.
"It's dotty I'm gettin', an' no mis-
tak'," muttered the Corporal, as he
wiped his brow, yet knew himself conscious of no fear. All at once thc
trench, tllat rim of danger and of
death, became a quiet, safe and holy
place, meet and fit for a little child.
But when the bursting shell came
over, and the little Corporal was buried feet deep in the appalling debris,
the vision faded.
Its work done, it had only returned
to its own place. On the other side
the little Corporal was welcomed by
the baby, whose short race was already
run.
At the Base lay Pollie's letter telling
him of the destruction of the house in
Hull and the death of the baby.
Later on when Billy Beazlcy was
invalided home, he carried the disconsolate Joffre with him. The black cat,
with the letter he had witnessed in the
billet behind the firing line, remain
Pollie Sanderson's treasures to this
day.
NOTICE   TO   THE   PUBLIC
Pure Milk Dairy Company
THE   HIGH   COST   OF   MILK   REDUCED
12   QUARTS   OF   PURE   MILK        -       $1.00
PURE   MILK   DAIRY   COMPANY
Pioneer Dairy of Vancouver
Office: 522 Broadway East. Samuel Garvin, Prop.
Phone Fairmont 272
'",!���!
PANTAGES
"The House of Happiness"
A. M. Gillis, Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
Prosperity Eight
Singers and Instrumentalists
AND   FOUR   OTHER   BIG   ACTS
Three   shows   daily   2.45.   7.20,   9.13
Admission���Matinees.     15c;     nights,
15c and 25c; boxes, 50c,
COLUMBIA
Week   OODI.    MONDAY,    \(IV.    Int
STERLING
ROSE & STERLING
"The   Mimical   Acrobat**'
Komcdy - r \M\ \n;n - Kartoona
ROYAL   OPERATIC   Ol ARTBTT
(Speolnl   NelcetloM     from     <.r.*ni<l
OtMTJI I
THE   MUSICAL   BBIVSOX8
S.   II.   Ilnhinsuii.   ������( ..ii ju - inu    Mini"
Ami (he R(*m( fn Motion I'lcturei
Rvenlnfrtij   )."����-.
*i.-tiiii��-.-s,   ith-.
CKNTKR   .*   HMSNA
Theatrical Notes
Columbia Theatre
Sterling, Rose and Sterling, an acrobatic trio of unusual merit, that carry special scenery and electrical effects. They embody various changes
in their act which has won for them
special mention iu all vaudeville
houses in which they have appeared
as the headliners. Their dancing is
a feature of the act and it is safe to
say that theirs is the only novelty turn
of this character that has apeared on
the western circuit.
Falkner, the "Komedy Kartoon"
man as he styles himself ,is undoubtedly in a class by himself as a de-
picto.r with the crayon and his com-
cdy suggestions which lie transposes
from his fertile brain to the paper, via
the crayon, have earned salvos of applause from his audiences. His ready
wit iu illustrating by bis chatter also
causes much merriment.
The Royal Operatic Quartette of
Mexican opera singers offer various
selections from celebrated grand 0-
pera. These people are endowed
with exceptionally sweet voices and
the violin and piano solos also testify to their versatility as musicians.
The Musical Bensons offer a ".Musical Act" which fairly bristles with
various instruments such as an aluminum  harp,  triple  silver chimes,  dou
ble organ bells, both nf the latter Instruments being played by lhe hands
and feet. They also feature some ar-
tistic hand-painted drops which serve
ti. set off their instruments t i good
effect.
A  conjuring man in  the person of
S. II. Rubin-.Mii. will endeavor to delude his audiences by his many tricks
which lie performs with an adeptness
and skill which to say the least i> extremely  puzzling.
An   extremely   fine   bill   of   motion
pictures  is  also  promised.
Pantages Theatre
Vancouver's most popular playhouse
is living up to its reputation with a
high-class bill for the coming week
The headliners are called the Prosperity Eight, which include eight talented
singers and instrumentalists. Tlie act
is very pleasing to the car a- they have
harmony and music down to a fine
art.
Santas and Hays. live up to their
title. The girls with the Funny Figures, one 90 lb. and tlie other .100.
Stcill and Hume have a line of new
patter that they style Harmonitts N'oii-
senee.
Ollie and Johnnie Vanis, are tight
wire wizards that have been the wonder of a great many audiences. A
one-act musical comedy entitled College Days, by the Society Girls, and
the  Pantagescope  close  the  nill.
Champion & White J
Best South Wellington Coal
DELIVERED SOUTH OF BODWELL ROAD
Lump $6.��0       Nut $5.��0 |
PHONE 9570 1083 MAIN STREET
:i,: I:::: .:���:':���:.,::���:.    :   :..-!-.: i.:'-.,i,   I.!i,. ���:, ��� -I -,.;;> ,^   : ���        '    ��� .���:! :��� i ��� .., .'.^
|llllIIII��IIill����II!liiiilllIIBlCl! liHIHBilllllUlUlfl
EDGETT'S 118 Hastings St.W.
THE STORE OF PLENTY
RETAILING GROCERIES AT WHOLESALE
ADDITIONAL BARGAINS FOR
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
SUGAR���We will sell 18-lb. sack Pure B. C. Granulated Sugar for
$1.15 if purchased with 3 lbs. of our Victor Blend Tea or Coffee,
regular 45c lb. at 3 lbs.  for $1.00
CRISCO���Again for Friday shoppers we will sell tin Criico for 20c
APPLES���B. C. Jonothans, Kings. Ribstons. Baldwins $1.75 to 70c
POTATOES���100-lb. sacks local potatoes 55c;  100-lb. sacks highland  for    65c
Another car of fancy Ashcrofts unloading today, per sack only. 85c
ROLLED OATS���One large Cube of Robin Hood Porridge Oats;
reg. 30c, for   20c
SOCKEYE     SALMON ���Reg.
25c tin   ..- 15c
FLOUR���No.   1   hard     wheat;
49-lb. sack, reg. $2.00, for $1.50
VINEGAR  ���   15c    bottle;    3
for    25c
TEA���Our Edgetta Blend;    40c
value; per lb 25c
BUTTER ��� Fancy Edgcwood
Creamery; 3 lbs. for  $1.00
MOLASSES���Reg.   15c   tins;  3
for    25c
CHERRIES���Gallon    tins    for
pics; reg. 50c, for   25c
JAM ��� 5-lb.   tins   B.   C.   fruit,
for    50c
COFFEE���Our     special;     reg.
40c lb��� for  25c
EGGS���Local ranch; 40c dozen;
3 dozen for   $1.00
Seymour 5868���5869
Goods Delivered Everywhere Mail Orders Rushed
" iwuiii

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.gvchinook.1-0315614/manifest

Comment

Related Items