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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Jun 12, 1915

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Array W ^NCQUVEfc
CHINOOK
Vol. IV, No. 5���Established 1911
SOUTH VANCOUVER. B.C., CANADA, SATURDAY. JUNE 12. 1915
Price Five Cents
PUBLISHED
Every Saturday by the Greater Vancouver Publiahera Limited
George M. Murray, Editor
HEAD OFFICE:
Corner   Thirtieth   Avenue   and   Main   Street.   South   Vancouver
Editor's Office Burns Drug Co., Vancouver Block. Phone Sey. 5490
TELBPHONE:  All department! Fairmont  1874
NIGHT   CALLS Fairmont   1946 L
Registered   at  the  Post   Office   Department.
Mail Matter
Ottawa,   as   Second   Class
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
points  in   Canada,   United   Kingdom,
Newfoundland,   New
To  all ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
���Zealand, and other British Possessions:
$1.50 a Year
Postage to American, Europear  and! other Foreign Countries, fl.H0
t*r year extra.
With public opinion running so high, it would
not be surprising to hear of bloodshed at the Muhi-
cipal I Jail any time. When men are hungry, men
b. c. ] do not hesitate to join mobs. We have the reeve
himself bragging that he would take the law into his
own hands, dismiss the police and call upon the
"Ratepayers."   That means riot.
It is up to the Attorney-General's department to
take an immediate hand in the South Vancouver
situation. There is plainly a situation developing
here which, if allowed to run, will mean anarchy
and bloodshed.
"The truth at all times firmly stands
And shall from age to age endure."
"/ AM DE IRON-CLAD BOYT
-ttT'HIS-S-S-S Municipality!    Ha Ha!
have buildings in   de   city.     But
;rpi
Dey
South
F
Vancouver-r-r-r-r!    It is a place of open
fields and pea-nut stands!"
This from the fellow who at present fills the
reeve's chair in South Vancouver.
South Vancouver's reeve embodies in his makeup all the elements which make working men rise
up and rebel. Such men as he have brought the
capitalist class as a whole under suspicion.
At the council meeting the other day he objected
to adequate fire protection for the municipality
which is the third largest in British Columbia���for
South Vancouver has a population of nigh 35,000.
Of course the Iron-Clad is himself a property
owner in the district. He owns many acres. The
���only improvement he has upon his extensive property is a little building, which may never house pigs
so long as the present owner holds thc land, but
���which would make a very poor pig pen. It would
be better suited for housing dogs or chickens. It is
a small, squint-eyed building with a brick chimney
���which has fallen down and with windows crashed
in by the stones of small boys in the neighborhood!
���who probably have a dislike for the Iron-clad.
Adjoining it is a gigantic sign board telling of the
glories of the particular district in which the property
lies, and setting forth figures on corner lots in the
subdivision,
One of the really funny passages in the air raid
Wednesday afternoon, was the clash between the
Iron-Clad and Mr. Russell of Cedar Cottage. The
Iron-Clad expressed the opinion that Councillor
Russell, though supposed to have been a mechanic
at one time, didn't "know enough to drive a rivet."
"That's alright," glibly retorted the councillor;
*'I can grow hair on the top of my head and that's
more than you can do."
Of course the Iron-Clad got red hot at this,
stroked his sleek and slippery dome for a moment,
and had to take the giggles of the audience.
* �� *
"I am the original Iron-Clad boy," shouted the
reeve at the meeting, as his hands and arms worked
like those of a swimmer in distress.
Surely it was so. The Iron-Clad likely took the
waters with one idea in view and that was to point
its pea-guns at every craft which hove in sight, friend
or foe, merchant man or dreadnought, submarine or
trawler.    -
The little Iron-Clad was tolerated for a time by
the fleets of the nations, but it is likely that some
one will throw a rock at it one of these fine mornings and sink it with all on-board.
Whether Gold plans to lead a mob or not is a
question. At Wednesday's meeting he threatened
to dismiss all the policemen and to call upon the
ratepayers to enforce the law.
* * *
It is surely the duty of the Attorney-Gene-al's department to intervene in South Vancouver. If something is not done by that official there is every likelihood of a situation developing which will seriously
affect the whole of British Columbia. As the
News-Advertiser" states, the municipality is bordering on a condition of anarchy.
A MERE MATTER OF GASES
ROM information touching upon the coal mining industry in this Province which has recently been put forward, one would believe that
it would be less dangerous to face the Germans at
Ypres than to work in certain of the collieries on
Vancouver Island.
Death took an awful toll at one of thc mines a few
weeks ago when gas caught a number of the miners.
It was the same death and the same gas which played havoc on the very day of the accident with one
of the B. C. regiments at the front.
It mailers not whether the gas is played into a
man's lungs from the nozzle of a German hose or
whether it is allowed to smother a man by a criminally negligent mining corporation. The result is
the same in each case. Possibly the intent is not the
same, but it is the same rigidity which sets the face
of the dead after thc poison has got in its work.
M
MAKE THE HILLS GIVE UP THEIR
WEALTH
R. J.  W.  WEART promises the people
that if he is elected he  will   press   for  a
change in the mining laws which will en-1
able the Government to encourage the prospector.
There are more idle prospectors in Vancouver
than in any other city in the west. There is more
mineial in British Columbia than in any other province in Canada.
Today the British Columbia prospector must pay
a fee of five dollars for the very privilege ol breathing the air of the hills.    Should he discover a good
I
M
COLLECTING TAXES FROM SOLDIERS
ANY of the soldiers who have gone to the
front are owners of lands in and around
Vancouver.    Some of these chaps are owners of lands upon which arrears of taxes are owing.
Mr. R. C. Hodgson and Mr. G. A. Stevens, representing a Conservative association, waited upon
the municipal council last week to urge that body! either party,
to withhold from the tax sale the lands of men now
on active service.
The idea is a splendid one and Messrs. Hodgson and Stevens were received cordially by the council. It seems that there is no provision in the Municipal Act exempting soldiers'' lands from tax sales,
but it will be possible to get around the act in some
such manner that consideration may be shown those
men who are today offering their lives for the protection of the homes of their brothers and neighbors,
whether those homes are encumbered with past taxes
or not.
A* TO PATRONAGE
T may be recalled that just before the close of
the recent session both Premier Borden and Major General Sam Hughes declared  that there
I had been no "patronage" in the awarding of contracts for war supplies for the Militia Department.
But there is proof.
It was on April 9th, before the Public Accounts
Committee that the proof came from the one man
best able to tell the truth.    Mr. H. W. Brown, Director of Government Contracts, testified, in answer
to direct questions:
"From 1906 to 1911 there was not very much
in the way of a patronage list; I was given a pretty
free hand and I bought without much reference to
sample of ore, he must take it to an assayer and pay any patronage ljst._There is now a patronage list;
anything from ten to fifty dollars for a report uponjwe buy from that list; it is a very large list now���it
it. has been entirely renewed since 1911 ���I suppose
Should the new property prove   workable,   the I we have 8,000 names on that list."
prospector must seek financial assistance in a mar-1    The people of Canada will be disposed to accept
ket which laughs at British Columbia mining pro-jtllis swora statement in spite of anything to the con-
. . ,      ,    , [ trary that members of the Borden Government may
positions���laughs because for a generation or more   ��� . ., '
.        ������ i i ii   i   i t t     ��� i    r i     c"oose to airily assert.
the wild catters have gulled the world with  rake j
mining claims in B. C. * ""*'
Mr. Weart would give the prospector a
cense.
He would furnish the prospectors with
assay office. ^B	
He would have the Government build a Government smelter for the treatment of ores.
He would organize a department of Government
whose duty it would be to investigate every mining
proposition being placed upon the market and to
make a report which would be embodied in the
prospectus of the company.
There seems to be more common sense to the
paragraph in Mr. Weart's mining platform than in
anything so far advanced by other   candidates   of
free
a   free
g��f?
T
JA STRONG GOVERNMENT
HE result of the provincial by-election    in
Shellbrook, Sask., is striking testimony to the
great popularity of the government of Hon.
Walter Scott.       In a three-cornered contest    the
straight Liberal candidate, E. S. Clinch, was elec-
! ted with a majority of nearly 1000 over a straight
Conservative candidate and an Independent-Liberal
put in the field chiefly by the liquor interests to test
the feelings of the people on the new liquor legislation in Saskatchewan.   The result is all the more remarkable when it is remembered that Shellbrook has
been consistently a Conservative seat, the by-elec-
lion having been rendered necessary by the resignation of S. J. Donaldson, who took the Prince Albert seat in the Federal house.
CAUSE FOR ANOTHER LIBEL ACTION
N    Eastern    exchange    in   enumerating   the
Western daily papers put out of business by
the hard times, includes   the   name   of   the
Vancouver "World" in the list.
A
This will come as a surprise to the reading public sa'd:
IF CANADA HAD CRUISERS
HE sinking of the Lusitania with the loss of
hundreds of lives of noncombatants, an act of
piracy and dreadfulness without example in
the history of the world, lends further point to the
recent observation of a Canadian newspaper which
T
I
NO TRUCK OR TRADE WITH THE
YANKS
N a recent editorial the Ottawa "Citizen" takes a
shot at Vancouver for memorializing the Government asking for assistance in developing the
cheap freight haul via Panama from the Eastern
sea-board to Burrard Inlet.
The "Citizen" points out that Vancouver would
have nothing whatsoever to do with the Yankees in
191 i, but now they are very anxious to use a Yankee institution, the Panama Canal.
Vancouver was "in liquor" in 1911, and did not
realize what she was about when she voted against
an American trade policy. She was drunken with a
false prosperity. Stevens was elected in self defence.
Senkler's friends didn't even vote for the Liberal
candidate. The Conservative machine said, 'Let
'Arry take the bleachers, what the 'ell do we care
for Ottawa." There was a rapid advance in values
in Coquitlam.
The Vancouver Board of Trade has swallowed
itself several times since 1911. The business men
of Vancouver know that they made a terrible mis-
of British Columbia, who are under the impression
that the paper is still being published.
Is Mr. Nelson of the "World" to receive only
an obituary notice for the paper in return for the
many thousands of dollars he has expended in putting the Vancouver "World" in the forefront again
among Canadian newspapers?
The lying article from the East is as follows:
"The difficulties of newspaper financing under
war conditions have forced the two daily papers in
Port Arthur to join forces and become one. According to the Port Arthur 'Chronicle," the following
Western dailies have gone out of business, with two
exceptions, since the war began: Fort William
"Herald," Winnipeg "Morning Telegram," Prince
Albert "Times," Medicine Hat "News," Brandon
'News," Regina 'Evening Leader," Regina "Morn-1
ing Province," Edmonton "Capital," Lethbndge
"News." and Vancouver "World." The Winnipeg
"Telegram" and thc Regina 'Leader" remain in I
the evening field and the Regina "Leader" in the
morning. The Regina "Standard" and Regina
Province amalgamated as an evening paper. Thc
others simply closed their doors.    In addition the!
"What Canadian would not feel an inch or so
taller today if we had half a dozen smart cruisers
helping those of the Old Land to make scrap iron of
the submarines which have been sinking merchant
ships and drowning passengers and crews in the Irish
Sea and the English Channel?."
R
take,    The workingmen of Vancouver and the un-|by the war, but the business of a newspaper publish
employed know that they made a mistake. In the
meantime the cost of food goes up. The wives and
families of soldiers at the front may be relieved of
the responsibility of paying their municipal taxes,
but at every meal they pay a tax of thirty per cent,
upon every article of food they eat, with very few
exceptions, because that food is not produced in
British Columbia, but is imported from the country
of the Terrible Yanks.
SINS OF COMMISSION
EFEFvRING to the boasting comment of
Major General Sam Hughes that the Militia
Department had paid a commission of 10 per
cent, to the P. W. Ellis Co. of Toronto for the purchase of binocular glasses for Canadian officers, and
the characteristic exclamation "I wish it had been
twenty per cent.," the Toronto "Telegram" said on
March 29th:
"An individual or a firm is said to be underpaid
with a commission of ten per cent, in return for the
services of a principal or an employee who assists
the Militia Department, and gives up his time and
talent for a few days in order to help save the country's money.
"Wives and fathers and mothers do not claim a
Saskatoon "Phoenix ' went into liquidation and was commission in return for the services of husbands
taken over by another company. The Western pa-land sons who assist the Militia Department, and
pers have suffered in a special way because of a'give up their lives in order to save the country's life."
business depression which was merely  aggravated j  . ��� .	
ing has suffered everywhere from the effects of reduced revenues and increased expenditures."
! AGAIN DEFERRED
HE question as to whether Canada is to be
M
LET ALIEN ENEMIES RUN AMOK?
R. H. H. STEVENS, M.P., has taken
sides with Mr. Eddie Gold in opposition
to interning naturalized Germans who are
abroad in the land. Mr. Stevens and Mr. Gold
agree that it would be most unkind and unfair and
ungentlemanly to take the Germans and put them
away in a camp.
It might be pointed out that since July 22, 1913,
a German law has existed which says that any German who obtains naturalization papers in any other
country may retain his citizenship in Germany.
A BAD YEAR FOR TORIES
IE Roblin Conservative Government in Man
T
T
embroiled in a general election in the near
future is still unsettled, although recent signs
indicate that the forces within the Government ranks
.���^���^^^^^^^^���^^^^^^^ , which have been agitating for an election have once
itoba has resigned in disgrace.    It quits office more been stopped by the weight of public opinion,
leaving behind^ a record of fifteen years of | In the latter part of April an election seemed a certainty and Conservative papers close to the Government went so far as to even name the probable date.
mal-administration culminating in an inglorious rush
for cover under a cloud of proof of criminal extravagance, if not worse. The whole Conservative
party of Canada must share the odium. It is but a
few months since the Premier and Leader of the
Conservative Government of New Brunswick was
compelled to resign his office following the finding
of a Royal Commission that he had been guilty of
grave irregularities in office. In British Columbia
the Government of Sir Richard McBride stands
convicted in the public mind of an utter and callous
indifference to the rights of the people and every
sign points to an early day of reckoning. The year
1915 has been anything but auspicious for Conservative Governments in Canada.
BY THE WAY
TOMORROW MORNING, the Seattle Times
and the Vancouver News-Advertiser will carry war
news printed tonight in these columns.
We carry exclusively the late Saturday night service of the United Press Associations, probably the
greatest news gathering organization in the world.
If you want the very latest war flashes, buy the
Saturday night edition of the CHINOOK.
-t-WWW.U"-- ���
TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, JUNE 12. 1915
Municipal Council Meetings
Disgraceful Scenes Enacted
Suspension of Clerk Springford Brings Matters to a Head And
Deadlock Ensues
hi- beard, which request was
The regular meeting of the municipal council ��;i> held on Monday evening lasi at 7.30 p.m., and scenes
took place which "ill long be remembered by those who were fortunate
to get into the hall. Hundre'ds of
people were turned away after the
municipal hall had been filled to its
capacity by an eager and expectant
crowd. At 7.M) the reeve and councillors were all in (heir places and the
reeve called the meeting to order. Th
asked t
granted. In clear, concise words he
stated bis position. lie had, he
claimed, been turned out like a vil-
lian, and die reeve had afterwards
stated that he perhaps would nm have
wished .ui audit before going, whereas the truth was thai for three hours
after being suspended, he had remained al the hall, and demanded an audit
before he would give up his keys.
There  was  prolonged  cheering    ai
minutes of the previous meeting were  this  point,  and_ it  was   clear  that  a
produced   by   tile  clerk   and  adopted.
Tile reeve next called (or communications lo he read and a communication was presented from the Northern
Electric Company re payments due
on their contract.    A motion was
large part of the audience were sat
isfied that Ihe clerk had right on his
side, and I hey showed their approval
in  no uncertain  manner.
Auditor McNeill was called into thc
im  and  on  being asked  by  Conn-  tions.     I'll
Reeve Gold suggested that all horses should be unshod and turned out
to the grass, thus saving the municipality from some expense in their
keep. The matter was finally left lo
the engineer and chairman of the
Hoard of Works to attend to. ihe -hoeing of the horses and the work being
done.
A  resolution    to    reinstate    Clerk
Springford was made and Councillor
Allen objected, saying: "I would never vote for this reinstatement; I
would do so il* I could feel there was
not further trouble ahead, but I can
see ihe same trouble as we've been
having all along. This is a malicious
proposition of ihe reeve, against this
man Springford. Two investigations
have Been held and he has cleared himself fully. You, Reeve Gold, have
brought into his office that man Sey-1
moiir, who has no bond, and we have
no security. I'm lure in the interest
of the municipality and I'll not stand
for this. I'm as clean as a whistle
and as a council wc have sat here and
been humiliated and brought lo the
ground   through   your   malicious   ac-
stan
1   for   no   more
suspend and I'll let out when  I  want
lo."
Councillor Welsh: "I'm like Councillor Allen, and I'll have no more of
ibis reinstating. The whole trouble
all along has been between this man
Seymour you brought here and Clerk
Springford, and I'll gladly let them
both go."
Councillor Stanley: "These are
fads; this municipality is ruined anil
has been ruined by no other than thc
present reeve."
Reeve Gold: "As long as I am reeve
I won'l be turned from my path one
hair, and come what may I'll carry
out my platform."
Councillor Slrecl: "I'll only-vole for
ihis reinstatement if a proviso he put
in that he remain clerk till Ihe end of
the year."
Reeve Gold; "He'll never come into that office while I an/ there, and if
he does and Ihe police don'! obey me,
then I'll call on Ihe ratepayers, and
they'll  lurn   out  everyone."
A resolution was put before the
council and carried, that A. II. Seymour, holding no official office in Ihe
.-"'���"! municipality, be excluded from Ihe
1   'private offices of the municipality, and
rie.l   that   ihe   compnay   be     notified   cillor   Campbell,   staled   that   he   had  neither from you nor [rom  any  man.   |(|u,  po,.c(,  jnstnIcted   ,���  set,  ,|1;lt  thjs
that no further payments would be
made until a satisfactory understanding has been arrived al in regard to
the invi stigation into thc Gamewell
Fire Alarm System.
The following communication from
II. II. Stevens, M.P., was Ihe cause
of considerable comment alter being
read:
"Dear Sirs.��� I have your communication of 26th. enclosing resolutions
of your council, reading as follows:
'Russell and Rowlings���Thai ihe
Dominion authorities he urged to intern all persons of German. Austrian
or Turkish birth and citizenship, whether naturalized or not till after the
war.'
"I regret to say I must entirely disagree with your council in its resolution in so far as it calls for the internment, in other words, of persons
born in alien enemy countries and
who are now naturalized British subjects. Such action in my estimation
would be entirely contrary to the traditions of the British race, as well as
being illegal. If your council or any
citizen is aware of any overt act on
the part of any naturalized citizen or
know of them having extended' assistance or traded with the enemy in any
way, they can be dealt with under the
law.
"This of course applies to British
born as well as naturalized citizens.
We can only intern enemies and this
is being attended to by the authorities with the utmost vigilance.
"I would again suggest that if you
know of any such alien enemies and
will supply the information to the
authorities, they will be dealt with
promptly. 1 would refer you to the
militia authorities or to Malcolm Reid.
immigration inspector of Dominion.
"(Signed)
"H. 11. STEVENS.
Councillor Russell took exception
to Ihe communication and claimed
thai this council had no need of dictation of its actions from Mr. Stevens, and he expressed himself as
strongly in favor of interning all aliens of German, Austrian or Turkish
birth.
Reeve Gold suggested that the
llianks of the council should be tendered to Mr. Stevens, and claimed
that this letter just expressed his own
feelings and twitled the council for
Iheir action in this matter.
Councillor Campbell claimed that
H. H. Stevens had no right to dictate to them and he strongly rescnt-
troubleed the remarks of Reeve Gold.
The communication was ordered to
be filed.
A communication from the council
of the district of NortrTVancouver re
the Internment of aliens was received.
made an audit and he could not find     Councillor Campbell: "I  also am i"j|H. don.
By "Observer"
cied   himself    the   wisest    of    the
wise."���Charles Kingsley.
fault with the work of the clerk as sympathy with every word Councillor
everything was kept as >any well re-. Allen has said. I'll stand for no more
gulated business ought  to be kepi.     of  your   malicious  conduct   and     I'll
Clerk Springford asked that a let- fight you to a finish, You have
ter from Spitzer, Rorick & Co. bejbroughl discredit upon this munici-
read, and this was done, the letter pality by your incapacity. Your Restating il had been .a greal pleasure Prions all through are nol only mali-
lo them to do business with a man so cious, but are simply the actions of
capable and businesslike, and who tin- an incapable person."
derstood his work so thoroughly as j Reevc c���M: "In me von have one
Mr.   Springford   had   done. ���.,���,   js   .,���   jr,in   cIa(]   jc\\,IK,   arKj   l'||
The  reading  of this  letter  was  the j
signal   for  a  greal   outburst   of   cheer-1 	
ing from a large part of ihe audience.
Reeve Gold here stated that he believed some of the councillors do nol
know much about these bonds and
certificates.
Councillor Russell: "We know more
about litem than you do, and if you
knew more and were more businesslike in your actions, this municipality
would not be all balled up as it is
today."
Councillor Campbell here said thai
the reeve had lied when he slated thai
Mr. Seymour, his private secretary,
bad not bad the combination of the
safe, and he asked Clerk Welton if
be had seen Seymour with the combination in his hand, and Ihe clerk
stated definitely  he had seen  that.
The reeve then went off on another
trail and said that if Ihe municipality
had had him for a chief clerk four
yeaYs ago. things would have been in
better shape.
Councillor Stanley here challenged
Reeve Gold to resign, offering to give
$1000 if Gold would run againsl him
and beat him.
Councillor Russell: "You can both
resign, but I'll stay here and I'll fight
you to a finish. You, Reeve Gold,
cannot work without Ihe aid of a private secretary and you're running the
municipality  l��� damnation."       '
A  deputation was present and was in���s am| ;il.,     |.���
heard   from   the     ratepayers'   associa-'
"lion of Ward 3. and ihe meeting was
adjourned till Wednesday. June 9.
Reevc Gold: "I'll instruct the police, and my orders will be carried out,
and if they don't. I'll call on the people and  I'll have a hunch of them."
Councillor Russell: "Yes, and we'll
have a hunch  loo."
Miss Dcncli and Chief Lester were
reinstated, the reeve slating lhal he
would again suspend them.
The meeting was then adjourned
till Friday, June 11th.
FACTS AND FANCIES
'What better thing can happen to a. The tongue lhal rallies like a stone
fool than that God should teach | in a can seldom says anlbing worth
him that he is one, when he fan-  listening;  to  and   il   becomes  a  weari
some  nuisance.
j Hit- people of South Vancouver must
(take the serious situation caused by
'the conduct of thc municipality's
chief magistrate into iheir own hands,
I if they do not wish to have their
homes and property sold for the benefit of debenture holders.
However, that is by the way. Talk-
ige of  miracles  is  said  to be lative  councillors,  though a  big nuis-
past,  and   failing   Divine  intervention, I ance,  can be borne  with���their  talkativeness   being   but   the   outward   and
audible   expression   of   their   political
inexperience. Bui,   the  conduct  of
Reeve   Gold  is  a   serious  mailer  and
one which should receive serious consideration,    The  reevc  has  humiliated
the  municipality  in   the  eyes  of Canada,  and  has  made   South  Vancouver
.,   the  laughing  slock   of   ihe   American
Reasonable argument is of no ��vn><- contitieht by bis unreasonable and cc-
Councillors only    waste breath  when  centHc conduct.    He has done more,
ihey argue and reason with the would-lHt,   ,,as   draggea   Srmth   Vancouver's
be autocrat   whom  a minority  of  the  cm|it  ;���,,,  tlu.   mirC]   instcac|  ,lf  car_
electors   placed   in   power.      Ihe   time      j,]g   ,������   |)js   (.k,ctiim   v]c(\Ke   ,���   iift
lor talk is past.    United actum on the  her inln thc  first  rank of    Canadian
pari ot councillors is necessary   I; >rst,  municipalities,  and   he   has  endanger-
however, a policy must be decided up-1,,,   (,,c   ,]om(,s  am,   |)r���m.rlv   ,,f  cvery
on,      That   agreed  upon,  councillors  ratepayer in the municipality
hoiilil  cease   talking at  council  meet-
t, no nioiion   should
be   moved   or   discussed   unless     the
mover  and   seconder  are    absolutely
sure   that   it   will   he  carried.     Switching al  the last  moment should be cm
out. '
Councillors now know their reeve.
They know that thc ordinary rules
governing   ihe   conduct   of   reasoiiahl
"I do not care, what arc the C0I1SC
quences or what Happens to this nuuii-
cipalily or anybody else. I am going
to do what  I  think right and proper
The council met again on Wednesday morning, but as in former meetings, many hours were wasted ill useless argument.
The reports of the different committees   were   read   and   adopted. -.,-,. :,-,      	
In  the report  of the-lire and l!Kht people everywhere do not apply with *, is tinu, thc |)CO])lc w|lose property
_..������'... .'.....   .���..',. ;'.     "f"'  him.     Ihey know  that reasonable ar- Lm,  jntcr6sts  |jc  j���  South  Vancouver
''���"" ''' ' ' ^ccjvc aroused themselves to the seriousness
'la. y of Ihe situation and take such action
:   ''������' ":   ' ' ������< will teach Eddie Gold that he mttsl
gel
I Reeve Gold told the council on Wednesday.     If  111   his   childish   desire   to
have his own way, Reeve Gold is determined   to  ruin     the    municipality,
f  rather than  act  in  a  sensible manner.
Thc stork left a little baby girl at  ed for thc primary department of the
���nunttee,  the  ionow.nD    ......    ������
peared:     I ha.  this committee go on\%M tnan it  ���,,���,,, ,,.,vc
record unanimously endorsing a schc-1 , ,      ���,   tnc   hear.
dule of salary for Ihe fire department. jV,       , ,, "\      '  \        ' ww,     ������'   ;i< W,M "a,c.    l',klle l-"," ,' .!lt l,c "
and  will   lake  the earliest opportunity'W     .T���     1,11       ',       J ��� ni i ,,"hilV1,  '''S  '''   reasonable  bci"*  '"'
c    ��� .-���    . ,      ' ���    -mi   ui o  tie   skull   "I   a   savage   must   _���.      i i,\l,l,'n   r,J,     ln.e-.iue
ol  giving effect  lo same.       ��� , , .     , ���      , ., r,.i,n ""'���     '   sa"   I'.'Kuc   iioiu,  nu.i.isi
Reeve  Gold'  "If von  are endorsing b,C'US-,(1 '" d"Yc '"'"V     ,   \-       G       .whole conduct as reeve is not the c
,, , 'V- ,   ���    osng that  the  people  n   South   Vancouver  j.,., ,,f ., ,.,.,., ,.,.. ,,f ��� r��PM,���  ���
a schedule, surely it is nol being com-!.,.,  ,, .,.,,-���    ��� ,.  .,,,,i  ,;,...     ,���  .,:_ ,���.  | ""'' "' a n,,ln "".'  ".' a. recKiess, i
Ihe home of Mr. and Mrs. Cunning
ham, 89 40th Avenue West, last Saturday evening, June S.
* *  r
Mr. Norman Mason is improving
the appearance of his home by an addition and extra windows in his front
room, and lattice work at the side of
his cottage.
* * *
Mrs. De Gruchy of 112 41st Avenue
West is recovering from an attack of
la grippe.
* * *
Mrs. Hans Sorlie, formerly of -list
Avenue West, now of Mission. B.C..
is spending two week.- visiting friends
in  Vancouver.
* * *
.Miss Sadie Harvey of Seattle is vis-
iliii" her parents this week at No.
81 41st'Avenue West.
Rev. Mr. Freeman of Ferris Road
Methodist Church, was calling on
peoole in the vicinity of 39th Avenue
lasi   i uesday.
* # *
The Ladies' Aid Society of St. David's Presbyterian Church are holding
a sale of work nexl Tuesday afternoon in the store, corner of Bodwell
Road and Windsor Streets, fee cream
and strawberries and afternoon tea
will be served and a large assortment
of articles will be on sale. The ladies intend handing over the proceeds
'of ihe sale to the managers of the
church for the general funds of the
congregation.
* A    *
Corporal George K. Grey, one of
our brave South > ancouver boys, is
reported wounded this week, Corporal Grey was formerly a captain in
the municipal fire brigade and went
with the first contingent from Canada, being joined to the 72nd Highlanders. He is one of a family of
five brothers, all serving with the
British Army at present.
Eire broke out at thc residence of
Mr. C. Cropley, corner of Almos and
Vanness Avenue. Thursday morning,
causing damage to the house of aboul
$.(00. The fire was caused by a spark
from the chimney. Mr. Cropley only
rents the bouse and could not say if
the house was insured. Mr. Cropley
congratulated Chief Lester and his
men for Iheir promptness in getting
lo the fire and the excellent way in
which they bandied the fire, and thanked them for saving his furniture. A
boy Griffith sent in the alarm.
* * *
A large number of the girl friends
of Miss J. Mathers formed a surprise
party the other evening which called
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Mathers
to do honor to Miss J. Mathers, one
of Iheir chums, who is to be married
in August. The girls brought with
them a kitchen shower of many useful arlicles. which Ihey, to the surprise
of Miss Mathers, presented to her.
After the surprise was over, the young
people were heartily entertained by
Mr.'and Mrs. Mathers and all spent
a very pleasant evening.
Sunday .school i his work is in charge
of Mini Ward, and the parents ami
friends are cordially invited lo alter.!
on Sunday afternoon next.
On   Wednesday     evening     last
Rev.   |.   C.   Alder   gave  an   interesting
and   instructive   lecture   in_ Westminster    Church   which    was   listened   '.
and enjoyed by a large audience.
Last Sunday evening at St. David's
Presbyterian Church the Rev. J. R
Robertson, the pastor, dealt in his
sermon with the "Crisis in If. C." ami
preached a mosi interesting sermon
to the large congregation present
The preacher claimed ibis was a greal
business, moral, and religious subject,
and as such must be dealt w;ith from
the pulpit and by the clergy as well
as the public.
The people's heritage was at stafc<
and il was the duty of cvery mar II
be actively interested in ihis greal
question at this time. Our brave nun
the finest of our province, are at the
front fighting for Ihe cause of righteousness, and are we lo sit -till .-
keep our peace whil. conditions de
maud that iheir and our interests
should be attended to
It is a greal moral and religious
question ibis crisis in B, C, and il
must be faced up by all men in al
ranks  and   walks of life.
pared with the city.
have   large   buildin
here  thev   have  o]
th.
city
.le.-;:
are heartily sick and tired
i centric  conduct.
and   a   resolution   was   passed   lo   en-! nut stands.''
dorse Ihe proposed action of the North       In   the   report   iron:  ihe  cngill
Vancouver council in ihis matter. was staled that owing to thc in
Reeve ��� ing   suspended   by    Reeve   Gold
Clerk  pumps were-standing idle n goo
this of the time and the municipality
I consequently having to p! j
rittcn  from Vancouver or  Bttrnal
On Sunday afternoon next a very
his'special event will take place in Wesl-
;on- minster Presbyterian Church, when
mis- graduation exercises will be conduct-
hie'vous hoy. Eddie is like a boy
[with a new gun; and he is handling |
. the weapons given him as reeve with j
a total disregard for the safety and ;
welfare of the people of South Van-
' couver.    Verb. sap.
PRESENTATION
A delegation of twejjty-two members of the municipal staff presented
a handsome gold ring to Mr. Bert
Richardson, who left for Vernon
Camp to g,. into (raining for the purpose of meeting the Germans at lh.
front.
The presentation read as follows.
"We. the undersigned, wish to express
our appreciation of the past comradeship and to wish you every success
for the future, and we hope you will
accept this small present as a token
of  our  good  fellowship  and  esteem."
The ring was attached to a cartridge and was presented to Mr. Rich -
unison. ���
Bravery Rewarded!
Two weeks ago two horses and rig
belonging   to   David.  Spencer,      Lid
dashed   madly  up   Prince  Edward   S:
from John St., the horses being frigb:
eried by a collie dog.    A man name
Fitz. .employed   by   Mr.   Avery,   gar
dener.   pluckly   threw   himself   at   tin
horses'   beads,   bringing     them   to   i
stop after being dragged about a doze-
yards.    Being a man of small statur
(about  5  feel  in  height 1  made the aci
a   very   plucky   one.   and   was   ihdci
worthy   of   some   little   compensati.
at   least,   but  after   the   two  men   wh
were  with the rig arriving and  fixin.
the straps of the horses, they mounl
ed  the  rig  without  a  word of  than'
I.. Mr. Fitz, Supposing an electric ci
bad been running- along Bodwell  Roa-
at the time or other conveyance, thprc
would   no   doubt   have   been   a   nasi)
accident, possibly Iocs of life and dam
age to horses.    The writer of ihis ar
tide   being   an    eye-witness     of     th.
runaway,   thought   it   only   right   thai
Mr. Spencer should hear of Mr, Fitz's
plucky  conduct  and  told   Mr.  Spencc.
he thought it should be acknowledgci
in  some  way or other, and gave  bin
Mr.   Fitz's  address.
The   communication
from      1
Gold    re    ihe    stispensb
11      ol
Springford   was  next   re
ad   and
started ihe  fireworks.
'Ihe  reeve  followed  u
I    his     ���-
communication   by  somi
verbal
mar - concerning tin   ...
ispensioi
t lerk   Springford.   claim
ng   lhal
coi III   do   ihe   wort   l,^
-ell   ami
I.
Ill
II and  ihe  water  runi]
.1
.rv elen
51 l-
misc -
mimi-
weri
his straightforward  talk.
Councillor Campbi II asked u
w hat be would think- oi a m
would lay off i , cry man w ..ri
such a plant ���;-, liny had hi
Turner   replied   he   would   say
led   lo  sign  the  notes  dll<   ihe  hank.
Councillor Campbell staled ilia: he
would not be a party to having any
temporary clerk appointed, ami pointed out lo tlie reeve lhal as he alone
was responsible i'<���- (he suspension
and lh.- pn s.n; trouble, then he muld
lift :he suspension and get rid of\the
trouble.
Reeve Gold here produced Ihe
tule book ami read several cl
showing ihe power which he as r
hail, and then staled that Spring
was not required and had been
long in the employment of the
cipality.
Councillor Russell: "Reeve Gold,
you're in a hole and Ihere's daylight
for you if you wish to get out; there's
a way by raising the suspension."
Councillor   Allen:   "Lots   of   people
know   wdiat   a   clerk's | as   such   liad   held
.    -J.      We   musl   h.-.e,.   :
cl
reinstate
you   see
don't   seem
position   really  is.    We  must  hav
and a reeve, and we must either
have   a   brand  new   clerk   or
Springford."
Reeve Gold: "Springford will never
come back here wjiilc I am in. ihis
office."
"Here's your cheque bylaw." and
afler reading this, the reeve stated, "I
intend to veto this."
Councillor   Russell:     "Dc
anything wrong with that."
Reeve Gold: "I ask you for the sake
of the people to do this and facilitate
matters by appointing a temporary
clerk; this is a serious business; you
require  to  meet $115,000.".
Councillor Allen: "I wonder the
bank manager gave $60,000."
Councillor Street: "Wc have had
two investigations and Springford has
cleared himself. Why didn't the reeve
if he had anything against him state
it to the council?"
Reeve Gold: "You were away holidaying at this municipality's expense."
Councillor Street: "Yes, and this
municipality would be thousands a-
head if you would go on a long holiday."
Mr.  Springford  here  appeared  and
Kiev.-  Gold  interposed  and
Mr.  , urner if ii was n fact thai ii
made a nasty remark aboul   him.
'I urner  denied   ihis  accusation
the reeve angrily replied, "I'll suspend
you;  i've heard enough about you and
I'll   attend   to  you."
Mr. McKay was next asked by the
reeve what he was and McKay replied
that he was a master mechanic and
sitiou before
coming here, for 13 years, with one
firm.
Mr.   Seymour   here   approached   thc
council   table,   and   whispered   to   the
. at which Councillor Russell ros
as   thy   ion
' Success.
ed   to learn
ad   io maki
much
ml  Comin
in
e   l-   tile   secret   oi
i took n.c ncarlv t\
. keep -till. At lirs
p.-eches; hut   I   did
the    srssi.,l|      just
-am   a   woman,   the
License  Commissioners Meet
\ meeting of il-,-  License Commis
sioncrs of South Vancouver was h -1
-it Wednesday morning last when an  \\,
,. :;���!- .:-io!i   for  i h,-  fell wal  of ihe  li-
cei sc   - -r   ilu   Gladstone   Motel    was
id red.    \ r< porl wai read from
:;- i  coi -'aid.-   stating  trial   ihi-
place was being carried on in ,i  first
cldss  and  up-to-date  manner, aid  ivi
mplainl   had   been   made  againsl   it
f j Phc license was unanimously granted,
;.,,,       An   application   was  also  made   by
,, ui (I tin   |>ri prieteir for leave to change ihe
.,   |;i(i. iname . i the hotel to Kingsway Hotel.
. \perf- j '"'ti-- application^was also granted.
"Hold  7 ��� .	
'litical ,THE HUSTLERS CINCH THE
Mr.   Ilamlily,  who has
i the residence -�����!  his
ice Street   tor several  -
iday for Toronto.
been  visiting I     Mrs.   C.   1''.   Smith,   i
.'liter an operation in il
pilal.
relurne
bvi i
Mrs. Woods, of 34th Avenue, is
ntertaining Mrs. Hutchison of Lad-
er for a  few days.
1-
Miller   Ri .
General  II
ler home.
Under [lie auspices of Ulster Lod -
L. '>. B. A., No. _'|, an At Home v. :
given on Monday afternoon last al
tin- residence ot Mrs. A. E. II. i
when a large number m' members ..' ���
Mrs. Houghton -pent the week-end friends spent a most enjoyable after
a: Coquitiam, noon  ami  evening.     In    addition    t
cards   and    farm ���   of   various    kinds
After an absence oi  12 months  vis-1 there   was   .,u   excellcnl   musical   pr-
itirtg   friends   and   relatives   in'  Illinois j gramme rendered  by  Mr.  Davis,  Mr-
and Mis-ouri.  Mr-. Avery has return- Davis  and   Miss Graham.    Mrs.  Sou
ed P. ihe honu of her daughter, Mrs. they poured lea and Mrs. Evans, Mrs
J. J.  Wright
o years
I 'liked
Ml talk-
closed. "I
hint   is
cme that aspu
well read, ma-
digest.
There i- an i
iiticians    might
i  and  inwardly
Having  been  awarded   contract   for
EASTERN CHAMPIONSHIP ^ihe school building at Langley. Messrs
Craig, W'igbt and Keency left la-t
week for that city, for ihe purpose of
inakiii" final arrangements for iis erection.
* * *
\t the regular monthly -.leeting of
By defeating Collingwood on Tuesday night by a sere of 7 to .3, the
Hustlers baseball team cinched the
championship  of  the   eastern  division
division. The game was played .
tlie Collingwood school grounds and
a large number of fans turned out to
root for the local boys. The field
play ol both team's was about equal,
'mi  ihe superior batting of ihe  Hust
lers   won   their   game.     A   In
1 saying that an cnipiy
> - mill's best���and in like manner
empty head rattles most. In this
inectiou councillors would do well
remember the story of a bishop
o. invited to address a meeting^
s asked when it w mid be couven-
,t.,t lor him to attend. He wrote lo
ind objected, saying: "I won't stand asl( how long be would be expected
tor Mr. Seymour butting in here; hcito -peak, and he laid down this sehe-
has no ngbi  here at this table." i,|ui,..     -|f   [   ;l���,   to  occupy   a   whole
There was considerable applause by  evening you may call upr.n me at any
the audience when this was said. time     if  |  am'to speak for an hour
Councillors   Allen.     Campbell     and I]   shall   require  two days''notice.     If
Rnssel   objected  to  the  time  of  the only  half  an   hour   I   shall  require  alplay a series with  the"y."m."c' A
w   ne,,,%'''V^'l   "!'   ''.'SP'.f? hveek's notice; if a ntiarter hour, two  who arc now leading the western di
to   petty   stories  brought   by   mdivid- week's  notice;  and  if only   five  min- 	
mils,   denouncing   ihe   whole   thin     as ��� ������,.   |   shall   need at  least   one  month
1'"'""yr"V   . . In  which  lo  consider what   I  have  to
A   resolution   was   received   and   ad-1 sav "
opted that   three men be laid off from * * *
tlie engineer's department owing to; ,hc n���lr;,i ,,f ,|u. slorv is |.,in
the lack Of work and money al this j The bishop wished to convey (he idea
time Ihe men are Messrs Buck. \ ��������� he coul(t Ullk f,���. a wh���,, ovon.
Harold and Re.d. Considerable dis- jnir without preparation-and sav m-
cussion took place over ihe suspen- thing Worth
sion   of   the   blacksmith.       Councillor
that he wished to say. it must he
something worth saying and. there
fore, would require much time and
thought. Councillors who love to
hear the sound of their own voice
in the council chamber will do well
to ponder over thc bishop's schedule.
,,.'   .1,.   c;��� V       r   , ,       ���'>'=""'      At He regular monthly ���.leeting oi
"the Sunday  School  Athletic  Lea- ^ w_ c. T.  rj,, whicn N.as ll(.w ;lt
a     in        I   y   ,!,,i'1">"'-.   ","���   '!'.'   "":l1   .he       Cedar       Cottage     Presby.e, ,an
io      ,, '''t, vlmu'rs  '"    he .Western  churci,  on   tllc  ,,,   huirstlay  of  ihe
Russell claimed that he as chairman
of thc Board of Works should have
been consulted in litis matter, and
stating that as a result of this action
of the reeve, the horses could not be
shod and were standing in the stable
at a loss to the municipality.
by Rex Cameron, a three bagger with
bases full and a couple of two base
bits was more than their opponents
could gather. The Hustlers have won
all of their games in Ihe league so far
md   will,   in   all   probability,   have   to
vision for the championship. The H.
A. A. are talking seriously of entering
a team in the newly organized South
Vancouver league.
WEDDING BELLS
A   very   pretty   wedding   took   place
. it St. Mary's Church. Soulh Hill, last
lung   worth   saying;  but   il   be   must   Saturday. June 5, when Mr. John Mc-
omnress   into ji   five  minute   speech  Gregor, 59lh Avenue East, was united
m marriage lo Miss Elizabeth Mayon
of .-gerton, Bolton, Jingland. Thc officiating clergyman was tlic Rev. Owen Bulkley, and after the marriage
ceremony, thc large number of guests
present were entertained by the parents of the bride.
month. Mrs. McPhie. Mrs. Woods.
Mrs. Prowse. and Mrs. Seagrief wore
appointed delegates to the Provincial
Convention of ihe VV. C. T. I'., which
was held this week in the First Baptist     Church,     Vancouver.       Lunches
ionic   run   w(,r(,   SITVC,|   by  thc   Mt-lln.ttist   lades
on Tuesday. Mrs. McPhie. convenor
by the Presbyterian ladies,1' Wednesday, Mrs. Esslemont, convenor; and
by the Baptist ladies on Thursday.
* * *
Mr. Al. Hatch, of Fireball No. 2,
is spending his holidays with his brother, George Hatch, at Powell River.
* * *
After several days spent with her
parents at Roberts Creek, Mrs. Thomas McQueen has returned to her
home on  Beatrice Street.
* + *
Miss Cave-Brown-Cave of New-
Westminster met the Cedar Cottage
Political Equality League at Mrs.
Hambley's on Thursday afternoon of
last week, for the purpose of drilling
the members of the chorus in Ihe
English suffrage song, "The March
of the Women." which will be sung
at the entertainment given in New
Westminster hy the different branches
of the B. C. Political Equality League
at   their   fourth  annual   convention.
iVatson and Misses Rhoda and Ljilj
Hatch served refreshments. Perlia-
the most entertaining feature of tin
evening was the dance which was p; :
ticipated in by old and young alike,
and which helped to make the occasion one of ihe most successful socio
functions ever given by Nester Lodge
* * *
Al tlie regular monthly meeting 61
the Women's Forum of South Vancouver, which was held at the home
of Mrs. Woods, Mrs. McConkey gave
a reading on parliamentary drill. Ii
was decided at Ibis meeting to giv.
a garden party next Saturday ��� afternoon at ihe home of Mrs. S. P. Jackson. The Woman's Forum will hold
no further meetings during the summer months.
* * *
Dr. Sipprell gave an address of unusual merit on Monday evening hist
to tlie members and friends of the
Robsou   Memorial   Epworlh   League.
* * *"
AI the parsonage on Saturday afternoon. June 5. Rev. E. Manuel
christened Edith Elizabeth, infant
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Humphrey
Triles. ,    ,
*    *    ��
Miss Mary E. Bainbridge and Mr.
Joseph II. Clark were married on the
afternoon of June 5th at Robsou Memorial Church, Rev. Manuel officiating. Mr. W. T. Reid acted as best
man. and Miss Hilda Reid as bridesmaid. The bride looked charming in
her (ravelling snil of grey cloth, with
hat to match, and was given away by
Mr. Reid, sr. Mr. and Mrs. Clark
went at once to their own home on
Dumfries Street. postponing their
honeymoon  trip until a later date. SATURDAY, TUNE 12. 1915
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
STOVEWOOD
14 inch inside fir
$2 so per load $2-5��.
Coast Lumber & Fuel Co., Ltd.
Phone Fair. 2500        Phone High. 226        Phone Fraser 41
The Cost of Operating Electric
Household Appliances is
Merely Nominal.
The actual cost of current for Electric Household Appliances is
out of all proportion to the comfort and convenience provided, this
being especially  true  during the  summer months.
Look over this table of hourly cost of operation.
Coffee Percolator
3y2  cents per hour
Electric Grill
4 to Sl/2 cents per hour
Electric Iron
4 to 5 cents
per hour
Electric Washer
3  cents per hour
Electric Toaster
5 cents per hour
N.B.���Appliances used for cooking are operated only a fraction of
an hour per meal. The cost of others depends upon the duration
of their use.
We will be pleased to demonstrate these appliances at our salesrooms.
B. C. ELECTRIC
Carrall and Hastings St.
1138 Granville St. (near Davie)
The
Telephone
THE ADVANCE AGENT OF
Comfort and Convenience
FORMS  A  CLOSER  UNION  OF HOME,
BUSINESS AND FRIENDS.
FOR A LIMITED TIME, BUSINESS AND
RESIDENCE TELEPHONES WILL BE
INSTALLED UPON PAYMENT OF $5.00
RENTAL IN ADVANCE.
FOR PARTICULARS CALL UP
SEYMOUR 6070.
CONTRACT DEPARTMENT
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH  TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
m
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D.T. A., Vancouver.'
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass. Agent, Vancouver.
A.   K.   Harron
J.  A. Harron
G. M. Williamson
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS
Vancouver���Office and Chapel:  1034 Granville St.     Phone Sey. 3486
North Vancouver���Office and Chapel: 122 Sixth St. W.     Phone 134
Ottawa, June 11.���Democracy, as it
works out under thc Borden administration, is .c greal riddle. In Canada,
as in other democratic countries, we
elect a parliament which in nun
chooses a  sub-committee  called    Ihe
cabinet.     Counting    C nons    and
Semite. Canada would have, under the
latest Re-distribution Act, some three
hundred and thirty-two kings. But
as thai would be altogether too many
kings for a young country like Canada, we simplify matters by agreeing
to a Cabinet of fifteen members
which is considered plenty, if ihey are
all hard workers and keen on their
job.
This bus been the practice for
years. The people delegate their
authority to three hundred and thirty-
two representatives, thc three hundred and thirty-two representatives
handpick an executive committee of
fifteen, and tin wc have representative government in Highly condensed
and effective form. To bring about
this condensation costs money but it
is conceded to be worth the price.
The pay of Parliament amounts annually to a million dollars, but nobody
would begrudge the money if it Stopped at that,
The Borden Government, however,
has made changes. It believes that
the country is not paying enough for
its ruling classes and to make the bill
larger il shifts a lot of detail to royal
commissions. These commissioners
are not answerable to the people, but
answerable to the party in power.
They give us what Mrs. Partington
would call the boon of free and irresponsible government in its most
expensive shape.
During its first year of office the
Borden Government appointed some
two hundred and fifty-five special
commissioners at an approximate
charge upon the country of two hundred thousand dollars a year. That
is to say they added twenty per cent,
to the cost of civil government in
order to give us a supplementary system which only balls up the wheels
of progress. Not content with spreading the load to this extent the Government lias lately appointed a commission of three to relieve it of the
task of spending one hundred million
dollars on war supplies and is complaining moreover that its burden is
too great to bear and that the people
of Canada ought to help some by
consenting to a general election. In
other words, ll|c Government is nol
strong enough to work but plenty
strong enough to undergo the turmoil
of a general election, with thc ultimate prospect that il would get five
years longer to do ils loafing in.
To increase the cost of civil government by one-fifth at a time when
Canadians in general have to pinch
pennies is bad enough, but to increase
'it because the Government of Ihe day
is too lazy to do its own work, makes
it that much worse. Some of these
commissions act as hod carriers for
the Government and are to that extent helpful but most of them have
two main objects���to draw pay and
to say the things the Government
would like, to misstate the activities
of the Government's Liberal predecessors and to smell out "offensive
partisans': among the officeholders in
the party out of power. They are a
sort of cross between a Greek chorus
and a committee of witch finders, and
they are twice blessed���that is to say
they edge the Grits out and make room
for thc hungry Tories to come in.
hey are good hands at their work,
they can always make two jobs grow-
where only or.e grew before. Incidentally while helping others they help
themselves ��� to what they can lay
their hands on. _ Also they help the
Government by giving it a chance to
spend the people's money on the party workers. Some of the commissions are composed of big men, but
most of them arc made up "heelers''
who would turn sore if they didn't gel
their feet into Ihe trough someway or
other. Some of "the boys" would not
look well in (be civil service but almost anyone of them is good enough
to be a special commissioner.
So far as pay is concerned the commissioners may be divided broadly in
two classes���those which are on salary and go on for ever, and those that
do piece work and are paid by the job.
The little fellows, belong mostly to
the latter class out do not despise
them on that account. The pickings
are fairly good and if a man gets several jobs and the commission works
is spread over the year so that he gets
the jobs consetutively it's equivalent
to a permanent income. A glance
over the list of special commissioners
shows that several defeated Conservative candidates are making a fat
living just that way.
The Post Office Department heads
the list in the matter of special commissions to hold investigations. The
former Postmaster General, the Hon.
Mr. Pelleticr, believed in investigating everybody but himself. During
his first year of office he appointed
eighty-eight commissioners, some of
whom are under pay yet. No single
commissioner got rich at it but everybody got a slice. Their activities
stood us in for the first year $17,000,
and they did a lot of investigating for
the money. They were so keen on investigating that Ihey found dead Grits
in the graveyard who bad been guilty
of "offensive partisanship" and dug
them up so they could be fired posthumously by a Postmaster General who
hewed to the line and a little beyond.
Not only were dead Liberal Postmasters discharged but Conservative Postmasters who had been let out in 1896
at thc age of seventy were found and
restored to their posts after an interval of fifteen years. This partly explains the briskness of the postal ser-
vice in some parts of Canada. Among
other ihings the commissioners found
was room for aboul three posl office
clerks where one clerk had been
enough before, which indicates the
thrift of the Government in these days
of sirrn retrenchment. Curiously
enough none of the eighty-eight commissioners Investigated the question
of padlocks for mail bags or the a-
m.tzing rise in value of the Carslake
Motel site in Montreal which was recently bought by Ihe Government for
a  postal  sub-station.
Thc Department of Public Works
furnished employment to nineteen
special commissioners during the fiscal year l��l 1-1912. They cost the
country only $4000, but they made a
number of useful reports which showed the Honorable Hob Rogers the line
of |easl resistance. That is to say he
got bints how the civil service could
be increased so thai twenty-one thousand men might do the work of ten
thousand.
The Department of Railways managed to appoint twenty commissioners in a year, nineteen of whom divided $7000 among them, while two,
Messrs. George Lynch Staunton and
Gutelius gol the lion's share of $67,-
000. As a work of literature the
Staunton-Gutelius report is hardly
worth $67,000, but as a partisan diatribe studded with ingenious misstatements about the National Transcontinental Railway, il is invaluable.
J be commissioners could hardly have
said worse for twice the money.
During the same year Inland Revenue appointed five commissioners,
Customs twelve, Alarine and fisheries
twelve, Agriculture live, Trade and
Commerce three,���perhaps ten thousand dollars worth of commissioners
altogether. Besides these there was a
commission of three to examine the
state records of the various departments, which worked for Ihe honor
of it and the usual sustenance allowance of ten dollars a day; a neat little
commission on better lerms for British Columbia which operates at $b.0O
per day per mcmtier and the usual
expense bill; and a Grain Commission
of three which costs $18,500 a year
and earns its money.
In addition to all these Sir William
Ralph Meredith appears on Ihe list
as special commissioner on certain
matters of higii import, and as the
Chief Justice of Ottawa is not a cheap
man, no doubt bis emoluments swell
the bill considerably.
Another commission which looks
like filly thousand dollars, if the personnel of the seven distinguished men
who composed it is considered, was
the famous Fishing Expedition of
which the Hon. L. B. Murine, late of
Newfoundland and anon of Newfoundland again, was chairman. The Government wanted to land somebody or
something so they got a good fisherman from Newfoundland. It was Mr.
Morine's first experience in the big
swim and he is not likely to forget it.
His record in the stormy sea of Newfoundland politics was looked up with
the result that he bad to go back there
again. He "resigned" by request in
June 1912. Thus it happened that instead of Mr. Morine landing anybody
he was himself landed by Frank Car-
veil who comes from New Brunswick
where fishing is also a great industry.
Two other members of the Morine
commission resigned in November,
1912, but for any blue book information to the conlrary, the other four
may be working yet, Lately the Government has added to its list a commission of one to "get" Frank Oliver
and a commission of three lo spend
one hundred million dollars among
the party patriots, and it now talks
of a commission on uiiempb ymcut
which will doubtless employ a certain
number of party friends who need ihe
money.
The Standard Trusts Company
Head Office:  WINNIPEG
H Branches:
VANCOUVER, EDMONTON, SASKATOON
H     Capital subscribed and  fully paid  .'.     $750,000.00
Hf    Kescrve   Fund        $425,000.00
jj     Total   Assets    $16,000,000.00
I     mi- 	
jjg     Ibis Company transacts all  business of a strictly Trust  character.
NO DEPOSITS ARE, OR HAVE AT ANY TIME BEEN
ACCEPTED
The Company has for sale a very large number of FARM
PROPERTIES in the middle West Provinces, belonging to Trust
Estates now being wound up.    Booklet on application to
VANCOUVER BRANCH     ���     VANCOUVER BLOCK
JAS. G.  FORRESTER,  Manager.
A woman's most vulnerable spot is
her pride. A man's most vulnerable
spot is bis self esteem.
Steamer New Delta
SUMMER SCHEDULE
On and after Saturday,  May  1st,
Steamer New Delta will leave from
FERRY WHARF
(Foot of Columbia Ave.)
For PORT MOODY
andioco emr)
DAILY  EXCEPT  SUNDAYS
At 6.30 a.m., 9.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.
Returning leave Port Moody at
8.00 a.m., 11.00 a.m. and 4.45 p.m.,
except Saturday, when she will
leave Port Moody at 12.00 a.m.
SUNDAYS
Leave Vancouver at 1.30 p.m. and
8.00 p.m.
Leave  Port  Moody  at  4.4S  p.m.
and 9.20 p.m.
Express or Parcels Reasonable
Rates
STEAMER LEAVES ON TIME
This   Schedule   subject   to   change
without notice
We   deliver���immediately���anywhere.
Phone your order to Seymour 6722.
VANCOUVER WINE
(With the Sunburst Sign)
1097 Granville. Cor. Hetacken.
Regular 20c Cold
Water Dry Paste.
Now 2 for    25c
Regular 75c Long
Handled     Brittle
Cleaners.   Now   2
for        25c
Regular $2.75
Shurley Dietrich
Hand Saws. Now
    $1.70
Regular   $6.50   EleC-
nic   .oastcr,     Now
$2.00
Regular 5c Cake
Cutters. Now 3
for        Sc
Lattimore
&
Blott
606 Main St.
Regular 25c pair
Stanley Butts
Hinges, 3'/'x3M.
Now 2 pr.  .. 25c
Regular 50c Picnic Baskets. Now
   20c
Regular
Bread
Now  .. .
Regular $5.50 Garden Hose with
Nozzle.      Guaranteed    1    year. Regular $1.50
$2.50   Salc Price    $3,50
,  White       Enamel
lxcr-s-    Regular $1.25    Garden    Shears. Flour  Bins.  Now
$1.60   Sale price   75c
Regular
bastine.
50c  Ala-
Now 35c
Selling Out At Cost And
Less All Kinds of Hardware and Kitchen Utensils. Everything Must
Be Sold.
Regular 50c Incuba-
'tor Thermometers.
Now     25c
Regular $1.75 Lanterns, Handy for
Campers. Now $1.00
90c
Regular $1.00
Cash Box for 70c
Regular 25c Flour
Sifters. Now 2
for       25c
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
MEMBERS VANCOUVER STOCK EXCHANGE
MEMBERS VANCOUVER GRAIN EXCHANGE
MEMBERS OF CALGARY OIL EXCHANGE
DEALERS IN ALL ACTIVE .CALGARY STOCKS, BONDS, ETC.
OIL STOCKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
"Stock Department, Seymour 6913
EXCHANGE BUILDING, 142 HASTINGS WEST
fftuHK
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
C. E. Jenney, O. A. P. D.
Phone: Sey. 8134 477 Gr.nvlll. Streat
BASEBALL
Athletic P*rk
Vancojver vs.
Victoria
GAMES
June  14-15-16 At   Victoria
June  17-18-19 At Vancouver
At 4 p.m.
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND  STORE
Can  supply your  needs at  right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right at Station)
One cent per Fowl, per Week
Poultry  Keepers
will get best results from constant
u.��e of
"B&B"
Poultry Spice
And  EGG PRODUCER
A Hen tonic, Pick-me-up and
Drop-em-down
Once Tried' Always Used I
Guaranteed  to  produce  results,  if
fed  according to  directions  (in
every sack)
3 lb. sack, 45c.   V/�� lb. sack, 90c.
100 lb. sack, $12.00
Manufactured In Vancouver.   Sold
Everywhere
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for public meetings, dances, etc., to Let
Apply W. J. STOLLIDAY
34 32na Avenue FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 1915
/����    fif.'..i,   v,���CN
fW    1 / I    *����0"ftJLL"
r ,jjia     '���"..'.      """"1
These  wonderful  Motors   can  travel anywhere that 2 wheels can
revolve.    100 to 120 miles on gallon of gasoline.   Just think of it.
HASKINS & ELLIOTT
516 and 518 HOWE STREET
Glazed Cement
Sewer Pipe
\in1aL.
Is the choice of property owners in
every city where its value has been
demonstrated. It gives good service
and has durability.
Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.
155 FRONT STREET WEST
Phone Fairmont  122
MAPLE LEAF DAIRY
PURE PASTURIZED MILK
We are Milk and Butter Specialists
A. Tommason, Mgr. Phone Bay. 1417
1935-2nd AVE. WEST
A phone call will have prompt attention
COAL
For kitchen use our Wellington No. 1 Nut Coal at $5.50
per ton is best Value on the market.
USE IT ALWAYS
USE IT ONCE
Phone: Sey. 210
MacDONALD, MARP0LEC0., Ltd.
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
1141 ALBERT CT. TELEPHONE   HIGH.   131
ENGINEERS, MACHINISTS  AND  FOUNDERS
IHOH AMD BKASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND SPECIALS
REPAIRS OP ALL DE8CRIPTIONr
Keeler's Nursery
Grower and Importer of Plants, Bulbs, Roots and Shrubs
Cut Flowers and Design
Work a specialty.
One  hundred varieties of
Roses  of  Choice  Sorts
and  three  hundred varieties   of   Dahlias.
Flowering and Ornamental Shrubs for Spring and
Fall planting. "AJJ/ Phone Fairmont 817
ICYOU WILL FIND OUR PRICES MODERATE
Cor. FIFTEENTH AVE. and MAIN  ST  :: MOUNT PLEASANT
VIOLIN EXPERT
Old and valuable violins carefully repaired.
Gufitars and mandolins repaired. Bows rcliaircd.
Violins bought.
JAMES TAYLOR
531  RICHARDS ST. Phone  Seymour  3415
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
All the Latest in Motion Pictures
The Looker-On
SOUTH HILL PALACE OF
VARIETIES
(Three blocks south of Municipal Hall)
ALL THE LATEST WAR SCENES AND BEST OF
MOTION PICTURES
AMATEUR NIGHTS. WEDNESDAYS AND SATURDAYS
"A duel's amang ye takin' note
An' faith he'll prent it.���Hums.
Till-', inevitable ha- come at la t Thc finances of the City of Vancouver arc al a deadlock. The Looker-On has more than once
uttered a warning note in tlie c columns that this crisis was on
tiie way. Now it is on us. The council has at last made public confession that the civic finances are "broke." The banks have- refused further overdrafts, already over $150,000. The arrears of taxes; $1,800,-
000, are still mounting up, while no effort is being made to collect them.
The only solution an incompetent couni ii can propose is to ask the citizens to vote money bylaws authorising them to borrow other $600,000,
thus further increasing the indebtedness of the city, and adding to the
interest charges. Suppose this authority given, will tlie council find
any investors who will lend us the money? If they do, the investor will
consider it such a gamble that he will undoubtedly exact a heavy discount, The last bonds sold were at 88 per cent. Thi- further issue, if
ever made, will be still lower- This is ruinous finance for tlie city. The
Looker-On seriously doubts, from his knowledge of Vancouver's present standing in the money markets of the world, especially the London market, whclher.any further issue of city bonds could be saleable!
This is truly a critical fix we have got into. Thc citizens had better
realise its significance right now. We must face the facts and shoulder
the burden, just as we have had to do in the war, and resolutely set ourselves to eliminate wrong conditions and put affairs on a sound basis.
At present we are on shifting sand. What is to be doner It is clear
the council can't save the situation. They haven't the financial capa-i
city, nor can be expected to have, for handling a critical financial crisis.
iUost of them are contractors or small business men. The Mayor whom
we put in last, i= a man who has muddled his own money matters. The
Looker-On in his remarks last week on this very subject, stated his opinion that an expert on civic finance would have sooner or later to be called in to put thc city's finance on a proper basis. The time has now come
when this must be done. A committee of the ablest and most responsible business men we can find amongst us should be formed forthwith to
confer with the council and this expert, and put our finances on the
footing that will save us from civic bankruptcy. l_et the people act and
act now.
������!: *' * il: * * * * #
A few weeks ago the British Isles were just on the point of going
"dry." The waste of money and time caused by inordinate drinking
among' sections of the workers was found to be detrimental lo the efficiency of the nation in view of the demands made upon it by the war.
The stupendous increase in national efficiency, fully 30 per cent., resulting in Russia and Trance, from prohibition had demonstrated its advantages. It would have been a tremendously interesting experiment
the making of Great Britain sober by Act of Parliament. The revolution
lias not, however, come off. The reform has dwindled down to Government control of the liquor traffic. This control meantime is to be directed principally to seeing that the quality of the liquor sold is wholesome-
Mo spirits under three years in bond can be sold, thus ensuring that new,
raw, adulterated spirits will be eliminated. .Many years ago the Looker-
On, w.ho has had considerable experience in social reform work in an
older and more bibulous city than Vancouver, advocated temperance
reform along these same lines. A commission of enquiry had been sitting and taking evidence on the drink question. Medical and chemical
experts proved that adulterated and poisonous compounds sold as spirits
caused most of the crimes and drunkenness traceable to liquor. Properly distilled and matured liquor has no such evil effects. So villainous
were some of the concotions sold as whisky that store-keepers had been
kuowiron race .courses to pour out-what was h fl of their stock. It was
nol worth taking back! The Loo .er-On -till thinks that, failing prohibition, strict governmental supervi ion over the manufacture and sale of
liquor should be exercised, if th s were done in Vancouver, lie is convinced much of the evil effects oi onr drinking-habits would disappear.
Lndeed the people .should be pro ected l>\ the strides! possible laws
againsl adulteration or short weight in food, drink and drugs. At in s
cut we have not tin- protection in adequate degree.
* * * :|: * :;: * :jc *
It is now settled that Mr. George Barnes, M.P., and his colleague
on the British Commission for securing mechanics to work in the munition factories in the Old Country is coming to the'Coast within the next
fortnight. He ought to obtain a considerable contingent here, as we have
1700 to 2000 idle mechanics amongst us, Their services are urgently
needed on the other side. Qualified men should get busy and see their
names enrolled for consideration by Mr. Barnes. Forms are at the City
Hall.
* * * * * * * * *
All Canadians must have read with grim satisfaction and some pride
of the destruction of a German Zeppelin over the city of Ghent in Belgium by Flight Lieutenant Warneford, a young Canadian born in India.
For this splendid deed of heroism the King has bestowed the coveted
V- C. on this brave and skilful young- aviator. It may not be generally
known that one of the first flyers in the world was a Canadian. I. A. D,
McCurdy. In 1908, before anyone in England had flown at all. McCur-
dy and the since famous American flier and constructor, Glen Curtiss,
were busy building aeroplanes, and during the winter of 1908-0" Ale-
Curdy and Baldwin flew over 1000 miles���S or 6 miles at a time���over
{ the ice in an out-of-the-way harbor in Nova Scotia. Such a distance
was not approached at that period by all the European aviators put together.    Canada will probably soon have a Flying" Corps of her own.
Here is a good story of Lord Kitchener after he had   inspected
sonic defence works on the east coast of England. The War Minister
motored from point to point, walked over the ground, but never said a
word all the afternoon until he was about to leave for London. Then
he opened his grim mouth and said, "'Those trenches oi yours couldn't
keep out the Salvation Army.'' This, of course, might be construed as
a compliment to the aggressiveness of the S. A., or otherwise, just as
you please.
��� GET YOUR ���
CAMPING TENTS
Camp Furniture, Canvas Hammocks, and other Camping Supplies from
C. H. JONES & SON Ltd.   .
Manufacturers
CANVAS GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
PHONE SEY. 740.
110 ALEXANDER ST.
Opposite North Vancouver Ferry Landing
=V
Health, Strength,
Happiness rxO
South
Vancouver Milk Co.
Fair. 1602 L
KlililJillll
1 I ���M
We are manufacturers of
DIAMOND  CHICK FOOD
which has no equal   for   chickens.
The Best  SEED   POTATOES
which are guaranteed to grow.
LAWN  GRASS  SEED  which
will make your lawn beautiful.
F. T. VERNON'S
MOUNT PLEASANT
FEED STORE
255 Broadway East (cor. Kingsway)
Phone Fairmont  180
Theatrical Notes
Pantages   Theatre
11 ltg 1'rimr , th< famous minstrel an. ' 1 ���' - makers,
.. nd 11 - - will id a splen-
,v bill .n Pantages for the week
commencing next Monday afternoon.
The new show will also have a notable feature in Cecilia Rhoda and
George Crampton. thi  opera singers
There are seven in the Primrose
act. The men appear in handsome
black and salmon togs and in regulation black face do a varied and entertaining minstrel first pari. The of-
ferirte includes also one of thc peerless
Primrose-soft shoe dances, a lot of
new jokes, some very good singing
by a quartette and si ill lists. The act
closes with a very funny imitation oi
a country hand.
Rhoda and Crampton will be seen
and heard in a novel playlet called
"Between Reels." a vehicle that gives
them a chance to display their remarkable voices tn fine advantage. They
will sing excerpts from a number ol
grand operas.
Early and Laight have a dandy patter act called "I hi the Water Wagon." Arline is a gipsy violinist who
plays beautifully and dances with
rare grace at the same time.
I ii-  Chartres   Sisters  and   i! Hi .
hai .    I. entertaining number in which
s i ..:: g,   dancing   comedy   and   whistling and a lot  i :  g irgei >us gow ns   in
facl irs,
Peggy  Br< mi n  and  .   r brothi r  do
some | articularlj   11  .. r balancing on
���      i| orted ladders
There will be in addition a fine array ui motion pictures,
PANTAGES
"The House of Happiness"
E.  D.  Graham,   Resident  Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
George Primrose
And HIS  MINSTRELS
Together with
6���Other Acts That Will  Make a���6
���  Hit With You
Three   shows*   daily   2.45.   7.20,   9.15
Admission���Matinees,     15c;    nights,
15c and 25c; boxes, 50c.
tl^bltaHsd VS93.V ������   i������'���.'"' ������.'; Relmcd,Seivicr
CENTER A H ANN ALIMITED
" NeWLocmtion,'  1049 Gr(KBi�� Slrei-l. eppqsit* iwW
': K""y5) ������"V.M-.'.CA.il..-?.       ������   .
FWproof Golntpbarium and .ft*cemne VWilli.  ���
Open-Day M^NiaM ."' S^'..242S
HOUSEHOLD GOODS and OFFICE FURNITURE
OLDEST AND LARGEST STORAGE CONCERN IN WESTERN CANADA
CAMPBELL STORAGE COMPANY^
MOVING - PACKING- STORAGE-SHIPPING
PHONF. SEYMOUR 7360. OFFICE 857J^TTY5T._gl SATURDAY. JLXK 12. 1915
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
a;
1VE
MONEY TO LOAN
In Multiples of $5,000  at  8  per cent, on
inside revenue producing business property.
Our client will only consider property  that
is now paying its way.
CANADIAN   FINANCIERS  TRUST  CO.
HEAD OFFICE, 839 HASTINGS ST. W.       VANCOUVER, B. C.
Patrick Donnelly, General  Manager.
Radical Views On Social
Problems
By Dr. W. J. CURRY
The   Remedy  for  Unemployment  and  and  workshops   for   pi
Poverty I goods, manufacturing 1 Is and shoes
and all wearing apparel.    Still ai   I
Lasi   week  ii   was  shown   that  ac-\gtoup    constituted  the  builders,    thc
cording  to Ihe  I. S   Government  re-|makcrs of  furniture    tl   I     would
ports    the   wage   earner-   engaged   in  be  teachers,   doctors,  uur-
You need a knowing druggist to fill your prescriptions
just as much as you need a knowing doctor to find out what s
the matter with you and tell you what to take. When your
doctor writes your prescriptions, bring them to us and know
t!iat you will get them filled right with first-class, pure, fresh
drufe'. I
We  never make a mistake.   We never substitute.
v Come to OUR Drug Store
THE BEST DRUG STORE
BURNS DRUG COMPANY, LTD.
Phone 3902
732 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.
tin
Id
productive employment in that country were only able with Iheir wanes
Ito purchase one-eighth of their products at the retail price, and lhal this
:sN difference   betv   en   iheir   wages   and
their productive power was one of the would be th
main can-.'- from which unemploy- wealth or so<
incut develops, because home market- ,., . ,.,,.,,...
are   largely   determined   by   tlie   pur-'  .   i' ' -n
, ' .     , J '     .     ell   lie   li   --II,
chasing   powers   "I   the   masses   climated bj   iheir wages.
We know nlso that the army of unemployed has ill the l'. S. bean growing  rapidly   for  many  yi ars
reports  issued by  tin   li.  S.  Govern-
: lllel'l   ill    1888,   there   Mere   13   per   . i nt.
: ui   I be  v. age  earners  out  of  i mpl ij -
i ment.     In   1890  ii   had  grown   i i  23
; per cent.    In 1900 il was 38 per   :enl
and in 1903 during the lasi  great  <-ri-
] sis.  owing tn  "ovSr-production,"  49.8
or   practically   half   lh��   wage   earners
of the U. S. were out of Murk during   J'
the time thc investigation took place.  ���  ,
j And so we see that capitalist produc-U'
I linn tends to destroy itself, as il is
based, not on social needs, but on ex-
ploitation and on thc purchasing power   of  the   workers,   which   through I'" '"^
the  evolution  of machinery  constant-   '"'	
I hi-   syslem
etc.     And   so   on   until   e\ l ���'
mem of social life is provided for
this  would   be   simplicity  itsi II
pai -I ��nil Ihe crazy warfare
pi litii m  w hich now pre\ ai!-. and
rative   i  im
irl
in
cl in K
munitii
CANYON   VIEW   HOTEL
CAPILANO.  NORTH  VANCOUVER.  B.C.
11. LARSON, Manager. P. LARSON. P��	
���:nic delights
Unequalled
hour'    i, ou ��� bom   146
JG.   HUNTING.   MOUNTAIN   CLIMBING,   Etc.
1' ���'.  Ion;; or short.     Family  Rooms
���. .o.   v.iih  special  rate.
��� -   .'I.:', grounds,  high-c al ��� -e.e
ip oi Grousi  Mountain, aititl  >   3 MO feet.
naiuilactun d gi oi
lodities with otht
r instance, we coul
limber and mine
I need and could
us   of   these   cm
ii
hut
���nuie] iii i  be pi
it- in manufacti
11 erage imports and exp< ���
nee.  and   there  would  be
ied drones in thc social h
producer   would   get   credit
purchasing power ei|ual t" b
to the community, ami  so  with  those
nn n u ho "wi iiibln'i  v nrk."
d   the
���crvict
il
trend   ol
' we sec ils
rial
dawn  in   I'..  C.
citabli I
utgh the
ly   represents   a   smaller   and   smaller
proportion of wealth produced.
The   official   report   claims   thai   the
US. last year exported 1000 million h ,������      b|.
dollars  worth ol  commodities  to  hu-
rope   and   elsewhere   mure   than    was
imported   and   had   these   goods     not   ���.,���,,, ,-,,������  i(  ,..,��� ,���.
been   purchased   unemployment    and ,1;m, ,     , tc(] us ,,v thc ,.l1lju,isK
lanime  would have been  so intense ill  ���,���:���i���   u   ..,,,.     ,i,        '       it     ' ,
,,     ,.,     ,     ,    ,     ,.     .....      i   ,,���      iiiiniilv  because   these  would  not  pay
the     and of the free    that  rebellion,   jjvjj.n(i '
We  have  our mail  service, our
-.   pari:-,   and     water     syslem,
In   Australia.   New   Zealand.     Den
mark.   Switzerland  'and   many
ft lit r
pri
duction
h   loda
"Nature Testh"
and skilled
painless service
My "Nature Teeth" which are entirely different from ordinary
artificial tceih, because they are built into the mouth to match
Nature's own in size and shape and exact tint���my skilled service and modem equipment���my absolute guarantee of painlessness, both during and following all dental work ��� these
things
���cost no more
than ordinary dentistry
. S. HALL
Licentiate   Dental   Sui -cry
Doctor   Dental   Surgery
Member   Royal   College   Dental   Surgeons
212   STANDARD   BANK   BLDG.
Seymour 4679
PURE MILK DAIRY CO.
Read these Prices
Set   ol   Xattire   Tfttll
t Work, per tooth   ..
Fillings,  per  tooth   .
tipper  or
 $10.00
     5.00
....    S.,00
     2.00
lain   Fillings,   |   i   1
Igam Villi' n, per 1
cai Extraction, pei  to
'    ..     1.50
il   ..     1.50
lii   ..      .SO
,,,       ��.,,,.,,,,
revolution   or     production     for
would  have been  inevitable.
it is evident, however, thai every
country cannot export more than l)arts ".' ,lu: wor1' ��� "l:,"-v productive
they import, any more than every man enterprises nine ���become socialized,
can be a landlord, and making a liv- V,"' IK,t""ls :" ui"' nave appropriated
ing by renting houses, or that Van- al private property which they need-
couver could have continually thrived,f(l '." llu'. "lteresls oi the state, I lu-
on the real estate business. ln   fiict   ls   the  source   of   Germany s
True democracy can know neither B1""' pnwer. It enables that country
exploiter or exploited, every commun- tn ?tam.' "P a^mst nations vastly sii-
ity and nation must consume its own [>"}"* .'��, number and resources, and
li'icts or iheir equivalent, and pro-," "s high tunc that we of R. C, ex-
id consumption must bal- erased the same powers in order t.
ance, if we are tn have permanent conquer hunger and distress
peace, true prosperity and social jug: Public evils add enemies
[:-��� ; exist m our midst.
Our forefathers owned the tools of
production   with   which   they   worked,
and the products were also theirs, bill I
through   the   development   of  machin-1
cry.   through   its   increasing   complex!-1
iv   and   cost,   the   ownership   graually
passed into the possession of the capitalist   and   corporation,     and     today |
these exploiters of labor not only con-
trol   thc  economic   forces  of  society,
but  Ihey  control  the public  press  and
the schools and colleges, and through
these, the ideas of the masses, and in
the- lasi   analysis,   "ignorance     alone
enslave-."
It is. evident that the remedy for
the world's social woes is the abolition of private monopoly oi ihe re?
sources of the earth, and the otil lie
ownership of ihe machinery ol pro;
duction; distribution and exchange.
I N G SW AY    HOTEL
FIRST CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS
R. CURRY, Prop.
PHONE SEYMOUR 900
MacDONALD & HAY
BARRISTERS,   SOLICITORS,   ETC.
1012 Standard Bank Bldg. Vancouver, B.C.
Pure Pasteurized Milk and Cream delivered daily to all
parts of the city
Try Our BUTTER Aill.K", fresh daily.     It aids digestion.
Our CREAM is the Purest.   Our WHIPPING CREAM the
Richest
Also dealers in BUTTER and EGGS
Office and Store     -     522 BROADWAY EAST
Plant        - 515 TENTH  AVENUE  EAST
It was all right  for rour  [orefti
"Iters
to  own   their   ox-teams,    their
row
boats and handlooms, bill il is ;i t
rime
againsl  Humanity  for n  i irisiti
,1 iss
lo  own  railroad-,  n i.m -.  mi Is.
���to-
ries. banh-. etc., the greal  so i il
util-
ities. which  wc  inusf  all   have  a
���c  -.-
lo in rirdt r In live.
How  Can  Production for Use
be
Introduced?
���
Let   ii-   suppose   that   the   wo
rs
cthi   .     i  turn   up."  i   ���     '
1 ,'
���  ii  .  r use, and
m-
ized   thcmseli es   into
groups ���<  irn sp i
l
mis fields of prod                  . - >ci;
.
livity necessijrj ii               Till n tl
'   :il-
tnunit).   arid   furl  i   m re,   lei   u-
as-
>ume  thai   tIn s   lorci d  on  a   IV
i\ m-
cial   elccti iji,   fired    thc   "States
m il
now in power by electing an adn
lllllS-
nation   representing   the   willing
allti
useful   members  ol   the   Pruvinc
���   iii-
stead   of  representing   the   drones
aml
exploiters,   as   the   Government
ui ies
today.
About the firsl  thing that won
d be
doii"  would probably be lo enact
islation   enabling   the   people   ihr
���ugh
their representatives to get  contr
.1  ol
���III I
Do You  Want  Bigger   Poultry Profits?
LET OUR EXPERTS SHOW YOU HOW
A few years ago poultry raising was a Comparatively easy mailer.
But today it is different. With the cost of feed going up���with competition growing keener and keener���with the rapidly increasing number
of truly scientific poultry raisers���the man who now raises poultry at
a profit simply MUST learn the business from the bottom up.
lie must know how to feed and breed for eggs���how to get the
most rapid growth for market���how to most successfully breed for
show purposes, lie must know the short cuts to success. He must
study the experience of others.
The poultry raising course of the International Correspondence
Schools comprises 24 practical lessons for home study. It represents
the experience of the most successful poultry raisers in the world as
well as our owil wide experience on the Raucocas Farm at Brown's
.Mills, N. J.���the world's largest  poultry  farm.
For any information regarding any of the I. C, S. courses (and we
have 284 lo choose from) see
W. H. Coulter
Local Manager
10 BURNS BLOCK,  18 HASTINGS STREET WEST
the land, timber and other natural resources,   as   well   as     the     productive
; mines,   mills,   factories   and   fisheries. |
[which   the  public  require.    The   State
could  pass  and  enforce  these  laws  in |
thc interest oi  the people just as today  laws are enacted and enforced in I
Ithe interests of the coal barons and
other  corporations.
These public requirements could be
purchased at cost or at their value or
(could be appropriated without compensation, according as the administration saw fit, for "Necessity know-
no law."
We would need money or a medium of exchange, and doubtless money
could then be borrowed for the credit
of the" Province which has been ruined by graft and mismanagement
would  be  restored  as  soon  as  induS;
i trial administration .replaced those
political adventurers now in power,
or the Province could issue its own |
bonds-or notes backed by the wealth
and industry of the Province, which |
would serve as a legal tender or money here and also serve for international  exchange  as  well.
We will suppose that one group of
workers cultivated the bind and supplied the foot' products for the rom-
munitv.       Another  erected     factories
WHERE
Q&ffa*
ORIGINATES
Drink this leading brew during the warm weather because you know it's pure.
Every bottle "pasteurized" and we take every precaution to make it a wholesome
and invigorating beverage.
Vancouver Breweries Limited THE GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
The
'Edgett's"   Sensational Low Price Grocery
Store���Saturday Bargains
"ti:
SUGAR���18 li'. sack Pure Cane Sugar, With
purchases;  regular $1.50 for only   	
FLOUR���1'> lb. sack Royal Household, Robin Hood,
Five Roses, Seal of Alberta; regular prices $2.25, for...
TEA���Our celebrated "Edgeit" Tea, 40c value	
Our Fresh Ground "Edgett" Coffee, 40c value 	
BUTTER���Alberta Creamery  Butter; A   LBS.
.Wc value, Sn��i.i��l ��
Special   	
CHEESE    Fresh cream,
Regular  _W   for   	
B.C. STRAWBERRIES,
Fresh   Victorias, box.. ..
FRUIT JARS-
Cjuarts, dozen
Lime Juice,
35c  values
20c
EGGS��� Fresh ranch,
Reg.   35c  dozen,   for
10c
Special Crate price
for Preserving
���Pints, doz. 65c    NEW RUBBER RINGS
 85c     Dozen  for   	
25c
drape Juice,
.i.tc   values   .
25c
Raspberry
Vinegar, 35c
25c
25c
SOAP���Royal
Crown,  14 bars  for
SOAP,  . els
Naptha, 4 bars for
JAM���Pure British Columbia Fresh Fruit, 5 lb. tins,
regular 75c; for only
45c
55<
for
: lb.
j!5c
25c
PRUNES���
3 lbs. for  ...
RAISINS
Secdetl, 3 pkts
RICK     Reg. 5
7 His, for   ....
CORN, PEAS, TOMATOES AND BEANS.
Special
VINEGAR���Reg. 15c
ottle,  for  	
25c
10c
TINS
25c
SODA l!lSCI:ITS���2-1
tins, reg. 30c; 2 tins for
LEMONS���"
35c doz. values for ...
POTATOES^-
NEW, 6 lbs. for 	
45c
20c
GINGER SNAPS���
3 lbs. for  	
ORANGES���
35c doz.  values  for
25c
25c
25c
OLD IIJGHLAND���
Per   s.tck    	
90c
PEANUT BUTTER���"
fresh   Matle,  lb	
20c
HAM,  longue, Game,    0[j
picnic size tins, 3 for ...*���*'*��
CANTELOUPES, PINEAPPLES. RASPBERRIES, CHERRIES,
CABBAGE, ASPARAGUS, BANANAS, TOMATOES���
Just received for Week-end Tratle	
SEY7586fc^ ALL PHONE   ORDERS   RUSHED SEY. 5868
SUCCESS
Awaits those wdio are prepared to accept their business opportunity
when it-presents itself,   Hundreds of
OPPORTUNITIES
Will present themselves in the great revival of business following the
war. If you are wise, you will get your training now and be ready
for your opportunity.
Our Winter Term Opens Monday, Jan. 4
See us about it NOW.     The information costs you nothing.
Success Business College
Limited
E. Scott Eaton, B.A., Principal
CORNER TENTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
Fairmont 2075 VANCOUVER, B.C.
Dr. W. J. CURRY
DENTIST
Ring up Seymour 2354 for Appobtment
Suite 301 Dominion Building, Vancouver, B.C.
HILLCREST DAIRY
THE   DAfRY   THAT   STANDS   THE   TEST
PURE PASTEURIZED
131 FIFTEENTH AVENUE WEST
Phone Fairmont 1934
New Minister of Munitions
David Lloyd-George, Reformer, Financier and Fighter
By Hugh S. Eayrs
Milk, Cream, Butter & Buttermilk
DELIVERED DAILY
INSPECTION INVITED :-: A TRIAL SOLICITED
About three years ago I heard the
following conversation in the section
in the select neighborhood of White-
chapel. Two garrulous char-women
glorious in caps belonging to their
worses halves, and with the inevitable baskets over their substantial
arms, were engaged in solemn confabulation.
"'Ow's yer old man?" said one.
"'E's sick i'bed. 'Lit 'is leg, 'e
did."
"Yew don't s'y so? Well, did you
ever!" said the enquirer nodding sympathetically, "ain't that orful?"
"Orful?" and the other sniffed triumphantly, "not bernard likely! Why
strike me, it's a little bit of orl right.
I gets 'is hinsurancc money pyed.
That there Lyde Garge has been dro-
rin' fowrpenee a week outer us for
some time, but it comes in 'andy at
a time like this. 'E's a great one,
'e is."
" 'E must be 'Ot stuff."
And so on.
And while th garrulous fish-wife
of Whiteehapel was declaring him to
be 'ot stuff, milady of Belgravia was
doubtless descanting to her guests
about "that dreadful man, Lloyd-
George, linieliousing again, y'know,"
and the big middle classes were either tearing him to pieces or putting
him on a more exalted pedestal, according to political predilection. For
here is a man who has made himself
at fifty-two the worst-bated, best-
loved figure in English public life.
Here is a man who for a decade lias
held the centre of the political stage.
compelling the eyes of all men to
himself. With his friends he has beer,
leading man; with those who like
him not, the heavy villain of the cast,
but whichever way you look at it,
still the star turn. He is ubiquitous.
You cannot escape him. The green-
capped, pipe-smoking individual at
the football match intersperses the afternoon's excitement with .remarks
about him. . His name is wafted to
you as you read your paper in the
Tube. Do you go to church, the parson from pulpited eminence drags in
the Chancellor. His name blinks at
you from newspaper placards, and
the Press without Lloyd-George to
conjure wilh���would have to rely solely upon Mr. Shaw's indiscretions, that
is, in times of peace. Music-hall ditties have been composed about him.
Diatribes enough to paper the walls
of a city full of houses have been
hurled ai him. Eulogies enough to
turn an ordinary man's head have
been thrust upon him.
And until recently I think the sum
total of his opponents' hate was
greater than the aggregate of his
friends' love. He tells, with the delightful naivete and genial raillery so
entirely Lloyd-Georgian, a story a-
gainst himself, which illustrates this.
A man had saved another from drowning and the Mayor of the city was
presenting the rescuer with a testimonial. "Really," said the man, "I
have done nothing to deserve this. I
saw the man in the water, went in
after him, swam to him, turned hjm
over to see that he wasn't Lloyd-
George���and brought him out."
There  is   more   in   this   story  than
mere and sheer fun.    There is truth.
It is indicative  of the attitude of a
large section of the United Kingdom
to  the  little  Welsh   Chancellor.    To
many people Lloyd-George is the biggest scoundrel unhung.    There is the
old  nursery  rhyme,  "Taffy    was    a
Welshman, Taffy was a thief." There
have been times, and they were not
rare, during  thc  last seven  or eight
years  or  so  that   half   England  was
willing to believe in the Pythagorean
theory  and  agree  that  Lloyd-George
was really Taffy, the ''beef-thief" reincarnated.    You see it looked so uncommonly like it.   Didn't lie go after
the unearned increment of the landed
classes, and on "Form Four," of awful   memory,   make   the   "plutcs"���to
quote Mr. Shaw���declare all sorts of
private  ami  confidential  things  about
their   financial   arrangements?      And
then, with calm insouciance, didn't he
demand fourpencc per week as insiir-
��� ance  money in  return  for  which  lie
i would  perform  strange   feats  of pre-
| stidigaitation   and    give     niiicpciicc?
(Ninepeuce   for   fourpencc���what   an
evidence of the Canaan lie would lead
England into!)    And, how could any
man   give   ninepence   for   fourpencc?
asked thc Chancellor's  critics.    How
preposterous!       How   dare   the   man
ask the doctors of the  United  Kingdom  to  enter  bis  insurance  scheme?
For This Week Only
We  will  make  up  from  any  material in the
house
LADIES'   SUITS  from $25 to $30
Regular $30.00  to $40.00
GENT.'S SUITS from $18'to $27.50
Regular $25.00 to $40.00
WORKMANSHIP THE BEST
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
DUCK YUEN & CO.
952 Granville St. Phone Sey. 9280
A good M.D. wrote to his paper and
said that any of his fellows who attended Mr. Lloyd-George should be
hounded out of the profession. He
was quite sincere. He meant it.
Lloyd?-Gcorge, according to most of
Mayfair, ought to be hanged, drawn
and quartered. "Lloyd-George"���thc
two words became a thing to threaten
naughty children with, when they
wouldn't do as nurse told them. Instead of "The goblins will get you
if you don't watch out" the small miscreant was threatened with "Lloyd-
George will get you, etc." Fact! Ask-
any of the bankers and the landed
proprietors and most of the members
of the Chamber of Peers, and they
will lash themselves into an ecstacy
of rage at thc mention of his name.
That is, they would have done so before thc Great European War. They
have a different story now.
And yet, strangely enough, he looks
anything but an ogre or a goblin-
substitute, or a bad genic, or a hardened criminal. A little man���stocky,
almost squat���be is inclining these
days towards a little superfluous flesh.
head and stopping abrupt at his collar leave a massive forehead which
you notice at mice. The eyes, alert,
always alert, .sometimes with the fire
of passion, sometimes with the radiance of a smile as he pinks an opponent with Ihe point of bis clever wit,
are the most outstanding features of
a face that becomes the mure interesting the longer you look at it. I
have seen those eyes eloquently bright
as he has preached the gosp'el in a
little church in Wales. For be is not
too big to forget the little Welsh chapel. He smiles as if lie meant it, and
when he is pleading the cause of
Wales or THE PEOPLE Tap's,
please, Mr. Primer) the light of in-
finite enthusiasm transfigures him
anil makes him a veritable Solomon
Eagle with an evangel which be believes in heart and soul. Most often
he is smiling, He loves to smile. He
radiates the sheer joy he feels in the
experience of living. For here is a
man who, whatever else he does, lives.
To him the living is the thing. The
batileis all that counts so far as its
personal effect is concerned. Life
to him is something more than a succession of the victors in laurels and
the vanquished in chains. He is no
fatalist!
* * *
He has always fought because he
has had to fight. A barefoot boy does
not become Chancellor of thc Exchequer without .fighting. His whole
career has -en a succession of stands.
Having known whom and what be has
believed, he has stood, sword in hand,
holding the enemy at bay till be got
it. He took his political life in his
hands over (be Boer War. The whole
country was in a frenzy of patriotic fervor, but the young Welsh member dared to remind the House of
"the righteousness that cxaltcth a
nation," We may have differed from
him as to his views on England's attitude with regard lo the Boer, but
tribute must -epaid to thc man who
risked everything for the sake of
what he believed. His constituency
endorsed his views by returning him
lo Parliament by an overwhelming
majority. Still fighting, be discerned
Mr. Chamberlain, the strong man of
the Government. He returned to the
attack. With the same low-pitched
voice, the barbed verbal arrows, the
same stinging personalities be fought
the great Birmingham statesman tin
flinchingly and unflagginly. For once
Mr. Chamberlain winced. Whereas
he had shaken every other critic as
a don- will shake a rat, he found in the
Welshman a foeman worthy of his
���steel.
You remember his fight over thc
Budget. The Government was losing favor. The country was turning.
Mob opinion was swinging round. Mr.
Lloyd-George decided to risk all on
the throw. He introduced his Budget and, though the winds of bitter
opposition ^howled about him he
would not consent to the withdrawal
of his land clauses. "If they go," he
said, "I go." He won out. And the
Government���that ministry of a charmed life���was recreated.
Then came the Insurance Bill. I
doubt if ever a measure introduced in
any House had a more unfortunate
reception. His enemies mercilessly
assailed it. His friends defended it
but lukewarmly. The sneers and jeers
about "stamp-licking" and "ninepence-
for-fourpence" would have daunted
most men; but not the little Welshman. He had to fight too much to
be disturbed whatever the  odds.
Gladness is his distinguishing note.
Observe how blithely he parries, how
gaily he presses home the point of
his weapon. I remember an occasion
in the House when Tim Hcaly���lonely
Tim, leader of a party consisting of
himself���interrupted him. "There are
fanatics in every party," he said.
"Yes," came the retort, accompanied
by a winning smile and dangerous
sweetness, "even in a party of one."
The point about his wit is that it
is quick as well as pretty. You can
never get under his guard. While
you are thinking. But how skilfully
you will pink h;m he has his blade
out and is pressing your arm. He is
a master of repartee. His very sau-
veness is alarming. With a winning
smile he will lean forward and knock
your weapon out of your hand and
hold the noint of his own at the spot
where you thought you were strongest. Said a cockney woman, looking
at a picture postcard of the Chancellor, "I likes 'im. 'E's so pleasant
like!" True for thc cockney. He is
pleasant all the time he is fighting.
* * *
war? Because, in the first instance,
we are bound by honorable obligations to defend thc independence, the
liberty, the integrity of a small neighbor that has always lived peaceably.
She could not have compelled us; she
was weak; but the man who declines
to discharge his duty because his creditor is too pottr to enforce it is a
blackguard."
One wonders, when one surveys (he
twenty-five years of the Chancellor's
political life, what motive power has
urgetl him on. I think it has been the
nearness and dearness to his heart of
the claims and cause of Ihe weak. He
has been poor himself, and knows
their case from experience. He has
known what it is to have to fight for
all that he has hail. And he has seen
in his own case, as others have seen
in his case, thc typification of things
that are to be. i he man of power is
going to be the people's man, one of
them, one with them, and yet one incomparably above them simply because of vision and dynamic power.
Now and then one has wondered as
one has watched him leap from peak
to higher peak whether he would
yield to the fascination that the game
of personal opportunism would offer,
and depart from those principles and
simple faiths with which he was born.
But the simplicity and the rugged
have clung to him in equal measure,
strength of the Welsh mountains
He has come to the seats of the mighty, but not one of them but knows
that he sits there only by proxy for
the People. The glitter and glare of
the great world into wdiich bis abilities have led him have left him un-
dazzlcd. unimpressed. He is in that
world, but he is not of that world. A
modest home with two Welsh maids,
and not a palace, is his abiding-place.
And this reflects thc man. Strong in
the strength of bis simple trust in
God, loyal to llic simple traditions of
his beloved Wales, unfalteringly
faithful to the cause of the simple
people, be will go down to history as
one of the greatest social reformers
of the age. . . . But he will not be
buried in Westminster, lie will rest,
as he once passionately said, "in the
shadow  of  the   Welsh  mountains."
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PURCHASES
From these FIRMS
Y
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Auctioneers
If you wish to dispose of your Furniture, Stock or Fixtures by Auction
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KING & CO.
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0
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AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES
VANCOUVER SPEEDOMETERS
Service Station, Stewart speedometer, Warner auto-meter;srepairs executed promptly, 516-518 Howe St,
JOHN S. RANKIN
D. S. MACD0NALD
Auctioneers
800  PENDER  STREET WEST
Phone Seymour 3111
Furniture Bought for Spot  Cash
A TELEPHONE Fair. 720 for
NGUS
PLUMBING   ::   HEATING
ELECTRICAL REPAIRS
A SPECIALTY
No order too large or too small for
prompt service
V
ancouver
Creamery Co.
Our Ice Cream cannot be beat.
Our Butter is of the best quality.
Our Factory is the cleanest in the
city. No hands touches our Butter
as it is all wrapped and put up in Mb.
packages.
EXPRESSING
and HAULING
B. R. GRAY
42 TWENTY-FIFTH AVE.  EAST
Furniture, Piano Moving and Expraaa Work.
Work  promptly  attended
art   right. Phone:
Work  promptly  attended  to and  our  prieaa
FAIRMONT  UI
M
THIS SPACE TO LET
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
B. C. INDEPENDENT UNDERTA-
kers, Limited���Successors to Sill &
Miller, Limited. Funeral directors
and cmbalmcrs, 652-654 Broadway
W.   PHONE FAIRMONT 738.
KEARNEY, T. J. & Co., DOMINION
Parlors, 802 Broadway west. Phonr
Fairmont 1098. Night . calls answered.      '
OUTFITTERS
FOUND���THE CHEAPEST PLACE
in town to get your Spring Suit on
easy payment; little down, little
weekly. Lester Outfitting Co., 1037-
39 Pender West.
In the preceding section I referred
to Mr. Lloyd-George's speech with
regard to the Boer War. It was the
speech of a man who loved peace, with
a passionate love, who Would preserve peace at any cost. Here is
what he said in the Queen's Hall
last August.
"There is no man in this room who
has always regarded the prospect of
engaging in a great war with greater
reluctance and with .greater repugnance than I have done throughout
the whole of my politcal life. There
is no man cither inside or outside of
this room more convinced that we
could not have avoided it without national dishonor. I am fully alive to
the fact that every nation who has
ever engaged in any war has always
invoked the sacred name of honor.
Many a crime has been committed in
its name; there are some being committed now. All thc same, national
honor is a reality, and any nation that
COLLECTORS
NATIONAL COLLECTING COM
pany, 202 North West Trust Building. Established 1907. We collect
current accounts, rents and bad debts
in town or country. NO COLLECTION, NO  PAY.    Phone 4980.
0
NLY     THE    BEST     OF
MATERIAL     USED     IN
REPAIRING YOUR
BOOTS AND SHOES
AT MY STORE.
JOHN STEPHEN
3324 MAIN STREET
Satisfaction Guaranteed.  Prices Right
N
THIS SPACE TO LET
Masses of dark  hair, brushed in  or-1 disregards it is doomed.    Why is our
Icrly disorderliness back over the bigj honor  as  a .country  involved   in   this
FOR SALE
v SNAP, 2 GOOD BUILDING LOTS
all cleared and ready for garden.
Inside city, near three ear lines and
school. $400; $10 cash. $5 monthly.
Hamilton Exchange, 1012 Holden
Building.
WANTED
WANTED���CONSIGNMEX ��� S OF
Garden Products, Small Fruits, etc..
etc., in small lots. Fair Market
Prices Paid.���Main Seed and Produce Co., 2434 Main St. Phone
Fairmont 2593.
E
THIS SPACE TO LET
Y
OU WILL GET VALUE
AND SATISFACTION BY
PATRONIZING
Crossland's Store
4520 MAIN STREET
A nice clean stock of Groceries,
Candys and Tobacco.
\.

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