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The Saturday Chinook Apr 1, 1916

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Array SATUROAY
Vancouver
British
CHINOOK
Columbia
Canada
Vol. IV. No. 48���Established 1911
SATURDAY, APRIL 1,  1916
Price Five Cents
CURRENT COMMENT
THE CURSE OF PATRONAGE
THE DISPENSARY
SIR GEORGE E. FOSTER, Dominion Minister of
Trade and Commerce, in a recent speech, declared
that patronage was the curse of politics in Canada.
Jic might have added ii was the purse of politics, or rather
. I political parlies, for parties consider the purses of their
patrons far more than the curses of their opponents. The
government knows the opposition will avail itself of ever)
opportunity to attack the inevitable outcome of the patronage system, but will never attack the system itself, lest at memb
any time the turn of fortune's wheel places it in the posi- longs
tion of dispenser of the loaves and fishes on the political
table. Tbe honest politician���and be is not sucl. n rare
bird as lhe politicologists aver���almost inevitably becomes ' ''���'
entangled in the nd of patronage and is captured by tin-
dispenser of government favors. As a young and ambitious man be may enter Ihe political arena determined to
live on his salary and make bis way purely by forensic or
other abilities and turn his bead from all subsidiary interests. But bis constituents desire government patronage
or expenditure and judge liiui by the cash result oi hi-
activities. The public works department ot governmeni
is the dispensary to which be must apply for those medicines which are popularly supposed to cure his constituents of their inalienable right to grumble. The Itlore perilous his seal the more soothing medicine required, So
he becomes a constant suppliant for docks, warehouses,
and Conservative member of the provincial legislature is
chairman. Probably few men would make better chairmen. In ilue course iie vvill retire, possibly when the
member fur Vancouver gets beaten or retires from Dominion politics. Tin- member may then lie appointed to
the Board as chairman. Knowledge of tin- business ij
not necessary. One member of the board was a most
respected marble mason, uln.se exceptional ,'iiits as a
designer of tombstones no doubt fully qualify him as an
assessor ot shipping din-. Nol one member of the'board
was ever in the shipping business. The member for the
constituency recommends certain people for such appointments io headquarters in Ottawa. Naturally be recommends men win. have done him a good turn, been
active workers for ii. party which he represents, or are
of one or other of the societies to which he be
lt;^ helpless victim of the system which saps the strength j ness  ol  which  lhe people  .in   ihc  shareholders and  the
of every government and invariably is the chief cause of | ministers th.- directors elected by those shareholders. The
various de-
should  be
A POSITION OK HONOR
no  reason  whatever
should not be administered by
cause of his experience with that
vised bv a board chosen from ai
why the harbor board
i secretary, engaged be-
class of work and super-
none business men inter-
its defeat in the long run.
THE SINEWS OF WAR
A political parly must have funds, and them- funds are
supplied from various sources. Apj
source is the government contractor or public works department. The contractor wauls a job from the government. Ile may get that job on tender but there are invariably extras. The case of the Kelly firm and the late
.Manitoba government is in point, it is supposed that the
money stolen from the people went not to any one politician bul lo the party funds, not ..niy the provincial parly
funds but those of the Dominion parly as 'veil. Locally, in
the recent inquiry into the commission of $75,000 given lo
Mr. J. S. Matson. proprietor of the "Colonist" and "\ews-
Adveriiser," Mr. Matson confessed that be paid the "News-
Advertiser" $30,000, saying that he owed it that sum. Mr.
Matson may really have borrowed that sum from the
I"News-Advertiser," but lhe public does nol credit it be-
. cause it km ws Mr. Matson has a great deal of govern
nient printing, in other words, is a government contractor
directors are appointed by the chairman to
partments as supervisors and advisors, The
merely the links which bind  the whole business together.
Apparently   the'chief! i""'' '''I''"'1""'"1 ,l;i* ;i general manager ami the general
| managers   should   really   form   a  secondary  cabinet  which
j could at all times advise the directors and if the directors
refused to carry out their advice could resign en masse
and refuse t , be responsible for the carrying out of such
| wishes of the directors as they considered inimical to the
'best   interests   of   the   country.     These   general   managers
( .should be paid at least $25,000 a year each and their posts
I should be permanent.    When they resign after a certain
number  of years  service   there  should  be a  suitable  pension attached.    I'.y this means  lhe best men  would be at-
I tracted to ihe civil service.    Moreover a permanent body
of such  officials  behind  the  merely political body  would
be of untold benefit to lhe whole country.    If tbe country
demanded a certain policy and returned a party to power
j pledged   to   carry   out   lhat   policy,   il   would   probably  be
modified   in   accordance   with   the   business   necessities  of
itbe situation.    Behind the heat and tlie sentiments of party
tin
develop
i-nl
if  lhe  harbor,  who  belong to i'
elevators, post offices, public buildings, and all those thill..
which bespeak progress and prosperity even if iheir real| politics must look out f     .   ������������> i dl-. -i.
value to the taxpayer is somewhat problematical.
WHAT IS PATRONAGE?
In the days of ancient Rome the master wh
esl
the various transportation, shipping, dock and other interests. To belong to such a board is an honor and no doubt
there are several business men who would consider it an
honor and not ask for payment. The powers of the board
can be regulated by legislation and all their meetings
should lie public. But this most simple method, which is
common to all other countries, is abandoned so as to
allow for the full play of politics and provide jobs for
certain people who are politicians, not business men. A
member who has given up his business and gone  in  for
���use he is forced
int.. oblivion at any election. If his parly loses the election  then all these appointments are liable to bc revised
ud   as   such   probably   contributes   largely   to   the   party <
,,,.., ... ., i    ���      o   .  *w     politics would -tarn! a permanent body o   sane men ready
hinds.    But tbe public jumps to lhe conclusion lhal $30,-   ' . '
000 went back lo tbe party funds, in other words, tli.it  ihc/" advise and  '"'"-'n"''-
Conservative party took $30,000 of public money for their j DEMOCRATIC AUTOCRACY
own  political  purposes.    It  will  be  admitted  thai   it  isi    *t might be said that the creation of such an inner cab-
party  and   very  bard  on | jnet would be the basis   n an autocracy and that the people
would not be able t.- rule themselves because of this pcr-
very hard on  the Conservative parly and  very bard
Mr.  Mais..n that such  thoughts should spring into men's
minds.   Hut that is the result of patronage and proves the
evil it does.    The most perfectly innocent transaction docs
not escape similar opprobium.
BOTH PARTIES TARRED
The Liberals cannot complain of lhe Conservatives,
'their record in past years when their patronage was in
the  hands of  one  of  the  shrewdest and   hardest working   Wl
maneiit official body which was not subject to the whims
and fancies of the electorate. But is plain that parliament
and the ministers would really control policies. The permanent officials could only advise or amend, such amendments being submitted to parliament and debated. This
is merely the roughest outline of the sort of method which
uld  be  able  to  establish  effeicicut   control  of  all  our
by iln- party coming into power.    Consequently there is! business men in Vancouver, was appalling.    It is simply j Public services without interfering with democratic gov-
his slave bul still retail
was known as a patn.it.
no devotion to duly, merely a devotion to parly.
A PERMANENT CIVIL SERVICE
The post office is another excellent example of a similar
V-.litic me;
and also the offices, contract
a public ofifcer may bestow
that it is distinctly a matter
if affairs,   The permanent staff may 1
. honors i
by favor,
.f favor, in
I Ireei,
I some paternal rights over him
This gave rise to what is known
as patronage  and which  today when applied t i the body
ins the rigln of nomination to political office state
md so forth which capable men with expert knowledge oi
It will be noted! The heads arc usually "d,ead" politicians
t a matter of fit- i tliere is no reason for men working bard and doing i
,.i,i, .,,',,, 1,,,,,,,-nis  best.   They can only reach assistant jobs even if they
ness.    ll has. nothing whatever to do with appointments'
which are given to men whose abilities qualify them for
positions.     In   the   public   service   of   Canada   today   there
are   hundreds   of   nun   totally   unfilled   by   experience   or
training for  the  positions which  they hold in  the  public
service.    They consist to some extent of politician- who
"have sue. ee.'.e.',  iii becoming members of thc  i**..minion
.-r Provincial legislatures, and on retiring have been pre-
e filled with
[ministration,
Consequently
' eir
an
Stupid to blame a wholesale grocer who finds be can reap
much advantage from a political system which practically
provides him with a special license in all his business undertakings, for making money out of politics, lie is in
business not politics. His intimate acquaintance with political parasites who cling like limpets to his office d".,r,
renders   him   extremely  sceptical  of  any   man's   honesty.
eminent.
PAYING THE PRICE OF PATRONAGE
Patronage with its evil trail lays a heavy ...11 on the life
of Canada. It throttles all finer aspirations, makes politics
a morass which destroys those who would tread its paths,
besmirches the reputation of the most honest of men,
allows  personal  interest   to  batten   like  a  cancer  on   the
tl
He  perceives  men  of  far  better education   than   himself  wjjole  body  of  political  life.    Once   eliminate  patronage
flattering him and doing many things to obtain his favor   from  politics  and  those  who  desire  t
sented
wit
i a postmast
irsh
p, a  eust.'ins
bille
,    1
other
post
which  pensi
>1]S
them al the
CNpC
ISC
public.
-if lill
PITY THE POOR MEMBER
It is natural, therefore, that during the lii
party tbe members of lhal party are liable i.
for some sinecure
feel it is time I
legislators are i
fessional man ;
tics, which 1 i
stituency. His
he a liberal con
not address an
welfare he can
more  grateful!}
into which they may step wh
them P. resign. The salaries i
-u.h as to attract any business
I as to devote his entire time
. n-is| in obtaining favors for
ii uses arc heavy, as I e is exp
ctcd i.
reac
lion of the Provincial Legislature, is another example oi
patronage. It expends large sums of money, am! any department which spends money is a legitimate oiler of the
political wheels, All such bodies should really come under
lhe head of a permanent civil service. There should not
lie any question of pany politics; there is no reason why
there .should be. The civil service of the country sh, uld
le considered a regular profession for which men are
trained jusl as they are in Great llritain, Special experts
such a.- engineers can be obtained by selection, but the
selection should be made by the permanent civil service
staff just as the directors of any company select experts
(.. advise them on special matters, The present
not only archaic and wasteful, but it is stupid,
iallv designed m gel thc minimum of result
maximum of graft.
JNO ESCAPE FROM GRAFT
Under the present systc m it is
Hoard in Vancouver, a crea-  w.h$ch he himself would despise himself for doing.    He ,1onorably and honestl
likes the feel of power, to order this man here or that man
there. He is perfectly indifferent to the politics of tin-
day. All he desires is to exercise the political patronage
and if it cosls him a large sum ill cold cash he regards thai
sum mircly as a business investment lie will very likch
be found subscribing to both' parties, from two different
sources, lie would never think- of allowing any clerk in
his office lo lake advantage of a customer; to gel the better of a rival in business is another mailer altogether.
lie will give tlie best service possible ami -ell lhe best
goods  because   it   is  good  business.     If  the  people  of  the
serve the  country
nli  ui fear.    But under
present   conditions,   to   serve   the   country  means   to   lose
every .-lired of personal reputation.   The public service he's the refuge'of seli'-seekers. the permanent home of
comes
ami ui-
mt r l ���_	
associat
i menl dc'par'tmi yv*.
j ignorant autocrac
j privilege.   Patri i
tics the-husband
mesty.
.in.
a nl
m is
more important than the head of a govern
ere is in. m .re narr ��� ���-.. minded sn<
nt
.-rente
>y  spi
system is
ith   tin
country  m  wincii  ne  carries
enough to lend themselves to
which be can turn to his fiua
he be blamed.*    lie is there ti
pie common sense.
COMMON SENSE
.-ii his business arc fools
an archaic political  system
icial advantage, why should
lo business, nol bach ; -
a mire ovi
ruplioii. I'
Canada cai
braining in
be trac
ividuals
, i  uemoc
Mamm.n.
ti
parties,    lair.
sacrificing  il
lemocracy is '
ther of pri* ilegi. and poli-
'.", eir -:      ��� i-   pread like
Out o   n springs cor-
of p ilitical corruption iu
patrol agi ,     tt is  no  use
agi   i- the natural
iph -  on   the
survive it must be
rituttor t -
ssociati m
at  least  si
than  the
all pli
for th
a mate
of thc 1
To be
th
wl
the satisfactory
s and fishes he Cl
essful the memb
desire something
,-ln Hie-.
cheque, which
:ss. Popularit;
esii in by his
iccure from thc
must be backe
-  return  for tl
or by an awaken..1 public opinion which, as
no interest in politics until its local interests
THE PATRONAGE COMMITTEE
lilicians   who  are   In
If he
tile   p
.n-ii'.ueiits
lispensary.
either bj
���ir supporl
rule, lakes
C at stake.
i*ni
-nl
ai,-- all publi
find fault wit
ii pi
The rcsiill is i
belie*, ed to be hoi
brush.   Their nest is i
iln
' extreme suspicion.   'I
! determination in  the
country cannot escap
all public offices.    It
I gas which permeates
I ition cm alvv
I waj - find some pers in
I in go* eminent jobs,    h
I go\ ernmenl undertal es
j those  activities  soouci
I A  man may make a fin
| business   and   then   will
j important post, regard!
' he  is  at  once  singled  I
s not a man in Cai
only uatitri
constantl"  li
lonorablc n a
do his  level
e miasma w iii
...1 .ills and m,
1  thai
ev er;.
:i will
all thi
'or   hi!
���i;
i ta
.in
ipp
ii ire or h-ss personally interesti d
a ci itintry like Canada where the
-,. many actiiiti< -, every one '
or laii r com.-- until ��� sttsj ii i I
record for hunscll in 1 is private
i tin- governmeni offers him an
SS of what bis p. lit
il for all kinds if' ab
li
th
nest a      ab!
exisl on tin     run
,1  "bosses ���   '
ih.-i  days thai  tin
ii-  representative
i oustituency will re
b\ iotis.    i ei rah   i I
���CRITIC! S,
THIS  IS  THE  FOURTH  OF THE "CRITICUS"
ARTICLES
���pi,    ��� ��� icncral's dih mi
ernmenl
]-,. Politics      u    I ���    ation.
i f Pa 11
��� commi   ���*
public
-   i ill
- are usual]-
ll.
1)1 111 111   Ol   I
. '   -. ii  by  districts,     I hei e maj ml eis    rom
Vancouver in the local legislature who an   pre-cmincntlj
fitted to hold ministerial rank, bul -   lv    ne ol them will
be   appointi d   1- sl   the   c nstiluciii y  of   Kan I
Its ll  -li-
hied.    Thai sorl   >l tl r.   was .ill very well ti n
I'hcre   years ago bul British Columbia   ia   nol remained in babj
nlarly supposed to be lined vvjtii j;   |)Ql ,( ||).1|| in Canada today who would accuse either   clothes.    No one  really   cares  today  whether a  cabinet
the same feathers,    If a perfectly honest politician, who  ^ wiu-t\,\ laurier or Sir Robert Borden of making money   minister  sits   for Vane, u
cannot afford to depend entirely Oil politics for his Inch-   ^    ^  p0|jtjCS|     ](,,,||   are   men   of   the   Inchest   personal , people cue    '
hood, is engaged in any other form of business, any in-   honor   yct DOt|] are victims of a system  which lias put | The cure li
crease in the growth of that business is attributed to government patronage. If he is not engaged in any other
business it is considered an absolute certainty that he is
making money out of politics. As member for his constituency he is supposed to have the patronage of that constituency. He may at election time inform his audiences
that patronage will be left in thc hands of a committee,
but the committee is merely a convenience which adds
to the number of channels through which governmental
favors flow. In Vancouver today it is believed Dominion
patronage is exercised by the member acting through a
committee which is composed of certain men whose knowledge of politics may bc profound but whose knowledge
of politics is bliss. 'Tis folly to bc wise when ignorance
I , :��� t f��������.nt    The committee is composed
Canada  on  a  level   with   the   United States  as  the  worst
country iii the world for political corruption,
THE PANAMA CANAL
Both countries must spend enormous sums of money
through their public works departments. The Panama
Canal is an excellent example of work done for the country by men whose, sole purpose was to complete a job
which would redound to the honor of their country. But
in order to do so thc work had to be taken out of politics
and made a separate business. And it is most interesting
to note that it was handled on the military system under
military officers and engineers. All Congress did was to
vote thc money. It had nothing whatever to do with appointments.   These were made entirely by Colonels Goe-
is no barrier to ^^J^^Vi^,  ^"and Gorgas who were in charge of thc work, the one
^a^nnam :,i :"SmI:::: :,,^ conferral -on,  as engineer-in-chief, the other as medical supervisor.    I be
iliee  for  the  local legislature,  whose  activities as  president of one of those defunct Trust Companies which have
done so much to ruin the credit of the province, brought
him under thc censure of a judge.    These gentlemen are
the arbiters of destiny where public business is concerned.
All work to be done, which comes under the aegis ol tne
Dominion  Government,  must be examined by  them  and
their recommendations arc final.   Naturally they would rto
give work to a rival who might vote against them        >u
they serve their country and themselves, no doubt to the
own perfect satisfaction and with due-regard for the efficiency of thc public service.    It is the same with hot
parties.    It is not considered extraordinary-.! is normal
and legitimate politics.
THE HARBOR BOARD
An excellent illustration of patronage is the Vanc0"''"
Board of Harbor Commissioners. This is appointed by
the Dominion Government and the members thereorare
salaried. No one knows what they get; thc sum tor some
reason or other is not published.   A veteran business man
result of that work and the excellent example it gave of
public work untainted hy political influence has been  oi
untold benefit to thc United States.
THE FIELD OF FIRE
In Canada the lesson has not been learnt. The Public
Works Department is nothing but a political dispenser of
loaves and fishes. It docs not matter in the least which
party is in power, the minister at the head of thc public
works depart, is invariably the target for criticism, with
"graft," in other words, sheer dishonesty, stealing, embezzling public funds, or whatever you like to call it, as the
field of fire. Does the Dominion Government construct
a wharf, then the question of tenders, the names of thc
contractors, their relations with this or that member, come
i��� for careful scrutiny. If a pile falls out of a wharf and
kills someone, or an accident takes place, thc government
is accused of "graft." But it is the government's own
fault Why on earth no premier has had sufficient strength
to alter the system and earn for himself undying fame, the
mere man on the street cannot tell.   Presumably he also
or Timbuctoo, What thc
in is an honesl and efficient administration,
in the bands of the people. They should
demand of every candidate his definite adherence to a
resolution which he will pledge himself to bring forward
in the house if he is elected. This resolution should provide that all public work should be undertaken only
through the public works department, which should In* a
permanent  department of the civil  service.
GOOD INTENTIONS
This is, of course, the present intention which paves the
road to the hell of corruption. But the intention is marred
by the political necessities of parties.. The minister of
public works is the exploiter of bis department instead
of its mouthpiece. His only duty should bc to acquaint
himself with the practical necessities of his department
ami lay hi.s conclusions before thc permanent officials.
Upon the officials should fall the responsibility for all contracts and all work undertaken. They can estimate from
year to year thc requirements of the country and can draw
up what they consider to In* thc necessary programme.
They would have to work within the limitations of the
regular budget and the money provided for the department.
The minister should have no say whatever in tbe assignments of contracts, in tenders, in actual work. All employees and contractors should be responsible solely to
thc permanent officials. It is scandalous and preposterous
that some petty chairman of a ward should bc allowed to
initial applications for work on government jobs. The
department  should  work  regardless  of political  changes.
���e permanent head of the department would occupy the
same sort of position as is occupied by the chairman of the
railway board. It would save Canada an immense sum of
money every year if this were done. Thc minister of
the department can advise and consult but he should not
be allowed to interfere with the working of the department.
THE BASIS OF GOVERNMENT
Essentially the idea sa which our form ot government
is based is that the government of the country is a busi-
iBaaBaRitBB'>"""BBI,l"BHWIiailllBa'
EDITORIAL OPINIONS!
The truth nl all tlmca firmly ���tniida
Ami   -Inill   lioni   Hill   In  urn*  i-nillir,-."
A SIGN IN a down town sh,,,, reads "VVe Never Sleep,"
which 1-oks like an unneighborly knock against the furniture   store   next  .lo.,r.   where  a   c >sy  bedroom   suite   is
displayed in  the window.
* * *
THE MILLENIUM IS not far off and ihe lion and the
lamb will soon be gambolling ou the same green. Ex-
Mayor Taylor's latest journalistic venture is published in
thc  Daily  PROVINCE office.
* *  v.
"Till'* RAIN IT raineth every day," but when it keeps
it up nights it becomes monotonous.
* ��� *
OUR AMERICAN NEIGHBORS made merry over thc
time it took Great Britain to suppress the Boer war. Perhaps when they get through with the little fuss over in
Mexico thc perspective may not be so humorous.
* * *
THE WAR DESPATCHES state that the French have
captured a German position called Angora. In military
circles this is regardvd as equivalent to getting thc Kaiser's
goat.
* * *
THE LAUNDRY COMRINE is another stiff proposition
the result of these piping times Si war.
* * *
THE LIQUOR DEALERS' compensation delegation
which interviewed the cabinet at Victoria the other day
cited thc fish canneries as a precedent. Tliere is some
force in their contention. One cans all the fish they can
catch, while the other catches all the suckers they can.
* * *
QUERY FOR THE Police Commissioners. Why employ  plain   clothes  alley  watchmen  to  do  the  work the
harness "bulls" arc paid for?
* * *
REVISING THE CIVIC estimates may not be grafting
but it sounds like pruning.
���i TWO
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  APRIL   1,   191
���:	
i'i lb-5-^
*i
^^^����^^^
One dredge is said to have operated all summer snouting
out mud on one side of itself and dumping it out On thc
other side. They spent the winter just reversing the motions, ihe Canadian people paying meantime wages, overhead expenses and so much per yard for the stuff which
was supposed to have been cleared away.
Dredging contractors often keep their machines far
enough away from the shore to escape the prying eyes
of anxious ratepayers. They love a fog bank or the shelter
of an  island.    They prefer dull,  wet  days.
Millions ban- been made in the government dredging
business, Many of Canada's millionaires got a start iu
that line. It is said thai Premier Roblin got in wrong in
Manitoba when he undertook to let contracts for dredging
oul a creek which ran by bis farm.
II..11. Robert Rogers, Minister of Public Works, awakened early to the possibilities of government dredging
contracts, So long as ii is necessar* to have mud to
throw at ones political opponents, the Hon. Rollers will
always have lots of it for he is keeping lhe dredges busy
day and night.
THE SATURDAY CHINOOK
Published every Snturilny at the Chinook Printing Mouse,
426 Homer Street. Vancouver.
Telephone   Seymour 470
Registered   at   the   Post  Office   Department,   Ottawa,   as
Second Class Mull Matter.
Sl'IISCKIPTIOX   nATES
To all points in Canada, United Kingdom, Newfoundland,
New Zealand and other British Possessions:
$2.00
Postage to Aniei-ican, European ariti other foreign countries
$1.00 per year extra.
THE RAID ON THE KITSILANOS
HAMILTON'  READ, the law student from  Bowser's
office who got nearly $30,000 as bis pari of the swag
after   the   deal   with   the   aborigines   bad   been   coll-
eluded, declared before  the  committee  tbis  week  that  he
and Alexander "were men of honor." and thai, consequently,   they could  enter  into  a   "gentleman's  agreement"   re-
i garding the division of the loot.
Another amusing feature was Read's declaration that on
'March  31,   Mr.   Ilowser  knew   nothing  whatsoever  of  the
.proposed  deal  or   negotiations.     Later  on   Read  declared
| that on .March 2 of that same year, Mr. Ilowser bad wired
lo   lion.  Robert  Rogers, at  Ottawa,  regarding lhe  whole
matter.
The Saturday  Chinook  will be delivered  to any  address
In Vancouver or vicinity at ten cents a month.
Member of the Canadian Press Association.
The Saturday Chinook circulates throughout Vancouver
and the cities, towns, villages and settlements throughout
British Columbia. Jn politics the paper Is Independent
Liberal.   We do not accept liquor advertisements.
Publishers Greater Vancouver Publishers, Limited.
FUNNY NAMES FOR PUBLIC MEN
SOME of the names which strive our eyes upon opening the pages of thc papers are: Whisperin' Jim,
J. Songhees Matson, Coldwater ike, Dewdney Bill,
Slippery Price, Coal Stock Young, Napoleon Ilowser,
These are not the names of members of Buffalo Hill's
Show but of men prominent in tbe public life of Western
Wild West Show but of men prominent in the public life
of Western Canada.
WHILE THEY ARE naming mountain peaks in B, C.
after prominent Dominion politicians, why not christen
one .Mount Deficit in honor of the lofty proportions of
Premier Bowser's provincial indebtedness?
* * *
THE ACTIVITIES OE Vancouver's so-called "Morality
Squad" is largely confined to the water Iron! and vicinity.
If they had the nerve to molest thc places "Higher Up"
they would soon swell the ranks of the unemployed.
* * *
IT IS STATED that the local ice companies have formed
a merger. This looks like a cold-blooded attempt to freeze
out competition.
* * *
WE GATHER FROM AMERICAN exchanges that the
spat now in progress on the Mexican border is the greatest war of the century. The little affair over in Europe
is a mere trifle in comparison.
* * ��
THE THREE BUSY B's in the coming Provincial Election will be Bowser, Booze and Boodle,
* * *   ,
THAT SAINTLY AND sedate paragon of all the journalistic virtues, the Vancouver WORLD, partially eclipsed
the initiation number of the Saturday Evening GLOBE in
its prize fight extra. Whether the malice was aforethought
of afterthought is an  open  question,
* * *
TWO BULLET-HEADED pugs got as much for pummelling each other for half an hour in New York the other
night as President Wilson gets for "wailing and watching" for a year.
* * #
AT LAST REPORTS General Villa was "Somewhere in
Mexico" and the American punitive expedition in Mexico
somewhere.
A WORTHY EXAMPLE
WHEN the Hudson's Bay Company advertised for
men on Monday of last week, it was stated tliat
preference was lo be given to returned soldiers or
men physically unfit to go to the front. In this the company set an example which might well he followed by
other Vancouver business houses. It might be followed
to particularly good advantage by the municipalities and
by tlie government.
ensue litigation which  would  make   Dominion Trust  litigation look like a minor police court trial.
* ��� *
We hope next week to print a lengthy article from the
pen of "Criticus" touching upon the Pacific and ('.real
Eastern scandal. "CritlcUS" writes with a wide knowledge
of ways ami means of building railroad- in British Columbia, lie has ample data upon the mbjccl of Pacific ami
Greal Eastern and will treat fully upon the mailer in an
unbiassed manner.
THE LAND!   BOYS! I   THE LAND! ! !
Give me lhe spade and lhe man  who can use it,
A fig Ifr the dude wilh his while lily hand.
For God gave you strength, do not waste or abuse it.
Give il back to your mother���
The  Land, boys!    The  Land! !
Yes! It will be "Back lo the Land" when the war is
over. Tile six-foot men with brand shoulders, big chests,
"with hair on their chests" as lhe Spaniards say, with hardened muscles and squared jaws, men who have faced death
���men who have "done things," will not be seen watching
ribbons in a dry goods store when the war is over. Great
big, bronzed fellows will not be asking the girl out "shopping" whether she wants them "with lace or without."
You will not find men with the physique of a bull fighter
hammering a typewriter ill a lawyer's office, or "thumping
the dominoes" al a Kincma Theatre. No! no! the men
who have seen the fair fields of France, Belgium, Flanders laid desolate, the men who have come
"Out of the jaws of death
Oul of the mouth of hell"
will want work, yes work, but work which will give the
promise of reward���work which will not entail the lurking
cares of commercialism, they will want work "in the open"
under God's blue sky with God's breezes fanning tlleil
cheeks, the work of primitive man, who, when war was
over did literally turn bis sw..rd into a ploughshare, his
spear inlo a pruning hook and win from
Till'   LAND
the sustenance tllat God. the Father, intended for his children.
Tommy has some quiet moments "on sentry go"��-sonic
quiet moments mid the dm of bank- and Tommy is���
thinking!
"Yes! we fall to wondering, very many of us, what wc
shall do when all this is over, when we are no longer held
to the obedience of the bugle and the drum, when we ate
learning uneasily lo wear civilian clothes once again, when
the quartcmastcr-sergeant has not anything for us on ;.,
day.
"Some of us look forward to that linn- with a definite
fear, some wilh unquenchable hope. But you will scarcely
find one among us all who hopes to go back to life ;���-
he knew and left it."
And   wherever   there   is   tllat   "unquenchable   hope"   it ���
is associated with���Land!
"Thc men with the crossed swords on their arms look us
and exhorted us through (he relentless hours of physical '
drill lill our bodies were fine and sound and strong. Wc
were led along the roads and over the great downs t
find not exhaustion but power. We were made to toil in
endless cunning ways till the weakling stood upright am',
the flabbily fat were lean and fit. War came to mak(
our bodies splendid."
And those splendid bodies. How could they be better
employed than ill raising fields of golden grain, in planting
orchards to be glorious with blossom ami then more glorious still wilh golden fruit?
(Continued on page 5j
TAINTED AT THE FOUNTAIN HEAD IS OUR LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY
Herewith is given a table which shows the manner in which members of the Provincial Legislature
collect monies' from lhe treasury of the  Province,  which  they are not entitled to colled.
This is but one of the little grafts which paves the way to more substantial takings. As llo-rath
said���"W'e all started in a small way."
On their going oul and coming the Provincial paymaster stands with an open bag and pays mem
B. C. Legislature liberally. They all have passes upon trains, but what of that���they lake down their
cents a mile just the same.
Economy in the conduct of the Provincial business should not start at the cutting down of salark
ists and school teachers.    Why a man whose actual travelling expenses    to  lhe   Legislature  are  four d<
as those of the  members for Vancouver���should collect  forty dollars from the Government docs not
quite clear to us.
deliberately
i Bottomley
bcrs of the
twenty-five
s of botan-
dlars���such
seem  to be
GOVERNMENT DREDGING PAYS WELL
n 'aid i
I'ompai
mtract:
I lab- in lhe pres
v ol  dredging c.
under    the     i'.
IS  wilh  w|m
has t0 be
ilitician   to  thon
UCH ha- l���
of a certaii
have   vasl
Canada.
I b edging  is a liti-.il:
; re  nol  familiar.    ( n
specialist  or a |
business.
II will   be   rem
dared  before   I lit
hundreds < f thousands f
If they did spend  such
gave it to them  to -p.
Up the head of False Cr
Pel a ivw yards distant under
inion Government.   Tl
way company were closely affiliated
of Vane .i
atractors v
" ernmenl
BOWSER'S BLACKMAILING CAMPAIGN
WE now observe the hand of our great Napoleon once
more at work, this time at the throttle of a blackmailing jaugemaut car.
Because Dr. John Mackay. the beloved head of Westminster Hall, dared to raise his voice against the Bowser
machine, an effort is now being made to hold the learned
doctor up to ridicule by the production of his letters to
the department of education at the time the head of that
department called upon Dr. Mackay to accept the presidency of he B. C. University.
Tbe letters which have been printed in two of the party
papers in Vancouver, were marked private and confidential. Dr. Mackay had been repeatedly threatened that if
he opened his mouth against the government that these
letters would be brought forward. But the doctor gave
way to his Scottish independence and so now thc letters
have been produced.
Thc surprising feature of the whole thing is that the
Mackay letters betray only one thing. That is that Dr.
Mackay can stand the acid lest. In his communications
to Young, who was minister of education, the doctor was
indiscrete. Young had proposed that he should become
head of the University. Naturally Dr. Mackay was pleased.
You can see this in his letters. But in his enthusiasm
over thc prospect which had been opened up to him, this
man, who was a gentleman himself and believed that
Ministers of the Crown must also be gentlemen, opened
his heart in discussing plans for this greal University.
Onr little Napoleon blackmailed Dr, Mackay���he and
the unspeakable Young, Our little man liuisl copy after
ihe greal Emperor. Napoleon I laid siege to Si. Peters
and made Ihe Pope of Rome a prisoner. This cheap little
fellow must Imitate and must lake one of the most honored "f iln- churchmen of the Province of British Columbia
ami iiisiill him.
Prussia never produced more hateful specimens than
lhe men  who- have blackmailed   I Ir.  M.iclac.
ughlv
llln
erstan
city
Mann
pent  some
ilse I'reek.
Dominion of Canada
lhe  dirt  which   filled
.f !-',
Ie-|
\
lhal   Mackcnzi
incil  lhat they
ing in the heai
sum, tin
1  because  th 	
k was dredged out oi the chan
ntract from the Dnnr
redging company and the rail
Probably the Mac
INSPECTOR GORDON'S POSITION
INSPECTOR GORDON of ihe Vancouver School Hoard
gave an interview to lhe press in which he put forward
'.-as for ihe administration of the schools during liu- coming year. His interview was interesting to the
ralepayers who read il. If these ratepayers were taken
more heartily into ihe confidence of ihc School Board
much  good  would  result.
kenzic and Mann people did spend several hundreds of
thousands filling in the head of False Creek in the purely
legal sense. As a matter of fact it was the Dominion Government who paid. Mackenzie and Mann merely took the
money out of their right hand pocket and put it into their
left hand pocket.
Look up a recent issue of thc NEWS-ADVERTISER
and you will sec the advertisement of Messrs. Blank and
Blank, Dredging Contractors. If any of the readers of
the NEWS-ADVERTISER desire to have tlieir backyards
dredged out, call up Messrs. Blank and Blank. This firm
also advertises in the H. H. Stevens' publication in Mount
Pleasant. You will find such advertisements in any paper
owned by friends of the party in power.
The Canadian ship of state is at present���this being
war time���closely guarded by a formidable flotilla of
government dredges. In the absence of a Canadian navy,
the dredges are at the front and are doing good work
dredging out the public treasury.
We are informed that Government dredges may he
found ou guard on both coasts and at thc mouths of all
the rivers, including the icy floods which empty into Hud-
sons Bay.
Every time a dredge shoves its nose down into the deep
the  Canadian   people  pay.    Sometimes  the  great  snout
brings up mud, sometimes rock, sometimes water, sometimes nothing���it makes no odds the Canadian people pay.
Constituency
Member's
Address
ex   B.   C.
"Year   Book,
page 365
Distance   to
Victoria in
miles
Mileage
presumably
chargeable   al
50 cents
Paid for Car, Apparent
Stage & Boat, EXCESS
Return  Fares     beyond cost
Names of
Members
Victoria    Victoria
>��� ,,
tt ,i
�� ii
Saanich           "
Islands  	
Esquimalt    Esquimalt
Cowichan    Duncan
Newcastle  Ladysmith
Nanaimo    Nanaimo
Albei ni    Alberni
Comox    Union Bay
Vancouver    Victoria
 Vancouver
tt a
a tt
Richmond            "
New Westminster New Westminster
Delta   	
Chilliwack     Chilliwack
Dewdney   Mission City
Yale (8.)   Vancouver
Lillooet    Clinton
Kamloops    Shuswap
Ymir     Trail
Revelstoke   (1) Victoria
Okanagan   (2)	
Similkaineeii   (3) Vancouver
Columbia    .'. ..Golden
Cariboo    Quesnel
 Barkerville
Kasl Victoria
Slocan    Silverton
Skeena  Prince Rupert
Nelson    Nelson
Rossland     Rossland
Grand   Forks   (-li ('.rami   Forks
Greenwood   Midway
Cranbrook   (7.) Cranbrook
Fernie   (5)    Victoria
Atlin (6)    Victoria
Miles
.17
34
4
40
59
73
1.12
131
72
72
72
72
72
72
84
84
14K
114
72
313
,150
628
380
381
72
547
505
545
507
551
���170
633
637
673
705
7S3
847
1137
$
$
totals..Miles, 12,094
2.00
20.00
29.50
36.50
66.00
65.50
40.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
42.00
42.00
74.00
57.00
40.00
156.50
178.00
314.00
40.00
273,50
252.50
272.50
275.511
235.00
316.50
318.50
336.50
352,50
391.50
$4387.50*
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4,00
14.00
4.00
4.110
4.00
���I .00
70.00
81.00
4,(10
.16.0(1
4.00
4.00
-I .co
4.00
4.00
$281.00
2.00
20.00
29.50
36.50
66.00
65.50
36.00
36.00
36.00
36.00
36.00
38.00
38.00
70.00
53.00
36.00
142.50
174.00
310.00
36.00
269.50
182.50
191.50
271.50
199.00
312.50
314.50
332.50
348.50
387,50
$4106.51)
Behnsen
Davey
McBride
Thomson
Eberts
Foster
R. H. Pooley
Hayward
Williams
Place
Wood
M. Manson
Bowser
Macgowan
McGuire
Tisdall
Watson
Carter-Cotton
Gifford
MacKenzie
Cawlcy
W. J, Manson
Lucas
McDonald
Shaw
Schofield
Taylor
Ellison
Shaiford
Fbrster
Fraser
t'allanan
Mackay
Hunter
W.   Manson
Mac I,can
Campbell
Miller
Jackson
l'a veil
Ross
Young
THE PACIFIC AND GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY
EXPOSURE
THE work of Mr. Malcolm Archibald Macdonald in
forcing thc Government to give up all information
touching upon the promotion of the Pacific and
Great Eastern Railway is in itself ample justification for
tbe election of Mr. Macdonald to the legislature.
In his pursuit of the question of Government aid to the
Pacific and Great Eastern Mr. Macdonald has shown a
persistency and fearlessness which marks him as a strong
man.
The information which thc public has received touching
upon the Pacific and Great Eastern transaction amply
proves the need of an opposition in thc House.
This crowning specimen of frauds are of little consequence as compared with the Pacific and Grcat Eastern
promotion. The SATURDAY CHINOOK for more than
a year has raised its voice in warning to the people that
in the Pacific and Grcat Eastern transactions, the people
had been swindled. The loss of the Dominion Trust was
after all more or less a moral blow to the Province, the
Pacific and Great Eastern ruins the credit of the entire
Province. The company have bonds and guarantees and
contracts with the Province which absolutely ties British
Columbia in a knot. And should British Columbia endeavor to back away from the obligations which Bowser
has heaped upon her acting as lawyer for the Pacific and
Great Eastern and lawyer for the Government, there would
The full 12,094 miles at 50 cents per mile, would only call for $6,047, as the maximum: therefore how could
$6,962 be taken as per Public Accounts for 1913? Even if (vide 8 & 3) we allow 70 miles from Vancouver, for Mr.
Lucas to Agassiz and 509 for Mr. Sbatford to Medley, that only raises the maximum to $6336.50.
N'.B.���Thc 7 Vancouver resident members overpaid 8 miles each���56 miles excess. Are all mileages on that
basis?
Are fractions of 10 miles computed as 10 miles? or are fractions of miles computed to nearest mile as I have
taken?
* In 1915, $4,388 was paid to legislators for "mileage," of which about $281 only appears due to them for Boat- ,^
and Stage Fares, so about $4106.50 looks like "Plunder." V*'
By deducting that $281.00 yearly from the "Mileage," members collectively charged through the "Public Accounts," as paged below, I derive thc following interesting Totals:���
Year
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
Page
48
51
50.
55
61
Mileage
Charged
$6,920.00
6.918.50
6,962.00
4,575.50
4,388.00
Boat and Stage
Fares Paid
$281.00
281.00
281.00
281.00
281.00
EXCESS
"Annexed"
$6,639.00
6,637.50
6,681.00
4,294.50
4,107.00
TOTALS,       $29,764.00
$1,405.00
 ���** $28,359.00���Since Mr. Bowser's Railway Act.
Now, I ask the "Public Accounts Committee" to declare whether the following Ministers, while residing in
Victoria, were not legally debarred from drawing any "Mileage?" and whether they did or did not wrongly draw
the amounts shown against their names below, in each of thc years 1911, 1912 and1 1913���viz.: Messrs. Bowser,
$40.00; Ellison, $190.50; Ross, $423.50; Taylor, $190.00, and Young, $454.00, and the Total Excess each'drew since
1910?
Yours   faithfully,
MOSES B. COTSWORTH.
X\ S\TT'RD.\V.   \PRIL 1, 1916
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
THREE
RENTAL LIST
We are Inning a number of calls for five and -even room
houses, iu different parts of the Cily. We shall be glad to have
your linings. \,, charge unless results obtained. Se, ���-. Rental
Department
North West Trust Company, Limited
509   Richards  Street Seymour 74-Ji
I
Municipal Bonds
���iiiiii
There is a demand for superior Municipal Bonds because they
can be readily marketed, so your money is not tied up. Yet they
pay the investor well and are a preferred investment suitable for
the most cautious investor.
Write our Bond Dept. for further particulars and latest list.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
Head Office, 839 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, "
Patrick Donnelly General Manager
llilliiliill 	
B.C.
IlilliliU::*: . : i! *v!i!ii;:li:i, '',: ��� '  ��� '     ';"i��ii!js:::^!'ii;i;|!;��'iiF��!iFllli:!i!|:!f
You Need Campbell's Help
To Ship Household  Goods
First of all CAMPHELL can save you money, in nearly every case, ..n
transportation charges. Second, where you might have trouble in securing
space reservation, CAMPBELL as shipping specialist, has none. Third,
CAMPBELL relieves you of all the detail, all lhe worry and fuss of shipping. Fourth, the charges are so small you will be surprised. Free estimates and information.    Phone  Seymour 7.160.
Campbell Storage Company
OFFICE:   857 BEATTY STREET
Phone Seymour 7360
iiip-ww   i-    ���    i* v-i: . .   -   ���'i���������:���' ;'������'��� ;������<��� '��'������ ���-
-V^  ;::".���-:���.;���    :. v :������.;���:.-.;;���.'���     ;: ;     ,V:;.|;
jj
I What Your Telephone
| Represents
Do you ever realize that having a telephone
places at your disposal the resources of an
$8,000,000 investment?
Not only arc you always in instant communi-      jj
M
cation with your friends, but also with all parts
of the province.
There is also the advantage, too, of being
able to telephone to all parts of the Pacific Coast,
and even to Toronto, Montreal, Chicago and
eastern American cities.
CANADIAN  LOAN  BIG SUCCESS
The Canadian Government's issue
of $75,000,000 has all be.n taken in
New York, ami |!ie public bought SO
eagerly thai the subscription books
wen- closed early, and the issue has
proven a pronounced success. New
York is daily becoming more and
more the recognized Canadian Bond
market.
The City of Vancouver will, nu
doubt, li ok to ibis market to dispose
of Ihe $25,000,000 issue of serial bonds
providing the necessary legislation
can be secured from the legislature,
and tin present stocks and bonds can
be mobilized in England, where they
are chiefly held.
��� I
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
li��iiiiiiiiiiiiiii��iiiii!iiiiiii��iiiiiiiaiii!i�� ��������� wmrorai wmmm
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.	
ftJ
J  MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H   W   BRODIE. Gen. Pass. Agent, Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic  Steamship Lines
C. E. Jenney, G. A. P. D.
Phone: Sey. 8134
W. G. Connolly, C. P. F. A.
527 Granville Street
BRITISH  COLUMBIA FINANCES
Tin- Budget brought down in the
legislature by the acting minister of
finance this week is a matter of grave
concern to the people of Ibis Province. Tbe estimated revenue is $5,-
944,015, and it is proposed to spend
$11,300,000, leaving the huge deficit
of $4,643,895, pr in other words, the
expenditure will exceed revenue by
nearly 80 epr cent. Such principles of
financing would not work satisfactorily if applied to an ordinary business.
The Government should be the business managers of the Province. Unless the people wish to face a terrible
crisis in the immediate future, as a
result of over-expenditure and railroad guarantees, they will have to
take a hand in the business of governing.
the expiration of the present bond-, lo
get   rebel.
Vancouver is at present at tlie peak
of her financial load, and coming al
a time of general depression, immediate relief as forecasted in this plan
will be  welcomed by the citizens.
If Vancouver can convert her stock
and debentures into serials, she will
have a much lighter burden for the
next ten years, and. even after that
time, her annual load, taking existing indebtedness only, will not be so
greal as her present yearly burden
of sinking fund and interest. This
is largely because her entire serial
flotations will be fixed at thirty-five
years, whereas under present conditions most of her issues run out before
that time. 'The extra period means
smaller annual outlay. Providing the
bond issues can be consolidated, the
ratepayers would, at the end of 35
years, save about $1,000,000, that representing the difference saved in interest payments by the annual retirement of the serials during that period.
Mayor MacBeath and Aid. Kirk,
Chairman of Finance, are furthering
the scheme, which lias been endorsed
by the Council, and if successfully carried out, it would appear to lie an
excellent   financial  deal   for   the   City.
Jingle
coal
Always Mined by Union
White Labor
Coast Lumber & Fuel Co., Ltd.
Phone Fair. 2500    Phone High. 226    Phone Fraser 41
:^ "��� ' '.���"��";   a
Northern Securities Limited
Established 1900
529 PENDER STREET WEST
Seymour 1574
FINANCIAL AGENTS. ESTATE MANAGERS
FOR   EXCHANGE
A   BEAUTIFUL   SUBURBAN   HOME
Situated on 2 acres of highly improved land with shrubs and small
fruits. Stable and Garage; 11,.use 111 rooms ami modern throughout
Will lake West End house in exchange.
CANADIAN NORTHERN TO
PROCEED  WITH  TERMINAL
DEPOT
General Manager M. II. MacLeod
of lhe Canadian Xorthern Pacific
Railway Company laid before the
members of the Bridges and Railways Committee of thc City Council
the plans of the company's $1,01X1,000
terminal passenger depot, and of its
freight terminals in False Creek, for
the approval of (be city council this
week.
Mr. MacLeod stated that his company would be in a position to call
for tenders for the foundation within
six weeks, and that the work would
proceed just as soon as the contract
is let, and also that it was his company's intention to purchase as much
of tbe material required ill Hritish
Columbia as is possible.
NEW PLAN FOR VANCOUVER
FINANCES
Very great interest is being taken
by lhe citizens ..f Vancouver in the
plans for the re-arrangement of the
city's finances, regarding which a public bill will probably be introduced in
the legislature al an early date.
A saving to the ratepayers of $400,-
000 per annum for lhe ensuing five
years, and a saving of sligblly less per
year during the following live years,
will be effected if the proposal of
Mayor MacBeath tor ihc consolidation of the bonded indebtedness oi
tin- city is consummated, The mayor's
plan requires a slight amendment to
thc City Charter to give it the power
to retire stock with bonds. At the
present time thc city has the right to
retire bonds with stock, but not stock
with bonds.
The plan of consolidating the City's
bond issue, which now amounts to
about $25,000,000, and disposing of it
in one big bond issue in serial form,
had been considered for some time.
It is in line with the policy of the
Imperial Chancellor of the Exchequer, who is now engaged in mobilizing in ('.real llritain for shipment lo
America securities held there for the
purpose of equalizing exchange in
Xew  York.
It is proposed to extend the issue
ver a period of 35 years and, whereas
the interest rate on bonds now held
in England is 4 1-2, 5 and 5 1-2 per
cent., it is just possible that a slightly
ligher rate would have to he paid in
the American market. But even if
thc rate is slightly higher, the city
ill get immediate relief lo the a-
mount of $400,000 per year for thc
next five years, and for the follow-
ng five years a slightly less amount
per year. The paying of interest and
the retirement of the serial bonds
lach year would not involve nearly
as great an outlay as that now necessary to meet sinking fund and interest
jn the present bond issue, and the
citizens would not have to wait until
THE PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN
FINANCE
The statement brought down in
the bouse by the government, regarding tbe finances of this road, is anything but satisfactory. The government has already been called upon
to pay interest on guaranteed bonds
due January 15, 1916, amounting to
$316,016.80. This is but the beginning of our troubles 'with this railway. It is far from completed, and
further aid by way of guarantees to
the extent of six and one half millions
is now being sought.
But before any new arrangement is
made, the people have a right to know
how much was actually paid bj' the
company for thc work already done.
It is announced that the company
gave one of its members a contract
for building the whole line. This contract was given without competition,
at a price which is not disclosed. The
contractor let the work to sub-contractors, and they to station men.
Now, if Mr. Welsh, to whom the contract for the whole road was awarded
without competition, has been able
to let the work to other contractors,
with a substantial margin for himself,
that margin is not a part of the necessary cost of the work.
A thorough and searching investigation should bc made by an independent board if enquiry before any
further action is taken. Further as
sistaiice under present conditions
would be little short of criminal. This
province is under railroad guarantees
f..r ,i total of $80,322,072, A number
of years must lapse before these
roads become self-supporting, even
under the besl  of conditions.
|  B. GEO. HANSULD Manag,
-'-:: -^ ���,' :.. .���.:..:: ::..:���.."���:; y^vLLL'":;, : :..i:;:;;:::;.- ';,.,:���,y/.v
THE VERNON FEED CO.
MOUNT   PLEASANT,   COLLINGWOOD and SO. VANCOUVER
DEALERS IN
Poultry Supplies, Hay, Grain  and Feed
CHICK FEED
LAWN SEED
FERTILIZER
SEED POTATOES
PHONES: Fairmont 186���878
DOG BISCUITS
CANARY SEED
PIGEON FEED
Fraser 175 and Collingwood 153
��� �������
PHONE: 8EV. 900
MacDONALD & HAY
Barristers, Solicitors, Etc.
1012 Standard Bank Bldg.
Vancouver, B.C.
LEGAL NOTICES
LAND   ACT
l-'orm   No.   11.
FORM   OF   NOTICE
Vancouver   T.and   District,   District   of   Coast
R:inge  2.
TAKE NOTICE th.it William V. Marchant
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends
to apply for permission to lease the following
tit-scribal lands:���
Commencing at a post planted on the
North west shore of Schooner Passage, Rivers
Inlet, dislant about three-quarters of a mile
in a Northerly direction from the north end
of Pendleton Island; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains east; thence south to shore
of Schooner Passage; thence following thc
. shorediue to place of commencement.
WILLIAM 1\ MARCHANT,
Name  of  Applicant   (in   full).
December 22,   1915.
J.   G.   Johnston,   Agent.
Two Dollars   a  Year
In the past the SATURDAY CHINOOK
has gone out at One Dollar per year. War
conditions make it necessary to increase the
subscription rate from this date forward tc
Two Dollars per year, delivered to your home
any place in the Province of British Columi-ia
or the Dominion of Canada.
THE   PUBLISHERS.
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
RICHMOND
TAKE NOTICE that TOHN MASON
LACEY, Broker, of tKc City of Vancouver,
H. C, intends to apply. for permission to
prospect for Coal. Petroleum ami Natural ('.as
under the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the Soulh(
West corner of Section Twcnty(seveu (27),
Range Six (6) Wesl, Block Four (4) North,
Croup One (1), New Westminster District;
thence North eighty 180) chains; thence West
eighty (80) chains; thence South eighty (80)
chains; Ihence East eighty (80) chains to
point of commencement, containing 6-10 acres,
more or less.
(Signed)  JOHN MASON LAc'EY.
Located the Sixth dav of January,  1916.
March 2nd,  1916.
VANCOUVER LAND  DISTRICT
RICHMOND
r ?n&? NOTICE that JOHN MASON
LACE} , llroker, of the Cily of Vancouver,
II. (.., intends to apply for permission to
prospect for Coal, Petroleum and Natural Gas
under  the  following deserihed   lands-
Commencing at a post planted at the South-
Wcsl corner of Section Twenty-Seven (27)
Range Six   (6)   West,   lllock   Four   (4)   North
Group One il) New Westminster District;
Ihence North eighty (80) chains; thence East
eighty (80) chains; Ihence South eighty (80)
chains j thence West eighty (SO) chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less,
(Signed) JOHN MASON  LACEY.
Located thc Sixth day of January,  1916.
March 2nd, 1916.
VANCOUVER LAND  DISTRICT
RICHMOND
VANCOUVER LAND  DISTRICT
RICHMOND
r T��&$ NOTICE that JOHN MASON
," r- '��� BT0*a< of ""! City of Vancouver,
u. l_��� intends to apply for permission to
prospect for Coal, Petroleum and Natural Gas
under the following deserihed  lands:
l ommeneing at a post planted at the North-
West comer of Section Twenty-one Cl)
Range Six (6) West, Block Four (4) North'
Group One (1) New Westminster District-
thence North eighty (80) chains; thence
ySS cLgl!,y (80) ch'ins; thence South eighty
(80) chains; thence West eighty (so) chains
to point of commencement, containing 640
acres,  more or less.
(Signed) JOHN MASON LACEY.
Located the Sixth day of January, 1916.
March 2nd,  1916.
TAKE NOTICE that JOHN MASON
LACEYy llroker, of thc City of Vancouver,
B. C., intends to apply for permission to
prospect for Coal, Petroleum and Natural Gas
under the following described lands:    *
Comemncing at a post planted at the South-
East corner of Section Fifteen (15), Range
Six (6) West. Hi, ck Four (4) North, Group
One (1) New Westminster District; thence
North eighty (SO) chains; thence West
eighty (SO) chains: Ihence South eighty (80)
chains; thence East eighty (80) chains to
point of commenci ment. containing 640 acres,
more or less.
(Signed) JOHN MASON LACEY.
Located the Sixth day of January, 1916,
March 2nd, 1916.
P
ANTAGEC
UNEQUALLED        |J
VAUDEVILLE
Phone  Seymour  3406
WEEK  OF APRIL  3rd
September Morn
A   Big  Time   Musical   Comedy-
condensed to 40 minutes
Three times daily, 2.45, 7.15, 9.15
"Matinee, 15c; Night, 15c & 25c- FOUR
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
SATURDAY, APRIL  I,   l'-ic
ELECTRIC COFFEE
THE BEST COFFEE
The Electric Percolator is ready for service
day and night.
Operates on connection with any ordinary
household socket and makes coffee at the
table for meals in the scientific way.
Starts to percolate from cold water within
30 seconds.
Makes five cups of coffee at one time in 10
to 15 minutes at a cost of only One Cent for
current.
Vancouver
Chilliwack
North  Vancouver
Eburne
;" Safe Milk for the Babies
That Means TURNER'S MILK
So a milk that is safe for the dedicate systems of the wee
tiny folks is surely safe and wholesome too for all members
of the family. We do not condemn milk supplied by other
dairies, but this wc <lo say:
THERE IS NO BETTER MILK SOLD IN VANCOUVER
THAN TURNER'S  MILK
because the highest authorities and the best judges in llritish
Columbia pronounce TURNER'S MILK "BEST BY TEST."
ORDER YOUR SUPPLY TODAY
PHONE FAIR. 597 AND  OUR DRIVER WILL CALL
TURNER'S DAIRY
SEVENTEENTH   AVENUE  AND   ONTARIO   STREET
(the top of which grows so prettily),'
cherry, clover, cockle, columbine, corn,
I corn-flower, currant, daffodil, daisy,
dewberry, eglantine, elder, fennel,
fern, fig. flag. flax, garlick, goose-
rry, gorsc, hawthorn, hazel, heath,
holly, honeysuckle, ivy, knot-grass,
laurel, lavender, leek, lettuce, lily, locust, mallow, marigold, marjoram,
mint, mulberry, mushroom,  mustard,
myrtle, pansy, parsley, peach, pear,
pea,  pepper,  pine,  pink,  peony,  plum,
damson, prune, poppy, primrose,
pumpkin, quince, radish, reed, rhubarb, rose, rosemary, rue, rush, rye,
saffron,   strawberry,     sugar,     thistle,
Phone Seymour 9086
YOU DO NOT NEED A
FLASH LIGHT TO FIND A
DOCUMENT  IF  YOU
RENT
A   Private  Box
IN OUR SAFETY VAULT
$2.50 PER ANNUM
DOW FRASER
TRUST CO.
122  HASTINGS  STREET W.
CENI'KH   A   HANNA   LIMITED
HOW TO MAKE A
SHAKESPEARE GARDEN
thorn, thyme, turnip, vetch, vine, violet, wheal, willow, wormwood.
Your garden may not be big enough
for all these, but yon can have sonic,
a good many of them, to delight your
eye and tickle your nostril anil your
palate. For Shakespeare mentions
many herbs good for food ami medicine.
If you want to know- more about a
Shakespeare garden try and gel "The
Plant Lore and Garden Craft oi
Shakespeare." by Henry W. Ella-
combe and "Shakespeare Garden and
Wayside   Rowers," by W.  Pbxtion.
���FELIX PENNE.
Classified Advertising
FLORISTS
Phone Highland 137
Grandview Hospital
1090 VICTORIA  DRIVE
VANCOUVER     -     B.C.
Medical : Surgical  : Maternity
Rates  from  $15.00   per  week
BROWN BROS. & CO., LIMITED,
Seedsmen, Florists, Nurserymen, 4*
Hastings St. E��� and 782 Granville
Street. Vancouver,  B.  C.
SHAKESPEARE'S BIRTHPLACE
This is the humble cottage ill which the greatest Englishman was born.
The cut is from a clever pen and ink drawing in the Collingwood Library
where, during Shakespeare week, a fine bust of Shakespeare will be unveiled.
It is hardly necessary to state that J. Francis Bursill, better known as Felix
I'enne. is throwing himself heart and soul into the Shakespeare Tercentenary
Commemoration.
��� A Shakespeare Garden for Vancouver J
���                              ���
M      The Parks Board will lay out an old Elizabethan Garden in fj
���                                                 Stanley Park ���
over which roses can climb and have
some arched trellis for rambler rose
and  honeysuckle.
Green and white should prevail in
all woodwork, for green and white
were the Tudor colors.
If you have space, willows, lindens,
hornbeam, hawthorn and privet can
he made into arches and bowers.
Flowers can be used in abundance
in beds, in pots or parterres, and the
beds can he bordered with box. A
mound of raised ground is a pretty
addition to an old world garden. Box,
privet, roses, fruit trees can bc used
and trelliscd arbors are quite delightful where there is spare.
A SHAKESPEARE GARDEN IS
REALLY AX ENGLISH GARDEN
and who is there would not like to
be reminded of Old England which
was sending her stalwart sons tint to
people this new western world in "the
spacious days of Queen Elizabeth."
Shall we not like our garden to remind ns of the days of Raleigh and
Drake, when the Armada was beaten
and England asserted herself "MISTRESS OF THE SEAS?"
Gardens at Montacute and at Old
Hatfield House. England, still remain
to remind us of the beautiful, simple,
restful gardens of Shakespeare's days.
Shakespearian  Plants and  Flowers
And   now   there   follows   a   list   of
Shakespearian   plants    ami     flowers
such as can be easily cultivated.
Here  the  reference  lo  the  play  or
poem  in which ihc plant or flower is
mentioned   is   not   given,   because   it
will be such a delightful task  for the
i reader to look up the references.
For instance, "apple." Now where
does Shakespeare mention an apple?
WATCHMAKER
10,000 WATCHES and CLOCKS
wanted to clean and repair at the
factory, 438 RICHARDS STREET.
MONEY TO LOAN
MONEY LOANED, DIAMONDS,
Jewelry, etc. A quiet, respectable,
������eliable place to bortow money.
Old gold bought. Established 1905
Star Loan Co., 812 Hastings West
STOVE    REPAIRS
DON'T THROW YOUR OLD
Stove away. We handle castings and
repairs to fit any stove or range.���
FRANKS, 44 Water Street.
Those Who Run May Read
The Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.'s machine-made Sewer
fl Pipe, put tinder test by The Robt. W. Hunt Co., Ltd., a pipe, 10
ij inches internal diameter, being subjected to two days' drying in an
|j       oven, then immersed in water for 24 hours.    Result���
Weight before immersion 105J4 pounds
Weight after immersion 106     pounds
Difference equals "4-pound of water, or .48 of 1 per cent.
CRUSHING TEST
On the same pipe after being subjected to thc above���crushed
M      at 29,200 pounds.
DOMINION GLAZED CEMENT PIPE CO., LTD.
j.      Office: Dominion Building, Vancouver, B.C. Phone Sey. 8286
iiuiiiiiiiBiiiininiiii
llUUBlIlil
If you have a garden, no matter
how small, lay it out this spring so as
to bc a commemoration of thc .TOth
anniversary of the poet's death.
Such a garden will also commemorate Shakes! .'arc's birth, for he was
born on or about the 23rd of April,'
which is also St. George's Day. a day
lear to every Hritish man, woman and
child.
Shakespeare spent his boyhood and
early manhood in beautiful Warwickshire. He knew and loved flowers.
Anne liathaway's cottage, where he
went "a cottrtin'," was a little garden
of sweet blossoms. I" Shakespeare's
day people thought of tlieir gardens,
small or large. The rich man had his
"landscape garden," and the poor man
his pretty flower garden, perhaps with
a   sun   tlial   and  bee-hives.
In the garilen a man would sit���
ami think���and that is why Elizabethan literature has so much philosophy. So much grace and dainty
charm. An Elizabethan garden had
square or oblong beds, divided into
squares, Walks should be made of
gravel or turfs as straight and as
broad as space will permit.
The old Elizabethan garden was enclosed. A modern garden should bc
such as to give pleasure to others as
well as thc owner. So let it be enclosed   by   green   and1  white   trellis,
You will find it in "Twelfth y'.'dit,"
Act   L Scene 5.
"Blackberry," where docs Shakespeare mention "blackberry," 'ton
will find it in "Al You Like ll." Act
III. Scene 2.
"Daffodil" is mentioned in "A Winter's Tale," Act IV, Scene 2, and so
on.
Search your Shakespeare for names
of plants antl flowers, you will find
it a delightful occupation.
Here    are    the   Trees,    Plants    and
Flowers you can Grow
Apple, batchelor's buttons, barley,
bay tree, bramble, box, briar, broom,
cabbage,   camomile,   carnation,   carrot
Plant the Best Seeds
Do not take chances with uncertain seeds.
Remember, you can plant but once a season. Buy
the best.   Buy
Brown's Listed Seeds
They are the cleanest, the purest and the best qualities obtainable anywhere at any price.   Give us your'
orders and we will sell you seeds that grow.
Brown Bros. & Co., Ltd.
FLORISTS,   NURSERYMEN   and   SEEDSMEN
48 Hastings St. East.
782 Granville St.
Phones Sey. 988-672
Phone Sey. 9513
YORKSHIRE SOCIETY DANCE
The president and officials of the
Yorkshire Society entertained a company of 75 couples to a very enjoyable
dance in the O'Brien Hall on Thursday evening. The Morgan-Guild orchestra was in attendance antl rendered a fine selection of music for
the 24 dances that comprised the programme.
The floor stewards were Messrs.
II. Whitehead and T. Devine, and everything was managed in the usual
satisfactory  Yorkshire  manner.
Thc Yorkshire Society will resume
tlieir fortnightly whist drives and
dances next Thursday evening in the
O'Brien Hall, the whist drive to commence promptly at 8.30. Only three
more of these highly enjoyable and
popular social events will be held this
season and the Society's officials are
hoping that their members and friends
will help them to finish up the season in a highly creditable manner, and
are hoping to break this season's record for attendance for the fourth
time.
The competitions in the Vancouver
Inter-club whist ami cribhage tournament arc almost completed, the l��� O,
I.. Moose have been successful iu winning the Baxter cup lor single crib
bilge, anil Western Jubilee Lodge Sons
of England have won the l.ockyer
cup for double cribhage. In the grand
aggregate the Moose anil Yorkshire
Society have run a neck and neck-
race all through the season and out
of the 150 games played, the Yorkshire Society have only the advantage
of one point. Thc Yorkshire Society
have also a slight lead in thc whist
competition and on the results of the
remaining two games depends the
destination of the Tisdall cup for
whist ami also the Nelson cup for
grand aggregate, which at present
are both held hy the Yorkshire
Society.
ANN HATHAWAY'S COTTAGE���
The Garden where Shakespeare went Courtin'
MOUNT PLEASANT
PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH
PROPOSED NEW FACTORY
IN SOUTH VANCOUVER
An open meeting will bc held at
Fraser Hall, Friday, March 31st, at
8 o'clock p.m., to consider establishing a new woollen factory. It is proposed to manufacture sweaters, socks,
underwear antl blankets, which are
now imported into B.C. in large quantities. $f3O,C00 is lost cvery day by
sending that amount of cash out of
B. C. for imported gootls. Here is an
opportunity to put the worthy unemployed at work and keep some of that
money at home. Property owners,
business men and everybody interested in the welfare of South Vancouver
are invited to attend.
Under the auspices of thc Crescent
Class, a very delightful concert was
given in the church on Friday evening last. A large audience greeted
thc various artists' efforts with loud
applause and encores were on the
demand throughout the programme.
It was certainly a privilege to hear
such excellent playing on the violin
by Mr. Ilolroyd Paull, an artist to
the finger tips. Mr. Paull simply carried his audience with him. His rendering of "Airs Russes," and an encore piece "Beethoven's Sonata" were
exquisite, Indeed, while Mr. Paull
obligingly responded to both items
on the programme, it was with feel
ings of regret that we did nol heat
more. In llayward's "Balata D'Am
our" he was excellent. In fact, his
playing is as wonderful an execution
as his violin is in beauty of tone.
Mr. Wallace, tenor, showed a well
trained voice in his two numbers, to
one of which he responded with
"Mother Machree." which he sang
very sweetly. Madame Brewer was in
excellent  voice, and  in  her rendering
of "Love's Citadel," ami Ncviu's "Tin
Woodpecker" she could not be es
celled. Mr. William Murray selected
two very fine songs on his share ol
the programme, "Jolly Old Cavalier'
and "The King's Own/1 Mr. Murra>
is possessetl of a very fine voice. Con
tralto voices of the better iptality are
always scarce. Miss Isdale is happy
in thc possession of a fine contralto
voice. "My Dear Soul," sang as she
sings it proved the above statement.
"Just A'Wearyin' for You" was also
very sweetly sung. Humor was not
wanting in the programme. Mr. I.
Ameil Crann gave us the laugh in his
"Trying a Magistrate." His interpretation of the various characters in
their different dialogues was exceedingly clever, as also his rendering ol
"Patie's Pirnie's Wooing."
An exceedingly clever young lad.
Mr. W. Silverman, gave two excellent
pianoforte solos, and the manner in
which those solos were played augurs
well for a future pianoforte start from
Vancouver.
Miss Elsie Alexander made an excellent accompanist, some brilliant
fingering being noticeable in her playing to Mr. Ilolroyd Paull and Madame Brewer.
Mr. Campbell, leader of the class,
acted as chairman and the Rev. A. E.
Mitchell officiated at the clnse of an
excellent programme.
���J.   W.  LECKIE. SATURDAY. APRIL 1, 1916
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
;;ivk
Small hats trimmed high and large
hats, trimmed flat, are the order of tin-
day. Wired circular frills bf gauzy
inaline added CXtraordinarj height to
, ne seen the oilier day. Another hat
was trimmed with large roses, altogether mi the crown. A glossy black
Milan had a soft edge of black inaline
and large upstanding bows at the
hark of the hat, where it was turned
to show the wearer's hair. Willi taffeta everywhere this spring, it is not
-���iy-risiug to see it used as trimming
on hats. One hat noticed not long
ago had a box plaiting around tin-
rown, and the new circular veil worn
.   ��� r it  to good  advantage.
OUR WORK BAG
Russian darning is very popular just
now. and while many imagine it is
very difficult, it is really quite simple. Thc only thing is to be careful
in counting, The heavier linen.-, which
are so popular jusl now are really I
"Tell  us  more  about   Pokey,   will
you. Grandma," asked Jack.   "Pies
do," coaxed wee Jimmie, too,
"Well, if you boys will sil slill until
I gel my knitting I will," said Grandma,, as she .'cached into the work
bag that was never far from her chair,
"l-'or you know, boys, while our soldiers need socks, 1 must keep bus).
There   now.   1   am   ready.
"It was just sin h a nice warm day
as this day is .vhen my sister and I
decided to give Pokey a bath. You
sec little pigs gel very dirty ami al-
though Pokey was such a cunning lit-1
tie fellow, he was just as fond of aj
iniiil piiddk as any other pig
"An invitation had arrived for Maggie ami I to attend a tea parly at Xan
Ross' home across the road from our
place. We knew Pokey would insist
on following us to the party and we
were determined that he should be I
thoroughly cleaned first.   So we took
Gardens at Grand Forks, B. C.
best for the work and on  which  'hei'""  '      "   '"  ' "*'   ""   trousjh  where, Decn usm , him ver    wcu so |R. |lal|,.u   ct    paurs   Presbyterian    Church, i of  Suffrage  propaganda,  relief  work, EXCESS of about *
darning looks most effective.    Draw|.father wateml thc cows ;""1 Ma8******-1  ������i i  i.:.-	
the threads as wide as the pattern "isl1"*1'1   hi'"   ullil"    urcd   ',:,il   after
desired  and  hemstitch  both .sides  of|pa,! "'  water m'*r ,"'"'
the   drawn   threads,   taking   up   three
or  four  threads, according    to    Lhe
"My, h..v,- he did squeal, bul I never
stopped until every sign of dirt was
weight of the linen. This leaves thejsone and he was quite clean. Then
threads in little ���.���roups ami ii is easy Maggie got a bit of blue ribbon for
lo weave in and out betsveen thorn '"�� "t"''k ;""1 another for the little
in any pattern desired. \ liliinl needle cllrl "f '"'s '����'. '""' he did look very
and  heavy  mercerised   thread   is  the | nice.
hest for weaving. Care urns! bc taken "Indeed every one was <|inU' in love
to   always   fasten   thc   thread     when | with   Pokey  whin   we  arrived  al   the
to go and have his teaparty where he]Grandview,   for  the benefit   of    the
would be better fed, for I notice you
never even offered him a bit of cake,
and I am sure that wasn't very polite.'
"That evening on the way home
we decided to leave Pokey at home
lill he knew how to act al a lea parly."
Ladies' Aid of that church.    In ..May
for the benefit  of the  Daughters of
tin-   Empire   it   wai
  SO in  1912.
ami Ked Cross work, they confidently! Had Mr, Bowser done his duty (for
expect to make next year's worli sur-j which he was highly paid- by amend-
pass   all   previous   records   made   by | ing   the   "Constitution"
jiven   the   third | them.
time in St. Mark's Hall, Kitsilano;
and iu June, at Xew Westminster.
during tlie Annual Convention of the
U.   C.   Equality   League,   the   Cedar I
C,   V WRIGHT,
i C ittage   League
j when he re-opened it the same day to
itary.      j increase   ministers,   he   would   have
       . ���   rightly  saved  that  mon-  than !?6,0il0
MR.  BOWSER'S  CHALLENGE     per year to B. C. taxpayers, for better
ACCEPTED I use as 1 shall later -1
���gain  demonstrated I
THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF        L      . ,,-.,, ,      ,-. i
THE CEDAR COTTAGE BRANCH.1"   *e   vMk     How   llu"   ^'""   TO��  Editor CHINOOK:
i OF THE B.C. POLITICAL ]
completing  one  section   before   start-1 party and  all agreed  they  had  never | EQUALITY   LEAGUE
ing a fresh one. I seen  a  more  cunning  little  pig.     He
I behaved beautifully al  first, too, just
I wandered  round   thc  orchard,  eating
BOSTON BROWN BREAD
all the apples he could find.
"By and bye we quite for got Pokey,
we were having such a gay time, and
never thought of him until it was time | special    executive    meetings;
Duri
At the June business meeting there
j was discussed the proposition made
|by   the   Progressive   League,   the   Mt.
mg the year ending March 6th, I tm      .   ,   i ,  .,      ,,    ,.     .   ���
un/-.   ,i,    c   i      ,���  .. , ,   ,, I Pleasant  League, and  the   It. C.  Mil
191", the  Cedar Cottage  League held   f
Two  cups  of corn  meal,   two  cups
of  graham   flour,   one   cup   I   white  ,^^^_^^^^_^^^_^^^^^_^^^^_^__^^^_^^^_^^^^^_^^^^^__
flour.    Three   cups   of   butter   milk, | to go home.   Now where do you sup-1 eight sewing meetings, which were all
fragc  League,  to unite  with  the Ce-
nine regular monthly business meet- dar Cottag(  League ;������| under a new
n.gs. with an  average attendance atjllame> fonil ,me strong society, x,���
each  meeting  oi   ten   members;  tw
one and one-half teaspoonful of soda, j pose we found him.   lie had wandered
one  cup  of  molasses  ami  one   tablespoon salt.
Melt the soda in the buttermilk,
then pour in molasses. Mix in corn
meal, graham flour, white flour and
add salt. Pour into greased baking
powder tins, only filling dishes not
quite half full.   Steam two hours.
out to the pig pen on the Ross' farm
and was having just a lovely visit
with the pigs.
"Oh, dear me, but he was dirty and
his pretty ribbons were gone. Maggie said he should be punished for
acting so at a parly but Nail's father
well attended. ,    |R,n   jt  WM   ,|od,k.(1   tha,   l]lis   step
On   April   15th.   1915,   the   League De no( taken.
being   able   to   reach   a   satisfactory
decision,  the  question  was laid over
in the present writing must suffice
all upon Mr. Bowser i - make
1 his promise of la-i Monday,
n he said;
Sunday's is^m- reprints Mr.  il ser's
vote baiting speech oi March 20th j -| promise this House now and I
with, his challenge to opponents that [ promise tin- country, if there is any
they prove lhat British Columbia has corruption shown, I will Ir- tlu- first
lhe most corrupt government in l ti - man ,,, remove from office every man
ada. i found guilty of any such offence."
Thai challenge  I  for ..ne accept. \- il appears that si me oi ids raitl-
The  vast and  varied  extent  of its
corruption   necessitates   many  pi
until a  special  meeting  held  in  July, j but as only one can bc considered al !
Dn July 6th at Central Park, the
League held their Annual I luting,
when members and friends brought
well-filled baskets and putting aside,
ior the day, the cares of lhe country,
and forgetting for the moment the in
gave a successful entertainment and
concert in Marfew Hall, Cedar Cottage, the net proceeds of which a-
mountetl to $102.65. Upon request,
this entertainment, which included a
sketch entitled "I low the Vote was
said;  'Why,   you   girls   couldn't   have  Won," was repealed  two weeks later'justjce ,,f its law makers, all enjoyed
a happy time of fun ami frolic.
Tliere   was    no   business     meeting
-> held in  August  but at  the  September
meeting   it   was   decided   that   in   addition   to   relief    work,    the  (League
would take up  Red  Cross work.
At a special executive meeting held
September 2Sth, it was recommended
that the Cedar Cottage League join
with the oilier suffrage societies in a
Suffrage    Red   Cross   Social   Sewing
istcrs and  several of the  members of
the legislature thus corruptly annexed
^_^^^^^^__^^^^^^^_^^_^__, money   from   the   public   treasury   to
one  time.   I   will begin  with  the   Rail-! which they  were  nol  entitle.:,  ihe el-
way   Act.   which   Mr.   Bowser  intro-  ,.ot,,rs |lave tne ri(,|U t0 requjre j|r.
dttced   and   piloted   through   the   fleet
of  money-catching  legislators as  per
B. C. Journals for 1911. pages 21. etc.
The  most significant clause  in   tiiat
Act is Section 245 bv which he forced,      ��� ...
majority on that  committee can pre-
aii railway companies in  British C d- -   *-        .       ,.      ., -
1 I vent it fmm branding that annexation
iimbia  lo  grain  our legislators  "lire
Passes."
Bowser to remove them from the legislature directly these facts are proved
by the public accounts committee.
Unfortunately  the  Bowser  machine
ile win
s the "Craft" which most pe
know  the facts consider it to he.
it  reads:   "The company  shall   fur-       ,,     ,. , ,
1     ��� .!     Mr.  bowser cannot show   such cor
rupting abuse if our Constitution Ait
in any other Province in Canada. Ko
man knew better than he that the
surest wa* to control li. C. legislators
in political shackles was p- subvert
their  independence  hy the   Attorney-
nish  free transportation upon any of'
ils trains for members of the legislature of this  Province with  their baggage, ami also for Ministers, vn\"
Through that enactment evcrj
memhi r has since travelled ivi-t- t<
and iroin Victoria over all -'cam
ami vied ne railwaj -. also fn i. 1
am odd. . ii tlu- (Ikanagan, \ mo*.
Kootcnay,   etc..   Laki    boats   of   the
Ui:
Mi
I'inance
it icarn-
11    ; new  ;    it ii
Act  cai    Hi -      ili
ightlj un i
R d
isl
SEPTEMBER   MORN'."  a- presented   by   Hie original producers,   Kowiancl   unci   uuiortl   ami   a   com]
"iirtccn people, is tin- hcadliner al   Pantages next  week,    The  balance of iln- bill  lives up  lo  th,-  repm
the  last  ifK weeks. <
FAITH and WORKS
The law forbids the sale of liquor and cigarettes
to minors, but it docs not restrain newspapers from going into respectable homes anil soliciting the patronage of the boys and girls with
flaring ami alluring advertisements.
Careful firesides must rely, therefore, upon newspapers that voluntarily banish liquor and cigarettes, those great
enemies of youthful strength and purity, from their columns.
In the campaign for saloonless state it is vital that
'  the forces of temperance cast the entire weight of their influence
against the wets.
Their subscription order for a newspaper is a vote
for or against liquor," according as the advertising columns of that
newspaper are for or against liquor.
The Saturday Chinook is against the selling and
distributing of liquor and cigarettes to minors through its advertising
columns.
For true temperance should begin at home and
with the Home Newspaper.
Delivered at
your door for
$2.00 a year.
Phone Seymour 470.
The Saturday Chinook
Circle, to meet once a month to w
for the soldiers, each  League in  turn j q    p    r      ]'111   in   crossing   between!
to furnish a programme; also lhat the Vancouver am]  Victoria the*   havi   i
balance of ihe relief money   >n hand ,,av s ��� each way as the -'-.'���- i
be used   i   assisting  ihc South  Van-i,    ,    ,-   .   ,!ln.t>'. ddys    h, ,,.;,;,,;      ,
.���omer Victorian Order of Mir-,-  i ,    ,   M ,.,.,���,��� , ���. Mninlanil
lhe extent of making infants clothei the two members for Carib     and one'
\1    he   regular   monthlj     meet ,   rjn0 , , |laV(   .      ...,-. s ,     .     tm
"  ' letober these  rpieatioi  ., ,pe, ,,,,.h. ,.,,. ,.,,.,..,,   ,  _.      ���
cussed and upon  proper mon  i ,   , {.h    \s|K.rof,     .,, ,; .; , ,.
r"''- Quesnel and Clinton, while the Skeena   Brewster,   Williams   im
Since October last, the Relief d . :. ,-      ,m   l -;.   -   Rupert
n ittci   lias madi   and di lii ered lo tin       ��� i      i ihip fare !
South  \ uncoil* er  Victorian < Ir lei ; en   we   i    ludi    'osts '
N'urses six sets of baby clothes, each |,flr,|ia   .in,|   input*   luhi.-l,   chonld     ,     \  '     '
set consisting of 16 nieces.
The Ri il Ci "Ss Committi e has
vided the material, made and del
to the  Central  South   Van ou  i r   I
Cross   Society   35   pairs   - f   li ispiti
slippers and  11   pairs of socks.    Tl.
work   was   very   highly   commende
at   headquarters;   being     pronounce
unexcelled by any similar work froi
other sources.
On account of removal or residenc
^^^^I^^I^^H^^Hi^iiHHi^i^i^iiifl
>uI  - f their $1600 each  receives i Kovcrnniei
'   i-   Tn v   ca-,-   to   pav   '""^ ''-v "u's
i      i   penses   thereoul   in  Vic        f d whethi
the   total   amount   paid        *  - tei any "Mileage"
idol!  bv all  11
50   pi   cc   lhat  members   ci ill
ti   il     $6,962   "For   transportation
! and from Victoria."
I am therefore requesting the "P
:   fully kne
the league has lost during the yearjlic Accounts Committee" to publish
many valuable indues, but there arc-the names and amounts taken by each
many left, and while t'ney have just - li. C. legislator in 191.}. to prove whoj
cause for pride in what has been ac- took .the apparent EXCESS of about
complished during the year in the line I $6,685   in   1913,  and  also  the  similar'
lion funds" against them
'LI
THE LAND!    BOYS!!    THE LAND! I!
I Continued from page 2)
The earth repairs the damage of war. The scarred surface is healed as a new skin covers a wound. "The man
with lhe hoe" will win from the earth the wealth which
has been wasted in war, and'only WORK. Sunshine, rainfall and harvest can. with "the healing hand of Time,'
make us forget the horrors and thc cruelties the world has
endured���as vernal spring and glorious summer makes
us forget the rigors of winter.
The good earth will be ready for the disbanded men,
released from the waste of war. And what vvill the men
find? Will they find the land in the hands of speculators.
Shylocks who have, like the Germans, taken thc men's
lives���for they do take our lives if they do take the means
by which men live.
Hear Tommy!
"We shall want the land. Vou who arc looking after
affairs at home while wc arc getting along with the fighting, will you ponder this question, make your decision,
and act? Will you begin now to make things ready so
that when we return we shall be able to get to work?
"It is not my business just now to deal with the steps
that will have to be taken, but I may, perhaps, hint at
one or two things. Your first problem will be to get hold
of the land to give us. There are all the thousands of
wasted acres. You may remember some of the arguments
we used to hear in those old days when we talked politics.
. . . This land is owned by someone or other. Is it too.
much to believe that these landowners might be brave
enough to hand over some of their acres for this purpose?
Or. failing that, could not the principle of compulsion bc
applied?"
Yes! Tommy has been compelled to fight. Make some
of the land grabbers give Tommy the land by which he
can live.
L ���IX
SATURDAY    CHINOOK
SATURDAY.  APRIL  1,  191.
$15 j Blue] Serge
Spring  Suits
FOUR SMART SPRING MODELS TO SELl
ECT FROM.   Pine, sofi texture blue serge, guaran
teed fast color.
PLENTY OF THEM, GENTLEMEN,���in spite
of a great shortage in Men's Clothing fabrics existing today all over the world.
The same low price, $15 for a mighty good suit,
regardless of this great shortage caused by war���regardless of a sharp advance in prices all over this continent.
WM. DICK Ltd.
Two Money - Back Stores
Full of Spring Wearables for Men
33  and  47   HASTINGS   EAST.
BEGINNING TO PAY
Among the questions asked hy M.
A. Macdonald relative to the Pacific
Crcal Eastern Railway, was lhe following: "Has any default taken place
oi any interest due under said bonds?"
The answer .returned by Mr. Ilowser yesterday was: "Yes; interest due
January 15, 1916, $316,016.80, was paid'
hy the province.
From this answer the public will
have occasion to hark hack to the
numerous assurances given by Sir
Richard McBride, Mr. Bowser, their
colleagues and party press that the
province never would have to meet
a single dollar of the interest charges
guaranteed hy il in connection with
the government's railway policy. They
were very positive on this point; as
positive as that the various roads on
the programme would he completed
within the time limit fixed in the
agreement.
The other day lion. Thomas Taylor,
late Minister of Railways, said in the
legislature that "up to the present the
taxpayers of the province had not
been called upon to pay a dollar under
the guarantees they ordered the province to pay," The minister may have
been referring to the main line of the
Canadian Northern Pacific, or to the
policies submitted by Sir Richard McBride in 1909 and 1912, which included
the Pacific Great Eastern project.
Perhaps he will explain. If he referred to the railway policy generally be
seems to have been curiously unaware of the facts. These interest payments are payable half yearly. How
much will we be liable for next June?
Have we paid anything on account of
the Canadian Northern? The public
must bc told the whole truth about
this railway business before another
single concession is granted by the
government.���Victoria   Times.
The  Western  Scots object to being called Ross' Toughs-Here is a picture of a bunch of soldiers at the Willows Camp, Victoria
SUFFRAGE���RED CROSS
SOCIAL SEWING MEETING
Thc Blue Room of the Motel Van
comer  was well   filled  yesterday afternoon   when   members  and   friends \
interested enj'ovcd  thc  filth  and  last
of a series of Suffrage-Red Cross so
cial sewing meetings, held by the United  Suffrage  societies  which,  'luring
the winter months, have been so popular,
We are Doing Business in the
New Store Now, as Well as
in the Old, and Shopping is
Indeed a Pleasure
It's like shopping in a large store in a large city���immense stocks of quality
goods to choose from at the lowest prices���everything arranged to make selecting
easy���and intelligent, courteous and experienced salespeople waiting to fill your requirements expeditiously. We deserve your patronage because we can serve you
best.   Try us and see.
Trimmed Sailors at the
Popular
Price of
$5.00
OUR $5.00 HAT has been a particular feature
of our millinery department for many seasons,
but this season's values put into insignificance
the offers of previous years. The hats are copies
of imported models���many of them are made in
our own millinery department, and are becomingly trimmed with flowers and large ribbon bows
���others are New York hats. Choice of large
and small shapes, of hemp, tagel, and satin and
straw combination. You'll get your Spring Hat
here; of course?
���New Millinery Department, Second Floor
These Splendid Suits
For Boys for
.95
$5.
���As smart a lot of suits as
one would wish to see���and
it's only because we bought
them at a bargain that we
can sell them for this small
price. Mad|e in Norfolk
style, with bloomer knickers
in sizes to fit boys of 8 to
16 years. Choice of plain
brown, and brown and black
check tweeds. They are
strong and particularly adaptable for school wear.
Suit
$5.95
ptfiudsonsBaijCrompany
Tuesday's meeting was held under
tbe auspices of the Cedar Cottage
Political Equality League, and, .is the
ladies of the audience busily plied
needle and thread and cheerfully
clicked the knitting needles, a most
entertaining   programme   was   given.
Mrs. Mclntyre, the newly elected
president of the league, occupied the
chair and the first number on the
programme was the Cedar Cottage
League chorus, "Banner of Freedom,"
effectively given as a piano solo by
Mrs. Radwell.
Mrs. Ralph Smith, speaker of the
afternoon, held the close attention
of her audience as she dealt with the
question of lhe woman's movement in
relation  to  Red Cross work.
Iu her most entertaining manner,
Miss Helen Badgeley sustained her
reputation in a recitation entitled,
"The  Mysterious Portrait."
The annual report for the year ending March fitfdi, 1916, was read by
Mrs. Wright, secretary, and proved
conclusively that the Cedar Cottage
League had accomplished much during the past year in relief work, Red
Cross work and suffrage propaganda.
A feature of the programme was a
beautiful solo, "Here my song with
Wings Provided/' tendered by Miss
Grace Richardson, the charming
young pupil of Madame Schaefer, who
accompanied her.
Miss Beryl llillis rendered k'aurcn-
noi Ostrow, by Kuhenstein, reflecting
in this classical number great credit
upon herself and her teacher, Madame
Schafer, "The Esthetic Analysis" being given by Madame Schacfcr,
The  singing of Cod Save the  King
closed the afternoon's entertainment,
* * *
A WISE HORSE
A liofsejielonijing |o Joe Sage was
lost for nearly a week and no trice
of it could be found. The other day
the animal was discovered in the basement of tbe bouse. It is presumed
that it mistook the noise made by the
local Cadillac for that of a "Zepp"
and had sought security.���West Yale
Review.
* * *
Is it Bowser to be or not to be?
or Tupper to bc or not to be? or
could Col. Taylor do better than either as a leader, or will the Conservatives bring "Dick" back and send
Bowser to London town? It is getting strenuous, if you would read thc
Sun.���Fraser Valley Record.
* * *
B. C. IS FALLING BEHIND AS A
MINING  PROVINCE
INC0BP0BATED 1870
lUMERTE.IUMlK*' STOWSCOHHISSIOUt*
A pamphlet issued by the Mining
Department of B. C. is entitled "The
Mining Province of Canada." The B.
C. administration is strong on this
class of advertising���boost stuff that
is not borne out by facts. It has resulted in the public discrediting all
classes of 13. C. advertising.
British Columbia ought to be the
mining province of Canada for she
has* been in the business for SO years;
she has gigantic mineralized areas;
great and numerous water powers;
three transcontinental railways and
1000 miles of coast line for transportation facilities; yet she has fallen to second place among the mineral
provinces of Canada���and a poor second at that.
Twelve years ago Ontario bad no
mining���not even a Mining Act. Today her mineral production is just
about double the value of British Columbia's. It is true that Ontario lias
bad the benefit of high grade silver
and gold ores, but in 1915 these represented only about one-third of the
mineral output of that province. The
real difference between the mining
of the two provinces is that Ontario
has accepted her opportunities, while
British Columbia has neglected them.
The Ontario Mining Department has
faith; the B. C. Mining Department
has nol. When Ontario finds a new
mineral district she develops it, bin
British Columbia has scores of districts in which she bas made no effort to encourage development. Ontario has mining courses in her universities and mining classes in her
high schools. She is turning out her
own mining men and even sending
them abroad; British Columbia does
not believe ill leaching mining to her
native sons, but invites the U. S.
capitalist to come in and help himself.
Is it any wonder thai B. C. is falling
behind?
It is time that the people of British
Columbia began to realize that before
sljc can become a great mining province she has got to educate her own
sons to bc miners, and has go! to encourage the prospector and small
peril lor.���Omineca Miner.
with thc seriousness oi Canada's ei
tiomic   position   before     deciding     !>
speak.  . . . The  will  of the Caiiadi.c
people  is   lo  do  their  utmost   in   t'
war  of civilization,    [t would not !
doing the utmost if we were to ovi
strain our economic machinery as
imperil   the   machinery   itself.    Th i
would he eminently satisfactory^ t!
Germanic   allies.���Canadian   Cottriei
MR. BOWSER'S CHALLENGE
ACCEPTED
(Continued  from  page 5)
Xow is the lime lo "cut nut'
railway "Mileage charges" for legi
lators and save the $6000 from ll
year's estimates by amending t!
"Constitution Act" as per draft I w
send lo Mr.  Bowser.
Yours faithfully.
Mi >SKS B. COTSWORTH
Xew   Westminster, 2,-tih March, I'1
RENNIE'S SEEi
*   HEADQUARTERS FOR SEEDS, PLAtH
BUI.BS AND SHRUBS
SEYMOUR 8550     f
VT iVI        IVUlllll
r��38 HOMER ST.   - -   VANCOU
"WILHELM" SHAKESPEARE
Wiih the approach of the tercentenary of William Shakespeare conies
an announcement lhat the German
Shakespeare society is to bold a celebration in Weimar in honor of the
dramatist's memory, when addresses
and presentation of "Macbeth," "Othello" and "Measure for Measure."
What, Germans doing honor to a
Briton? No. The Teuton is wiser
than this . Just who it was slips from
recollection, but about the opening of
thc European war one of those industrious lights of the Fatherland
who busied themselves with nationalising all things bright and beautiful
and intellectual that the country seemed likely to need included the bard,of
Avon, insisted that be was a Teuton,
that in faet he didn't rightfully belong
to England, insisted, too, that only the
Genpans properly appreciated him.
The subtlety and foresight of which
move does now appear. To honor a
British dramatist might arouse opposition among the prejudiced nfinds of
the empire; but to honor a German,
stolen through craft from the nation
that rightfully lays claim to him, that
is a patriotic duty.
German   preparedness   extends  beyond mere military and economic efficiency.-���Detroit Free Press.
* * *
SHAUGHNESWS  STATEMENT
i
( It is fair to assume that Baron
Shaughnessy did not give publicity to
his convictions without hfcving weighed carefully the probable effect of his
remarks. That being the case, he must
indeed   have   been  depply   impressed
"NEVER TOUCHED BY
HUMAN HANDS"
People in All Parts
of the City Want
Sou- Van Milk
Enquiries continue to come in
daily from people whom we can
not serve. Al present our delivery service is restricted to
South Vancouver, Grandview
and Mount Pleasant, where we
serve hundreds upon hundreds ol
highly-satisfied, customers. It
is the residents of these districts who should take advantage of Sou-Van Milk.
SOU-VAN MILK is the product of healthy, government-
inspected Fraser Valley cows.
It is clarified and pasteurized
at our sanitary dairy, where
we spent several thousand dollars in installing the most modern and efficient appliances f *
handling milk. You are invt^gi
to inspect our dairy. Thers iff
no special "clean-up" or "sle V"
days���choose your own time
and see our plant in operation
���you will be delighted.
SOU-VAN MILK is fresh,
rich and wholesome���a clean
milk for all domestic and household! purposes���the safe milk
for' babies and growing children. Our phone is Fairmont
2624.
South
V
ancouver
Milk Co.
29th and Fraser
-N\

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