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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Jul 24, 1915

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Array "ANCOUVEfc
Vol. IV, No. 11���Established 1911
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C.
HINOOK
CANADA, SATURDAY, JULY 24. 1915
Price Five Cents
PUBLISHED
Evetj- Satardav ky the Greater Vancouver Puhiiahara Limited
Georte M. Murray, Editor
HEAD OFFICE:
Carter  Thlrtlatk  Avenue  and  Main Street,  South  Vancouver,  B. C.
Editar'a OSce Burnt Drue Co., Vancouver Block, Phone Sey. 5490
TELEPHONE) All department! Fairmaot 1S74
MIGHT CALLS FaJnnoat  1141 L
Baftatarad It  the   Pott  OSce   Department,  Ottawa.
Mall Matter
aa  Second  Ctaas
.taJ-Fc
h*r��Britl
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Ta all palata f! Canada.  Urdttd Klnfdara,  Newtaaadland,
Eaalaad, and other*Brltieh Poaaeaaiona:
$1.50 a Year
Paatafe ta American, Euroaeai and athar Fertifa Cauatriee, Il M
"The truth at all tlmaa Irmly ttaada
And ahall from ������� ta afe eadure."
HAS THE BOTTOM BEEN REACHED?
TAX SALES are not welcomed in any com-
mnnity. It would seem, however, that the
tax sales which have been held in North Vancouver, Point Grey, South Vancouver, Richmond,
Langley, and other British Columbia municipalities,
should mark definitely the end of a rather dark
period in the history of the country and the beginning of a brighter era.
In the past ten years the properties figuring in the
tax sale lists have been turned over, in some cases,
scores of times. The dealers were speculators. They
boomed the land and prices rose beyond all reason.
Then the decline came and if the history of values
could be shown upon a chart, we are now back practically where we began.
Though there is little likelihood that the history
of the development of Vancouver and the adjoining
municipalities will ever be repeated, it might be observed that in laying out this grand city, many mistakes have been made. Perhaps one of the most
flagrant was the subdivision into thirty-three feet
Jots of lands so far out that they can never be other
than garden properties for years to come.
During the first few days of the tax sale in South
Vancouver much of this land had to be taken over
by the municipality for want of bidders. A considerable area of it was located south and east of
Collingwood and between Kerr Road and Victoria
Road. In this locality may be found splendid home-
sites. Nature intended this section for small farms,
such as the five acre farms to be found in Burnaby.
Exploiters, however, had all this property carved up
into thirty-three feet lots. In some districts may be
found rows of fine little cottages set up so close together that light wells are necessary between the
houses. There may be six of such houses in a row
and not another house or piece of cleared property
for a quarter of a mile in any direction.
Town planning was conducted upon a hit-or-miss
basis, and the promiscuous subdividing and settling
of the district meant the expenditure of millions of
dollars upon streets, waterworks, and other public
utilities. The fact is that such a municipality as
South Vancouver will have to spend a generation in
catching up to its public utility improvements���and
by that time these improvements will have to be renewed throughout.
It is to be hoped that the next cycle of development in the municipalities round about will be directed with greater wisdom than the last. The tax
sales simply mean the melting pot. Out of it we will
emerge purified. The huge bonded indebtedness
which will have to be carried will be as an indemnity which the people who will carry forward the
new order of things will not find so hard to bear.
In all events, the bottom seems to have been reached
and the worst pessimist cannot say otherwise.
The people of the State of Washington have vote
the liquor traffic out of existence.
Old John Barleycorn's realm in the Northwest
is now cut down to British Columbia, Alaska and
the Yukon. Here is his last hunting ground. T|o
him it has been a happy hunting ground. Here
has fed fat ever since the Hudson's Bay Company
matched the Siwashes with him and bred along th
favored coast physical and moral depravity, dealh
and desolation.
It may be said that the history of British Columbia up to the present time since the days the first
jug of Scotch was traded with the native for forly
thousand dollars worth of silver fox skins has bee)n
written in rum.
The Siwashes traded the fruits of their labor,
their daughters, their wives and their dogs for run.
And when the white man came, John Barleyco
was the boy who presided over most of the deals
through which the whites passed the immense natli
ral resources of British Columbia into the hands
private interests.
There is not a trail, a waggon road, a railroad
any direction from Monte Creek to the furthermost
points in British Columbia which is not studded every ten miles with establishments presided over by
Mr. Barleycorn.
John Barleycorn wrecks men and homes.    It
he who musters the army of the unemployed,
latest achievement in this Province was the wret
ing of a Cabinet.
WE DON'T NEED THIS OUTFIT
I
of
in
is
His
T is related that a certain industrial "king" from
the east, seeking a cheap location for a branch
factory,  negotiated with South  Vancouver in
the matter.
He was intervicved at his hotel, shown every
courtesy by the South Vancouver people, and piloted over the district.
This man thought the situation over and at the
end of a few days, after gathering all the information possible, he coldly told the local people that he
did not think that the name "South Vancouver" on
his letterhead would help his business.
Now this man cannot be a business man. Granted that South Vancouver could furnish him with a
cheap site, good transportation facilities, cheap power and water, this should be the site for his factory.
But 'South Vancouver" would not look well on
his letterheads!
If his business was properly conducted and he
was able to turn out an honest product at a fair price
and do his work as well as he could, the world
wouldn't ask him whether he came from South
Vancouver or South Dakota. In fact they wouldn't
be interested. "Though he live in a bush ... the
world would beat a pathway to his door."
We do not need men of this fellow's type. We
have too many of them here already. One of them
sits at the head of the council and claims that the
district is one "of open fields and peanut stands."
T
DO YOU EAT MUCH SUGAR?
HE average ratepayer who attends municipal
meetings and storms    about    comparatively
small municipal matters, buys a good amount
of sugar every week.
Every time de dumps a pound of sugar into the
family coffee cups or on the surface of the family
porridge, he pays two cents to the Dominion Gov
ernment.
In short the duty on sugar coming into Cana
from China or the United States is approximate ly
$2.09 per hundred pounds.
This duty is charged so that the manufacturer of
sugar in China or the United States may not interfere with the manufacturer of sugar in Canada. Th
theory is that Canada is a nice little preserve wh>
the- sugar manufacturers settled  in  the  Dominion
have a complete monopoly of the business.
The tax on sugar coming into the country fas
doubled during the past few years. Incidenta ly
sugar made in Canada and sold here has shot up in
price. Every time the tariff goes up, the price of
sugar to the consumer goes up.
Raw materials used in the manufacture of sugar
come into the country free, with few exceptions
It is, of course, the poor man with the large fan-
ily who is hit by this Germanic system of taxaticm
Every family uses sugar, but the possibilities are that
the working man will have a larger family to sip
port than the millionaire. The possibilities also ;
that there are about 30,000 working men to every
two millionaires. All are taxed alike, regardless of
their ability to pay.
Sugar shoots up in price, because the Canad
sugar manufacturer has a monopoly and he
charge what he likes for his product.    The oulsi
manufacturers are absolutely debarred    from
market.
The war has given the Government a further excuse for hoisting taxation.    With $2.09 a hund
being charged by the Government on all imports
granulated sugar, the foreign manufacturers are u
able to ship one pound of sugar into Vancouver
This great tax upon sugar will not help the Em
pire in the least, nor will it be the means of raising
any revenue for the Government.   It will have or
one effect���the squeezing of money out of the pockets of the already hard hit working man and piling
it into the pockets of the few anointed members
the Canadian Manufacturers Association who   ;
interested in the sugar manufacturing monopoly.
RESURRECTION OF "THE JOURNAL"
R. JOSEPH MARTIN'S avowed inten-
WESTWARD THE TIDE OF
PROHIBITION
AN Eastern reformer stated during the last Ontario elections that Carifcda would have to
abolish the liquor traffic or "a more virile
nation would write her epitaph."
Wednesday last the people of Alberta decided
to deport John Barleycorn as an undesirable.
Saskatchewan some months ago gave the old fellow his walking ticket. The Conservatives of Manitoba are going to the people on a Prohibition ticket.
nn
can
e
the
of
IVl tions of breathing the breath of life once
more into the "Evening Journal" have
aroused much interest in political circles.
During its life of forty-two days, the "Journal's"
editorials caused a series of severe electrical disturbances from one end of Canada to the other.
Mr. Martin's re-appearance in the journalistic field
will add a touch of spice which will be much appreciated by Vancouver's newapftper r-.'tad.bg puHii;.
Mr. Martin is a very shrewd business man, and
with the re-appearance of the "Evening Jorunal,"
we may take it for granted that the clouds of financial stringency are lifting a bit. We may also take
it for granted that the elections are not far away,
and that Mr. Martin will have a great deal to say
regarding both Federal and Provincial politics.
There is at least one newspaper in Vancouver
against which Mr. Martin may be expected to
launch a few broadsides.
Meantime some of the boys of the Typographical
Union who pay daily calls to the secretary's office
at the Labor Temple are cheering up a bit.
NOT EXACTLY HON. SAM'S SOLDIERS
" V SEND you my congratulations and the admir-
I ation of my soldiers, who have carried the
badge of Canada into the battlefields of Flanders for liberty." This striking message was cabled to Hon. Louis Botha today by Major-General
Hughes, Minister of Militia and Defence, who fifteen years ago met the South African Premier as
a foe, says The Mail and Empire's London correspondent in a cable dated July 12. The Globe has
refused to take part in recent attacks on General
Hughes, believing that the Minister of Militia had
a great work to do and that his attention ought not
to be distracted by the necessity of defending himself from the assaults of his somewhat numerous enemies. Criticisms of the Militia Department in the
raising, equipping, and sending forward of men to
the front is legitimate and has proved salutary, but
personalities should be avoided if at all possible.
General Hughes, however, goes too far in his cable to General Botha, and his colleagues in the Government should tell him so plainly.    He has a perfect right to send his congratulations to the    great
South African, but he offends against good taste
when he speaks of Canada's army as "my soldiers."
There are too many budding Napoleons abroad in
the world today who regard themselves as heaven-
inspired leaders of men, entitled to command by reason of their superior mental endowment.    General
Hughes may think he belongs to this superior order
of humanity, and that Canada's soldiers are really
his.   But they are not.   They fight for freedom, not
for General Hughes.    It is an impertinence on the
part of the Minister of Militia, in a message to the
Premier of South Africa, to speak of the Canadian
troops in Britain as "my soldiers."   The King himself, who alone has the right to use the phrase, does
so very rarely.   Let General Hughes cultivate modesty; he will thus possess himself of' at feast one of
the attributes of true greatness.��� The Globe.
M
BY THE WAY
m
A COMPLAINT
MANY retail grocers throughout the distiict
complain that they are being discriminated
against by the wholesale trade in the matter
of cartage rates charged on all consignments coming
beyond Sixteenth Avenue.
The wholesalers tack to their bill a cartage charge
of one dollar a ton on all materials bound beyond
Sixteenth Avenue- tr>e argument being that territory
beyond that point is "out of the city."
Of course the wholesalers own great vans which
carry the goods. They are not called upon to pay
the cartage tax exacted from all cartage concerns
doing business in the district. Yet they appear] to
engage in the cartage business.
SIR J. A. M. AIKINS, PURITAN
THE Conservatives of Manitoba have chosen
for their leader Sir J. A. M. Aikins, M.P.,
who has mapped out for them a programme
of Prohibition, Purity, and Woman's Suffrage.
Here is a knight who is said to have many virtues
and *he Conservatives welcome him as one who will
redeem the party.
Sir J. A. M. Aikins was a member of the Commission which investigated the horrible boot contract graft at Ottawa some lime ago. Before this
commission it was conclusively proven that Canadian boot manufacturers had sold inferior shoes to
the militia department for the use of Canadian soldiers of the first contingent.
Aikins was unable to see anything wrong whatsoever in the putting through of the rotten contracts.
He voted to whitewash the grafters.
The question naturally arises as to how much
would have been brought to light in the Manitoba
parliament building thefts if Sir J. A. M. Aikins
had charge of the fortunes of the Conservative party
in that riding when the million dollar mystery was
being pulled off.
"SIX DAYS SHALT THOU WORK'
o
RANGEMEN in Manitoba have entered a
protest against attempts to introduce Sunday
baseball into this province.    The Orange-
SPEAKING OF JOHN BARLEYCORN. If
we must have him with us, why could not the people
of British Columbia grow sufficient hops and barley and rye and wheat to furnish him with munitions
of war.
* * *
WHY SHOULD WE import all the materials
necessary for a proper equipment of the Old Boy's
arsenal.
Sp   >{.   S��
"WHO WAS RESPONSIBLE for the Tax
Sale?" The Rev. J. R. Robertson promises to answer the question from the pulpit of St. David's
Church next Sunday evening. Tlie ministers of
South Vancouver, like the press of the district, are
not afraid to speak out.
OF COURSE IT might be different if their audiences were different. For instance, a young minister in a church whose leading supporter controlled
the liquor trade of the country, would have to be
very bold to attack that particular line of evil. Similarly an editor whose paper is owned by certain interests would be very canny about writing anything
offensive to the tastes of his owners ��� unless, of
course, he was willing to give up his position.
A BRIDLED PRESS is the great curse of Canada. Hell, we repeat, is paved with the plants of
journalistic prostitutes.
MR.   ISRAEL   RUBINOWITZ, of Steveston,
men, or any other men, who oppose Sunday baseball 'writes to the daily papers to say that he think;
are right. There is strenuosity and distraction
enough during six days in the week without adding
tension to the seventh. Sunday baseball is being
promoted because professional sport managers want
Sunday profits. It is not a healthy sport-promoting
proposition, but a plain money-making scheme. The
expressed aim of the laws of Canada is to have a
cessation of commercialism on one day in the week.
It is a splendid aim, viewed from the moral, physical, spiritual, commercial or any legitimate public
side.���Winnipeg Tribune.
s our
reeve is a great man and a successful municipal official. Who says that the Highland Scotch are the
only clannish nation on earth.
HIS WUSSHIP SAYS that "South Vancouver
should burn candles for street lights." There are
some people in the district who would weep but little to see candles burning for a less worldly purpose
to light through a blacker gloom. TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
The Standard Trusts Company
Head Office:  WINNIPEG
Branches:
VANCOUVER, EDMONTON, SASKATOON
Capital subscribed and fully paid       $750,000.00
Reserve  Fund       $425,000.00
Total  Assets    $16,000,000.00
This Company transacts all business of a strictly Trust character.
NO DEPOSITS ARE, OR HAVE AT ANY TIME BEEN
ACCEPTED
The Company has  for   sale a very   large   number of   FARM
PROPERTIES in the middle West Provinces, belonging to Trust
Estates now being wound up.    Booklet on application to
VANCOUVER BRANCH     ���     VANCOUVER BLOCK
JAS.  G.  FORRESTER,  Manager.
r
Coast Lumber & Fuel Co., Ltd.
Dealers in
Tile, Sewer Pipe, Cement,
Lime, Brick, Etc.
Exclusive South Vancouver Agents
For Manufacturers of "Quality"
Phone Fair. 2500       Phone High. 226       Phone Fraser 41
The Cost of Operating Electric
Household Appliances is
Merely Nominal.
The actual cost of current for Electric Household Appliances is
out of all proportion to the comfort and convenience provided, this
being especially true during the summer months.
Look over this table of hourly cost of operation.
Coffee Percolator
3%  cents per hour
Electric Grill
4 to by2 cents per hour '
Electric Iron
4 to 5 cents
per  hour
Electric Washer
3  cents per hour
Electric Toaster ,
5 cents per hour
N.B.���Appliances used for cooking are operated only a fraction of
an hour per meal. The cost of others depends upon the duration
of their use.
We will be pleased to demonstrate these appliances at our salesrooms.
B. C. ELECTRIC
Carrall and Hastings St.
1138 Granville St. (near Davie)
Spending $100,000
To Increase Telephone
Facilities
For some weeks past, the B.C. Telephone Company has had
workmen busy installing big lead cables to provide further telephone facilities in certain portions of the city. Cables placed previously in the south-eastern portion of the district served out of
the Fairmont exchange, and also in the east and west portions of
Bayview district, are working to capacity. To supply other subscribers, and also to provide for reasonable future needs, over
$30,000 is being spent by the company, approximately $15,000 in
each section.
The work in Vancouver is only part of many extensions and
improvements being made by the company. Estimates have already been completed in Xanaimo and North Vancouver. In
Victoria, another $30,(300 is being spent to give the necessary increased facilities in outside districts; in Cloverdale and Milner
districts, many miles of poles are being set to reach new subscribers; on Lulu Island, Morty miles of wire will be stretched within
the next few weeks for the same purpose; while in the interior,
extensive improvements are being carried out in Nelson and Rossland. Work in North Vancouver and Nanaimo has already been
completed. All this involves an expenditure of considerably over
$100,000.
In addition, tlie company has overhauled all its exchanges,
renovating and redecorating, taking advantage of the time when
the least inconvenience will be caused. So altogether it is pretty
busy, following out its policy of being always prepared) to give
telephone service.
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
A.  E.  Ha
J. A. Harron
HARRON BROS.
Caesar's Wife Should be Above
Suspicion���Not Like Women
Who Follow Council Meetings
LORD PEANUT ADMINISTERS PUBLIC REBUKE TO
LADIES ON FRONT BENCH AT EVERY COUNCIL MEETING���"IF I HAD A WIFE," SAYS HE,
"SHE WOULD STAY AT HOME AND COOK AND
MEND AND WATCH THE CHILDRENS"
AT every meeting since the uprising began in South Vancouver,
the front row of the bleachers at the Municipal Hall has been
occupied by ladies, several of whom are of uncertain years.
It was to this line of loveliness and maturity that the chivalrous
Lord Peanut was wont to make his bow before and after throwing
himself into the soliloquies which have made the hair of Messrs. Spit-
zer Rorick stand on end.
His Lordship, Thursday, held court, and ere stepping from the
throne, a menial approached with cheques to be signed with the official pen.
Glancing over the list, His Lordship glued his eye to several
names of men who, in past days, had been cast into utter darkness at
his command.
"Thee-s-s-s-e," quoth he, "are brother-in-laws and relatives. I
ain't goin' to sign thee-s-s-s-e cheques. Take them away, out from
here. I have cut the heads off these fellows. Relatives, brother-in-
laws.   Ha, ha, ha, ha."
Whereupon the councillors made motion over the head of his
Lordship and had the Councillor of Finance sign the cheques.
"This-s-s-s," hissed Lord Peanut, "is unthinkable. Brother-
in-laws, sister-in-laws, friends. All working for the municipalite.
They will haf dere wives here next!" And he threw up his hands in
holy horror.
"Alright," said a quiet and dignified councillor, addressing
Lord Peanut, smiling the while, "you couldn't bri*0 your wife up
here!"
Laughter broke out in all directions, shared by the beauty of the
front row of the bleachers.
"Naw," snarled Lord Peanut, "I couldn't bring my wife up
here, and I wouldn't if I had a wife.    If I had a wife" and his
Lordship, Caesar-like, thumbs down, narrowed his eyes and peered
into the souls of the ladies on the front bench "I wouldn't expect
that she would come to this hall to hang around all the time. I
would expect that my vife would stay to her home and keep clean
the kitchen and wash clean the dishes and cook my meals for me and
look after the little childrens!"
Having concluded his remarks, Lord Peanut left the room.
The front row hesitated for a moment. Then ten noses went into
the air, and ten ladies, mostly fair, some of uncertain ager rose up,
seized umbrellas and gauntlets, smelling salts and wristlets and chatelaines, and marched out.   .
"After all we have done for h-i-m," sobbed one of them upon
reaching the street. There the little party of femininity parted and
went their several ways, and it's a safe bet that "it will be a long, long
day before they will ever darken the door of the Municipal Hall
again."
FACTS AND FANCIES
By  "OBSERVER"
("Observer's" Notes coming in late
last week hud to be unavoidably lieltl
over).
G. M. Williamson
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS
Vancouver���Office and Chapel: 1034 Granville St.     Phone Sey. 3486
North Vancouver���Office and Chapel: 122 Sixth St. W.     Phone 134
"Government does not propose giving further consideration tn request
re treasury certificates, but mi iln-
question of extension of time the government will consider the advisability
of introducing legislation at the next
session extending the period of redemption of property sold for tuxes to
two years under such provisions as to
increased rate of interest as may be
thought fair to tlie purchasers, and
of making such legislation applicable
to tax sales of the present year."
Thus replies the premier. Sir Richard McBride, to the request of Reeve-
Gold of South Vancouver for special
legislation to issue three year treasury
certificates against arrears of taxes or,
failing that, an extension of time for
redemption of tax sale property. The
tax sale will, therefore, proceed as advertised, on Monday, July 19.
* * *
Looking at the matter of the time
extension impartially, there does not
appear to be any good reason why the
redemption period should not he two
years instead of one, provided interest
is charged at such a rate as to induce
investors to purchase at tax sales. If
that is not done, the object of a tax
sale���that of raising money for the
immediate needs of the municipality
���might be very much affected; he-
cause, unless people can he induced
to invest in land offered for arrears
of taxes, municipalities will find themselves with a considerable amount of
property on their hands from which
they will be unable to collect taxes.
* * *
On the other hand, if sufficient revenue can be collected to meet fixed
charges and current expenses each
year, in the case of South Vancouver,
it would be a very good thing for the
municipality to own a considerable
proportion of the land in the district.
Of course, much would depend on the
locality of the land as to the uses to
which it could he put; but there can
be- no doubt (hat South Vancouver, as
a municipality, would benefit considerably if it was in a position to offer
industrial sites to manufacturers on
long terms leases at reasonable rentals. Then again, having regard for
the prices asked by individual owners
for land for school or park sites, it
would not be a disadvantage for the
municipality to be the owner of land
suitable for those purposes.
* * *
The enormous wealth of the great
landowners in London, England���the
Duke of Bedford and the Duke of
Westminster for example ��� is very
largely derived from ground rentals
and leases. And there is no reason
why a municipality should not be the
owner of all property within its boundaries, if properly administered. One
of the most flourishing towns in Greal
Britain today has been established on
a townsite owned by a public company which controls the whole business of the local community, and has
established a prosperous industrial
town with over fifty factories and an
agricultural community, as well as a
large residential population whose
business  takes  them  to London  each
day.
* * *
Mr. Thomas Adams, who was recently engaged by the Dominion Government as town planning expert for
Canada, was secretary of the company which ��� was formed to locate a
town where, none existed. The share
capital of the company was $1,500,-
(100. An estate comprising six square
miles of agricultural land was purchased, 34 miles from London.  When
SATURDAY. JLT.Y 24,  1915
MO^IEY TO LOAN
In Multiples of $5,000  at 8 per cent, on
inside revenue producing business property.
Our client will only consider property that
is now paying its way.
(IanadiAn   FINANCIERS TRUST CO.
HEAD OFFICE, 839 HASTINGS ST. W.       VANCOUVER, B. C.
Patrick Donnelly, General Manager.
MAPLE LEAF DAIRY
We
Tommason
A pin
PURE PASTURIZED MILK
are Milk at.' Butter Specialists
:, Mgr. Phone Bay. 1417
1935-2nd AVE. WEST
one call will have prompt attention
COAL
For kitchen use our Wellington No. 1 Nut Coal at $5.50
per ton is best Value on the market.
USE IT ONCE USE IT ALWAYS
Phone: Sey. 210
WacD0NALD,MARP0LE C0.,Ltd.
Keeler's Nursery
Cdit
Work
Grower and Importer of Plants, Bulbs, Roots and Shrubs
Flowers
a specid
Fljowcring and
Shrubs for
11   planting.
nd  Design
Ity.    .
Ornarnen-
^pring and
Do You
Sill
One  hundred varieties of
Roses  of  Choice Sorts
and  three  hundred varieties  of   Dahlias.
Phone Fairmont 817
YOU WILL FIND OUR PRICES MODERATE
Co>. FIFTEENTH AVE. and MAIN ST :: MOUNT PLEASANT
Want Bigger  Poultry Profits?
LRT OUR EXPERTS SHOW YOU HOW
A few years ago poultry raising was a comparatively easy matter.
Bit today it is lifferent.   Wilh the cost of feed going up���with competition growing teener and keener���with the rapidly increasing number
truly scientific poultry raisers���the man who now raises poultry at
irofit simply MUST learn ihe business from the bottom up.
lie must k low how to feed and breed for eggs���how to get the
st  rapid  grrwth  for  market���- how  to most successfully  breed  for
w purposes.    He must know the short cuts to success.    He must
sti|idy thc expeiience of others.
The poultry raising course of thc International Correspondence
hools comprises 24 practical lessons for home study. It'represents
p experience of the most successful poultry raisers in the world as
II as our own wide experience on the Rancocas Farm at Brown's
(lis, X. J.���(lie world's iargest poultry farm.
For any iniormation regarding any of .the I. C. S. courses (and we
284 to clu ose from) see
the estl
the  company  a  coi
adc
work j
mains
railway
vided
the   (
had be
arrang
tion
popula
bers
ite came int
W. H. Coulter
Local Manager
10 BUR1|JS BLOCK, 18 HASTINGS STREET WEST
a water Slip]
erected, wat
laid, new rt
station and
a railway
tate, farming
pn in existen
id, and an eh
as equipped
ion began to
t'nc possession of
|iplete  survey  was
ly was  found, gas
er  mains  and  gas
ids constructed, a
freight  yard  pro-
whlch ran through
tenancies   which
before Mere re-
ctrical supply sta-
ng   before   the
unve in any num-
I-'rini|i  the lirst a
the d
fined,
as prai|
the tc
ously i
ent  pa
growth
ral
cept tl|
elopnient ot
Itld although
tical growth
Wn has been
lefined lines.
Is corelated
of the town
^hat of any d
and organized,    Ne
complete plan for
the town was de-
modified ill detail
showed necessary,
built on liarmoni-
wilh all ils differ-
iiiicl unified. The
has been as natu-
rdmary town, ex
at  it was  previously     planned
|irly   two-thirds  of
the lanfl is left as an open belt round
ite, and is used for small hold-
rms, golf bins, etc. The ccn-
he town is d .-voted to business
sesses mime ous stores, public
anks, etc., while factories and
are located along the
the est
ings, f;|
tre of
and pol
halls   '
other Industrie
railway
remove
factory
worker
icnt, tl
the  fac
The
the   de
from  sight]
area, and   1
are placed s
ough  not  so
fories "under
* *
bulk of the
clopment
999
most c
er and
cation
shares
essenti;
the   to\|
The residential section is far
or sound of the
|he homes of the
as to be conven-
near as to have
their noses."
built bk- individual
prisq. The company
plots, iingly or in
eighth to two acr<
erection of houses
buildings.     Leases
property,    except
rks,    has    been
|or  private   cnter-
'  leases  building
roups  from  one-
in  area,   for  the
stores  and   other
re  issued   for  99
cally   equal   to  a   fr
Thc   building  plots
.(uses good m
sewers avail
of    member
|n the compa)
for reside!)
Property!
years, the  latter  being practi-
' pchold  in  tenure.
ffered   have     in
Ills with gas, wat-
bit.     No  mialifi-
hip    or    holding
-y i-,  in any way
;t  "r  building  in
changes     hands
freely, and the leases of the company
are accepted by mortgagees and building societies. For those who do not
wish to build or buy houses, house
agents in the town have lists of furnished or unfurnished residences lo l..e
rented for short or long periods, and
ii is expected that the town will shortly have ,1,S,(XK) of a population.
* + *
In short, a model flourishing town
has been established on an estate
owned by one company. What has
been possible for a public company to
do, should not be impossible for a
municipality lik.e South Vancouver, if
the whole of the land within the district was owned by the municipality.
The population of the town referred
to is for thc most part an industrial
one, and the industries are of a good
type, employing a good type of workmen. And given foresight and care,
and the application of thorough business principles in the development of
South Vancouver, there is no reason
on earth why the municipality should
not grow and flourish, even supposing the laud offered at tax sales from
time to time was all bought in or otherwise acquired by the corporation.
Verb, sap.
Glenboro Reunion Gay Scene
Mrs. L. Lockhart, 1727 45th Avenue East, was hostess at a reunion of
former Glenboro friends, on Saturday
afternoon, July 19th. Mrs. Lockhart
was assisted by Miss Silvia Lockhart
in   receiving her  guests.
A large number of friends attended,
aiWrmg them: Mrs. A. Carson, Glenboro, Out., guest of honor; Mrs. R.
Rae, Mrs. J. H. T-'awcett, Mrs. J. Mog-
gay, Victoria, B.C.; Mrs. Frank Cum-
mings, Seattle, Wash.; Mrs. E. C. fr-
win; Mrs. J. Irwin; Mrs. Armitage;
Mrs. G. Chambers; Mrs. P. Young;.
Mrs. W. Gowanlock; Mrs. J. E. Mc-
Cague; Mrs. R. C. Cooke; Mrs. N.
Telford; Mrs. Manuel; Mrs. G. Stokes;
Mrs. J. Elliott; Mrs. Downman, and
Mrs. Willis; also Miss Muriel Fau-
cett,  Vivian  Moggay, and R.  Willis. SATURDAY. JULY 24, 1915
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
HILCREST DAIRY
PURE PASTEURIZED MILK
No Preservatives No Adulteration
Purity Guaranteed
11 Quarts for 1 Dollar
131 FIFTEENTH AVENUE WEST
Phone Fairmont 1934
L
Duty of Canadians In Times
Of Trial Is Clearly Outlined
Mr.  Donald  Downie  Speaks on  Great  Canadian  Renaissance and
Imperial vs.  Petty Politics
WFmmmmmamaaBmBmmBamt
Mill: Foot of Ontario Street. Fraser River
Phone: Fraser 97
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
���i*s&Ls
Manufacturers of
BEVEL SIDING, BOAT LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
Wbolesale and P.etail
GRIMMETT  P.  O.,  SOUTH VANCOUVER
P. M, HAMILTON F. WILLIS
uKiateKxBE'Jl'rai^B-S^^
Spaking on thc subji cl of the Greal
Canadian renaissance, and Imperial
vs. Petty Politics, al the joint Liberal
ii g in 4362 Main Street on Tuesday evening, Mr, Donald Downie
said;
Revolution is in the air. "Wnk.-
up, England!" cried the king. We
cry here, "Wake up, Canada!"
Tin- awakening Ij:is come to women
���perhaps as they are so super-sensitive, a little earlier. They have fell
ii first, and for a few years back. This
meeting here is a sign of that political,
moral and spiritual revival far above
petty politics of ihe parish pump.
Lcl us be ambitious for ibis Canada of ours, peopled by both these
chivalrous races, descended from these
two worthy ancestors sprung from
thi Anglo-Norman stock, and spcak-
inj both these rich and graceful ton-
���;< ��� thai she might also one day
occupy such an enviable position in
the family compact and confidence of
nations.
Duty   of  the   Hour
Bui the duty of the hour���what is
it? is it, as a greal editor has suggested to us the oilier day���to silence
all criticism and u> close the ear to
all complaints and the eyes to all corruption during the war?    Are we, be-
use  of  this  world   danger   to  leave
nir   In
CAP1LANO.  NORTH  VANCOUVER, B.C.
II. LARSON, Manager. P.  I.AKS'J>
���It
roprtetpr,
.'
���>.��.���-,#      | .��vi��*r,.,
Elevation   625  feet. One hour's  trip  from  Vancouver. Telephone   146
SCENIC   DELIGHTS.   FISHING.   HUNTING.   MOUNTAIN   CLIMBING,   Etc.
Unequalled  Resort for  Holiday, long or short.     Family Rooms
en suite  with special) rate.
Modern  appointments   throughout,   spacious   ground's,   high-class  service   at  moderate
rates.    Easy trail to top of Grouse Mountain, altitude 3.6G0 feet.
C^f^^^^^^^f^
You need a knowing druggist to fill your prescriptions
just as much as you need a knowing doctor to find out what's
the matter with-you and tell you what to take. When your
doctor writes your prescriptions, bring them to us and know
that you will get them filled right with first-class, pure, fresh
drugs.
We  never make a mistake.   We never substitute.
Come to OUR Drug Store
THE BEST DRUG STORE
BURNS DRUG COMPANY, LTD.
Phone 3902
732 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.
country   unprotecte*
19-49
IRC.
TERMINAL   CITY  IRON    WORKS
ALBERT ZT.                                   ,                          TELEPHONE
ENGINEERS. MACHINISTS AND FOUNDE-RS
. AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTION
HIGH.
SPKCI/
131
Musi ��c- fold our hands while our liberties are invaded, or look in silence
upon public robbery. And all that bc-
cause party has the second call���second to thc call of country.
No, If we are truly loyal we shall
neither advise nor submit to arbitrary
or corrupt measure. The smoke of
Flanders shall not shield the housebreakers in Manitoba,or in Carleton
or in II. C We -hall exert our endeavors, at whatever hazard, and more
stil iii time of war than in peace, to
repel the selfish aggressor and to drag
the public thief to justice; whatever
advantage he may try to derive behind the flag, or whoever may protect
him in his villainy, or whoever may
partake of his plunder.
And yet the outlook on humanity
rather than on the parish pump���the
pushing back of onr horizons, rather
than a narrowing and restricting selfishness���that is the subject brought
home to us. in useful lessons, by the
war. But the greater does not extinguish the less. However it may
obscure or overshadow it. There are
two questions and issues that run concurrently. The second is how our
country shall be governed���well or ill?
��� But the first is���shall we preserve a
country for which to make any form
of government?
Wake Up, Vancouver
So let us reform our old methods
in this next historic year, and let us
"wake up, Vancouver," in spile of the
advice of designing foes and mistaken
friends; of some great editors and of
Mr. MacDonald Mowat, who won].!
all advise us to go to -deep while the
war lasts and submit to everything,
and investigate nothing and criticise
nothing���let us wake up, Canada. British  Columbia.
If public plunder and graft and political corruption are to be tolerated
Oil that plea���and laid over and winked at and condoned���it would be unfair i-i all the other combinations of
loyal criminals w( .are condemning
every day in the criminal courts.
Might they not also petition the crown
for a truce and for an amnesty pendente helium? And ihey miglil begin
by saying:
"We your majesty's loyal bandits
and highway men of Harris Street.
respectfully represent thai justice
should be free and equal." You can
imagine the rest for yourselves.
Aliens in the City
There arc the aliens in our midst.
Do you know that aliens are employed, principally Germans, in public offices, claiming American nationality
���such fraudulent American- as those
wc shot lately in ihc Tower of London���to encourage the others. We
have canttned the German paper
trade. So 1 see that to keep the resources from the Alvcnslebcns and
other Germans we have sold them to
llcrr I'leischackcr, and Hcrr Bloch,
and Guggenheim, and Satre. there is
ihe patriotism.
Of the shopkeeper���German goods
. f the shoddiest kind have been encouraged here in preference to the
good old Sheffield, Leeds and Birmingham, Belfast and Paisley and Glasgow goods, which are, so to speak, all
wool and a yard wide. The narrow-
minded dollar-chasing dealer is more
lo blame than the buyer. The buyer
must buy what tradesmen carry.
Tradesmen carry what they can makefile biggest profit on. The biggest
immediate profit is made on the trashiest goods presented to him by the
German American travelling agent
from Seattle or Oshkosh or Kalamazoo.
Government's Position
Let us see for a moment how a
great and 'oyal government al Ottawa plays Ihe great imperial game. T
am speaking in round figures. Figures
proverbially do not lie. And yet you
know that if you transpose them improperly they will lie like a German
diplomat���like Baron von Bernsdorf,
Ananias Munchausen. But here they
arc. We borrow 150 million from
Britain at 4 per cent, to finance the
war in Canada. That adds six million
a year to our burdens���to our supposed contribution. How do we meet
if By a British preference, proba-
blv?   No.
We impose an additional 5 per cent.
dm- -ai all British goods coming itit��� ���
Panada���though ours enter ihe Motherland free. Thai 5 per cenl on an
importation of 130 million Britis .
Is costs the Mother country then
6 1-2 millions a year. So instead of
contributing to show our patriotism
we are profiting from the transaction,
like a drug merchant or a horse buyer, or a Winnipeg contractor. Instead
of increasing the preference to the
Mother country, as Sir Wilfrid Laurier proposes to do, we arc decreasing
it. It is of a piece with tin- pernicious principle laid down firsl by the
most astute of all Tory leaders when
he first ranged the manufacturers of
Canada behind his party, wilh their
campaign funds���"Well, if ihis endangers British connection���.-, much
thc worse for British connection."
Thai from the great founder and
apostle of Toryism in Canada When
anything endangers their hold on
plan and power then so much the
worse for British connection.
Liberals were  Right
And ycl these are the people whpl
have a monopoly of loyalty, And we
poor Liberals, because wc had ideas
of our own about the value to the
Empire of our own coast defence���
and to organize that coast defence by
forts and fast cruisers and submarines, would have been ju-t as imperial
as a present of 35 million dollars to
build superfluous superdreadnottghts
-���we were roundly abused in every
tone. Well, it turns out thai we were
right. Thai we were farsccing. . hat
to keep the mone) at home and to
forsee ihe necessity of home defence
on ihe outbreak of hostilities showed
some prescience, some foresight in
our good old I'reiich-Canadiau prime
minister. .And to forsee is to govern
as a French statesman has said.
"Gouverner���e'est pre voir."
And yei he lost power just four
years ago on this issue���and on the
cry thai the .flag of England on this
continent would not be safe in the
hands of a  French-Canadian.
They had conveniently forgotten
ihe words of iheir own Sir George
Ettiene Cartier in one of his best
public speeches in London, where he.
like Sir John Tliomp-on. had the
happiness to die in the capital "I the
Empire: "I predict for our loyally,
thai the last cannon lo be fired, on
the North American continent, in defence of ihe Bripsh flag tlicre, v. ill
be fired by a French-Canadian'"
J. B. HOLDEN PAYS FLYING
VISIT���RETURNING TO ALTA.
Declarer, that Smaller Cities on Prairie
Are Prosperous and that there is
A Big Crop in Sight
DREAMLAND
H.   K.   DC AN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
TUESDAY, JULY 27.���"THE GHOST BREAKER," in five parts.
With the Famous Players.   Th- ihe Haunted Castle; The
Young Kentuckian; The murder: The treasure. And many hairbreadth escapes ;-;'. to mall e best subjects put Out by
Jesse  L.  Lasky.
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
All the Latest in Motion Pictures
Mr. James I!. Holden, for Some
years a highly respected citizen ^ of
South Vancouver, now living at Vcg-
reville. Alberta".' spent some days in
the district last week, eu route home
from attending the great Shriners'
celebration in  Scattl".
"ihe smaller cities on the prairie,"
said Mr. Holden to the CHINOOK
"arc prospering. . The cr ipS are going to be big this year, and thee is
iittle talk of hard times."
When asked in a jocular manner if
they were turning over any real estate
in Alberta, Mr. Holden replied: "V, s,
They are turning over a greal 'leal ol
real estate'. This lime, however, ihey
are doing ii wiih plows and harrows.
Before a whole lot was being turned
- iver on paper.
��� he day of the real farmer has begun in Alberta. They arc selling lam',
over (here, loo���strange as that may
seem to some -if our Vancouver
friends, bin they ale selling it to iln
actual farmer. 1 here is nol." continued Mr. 11-dden. "such a knee influx of people as in former years. I
regret to say that immigration from
Ihe United State- into Alberta has
fallen off badlj during ihe past three
or four years. The settlers from below Ihe line are among lh. best people culling into the prairie country, j
Thcv come with their families, their
household goods, their money, and, |
more than all. with a thorough knowledge of scientific farming."
Mr. Holden staled that ihc Shriners' celebration in Seattle was a wonderful affair. The city of Seattle entertained ihc sixty thousand or more
visitors in a manner which reflected
great credit upon the city. Mr. Holden declares that Seattle is surely able
lo leach some of ihc sisler cities lessons in displaying fraternal and cooperative  spirit.
Discussing politics. Mr. Holden
said: "1 believe that the temperance
people wilt score a success in Liberia, judging from the sentiment expressed in many quarters. In handling the situation. Premier Sifton did
nol wish io go so far as Premier
Scott of Saskatchewan, who wiped the
traffic out ny act of parliament, without referring it to the people. The
people in Alberta will vote upon Ihe
measure."
SOUTH HILL PALACE OF
VARIETIES
(Three blocks,   south   o'  Municipal  Hall)
ALL THE LATEST WAR SCENES AND BEST OF
MOTION PICTURES
AMATEUR  NIGHTS.  WEDNESDAYS AND SATURDAYS
VIOLIN EXPERT
Did and valuable violins carefully repaired.
Guitars and mandolins repaired. Bows rehaired.
Violins  bought.
JAMES TAYLOR
531  RICMARDS ST. Phone  Seymour  3415
PANTAGES
"The House of Happiness"
E.  D.  Graham,  Resident Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
THE    CELEERAT3D     l-R.'-NCO-
AMERICAN   COMEDIENNE
Julietta Dike
And
6 ��� OTHER  GREAT  ACTS  ��� 6
Three   shows   daily   2.45.   7.20,   9.1.5
Admission���Matinees,     15e.;     nights, !
15c and 25c; boxes, 50c.
 jfe
  hxitti
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can   supply  your   needs   at   right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right  at  Station)
msmtiiJ;^.:,
a great deal ol
ever,    a    Gcr
ir. ��� ing ia i S- n
or'with the Gi
sent  war
He  found,
not continue i
tain unpleas;
bound  io aiis
like    men.
nd ihrusi
hey heard an ex-
��� ������������'������   then  a  gasp
���   moved   and
-
. ���-
uter a
- erence.
i"  the     nited States  ti C         n                             .   was stand-
war,   when they did nol
again  to Western ���    ��� ,'.    uking
his  ��� pinion,  ia  the laud . .           I  the  click   of
fulfilled. Iso \   ���
I,   ami   then  came
'. !���'. GOSNELL 1? A nd hl, foot.
WARLIK tumuli  in  ihe
                                                   lually ceased,  and  sooti  af-
McBridc's    Private    Secretary    Says ..**',.    '-' -���'  re-reau-d
.u���. .,.. fs_. _������,,.. ,��� D.i.:.,i.  i �� ' ' 'he Hue.    A;  dusk ihe
forth, and. by mak-
.
���j  ����  ��
MR. VELLGUTH  HEARD  FROM
Former    Vancouver     Newspaperman
Now in San Francisco
Friends of Mr. H. A. Vellguth, formerly circulation manager of the
CHINOOK, will be interested to
know that Mr. Yellguth is now on the
staff of the "San Francisco Bulletin,"
and,  from  all  accounts,  prospering.
Mr. Vellguth is one of thc best
"circulators"   in   the   Northwest,   and
Guns
Mr. R, !���'..
Rotary Club i
on Imperial I-
he hoped the
even Llitl an
Pacific Coast
and that fort-
waterways lea
MR. HAROLD  NELSON  SHAW      i \ tilctta   i
HELPED CONCERT ALONG;*'
Mr. Harold Nelcon Shaw,   :.    ac
appeared  in   tlie   balconj   .-.   il
Romeo and Julie t al the concert
last, Friday   nigh:   at     the     Impel
Theatre, in aid of ii;-- "World's" machine gun fund.
rl - d i oiind tin'
d   r<   rlicd   the
Iheatrical Notes
IT APPEALED ALIKE TO
FRIEND AND FOE
Tlie following anecdote aboul
Scottish soldiers who were con
in a house by the enemy is of thi
that reaches ihe heart:
As  lie read  there were loud  sh
belpw;  doors  banged  and  glass
smashed.    But he wen', on:���
"He lhal   findeth his  life  shall  lose)'jjj!
it, and he  that  loseth his life   for   My
sake shall find it."
He ended, and his grave fact to ik
on a wry smile. "I'm no' a gude hand
at this job," he said, "bu: we mam;
finish i: -u'f.    Let us Dray."
The corporal stood with the book in
his hand, and the others knell and
bowed their heads. A little haltingly,
but very simply, he committed their
way to God, and asked for strength lo
Pantages Theatre
i \ve< k's bill    at   Pantages,
��� ���    ci lebrated  Francrj-
������ imedit nnc and Ei >r-
-:.ir,   will  prove
acts  ever broughl  to
d in ger Graham.    Her
'.    s and Ww York crea-
5i   ih"  women  to gasp
iration,  and   in   addition   to
torial    embellishments,    Miss
hieing specialty.
i-  mechanical prong   the   sinking   of
.;   Lusitania,   is   a   thrilling   feature,
quite  the  last   word  in  that kind  of
ni al    tti  ��� tion.    Rio and  Nor-
sational    cr bats;   Rice  and
resei th g   patter   and   song,
anil- North,    a    comedy
��� ������ I       team,  are  all   high-class  bookings,    line of Ihe laughing bits of the
programme is Josie Flynn and her fe-
Ic   minstrels,   a   novelty   in   vaudc-
Dika In
Klein's   i
Millinery  Sale
Mrs.  Bey is holding a sale of mil-
in.er.y next week to clear her stock for
he fall business.
She has some real bargains.    Don't
'Hie number is 147 30th Ave.
East. ' GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, JULY 24, 1915
���    '      :..     ;r;
Health,
Happiness
The Middle Strata
*
BY ED. CAHN
South
Vancouver Milk Co.
Fair. 1602 L
��� GET YOUR-
CAMPING TENTS
Camp Furniture, Canvas Hammocks, and other Camping Supplies from
C. H. JONES & SON Ltd.
Manufacturers
CANVAS GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
PHONE SEY. 740.
110 ALEXANDER ST.
Opposite North Vancouver Ferry Landing
KINGSWAY    HOTEL
FIRST CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS
R. CURRY, Prop.
'
PURE MILK DAIRY CO.
Pure Pasteurized Milk and Cream delivered daily to all
parts of the city
Try Our CUTTER MILK, fresh daily.     It aids digestion.
Our CREAM is the Purest.   Our WHIPPING CREAM the
Richest
Also dealers in 'BUTTER and EGGS
Office and Store     -     522 BROADWAY EAST
Plant        - SIS TENTH  AVENUE  EAST
111
ammmmm
We are manufacturers of
DIAMOND  CHICK FOOD
which has no equal   for   chickens.
The Best  SEED   POTATOES
which are guaranteed to grow.
LAWN  GRASS  SEED  which
will make your lawn beautiful.
F. T. VERNON'S
MOUNT PLEASANT
FEED STORE
255 Broadway East (cor. Kingsway)
Phone Fairmont 186
"No, there is nothing the matter
with you, Miss Deering, except that
you arc becoming rather too self centered. You need to get out of the rut
you arc in. Get some fresh impressions,"
"Now Doctor! Don't tell mc I must
go ill for society. I hate il you know.
Can't you give mc a tonic or a pick-
me-up ol some son? I am so bored
all the time, I know that 1 need something.''
".Medicine is the last thing I will
prescribe. It is loo bad that you have
so much money and so few troubles.
Have you ever felt any curiosity to
see how the other half lives?"
"1   have  been   slumming,  of  course,
everyone goes."
"1 meant the great middle strata,
when I said the other half. The submerged tenth is fairly well known.
You really ought lo investigate the
middle ranks, it would be interesting. Suppose you think about my
prescription which is a mild dose of
the middle layer, then take it and report say a week hence."
"Doctor Jlrill shoved his prescription pad away and stirred in his chair.
By those two movements lie invariably signified that the consultation
was at an end,
Aliss Deering rose. Her pallid fac
wore ils usual bored expression tinged, however, with just the faintest ray
of interest which, by the look of her
firmly closed lips, was doomed to an
early death.
"How extraordinary you arc, Doctor Brill. You will drive me to the
taking of those remarkable cures advertised in the papers."
"1 think not. 1 hope that you will
not forget that 1 expect you to let me
know how the cure is working, this
day week. He bent his serious blue
eyes upon her for a compelling instant, shook her hand heartily, opened the door and the next instant had
disappeared with a waiting patient.
Viola Deering stepped into her luxurious automobile and was whirled
homeward. At first she was inclined
to be annoyed with her man of medicine but his suggestion interested her
after all. Suddenly she decided to
vary her course a trifle, and spent an
amusing hour ill one of the cheaper
department stores, carrying an armful
of bulky parcels, to the automobile;
herself.
Arrived at her home���outside, all
pink brick, white enamel wood trim,
real old Colonial door and knocker,
diamond pane windows and filled inside with order, a somewhat cold laste
in decoration and furnishings, but
comfortable in every detail, she summoned her housekeeper and gave orders for the week to follow. Then,
still carrying her parcels almost jealously, she proceeded to her room.
She packed a small handbag and
then arrayed herself in her recent purchases. Making sure that she could
depart unobserved Miss Deering picked up her bag and tip-toed out of her
own house as quietly as a dismissed
domestic.
t. wo blocks away she boarded a
street car and half an hour later was
climbing the ricketty steps of a hoard
ing house near the centre of the city,
whose standing advertisement said
that its board was good and its terms
reasonable, and to which Miss Deer
ing knew that the social workers in
iu-r club often directed people.
The landlady, a stout woman of
forty, with a worried, choleric face
looked Miss Deering over appraising-
ly-
"Yes, I have a vacant room." She
said at last.
"Could I sec it?"
The landlady seemed lo consider,
the while she stared at her would-be
gliesl as if to read her past life, future
prospects and financial and moral re-
liability in her face, ringless hands
ready-made suit, three-dollar hat and
elegant handbag with silver fittings.
Miss Deering had not paid sufficient
attention to that detail. It did not
harmonize with the rest of her aspect
and her cooly superior manner was
also much against her. had she known.
"Are you working?" demanded the
landlady, pulling a bunch of keys out
of her belt and half turning toward
Ihe gloomy  stairs.
"No. 1���that is, I am looking [or
work."
"Oh. Well, you'll have to pay in
advance.    Do you want a hall room?"
"I can't say, until 1 see it."
"It's two flights up."
They climbed the steep stairs. One
horrified glance at the tiny cell known
as the hall room, its bumpy bed, bureau on three castors, and decrepit
wooden chair was enough for Viola.
She decided to see a better room and,
ten minutes later had paid a week's
board, and was in full possession of
her new quarters.
She made a tour of the place, disgustedly examining every dusty corner, noting each untidy, uiihealthful
uninspiring detail. She wondered how
many hundreds of people had slept in
the old fashioned black walnut bed
and if the bedding had ever been renovated, and contrasted the room with
thc poorest one she supplied her servants, and smiled.
That evening, she waited until she
thought most of her fellow boarders
would be assembled in the basement
dining - room and then descended.
There was a little hush as he entered.
Every pair of eyes was frankly fixed
upon her.
It was disconcerting to be kept
standing there in the middle of a huddle of not immaculate tables. A few
faint rays of the waning daylight
struggled through the windows, which
looked onto thc botlom of a light well.
The unshaded gasjets flared and
smoked, the stale air reeked with oily
food smells.
No one spoke to her and at last she
decided to seat herself. She was drawing out a chair at the nearest table
when  ;
taken!'
Miss
was  a
pert  voice  said  "That seat's
Deering drew back, and there
titter. Just then, Lena, the
waitress, kicked open the kitchen door
and entered, her tray laden wilh little
round stoneware bowls of cabbage
soup. She set them down and pulled
out a chair at a vacant table in a corner. "You kin set here," she said, and
smiled.
The new gucsl felt warmed by it
and took her seat with a leeling of
genuine gratitude.
"Cabbage   er   tomatl���o   soup?"   in
quired   1
apron.
"Tomato, please."
"What'.-,  yer  name
be askin' me."
"Oh, Aliss Deering
duce people?"
"Law no!   Don't wait f<
\V"y  they just  come  up
you  do  the  same.    Cabbage  did  you
say?"
"Tomato."
"All right."
The   room   was
talk.    No one paid
to  the newcomer.
knives  and  fork
triously.     They
ena,  wiping  a  spoon  on  her
Every buddy'll
Do you intro-
that, here,
talk  an'
again   abuzz   with
tiie least attention
The guests plied
and tongues indus-
varied from a fine
faced old gentleman of over eighiy
lo a fluffy haired blonde chit of seventeen who was somebody's typist
during the day and another somebody's "steady company" every evening.
In spite of the fact that adversity
had compelled the old gentleman to
live in Airs. Black's boarding house
for over ten years, he still possessed
the courtesy of another age and he
smiled and nodded to those who spoke-
to him, with the air of a grand duke.
There was a smart appearing woman of about Miss Dcermg's age who
s it next to the old man. She complained a little of the fatigue of the
day. .Miss Deering observed (hat her
eyes were heavy, her hand trembled as
she lifted her teacup and she seemed
to be forcing herself to eat. "The
woman is tired to the point of Utter
exhaustion," thought Viola.
"I hope you will be able to get some
sleep tonight," said the old gentleman.
"No chance.    I've got to work."
"You   are   not   going   back   to   the
store?"
"Yes.    Stocktaking."
"Already!" cried two voices at once
from the next table.
"We dont' begin until next week.
Gee! How 1 hate it. Y'ou look awful
tired, Aliss Glass. When are you going lo get a rest?"
"You should get married, Miss
Glass," remarked a loudly dressed
young man with red hair who was
bolting his food at an alarming rate.
"That's what everybody tells me.
But 1 don't see much hope for me
with all those pretty girls here. Besides, who ever heard of an old maid
getting married?"
"���Cheer up, there's hope yet." This
was from a pop-eyed dried-tip looking
woman who presided at what Lena
called "the family table," for it was
sacred to the Bums family. Father,
mild and colorless; mother, the speaker; daughter, Hilda, who was learning
French and corresponding with a divinity student; sister Dodo, a student of
music; Bob and Leslie, schoolboys,
aged twelve and fourteen, and like all
other boys.
The family dutifully applauded mother. The rest laughed only faintly,
so Miss Deering concluded that Miss
Glass was rather better liked than
Mrs. Burns.
Mrs. Carpenter at a far tabic, raised
her voice a trifle. "Miss Deems has
got a 'kisc' " There was a ripple and
general attention. "Aliss Deerm is
English and says 'kisc' for case; she's
a nurse," explained Lena to Aliss
Deering whilst she removed the soup
plate.
"At last!" said Mrs.  Bums.
"Yes.    At the King Hal Hotel. She-
was to give the man hot applications
right away, the doctor said."
"Fancy!   Oh."
"Oh, his wife is there, so il is all
right."
"Of course. Well, it's a good thing
for Aliss Deems. She has been idle
so long. I hope the man stays sick
a month," said Miss Glass.
"Mercy on us, Miss Glass, you don't
wish him any ill fortune or anything,
do you?" cried Air. Carpenter.
"If some one has bad luck it means
good luck for somebody else. Life's
a see-saw."
"What she meant was, Jim, that she
hoped thc man would fancy he was
ill."
"Not exactly, Mrs. Carpenter, fancying and being, are usually the same.
.Men arc such babies anyhow". Miss
Glass got up and pushed her chair
back in place.
"There's another nawsty one!" exclaimed Mr. Struthcrs, the blonde Englishman who was writing a book.
Miss Deering watched Miss Glass'
superb figure out of sight, wondering
meanwhile if she could possibly be as
near collapse as she looked.
A large black haired woman came
in. "Hello, everybody," she said
breezily.
"Good evening, Mrs. Mack," said
the family primly. Thc old gentleman
nodded gravely, the red haired young
man put out his hand and wrenched
a chair out. "Hello, Carrie," said he.
"How is the whole vile world?"
"Great! I feel fine; tired as a dog:
going motoring with my friends tonight���away out in thc country; going to dig up a lantern an' see if 1
can't locate some flowers. What we
got for dinner? My, but I'm hungry.
Hello Donnie! How's Donnie! Heard
you come in last night, you scalawag.
Bet it was three o'clock if it was a
second."
Aw now, Mrs. Mack!"
Well, it was.    I know, because that
kid across the alley  always  starts  to
yell yell about one and il hail been at
it for a couple of hours."
"L'm hum, it was a quarter after
three," said All*. Samuels. "1 was up
and looked at my watch."
"How did you know that 1 was
lliere?"
"Seen y. air light, of course, you
mult."
"Now I've got you! I didn't have
a match and couldn't light the gas. I
went lo bed in ihe dark!"
"Say, Aliss Welsh, I saw you out
last night," called Donnie to the little
typist.
"Did yell?"
"Yes. Gee, you was all lit up in
pink. Who was the fella yon was
with?"
"Friend of mine."
"You want to be careful of him. 1
knew a fella once that looked jusl like
him���he was a porch-climber.''
"Oh, you!"
Most of lliese sallies were greeted
with general laughter. Aliss Deering
noticed the conversation did not impede the sjieed with which they all
ale, and that none of them seemed to
be anxious to linger. Everyone looked tired but still nervously alert. S'-me
were planning the evening's entertainment.     Nearly   all   talked   oi   the
who
iney,
the
and
theatres   and  ball   games;   tho
were in funds did not mention
those  who were  not,  bewailed  its
seuce aloud.
As Aliss Deering began on
roast, the family rose as one man
departed. Dodo and the boys stalked
out, eyes straight ahead. Hilda and
her mother nodded right and left, graciously. Air. Burns picked his teeth
and slouched in the rear, bored. .Miss
Deering pitied him, she at least was
not bored, but she knew very well she
would have indigestion after this
greasy meal.
After the Burns' had disappeared
the room became noisier. .Mr. and
Airs. Carpenter were laughing hilariously at a joke being told lotto voce
by Mr. Ewing, the confirmed bl
who was reported, Lena said. 1
lots of money bin was awfully queer,
Mrs. Alack was making shameless
love to Donnie, the handsome but dissipated young salesman, while Ihe red-
haired young man leaned back in his
chair and regarded them with amused,
half-shut eyes.
Donnie was not al all deceived by
Mrs. Mack's pretence of the maternal,
He teased her by pretending to look
upon her as a son looks to a mother,
and his impudence was almost shocking. Viola watched the little farce,
mid felt contempt, then amusement,
then suddenly she understood and
while she bit her lip to keep from
laughing at the funny side, her cold
heart ached for Airs.  Mack.
The landlady bustled in and sal
down opposite her new guest. The
most of the boarders ignored her as
completely as she ignored them. Miss
Deering she favored with a nod.
"Well," she said fretfully to the room
at large, "the Burns are going to leave
me."
"Really?" cried Miss Welsh and her
chum added, "I thought they were fixtures here."
"Nothing is a fixture in this world.
Lena, this soup is too salty. It's the
queerest tiling how tllat cook will ov-
chelor
i have
rytbing.    Yes, they
ire go
ersalt   eve
ing."
"Where to?" Mrs. Mack took her
hand off Doiinic's arm and turned
around.
"Oh, they are going to live in somebody's house while the somebody is
away."
"I shouldn't like it, myself."
"No."
"I would, if it was a nice house."
Donnie and the red-haired young
man took their leave, and the bald
Englishman followed. Mrs. Mack's
air of gaiety fell from her like a garment.    She attacked  the  remainder of
lhal al last she --as forced
slreet  things and  venture
Deering
to don  1,
forth.
Th, re ..;;s no wh-'.e in particular t->
gO,      The      -tires    were      closed,      the
churches dark, and there was no park
within walking distance. She wondered how people who had to live in
Mrs. Black's boarding house the year
around, managed to keep from going
mad every evening. For the first time
she realized how lonely life can be,
anil turned her steps into a quiet
street, pondering as she walked.
Two girls passed lu-r arm in arm.
She recognized Miss Welsh as one of
them for she was speaking. "I just
sung out, 'that chair's taken,' I wasn't
going to have any old maid" with a
face like a quince, sealed at my table."
"I don't blame you. An old maid
is in. gimd I., herself or anybody else.
They are all as selfish as they can
be."
realized thai  she
their  conversation
st  pari,  she
was
and
Miss Deerill;
Ihe 'subject of
too, that fur Ihe n
no go,nl In herself or to anyone else.
She turned Ihis new idea over ami over, could il he lhal the old self she
had discarded that day was ihe unnatural one and Ihis other, dressed in
ugly garments and thrilling through
and through with pity for the old
blind woman, and foolish, overworked,
hear! starved Mrs. Alack was her better  self?
Al last she noticed tllat it was nearly ten o'clock. She had wandered a
long way from the boarding house
and was very tired. There was a lunch
room al hand, in fact, it was the clock
in ihe window thai had startled her.
White enamel letters below the name
announced thai ladies were served.
Wli}- nol go in for a cup ol coffee?
Miss Deering hesitated only a second, then opened the door and went
in. I h.ere was a long counter, three
young Greeks presided behind it and
a row of rather shabby young men
perched variously on stools before it.
.���several wore their hats.
At in-  rear of the room were some
small   tables  and   twi
seated al one of them.
iVas all lhal saved Viola
mounting a stool ai the
Site ordered coffee
from
time
rdered   c
genuinely   tired
lion  for ihe  first
women were
Their presence
i Deering from
counter,
md crullers,
physical exer-
for years.    The
coftee came in an civ
:.hal resembled a hoi
The   waiter   had   pill
hidden, as a  matter
irmous china cup
ow cobble stone,
milk into it unit course.    Viula
rself 1-i a spi
nnd   though!   il
-niiful of coarse
all     amazingly
helped
sugar
gimd.
She looked around her wilh the liv-
liest interest. To be sure, there was
dirt in the corners but mi the surface,
things were surprisingly clean, and
the prices mi the flyspecked bill-of-
fare, incredibly cheap.
A young man came in, swung himself in a stool, threw his hat onto a
peg and gave his order all ill a breathless moment.
"Adam
Ihe waiter to
swing doors.
shrieked anoth
dered just wl
he but she for
her Interest  in
He was a yc
dressed, he ws
cry line of his
able sign of cl
1 and listlessly
c and ate some
ilieeable lhal begs   around   the   s
1   Eve  on  a  raft!" yelled
Ihe   cook   behind   the
"Slack   o'   wheats!"
rr.    Miss Deering won-
at   these   things   would
gut  to watch to see, in
another newcomer.
ling man, very shabbily
Iked   slowly and in   ev-
facc was the unmistak-
nsumption,    1 le took a
inner ol lh
ow   you
her dinner and did u
The obi man stalked
room, his cane held
the  hall  was dark.
There was a clatter
three iporty lookin | )
three slender, overdres
in and seated themseh
There was a lain 1 r
door.    An old. whit    '
t look
iliflly
before
up again.
an oi the
him,   for
away.
on the stairs,
ung men and
nl girls came
s noisily.
rustling al the
laired woman in
a very dirty whiti waist and a very
dirty black satin skirl came slowly in,
catching al ihe edges of the tables as
she passed. She wore an uncertain
smile as if she pled, half laughingly,
for indulgence. She was almost blind.
The landlady watched her safely into her chair and then turned
Everyone looked al her but i
took thc trouble lo speak, for she was
a little deaf and her old brain did nol
work quickly. One was apt to have to
repeal an inane remark several times,
so what was the use? ]t is easier to
let old people alone.
Mis Deering waited in vain for a
finger bowl, then, remembering that
the others had concluded without, she
excused herself and went upstairs,
There were lights under a fen-
doors. Someone was worrying a disjointed tune out of a mandolin, Don-
nie's fine bass voice was singing the
latest ragtime hit. and as Viola reached her door the flat notes of a tuneless
piano in thc parlor tinkled upward.
She was fond of music, but she hated
noise, so she shut her door with a
bang, something she had nol done in
as long as she could remember,
"Heavens! How soon one becomes
middle class!" Her room was stuffy,
a peculiar odor, half kerosene and half
carbolic acid, pervaded everything.
She lii the gas and her aristocratic
nostrils trembled with disgust. She
was sorely templed lo return t.. her
own cheerful library but decided a-
gainst it.
She had nothing to read, and there
was nothing interesting or even restful ill her room. Somewhere a child
was crying weakly.    It disturbed Miss
others,
feelin'.
waiters,
don't think,
light mil   I'll gels me."
drank a cup of cof-
pancakes. (t was
did  not  twine  his
tool  in  the  hearty
mi.   of  tli
"Fine, I
I might ti
fore the Ci
"Going?"
"Who   me?
private   car."
and  wilh a  g
out.
The men on the stoo
him, some indifferently,
pity.     The   Greeks   shoal   each   oilier.    Then,
phalie  than  the others.
Bill?"   inquired
The
Col
doc
irndi
says
��� be-
(lh,   my  yes!     In   my
lie   paid  for   his  meal
sping,  "So  long,"   went
".Si
Is 1
iked
after
but most with
'k their heads,
me more em-
observed   that
jl was a blanked shame aboul Bill.
"Here he wmks like a smi-of-a-gun
since he was so high. Father, he is
dead; mother sick; five, six kids, all
girls. Bill has to buy them shoes,
send 'em to school, and do everything,
it's al! up to him. He.gets sick, but
lie's got to work or they all starve,
naturally he gets worse. Now look
at him. It's a damn shame. Things
are not even in this life. Look at
those rich fellers that roll in money,
and then look at Bill."
"Why don't he make the kids get
jobs," asked a messenger-boy practically.
"Him! Them girls is to be ladies���
only!"
The messenger boy made a grimace
and demanded custard pie.
Miss Deering finished her coffee
and beckoned the sympathetic Greek.
"Sit down," she' said, "I want you to
tell me all about that young man with
consumption. Do you know his name
and where he lives?"
The Creek, aflcr a prolonged stare,
gave her all the information she asked. She made a few notes on a scrap
of soiled wrapping paper, with the
Greek's stubby pencil, and then she
paid for her coffee and left.
"Who's your frien'?" asked one of
the others as Viola opened the door.
"Her? 1 dunno. One of them ugly
old maid angels, maybe."
Verily, the middle strata was frankness and  carelessness itself!
"Old maid." How sour she must
look, that everybody knew it. But
aboul Bill, should she follow the sensible rule and thoroughly investigate
his ease, or should she carry out the
plan born in a moment?
(���Continued on page 6)
/j SATURDAY, JULY 24, 1915
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
EVERY TIME
YOU MAKE
PURCHASES
From these FIRMS
Y
OU WISH TO SELL?
Auctioneers
Correspondence
If you wish to dispose of your Furniture, Stock or Fixtures by Auction
to the best advantage, consult
KING & CO.
Auctioneers, who guarantee satisfaction and cash day of sale. Estimates
and Valuations Free.   Phone Sey. 507
0
668 .12nd Avenue East,
South Vancouver. B.C.,
20th July,  1915.
To the Editor,
CHINOOK   Newspaper.
Dear Sir,���The  following is a copy
of a letter  I  have sent  for publication
to the Editor of the "Challenge."   As
he may not be "throwing out"    anj
more "Challenges," 1  would be obliged  if  you  will  publish   same  in  youl
paper.    Thanking you in advance,  for
the U��e of your space.
I am,
Yours sincerely,
A, II. SEYMOUR.
u
SHOULD  PATRONIZE
HOME INDUSTRY
F. FAULKNER
THE     MECHANICAL     REPAIR     SHOP
Autos, Bicycles, Lawn Mowers, etc.,  Repaired
' Locks  and  Key  Fitting
Wc   Buy  and   Sell   Second-hand   Bicycles
Stove   Connecting.        All   Work   Guaranteed
Give us a trial  and be  convinced
4095    MAIN    ST.,    VANCOUVER
s
EE US FIRST!
JOHN S. RANKIN
D. S. MACDONALD
Auctioneers
800 PENDER STREET WEST
Phone Seymour 3111
Furniture Bought for Spot Cash
A
TELEPHONE Fair. 720 for
NGUS
PLUMBING   ::   HEATING
ELECTRICAL REPAIRS
A SPECIALTY
No order too large or too small for
prompt service
V
ancouver
Creamery Co.
Dur Ice Cream cannot be heat
Our Rimer is of the best quality.
Our Factory is the cleanest in the
city. No hands touches our Butter
as it is all wrapped and put up in 1 -lb.
packages.
E
XPRESSING
and HAULING
B. R. GRAY
42  TWENTY-FIFTH   AVE.  EAST
Furniture,- Pia^o Moving and Express Work.
Work promptly attended to and our price*
are   right. Phone:   FAIRMONT   801
M
0
NLY     THE     BEST     OF
MATERIAL     USED     IN
REPAIRING YOUR
BOOTS AND  SHOES
AT MY STORE.
JOHN STEPHEN
3324 MAIN STREET
Satisfaction Guaranteed.  Prices Right
N
E
Y
OU WILL GET VALUE
AND SATISFACTION BY
PATRONIZING
Crossland's Store
4520 MAIN STREET
A nice clean stock of Groceries,
Candys and Tobacco.
"Is the Private Secretary's Resignation
Genuine?"
Sir.���The inference contained in the
paragraph appearing under the above
heading, in large type, in the issue of
the ���'Challenge" of 19th insl., is so erroneous, that I am wasting enough
time to put the writer of same and
"certain people" who he says are in
thc know, and who asserted that
"Seymour's resignation i* a hoax and
scheme" right in the matter. Thc inference is that I am still being paid by
Reeve Gold lo "light the Councillors
011 the outside"���this is entirely false.
The reasons ior my resignation are
clearly set out in my leller to Mr.
Gold.
For the benefit of certain persons
in the know." and your readers generally. I would like to state, that when
I agreed to act as secretary to Reeve
Gold, it was not with thc idea of fighting any councillors, but wilh the idea
of endeavoring to help to carry out
a policy which I honestly believed,
and still believe, if properly earned
out, would have been greatly to the
benefit of South Vancouver,
Yours sincerely.
A. II. SEYMOUR
Classified
Advertisements
Tax Sale So Far A Success Say
Municipal Officials
Flundrcds of People attend Municipal Hall and bid upon properties.
Municipality forced to lake over great area of land in the eastern section of the Municipality.
The tax sale goes merrily on. So far, it is estimated that about
$25,000 has been taken in on properties offered for sale. This week
finds the most of the tax sale properties in the eastern section of the
district disposed off. Bidding has not been very keen in that direction, but it is expected that when the lists of properties in the Fraser
Street and Main Street districts are reached, that there will be much
excitement while Collector Riley wields the hammer.
Though the municipality is getting the major portion of the property, the following statement from a prominent financial man will
be of interest:
"Nature Teeth"
and skilled
painless service
artificial teeth, because
Nature's own in size an
vice and modern equip!
lessness, both during a
things
FIVE
My "Nature Teeth" which are entirely different from ordinary
hey arc built into the mouth to match
I shape and exact tint���my skilled ser-
lent���my absolute guarantee of pain-
nd following all denial  work ��� these
Read these Prices
Full   Set   of   Nature   Teeth,   upj
Lower       $10.01
Gold   Crowns     5
Bridge   Work, t.er  tooth     5
Cold   Fillings,  per  tooth     2.01
Porcelain   Fillings,   per   tooth   .. 1
Armalgnm  Fillings, per tooth   .. 1.51
1'ainkss iixtraclion, per tooth  .
cost no more
than ordinary dentistry
WM. S. HALL
Licentiate   Dental   Surfjery
Doctor   Dental   Surgery
Member   Royal   College   Dental   Surgeons
212  STANDARD  BANK   BLDG.
Seymour 4679
BORROW ON YOUR DIAMONDS,
jcwelcry, musical instruments, etc.
401 Dominion Bldg. Business confidential.
FLORISTS
BROWN BROS. & CO., LIMITED,
Seedsmen, Florists, Nurserymen, 48
Hastings St. F.., and 782 Granville
Street,  Vancouver,  B.  C.
WATCHMAKER
ENGLISH WATCHMAKER AND
Jeweller when you think of watch,
clock and jewellery repairs think
Applcbv, 438 Richards St., half block
from Hastings. All mainsprings and
cleaning jobs guaranteed 12 months.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
B. C. INDEPENDENT UNDERTA-
kers, Limited���Successors to Sill &
Miller, Limited. Funeral directors
and cmbalmcrs, (352-654 Broadway
W.   PHONE FAIRMONT 738.
KEARNEY. T. J. & Co., DOMINION
Parlors, SW Broadway west. Phone
Fairmont 109S. Night calls answered.
COLLECTORS
NATIONAL COLLECTING COM-
pany, 202 North West Trust Building. Established 1907. We collect
current accounts, rents and bad debts
in town or country. NO COLLECTION, NO PAY.    Phone 4980.
MONEY TO LOAN
MONEY LOANED, DIAMONDS.
Jewelry, etc. A epiict, respectable,
reliable place lo borrow money.
Old gold bought. Established 1905.
Star Loan Co., 812 Hastings. West,
MANICURING
MADAME L1LYANDER, Manicuring. 864 Granville Street. Suite 9.
Telephone Seymour 3333-0.
Steamer New Delta
SUMMER SCHEDULE
On .and after  Saturday,  May  1st,
Steamer New Delta will leave from
FERRY WHARF
(Foot of Columbia Ave.)
For PORT MOODY
and I0C0 CTSrT
DAILY  EXCEPT  SUNDAYS
At 6.30 a.m., 9.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.
Returning leave Port Moody at
8.00 a.m., 11.00 a.m. and 4.45 p.m.,
except Saturday, when she will
leave Port Moody at 12.00 a.m.
SUNDAYS
Leave Vancouver at 1.30 p.m. and
8.00 p.m.
Leave   Port   Moody  at   4.45  p.m.
and 9.20 p.m.
Express or Parcels Reasonable
Rates
STEAMER LEAVES ON TIME
This   Schedule   subject   to   chan'gc
without notice
We   deliver���immediately���anywhere.
Phone your order to Seymour 6722.
VANCOUVER WINE
(With the Sunburst Sign*)
1097 Granville. Cor. Helmcken.
"The property in ihis district is I
aiming tlie best for residential purposes iif any in Greater Vancouver,
and while it may be temporarily embarrassing lo the council to have so
Inany lots 'sold to the municipality,'
in my opinion it will be the best thing
that could happen t'> South Vancouver  if  this property is not  redeemed.
"One nf the chief ocjections tn
South Vancouver district has always
been that if a person purchased a
home site and built a nice house upon
it he bail no guarantee that a mere
shack would not be put on the adjoining lot or that some Chinaman or
Hindu or other undesirable person
would not become their next-door
neighbor.
"But, in the event of the land on the
southern slope, now being knocked
down to the municipality, eventually
becoming the property of the corporation, there is no reason why South
Vancouver should not develop almost
as good a residential district overlooking the Fraser River as that established by the C. P. R. on Shaughnes-
sy IIeights, with restrictions as to the
cktM- of properly In be erected in that
district.
"Among the property sold in the
municipality is also some five-acre
lots which, if not redeemed, will be-
most useful to South Vancouver. Instead of putting men on 'relief work'
of an unproductive character the Municipal Council will be in a position
to put them to work on clearing and
cultivating the land, so as to produce
either revenue or products which will
help  in  relieving distress.
"It is probable, however, that most
of the properly now being Bold to the
municipality will be redeemed during
the next twelve months, bringing in a
steady revenue throughout the year.
And if some of the property is not redeemed thc council will be in a position to offer such inducements to industries to locate in South Vancouver
as  has not  been  practicable  hitherto.
"I am of opinion, therefore, that
while the fact that so much property
is being knocked down to the municipality may temporarily embarrass
the council, it will be a good thing
for South Vancouver eventually."
PHONE SEYMOUR 900
BARRISTERS,
1012 Standard Bank Bldg.
VICTORIAN ORDER OF NURSES DOING GOOD
WORK���TURN OUT TO BENEFIT GARDEN PARTY
Will be held al Brocl( School, August 3rd, afternoon and evening,
and splendid programme and magnificent refreshments mil be
served.  ���
In peace or war, the Victorian Order of Nurses continue their
splendid work of relieving the distressed throughout the district. Just
now the ready response being given to Red Cross and other worthy
patriotic, war-time philantrophies, overshadows to some extent the
work of the Victorian Order.
The Victorian Order of Nurses aim to help the mothers and
the children and the sick. Their work is of vast benefit to the community, and it is one which should receive every encouragement.
The dark shadow has been lifted from many a poor home in
the district because of the tender ministrations of those agents of
mercy, the nurses employed and supported by the Victorian Order.
The garden parly on August 3rd, then, is in support of the Victorian Order. The best talent available in the city of Vancouver and
the district round about will be secured. The ladies of the Victorian
Order and other ladies throughout the district are co-operating with
a committee from the Ladies' Liberal Association in arranging the
affair.
WAR ANNIVERSARY WILL BE OBSERVED
MacDONALD & HAY
SOLICITORS,   ETC.
Vancouver, B.C
NOURISHING AS BREAD
ally
August Fourth will see Giant Celebration in which South Vancouver
Will lake part
*i  Good beer is practica
trated extract of selected
hops enrichens the water
wholesome and invigorati
\\  Pure beer promotes b
gives strength.
1   We know "CASCADE
best of materials are used
in the most modern plant
corner and crevice is kept
'   Costs less than Ame
brewed locally there is n
rates to pay.
V  Ask your dealer for
WITHOUT A PEER
6 PINTS
3 QUAR
T3
Vancouver Breweries Li
August thc Fourth will mark the first year of the war, and the
citizens of Greater Vancouver will leave no stone unturned to see that
the date is fittingly observed. Committees have been appointed by
the Municipal Council and the Board of Trade and other public
bodies in the district, and nolhing will be left undone in co-operating
with the city in making the pageant and patriotic features of the day
a great success.
There must be no spectators and patriotic citizens will be expected to turn out in a bod}, each to take some part in the celebration.
There will be ringing of bells and blowing of whistles, martial
music, and military exercises.
A BOUQUET FOR CHINOOK
The CHINOOK is indebted to Mr. W J. E. Ramsey, 55th
Avenue East, for a magnificent bouquet of flowers from the Ramsey
garden. Mr. Ramsey's home at 55th Avenue is a bower of flowers.
The sun-kissed Fraser slope cannot be beaten as a producer of roses
and blossoms of all sorts.
ISABEL S. MILLER UPHOLDS  HONOR OF SOUTH
VANCOUVER SCHOOLS
Out of 210 pupils who went up for Entrance Examinations, Miss
Miller captured ihe Governor-General's Medal wilh 798 marks
���Was Pupil at General Wolfe School.
Wretched conditions of local government which kept South
Vancouver school teachers in a panicky state during the past year,
and almost took away from them much of the loyalty and zeal which
characterized their work in past years, were displayed to some extent
in the showing made this year by pupils from the district at the Entrance Examinations.
Last year all the pupils from South Vancouver who underwent
the examination were successful, the highest marks being carried to
South Vancouver. This year 174 out of 210 candidates were successful.
The leaders in the various schools were as follows:
Brock, Beatrice L. Denton, 736; Carleton, E. Winifred Oates,
744; Moberley, Vera J. Anthony, 701 ; Van Home, W. Allen Gill.
718; Wolfe, Miss Miller, 798; McBride, Annabelle Hurry, 777;
MacKenzie, Constance M. <
Stocks, 721; Selkirk, 1st Di\
2nd division, William A. Or
ning, 703 ; Tecumseh, Jessie
Next week thc full list \
A ratepayer complains th
it cost him a nickel to call thi
liquid bread���the pure, concen-
barley, with the tonic properties of
and makes a beverage   that   is
lg at all times.
tter appetite, aids digestion, and
is pure, for nothing but the
n its manufacture, and it is brewed
on the Pacific Coast, where every
spotless clean.
:an   and   Imported   beers,   being
*> excessive duties and high freight
'CASCADE,"  "THE  BEER
FOR	
FOR
liled.
50c.
50c.
-amtield, 721 ; Norquay, George H.
ision, Arnold E. Evans, 759; Selkirk,
tad, 688; Sexsmith, W. Harold Fan-
alconer, 758.
11 be given.
FIVE CENT TOLL TO CALL POLICE
at when his little boy got lost last week,
e police office at the Municipal Hall.
He states that in the excitement, the lad's mother went into a Main
Street store where they have * pay station. She clashed to the phone
and called the South Vancoiver department, and central said "five
dn't have the nickel, so she could nol
police had not a young man standing
cents, please." The lady di
have got the assistance of thc
by come to her aid.
MR. E. H. SISSONS OPI
Wel\-known young man enters
and invites ihe
Mr. E. H. Sissons has
corner of Fifty-first Avenue
well-ventilated, well-equippec
cordially invited to pay him a
known in the district, and
CONCERT IN AID OF
MACHINE   GUN   FTJND
The interest in the campaign
machine guns is growing apace,
till now the subscriptions have
coming in in large sums and fheri
been no opportunity or solicitatii
those who wanted to give " Their
However, there will be an r pport
on Sunday night next, July 25th. ���
there will be a concert given ii
Orpheum Theatre. 765 Granville
Vancouver, at 8.30 p.m.. by the
couver Symphony Orchestra, as*
by Mrs. VV. F. Brougham, cont
and Miss Scruby, 'cellist.
,NS NEW STORE ON FRASER
the business field on Fraser Streel,
public to pay him a call
Dpened a fish and produce store at the
nd Fraser Street.    He has a splendid,
and sanitary store, and the public are
visit.   Mr. Sissons is a young man, wel!
make a success in his new venture.
should
ior
Up
been
has
1 of
)it."
itiity
vhen
the
St.,
V'an-
istcd
Ito,
  ' I      '
Tickets are obtainable at the following stores:
Lancaster & Fox Co., 25th Avenue
and Main Street;
Bowes Music House, Holden Building:
Fletcher Bros. & Co.'
And on Sunday night at the Orpheum Box Office.
The price has been set at the nominal sum of twenty-five cents for all
scats except thc boxes, which will be
fifty cents, so as to be within the reach
of everyone, but, as expenses will be
kept at the lowest possible minimum,
should there be a "bumper" house,
there will be a substantial sum netted
for the fund. SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, JULY 24,  1915
I
"Whisky Should Be Placed Along
With Prussic Acid, Cocaine,
Iodine And Other Poisons"
If This is the opinion of one who claims he has drunk enough of it to
"float the British Navy"���A wonderful attack upon the liquor interests by the notorious Robert Edwards, editor of the "Calgary Eye
Opener."
| In Saskatchewan a death blow has been dealt the liquor traffic;
in the State of Washington, the bars go with the year 1915; Alberta
will vote on a prohibition bill this month.   Indications are that British
Columbia is likely to be an alcoholic oasis in the  "desert"  of  the
Northwest.
If Among the men who have been fighting the liquor interests in the
prohibition campaign in Alberta is "Bob" Edwards, the editor of the
widely-known "Calgary Eye Opener."   In the campaign which will
undoubtedly result in the banishing of the bars and the liquor shops,
Mr. Edwards has taken a leading part.
f Through the columns of his paper, Mr. Edwards has told from
week to week of his own experiences with the traffic.      He pleads
guilty to having been for more than twenty years a victim of the black
bottle.   His sudden turning against John Barleycorn has sent a thrill
throughout Alberta.
jf We quote from the last edition of the "Eye Opener":
. "Making our position clearer sl'll,
let us state that we are anti-whiskey
first, last, and all the time, If anybody
should know the rotten, blighting and
damning effect of whiskey, we should,
because during the past twenty years
we have drank enough of it to float
the whole of the British navy, with
about half of the Turkish fleet, including the Goeben, thrown in. It
came very near "getting" us early last
summer and we have been too scared
to touch it since, confining our efforts
to sporadic excursions into the less
dangerous realm of lager beer. One
more whiskey jag and out goes our
light.    That is a cinch.
"We have no hesitation in saying
whiskey should he classed as a drug,
the same as opium, morphine or cocaine. It is a poison, especially dangerous on account of ils bland harmless-
ness on some temperaments and its
terribly destructive effect on others.
Quite a number of our own friends :n
Alberta have beeM killed off in the
most direct fashion by whiskey, their
deaths being encompassed as effectually as if a German machine gun had
been turned on them. Took a little
longer perhaps, but it got them just
the same. They are now lying toes-
up in cemeteries all thc way from
Edmonton to Macleod, almost all of
them having taken the K. O. from
John Barleycorn in the prime of life.
* * *
"Yet, on the other hand, there arc
men of our acquaintance who hit up
thc whiskey every day and go to bed
every blessed night of their lives in
a mild haze of booze. These men arc
exceptions. They have ostrich stomachs and no nerve centres. Drinking,
with them, is like pouring it down a
rat hole, and we fail to see what fun
they get out of drinking at all.
* * *
"The hotel keepers arc the wise
guys���they don't drink at all. As a
class   they  are  perhaps   the   soberest
bunch in ihe community.    Nor have
we ever seen a wholesale liquor dealer take a drink in his own establishment. Surrounded by a dense forest
nl" buttles containing every imaginable
brand oi rotgut. he never draws a
cork for a private snifter. Xot he.
He knows better. And in this connection ue might also state that few
druggists even hit up tlfeir own Prussic acid, and hardly any of iheni have
ever been known to invite a customer
to join them in a jorum of cyanide of
potassium in the little back room.
The only difference between these
deadly poisons and whiskey is that
the killing process of whiskey is slower.
* +  *
"When 'one of the boys' dies from
the effects of continuous association
with Johnnie B.. thc death is tacitly
accepted by his friends as having been
due to some illness with a respectable
name. Heart failure sounds all right.
This out of deference to the dead.
'The boys,' those jovial spirits wtih
whom the deceased was wont to
whoop 'em up at the bar, merely remark amongst themselves that 'the
hard stuff got him at last,' and that
it was 'too bad, because he was a fine
feller,' and then proceed to blame the
doctor for not tapering him off properly. Oh, believe me, it is a great
game!
"Laying aside these possible fatal
results, why should a man, especially
a young man, deliberately and with
his eyes wide open, throw obstacles in
the path of his own success?
"There is no use laboring this phase
of the question. The point we wish to
make is. that thc Drys should have
at thc beginning of their efforts on
behalf of temperance, invoked the cooperation of the Dominion Government, and brought about a condition
where whiskey and kindred hard
drinks were put into thc drug class
and laL Mlcd Poison."
MAJOR GRAHAM
A Personal Reminiscence
By F. L. Vosper
A "REBEL" GOES TO THE
FRONT
The CHINOOK representative
went down to the C. P. R. depot to
see some of the soldiers away. A
burly man in the crowd whose face
was familiar, rushed up at him, shook
a ten-pound fist in his countenance,
and without any attempt at mildness,
said as follows:
tii.
'I'm goin' to the front and you and
i  CHINOOK.  I  hope  may go to
 .    I voted  for  Eddie and  he'll
be reeve again next year in spite of
Vour dirty rag."
"Not if he was made out of the
same stuff as your worthy self." replied the CHINOOK, slapping the
big fellow upon the shoulder.
The rebel laughed, there was a hand
shake, and the train pulled out.
The article on my esteemed friend,
Major Graham, which appeared in last
week's CHINOOK, recalled some
facts connected with South Vancouver Schools which I thought might
be of interest to your readers.
In 1893 there were two schools in
what is now South Vancouver and
Point Grey. One, a small frame building, stood at the corner of Eraser
and River Avenues, then known as
North Arm and River Roads. The
other, still smaller, was on Granville
Street South, then "Centre Street," a
short distance from Townsend Road.
In that year, the South Vancouver
School Board acquired a piece of land
in D. L. 301, and a school was built
in 1894, with Mr. Phoenix as teacher.
Mr. Phoenix was succeeded by Mr.
John Moscrop, Color-Sergeant 5th
R. C. A. When the South African
war started in 1899, both Sergeant
Moscrop and his friend, Sergeant
Graham, volunteered for service. The
choice fell on Moscrop, and Graham
took his place in the school in the middle of November, intending to hold it
until the end of the month. Thc
School Board, however, recognising
his ability, and knowing a good man
when they found one, prevailed on him
to stay, and he stayed. A photograph
taken a few months before Sergeant
Moscrop resigned, shows him mustering up his school, consisting of fourteen scholars, which I think Major
Graham has informed me, had at the
time of his appointment, increased to
23.
About 1896, a small school was built
at Collingwood, and placed in charge
of Mr. Martin Ravey.
I think I am safe in saying that fifteen years ago the total school atten
dance in South Vancouver, which then
included Point Grey, scarcely exceeded 100. When the first section of
Lord Selkirk school was built in 19(18,
Major Graham was appointed Principal, having charge of both Ihe
schools in D. L. 3(11 and Lord Selkirk,
from whence he was promoted to the
position of Inspector of Schools for
the whole district.
At the very outset Major Graham
and 1 recognized each other as kindred spirits, and there arose a mutual
esteem and friendship which has deepened as the years have passed, and I
hope to be one of the first to welcome
him home from what I feel sure will
be a successful and glorious campaign,
through which, I trust, he will be
brought into safety.
There is a little personal incident
connected with Major Graham which
is of considerable interest to mc.
Acting on the advice of the Rev.
W. H. Withrow, D.D., I got together
a score or so of stories illustrative of
'life in Devon and Cornwall, most of
which Dr. Withrow had published in
his magazines and periodicals, and
wrote them over again in order to
publish them in book form.
Major Graham took a keen interest
in the work, and never failed whenever we met to ask me how it was
progressing.
Meeting him one day on Westminster Road, when it was nearly completed, he asked mc if I had decided
on a title. I told him I had not. He
then suggested "Real Life Sketches
from Devon and Cornwall." the title
under which it was published a year
or so later by Messrs. Jennings &
Pye,  Cincinnati.
HATS - HATS
HATS
Women's and  Children's  un-
trimmed shapes, 25c to $1.00
Women's and Children's
Trimmed Hats, 75c to $1.50
Beach
EXTRA
Hats 	
..20c.
Beginning
MONDAY, JULY 26th
Mrs. Best
147  30TH  AVENUE  E.
Fairmont 2519 R
RATEPAYER COMPLAINS
A ratepayer has written to the
CHINOOK, complaining that lights
were left burning from an early hour
in the evening until after daylight at
certain street corners in obscure parts
of the district where they served no
good purpose. He believes that the
council should look into this matter
and cut off a score of these street corner lights, which, he alleges, are a
needless expense. Wc refer the matter to the  Fire and  Light  Committee
of the  Municipal  Council,
go at that.
and  let  it
THE LATE MRS. CORTI
Fear of
Nothing
Ashame
Pain
to
cl
Is
Be
of-
The funeral of Mrs. Corti was held
Tuesday afternoon from the rooms of
Messrs. Greene & Mcrkley to the
Mountain View cemetery. Services
were held at St. Patrick's Church,
Twelfth Avenue, and a large number
of sorrowing friends followed Ihe remains to their last resting place. The
pall bearers were Messrs. S. F. Henderson, D. R. Davis, Harry Kay, and
J. M. Stuart. Many beautiful floral
offerings were laid upon the bier of a
young woman who was beloved by all
who knew her. The sympathy of the
entire community go out to Mr. Corti
and thc little son in their very sore
bereavement.
believe, playing deputy Providence.
I'm going to need a card index to
keep track of my people. Hum, hum,
I'm so deliciously tired. How I shall
sleep. I wonder what we will have
for breakfast,  Pm almost hungry.
"Doctor  Brill knew what  I  needed.
. . . He is a wizard. ... I
must endow a cot in his hospital . .
. poor Bill . . . six little girls .
. . he wants them to be ladies . .
. what will he think . . when
he gets my note? ... He had
beautiful eyes ... I noticed
. . Not an old maid . . . face
like a quince. ... a big bachelor
girl brother to ... . thc . . .
middle strata."
Miss Deering was asleep.
One cent per Fowl, per Week
Poultry  Keepers
will get best results from constant
use of
"B&B"
Poultry Spice
And  EGG   PRODUCER
A Hen tonic, Pick-me-up and
Drop-em-down
Once Tried Always Usedl
Guaranteed to produce results, if
fed  according-  to  directions  (in
every sack)
3 lb. sack, 45c.   6% lb. sack, Mc.
100 lb. sack, $12.00
Manufactured in Vancouver.
Everywhere
Sold
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for public meetings, dances, etc., to Let
Apply W. J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
Time was when most painful surgical operations were conducted without the aid of
anaesthetics, and many worthy persons opposed their introduction to surgery on the
grounds that pain as a natural sequence to illness or injury should be borne and nothing
clone to avoid or minimize it. Science, however, has overcome this prejudice, and now-
adays in surgery everything possible is done lo minimize and relieve pain .
Pain and the Fear of Pain in Dentistry
is today, however
are thousands of
certain tortures.
of bad teeth is as nothing to the agony of the average denial operation.
for all persons who are handicapped by bad or imperfect teeth, I   have
gladness.
a very apparent consideration. So much is this the case that there
persons who will not submit themselves to the dental chair and its
To them the pain of toothache and the inconvenience and drawback
But for them,
a  message  of
THE MIDDLE STRATA
(Continued from page 4)
Pain Is a Stranger in My Office ���I Have
Conquered Pain In Dentistry
Oralthesia, the one and only sure amidol
results ol" years of painstaking study and
many other so-called painless remedies, it has no bad effect
greatest importance, it leaves no bad effects
conscious of all surroundings.   Conscious of
te to pain in dentistry, is my own discovery, the
research. It is safe, simple and sure. Unlike
effect on the patient, and of
. When I use Oralthesia the patient is fully
the absence of pain. Thousands of satisfied
patients testify to the truth of my claims. So sure am I, to each
beforehand:
and every patient I say
"IF IT HURTS DON'T PAY ME
>*>
I
am the only dentist in Vancouver who dares say so.
Test my claim for yourself.   Call today for your free examination.    Let me operate on
ruy one of your teeth, preferably thc most sensitive one, and if you experience the slight-
' "iberty to walk out of my office without paying me a single cent.
est pain you will be at
DR. T. GLENDON MOODY
18 Years'
Practical
Experience
DAWSON BLOCK
OVER OWL DRUG STORE
Corner Hastings and Main
Vancouver's
Pioneer
Dentist
In a stationery store she purchased
writing materials, from her coat pocket came her check-book and under the
coldly incurious eye of the saleswoman Miss Deering wrote a check and a
note which said: "Accept this in payment of a debt which you know nothing about. I expect you to leave for
Colorado within three days.
Very cordially yours,
"Viola Deering."
P.S.���I have instructed my bankers
to give you no information about myself."
Miss Deering wrote a brief letter
to her hankers making good her postscript, posted both letters and took a
car to Mrs. Black's boarding house.
It was alter eleven o'clock when she
opened the door.
All was quiet, the gas in the hall was
turned low, the faded red carpet looked warm and mellow, the old walls, in
Iheir dim, dingy paper seemed to he
brooding upon all their ear, had heard
in all Ihe countless days of their long
lives. Somewhere a board creaked,
and Ihc sounds from the city penetrated faintly.
Viola ran up the stairs as lightly as
a girl. Mrs. Black was coming down
and Ihey met upon the landing. Miss
Deering's face was bright with a smile,
and thc landlady, surprised out of herself, returned it. "You look happy,
Miss Deering, have you found work
so soon?"
"Yes! The best work! Oh 1 am
so happy."
Mrs. Black smiled again, "f am
glad.    Goodnight  and  sweet dreams."
Viola unlressed in a glow, humming
a tune. She could have danced, she
felt so happy. Once in bed, she painted the darkness with her rosy plans.
"I'm not going to be an old maid.
I'll be a bachelor girl. I'll stay here
a week and do all T can. then I'll report to Dr. Brill. To think that I
was ever bored. Oh, it's great to have
money to use. T wish T had known
long ago how fine it is to help people
in the middle strata. Won't Bill be
surprised?"
* "Tomorrow I will make friends
with the old gentleman and the poor,
half blind old lady. I'll do something
for them without their knowing it.
Miss Glass is going to get a rest if I
have to buy her store and dismiss her
from her place.
"Yes. I'll stop being a sour old
maid with a sour face and a bored
soul. I'm going to get busy, and
slangy and alive. I have been shirking out of my job which  is,  I verily
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
M
J. MOE, C..P. A., -134 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass. Agent, Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
C. E. Tenner, O. A. P. D.
Phone:  Sey. 8134 537 Granville Street
EDGETT'S
THE BIG GROCERY
CUT-RATE PRICES
Sensational Low Prices for Saturday
SUG
All-
R-
-<Wlth other groceries), 18-lb. sack, B. C. only	
-,.,..     .. ~No- } J"11"'' wheat! no better bread Hour In city	
IK A���Our celebrated 40c Victor blend; now worth 50c; 3 lbs
.$1.25
.51.75
.$1.00
lii,
'1'aploca, Sano���Extra   Special,  5  lbs,  lor   25c
i,i   I I lill���Our special fresh Brass Edgewood Creamery, 3 lbs   . $100
.strictly now  laid, guaranteed  3 days old; 3 dozen $L00
special  this week;  45c brooms for   3*0c
KOQS-
JSUOOMS-rExtra
I    BACON���Mice  miiu  cured  streaky Bacon,
per  lb.
 25c
.MOLASSES���15c tins 10c
VINEGAR, 2 bottles for
.   bars  lloyal  Crown  25c
; PICKLES, English mixed. 35c bottles. 25c-
25c; TOILET PAPER, 7 rolls for 26c; SOAP
'"  bars Fcls  Naptha for i;oc
I    FRUIT JARS���gnartgjnSoi  pints TBc  values for dozen.
���'if'c    I
.1A.M���Kootenay  Pure
sugar   	
5-lb.   tins,  S5c  values,  pure  fruit.
pure cane
    60c
Peaches���Gallon tins for pies.
2;>c, Special prices for doz. tlnB
Cherries, gallon tins, for Dies.
25c,     $2.50 dozen.
(latmea I
special
lbs. for 25c; Salmon, 25c, reduced
; Salt, finest shaker, 3  for   ......
for 25c;
Cocoa, pure,
 26c
I Urape  Nuts.  2 pkges  tor.. 25c I      I Rogers' Syrup.   5-lb.   pails.:l0c~i
Corn Flakes (Krlnkle). 2 for 25c; Coffee, 40c seller for 25c- Apricots
per crate. $1.00; Tomatoes, fancy, per lb. 15c; Apples, new' 0 lbs for
25o;  Pears and  Plums,  per basket    36c
Libby's   (Hives,
bols.    for    	
45c
.26c
Libby's
for
Pears,
35c     value
���    25c
Ox Tongue, 40c size 25c: Libby's Asparagus Tips, 35c size 25c- Rnse
dale Peaches, 30c size 20c; Libby's Soups, 15c values 10c- Veal and
Ham  Loaf,  30c size 15c; Libby's Catsup, 30c value for 20o
Mali Order Department 1-lione Seymour'K����s
Daily Deliveries All |>art�� of Cltyt Kerrlsdnle nnd Rbnrnr Tile.dnv.
and Fridays; North Vancouver. Monday* and Thurndayas Colllnarivood
nnl Central Park, Tueialay* and Fridays. *   ' ^0"'��'ewooa

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