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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Aug 14, 1915

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Array f SIR RICHARD McBRIDE SAYS THAT THE ELECTION IS NOT FAR OFF. THERE IS ONE SUBJECT UPON WHICH THE PEOPLE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA WOULD LIKE TO BE ENLIGHTENED. HOW ABOUT THE $7,000,000 FOR THE PACIFIC AND GREAT EASTERN ? IT WAS OVER THIS
MATTER THAT THE "SPRING BREAK UP" DEVELOPED IN THE CABINET. IS SIR RICHARD GOING FORWARD WITH THE $7,000,000 BONUS FOR
THIS RAILROAD? IS MR. BOWSER GOING TO BUCK THE $7,000,000 GIFT? IT WILL BE UP TO THE PEOPLE TO SEE THAT NO ONE PULLS THE
WOOL OVER THEIR EYES IN THIS CONNECTION. WE HAVE HEARD LITTLE OF THE $7,000,000 PROPOSITION DURING LAST FEW MONTHS.
" ,l ,        ...    ���; .���_ _.   a _  i u	
0-^NCDUVER
CHINOOK
Vol. IV. No. 14���Established 1911
SOUTH VANCOUVER. B.C., CANADA.   SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 1915
Price Five Cents
PUBLISHED
Every Saearday by tha Greater Vancouver PanlUhen Disked
George M. Murray, Editor
HEAD OFFICE:
Carnar Thirtieth  Avenue and Hata  Street.  South Vancouver,  B. C.
Editor's Otnce Burna Drug Co., Vancouver Block, Phane Sey. 5��90
TEUPHONE:  AH departmenU .Peirnsent  1174
MIGHT CALLS Fairmont  1146 L
Eaftetared at tha Poat OSce Department. Ottawa, aa Second ClaM
Hall Hatter
���'       1  <���   , ,	
SUBSCRIPTION KATES:
To all peinta in Canada, United Kingdom, Mewfeuadland,  New
Eealand, and other British Paiicaaiona:
$1.50 a Year
Paatace to American, Europaai and ether Fereirn Cauntriaa, 11.11
par year antra.
"Tha truth at at] timet firmly ttaada
And thall (ram afe to afe endure."
THE KING AND YOUR EMPLOYER
CANADA sends forward her legions to the
support of the cause of the Allies. Every
Province in Canada, particularly British Columbia, has made a noble response to the call for
men. *
There are still in Canada thousands upon thousands of men of fighting age ready to join the colors. Some of these men are single and some of these
men have wives and families. All of these men,
whatever their domestic positions, have the spark
within them���the spirit and the strong right arm to
fight, to die for the Cause.
Because a man happens to have a wife is no reason why he should not respond to the call. This
fight is one for the protection of the honor of women
and the safety of little children.
Every man in Canada, married or single, is the
keeper of his own conscience. Thai all citizens under the Crown have equal rights is one of the principles upon which the constitution is built.
It is little wonder, therefore, that Canadians have
resented the campaign begun by certain large employers of labor of passing the white feather to unmarried men under the guise of the little notice:
"Your King and Country need you; we can get a-
long without you."
Mr. Nelson Rowell, in a speech which received
the praise of every newspaper in Vancouver, said'
"The British Empire confers her privileges upon all;
her obligations upon none.."
It is not necessary in this country to bring economic pressure to bear upon a man to rouse his loyalty.
It is not right that an employer should arrogate unto
himself the responsibility of keeping the conscience
of his employee.
Canada is prepared to amply care for her share
of the needs of King and Country. A full and complete response to the call is likely to be weakened
by any display of pressure which is not sanctioned
by the people and which is directed upon a certain
class of wage earner.
WAR WITHIN WAR
THIS Province is about to embark on a crusade the moral and economic advantages of
which will be far-reaching and altogether
beneficial. The movement for the prohibition of
the sale and manufacture of intoxicating liquor in the
Province which has long been simmering in many
minds, has taken concrete form and is about to be
launched on the waters of Provincial reform.
The initiators of the movement are a committee of
prominent business men in Vancouver, on which are!
such names as E. B. Morgan, of the North West
Trust, Chris. Spencer, W. H. Malkin, Dr. Mc-
Guire, W. H. Leckie, Alderman Mahon, and many
other equally well-known citizens of Vancouver.
Preliminary action was taken on 9th inst., when a
delegation from the Business Men's Prohibition
Committee, representing Vancouver, Victoria, New
Westminster, Nanaimo and other parts of the Province, waited upon Sir Richard McBride, the Prime'
Minister, and formulated the following demands:
1.���That during the currency of the war, total
prohibition be immediately established.
2.���That a bill be promoted by the Government
for referendum to the people at the forthcoming election, prohibiting the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquor throughout the Province of British
Columbia.
The delegation very definitely declared their intention to prosecute the aims of the committee, irrespective of the interests of political parties, and after
a full discussion of the question, the Premier promised to state the purpose of the Government with respect to the demands made by the delegation in time
for the Provincial Prohibition Convention, which
has been summoned to meet in Vancouver on August 25th and 26th.
This Convention will be held under the auspices
of the Business Men of the whole Province.
Already much spade work has been done in different districts, and a large representation from all
parts is assured.
All who are interested in this great reform are
invited to attend. The Convention is open to all
friends of Prohibition, regardless of religious, political or economic views. The proposed reform is
above the limitations of creed or party. Any man
or woman who registers at the Convention and is in
favor of and willing to work for Prohibition, will be
eligible to vote at the Convention. Delegates from
outside points may obtain reduced fares by applying
at their local railway ticket office. British Columbia is the last of the Provinces to enter the warfare
against John Barleycorn. We expect it to assault
the enemy entrenchments with its characteristic valor
and with the added experience of the other Provinces who have fought and won the    great   reform.
The CHINOOK is heart and soul with the movement and will lend'it all the support it is capable of
giving.
 1    ��    i	
THE STAND OF THE "WORLD"
IT is a matter of some pride to the CHINOOK
that we were the first newspaper in British Columbia to openly declare for prohibition. Since
our declaration upon that subject, the tide of prohibition has been growing until today it is at the flood
and the best men of British Columbia of all parties
are giving prohibition their support.
Prohibition has been endorsed by the Liberal parties of Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. We are, therefore, within our bounds in expressing the hope that the Liberal party of British
Columbia will lose no time in taking a determined
stand upon this matter. The whiskey monopolies
are products of Toryism and it would be in line with
the traditions of Liberalism for the party locally to
put forward that plank in its platform which deals
with the liquor question, for a revision which would
fit it for the conditions as' they are today.
It is sometimes easier for a smaller newspaper to
take a firm and courageous stand upon matters which
deeply interest the people. The small newspaper is
not so likely to be entangled with the web of special
interest. The stand of the CHINOOK on prohibition is merely in line with the stand taken by this
newspaper during the pasl three years on all public
matters.
Indeed it is a sign of awakening of the public conscience when we find a large newspaper like the
Vancouver "World" come forward flat-footed and
declare for prohibition. The "World" represents
an investment of hundreds of thousands of dollars.
It carries a payroll which amounts to thousands
weekly. It is under great expense, and it must draw
sustenance from every line of legitimate business if
it is to continue. The spectacle, then, of the owner
of the "World" coming forward and openly laying
do./n the gauntlet to the biggest branch of vested interest in this country, the whiskey monopoly which
is interwoven with politics and commerce to such an
alarming extent, has in it something of an inspiration.
Such a thing is a guarantee that there is still lots of
manhood left in British Columbia, that there are
still men here with ideals and with imagination who
are prepared to sacrifice their own selfish interests
for the good of the whole community.
"It would be," he continues, "a request to the
Imperial authorities to take us over, appoint a man
to direct the Province for us, a guardian so to speak.
In fact I am surprised that so many people in British
Columbia have ever supported such an absurd suggestion."
AGAINST AN IMPERIAL COMMISSION
WE are indebted to a certain worthy Liberal
for a rebuke for countenancing the demands of certain people for an "Imperial
Commission to Investigate the Acts of the Provincial Government during the past number of years."
"Do you realize," writes this gentleman, "that to
ask the Imperial Government to take this matter up
would be to plead guilty that we in British Columbia
are a lot of idiots unable to govern ourselves.
THE LAWYER IN POLITICS
DOES the following from a lecture by Tal-
mage, entitled "Big Blunders," have an application to any of the numerous lawyers
now in the field, who imagine that they are the
chosen ones to lead Manitoba out of the jungle of
mismanagement and worse: '"Blackstone Large
Practice was the best lawyer in town. He could
make the most plausible argument and had the largest retainers, and some of the young men of the profession were proud to wear their hair as he did, and
to have just as big a shirt-collar. But he concluded
to go into politics. He entered that paradise which
men call a caucus. He was voted up and he was
voted down. He got onto one platform, but a plank
broke, and he slipped through. He got on another
platform, but it rockeJ like an earthquake, and a
plank broke and he slipp-.*:! through. Then, as a
circus rider with a foot on each horse whirls round
the ring, he puts one foot on one platform and he
slipped between them, and, landing in a ditch of
political obliquy, he concluded he had enough of
politics. And he came back to his law office, and
as he entered, covered with the mire, all the briefs
from the pigeon holes rustled with gladness, and
Kent's Commentaries and Livingstone's Law Register broke forth in exclamations: 'Welcome home,
Hon. Blackstone Large Practice, Jack of All
Trades, and Master of None.' "���Winnipeg Tribune.
(Smug lark
THE jitney carried its full complement. One
was a soldier. On the high seat he sat and
smoked his cigarette, and the world wasn't
troubling him. There was a young and giddy couple. He had a jitney hold on her. They were cheerful and, as the saying goes, full of prunes.
In the rear seat were cramped in two people long
past middle life. The man was about sixty and the
wife about the same. On the back of the jitney and
on the front were packed someone's household gods.
There was sorrow written deep on the face of the
grey-haired lady. There was sorrow, mixed with
hope, in the face of the old man.
We drew up at the station and the old folks got
off.
They were going back.
Going back to the prairies.
As bride and groom they had started on that same
journey once thirty-five years ago. But then they
were full of youth and energy and ambition. Now
they were old and not fit. When they got on the
train which carried them to the Manitoba prairies
thirty-five years ago they had no money. It was the
same today.   They .had no money, save the tickets.
Before, they came from the east to the prairies.
Oh, the agony, the heart-breaking, the sorrow
of this trip from the west to the prairies.
Twenty thousand dollars was the stake the man
brought to Vancouver with him just nine years ago.
It represented the work of himself and his wife in
a certain part of Manitoba of just twenty-six years.
Now they were going back.
"I'll get a quarter of land," said he, "in Alberta
somewhere's, and I'll make enough this harvest to
buy a team and we'll start it all over again. Won't
we, Maggie?"
"Yes, we will, Jim."
So they're going back bv the dozens and the women are going along, too. Busted, old and dejected,
they're going back. Do you know that these are
the grandest women the world has ever known.
These are the brides of thirty-five years ago who
came to the prairies from the east. Side by side
they worked with their husbands. In the harvest
fields, in the kitchen, in the barns. There was no
work too hard fo* them, no sacrifice too big. They
gave their heart's blood for their husbands and for
Western Canada.
Twenty-six years on the prairie farm is an experience which tries the mettle of a woman. Twenty-six years of hard work, of trials, of prairie bliz
zards, prairie hail and prairie droughts under blistering suns. Twenty-six years of raising a family
and helping to plant the bulwarks of a nation.
Once they had taken a short vacation and had
visited the coast. How the pleasant skies of British
Columbia, the green hills and blue waters had
charmed the tired, brokendown prairie wife. She
talked her man into selling out. For they had made
enough, They would come to Vancouver, buy a
little bungalow, and with their money they would
make such investments as would keep them.
They sold out. The neighbors back there gave
them a big presentation and an address, and they
came. Maybe the township council gave Jim a
gold chain or a stick pin.   They came.
We welcomed them and flattered them and lied
to them. We grabbed them on fake townsite lots,
we rushed them into the Dominion Trurst. We sold
them stock in companies where members of our
Government were directors. We taxed them, we
flimflammed them.   We milked them dry.
There is a cheap excursion and they're going
back.
The women have to go back, too, God bless
them!
���G. M. M.
M
BY THE WAY    m
THE SLOGAN OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
"While the Treasury lamps do burn
The humblest railroad may return."
If    !f    !f
W. J. BAIRD, the Conservative candidate in Richmond, has been given a brief by Mr. Bowser in connection with the suit for $200,000 against the people
who were supposed to be bondsmen for the Dominion Trust Company.
* * *
THE DOMINION TRUST has been a great asset to the politicians.
IT WAS SOMETHING of a help to Harry Stevens, M.P.���we refer to the getting of the Dominion Trust charter from the Dominion Government.
THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT decided to provide $200,000 for the depositors, believing that the guarantee the Dominion Trust put up
was worth that amount.
* v *
NOW, IF THE GUARANTEE which the Do.-
minion Trust put up and Mr. Bowser accepted, was
not worth the paper it was written on, as it will be
claimed by the guarantee company, where does the
Government head in?
OF COURSE THEY will not be able to pay a
penny to the depositors.
��  if,  if
OUR QUERY AT the top of this page is timely.
The people should demand that everyone go on record regarding this $7,000,000 proposition. The
P. and G. E. is going to help Vancouver out a great
deal. They are already running a splendid service
between here and Lilooet. They have fine fishing
along certain sections of the road, but let us see that
the owners of the P. and G. E. will find that the
close season iron for fishing in the fast streams at
Victoria.
* * *
IF WE NEED TO give away $7,000,000, let us
spend it on machine guns. :
* * *
A BRANDON PRESBYTERIAN minister
says: "In these days, when brave men were giving
themselves to suffering unto death for the cause of
liberty and freedom, every self-respecting citizen
must feel grieved, humiliated and sad at the revela-
tion of greed, of graft and of spoilation that have
been going on in the province during the last few |
months."   That's about the situation.
1 :	
TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 1915
'
I
1
HiimaBiiiiiiiiii BiiiuunBii
The Standard Trusts Company
Head Office: WINNIPEG
Branches:
VANCOUVER, EDMONTON, SASKATOON
Capital subscribed and fully paid      E'St'SfSSn
tceserve Fund   '��,lss'SS'}5
Total Assets   $16,000,000.00
This Company transacts all business of a strictly Trust character.
NO DEPOSITS ARE, OR HAVE AT ANY TIME BEEN
ACCEPTED
The Company has for   sale a very   large   number of   FARM
PROPERTIES in the middle West  Provinces, belonging to Trust
Estates now being wound up.    Booklet on application to
VANCOUVER BRANCH     -     VANCOUVER BLOCK
JAS.  G. FORRESTER, Manager.
Miiiiaaiiiiiii mmamanmuwwUMUBHm
"EASY MONEY
The South Vancouver Milk Co.
Will give 2 prizes for the best Slogan suitable for their
business.
"Empire Being Sacrificed That Rich Canadians
May Grow More Rich," Says Mr. Murray
****** ******       ******
Speaker at Collingwood, Tuesday Night, declared that Canada must rouse herself from her sleep and throw off the
forces which are eating into her vitals���The Patriotism of Tearing Down  the Tariff.
CONDI 1 IONS
All Slogans must contain the words SOU-VAN.
All attempts to be sent or mailed to the Manager at
537 29th Avenue East, and marked "Slogan Contest," not
later than August 31 st.
FIRST PRIZE���$4.00 cash and $2.00 Milk Tickets.
SECOND PRIZE���$2.00 cash and $1.00 Milk Tickets.
The Cost of Operating Electric
Household Appliances is
Merely Nominal.
The actual cost of current for Electric Household Appliances is
eut of all proportion to the comfort and convenience provided, this
being especially true during the summer months.
Look over this table of hourly cost of operation.
Coffee Percolator
. 3% cents per hour
Electric Grill
4 t* Sl/2 cents per hour
Electric Iron
4 to 5 cents
per hour
Electric Washer
3 cents per hour
Electric Toaster
5 cents per hour
N.B.���Appliances used for cooking are operated only a fraction of
an hour per meal. The cost of others depends upon the duration
of their use.
We will be pleased to demonstrate these appliances at our salesrooms.
B. C. ELECTRIC
Carrall and Hastings St.
1138 Granville St. (near Davie)
Are You Taking Complete
Advantage of Your
Telephone Service?
When you wish lo communicate with someone within
your own exchange district, how do you do it?
By Telephone, of course.
Naturally, because it is the quickest and easiest way.
Do you realize there are over 40,000 telephones on
the lower mainland of British Columbia and Vancouver
Island that can be reached in the same quick and easy
way?
In one minute, one hundred and eighty words can be
spoken distinctly over the telephone. The cost of long
distance telephoning is a very small fraction of a cent, per
word. Besides, the charge includes your answer, which
is received immediately. Between 7 p.m. and 8 a.m. you
can talk three times as long as the day period at the same
rate. Appointments may be made at any time during the
day.
Can you afford to write letters and wait for answers
when this service is at your command day and night?
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
A.  E. Harron
J. A. Harron
HARRON BROS.
*
Setting forth in a clear manner the
evils which have flowed from the
Tory syslem of high taxation. Mr.
George M. .Murray addressed a meeting of Collingwood citizens at the
Joyce Road Liberal Association rooms
Tuesday night.
Mr. .Murray drew a clear and distinct line between truth on the one
side and error on the oilier; between
the policy of Liberty and Freedom and
the policy of Slavery.
Throughout the speaker sounded D
high patriotic note, and deplored the
fact that in the present crisis. Ihe
people of Canada, though contributing
magnificently of men to the cause of
Freedom, were losing sight of their
responsibilities as guardians of the
heritage for which Ihe men at the
front are fighting.
"The tariff," said Mr. Murray, "is
something which wc common people
in South Vancouver are not supposed
to be familiar with.
"Thc tariff is hedged round with
mystery. Our newspapers never refer to it, particularly our Tory newspapers. Our speakers rarely deal with
it. It seems to be a sacred, mysterious institution. It is kept behind a
veil. Like the bloody relics which the
fathers of the House of Hohenzollern
hand down to their sons, thc tariff is
not for the vulgar gaze of thcordinary
mortal.
"Yet the tariff plays a bigger part
in your lives than any other institution that we have.
"Everything that you eat falls under the influence of the tariff. Everything that you wear comes under the
tariff. Everything that you use cornes
under the tariff.
"The knights of old who rampaged
over the Scottish borders had great
castles, with high turrets and with
walls and moats. Our Canadian tariff
serves the Canadian knights of today
just as those rough fortifications served the knights of old time���the knights
who vere no less blood-thirsty, no less
oppressive of thc poor, no less rapacious than the average Canadian
knight of today who bought his
knighthood with moneys wrung out
of the common people of Canada
through the medium of thc high protective tariff which surrounds this
Dominion.
"You South Vancouver people," said
Mr. Murray, "arc always glad to attend municipal meetings and to lecture your reeve or councillor for
spending so much money and taxing
you so heavily.
"Well, the average South Vancouver man pays maybe twelve dollars in
taxes cvery year to thc municipality
on his thirty-three foot lot. This
alarms him. He rises up and calls
public meetings. But he sits by his
stove and willingly permits the Government of Canada to tax him ten
times this amount every year���and
more too, if his family be large
enough.
"The only difference is that you
pay the tax direct to thc municipality,
but the money is stolen out of your
pocket by the Dominion Government,
Yet you suffer this brigandage, say
nothing, seem to enjoy il. You sit in
a community stricken with unemployment, you sit in a community where
they have breadlines. Some of you live
on oatmeal and potatoes, but you let
this exorbitant and outrageous lax
go on.
"The tariff wall which is around
Canada protects Only one type of individual���ihc eastern manufacturer
and  tiie  western  monopolist.
"These men have become enormously rich because through the tariff
Ihey were placed in a position where
Ihey could dominate the whole oi the
country���where they could dictate lo
thc people of Canada what they should
cat and wherewithal Ihey should be
clothed, and ihe price they should pay
for their food and clothing.
"The Government has no right to
take from the earnings of anyone any*
thing save what is due to carry on the
1
*
are   backed  by
Columbia  unless
big money.
"There is a tax on farm implements
made outside of Canada .-> < high thai
you must either buy your machncry
from Toronto or Brantford or do without it.
There is a tax on sawmill machinery which in a great measure has put
thc damper on Ihe lumber industry in
this province.
"There is a tax on shoes, a tax on
clothes, a tax on practically every conceivable article necessary for the use
of man which is brought into British
Columbia.
"There is a tax on rolled zinc, a tax
on bar iron, and a tax on copper paint
and upon all thc maetrials necessary
to the success of the ship building industry. There is a tax on thc very
materials wilh which wc could make
machine guns for mowing down the
Huns of Emperor Wilhcfm���who is,
by the way. the finest example of high
protectionist that I know of.
"We live to be taxed," declared Mr.
Murray, "and thc idleness abroad in
thc land at the present moment, the
want, thc poverty, the dead stillness
which reigns in our factories, the
empty freight cars, the empty docks
���all these, I say. bear testimony to
thc fact that a high tariff has not
been successful in British Columbia.
A Truce to Petty Politics
"A truce, say wc all, to petty political squabbling," went on the spcak-
cii; "but wc must bear in mind that at
a time like this when the Empire is
fighting to break down thc monster
who attacks from without, it is our
duty to keep guard over our interests
within the gates.
"It is our duty at the present time
to make Canada a granary for the
Empire, a store house of munitions
of war, a real valuable and tangible asset from which sustenance may be
drawn for the g at fight on the outside.
"It is our duty, if 'Business as Usual' be thc slogan of thc Empire, to
take first heed to the business of this
country and to so conduct things and
so handle our affairs that the boys
over yonder shall not have died in
vain.
A Few Local References
"Now there is a heavy tax on all
nails coming into tbis country," continued the speaker. "A little concern
started in to make nails in Vancouver.
For a time they flourished. They
were able to turn out a good nail and
put it in the hands of the trade at a
price lower than the Montreal people.
They were building up a goodly payroll. They were putting in machinery
and getting along famously.
"Then the big trust in the east began to feel the influence of this competition. What did Ihey do? They
shot several tons of nails into British
Columbia at a figure so low that the
local chap couldn't buy grease for his
machinery at such a price. Out went
thc lamps of the local industry. Out
went their employees, maybe to the
breadline. Thc monopoly now controls that business here, and you pay
Iheir price for the nails or vou may
make wooden pegs as Ihey did a few
centuries ago.
"A certain concern started up in
a manufacturing business. I knew the
heads of that firm and they were good
I honorable young Canadians, shrewd
business men. For a lime they flour-
iished and they "ere i credit lo Vancouver. They invested more than
! $200,000 in their plant. They had a
pavroll of score'; of men.
Tin-re was another factory here of
'the same kind. That factory was
I owned by a corporation in the east
Thc eastern fellows had a factory in
evcrv city in Canada, and an ungodly
tariff to protect them from the outside competition. The Vancouver industry flourished for a lime. Then
the   trust   undersold     them,     spoiled
*
Mr. Murray turned for a moment
to ihe shipbuilding business. "Seattle," said he. "is enjoying a great boom
in ship building. The Seattle Dry
Dock and Strip Building Company
(from whom thc submarines were
bought) are taking in the British dollars hand over fist. A short time-
ago the Protesilaus, a Blue Funnel
boat which had been used by the Admiralty, had to be overhauled. She
was in these waters. Tenders were
asked for. British Columbia firms
who could have handled the work, bid
���the lowest local bid was, I believe,
$125.<KK). They were British firms,
employing British workmen and she
was a British boat and thc Brilish
Admiralty were paying British pounds
for thc work-���but exercising British
business prudence.
��� "Thc Seattle people bid $100,000 and
got thc job, for their tender was
iower than ours.
"There is the case of the Ixion,
which was in need of repairs. The
Wallace Shipyards bid some $8,000,
the Yarrows between $7,000 and $8,-
000. The Seattle people bid $4,000
and, of course, got the work.
"Now this work went to Seattle and
all our big work in this line goes to
Seattle because there is such a big
tariff on the materials used in shipbuilding materials not produced in this
country, and which must be brought
from the United States just as thc
British munitons of war���be it said to
the shame and disgrace of Canada���
must be brought from the United
States.
"In the repair of the Protesilaus,
some of the material used was: rolled
zinc, upon which there is a duty of 20
per cent.; copper paint, duty of 30
per cent.; bar iron, duty of $7.00 a ton.
The duty of the material necessary to
fit up the Protesilaus in Canada
would have run over $25,000, so the
work went south while scores <H competent hands were unemployed in this
city. A shame, a disgrace, brutal and
unpatriotic, the blame for which rests
with a Government which is legislating only in thc interests of the chosen.
Political Corruption
"It is not because the Canadian shoe
trust was mixed up with thc disgraceful war contracts grafts that I say
that under the high tariff political corruption flourishes in Canada. But
from thc tariff, certain dark pages of
Canadian history records, emanates
political boodling and extravagance.
It is thc wrong principle to put one
man over another, to dictate to him. to
extort from him and to squeeze him.
In this country we are supposed to be
equal, but the men who flourish under
the tariff, the raising of which from
time to time, they purchase through
contribution to campaign funds, arc
the, real rulers of the country and thc
Government is but a tool in their
hands.
"The great, wealthy eastern knights
who control the big manufacturing establishments in the East, are also prominent  upon   the   boards  of  director
ate of our Canadian banks, a money
monopoly the like of which has never
been known in any country. These
men figure upon our railroad boards
and upon our public utility boards.
These men arc in control of the whole
commercial system of Canada. They
own the banks, they own the railroads, though we pay for the railroads and we make it possible for the
banks to operate and enjoy rich privileges. They own the telegraphs, the
express companies. They own the
real estate of the country, they have
a strangle hold on the natural resources of the country, and the Canadian
people must dance to their tune.
Are We Truly Loyal
"Arc.we doing our part by the Empire today? I say that wc are not,'
and because we are not, our loudmouthed "patriotic" people lay the
blame on the war. The war has had
nothing to do with our industrial
sleep. It developed before the war
and will continue after the war unless
the people arouse themselves. Do you
know that thc Allies have placed orders for over a billion dollars with
American firms? Do you know that
the United States is helping to finance
Canada today and that New York is
rapidly taking the place of London
(yet we must pay fealty to buy bacon
from United States). We people of
Canada are not doing our best by
the Empire. Our silent machine
shops which should be turning out
British guns testify to it. Our sawmills which should have dressed up
that last 10,000,000 feet order for a
certain railway subsidized by the B.
C. Government, which was placed
in thc United States, now idle and
rusting, testify to it. Our great masses of mineral resources ��� copper,
gold, lead, zinc, iron���lying undeveloped in our hills, testify to it. Our waste
places through British Columbia
which should be blossoming forth under harvests, testify to it. Our Government docks, costly of construction, but not carrying loads of British
Columbia products, testify to it, and
our breadlines testify to the fact that
we arc not truly as loyal as those
good and hardy and brave settlers
who built up the Dominion of Canada.
"The workingmen of this country
have yet their vote. It is, therefore,
for them to see that they rouse themselves that thc cancer within this tariff
drugged Dominion, which if allowed
to grow and thrive will in the end be
as great a menace to our national welfare as thc monster who knocks without, is dug up and removed. It is the
cancer of special privilege, of monopoly, of vested interests. Let us so
direct our energies and our abilities
and our franchise that our Canadian
regiments will not have been decimated in vain, that the Dominion of
Canada may he once more a great,
free, prosperous domain where a man
may have the full privilege of a Briton
to work a full day at an honest job���
to work, to eat, to live."
usmess of the country. The moment their credit al thc hank, put them on
the Government takes one cent from] the down grade, and now the sheriff
your pocket and that cent docs not sits in judgment on a 'Made in B. C.
go  into  thc  treasury  of  the  country  Industry.'
that is robbery. "There is another case.    Let us re-
Dealing with the local situation. Mr, fer to Ihe sugar manufacturing indus-
Mltrray declared that the lumbermen try. And here is a B. C. industry that
of British Columbia were unemployed, .laughs at hard times. There is a tar-
thc sawmills were idle. Here he de-jiff of $2.09 a hundred weight against
clored there was over '$50,000,000 worth; all sugar of a certain standard grade
of sawmill machinery in this province | coming into Canada. We. would be
not turning. The small industries of unpatriotic if we ate sugar made out-
thc   Province   were   not   running,   the  side  of  Canada.    This  $2.09  t*ix  was
MONEY TO LOAN
In Multiples of $5,000 at 8 per cent, on
inside revenue producing business property.
Our client will only consider property that
is now paying its way.
CANADIAN   FINANCIERS TRUST CO.
HEAD OFFICE. 839 HASTINGS ST. W.      VANCOUVER, B. C.
Patrick Donnelly, General Manager.
mine
s of thc Province were not being, put  in  force by the Borden  Government.    In the ��ld days it was some-
G. M. Williamson
i FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS
Vancouver���Office and Chapel: 1034 Granville St.     Phone Sey. 3486
North VanconT.*"-���Office and Chapel: 122 Sixth St. W.     Phone 134
developed, and the farming' resources
of British Columbia were not being
put to a proper use.
'Combined," said Mr. Murray,
"with thc careless administration at
Victoria, we may place thc blame for
Ihc great part of our idleness, desolation, poverty and hunger upon the
shoulders of the men in this country
who legislate for the enriched few as
against the masses.
'According to the last report from
Victoria, we imported into British
Columbia last year $20,000,000 worth
of foodstuffs. Every pound of the
food stuffs brought into this country
was taxed. We should grow all our
own foods, but unfortunately we do
not. Yet an idle community, in want
in a place of plenty, were held up with
a tax of some thirty per cent, on the
value of every item of food produce
brought into  British  Columbia.
"As it is with food, so it is with thc
implements for the production of food
and thc production of the general
wealth of the country.
"There is a tax on mining machinery which makes it unprofitable to import   mining   machinery   into   British
hing less than a dollar. This $2.09 tax
says that you will eat Canadian made
sugar in your porridge or none at all.
The tax absolutely prohibits Ihc
bringing into this country of foreign
sugar.
"What is the result? Here it is.
In Vancouver today you have to pay
more for this sugar than in any other
city in the world. American retailers
advertise their sugar at five cents a
pound. But you'll pay nine cents a
nound for Vancouver sugar or go
hang.
"Here is a vested interest, a monopoly, a close corporation, the owners
of it may be just as haughty as the
brave Borderers of old. The price of
the raw material may go down, the
nrice of labor mav go down, but the
higher thc protective tariff on sugar,
the higher the cost of sugar to the
neonlc. And thev have thc disloyalty
to blame this condition on the war!
"As it is with sugar, so it is with
everv other commodity manufactured
in Canada which is protected by the
tariff and controlled by mighty money
interests."
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J*^ w ���
SATURDAY, AUGUST 14,* 1915
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
VANCOUVER
GENERAL
HOSPITAL
A Short Resume Descriptive of the  Tremendous Work   Being
Carried on by the Famous Institution
We are hearing much these days of
the sick and wounded, of hospitals,
red cross organizations, and all that
they convey to thc minds of those engrossed in war news. We are reading
daily of the brave fortitude of our
soldiers stricken with wounds or sickness at the front, of the skill of surgeons, and thc ministering care of the
nurses who are tending them. Bui
it is well to remember also, that there
are many sorely wounded or afflicted
with sickness who have nol been al
the front, but who none the less deserve our intelligent sympathy. Jusl
as they also serve who stay and wait,
they also appeal to our active interest
if not in quite so dramatic a form as
those who fall on the field of battle.
It is fortunate, therefore, that we
have in Vancouver so efficient ami admirable an institution as the General
Hospital. Its   expansion   has   been
quite   remarkable. Incorporated   in
1903, when the hospital occupied the
old building on iGambie Slrcct, now
used by the associated charities, .there
were 857 patients treated that year as
compared with about 6000 in the Fair-
view buildings during 1914. The firsl
wing of the Eairview institution was
opened in 1906, and since then wing after wing has been added until the different hospital structures occupy a
considerable area. And still the hospital keeps growing, various building
operations being now in progress, all
of which when completed will greatly
add to the usefulness of what is even
now one of the finest institutions of
the kind on the continent.
Those who visit one or other 'if Ihe
wards can derive but a limited idea of
thc extensive scope of the hospital's
work. It should be known, for instance, that all kinds of cases are admitted without question, with the exception of plague and smallpox, and
that there are surgical, medical, gynaecological, obstetrical, children'-, eye,
car, nose, throat, and infectious departments. No mere details of Ihe
various buildings can be half as interesting to (he public as some knowledge of the general working of the
institution and the personal element
of the general organization. Figures,
howeyer, are sometimes eloquent. Por
instance, there will be 624 beds available after August 1st. when a final fit)
will be added. Then there are approximately 287 people on the hospital staff, including 13 resident medicals, 3 non-resident medicals, 124
nursing staff, 96 household staff, 5
office staff, 8 nurses home, 5 isolation
hospital, besides those employed in
thc laundry, power house and other
departments.
Among the principal hospital officers it may be mentioned that Dr.
Malcolm T. MacEachern is now the
'general superintendent, succeeding
Dr. Whitclaw in 1913. Dr. MacEachern is a graduate of McGill Medical College, and was formely attached to the resident staff of thc Royal
Victoria Hospital, Montreal. Ile was
also superintendent for two years of
the Maternity Hospital of Montreal.
Dr. J. A. .Smith, thc first assistant
superintendent,   who   took   office     in
1914, i- a graduate of MdGill Medical
College,  1912, ard was house    ur
of  Vancouver   < '���< n< ral    I lospital    in
1913.
Dr. T II. I.ennic, the si cond ;i
.���mi superintendent and anaesthetist, i-
al-o a graduate ol McGill Medical
College, and wa* lasi year a house
surgeijn of the Vancoiivi I Gem ml
Hospital.
I Jr. J. II Carson, who was formerly
night superintendent; is now in charge
"i the admitting offices, and is :i graduate of De I'anw  University.
Mr.  George   II.   Haddcn,  the  indi -
fatigablc managing secretary . has been
connected   with   the   hospital   almost
, (rom  it-  beginning.
Mis- Helen Randal, lady superintendent and supi rintendeiil of the
Training School for Nurses, is a graduate from the Royal Victi rin I lospital, Montreal, ami wa- for i couple
of years in charge of a hospital in
San  Francisco.
Thorough organization and system
arc essential points in all public institutions, and the Vancouver General
Hospital is mosl effieienl in that direction. Tin- work is divided into
medical, nursing, secretarial, housekeeping, laundry and engineering departments, and these are further subdivided ami organized. Each department has a competent head, who manages and works out all its own details, and who is responsible to the
general superintendent for the work
oi the department At tin- same time,
each department is being constantly
overhauled in order to perfect the
system. The aim. in short, is that all
the departments should run smoothly
and, so far as  possible, automatically.
Not less important than good organization, apart from skilful medical
attention and nursing, i- the cheerful
atmosphere of a hospital. There still
lingers among some people a prejudice, sometimes a dread, "i entering a
hospital. In other days, and with regard to other hospitals, a Certain coldness and severity of atmosphere has
given, perhaps, some cause for this
feeling. But wilh the advent of kindlier and more humane methods, in
conjunction with increased medical
and nursing skill, and improved accommodation, this prejudice is rapidly
disappearing, Certainly, there is no
rea-oii for it with regard lo ihc Vancouver General Hospital. For here
the patient receives not only the highest medical or surgical attention a-
vailablc in Vancouver, and the mosl
kind and efficient nursing, but his
surroundings and the atmosphere are
bright, .cheerful  and  restorative.
Speaking to a representative of the
CHINOOK, Dr. MacEacfiern, the
general superintendent of the hospital, said in effect:
"Efficiency is aimed al in all our'
departments. '1 hi- means good employees in each department, They
must be filled with as much interest in
tin- department as if it were their
own personal property or business,
They must show tact, kindness and
diplomacy. They must endeavor to
surround themselves with' an atmosphere   of   welcome   and   Sympathy   so
'
amh.'Jf: ...
, ���
1-/
: F
���  ���
- ���
���      . ������ ���     -
i
Typical Bedroom,   Nurses' Home
Vancouver  General  Hospital, facing 10th Avenue
as lo win over the patient at once
and endeavor to dispel the coldness
or commercial air about hospitals. The
officials must extend the glad hand
io all suffering and give them immediate treatment if necessary. The
question of money must not be
thought of, for il matters not whether
the patient be a millionaire or a pauper, he must have what he needs in
ihis hospital to lnlp his physical requirements. Promptness, courtesy,
kindness, personal interest, and sympathy must permeate all our personnel. Again, we must have good buildings and good equipment. Thanks
are due to our loyal and benevolent
council and citizens, as well as to the
Provincial Government, for their kindly assistance.
"Many additions," continued Dr.
MacEachern, "have been made to our
hospital, and many are being made, so
specialist. I might further illustrate
this by reference to the anaesthetic
department of the hospital. Recent
introduction of gas into thc field of
surgery has rendered many operations that would otherwise prove dangerous, from ihe anaesthetic, lo be
absolutely safe. The very elaborate
apparatus to be seen in the Vancouver General Hospital, and in daily
use, demonstrates with what ease,
comfort and facility the anaesthetic
may be administered to the most serious of cases."
That the kindly and considerate
treatment of patients, as well as the
latest and most efficient methods prevail throughout the hospital, as referred to by Dr .MacEachern. can
be borne testimony to by the writer.
Each ward, light, bright and cheerful,
has a qualified nurse in charge, with
a  staff of under-graduates  whom she
dent doctor, with an orderly at hand,
and the watchwords are "readiness
and promptness."
An important development- of ihc
hospital's activities is the "outdoor department," which was opened in January of ibis year, absorbing the free
dispensaries down town. This department is thoroughly equippecrand manned by six physicians, six surgeons,
and a number of specialists. Those
who cannot afford a doctor receive
free treatment here and that the splendid work oi the department is appreciated is evidenced by the fact that as
many as 1200 visits a month have
been made for treatment.
Among comparatively recent additions to the Fairview buildings, one of
the most attractive is the new Nurses'
Home. It has accommodation for a-
bout 100 nurses, each nurse being provided with a separate room, and there
Reception   Hall,   Nurses'   Home  (Opened January 1, 1915)
���that very soon we will have one of
ihe finest hospitals in the continent,
as il is todaj Ihe second largest in
Canada. We have perfected our
equipment of late and now things arc
really modernized- I" passing, i! is
might In- illustrated in reference to'
our X-raj department, An up-to-date
plant las bi u installed and is in lull
working order, capable of being used
in practically all cases for diagnosis as
well aa treatment. Through the assistance ol ihi- machine, man) internal conditions, formerly undiagnosed
or diagll --ed wilh difficulty, are now
made easy. The use nf ibis machine
is far-reaching, and most wonderful
rtsulis have been obtained. When you
think of a man sitting down and eating a nn al. and this meal being photographed a- it passes through the
bowels, you can readily understand
how useful this apparatus may he.
This department, as all other departments,  is  in   the  hands  of an  expert
oversees and trains. In addition there
are, of course, a number of trained orderlies with a qualified man in charge.
System and organization may prevail
throughout the wards, but cheerfulness and thouglitfulness also permeates the atmosphere.
( Ihe oi ihe most interesting departments of the hospital is thc emergency division lor accident cases. -A
small ward, anaesthetic room, operating room and general utility rooms
are always in readiness. Situated as
these are al the ambulance entrance
door, no lime is lost ill waiting i"i
elevators i r stretchers in getting cases
quickly into the emergency treatment
rooms and under immediate first aid
treatment. All possible antidotes for
poison are available, in addition to a
stomach pump, the lungoniotor for
artificial respiration in cases of asphyxia, and all manner of sterile instruments. This department is constantly in charge of a nurse and resi-
are class-rooms, reception halls, libraries and sitting-rooms in connection.
It is worthy of note that the material
throughout in the building of (hif
home is of British Columbia origin.
11 is a solid, reinforced concrete building, finished in a fin< Medusa cement,
while thefurnishiuga were made in
VatlCi 'liver.
The iin.si recent addition to the
hospital i- iln new pathological department, jusl opened in June. It is
a two-stoie> building with access
from underground, and every facility
is being built up by means of dona-
sai> pathological work in connection
with the institution. In conjunction
with this department a line museum
is oeing built up by means of Dilations from local physicians' and the
other hospitals,
During the summer and at the pre-
(Continued on  page 6)
"3nTJj��l ^Jf^r77xaig^-J4ffllJ��.
*4MsffeifkrSn"4-M_
Nurses' Home ����y
wmm
FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 1915
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R. CURRY, Prop,
How a Drop of Borgia Blood
Made a Modern Murderess
The   Extraordinary  Revelations   of the   Power  of  Heredity Juat
Made  Known by the Release of Beautiful Countess Tarnowski
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Twenty-four hours after the declaration uf war by Italy against Austria,
the KiiiK of Italy interrupted his mili-
tary cares to sign the pardon of the
Countess Tarnowski, convicted of in-
citing others to  murder her husband.
In spile of the war, this has set
famous murder trial of modern Italy,
many people talking again of the most
in winch the psychology of a woman
with all thc characteristics of a Borgia and many additional traits of perversity was revealed to an astonished
world. Indeed, it was shown that thc
Countess was remotely descended
from the historic family of the Borgia s.
��� Her acts were certainly worthy of
Cesare Borgia, Duke of Valentinois,
who poisoned with mysterious, untraceable poisons at his splendid banquets Ihe guests who were afraid to
refuse his invitations. An equally
strong likeness to the Countess may
be seen in Lucrezia Borgia, the sister
of Cesare.
Cesare Borgia, who appears to have
been the worst monster of the family,
was the son of Rodrigo Borgia, and
was bom in 1498. The family held a
dominating position during the era
of splendid luxury, criminal intrigue
and secret poisoning that prevailed in
Italy through the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.
Cesare began his career by assassinating his cider brother, Giovanni
Borgia, Duke of Gandia, in order to
obtain his estates. He carved out a
new realm for himself in Italy by intrigue and murder, and chiefly by the
use of mysterious persons whose presence could not be traced. To put
the chmax on his career he is believed
to have poisoned his own father.
Mis sister Lucrezia Borgia was a
woman of wonderful beauty and fascination. She is credited with having
been an accomplice of her brother in
Ins worst crimes and poisonings. Her
three husbands perished mysteriously
or violently. The first, Giovanni,
Morza, Lord of Pesaro, was divorced
from his wife before he died. The
second, Alfonso, son of the King of
Naples, was murdered at Cesare Borgia's instigation, because he wished
another husband for his sister. The
third Husband was Alfonso of Estc,
Puke of Ferrara, the richest prince of
Italy.
Many horrible, fantastic crimes, in
addition lo murder, are charged a-
gainst the  Borgias.
The probability tllat the Countess
Tarnowski has inherited a homicidal
taint from these monstrous ancestors
appears to be strongly confirmed by
the fact that two of her cousins have
recently been convicted of murder.
One of them is Count Bogdan Roni-
ker, recently sentenced for the murder
of his wife's brother, and the other is
Count De Lacy, convicted of thc killing of a man named Patchcnko.
Thc Countess was convicted five
years ago in Venice of inducing her
admirer, Nicholas Naumoff, to murder her recently acquired second husband, Count Kaniarowski, in order to
obtain the enormous insurance policy
the latter had recently made out for
her benefit. She was aided in the plot
by another admirer, M. Prilukoff, a
wealthy middle-aged Moscow lawyer,
whom she had taken from his wife
and family.
She planned that Naumoff should
commit suicide after killing Count
Kaniarowski, in order that the secret
of her  plot  might  be  buried  forever,
but flu's intention failed,
Tl-.- decision lo free her must be
the result of a widespread belief that
sin- is suffering from irresistible homicidal insanity which forces her to take
Hie That such a condition might result from the inheritance of a drop of
Borgia blood is generally accepted in
Italy, where the horrifying deeds of
that notorious family are as familiar
as nursery tales. Many, nevertheless,
see in her release a miscarriage of
justice. At the time of the trial she
was studied by the most famous alienists in Italy, who differed considerably in their views of her. Professor
Rossi, of Genoa, one of these alienists,
stated:
"The woman is suffering rfom a
diabolical malady, which makes her
unanswerable for her acts. She should
be subject of pity, not scorn, hatred
or torture.
She should, of course, be so confin
ed as to prevent her from injuring oth
crs or herself. Three times in the
past two years she has attempted suicide. Whether guilty or not of planning the plot of murdering her bus
band, Count Kamarowski, put into
execution by Nicholas Naumoff, her
responsibility cannot be acknowledged
by modern alienists."
On the other hand, the late Cesare
Lombroso, the first of criminologists,
declared that the Countess was essentially sane, except that she had a congenital tendency to commit murder.
In his report he said:
"If the Countess actually conceived,
planned and carried out the tragedy
which resulted in the murder of Count
Kamarowski in Venice, she is the
most remarkable criminal of modern
times. Her methods show an absolute mastery of masculine sentiment,
passion and covetousness. Her idea
of having one lover slay her husband
and then having another lover dispatch him so as to prevent him from
becoming accuser is absolutely original,
"The crimes of the Borgias and of
the Strozzi offer nothing surpassing
this.
"The reported descent of the Countess from Cesare Borgia through several indirect lines is    an    interesting
i
suggestion, and certainly plausible.
We know that such a highly specialized congenial criminal trait as that
displayed by thc most celebrated
family of poisoners in history is a
dominant characteristic, and may be
inherited undiminished by many generations, and even after many intervening direct ancestors have been apparently free from it.
"Her ancestry and early history
must have been very remarkable. It
is unusual for one of criminal proclivities to plan so rational a conspiracy
that its execution could have been
accepted without question by the public. Had her lawyer, Prilukoff, in the
first instance not so elaborated his
defense as to have aroused suspicion,
and had the assasin, Naumoff, been
killed, as planned, or had the confessions of the Countess and Prilukoff
not been shown him, he would undoubtedly have committed suicide, as
the Countess had foreseen. On learning that she had bertayed him, the desire for vengeance, which could only
be attained by living, natuarally pos?'
sessed his mind, thus diverting his inborn homicidal tendencey from suicide." - ���'���'���'fl
The Countess at the time of her
trial was barely thirty years of age,
of a majestic, yet supple figure .rising to nearly five feet nine, with a
Grecian bust and nee, and with great
green black eyes, quick to melt into
softness or harden into hate, an a voluptuous, insinuating mouth. These
charms were crowned by a wealth of
brownish black hair that gleamed golden bronze in the sunlight.
1 he late Count Paul Kamarowski,
a calthy Russian nobleman, had a villa
in the Campo Santa Maria del Giglio
at Venice. One morning in 1907 he
was found dying of bullet wounds. It
was believed that he had been attacked by a Russian Nihilist, for he had
been known as a cruel, overbearing
army officer and Government official.
The Italian police arrested at Verona a young Russian named Nicholas
Naumoff, who was coming away
from Venice.
In the meantime news had been
received from Vienna that Count
Kamarowski had recently insured his
life for $200,000 in favor of his newly
married wife, Countess Tarnowski.
The Count had been in the Russian-
Japanese war, had had fever, and was
evidently a bad risk. One company
refused to isiise the policy, but another consented.
The Countess was then found in thc
Hotel Bristol, in Vienna. With her
was a prominent Moscow lawyer,
named Luiz Prilukoff. They occupied
six rooms in the fashionable hotel.
Shortly before Kamarowski had been
with his wife in Vienna and had then
gone on to Venice. She had pretended to iro on to Kieff, Russia, but
returned to Vienna.
It should be explained that she was
first married at the age of eighteen
to Count tarnowski, a wealthy nobleman of Kieff, Russia. He is said
to have shot her lover dead. His wife
the obtained a divorce and Prilukoff
represented her in thc proceedings
and became fascinated by her.
While the Countess and Prilukoff
were together in Vienna, it was learned that they were much in thc company of a young man with a very
gloomy and nervous manner. A photograph oi the man arrested at Verona was sent to Vienna and recognized there as that of this unknown
young man. He was Nicholas Naumoff, a young student of good family
and  excellent  character.
The Vienna police put Prilukoff
through the third degree. At first reasserted that the murder was solely planned by Naumoff, that he had
sat up all night with two detectives
lo protect Count Kamarowski in Venice, but that Naumoff had slipped in
unseen and killed the Count.
When Prilukoff was shown letters
from the Countess encouraging him
in the plot he broke down and confessed that she had really planned
the murder. Her idea was to use Nau-
moff's mad devotion to her to make
him kill Count Kamarowski and then
commit suicide. Prilukoff also told
how she had fascinated him into
stealing his clients' money in Moscow
and deserting his family. She also
coerced her maid into helping in the
plot.
Prilukoff was sent on to Venice for
trial. In thc meantime Naumoff had
also confessed how, like the other, he
had been used as a tool in the murder by the fatal Countess.
The trial took place in the historic
Tribunal of St. Mark, at Venice where
the Council of Ten formerly sat. The
Duke of the Abruzzi was present at
several of the sessions, and the most
celebrated personages in Italian society struggled for places. The prisoners were taken to and from the
court in gondolas,
Naumoff broke down and in broken
words told how the Countess had bewitched him into committing the
crime. He said that a forged telegram from Count. Kamarowski denouncing both him and the Countess
had induced him to start off to Venice to murder the Count. He arrived
at the villa in thc early morning, surprised the Count and fired five shots
at him with a revolver, four of which
took effect. As the Count lay dying
he murmured:
"Have you no heart?   I leave a motherless daughter of eight years at the
mercy of a tigress."
Prilukoff      confirmed      everything
(Continued on page 6)
HILLCREST DAIRY
F-.--y^y   -   "  t ���������-. ��� -��-��� ��� - ~tzezz?2:l&-'~'\
PURE PASTEURIZED MILK m
tiv��asnx-w-��"��'
No Preservatives No Adulteration
Purity Guaranteed
11 Quarts for 1 Dollar
131 FIFTEENTH AVENUE WEST
Phone Fairmont 1934
Mill: Foot of Ontario Street. Fraser River
Phone: Fraser 97
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
CANADIAN   CEDAR
LUMBER CO.
Manufacturers of
BEVEL SIDING, BOAT LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
Wholesale and Retail
GRIMMETT P. O., SOUTH VANCOUVER
P. M. HAMILTON F. WILLIS
CANYON  VIEW  HOTEL
CAPILANO, NORTH VANCOUVER, B.C.
H. LARSON, Manager. P. LARSON. Proprietor.
""fa.-U-i-tv,-,
Elevation 625 feet. One hour's trip from Vancouver. Telcplionn 146
SCENIC   DELIGHTS.   FISHING.   HUNTING.   MOUNTAIN   CLIMBING.   Etc.
Unequalled Resort for Holiday, long or short.    Family Rooms
en suite with special rate.
Modern appointments throughout, spacious grounds,  high-class service at moderate
rates.   Easy trail to top of Grouse Mountain, altitude 3,000 feet.
33*
ifra-thf
You need a knowing druggist to fill your prescriptions
just as much as you need a knowing doctor to find out what's
the matter with you and tell you what to take. When your
doctor writes your prescriptions, bring them to us and know
that you will get them filled right with first-class, pure, fresh
drugs.
We never make a mistake.   We never substitute.
Come to OUR Drug Store
THE BEST DRUG STORE
BURNS DRUG COMPANY, LTD.
Phone 3902
732 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.
TERMINAL  CITY   IRON   WORK8
1141 ALBEIT CT. TELEPHONE HIGH.  Ill
ENGINEERS. MACHINISTS AND FOUNDERS
WON AND BEA8S CASTINGS
FIXE HYDRANTS AND SPECIALS
REPAIRS OP ALL DEICKIPTIONr SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 1915
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
/?=
Do You Want Bigger  Poultry Profits?
LET OUR EXPERTS SHOW YOU HOW
A few years ago poultry raising was a comparatively easy matter.
But today it is different. With the cost of feed going up���with competition growing keener and keener���with the rapidly increasing number
of truly scientific poultry raisers���thc man who now raises poultry at
a profit simply MUST learn the business from the bottom up.
He must know how to feed and breed for eggs���how to get the
most rapid growth for market���how to most successfully breed for
show purposes. He must know thc short cuts to success. He must
study the experience of others.
Thc poultry raising course of the International Correspondence
Schools comprises 24 practical lessons for home study. It rupresents
the experience of the most successful poultry raisers in the world as
well as our own wide experience on thc Raucocas Farm at Brown's
Mills, N, J.���thc world's largest poultry farm.
For any information regarding any of thc I. C. S. courses ''and we
have 284 to choose from) see
W. H. Coulter
Local Manager
10 BURNS BLOCK, 18 HASTINGS STREET WEST
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
C. E. Jenney, 0. A. P. D.
Phone:  Sey. 8134 ��' Granville Street
������.���������������������Ma^a^MMa^aWMMa^WMallWlEMflirWIinill ��������� ���!��� ���
"Nature Teeth"
and skilled
painless service
My "Nature Teeth" which are entirely different from ordinary
artificial teeth, because they are built into the mouth to match
Nature's own in size and shape and exact tint���my skilled service uiid modern equipment���my absolute guarantee of painlessness, both during and following all dental work ��� these
things
���cost no more
than ordinary dentistry
Read these Prices
Full   Set  ol   Nature   Teeth,   upper  or      flTtf     O      II   1   |    f
Cold   Crowni     5.00 YY 1VJLL  ij.   ll/\JL��l-l
Bridge Work, per tooth    S.00 Licentiate   Dental   Surgery
Gold   Fillings,  per  tooth     2.00 Doctor  Dental   Surgery
Porcelain   Fillings,  per tooth   .. I.S0 Memb"   f0""' ,^"**'  P!*^   ^"^
Armalgam Fillings, per tooth .. 1.S0 212   STANDARD   BANK   BLDG.
Painless Extraction, per tooth .. .SO Seymour 4679
531 RICHARDS ST.
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
f    JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
w
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A��� Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass. Agent, Vancouver.
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   DEAN.  Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
All the Best in Motion Pictures
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
H   Local Notes and Jottings   ��
Mrs.  James   B.  Springford  was   re-
moved  from the General  Hospital to
her home last week.    Her large circle
f friends will be pleased to hear of
her rapid recovery,
��� * *
A quiel wedding tvas solemnized by
the Rev. J. W l.uWi last Wednesday
evening, August 4. at the home of Mrs.
James Wright, when In r only daughter, Mary, became the wife of Cecil
11. Hut's. Only near relatives were
present. The bride has been a resident of South Vancouver for a number of years, coming here with her
parents when quite young, Mr. Btitts
has also spent some time hire. Recently Mr. Butis enlisted in the
D. C. O. R., and will leave shortly
for lii-- training tamp at Vernon, 11.C.
Mrs, Hulls will be al home to her
friends al -list and Princt Albert St..
after August 15th,
* * *
Mts,   Parker    am
Jayce,   returned  home
last  week, after a three
with  her  mother,   Mrs
Ontario Street,
* * *
Mr.   and   Mn
Thirty-ninth Av
congratulations
on   criday,  August  6
babe are doing nicely
VIOLIN EXPERT
Old and valuable violin* carefully repaired.
Guitars and mandolins repaired. Bows rehaired.
Violins bought.
JAMES TAYLOR
Phone Seymour 3415
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH  TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
All the Latest in Motion Pictures
SOUTH HILL PALACE OF
VARIETIES
(Three blocks south of Municipal Hall)
ALL THE LATEST WAR SCENES AND BEST OF
MOTION PICTURES
AMATEUR NIGHTS, WEDNESDAYS AND SATURDAYS
her    daughter,
to    Winnipeg
months'  visit
Mulvin,  3732
lill    Rankin.    151
East,  arc  receiving
the birth of a   son
Mother    and
J
^^^^^^^^^^JB1 * *
Mrs. James E. I'atterson and family
who have been at camp in North Vancouver, returned home this week.
* * *
Father Malone. who has been in St.
Paul's Hospital, when- he was suffering   from   an   accident,   will   soon   be
able to resume his duties.
* * *
Miss Emily McGeer, who has taught
in the McKenzie School, 45th and Fraser Street, for some four years, anticipates teaching at Phoenix High
School, where she has already received an appointment, Miss McGeer
will leave for Phoenix the latter part
nf next week.
* * *
Miss Eva J. and Henry Kay are
enjoying a few days fishing at  Indian
River.
* * *
.Miss Mary Mathews is spending her
holidays at Mission, B. C.
* * *
One of the best features of the recent garden party was a class of some
forty young women, excellently trained in rifle practice, fencing, sword
drill, etc., all South Vancouver lassies,
drilled and trained by a South Vancouver man.
* * *
Jack Prowse, who met with rather
a serious accident last Friday, is recovering splendidly.
* * *
Mr. H, C. Wood, 29th and Walden.
has gone to Anyox, ll.C, where he
secured a plastering contract.
* * *
Mr. James Robertson. Fifty-sixth
Avenue East, who has been busy with
work   in   the   building   line   at   White
Rock, has gone north to Stag Hay,
B. C, where he is erecting a number
of buildings  for a lumbering industry.
* * *
South Hill Liberal Association
meets Tuesday night. Business: appointment of delegates to the Federal
Convention,  September 3rd.
* * *
The Conservative Association haw-
moved their rooms from Twenty-second Avenue, on Main Street, to the
II. Hallberg building, two doors north
of Twenty-ninth Avenue.
* * *
ll is stated that the barrier against
men not of the Conservative faith has
been removed by the Sewerage Board.
Since the sad Bowser meeting at Kal-i
enberg Hall thc bars were taken down
is the report. Now a man does nol!
have to swear fealty to any political
organization for the privilege of throwing muck out of the ditch at a lower
wage than specified in the articles
governing wages on the great public
work.    At least this is the report.
* * *
Sergeant Ben liliss. formerly of the
South Vancouver Police Force, is in
thc district, visiting his home. Sergeant P.liss is on leave for a few day-.
when he will return to the camp. Sergeant P.liss, who was one of tlie best
looking policemen in Greater Vancouver, is enjoying army life. One 'if his
tasks at the camp is to superintend
the feeding of 600 men. Ile was recently raised from the ranks. He will
take back with him a number of young
men  from  the district, who will  train
for active service.
* * *
South Hill Liberal Association
meets Tuesday night at the Municipal
Hall to appoint delegates lo the Kalenberg Hall convention which will be
held  September 3.
�� * *
Mr. Jack Cashion, of Cedar Cottage,
is spending some time in Chilliwack.
regaining his health. Mr. Cashion will
return to business within the next
few weeks.
PANTAGESJEVERY TIME
YOU MAKE
PURCHASES
From these FIRMS
"The House of Happiness"
E.  D.  Graham,  Resident  Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
MAUDE LEONE
Vancouver's  I'avorite Actress
"INSIDE STUFF"
6 ��� OTHER BIG TIME ACTS ��� 6
Three   shows   daily   2.45.   7.20.   9.L2
Admission���Matinees.     15c;     nights
15c and 25c; boxes. 50c.
Y
OU WISH TO SELL?
Auctioneers
Classified
Advertisements
BORROW ON YOUR DIAMONDS,
jewelery, musical instruments, etc.
401 Dominion Bldg. lHisiness confidential.
FLORISTS
If you wish to dispose of your Furniture, Stock or Fixtures by Auction
to the best advantage, consult
KING & CO.
Auctioneers, who guarantee satisfaction and cash day of sale. Estimates
and Valuations Free.    Phone Sey. 507
BROWN BROS. & CO., LIMITED, I
Seedsmen, Florists, Nurserymen, 48 |
Hastings  St.   E���  and  782  Granville
Street,  Vancouver,  B.  C.
0
WATCHMAKER
ENGLISH WATCHMAKER AND
Jeweller when you think of watch,
clock and jewellery repairs think
Appleby, 438 Richards St., half block
from Hastings. All mainsprings and
cleaning jobs guaranteed 12 months.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
B. C. INDEPENDENT UNDERTA-
kers, Limited���Successors to Sill &
Miller, Limited. Funeral directors
and einbalmers, 652-654 Broadway
W.   PHONE FAIRMONT 738.
KEARNEY, T. J. & Co., DOMINION
Parlors, 802 Broadway west. Phone
Fairmont 1098. Night calls answered.
A   meeting   of   the   Richmond   Dis-,
trict   Liberal  Association will  be held |
Monday   night   at   Kerrisdale.   at   the
Municipal Hall.
it    +    *
Through an error it was stated last
week that a certain pony was offered
for sale at the corner of Twenty-ninth
Avenue and Main. The paragraph
caused some annoyance to a resident
there. It crept into the paper through
a mistake which we regret very much.
+ * *
Major Alex. Graham, Municipal Inspector of Schools, has left with the
62ml Battalion Overseas Contingent.
Mr. C. J. Mabbott has been appointed
to carry on the work during his absence. Mr. Mabbott has been engaged at the Municipal Hall for several
years, but previous to coming to South
Vancouver was principal of a very
large and successful secondary high
school in his native town in  England.
A SOLDIER'S LETTER
Mrs. Hemming, 85 Twenty-seventh
Avenue East, whose'husband is away
at the front and now lies in a hospital
at  Rouen, has received a latter from
him.   th>
therefrom
"Ni
following   being   an   extract
11   Stationary   Hospital. .
��� Scottish Unit,
Rouen,  France
July 14.
"My old Stump is beginning lo ileal
up some, but il will be some linn yet
before il is well. But don't expect
now to get to England with it, unless I
they get filled rlghl up lure. It's been
very quiel -nice l came down here,
Kit! i* mi-.ins something doing later.
We have a good share of the rough
stuff this spring, bul Ihe second contingent is supposed to be over - -n
to relieve the first. Don't know what |
they will do with us then. Then are
not many of the original 5th Battalion
left, but (,f course a lot are wounded
and some prisoners. You asked mc
to tell you about the battles J have
been in. Well, the reason 1 did not say
loo much was because 1 wanted you
lo get all my letters and especially al
that lime when 1 could not write very
often. But I will tell you now about
the 24th May. You will know where
we were then. This is the second big
fight I was in.
"We were in reserve to our 8th and
10th Battalions of the Second Brigade.
May 22nd. So wc were called out on
a working party to put small bridges
over the Germans' communication
trenches in front of our first line trenches so that the 10th could make a
charge and have a clear run, It was
a warm place. The Germans had seen
us and gave us a nice shelling, also a
steady rifle and machine gun fire. But
we came on pretty good, not many
getting killed. The 10th then jumped
over the parapet and soon captured
the first German trench, but they tried
to take it again and kept up a fierce
fight with bombs all night, but the
10th held on Well, only losing about
forty yards of it.
"My company was packing wounded out all night and under shell fire
it was an awful job, as in some places
there was shell holes you could get a
house in, but wc managed to get them
all out by daylight and then we went
back in reserve again to sleep, tired
out. We were in again the next night
but it was pretty quiet, Then on thc
morning of the 24th we were roused
out at 1 o'clock, fall in, carrying water bottle and ammunition only. We
knew then something was coming off,
and it did not take us long to find
out. Up to the first line wc went and
laid down behind the parapet, waiting
for the word charge. Wc were told
four attempts at this trench had failed
but that we had got to take it at all
costs. It was a little exciting laying
| there.    The fellow in front of mc had
his bayonet snapped clean of his rifle
by a shot, but he managed to gel another. Then we got the word and off
wc went. I felt just righl for it as
I knew we would be close to the !'.- r-
mans, and out of the shelling if �����
got across alright. The Germans did
not know what was up for a minute,
as there had been no artillery playing
on their trenches, but the) soon foun 1
out. and talk about bullets flying. i<
was a wonder anyone got up t<. the
trenches at all . The corporal ot my
section wa- killed when we had nnlj
gone a few yards and men were dropping right and left of me. Bul We
kepi going and when we got t i the
trench there was only a few i I mi -
left. They had fled. ' These -li'! not
lasi long, but we found a Bavarian in
a dugout with one "i the loth who
had been cultured a few days bcl ���'-<
as he was wounded, and In- had shared
his food with this fellow ami dressed
his wounds, So he was made a prisoner. We held on lo ihe trench all
that day and nexl night and wen re
lieved next morning. We were just
about all in as il had been very hoi
all day, and our water sunn run dry
and we had nothing to eat as it was
impossible lo connect up with our
other trenches, as they had been flattened out by ihe German artillery fire
The trenches were held by the
Strathcona Horse and Canadian dragoons, and ihey had suffered very severe. It was an awful night coming
i tit. just littered with dead. I helped
carry the last wounded man out just
at daybreak and we were sniped at
all the way. We had an awful job with
thc man on the stretcher. He could
not keep still, wanted to roll off all
the time. He was wounded worse
than we expected and died just as we
got to the first dressing station. We
rested that day and then went back
again to a new firing trench right in
front of the Germans, but came out
lucky as no one got hit. 1 expect they
were very busy themselves, as our
artillery had given them a warm time
of it and they lost heavy too. After
this wc went back for three days'
rest. . . ."
, Your loving husband,
LKN."
THE LADIES' AID ENTERTAINS  ON TUESDAY  EVG.
Everyone is familiar with the success that attends the affairs of the
Ladies' Aid of Westminster Church,
and this one will not be an exception.
"Thc Family Album" will be thc feature number. This is a most humorous sketch, and the balance of the
programme will be interspersed with
musical selections and a general good
time. The proceeds will be handed
over to thc funds of thc society to
carry on their plat, of work.
COLLECTORS
NATIONAL COLLECTING COM-
pany, 202 North West Trust Building. Established 1907. We collect
current accounts, rents and bad debts
in town or country. NO COLLECTION, NO PAY.    Phone 4980.
MONEY TO LOAN
MONEY LOANED, DIAMONDS,
Jewelry, etc. A quiet, respectable,
reliable place to borrow money.
Old gold bought. Established 1905,
Star Loan Co., 812 Hastings West,
MANICURING
MADAME LILYANDER, Manicuring. 864 Granville Street, Suite 9.
Telephone  Seymour  3333-Q.
Steamer New Delta
SUMMER SCHEDULE
On   and   after   Saturday,   May   1st,
Steamer New Delta will leave from
FERRY WHARF
(Foot of Columbia Ave.)'
For PORT MOODY
andlOCO (InErr)
DAILY   EXCEPT  SUNDAYS
At 6.30 a.m., 9.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.
Returning leave Port Moody at
8.00 a.m., 11.00 a.m. and 4.45 p.m.,
except Saturday, when she will
leave Port Moody at 12,00 a.m.
SUNDAYS
Leave Vancouver at  1.30 p.m. and
8.00  p.m.
Leave   Port   Moody   at   4.45   p.m.
and 9.20 p.m.
Express or  Parcels Reasonable
Rates
STEAMER LEAVES  ON TIME
This   Schedule   subject   to   change
without  notice
One  cent   per   Fowl,   per   Week
Poultry   Keepers
will get best results from constant
use of
"B&B"
Poultry Spice
And  EGG   PRODUCER
A Hen tonic, Pick-me-up and
Drop-em-down
Once Tried Always  Used I
Guaranteed  to  produce  results,  if
fed  according  to  direction*   (in
every sack)
3 lb. sack, 45c.    6V2 lb. sack, 90c.
100 lb. sack, $12.00
Manufactured in Vancouver.    Sold
Everywhere
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can  supply  your  needs  at  right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right at Station)
PEN FOR BUSINESS
City Heights Stables
Rear 4164 MAIN STREET
Horses boughl and sold. High-
class hi - all kinds always on
hand.
Public Auction Every Week
u
SHOULD PATRONIZE
HOME INDUSTRY
F. FAULKNER
THE      MECHANICAL      REPAIR      SHOP
Autos,  Bicycles,  Lawn  Mowers, etc.,  Repaired
Locks   and   Ke*v   Fitting
We   Buy   and   Sell   Second-hand   Bicycles
Stove    Connecting.       All    Work    Guaranteed
Give   us   a   trial   and  be  convinced
4095     MAIN    ST.,    VANCOUVER
S
EE US FIRST I
JOHN S. RANKIN
D. S. MACDONALD
Auctioneers
800  PENDER  STREET WEST
Phone Seymour 3111
Furniture Bought for  Spot  Cash
A
TELEPHONE Fair. 720 for
NGUS
PLUMBING   ::   HEATING
ELECTRICAL REPAIRS
A SPECIALTY
No order too large or too umall for
prompt service
V
ancouver
Creamery Co.
Our Ice Cream cannot bt beat.
Our Butter is of the best quality.
Our Factory is thc cleanest in the
city. No hands touches our Buttei
as it is all wrapped and put up in 1-lb.
packages.
E
XPRESSING
and HAULING
B. R. GRAY
42  TWENTY-FIFTH   AVE.   EAST
Furniture, Piano Moving and Express Work.
Work promptly attendee lo ami our pricet
are   nght. Phone:    FA1HMONT   101
M
0
NLY  THE  BEST  OF
MATERIAL  USED  IN
REPAIRING YOUR
BOOTS AND  SHOES
AT MY  STORE.
JOHN STEPHEN
3324 MAIN  STREET
Satisfaction Guaranteed.   Prices Right
N
E
Y
OU WILL GET VALUE
AND SATISFACTION BY
PATRONIZING
Crossland's Store
4520 MAIN STREET
A nice clean stock of Groceries,
Candys and Tobacco. SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, AUGL'1     14, 1915
ii1:
���
��� :���
i
it
������
1
Reeve Apologized to the Chinook
After Calling paper a Dirty Jack-Pot
Insulted Employees of the Paper, and Council and Ratepayers Make Him Swallow Himself
The reeve occupied the chair at the
la.st meeting of the Municipal Council, when a tender from the CHINOOK, with a number of other tenders, was opened.
The sound of the name of thc celebrated paper put the reeve into a rage.
There wire present in "the hall about
I(X) ratepayers.
"The  CHINOOK,"  said  the  reeve,
"a thirty  jackpot  run  in  the  interests
t ol the emyloyees.    A dirty jackpot, 1
,jay,  run  in  thc  interests  of the  em-
.i.plpyees."
,; Mr. John Rankin, who was present,
.  at this point arose, levelled his finger
at the; .chief cadi and said: "I am an
employee of that paper, and I believe
that   you  deliberately   insult   me   and
every  other  employee  when  you say
. .that ijhe. napcr is a jack-pot in which
wc participate.    You may be reevc of
this. , municipality,  but  you  have    no
right to insult me or any other man,
,.'.'ja<id  1 believe, that you are no gentleman,, though you be reeve.
"You may attack  the policy of the
paper," went on Mr. Rankin; "you
may even attack the editor of the paper, but you have no license to attack
employees who give the paper a decent day's work for a fair wage."
The reeve's hair, at this point, stood
on end.
"Constahule," yelled he; "remove
that man."
The constable didn't move a hair.
"Constahule," yelled the reevc,
"trow dat man out. 1 am reeve, do
you get me? Trow him out. Out wid
him���away wid him!"
Everyone present had a laugh at
thc spectacle. Thc CHINOOK man
held his ground and when quiet had
been restored, referred in very severe
language to the worthy reeve.
The policemen were about to direct
Mr. Rankin to the door, when Councillors Welsh and Campbell and a
score of the ratepayers in the Hall
rose at once to tell the reeve that he
was going beyond his authority and
would he well advised to subside and
apologise to the man he had insulted.
Seeing the majority against him,
and finding public opinion so incensed
over what he believed to he hut a
trifle, the worthy reeve apologised to
Mr. Rankin, to the hand clapping of
the gallery.
Mr.    Rankin    took    bis    seat    and
throughout the remainder of the evening Wat accorded the  same treatment
as  others present at  the meeting.
��� ���  ���	
SUNDAY SERVICES AT
WESTMINSTER   CHURCH
Keeler's Nursery
I Grower and Importer of Pluto, Bulbs, Roots and Shrub*
Cut Flowers and Design
Work a ipecialty.
Flowering and Ornamental Shrubs for Spring and
Fall   planting.
One hundred varieties of
Roses of Choice  Sort!
and three  hundred varieties  of  Dahliai.
Phone Fairmont 817
YOU WILL FIND OUR PRICES MODERATE
Cor. FIFTEENTH AVE. and MAIN ST :: MOUNT PLEASANT
 (	
The regular services will he held in
the Westminster Church next Sunday.
In the evening thc Rev. Craig will deliver a special sermon for men. Topic: "The Men') Duty."
On Tuesday, August 17lh, the Ladies' Aid Society will hald an entertainment in thc church. The programme will consist of voral and instrumental music by well-known artists, and will conclude with thc
sketch, "The Family Album." Tn
thc past the ladies of the society have
given some very fine entertainments
and we are assured that this will surpass previous programmes. Thc admission for adults is 10 cents; children 5 cents.
INTERESTING CONTEST     M
GOOD PRIZES  GIVEN
GAELIC SOCIETY ARRANGES
FOR RED CROSS CONCERT
The Gaelic Society held its regular
monthly meeting at the Pender Hall,
on Thursday evening, and a very good
programme was rendered.
The lady patriotic workers of Ihe
society have decided to give a special
concert on Thursday, 19th inst., with
an admission charge of 25c., U> help to
purchase materials for their Red Cross
work. A good programme of a varied
character is promised and refreshments
will be served by the ladies. A drawing, also for Red Cross purposes, will
he held at thc conclusion of the programme.
.EAVE FOR SASKATOON
South Vancouver Milk Company, want
a Slogan
That up-to-date business concern,
the South Vancouver Milk Company,
are seeking a slogan for their business.
What would he a good slogan?
How would this go: "Sou-Van, the
Raines' Brand."
Or this: "Sou-Van, thc milk for
Babe or Man."
Anyway, figure it out for yourself.
Manager Barker offers a four dollar
rash prize for the best slogan, also
$2.00 worth of tickets. For thc second
best slogan he gives $2.00 cash and
$1.00 worth of tickets.
This must appear in the slogan.
"Sou-Van."
The South Vancouver Milk Company sell a Rood, clean product, so you
cannot overstate the case in your slogan. I
PHONE SEYMOUR 900
MacDONALD & HAY
BARRISTERS,   SOLICITORS,   ETC.
1012 Standard Bank Bldg. Vancouver, B.C.
FAREWELL PARTY
Mr. and Mrs. George Darling. Rth
���\vcniic West, gave an informal evening og Mondav to Mr. and Mrs. C. D.
Butts. About fifteen immediate friends
were present. The occasion was to
extend good wishes and a safe return
s  Mr.  B��tts  left  for    the    training
Mr. William Morrison and Mr. W.
E. lligclow, of the well-known hardware firm of Morrison Brothers, 16th
Avenue and Main Street, leave next
week for Saskatoon, where they will
remain for some time looking after
business interests. Messrs. Morrison
and Bigelow are oldtimers from the
city of Saskatoon, and were pioneers
in that district. They will return to
Vancouver after a stay of some weeks.
Theatrical Notes
have an opportunity to kill him after
surprising him in the act of murder, or
else, Naumoff, trapped and held at
bay.  would kill  himself.
But Nattmoff's astonishing speed
and secrecy in the killing upset litis
carefully calculated plan.
As Prilukoff told these details, thc
Countess interrupted with an ironical
smile, exclaiming:
"You are simply ,-l liar. Everything
you say is a lie."
The wretched Prilukoff, with an expression of terror, cried to the Judge:
"I cannot go on with my testimony
if I see her."
The Countess was removed from
the courtroom temporarily, and he
proceeded.
An old and ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Russian Prince, who had fallen under
the   Countess's    fascination,    haunted
the courtroom.
After a long trial the Countess was
sentenced to eight years imprisonment. Prilukoff to ten years and
Naumoff to three. It was generally
said that the Countess's beauty had
been very powerful in inducing the
jury to give her such a light sentence.
During her imprisonment she continued to fascinate many men who
came In contact with her.
If you wish to dispose of your
Household Goods. Horses. Cattle,
Automobiles by AUCTION consult
R. C. Fitzsimmons
who will guarantee satisfaction and
prompt  returns day  of sale.
OFFICE: 25TH AVE.  &  MAIN
South Vancouver.  Phone Fair 1962
Res/ Phone:  Sey. 8527 L
CARD OF THANKS
Thc ladies in charge of the Garden
Party recently held wish to tender
enormously wealthy j tlianks to all those who so willingly
co-operated with them in making it a
success. The ladies beg to be forgiven for any negligence, and wish to
assure efficiency by experience.
P.S.���Will some young lady who
used a nurse's apron with straps and
pockets, please return it to Mrs. Wallace, 265 29th Avenue East, who was
good enough to loan it.
Pantages Theatre
Clever impersonations by little men
and women of well-known stage celebrities, in an attractive act entitled t
"The Birthday Party," forms the
headline attraction of a good bill at
the Pantages for next week. There
are eight in the company and the impersonations vary from thc singing of
Eva Tanguay and Caruso to the stage
dancing of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Castle.
In Chester Spencer and Lola Williams the Pantages has as entertaining a song-and-dance pair i*s has been
seen at the popular Hastings Street
house. They have a good line of patter and numerous tricks of articulation.
Howard & Fields prese'nt a miniature minstrel act with three men.
Some of the song hits of the evening
are woven about roast beef and pate
de fois gras, and their mournful ballad, sung with voices choked with
tears, brings down thc house.
Hanlon, Dean and Hanlon open the
bill with a clever exhibition of tiiml:
ling  and  hand-balancing,  interspersed
with comedy.
Thc Parisian Trio, three men with
good voices, entertaining vocalists and
instrumentalists.
Maude Leone & Co. present a dramatic playlet, "Inside Stuff." acted by
three people. The plot is built aboul
a girl's undergoing of "the third degree," and the girl "puts one over" on
ihe chief of police.
OUR "COUNTRY GENTRY" LIVE
AT SWEET SUNNYSIDE
South Vancouver people who have
land there have formed a Farmers'
Institute.
Vancouver General Hospital
(Continued from page 3)
Some of the "country gentry" from
South Vancouver whs are making
homes for themselves at loco, near
Port Moody, are interested in the formation of a Farmers' Institute, the organization of which was completed
iast week.
The President elected was Mr.
Smith; Secretary, R. Belford; Vice-
president, Mr. F. J. Lancaster, 25th
Avenue and  Main  Street.
The association will be known as
the Sunnyside Farmers' Institute
There are already forty members
among whom is Mr. Gales Johnson,
foreman of thc press room at the
CHINOOK office.
The Sunnyside district, which lies
behind loco, sloping down to thc Inlet, is one of thc most desirable areas
of countryside near Vancouver. Twenty and thirty acre tracts were thrown
open about a year ago by the Government of Canada, being sold at very low
figures. Energetic South Vancouver
ppoplc decided that they would have
a farm in that district and were rewarded for their ambition by each receiving a parcel of good land at ridiculously small figure.
Clearing is going on in the district,
road building will be taken up, houses
and hams are being erectc/1. and there
is every evidence that Sunnyside will
in a few short years be one of thy
most progressive and productive districts within a day's ride of Vancouver.
How a Drop of Borgia Blood
Made  a  Modern  Murderess
(Continued from page 4)
VERNON FEED COMPANY
OPEN BRANCH STORE
Naumoff confessed. lie told how
the Countess had incited him lo kill
thc Count first. ITc proposed to do
it with a new revolver, firing expanding bullets, but she objected to this
because she had bought thc revolver
herself, and its use might incriminate
her,. Then they agreed that Prilukoff
should use a poisoned stiletto. Mc was
to reserve thc revolver for use on
himself.
The Countess handled litis weapon
and explained to Prilukoff precisely
how to charge it with expanding bullets. She also gave a practical illustration of how he was to hold the barrel upward inside his mouth, so that
his own face and forehead might in
the explosion be shattered beyond
Identification, as had happened in the
case of her former lover, Sahl.
A letter from Stahl, was produced
in which he wrote:
"On my word, and by all that is
strorg and pure within me. f, Vladi-
mer Slhal, promise Marie Tarnowski
to do all that she commands mc. I
deeare again I hat she commands me.
I declare again that this constitutes
no sacrifice on my part and I ask no
recompense."
In another letter, written just before he died, he said:
"I shall Still live forty minutes more.
All is ended. My love for you alone
ives. I live with thc sole hope that
you shall pass before my bier. I kiss
you and I die."
Continuing his revelations, Prilukoff lold how the Countess made him
write a letter addressed to herself,
which he was to post in Venice just
before the murder, wherein he confessed he had been driven to take
Kamarowski's life purely through his
own uncontrollable jealousy.
Naumoff's devotion to the Countess
showed them a safer method of accomplishing the crime. Prilukoff was
to wait on guard while Naumoff killed the Count.    Then Prilukoff would
Belter service to his patrons ir.
South Vancouver is the aim nf Mr.
Vernon, who has opened up a branch
feed store at the corner of 49th and
Eraser. Mr. Vernon has had many
years of experience in the feed and
poultry business, and he hopes by giving lower prices for feed to Stimulate
thc poultry business in South Vancouver, thereby doing which will help
materially the financial situation Ihis
coining winter.
Thc Vernon Feed Company has
been doing business for the past years
at thc corner of Broadway .-mil Kings-
way, and has established a reputation
for giving a fair deal lo his many
valued customers. Ilis motto: quality,
service and low prices.
sent time, there is being er -ted a
number of new operating rooms. On
thc main operating room floor are
five rooms, two of these being dark
rooms for special operations. These
rooms are all spacious, well-ventilated
and lighted, particular care being taken to have all cupboards, fixtures,
and electric lights flush with the wall
so as to render them more sanitary.
In connection are a series of general
utility rooms, consisting of doctors'
dressing rooms, nurses' rooms, supply
rooms and sterilizing rooms. A unique feature is thc provision of a anaesthetic room at each end into which
patients can enter privately without
passing through the operating room
corridor. Patients arc anaesthetized
in a room as private as their own bedroom, and they arc thus free from
any undue excitement that might be
caused by thc sight of white corridors,
operating room tables and instruments.    ��
The scope of the present article
will admit of only brief reference to
thc other various departments of this
splendid institution. ' There is the
training school, for one, where the
nurses, orderlies and the resident stall
have a full curriculum of studies and
lectures. There is the woman's au*,-
iliary, which renders valuable assistance to the medical work of the hospital, and the Elsie Ward for children,
to which it is said they become so clinched that they are ill no hurry lo
leave when their time is up. Thei
there is the Medical library, commenced a few months ago, and which was
opened by a large donation of valuable medical works from Dr. S. J,
Tnnstall. Some idea also tuny he gn
thered from the operations of th"
main kitchen, situated on ihe top ./'
Ihc new service wing, of the extent f>''
the hospital's work when it is mentioned thai it has facilities for th
handling of from 8.000 to 10,000 meals
a day.
It is not thc purpose of the prescn1
Sketch of the noble work of the Vancouver  General   Hospital  to  describe
the invaluable skill of the various phy
sicinns.  surgeons  and  specialists  con-
nectcd with the institution.    It is sufficient here to say that the most capable  men  in  the  healing art of Vancouver are  devoting their services lo
the  inmates  of  the  hospital.    Nor  i
it possible within the compass of Iln
artiele lo do adequate justice to th
f the governing board, of which
J. Banfield is the president.
work ,
Mr. J.
���E. M. YOUNG.
PROVINCIAL
PROHIBITION CONVENTION
A Provlholi
nesday and Tin
I'llSllieSS   Moll   t
All who Mi
ll Prohibition Convention will be held In Vancouver, Wod-
rsdny,  tiiKii.i 25th mill 2lllh, HH5, under the auspices of the
I' ttie whole Province.
Intereatod In prohibiting the sale nf Intoxicating Uauori in
Hrlllnh -Columbia are Invited tn attend. The Convention In open to all
friend* or Prohibition, regard's'! or Religious, Political or Economic views.
Any man or woman who registers at tin- Convention and is in fnvor of and
willing lo work  for I'rohlhlilon will ho eligible to vole nl  the Convention.
Delegate* from outside points may ohliiln reduced rates by applying at
their looal  railway  ticket  office.
Further Information enn be aaoured by writing
E. B. MORGAN, Chairman Business
NORTH  WEST TRUST 111 II,DIM:
Men's Convt
mtton.
VANCOUVMH, II. 0.
Jl.t,U,.-_l t*��3 ���'.;;'-'���" ReSnfd'Spwt
CKNTEk ;&.HANNA LIMITED
N^w l-ocalion;, 1049 GffofoiB Slteo.^pl'Osil'' n<V
..   :���, ������:;;Vft��.C;\   ]   ...-,������ '���"."
. ..'-ircjltdjii Coliimli^rium'ami Kerriviow Vkulu'"'
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for oublic meetings,  dances,  etc.,  to  Let
Apply W. J.  STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
We   deliver���immediately���anywhere.
Phone your order to Seymour 6722.
VANCOUVER WINE
(With the. Sunburst Sign)
1097 Granville. Cor. Helmcken.
Apricots���Reg.
Onion*���12 lbs.
Annies���10  lbs.
I'lUllls���P-T    h;,;
cmons���15   for
Oranges���2  doz
Watcrnu-lotis���TV
$1.00,    for
FOPFTT'S The Big Grocery
M-*mJkJLL* 1    1    *D   us Halting* Street West
Where Everything is Reasonable and Seasonable
SATURDAY AND MONDAY
18-lb. Sack Pure Cane Fine Granulated Sugar for only nr*
If purchased with ten and coffee as follows: 1 lb   English" " 70*
Breakfast Coffee for 50c; 1 lb. Victoria Cross Tea, at 10c- 1 lb   India
Ceylon Tea at OOe.
Butter���3     lbs.     Finest     Edgewooil
Creamery   for     (1.011
Rug. ttlc lb.  Equal,  in every way
to New Zealand.
Checec���Finest Canadian;      regular
2Gc, for  .20c,
This is a special only.
Flour���No. 1 Alberta hard wheat
flour; reg. $2.25, for . ...*I.7B
No bolter bread  flour.
ICggs���Fancy 3-day-old locals;
reg, 40c dozen; guaranteed;
3 dozen for  IM.00
tmocicmF.s
10i
2   for   	
;  -1   lbs.   ...
2  for
le;   only   ..
c,  reduced
dn, ed   to   .
���dueed   lo   .
Syrup���Reg.  1;*
Prunes���it
Fcrolu���Reg.
Cherries���Reg
Itroooi ;���\itli.
Regular  50c
Regular   Hie
Hi������7  lbs. for   	
Vinegar���Qt,   bottles
Old   Dutch  f'loanseri
clal,   3   for   	
Royal   Grown   Soap���II   b&rfl
Lihlty's Asparagus���Reg. 80C
I.ihhy's Tongue���Reg. 30c .
Moby's   Olives���Hog.   35c    ..
hi,
, . -.,<���
. ,15c
. ,25c
.. me
i noc
.. :tr>e
. .280
. >S5e
. ,10c
Spe-
    PROVISIONS
Picnic Hums���Per  lb 14*^c
Swift's   Dacoil���Per   lb 25c
15c
80c
,2<tc
��� 25c
Swift's   Hacks���Per   lb.
rooked  Ham���Per  lb	
I,nrd���2  lbs. for	
Crlsco���-Rep;. 35c, for ....
Peanut Butler���Per lb. . .
I.olistcr���Reg-.   35c,   for   ..
.Sardines���:!   tins   for   	
sweet Pickles���Per quart
Sour Pickles���Per quart
Maple   Syrup���Quart   bottle
 22c
 :i5c
 25c
��� aoc
 20c
 25c
 25c
 25c
 25c
. .45c
Devilled   llam���Reg.  15c,  for  ...10c
Doiiicd  Tongue���Reg,   15c,  for l()c
lieiiiied  Chicken���Reg.  15c, for lOr
FRUITS
15s      Peaches���Per   crate     *I.oO
;r��e      Potatoes���Per  sack    KOc
25c      New Corn���Per dozen   18c
Crnbapples���5   tbs.   for    25c
Blaekberrtce���:!  lbs. for   25c
Illuclicrries���:!   lbs.   for    25c
Squash���Per   lb. 4c
.25c
.::.-��
. ,3c
WATCH Oil! WINDOWS FOH SPECIALS
5888   KbteniUaate   Conm-etlnu-   all   Departments
Colllnipvood   Deliveries���Tuesdays  and  Fridays.     Kcrrlsdalc and  FJmrnc���
Tuesdays and Thursdays.

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