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The Saturday Chinook Mar 11, 1916

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 !���������
SATURDAY
VANCOUVER
BRITISH
CHINOOK
COLUMBIA
CANADA
Vol. IV, No. 45���Established 191
SATURDAY, ��4ARCH 11.  1916
Price Five Cents
Kettle Valley Railway, Vancouver's New Food Route to Boundary Country
Hon. Martin Burrell in  Orchard, Grand  Forks
-v. ������'   ���
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.l,.��'Ste?s*s
���..���.' ^.'iiSft -".'fi/v*1
y/'i/^^sr^l*
1   ��&*<��.'
Laying steel on last link of Kettle Valley Railway, near Princeton, April, 1915
i^sa
Probably the oldest orchard in the interior of British Columbia���planted by Thomas Ellis, pioneer
rancher, almost fifty years ago. Now the property of W. T. Shatford, Esq.
Clean-kept Orchards at Grand Forks
Grain Growing at Grand Forks
Fruit Scene at Grand Forks
Cattle Scene, Nicola Y��Uey, B. C.
Boating on Okanagan River TWO
SATURDAY   CHINOOK.
SATURDAY.  MARCH   II.  1916
whatever to do with the government's defeat in Vancouver, because despite the triumphant departure of the delegation from its interview with the premier, Mr. lircwster
defeated Mr. Flumerfelt ever more signally than Mr. Macdonald defeated Mr. Tisdall. But it did prove that the electorate was nol to he whipped off the scent hy any of
tlie usual political potions with which it used to be regaled
by parties desirous of stimulating its latest emotions at
tlu- eleventh hour. The real issue between lhe electorate
and Mr. Ilowser is not political but personal, anil unless
thc premier and his supporters recognise this, they will
go down to defeat at the coming general elections. Both
Messrs. Tisdall and Flumerfelt were strong candidates,
but tlu-ir strength lay in iheir personalities, not in their
policies; their weakness, which proved their damnation,
lav in their association with Mr. Ilowser.
tendency to put such business as he could in the way of
his previous partners. He might refuse to allow his firm
to practice criminal law. just as it is believed Mr. Bowser's firm refuses criminal cases, but the enormous amount
of other business available through tlie office of the attorney-general would amply compensate any firm for the
loss of defending or prosecuting a few criminals.
THE SATURDAY CHINOOK
Published every Saturday at the Chinook Printing House,
42G feomer Street. Vancouver.
Telephone   Seymour 470
Registered   at   the   Post   Office   Department,   Ottawa,   as
Second Class Mall Matter.	
SUBSCRIPTION   RATES
To all points in Canada, United Kingdom, Newfoundland,
New Zealand and other British Possessions;
$1.00
Postage to American. European ana other foreign countries
$1.00 per year extra.
The Saturday Chinook will be delivered to any address
in Vancouver or vicinity at ten cents a month.
Member of the Canadian Press Association.
The Saturday Chinook circulates throughout Vancouver
and the cltleB, towns, villages and settlements throughout
British Columbia. In politics the paper is Independent
Liberal.   We do not accept liquor advertisements.
Publishers Greater Vancouver Publishers, Limited.
GEORGE IH. MURRAY
u
I
THE HONORABLE (?) WM. J. BOWSER
THE Premier of British Columbia, the Honorable Win.
J. Bowser, need not rely too much on the comforting assurance of his supporters, that the defeat of
his two Cabinet ministers in the bye-elections in Vancouver and, Victoria is solely due to the desire ou the part of
the electors to see an opposition in the local legislature.
That there is such a desire everyone will admit, hut it does
not attain the majorities tinder the weight of which Messrs.
Tisdall and Flumerfelt sank from office. The sentiment
of the electors has been plain for months; only those who
were blinded by the past and their own personal bias could
have failed to appreciate it. If Mr. Bowser had been Up
for election instead of either of his ministers, he would
have been defeated by still greater majorities. The plain
fact is that the people of British Columbia neither see
Mr. Bowser as he sees himself nor do they take him at his
own valuation.
* * *
Through the Looking Glass
Mr. Bowser sees himself as a dominating personality,
a virile statesman of transceiidant powers, a dictator, an
arbiter, whose lightest* word is taken seriously and whose
mental powers are so far above those of other politicians
in Hritish Columbia that he alone can judge what is or is
riot good for the people. Like many vain men of small
stature and heavy waist, he thinks he resembles Napoleon.
Mr. Bowser poses as a man of indomitable strength, a
fighter, an incisive and decisive speaker, careless of criticism, self-sufficient, concentrative.
�� * *
As Others See Him
To the public he is nothing but a hard-working lawyer
who has succeeded through politics in building up a private
practice of somewhat large dimensions. His appearance
is that of a rather stout, pompous little man, full of self-
conceit and condescension. Shell him from his surroundings
and he remains exactly what he always has been, a commonplace, undistinguished, arrogant, ambitious man. not
over scrupulous, and willing to slave his head off if ,t
will give him power and money, both of which are synonymous to him. Ile is clever, .or rather shrewd, but he has
no imagination, and no sense of humor. Ile is calculating and cunning, and has succeeded as a politician but utterly failed as a statesman. His one public virtue is lhat
he means what he says though he very seldom says what
he means. This gives him a reputation for directness,
fearlessness, and decision, when, truth to tell, it is but the
impatience of an autocratic nature with a democratic constitution. 'His reputation for fearlessness rests entirely
on the political foundation of his fortunes. With all thc
cards in his hands, he struts like a gamecock. With opportunity but no cards, he coos like a sucking dove.
* * +
Distributing Largesse
Witness the abnegation of this politically reflected autocrat the week following Mr. Tisdall's defeat. The knees
of his fortitude gave way and he grovelled in a manner
which disgusted his most ardent supporters. He ordered
his non-political minister of finance, much advertised as a
pre-eminent business man, to announce a shipbuilding
programme of which the only definite feature was the
fact that $2,000,000 was to be set aside in order to suckle
an infant industry. If this was the first-born of a "business" government, then people of British Columbia may
pray fervently that the other children will be still-born.
He positively crawled to the prohibition delegates, ascribing his defeat in Vancouver largely to their machinations. Finally he decided to insure the Parliament building in Victoria for $2,250,000, in order to distribute the
commission among the. fire insurance agents, many of
whom were also agents for employers' liability companies, whose business he was oblivious of wrecking under
the Workmen's Compensation Act, if only lie might secure the -political support of labor. Xo government buildings in Canada arc insured against fire as tbe risk is so
small as to be practically neglible.
* �� *
Keeping Bad Company
This 'distribution of largesse failed' utterly of its purpose.    Incidentally it proved that prohibition had nothing
The Fundamental Error
The supporters of Mr. Bowser make this fundamental
error. They imagine thai times have not changed and
that there has been no spiritual awakening of the people.
They still pursue the habits of an ostrich ami cover their
heads in the sand of quibbles. They excuse Mr. Bowser's
connection with the firm of Bowser, Reid and Wallbridge
on tlie ground that every attorney-general iu Canada
when in office keeps his law practice alive. They say that
at worst it is human nature to throw business to a firm
iu which an official supposedly representing the people,
is personally financially interested in the fortunes of that
firm. They cry with truth that Mr. Bowser is extremely
hard working, and has borne the labor of administration
in tbe past. They ask with a good deal of reason why a
tried man like Mr. Bowser should be discarded in favor of
a novice. They appeal for support on the foundation of
the past. They call attention to Mr. Bowser's quickness,
his abilities and his directness.
* * *
Serving Two Masters
But they ignore the fact that a man cannot serve two
masters. The cardinal sin of Mr. Bowser in the Dominion
Trust disaster is not his connection with the paradoxically
illegal legislation by which thc managing director, the late-
Mr. W. R. Arnold, looted the company, but his connection
with the firm of Bowser. Reid and Wallbridge. the solicitors for the defunct company. The electorate desire to
know without quibbling the exact sum paid by the Dominion Trust Co. to Messrs. Bowser, Reid and Wallbridge
for "legal advice in the last four years, and what part of
that sum was pocketed by Mr. Bowser as a partner in
the firm. They do not really care whether Mr. Bowser
was hoodwinked by the late Mr. Arnold. What Ihey do
care about, however, is the speech made by Mr. Bowier
in his own defence last session, which raised a new standard of political immorality by ignoring the real issues,
and dwelling with considerable nnctuoitsness on his great
sorrow for the robbed depositors, while he jingled his
portion of the fees in his pockets, Has Mr. Bowser ever
attempted to return those fees or at least his portion of
them?
The Court of Public Opinion
The only way out of ibis dilemma is by discussing it in
the court of public opinion. Legally there is nothing
criminal in taking advantage of the situation thus created.
Morally it depends upon the Standard of personal honor,
always most rigid when concerned with some one else's
honor, but most elastic when applied lo personal matters.
If, however, the legal position is secure, the moral posi-
tion can be outflanked. At least that is the point of view
nf so many politicians. There is nothing illegal in getting
i reliable business friend to gather options on property
surrounding a new site for a public building before announcement of that new site has been, made public, and
selling those options when the announcement is made, at
a very nice profit. There is nothing illegal in building
a hotel and leasing it at high rates owing lo the nature of
(he business carried on by the lessee. A busy landlord can
always plead ignorance of bis tenants doings and plead
that lie really cannot be responsible for them���as long as
they pay their rent. The relation of the business to the
income derived from that rent is a matter of morals, and
morals are a matter of discovery. There is nothing illegal in appointing at an excellent salary a close relation j
entirely unfitted by experience or training to a post of
considerable   technical   responsibility   and   large   expendi-
ambitious Mr. Bowser, the members of the government
parly are panic stricken. The new master has not con
suited them upon any of the legislation which he has out
lined. The result is that most of the members have beer
made to look ridiculous. Some, for instance, who have
been  strong anti-prohibitionists, have been pledged to tlu
policy of prohibition,
Despite this, the occupants of the seats on the government side are absolutely powerless, Many of these gen
tlemen have not raised their voices in public in years. I;
lhe past these men delivered only such speeches as Si-
Richard might suggest. And Sir Richard's private seen
tary. Mr. R. E. Gosnell, usually did the writing of tli.
speeches���masterpieces of diction which usually suffen-
much in the reading.
Sir Richard did not raise his legislature to be leaders
to  parody  a  popular  song.    Chinese   highbinders  are  n
more  severe  in  their rules  than  lhe managers of a  part-
caucus.   The caucus is a place of secrecy,   A man who i
prepared  to  take a  stand  in  caucus against  the  leader-
such as Mr. L. W. Shatford did when C. X. R. legislation'
was  first  introduced���is  mighty  soon  sweated  and  dis
ciplined.    There are in  the  House today, on the govern
ment side, several men of ability and outstanding charai
ter, who are anxious to do their best by the Province.    Bul
these men, unfortunately, are not prepared for leadershii
The political school  in  which  they were  trained  did  no
strive   to   develop   individuality,   initiative,   independenc.
They are the victims of the caucus.   The McBride caucus
has been the undoing of the party as well as of the conn
try.
BREAKFASTING HONEST  IOHN OLIVER
ture of public funds.   There is nothing illegal in receiving
applications for pre-emptions and holding them back until I J I1 in Fort George. Mr. Harlan Carey Brewster, leac
another reliable friend has had the opportunity of exam- \J er ��f the Liberal party, had an odd and somewlli
ining the property and pre-empting it for himself.   These costly experience some time back.    It was early i
things are not illegal���they are merely monetary gain. I the morning that Mr. Brewster ran upon a frieaid he ha
They are playing the game of business with marked cards' not seen in some time.
and with public funds.
* * *
The Excuse fc r Cheating
Moreover these things are very difficult of proof even
before the court of public opinion. It is difficult to obtain evidence as so many people, in a country of lavish
public expenditure, rely on some part of that expenditure
for their livelihood. In one form or another greal pressure can be exercised on any man likely lo "squeal," The
multiplication of government officials and of government
supervision or direct governmental activities in the life of
any community multiplies the supporters of government.
Under a system of elective government ownership of public utilites or of industries connected with the government,
the danger is increased a thousandfold. Any man who is
more or less dependent in politics for his livelihood is
liable to excuse cheating on the ground that his party
must have funds for their political campaigns, Truth to
tell, even the public is apt to excuse this form of cheating
on the ground that one man is as bad as another and that
every politician will take advantage of his position to push
his personal interests.
The Kitsilano Reserve
Mr. Bowser in his speech at the Orpheum Theatre the
Thursday evening before Mr. Tisdall went down to defeat,
mentioned thc case of the Kitsilano Reserve. He stated
that the public was misled by the similarity of the name
of Mr. Hamilton Read to that of Mr. Reid, his law partner. The latter, he said, had no connection whatever with
the Kitsilano deal. It was consummated by Mr. Hamilton
Read, a former clerk in his office who had severed bis
connection with the firm before the deal was completed.
Now Mr. Bowser knew perfectly well that nobody was
misled by this similarity of names. The public wanted
to know when thc deal was begun, when Mr. Hamilton
Read first became cognizant of it, and how many days
or hours before it was completed he severed his connection with the firm of Bowser, Reid and Wallbridge.
Moreover,, it was frankly curious about the division of tlie
so-called commission. The public may be pardoned its
curiosity seeing that the Supreme Court of Canada was
also curious about it. It knew that Mr. Hamilton Read
received $40,000 from Mr. Alexander as a "bonus" oul of
the $80,000 handed by the government to Mr. Alexander,
a government official. It also knew that Chief Cole, the
Indian principally responsible for the deal, claimed $20,-
000 commission from Mr. Read, which he did not receive.
But what the public did not know and what it desires to
know is what became of the $40,000 pocketed by Mr. Dowser's clerk, Hamilton Read, as his share of a deal which
apparently was initiated by Mr. Bowser himself. Do the
clerks in Mr. Bowser's law office usually receive such
splendid honorariums for cases which Mr. Bowser puis
their way? If so what sort of fees do the firm itself receive for such business as the attorney-general of Hritish
Columbia is able lo recommend to their notice?
* * *
The Attorney-General's Dilemma
The foregoing are two specific cases of how difficult
it is to serve two masters. Mr. Bowser may bc as honest
as he is straight forward, when it suits him. But he cannot escape from what may be called the attorney-general's
dilemma, which is to separate his private and public practice. As administrator of the department of justice. Mr.
Bowser represents the people, and is paid a salary for
so doing. As senior partner in the firm of Bowser, Reid
and Wallbridge. he presumably draws-a portion of the receipts paid by clients. Do those clients have business
with the people of British Columbia whose attorney is
Mr. Bowser? In the case of the Dominion, Trust, they
did. How many contractors, who have business with the
people of British Columbia, are represented by Bowser,
Reid and Wallbridge? Supposing for instance a contract
for clearing government land is let to a contractor who
draws his money from the government, and that contractor
does not pay his workmen but goes into liquidation before
the work is completed? What sort of redress have the
workmen, who may be foreigners, when they find that
the solicitors for the contractor are Bowser, Reid and
Wallbridge?
* * *
Another Supposition
It is admittedly a dilemma. The new Liberal member
for Vancouver is Mr. Macdonald, a lawyer, with a practice.
Supposing the Liberals victorious at the general election
and Mr. Macdonald, attorney-general. .Is he to sever his
connection with his firm? As attorney-general he would
draw a salary of $6,000 a year. As a private practitioner
he might be making considerably more. He may be public spirited, and animated by a desire to achieve distinction in public life. Is he to forego that perfectly legitimate
ambition because he makes a larger income at the bar? Is
the community to lose the service of an able man because
he cannot afford to trust to the fickle favors of the electorate? He may find himself in office just long enough
to lose his practice.    In any case there would be a natural
The Awakening of Public Conscience
Now ant! again, however, there is an awakening of the
public   conscience   and   the   politician   who   ignores   that I I'^'l ��'Hl a ^ishol honey w.ll about_ do for n,
After a short chat, Mr. Brewster said, "Come on in am
have breakfast with me."
"Xo thanks, Mr. Brewster. I'm not hungry this morn
ing. This air up here seems to have taken away my appt
titc.    I  couldn't eat anything."
"Oh, come into the dining-room anyway," urged Mr
Brewster. "Have a cup oi tea or something. I want t
talk to you about politics."
So they went into the dining room.
Mr. lircwster ordered the usual morning meal, so p'opti
lar with Victorians, of tea and toast and marmalade.   Th
friend ordered the same ami upon clearing lhe boards, asserted that the mild nourishment had but whetted his appi
tite.
"We're short of food in British Columbia. That's what -
wrong with us," the friend declared. "And when we gi
into power the first consideration must bc an adequati
land development policy. We import our bread, we in
port our meats," he declared, thumping his hand on, tin
table, Then iu a lone which indicated that something
had just dawned upon him���
"Talking of meats"���beckoning to a waiter���"Com.
over 'ere. One beef steak done rare, a couple of fried
eggs, some Ashcroft potatoes, some hot rolls, a pot o
; coffee and a side order of bacon,    That with some con.
awakening is smothered by the accumulated ammunition
of his opponents. His personal honesty is assailed on every
side and if in addition to the mud uncovered by the falling
tide ol his political fortunes, his disregard of ordinary
courtesies and his greed for personal power provide the
attack with a fair field of fire, liis defeat is almost a foregone conclusion. This is what has happened to the Honorable William J. Bowser. Ile believed he was the autocrat of the electorate, forgetting that autocracy demands
an aristocracy of intellect. Mere boasting cannot take
the place of statesmanship nor the most efficient political organisation the plate of leadership. The oil of party
patronage may make lhe machine run smoothly when once
it is set going, but it cannot supply the motive power when
the personality of leadership is lacking. Mr. Bowser's cup
is full of lost opportunities. He showed political ability
as long as he was merely managing clerk in the holy
order of ward heelers. Directly he assumed full responsibility for the fortunes of his party he proved that to
attain the Heaven of his ambitions, he relied on the Gods
of the past to whom he had made such lavish sacrifice.
But the gods of the past could be placated by choirs singing their praises in unison, while the gods of the future
are deaf to laudation. Mere promises of reform sound
too much like death bed repentances.
* * *
The Graceful Way Out
Today it is probably quite safe to wager that Mr. Bowser's mind is not occupied with lhe problems of a business
government. His one idea is how to maintain his personal position and by hook or crook win the coming general election. He still gazes at himself in the looking
glass and strutting before his reflection, crows shrill*' iu
defiance of his enemies. If the Conservative party desires
to win the next election it will first have to present to its
premier a doctor's order sending him to Kamloops for recuperation and rest and insist that from there he dictate
a manifesto stating that on account of his health, his medical advisers demand tllat he resign the premiership. It
can be done gracefully. It is often better to retire under
doctor's orders than under the heavy and most discourteous boot of the electorate.
���CRITICUS.
At this point  Mr.  Brewster  i1; declared to have  ke
over.    When he came too, the  waiter presented him w : .
a bill for $3.50.
Mr. Brewster asserts that he will never ��� at least nut'
such  time  as  the  party  gets  into  power���invite   Hone-'
John Oliver of thc Delta lo dine with him.    "If  Honesi
John is that strong for breakfast,  what could a  man o
pect after the day's work is over?" asks the Liberal leader.
THE VICTIMS OF THE CAUCUS
WHEN Sir Richard went away he left the members
of his party as helpless as the babes in the woods.
The utter irresponsibility and impotency of the
government party is. indeed, the most tragic feature of
the political situation as it now stands in this Province.
The new Premier, popularly regarded in the past as a
man of great strength, yielded readily to the prohibition
party after his first defeat in Vancouver. In fact during
thc week following that defeat, the Premier was in such
a frame of mind that he was prepared to give anything
or make any promise which might bring a few votes. It
is well that no one asked him during that week for the
parliament buildings. Had such a request been made the
premier undoubtedly would have yielded readily.
Should Mr. Bowser resign from the premiership there
is not a man on his side of the House prepared to take on
the responsibility of leadership. We base this assertion
upon the words of many members of the legislature win*
have been supporters of the McBride Government. These
men claim that the policy of Sir Richard was throughout
to monopolize all the honors and all the responsibilities.
He used Mr. Bowser to handle the more unsavory work of
administration and as for the rest of the members���they
were merely for voting purposes in caucus.
Xow that Sir Richard's place has been usurped by tlie
THE RKV. MR. GOOD, of Xanaimo. was one of the mo-
successful of missionaries to the frontiers of British Col
umbia. In Victoria there is a Mr. Joy who is a hold
man.    Yet some people say there is nothing in a name.
* * *
A   FRIEND  FROM   Kerrisdale  writes  to  the  editor  regarding the recent bye-elections.     "Will the premier bow.
sir, to the will of the people?" asks the Kerrisdale gentli
man.    Answer;   Better  go ask   Brother  Frank.     Ile  livi
out your way.
* * *
While this journal supports the cause of prohibitum
we do not agree with Judge Grant who is quoted as sa>
ing, "There's no such thing as a law abiding citizen in th
liquor business." It would be just as reasonable for Hi
Honor lo say that all the people opposed to the liquo
traffic are raving fanatics.
* * *
PARKER WU.UAMS CLAIMS that II. II. Thompioi
M.I..A.. Victoria, is owned by John llopp. It will be re
membered thai llopp is the man who through cpnnl*
ance with Government officials, took possession of R. I.
Ward's gold mining properly in the Cariboo���a proper!;
valued at many millions.
* * *
Win' IS IT that the revenue from the taxation of mil.
ing concerns operating in British Columbia has decrease i
during the past ten years?
* * *
THE MINING INDUSTRY has grown, but revenue
therefrom has not grown commensurately with the industry.
* * *
WHAT BRITISH LAW makes it possible for a foreign
mining company to throw a wall around a British Columbia city, exact a customs tariff on goods going in or oui.
and use its own discretion in the matter of allowing peoph
to pass in or out of the city's gates?
��� * *
APPLICATION HAS BEEN made to the Provincial legislature for the incorporation as a city of a place called
Poit Mann. located on the Fraser River.
* * *
PORT MANX ADJOINS the busy city of Liverpool,
which is marked by a blue sign board which carries a map
of the city.
* * *
SJEEL CITY IS nearby.    Steel City is a busy place.
�� * *
THE INCORPORATION OF Port Mann, as a city will
enable Mackenzie and Mann to further milk the people
who were persuaded through fraud to buy lots in the subdivision. Today there is little or nothing at Port Mann
save a round-house and much scenery. However, if the
railway promoters are allowed to incorporate, it will be
possible to force the property owners to pay taxes to bnil"
sidewalks, pave streets, and generally make a bluff at having a real community.
* * *
THIS INCORPORATION OF dots on the map as cities
is quite as criminal as the incorporation of fake mist companies. SATURDAY,   MARCH   II.  1916
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
THREE
ffi-
Have You a House to Rent
We are having numerous enquiries for six and seven room
modern houses 111 the West End and Kitsilano. ()ur Rental Department  is at your service.
LIST  YOUR  HOUSES WITH  US
North West Trust Company, Limited
=ffi
509  Richards Street
Seymour 746/'
ft:
ffi
''     ''        /'iSH^HHHP'' !'*-''
Municipal Bonds
There is a demand for superior Municipal Bonds because they
can be readily marketed, so your money is not tied up.   Yet they
pay the investor well and are a preferred investment suitable for
tl     the most cautious investor.
Write our Bond Dept. for further particulars and latest list.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
Head Office: 839 Hastings Street West. Vancouver, B. C.
P. Donnelly, General Manager.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiM
Advantages in Using Campbell's Big
Moving Van
They are completely enclosed���not side-curtained���therefore no torn
nor flapping sides to expose your household goods to all kinds of weather
conditions. Each "Car Van" is heavily padded inside to prevent jar or
friction. First to introduce these in Vancouver, OA'MPBELL now operates twice as many as all other firms put together. Your goods will come
out safe, sound and whole when moved in them. Rales moderate���free
moving  estimates  given.     Phone  Seymour 73H) TODAY.
Campbell Storage Company
PACKING,   MOVING,   STORING,   SHIPPING
OFFICE:   857 BEATTY STREET Phone Seymour 7360
ilii'.ni'iiPlinililPllni'il'ii.i-l'lliP!IHIi:ll".!'!1lil'illii|IH;iri|||'l!,l'il'���������;���'ii-j t in'.ii; rji.1'ii-iilMIHHI|M|llill1i|l��l'i|ili;!Ml;|i-in ' '��� ':!;l',!ilMI'-l'"   _____
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nilll!lllilllM!llliMII!l!l!lll!l!IlllUi
Next Telephone Directory
Closes March 15th
Is Your Name Listed There ?
The telephone directory of a big city is relied upon as
the most dependable compilation of personal information. Is
your name in the directory?
The May issue closes on March 15th. Corrections, alterations or additions must be made by that date to ensure insertion.
Advertising  forms will  close about the iitst of April.
If  you  are  thinking  about putting  in  a telephone,  do  it
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
THE AGRICULTURAL I
CREDIT BILL
lhe Government announces that the
Agricultural Credit Hill enacted at
the last session of thc legislature, will
be brought into operation tbis year]
by placing one million dollars at tlu-
disposal of the Commission which is
to be appointed thereunder, lo be loaned to farmers by way of first mortgages on their land. The action of
thc Government herein will be welcomed, as the measure is of great importance, and its successful operation will mean much to this Province, which is sorely in need of Agricultural development. It is questionable, however, whether at this
time the Government will be able to
borrow money at a sufficiently low
rate; but it is sincerely hoped that
they may succeed in this respect. No
doubt, this measure vvill aid agricultural development to a marked degree; but a further development policy is necessary to make this Province highly productive as it should
be. The clearing of land is the great
task which faces the agriculturalist.
A Government land-clearing policy
must sooner or later be brought into
operation, and the Government of the
day should give this matter their attention at an early date.
British Columbia should be prepared to take care of her fair share
of desirable settlers after the termination of the war. Large tracts of suitable land could bc selected by experts. On each 80 acre parcel the
Government could clear, say, 15 acres
ready for cultivation. This would
make it possible for the settler to
make his living while clearing the
balance of his homestead.
The actual cost of clearing could
be extended over a term of years, the
settler paying sufficient interest in
the meantime to reimburse the Province for its capital outlay. A plan
of this kind would, of course, involve
the necessary working out of details,
and the undertaking should be carried
out on a moderate scale until proven a
success.
TRUST  COMPANIES'  ACT
The following companies are reported to have changed tlieir memorandum of association by deleting
trust powers, to comply with the Act:
Irvine   Place  Syndicate,   Limited.
North Coast Sand Company. Limited.
North  Vancouver Club, Limited.
The Unionist Investment Company,
Limited.
The. Wrighl Investment Company,
Limited.
One-Six-One.  Limited.
Realty  Securities  Corporation. Ltd.
Those Who Run May Read
The Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.'s machine-made Sewer
Pipe, put under test by The Robt. W. Hunt Co., Ltd., a pipe, 10    jS
inches internal diameter, being subjected to two days' drying in an    m
oven, then immersed in water for 24 hours.   Result���
Weight before immersion 105J4 pounds
Weight after, immersion 106     pounds
Difference equals J4-pound of water, or .48 of 1 per cent.
CRUSHING TEST
On the same pipe after being subjected to thc above���crushed    K
at 29,200 pounds. ��� S
DOMINION GLAZED CEMENT PIPE CO., LTD.  |
Office: Dominion Building, Vancouver, B.C. Phone Sey. 8286    ���
DIMBIIH
|!linflllllllllllll!l!ill!i:inilllil!^
| Champion & White |
Best South Wellington Coal
DELIVERED NORTH OF 25TH AVENUE
Lump $6.��o       Nut $5.��o |
1083 MAIN STREET    H
aiiiiiiiiiiaiiiisiiiiiiBBiiiiiiiiiifl
BRITISH  COLUMBIA PERMANENT LOAN COMPANY
One of the substantial financial con
cerns which has grown up wilh thc
City and Province is lhe Hritish Columbia Permanent Loan Company,
with ils head office at 331) Pender
Street West. Although the year 1915
has been one in which mortgage and
loan companies have had to face very
unusual and unsatisfactory conditions, owing to non-payment of interest and moratorium enactments, yet
the British Columbia Permanent
Loan Company directors may be congratulated on the strong statement
which they have been able to present
to the shareholders. The Company
has enjoyed eighteen years of continued progress, and a dividend has been
regularly declared, but the directors
have acted wisely in passing the dividend for the latter half of 1915.
The profit and loss account showed
that the total earnings, including thc
balance of $24,60075 brought forward
from 1914, amounted to $257,548.52,
and contained only revenue which had
actually been collected. After deducting all expenses of management, including special war taxes, interest on
debentures and terminating capital,
placing $5,000.00 to contingent fund,
and other charges, amounting in ail
.to $185,467.07, a net profit of $72,-
J081.45. or over 8 1-3 per cent, on the
capital stock, remains. Out of this
the company paid a dividend at thc
rate of 5 per cent, per annum for the
first half of the year, amounting to
$23,049.65. and carried forward to
1916, $49,031.80.
Economy in administration is a notable feature in thc statement which
shows a reduction of 20 per cent. Due
to higher interest rates, however, the
interest on money borrowed by way
of debentures increased to $111,062.00
from $'��I..X_,7.IJ<J.
The balance sheet shows a reduction in liabilities of $240,484.00 and
the surplus account, which includes
���the reserve fund, now stands at $791,-
445.00, or 85 per cent, of the permanent capital, as against $727,908 last
year.
The board of directors for the ensuing year is comprised of Messrs.
1). II. Wilson, M.D., president; VV, 11.
Malkin, vice-president; C. Spencer,
George Martin, A. II. Douglas, R, J.
Robertson and Robert Gelletly; and
Messrs. David Spencer, Ralph Smith
and Laurence Goodacrc are the trustees. Mr. T. D. Macdonald is general manager and James Low, secretary and treasurer.
STATE OF TEXAS HAS A
BENEFICENT   EXEMPTION
LAW
Down in the sunny south, in the
state of Texas, they have in operation
a very liberal exemption law which
is apparently beneficial to the welfare
and solvency of the people.
I'nder title 55 we quote; "Article
3785���Property exempt from attachment to every family; The following
property shall be reserved to every
family, exempt from attachment or
execution and cvery other species of
forced sale for thc payment of debts
except as hereinafter provided; 1,
the homestead of the family; 2, all
household and kitchen furniture; 3.
any lot or lots in a cemetery held for
purposes of sepulture; 4, all implements of husbandry; 5, all tools, apparatus and books belonging to any
trade or profession; 6, the family library and all family portraits and pictures; 7, five milk cows and their
calves; 8, two yoke of work oxen with
necessary yokes and chains; 9, two
horses and one wagon; 10, one carriage or buggy; 11, one gun; 12, twenty   hogs;   13,  twenty  head  of  .sheep;
14. all saddles, bridles and harness
necessary for the use  of the family;
15, all provisions and forage on hand
for home consumption; and 16, all
current wages for personal services."
A homestead is defined as being not
more than 200 acres of land, which
may be in one or more parcels with
improvements, and if in a town or
city shall consist of a lot or lots nol
to exceed in value $5000 at thc time
of designation as a homestead, regardless of the value of improvements
thereon; provided that it shall be used
for a home or to exercise the business of the head of tlie family, ami
that no temporary renting of the
same shall alter its character.
Once clear title has been acquired
to the homestead il cannot be attached for anything except taxes due or
work and material used in improvements thereon, provided the same has
been contracted for in writing, with
the consent of the wife if there be "ii>
Article 3787 provides: "The proceeds ol' the voluntary sale ol the
homestead shall not be subject to
garnishment or forced sale within
six months after such sale." Individ
uals have exempt from attachment all
wearing apparel, all tools, apparatus
and books belonging to any trade or
profession, one horse, saddle and bridle, and current wages for personal
services.
No doubt a law of this nature would
prove inconvenient in some cases,
but in case a similar or possibly an
improved measure were in force in
British Columbia, there would be no
excuse for extending credit to a man
because he is the owner of a homestead or other exempt property. Credit would be extended for other considerations. In a population of about
four million people in Texas there
are said to be no mortgaged homesteads. What serious thinking citizen will deny that there is food for
serious thought in the foregoing as
applied to conditions in British Columbia today?
LAND   ACT
Form  No.   11.
Jingle Pot
coal
Always Mined by Union
White Labor
Coast Lumber & Fuel Co., Ltd.
Phone Fair. 2500    Phone High. 226    Phone Fraser 41
y;1!:":'"1 * ���"    :^::.':::,:i;::; ^'V*;;*n;;
Northern Securities Limited
FORM   OF   NOTICE
Vancouver Land District, District of Coast
Range 2.
TAKE NOTICK tliat William P. Marchant
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends
to apply for permission to lease the following
described lands:���
Commencing at a post planted on the
North-west shore of Schooner Passage, Rivers
Inlet, distant about three-quarters of a mile
in a Northerly direction from the north end
of Pendleton Island; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains easti thence south to shore
of Schooner Passage; thence following thc
shore-line to place of commencement.
WILLIAM  P. MARCHANT,
Name of Applicant  (in  full).
December 22,  1915.
J.   G.  Johnston,  Agent,
__^^ KsUiblished 1900
529 PENDER STREET WEST
Seymour 1574
ESTATE MANAGERS
FINANCIAL AGENTS.
IN CASE OF FIRE
Do not put off your fire insurance arrangements.    We can protect
you in several strong and reliable companies.
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
We are well equipped to manage properties and attend to the collection
of rentals.   We have many enquiries for houses in good districts.
I   B. GEO. HANSULD
Manager
SlllieiillilliniilillllilUilllllllllllll!
Cold Weather Poultry Hints
These cold mornings feed Warm CHICKEN CHOP mixed with
JOHN BULL or PRATT'S EGG PRODUCER.
Our special "DRY   MASH" is excellent to keep fowls healthy.
(See our window for home made dry mash hopper).
MANGELS are a good substitute for green food, only 60c pen
100 lbs.
Keep your fowls busy and healthy by a plentiful supply of Dry!
Straw, Shell, Bone, Charcoal, Beef Scrap,  and  clean  cold water.
THE VERNON FEED CO.
THREE STORES-
MOUNT PLEASANT      49TH and FRASER        COLLINGWOOD
Phones: Fair. 186���878 Fraser 175 Coll. 153
I
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH   TICKETS  ISSUED
FROM  VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
 I     CHINA  AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist S'eepers.
t0
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D.T.A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE. Gen. Pass. Aeent, Vancouver.
Eating between  Meals  is perfectly  Natural for
Healthy, Active Children
���Give Them Good, Energy-Restoring FOOD!
SMAX and SUNLIGHT
The BETTER Breads
ARE JUST SUCH FOODS
Made of Canada's most nutritious flour and pure water in British
Columbia's most sanitary, clean, modern baking plant
5c
FULL    16    OUNCE    LOAF
Every one "sealed at the oven"
HAMPTON-PINCHIN
Bakers of BETTER BREAD
60 LANSDOWNE AVE. WEST PHONE FAIR. 443���1013
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
C. E. Jenney. G. A. P. D.
Phone: Sey. 8134
W. G. Connolly, C. P. F. A.
S27 Granville Street FOUR
SATURDAY    CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  MARCH  11,  1910
Vancouver Women's Work for Women
*
*
*
SHEEP-RAISING FOR THE
WOMEN OF B. C.
The high price of wool makes one
wonder why women on farms don't
lake more interest in sheep-raising,
especially in British Columbia, where
the winters are not severe.
According tu the census last year,
Pennsylvania had 70UO woman fanners, the majority of whom owned the
land on which they worked.
In Georgia, during the last three
years the number of women farmers
has more than doubled. The majority
of women go in for raising hogs, cattle and foodstuffs, leaving the cotton
planting to the men.
# * *
Lady Wolseley has for some years
promoted the study of agriculture
among thc women. She herself superintended thc college for women gardeners at Glynde in Sussex. Here
dairying, poultry raising and bee keeping, as well as gardening, were taught
to the daughters of the people, who
had been accustomed to consider paid
manual  labor  derogatory.
Women who are well educated
train for at least two years at Glynde,
after which they aer fitted for the
work of directing the labors of others,
.but such a long period of training
and as thorough an education are not
needed by dairy women or poultry
raisers.
* * ��
It is estimated that the fleece of
more than one bilion sheep would be
required to supply the clothing for
one year to the armies now in the
field, and yet, Mr. J. W. Woods, the
retiring president of the Toronto
Board of Trade says the world's muster of sheep falls short of this number by two hundred and fifty million.
Where the wool is to come from,
both for" army and for ordinary commercial use, looks like a problem.
SCHOOL FOR BLIND SOLDIERS
Thc most difficult class to provide
for are the blind. Already Canada's
blind population is 3,2fX), and with returning soldiers this number is going
to bc greatly increased.
There are only five schools for thc
blind in the whole of the Dominion
of Canada, and the only one that is
suitable for the training of the adults
is the blind training school in Halifax, under the splendid supervision
of Sir Frederick Fraser, through
whose influence literature for the
blind was first allowed to go through
the mails without postage, a privilege
which has made the Dominion wide
work of the Canadian Free Library
for the blind possible.
The wonderful system of tangible
reading and writing was invented by
a blind Frenchman, Louis Braille, almost a century ago. and ever since
has been known by his name.
TAKING THE BABY'S
FOOTPRINTS
"Of course" every mother will answer when asked if she knows her
baby. Indeed, it scarcely seems likely
that a mother could bc given another
woman's baby by mistake; yet such
eases must arise al times, because a
Chicago hospital bas a novel scheme
for preventing such mixed issues,
Tbe baby's footprints arc taken,
As soon as the baby is born in the
hospital tlieir tiny feet are pressed
gently   against  an   inked   roller,   and
then upon white paper, copies of
which are given to thc parents. Xu
two little footprints are the same.
RED CROSS NOTES
The Vancouver Branch of thc Canadian Ked Cross Society held their
monthly meeting at the Board of
School Trustees rooms on March 9,
at 8 p.m.. .Mrs. M. Mills presiding.
The Vancouver branch is really the
central depot for all of British Columbia, and the following report goes to
prove that the people of B. C. are
far from neglecting their duties toward the brave and heroic in Europe.
During the month of February (a
short month), 143 cases of field and
hospital, supplies were shipped to
Toronto, making a total of 58,456 articles, an in ise of 54 cases, and
21,307 article more than January's
list. Included in this list were 3,\99
field comforters, comprising day
shirts, khaki handkerchiefs, a small
number of mitts and scarves and 2.-
650 hand-knitted pairs of sox. This
seems a pretty fair record of socks for
one month.
The hospital supplies included py-
jama suits, night shirts, stoup-writig-
ers, serviettes, sheets and pillow cases, abdominal binders, head and knee
bandages, eye bandages, many (ailed
and T binders and 38,560 surgical
dressings. A pair of atificial limbs
worth $250 were also sent to England
as it seems a better use can be made
of them there, all Canadian soldiers
in need of such appliances being fitted for the same before leaving for
Canada.
Every one is asked to put forth her
best energies, as during the next few
months there will be need of all the
supplies we can send. Tons of dressings are required after a big battle,
according to the latest advice from
headquarters, so wc shall hope to increase our supplies very materially
in the next two or three months.
The following branches shipped
many supplies during the month of
February: Kelowna, Summerland,
Naramata, West Summerland, Ashcroft, Langley Patriotic Society, Salmon Arm, Kamloops, Port llaney,
Willing Workers, Port Haucy, Pre-
vocational School,'Boundary Women's
Institute, East Point Grey, West
Point Grey, St. Julicn Surgical Club,
South Vancouver Soldiers' and Sailors' Mothers and Wives branch, Rose-
dale, St. George's Parish Auxiliary,
Collingwood and Central Pa'rk, Trail,
Kaleden, South Vancouver Auxiliary,
Xorth Vancouver, West Vancouver,
Working Woman's Auxiliary, Notch
Hill, South Vancouver auxiliary, Co-
wichan Woman's Institute, Duncans,
Britannia Beach, Princeton, Magee
Auxiliary, St. Andrew's Church Circle, Richmond Municipality, Clover-
dale, Port Moody Patriotic Society,
Port Coquitlam, Kerrisdale, Daughters of England Society, Strathcona
Heights, University Branch, Yale
(All Hallows School), Christ Church
Circle, Mizpah Soldiers' Relief Association, Blubber Bay, Fort George,
Burnaby Lake, Junior Ked Cross Auxiliary, Kitsilano, Chase and Shuswap
Branch, Allies Comfort Club, Fair-
view, Armstrong, Maple Ridge, Merritt, Auxiliary Xo. 2 Ward 1; Chase,
Sylvia Auxiliary. Mount Pleasant Hall,
Surrey Centre, Chrysler Chap. tiO.
O.K., Vernon, Sorrento.
Material to the value of <;(>.TO.41 has
been purchased by thc chairman and
���hipped   without  any  delay.    Not  a
very large expenditure considering the
vast amount of work which is being
carried on, is thai of lhe Central Red
Cross Depot lhe merchants have
been very generous as usual in giving us donations lo carry on our
work.
YORKSHIRE  SOCIETY
WHIST DRIVE AND  DANCE
Even more successful than any of
its predecessors, thc twelfth whist
drive and dance, given under the ails-
pices of the Yorkshire Society during
the present season, was held in the
OBrieil Hall, on Thursday evening,
and despite thc wintry weather conditions attracted the usual large
crowd for which these social gatherings are noted.
The Whist Drive, which consisted
of 12 games, was under the control
of Pres. A. Lobley, assisted by Messrs. Divine & Whitehead, who officiated as floor managers. Many large
scores were made, Mrs. Willoughby
taking the ladies' first prize with a
score of 94, the second prize was won
by Mrs. Chas. Fisher, a member of
the society, who followed closely with
a score of 93. No less than four ladies tried for the booby prize, with
scores of 65, and after cutting the
I cards, Miss A. Griffiths was in pos-
ses'iion of the doubtful honor.
The scores of the gentlemen were
even higher than thc ladies, which is
a very rare occurrrence; Mr. J. C.
Hitchcock taking thc first prize with
a score of 95, the next successful
player being Mr. J. S. Edge, who totalled 93, Mr, W. Snowden for the
second time this season taking the
booby prize with a low score of 58.
Immediately at the close of thc
whist drive, refreshments were served, during which the Morgan-Guild
orchestra enlivened the proceedings
with a trio of well-rendered selections
that received well merited applause.
Refreshments and the distribution
of prizes being over by 10.15, the rest
of the evening was devoted to a dance
programme consisting of old country
favorites, as well as Canadian and
American  dances.
Another of the Yorkshire Society's
enjoyable whist drives and dances is
announced for Thursday, March 16,
while on Thursday, March 23, the
society have arranged for another
"Yorkshire Dance," both to be held
in the O'lirien  Hall.
"PATIENCE" GOING TO
VICTORIA
Clever Opera to be given at Avenue
Theatre, Saturday, to defray transportation expenses
"Patience" is to be given again on
Saturday evening in thc Avenue Theatre. Mr. J .C. Welch, conductor of
the Patriotic Operatic Society, returned last night from Victoria where
he has been arranging with the Patriotic Society there regarding the
advisability of giving performances
of the pretty operatta in the capital
city. Victorians are very enthusiastic over the success which crowned
thc efforts of the company in Vancouver last week and gave their ready consent to Mr. Welch's suggestions.
"Patience" will be staged there on
March 28 and 29. The society in
Victoria  will  look  after  the  theatre
FAITH and WORKS
The law forbids the sale of liquor and cigarettes
to minors, but it does not restrain newspapers from going into respectable homes and soliciting the patronage of the boys and girls with
flaring and alluring advertisements.
Careful firesides must rely, therefore, upon newspapers that voluntarily banish liquor and cigarettes, those great
enemies of youthful strength and purity, from their columns.
In the campaign for saloonless state it is vital that
the forces of temperance cast the entire weight of their influence
against the wets.
Their subscription order for a newspaper is a vote
for or against liquor, according as the advertising columns pf that
newspaper are for or against liqucr.
The Saturday Chinook is against the selling and
distributing of liquor and cigarettes to minors through its advertising
columns.
For true temperance should begin at. home and
with the Home Newspaper.
Delivered at
your door for
10 cents a month.
Phone Seymour 470,
The Saturday Chinook
rental, advertising and the hotel bill,
etc., of the company, but the players
will have to manage their transportation, To overcome this difficulty, it
has been decided to give "Patience"
again on Saturday, at which performance the price of the seats will be
considerably lower than last week,
1 lilts enabling those who desire to sec
the opera over again can do so without
the expense. Also there were a large
number turned away on Friday and
Saturday evenings owing to lack of
scats. No doubt these citizens will
he glad to avail themselves of this
opportunity. "Patience" as it was given last week was one of the best
amateur performances ever given in
Vancouver, and was well worthy of
the splendid support it received. The
Saturday presentation will be of quite
the same standard, and it is hoped
there will again be the splendid response to such excellent patriotic efforts.
KING'S  DAUGHTERS
Thc Victoria Circle of the King's
Daughters were entertained by Mrs.
Ilicky at her home on Osier Avenue
on Friday last.
Mrs. J. C. Kemp gave a very interesting address on the new work
of the B. C. Consumers' League, in
which she stated that some $57,000,-
000 went out of thc province for imported godds from foriegn countries.
The imports exceeded the exports to
the extent of $24,000,000. She went
on to state that B. C. does not produce enough farm produce to support the people, less than half a mil
lion in population. It is absurd to
suppose that a province of thc magnitude of 'B. C. is unable to produce
agricultural products to support its
people, During 1915 tbe lower mainland alone supplied the market with
36,000 boxes of apples, 3,7��8 boxes of
pears, 24,600 crates of plums, and 52,-
646 crates of raspberries. If our fruit
ranches are given the encouraging
support due them, they will not only
supply 11. C. markets, but they will
export also.
The small investor may enter into another profitable business, that is
hen farming. In 1914 the people of
B. C. paid duty on 2,854,178 dozen
eggs. In 1915 we paid duty on only
552.399 dozen eggs, being a decrease
of 2,301,799 dozen. Tbe falling off in
imports was due to thc additions of
a 7 1-2 war tax on thc regular duty
of 3 cents per dozen, due to some ex-
tnet to the work of thc B. C. Consumers' League.
Mr. J. A. Cunningham, president
of the Manufacturers Association, told
of his recent visit to Ottawa in behalf
of the association in regard to the
large increase of war orders that had
been secured for tbe province.
HELP THE PROVINCE SAVE
MONEY    FOR    RETURNING
SOLDIERS
The British Columbia Consumers'
League has raised the question "What
are we doing to prepare this province
to support thc soldiers who will come
back from the battle front?"
British Columbia at lhe present
time is utterly unable to offer support to the thousands of men who
call tbis province their home and who
arc now fighting in Prance. When
these men come home in a year or in
two years' time, we shall he woefully unprepared to offer thcin means
of self-support unless we begin to
prepare for them at once.
The question as to thc best methods
of preparing for their home-coming
has been answered by the Consumers'
League. British Columbia spends
daily thc sum of $100,000 for imported
goods which can be made in this province. If British Columbia will patronize our manufacturers and farmers,
we can keep this money inside our
own home province. We shall grow
richer at the rate of one-tenth of a
million dollars per day and this means
that wc shall be saving forty million
dollars a year for tbe purpose of supporting our boys who return from
the front. Every dollar spent on Bri
tish Columbia products means a dollar spent for th ebuilding up of the
province. We cannot continue to
spend our money for outside articles
and expect to see our own industries
prosper.
There is not the least doubt that
British Columbia would be far better off today if she had not foolishly
spent forty milion dollars cvery year
for imported goods. Individually we
are responsible for this continual
wastage. If we seriously a.tdress ourselves to the problem of keeping our
money at home, it will not bc very
long before we shall find that our
factories and our farming communities are all increasing in prosperity.
With their growing wealth, the wealth
of every other section of the people
will grow.    It is a very near-sighted
IS YOUR BREAKFAST TABLE
ELECTRICALLY UP TO DATE
On Your Left
THE
ELECTRIC
TOASTER
at $4.50
Delicious hot and
crisp toast
In the Centre
THE
ELECTRIC
GRILL   STOVE
at $6.50
For  the bacon  and
eggs
On Your Right
THE
ELECTRIC
COFFEE
PERCOLATOR
at $4.50
Perfect   Coffee
All complete with connection cords
Hastings and Carrall Sts.
1138 Granville St., near Davie
Phone Seymour
5000
i' [/' Safe Milk for the Babies
That Means TURNER'S MILK
So a milk that is safe for the dedicate systems of the wee
tiny folks is surely safe and wholesome too for all members
of the family. We do not condemn milk supplied by other
dairies, but this we do say:
THERE IS NO BETTER MILK SOLD IN VANCOUVER
THAN TURNER'S MILK
because thc highest authorities and the best judges iu British
Columbia pronounce TURNER'S MILK "BEST BY TEST."
ORDER YOUR SUPPLY TODAY ! I
PHONE  FAIR.  597 AND  OUR DRIVER WILL  CALL
TURNER'S DAIRY      I
SEVENTEENTH   AVENUE  AND  ONTARIO   STREET j
i
Phone Seymour 9086
YOU DO NOT NEED A
FLASH LIGHT TO FIND A
DOCUMENT  IF  YOU
RENT
A  Private  Box
IN OUR SAFETY VAULT
$2.50 PER ANNUM
DOW FRASER
TRUST CO.
122 HASTINGS  STREET W.
Phoae Seymour 4223 Mrs. A. CLARK
The Ladies'  Agency
DOMESTIC,   EDUCATIONAL   AND
BUSINESS   OPENINGS
20-22 LEIGH SPENCER BLDG.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Also at 526 Sayu-anl Bldg., Victoria, B.C.
Phone Highland 137
Grandview Hospital
1090 VICTORIA  DRIVE
VANCOUVER     -     B.C.
Medical : Surgical  : Maternity
Rates   from   $15.00   per  week
economy which buys an imported article because it is a little lower in
price than the local article. Every
dollar spent for an imported article
means that you have bought so much
citizenship in thc country where that
article was produced.
The B. C. Consumers' League wishes to obtain your co-operation in its
endeavor to so build up our local industries that the returning soldiers
will find employment. This work is
directly iu line with the objects of
your organization. May we hope to
have your sympathetic assistance and
also your practical assistance when
you do your buying?
PHONE: 8EV. 900
MacDONALD & HAY
Barriiten, Solicitors, Etc.
1012 Standard Bank Bldg.
Vancouver, B.C.
CKNTEK  ��   HANNA   I
Classified Advertising
FLORISTS
BROWN BROS. & CO., LIMITED
Seedsmen, Florists, Nurserymen, 48
Hastings St. E., and 782 Granvilh-
Street,  Vancouver,  B.  C.
WATCHMAKER
10,000 WATCHES and CLOCKS
wanted to clean and repair at the
factory, 438 RICHARDS STREET.
MONEY TO LOAN
MONEY LOANED, DIAMONDS,
Jewelry, etc. A quiet, respectable,
reliable place to bonow money.
Old gold bought. Established 1905.
Star Loan Co., 812 Hastings West.
STOVE    REPAIRS
DON'T THROW YOUR OLD
Stove away. We handle castings and
repairs to fii any stove or range.���
FRANKS, 44 Water Street. -Hi
SATURDAY,  MARCH  11. W16
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
Views of the Empire Opened Up by The Kettle Valley Railway
FIVR
Vineyard on Gillies Ranch, Penticton
LXjL
Prize Winning Exhibit of Penticton Fruit
:
"��-**:- -*. -
CLUSTER OF FRUIT ON TREE
',&&. x\t:   t
.m
< -�����._.
i   *'�� 9
���    ' ���      '
������'-'.
'    ,
��� Bunch of Grapes grown on Gilles Ranch, Penticton.
All shown in picture were grown on one vine
FRUIT FARM AT GRAND FORKS SIX
SATURDAY   CHINOOK
SATURDAY  MARCH   11,  1916
JOIN THE CROWD OF
Well   Dressed   Men--
it pays���you, and your family, and your neighbors
will think more of you.
Dick's Spring Suits
$15     $18     $25
They're "all to the good" -and good to all the men
who are wearing them.
WM. DICK Ltd.
Two Big "Money-Back" Stores, full of good
Spring Wearables for Men
33 - 47   HASTINGS   EAST
AVENUE  THEATRE
SATURDAY, MARCH 11TH
Gilbert and Sullivan's Immortal  Opera
PATIENCE
50    ARTISTES. ALL     VANCOUVER    TALENT
PRICES ��� 25c, 50c. 75c. $1.00
Entire  Proceeds, after payment of necessary expenses, go   to   the
Canadian Patriotic Fund
Sterilized
with live steam
���Sou- Van milk bottles
SOU-VAN Milk Bottles are
cleaned with a strong washing
solution, held over an electric
rotary brush, which chases out
all dirt, rinsed oU( with clean
cold water, then returned to
their cases. The next opera-
lion is pulling bottles and cases
into a machine where they are
rinsed wilh cold and hot water
in mm ��� then sterilized with
live steam.
This is thc mosl effective method for cleaning milk bottles.
Wc adopted it because it ensures perfect cleanliness and
freedom from dirt.
With a clean, fresh milk,
scientifically handled all the
way from the cow to our dairy,
then sent to your home in sterilized bottles, you may feel perfectly safe in using Sou-Van
Milk. Good for all household
purposes ��� Safe for babies.
Fair. 2624.
You are invited to visit our
Sanitary Dairy ��� one of the
most up-to-date in Vancouver.
South
Vancouver
Milk Co.
29th and Fraser
A Shakespeare Garden for Vancouver J
  ���
The  Parks  Board  will  lay  out M   old   Elizabethan    Garden   in a
Sta-Ie;.   tark ���
Aspen, birch, bramble, bro m. ca n
omlle, carnation, clover, columbine,
hawthorn, lavender, rosemary am!
over  a   hundred   other   old   English
plains ami flowers such as delighted
ihc eyes of Shakespeare will gladden
the eyes of the people of Vancouver.
The Parks Hoard will lay out a
Shakespeare garden in Stanley I'ark
and a tree will be planted as part of
the rjtrempnial proceedings of tercentenary   week*.     Over   a   hundred   and
lhe era in which Shakespeare lived
and worked was one particularly Favorable for gardening, as well as ior literature and lhe Other ail-.. It was
only just previous to this period that
the nobility began io erect their greal
country mansion-, and the garden was
considered a most important adjunct
Probably at no other lime has landscape gardening taken a higher rank,
the garden giving, as it did, a special
and finished character lo thc building.
VANCOUVER     LAND     DISTRICT
RICHMOND
TAKE     NOTICE     that   JOHN*     PERCY
HOOPER, Broker, of thc City nl Vancouver,
It. C , intends to apply for permission to
i Mi-i.,-ct lor Coal, Petroleum and Natural
Gas   Under   the   following   described   lauds:
Commencing at a post planted at tin; South-
West corner ol Section Three (.1), Range
Six im Wet. Block Three (,i) North, Croup
On,- ill. New Westminster District; thence
North eighty (KO) chains; thence West '
eighty (80) chaiua; thence South eighty (80)
chains; thence Rait eighty (80) chains to
point o( commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or teaa.
(Signed) JOHN  PEHCV  HOOPER.
Located tin- Twenty-ninth day of December,
1915.
���February 25. i�����16.
RENNIE'S SEEDS
HF.ADQUARTERS FOR SEEDS. PLANTS.
BULBS AND SHRUBS
SEYMOUR 8550
Wm. RENNIE Co., Limited
U38 HOMER ST.   --   VANCOUVER
A certain football referee is a great
stickler for etiquette among the
boosters of the ball.
In one match, which he referee;!,
the visiting team took offence at one
of their opponents, and presently
their dislike took teh form of audible
remarks  disparaging  to him,  his  ap
pearance, and his methods of playing.
In a moment the referee turned
angrily on the talkers, and said
sternly:
"Cut out them personalities! Cut
out   them   personalities,   I   tell  you!"
Like an echo came a voice from tlie
stand: "Cut out them grammar!"
*'""~"^?T��-~ ���-*""'-���!'���'.   -"**>*^C    ������-���'    :        -1    ���-'���"feS;-
Shakespeare's Birthplace, Elizabethan House and Garden
forty plants and flowers were mentioned by Shakespeare, lovingly mentioned in his works, and Mr. Davidson, the Provincial Bot'anistj says that
they will flourish in Vancouver. The
Parks Board allotted an ample space
for their cultivation. Mr. J. Francis
Bursill and Mr. St. John Mildmay put
the proposition before the Hoard on
behalf of the committee, and the
Hoard told Mr. Rawlings to do all
possible to make the garden a success.
The works of the great dramatist
abound in plant lore and garden craft
and a Shakespeare garden is therefore a fitting feature of the Tercentenary   Commemoration.
and being an essential part of the general scheme. Tbe architect-builder of
thc house was usually thc designer of
the garden. John Thorpe being one of
the most famous architects of the
period, who designed many estates
combining bouse and grounds. That
the landscape was considered no mean
task is evidenced by Bacon's statement that "Men come lo build stately
sooner than to garden finely; as if
gardening were the greater perfection."
The people of Vancouver will delight in this garden as a memorial to
thc poet: they will be able to weave
a real
VANCOUVER     LAND     DISTRICT
RICHMOND
TAKE    NOTICE    that    JOHN   PERCY
HOOPER,  Broker, of lhe City ol Vancouver,
II. (.'.,    intends   to   apply    for    permission    to
prospect (or Coal, Petroleum and Natural
Can under the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the South-
West  corner of Section  Three   (3),   Range Six
(6) Weat, lllock Three (3) North, Croup One
III. New Westminster Diatrlct; thence South
eighty  180)  chains; thence  East  eighty (80)
'���chains;    tftenOC    North    eighty    (80)    chains;
thence Weat eighty (80) chains to point of
commencement, containing 6-10 acres, more
or [eat.
(Signed) JOHN PERCY HOOPER.
Located ihc Twenty-ninth dav of December,
1915,
February 25, PMC.
VANCOUVER     LAND     DISTRICT
RICHMOND
TAKE    NOTICE    thai    mux    PERCY
HOOPER, llroker. ol the City Of Vancouver,
II. C, intends lo apply (or permission to
prospect   for   Coal,   Petroleum   and   Natural
Gas   under   the   following  dt scribed   lauds:
Commencing at a post planted at the South-
West euriu-r of Section Three I.l), Range Six
(6) West, lllock Three (3) North, Croup
One (I). New Westminster District, thence
South eighty 180) chains; Ihcnce Wesl eighty
(811) chains; thence North eighty (s'll) chains;
thence East eighty (80) chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or   less.
(Signed) JOHN PERCY  lloopi'R.
Located the Twenty-ninth day of December,
February 25, 1916.
Great Sale of Top Grade Boots
For Women
-?&-.
\(*\
Tit.
VANCOUVER     LAND     DISTRICT
RICHMOND
TAKE NOTICE that JOHN PERCY
HOOPER,  llroker, of the Cily of Vancouver.
II-   C tends   to   apply   for   permission   to
prospect for Coal, Petroleum and Natural
(,as   under   the   following  described   lands:
Commencing at a posi planted at the South-
Weal corner of Section Twenty-five (25),
Range Seven in West, Block Pour (4) North,
Group One ill, New Westminster District;
thence    North   eighty    (wi)    chains;   thence
Easl   eighty   180)   chains;   thence  South  eighty
ism chains; thence West eighty (80) chains,
to point fi commencement, containing 640
acres,  more or less.
(Signed) JOHN PERCY  HOOPER.
Located ihe Twenty-ninth day of December,
1915.
February 25, 1916.
.69
���a shoe selling event of more importance to you than any previous shoe
sale because
Boots are going up in price
Good leathers growing scarce
es are almost unobtainable
MR. H. C. BREWSTER FOR
SOUTH VANCOUVER
Will Address Meeting at Fraser Hall,
March 18, in interests of Messrs.
Weart and McGeer, Liberal Candidates
 a week passes but what  some
shoe   manufacturer advises us that
from now on his boots will cost us
more���and here
are we offering
boots of style,
newness    and
quality,    at   a
third to a half
less   than   old-
time prices. No
Woman having
Spring     Shoes
to buy  should
let    this    sale
pass unheeded.
The assortment
is  large,   comprising   scores
of styles in novelty as well as
tonserv a t i v e
patterns,   with
the season's latest mode  uppers.
We bought these shoes at an immense price concession and we are giving
you the benefit of our buying advantages.   If you are bargain wise you will
take advantage of the saving.
The collection includes Edwin C. Burt shoes, celebrated for their style, fit
and service.   They are Standard $6, $7 and $7.50 Values
SALE PRICE, per pair	
Mr. H. C. Brewster, Liberal leader
in the legislature, is paying South
Vancouver the compliment of holding
the first public meeting since liis election, in that municipality.
Mr. Brewster appears at Fraser
Hall, Saturday evening, March 18, at
8 o'clock. Thc meeting is in the
joint interests of the Liberal candidates in Richmond and the adjoining
riding of South Vancouver.
Mr. G. G. McGeer, Liberal candidate in Richmond, will speak first
and vvill be followed by Mr. Weart of
South Vancouver. Mr. Brewster is
expected to give a review of the Provincial situation as be now finds it
and it is possible that he may take
advantage of the occasion to make
several  important announcements.
PANTAGES  THEATRE
ateurs over to Victoria, and everyone
who missed the previous performances should go to tbe Avenue to-
morrow night.
In reviewing amateur productions,
particularly these presented by local
artistes, tbe critic is naturally inclined
to prefer kindness to candor���though
candor would often be the greatest
kindness. In the latest revival of
"Patience" by the Patriotic Amateur
Operatic Society, however, one can
combine both without sacrificing thc
obligations of either.
Thc production of any Gilbert and
Sullivan opera is a revival in its double sense. It not only revives a classic comedy but it is guaranteed to revive the most jaded playgoer from
thc worst attack of dramatic dyspepsia. That, which the zeal and devotion of Mrs. James McNeill and Mr.
J. C. Welch made possible last week
reflects tbe utmost credit on both the
stage director and conductor, while
the experienced hand of Mr. Harold
Nelson Shaw gives that finish to tbe
production as characteristic of him
as it rare in less fortunate local productions.
"A Dream of tbe Orient," a magnificent musical spectacle with ten
people, is thc main attraction at the
big show next week. Madame Mak-
arenka and her beautiful Oriental
girls put one of tbe classiest acts with
beautiful settings to be seen here for
some time.
Fdward Farrell and Co. in a farce
comedy. "After the Wedding," is a
scream from start to finish. Melodies
rare to the ear' are played by the
De Michele Bros., wizards of the
harp and violhi. Fabcr and Waters
with  a  good  line  of  nifty nonsense
���������' tbe Australian CreighLons, eccentric juggling acrobats, close tbe bill.
VANCOUVER     LAND     DISTRICT
RICHMOND
TAKE    NOTICE    that    Toll.Y    PERCY
HOOPER,  llroker. of Ihe City'of Vancouver,
II.    (.'..   intends   to   apply   for   permission   I
prospect    for   Coal,    Petroleum    and    Natui  .
('.as   under  the   following  deserihed   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the Soutii
West corner of Section Twenty-five C25),
Range Seven (?) West, lllock Ponr (4) North.
Group One (I), New Westminster District;
thence South eighty (80) chains; thence
Easl eighty (80) chains; thence North eighty
(80) chnins: thence West eighty (80) chains,
to point of commencement, containing 6-10
acres, more or less.
(Signed) JOHN PERCY HOOPER'.
Located Ihe Twenty-ninth day of Decemhcr,
1915.
February 25, 1916.
VANCOUVER LAND  DISTRICT
RICHMOND
TAKE NOTICE that JOHN MASON*
I.ACI'Y, llroker, of thc City of Vancouver,
B. C, intends to apply for permission lo
prospect for Coal, Petroleum and Natural Gas
under the following deserihed lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the South!
West corner of Section Twenty(seven (27).
Range Six (6) West, lllock Pour (4) North.
Group One 11), New Westminster District:
thence North eighty (80) chains; thence Wesi
eighty (80) chains; thence South eighty (80'
chains: thence East eighty (80) chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or  less.
(Signed) JOHN MASON LACEY.
Located  the Sixth day of January,  1916.
March 2nd,  1916
$4.69
(Mufcons Bay (Tompamj
"PATIENCE" REVIVED AT
AVENUE THEATRE
PANTAGEC
UNEQUALLED       %*J
VAUDEVILLE
Phone Seymour 3406
WEEK OF MARCH 113
A Dream of the
Orient
AN ELABORATE MUSICAL
SPECTACLE
10         PEOPLE         10
Three times daily, 2.45, 7.15, 9.15
Matinee, 15c; Night, 15c & 25c
VANCOUVER LAND  DISTRICT
RICHMOND
TAKE NOTICE that JOHN MASON
LACEY, llroker, of thc City of Vancouver.
11. C, intends to apply for permission to
prospect for Coah Petroleum and Natural Ga
under the following deserihed  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at thc South-
West comer of Section Twenty-seven (27).
Range Six (6) West, lllock Pour (4) North.
Croup One (1) New Westminster District
thence North eighty (80) chains; thence Eas
eighty (80) chains; thence South eighty (80
chains: thence West eighty (80) chains l>-
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
(Signed) JOHN MASON I.ACKY.
Located Ihe Sixth dav of January,  1916.
March 2nd,  1916.
VANCOUVER LAND  DISTRICT
RICHMOND
LEGAL NOTICES
INCOWPOMTEP lt)tt>
HEMEKTt.tUMIMit STOWSC8KWI5SI0HtH_
Last Week's Delightful Revival Earns
the Repetition it will receive Tomorrow Night
Did you see "Patience" last week?
If not, go to the Avenue on .Saturday, to see thc special performance
of the revival staged last week of
Gilbert and Sullivan's evergreen opera, in aid of the Canadian Patriotic
Fund. This Saturday's performance
is to be given to "raise the wind" to
carry our clever company of local am-
VANCOUVER    LAND     DISTRICT
RICHMOND
TAKE NOTICE that JOHN PERCY
HOOPER, llroker, of the City ol Vancouver,
R. C, intends to apply for permission to
prospect for Coal, Petroleum and Natural
Gas  under the  following  deserihed  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the Southwest corner of Section Three (3). Range Six
(6) West, lllock Three (3) North, Group
One (1), New Westminster District; thence
North eighty (80) chains; thence East eighty.
(80) chains; thence South eighty (80)
chains; thence West eighty (80) chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
(Signed) JOHN PERCY HOOPER.
Located thc Twenty-ninth day of December,
1915. ���
February 25, 1916.
TAKE NOTICE that JOHN MASON'
LACEY, llroker, of the. City of Vancouver,
P.. C. intends lo apply for permission to
prospect for Coal, Petroleum and Natural Gas
under the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the Nortli-
West corner of Section Twenty-one (21 ',
Range Six (6) West, Block Four (4) North.
Group One (1) New Westminster District;
thence North eighty (80) chains; tUence
East eighty (80) chains: thence South eighty
(80) chains; thence West eighty (80) chains
to point of commencement, containing 640
acres,  more  or less.
(Signed) JOHN MASON LACEY.
Located thc Sixth day of January,  1916.
March 2nd, 191''-
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
RICHMOND
TAKE NOTICE that JOHN MASON
LACEY, llroker, of thc Cily of Vancouver.
B. C, intends to apply for permission I'1
prospect for Coal, Petroleum and Natural Gas
under  the  following described  lauds:
Comemnclng at a post planted at the South-
East corner of Section Fifteen (15), Range
Pis in) Wesl. lllock Four (4) North, Group
One (1) New Westminster District; the'uv
North eighty 180) chains; thence West
eighty (80) chains; thence South eighty (81"
chains; thence East eighty (8(1) chains tn
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
(Signed) JOHN MASON LACEY.
Located the Sixth day of January, 1916.
March 2nd, 1916-

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