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The British Columbia Chinook May 29, 1915

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Array ^v
^P'JjOLUMBlA
Exclusive Late Saturday Night War News Supplied to the Chinook by the United Press Association
Vol. IV, No. 3���Established 1911
VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA.  10.10 O'CLOCK, SATURDAY NIGHT.  MAY 29, 1913
Price Five Cents
Death Claims A
Victim of Dominion
Trust Swindle
DEPOSITOR IN VANCOUVER'S DEFUNCT FINANCIAL INSTITUTION PASSES AWAY AFTER
MONTHS OF SUFFERING
F
ROM California last week came the word that a woman
(Special United Press Telegram) I form.   They expressed hope that the Americans would be
WASHINGTON, D. C, May 29, 7.30 p.m.���That re-! convinced that Germany has justice on her side.
very' lations between the United States and Germany are strain-
prominent in Vancouver through her association with various j ed to the breaking point as a result of the reply of Germany j BERLIN, May 29 (via Wireless to   London).���Gen-
patriotic organizations, and because of the fact that she had'to the United States note protesting against Germany's eral Mackensen's .great net is closing upon Prezemysl, and
been a resident of the city and province for many years, passed away! submarine warfare against merchant vessels was admitted j a great Austro-German army is within a few miles of the
after months of suffering in comparative poverty in one of the hospi- '< bY lhe State Department tonight. j Prezemysl-Lemberg railway.    Despite some recent rever-
hh nf il,,t rlh,    TK�� t,.,������J��� ���f fUQ ���;���   t-     ��� i.   . i   l     J        A summary of the German reply as sent by Ambassa-, ses, the Germans believe that the fall of the Galician for-
tals ol that city.    1 he tragedy ol the situation is accentuated when it i ,     ��� . ,    ,   ,    _ l J r ��� ,   J   , .      r       I.
j    ����� j .i  . i     .i ���      , ii.    dor Gerard reached the Department of State late this after- tress is near,
is understood that less than a year ago, or in other words, when the I noon    It proved that sugestions of the United press cor. I Official statements from the war office tonight repor-
Dommion Trust Company was flourishing, she considered herself a|respondent in Berlin that the note, while friendly, was in ted an entire German regiment wiped out in the fighting
wealthy woman through the savings of a lifetime of toil and enter-j effect a blunt refusal of American contentions, were in ev- North-east of Prezsyml. Official German despatches paid
prise and self-denial.   It was typical of this woman who all her life !ery way the truth. tribute to the Russian defence but declared the   Austro-
had preached the doctrine of patronizing home industries and who \ Arrti-American expressions printed in many of the of- 'Germans were rolling into the encircled fortress. The
with tongue and pen labored unceasingly to give publicity to our glo- ificial PaPers in Berlin today came as a forerunner of   the; Slavs are fighting as they fought before Warsaw but with
,Cf u���, ,u ���      n VI  c \    IV    German reply to the note, the contents of which are receiv- i less success.   They are not only fighting to save Prezsyml
 ,"r"    olli:il"a ing the attention of the President, who is at this hour clos-; but perhaps all Galicia for the Czar.
eted with Secretary Bryan and high officials of the Gov- Despite the obstinate nature of their defence they are
ernment. I being forced back yard by yard in the tri-angular shaped
* *        *        * * * *        * | valley between the San and Vosnia rivers.
BERLIN, May 29.���Counter proposals for further ne- j The rough hillside and plain are littered with the Prus-
jgotiations over Germany's reply to the American note are;sian dead. Austro-German losses hav,: been heavy, but
1 already o ntheir way to Washington. small as compared with the toll of deat'i in the ranks of the
The full text will not^e formally given to the public j Slavs.    General Mackensen has swept' the region   south-
Truly W. J. Bowser and the government of British Columbia untu noon tomorrow but the main features are a proposal iward t0 the very ��ates o* Prezsyml,/the fiercest shell fire
have a lot to answer for, but in spite of their proven callousness to the;that the two Governments first agree on the statement of jthe Galician battle front has ever known.
suffpn'ncrq nf thP vlriimi nf ikpi- inio,,;^,,,, ������fi ��� i        j   i.. t        i facts regarding the character of the Lusitania when attack- I*
sunenngs or tne victims or their iniquitous methods, we doubt if even     ���>,,,-. , ,   ,. ,. . r>rii\/rT?   i\/t���.   on      a_  a    j. ���     Il   j i
.v    ���     ,.    ir.,,,,, ir        j    ���. ,,., ed by the German submarine, before proceeding to the gen-!        ROME. May 29.���An Austrian hydro-aeroplane was
they realized last fall the appalling and widespread m.sery which was eral question of Germany's submarine policy. i captured off the Italian coast and the-crew made prisoners,
to be caused by the collapse of the Dominion Trust Company, which j        The note contains a complete disavowal of attacks up- j ** was announced.
they allowed to plunder investors despite laws passed for their pro-J on the American steamers Gulf Light and Cushing and the j * * * * * * *
lection.    "Kaiser Bill" has been hanged in effigy for ordering the , German promise to compensate their owners. | GENEVA, May 29.���It was rerJorted here today that
swking of the Lusitania, but are not public servants who allow their I        The note expresses Germany's regret of the   loss   of jthe Zeppelin which raided Southend-Jpn-Sea, near London,
rious province, that she should invest her all in a
institution, and when the Dominion Trust exploded, she found herself beggared overnight. To her everlasting praise be it said that she
remarked that what hurt her most was not the loss of her money, although it was all she had in the world, but the fact that her confidence
in the institutions of British Columbia was forever destroyed.
v * *
constituents' fortunes to be shipwrecked and their lives   cut
equally deserving of blame?
short
i American lives in the Lusitania disaster and the deaths of; several days ago, was destroyed by a British   shell   while
While the lad
* * *
ay in question was one of the pioneers of the Can-
Americans aboard the liner Falaba.
Suggestions are made that if the   first   negotiations
find that the two governments are not in accordance, the
, ,.    .      ,       ���      i      ,    I,  ��� i questions then in controversy be referred to a court of ar-
boo country, and had not been in robust health for some time, she had : bitration
reached that golden period of life when one looks forward to many | Afew hours after Germany's reply was handed Am-
years of quiet enjoyment���travel, intercourse with friends, literary bassador Gerard at 1 0a.m. today, the note was en route to
work and social pleasures.   It can be imagined therefore that the news! Copenhagen, having been translated and coded by Embas-
of her death came as a shock to her friends in the city who looked i8? Secretary.. It cleared the wires to Copenhagen late this | torn.   The chief office'rYndHxteen^other run were -ul^.l
afternoon and was presumably upon its way to the Amen- up by trawlers and landed at Falmouth.   They said that the
sailing over the North Sea.
* * # *       (  * * * *
LONDON, May 29.���Sixteen rlen of the British
steamer Ethiope which was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine, are missing. It is relieved that they are
drifting in the open sea in small boats.
The Ethiope was bound from Hull to Africa when run
down by a German under-sea raider and sunk to the bot-
foiward to enjoying her friendship for a long time to come.
sp   ��p   Sfi
Those who were best acquainted with the deceased, say that
although an excellent business woman, she had implicit confidence
in the late W. R. Arnold, and at his request placed the entire administration of her affairs in his hands, giving the various deeds and documents to him without even the formality of a receipt. When the
crash came practically everything she possessed was inextricably
tied up, and it is said that she aged twenty years within a few weeks.
Anxious for her life, her friends persuaded her to try a warmer climate and in response to their urgings she went south shortly before
Christmas. So great, however, had been the shock which she received through the failure of the trusted institution, that her mind
never recovered its usual clearness and balance, and that this, in conjunction with the pecuniary troubles into which she suddenly found
herself plunged, was the means of hastening the end there is no reason to doubt.
'Here lies a victim of W. J. Bowser and the Provincial Government" might well be her obituary. It is a sad commentary upon (he
administration of affairs in British Columbia that one of the pioneers
of the west, who had preceeded the railroad in the Cariboo country,
who had honestly made a large fortune through her enterprise and
faith in the country, should now sleep in a foreign land, far from the
city she loved so well. Of course her body will ultimately be interred here, for her friends are determined to perform this sacred obligation to the dead. And as for her it might well be said, to use
Shakespeare's words, "After life's fitful fever she sleeps well." Our
duty is now to the living���to see that an iniquitous government which
has waxed fat through its depredations and abuse of power shall be
forever swept from office. If progress in British Columbia must
have its martyrs, let us prove that their lives are not sacrificed in vain.
can embassy at London tonight.   From thence it was cab-' submarine appeared off the bow of the Ethiope    The Ger-
led to Washington tonight. . [ man ordered her to stop, then gave the crew five minutes
A semi-official statement has been made that the re- to take to the boats. All had barely got over the side when
ply "is polite but leaves room for further negotiations," the steamer was shaken by a terrific explosion and went
came from official circles. I down.
******** * * * * * * * *
LONDON, May 29.���Berlin and Copenhagen advices | CHICAGO, ILL. ��� The Italian Government today
to the Exchange Telegraph tonight said that Germany's re- purchased from Chicago packers 6,000,000 pounds of beef,
ply to the United States is worded in the   most   friendly it was announced today.
&l!S^3MR^I55>!-35-5355JJ.5S5&^3?55S5JG��3S'5R5!
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WMUMgjj
^TONIGHT'S SCORES
At ABERDEEN
VANCOUVER 	
Engle and Vance,; Hunt and Check.
R. H. E.
5���7���2
1���7���2
At SEATTLE    7���10���3
SPOKANE      3���3���1
Mails and Cadman; Salveson and Altman.
At VICTORIA     8���9���0
TACOMA       3���8���2
McHenrv and Hoffman; Peterson and Stevens.
SALMONBELLIES TASTE DEFEAT
VANCOUVER'S TEAM LOOKS LIKE CHAMPIONS
WITH NEW FACES IN THE LINE-UP
Before a record crowd at Athletic Park today the Vancouver Lacrosse team handed a defat to the Westminster
Salmonbellies to the tune of ten to seven. The feature of
the game was the star playing of Roberts and Donihee,
Roberts scoring five of Vancouver's ten goals. Spring was
the star for Westminster. It looks like professional lacrosse
will once more win the favor of the local fans. Lester Par-
tick again had the game well in hand, much to the satisfaction of the crowd.
SCORE���
* Total
VANCOUVER    2���3���2���3   ���   10
WESTMINSTER   1���2���0���4   ���     7
dtl
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II TWO
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
SATURDAY, M.V,  20, W\5
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W������M
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You need a knowing druggist to fill your prescriptions
just as much as you need a knowing doctor to find out what's
the matter with you and tell you what to take. When your
doctor writes your prescriptions, bring them to us and know
that you will get them filled right with first-class, pure, fresh
drugs.
We  never make a mistake.   We never substitute.
Come to OUR Drug Store
THE BEST DRUG STORE
BURNS DRUG COMPANY, LTD.
Phone 3902
732 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.
===== ,_.__,=i=M;j..S! I)
What Shall We Do With War Babies ?
A BIG NATIONAL PROBLEM WHICH MUST BE MET BY STATESMANLIKE ACTION
S'
MONEY TO LOAN
In Multiples of $5,000 at 8 per cent, on
inside revenue producing business property.
Our client will only consider propetty that
is now paying its way.
CANADIAN   FINANCIERS TRUST CO.
HEAD OFFICE, Sj39 HASTINGS ST. W.      VANCOUVER, B. C.
Ritrick Donnelly, General Manager.
*i=
#
"Nature Tetjh"
and skilled}1
service
My "Nature Teeth" which are entirely different from ordinary
artificial teetlj, because they are built into the mouth to match
Nature's own; in size and shape and exact tint���my skilled service and modern equipment���my absolute guarantee of painlessness, botj during and following all dental work ��� these
things       ���
-cost no more
Read these Prices
Full   Set   of   Nature   Teeth,   upper   or
Lower      $10.00
Gold   Crowns        5.00
Bridge Work, per tOOth        5.00
Gold   Fillings,   per  tcotli        2.00
Porcelain fillings, per tooth .. 1.50
Armalgam Fillings, per tooth .. 1.50
Painless Extraction, per tooth ,.     ,50
than ordinary dentistry
WM. S.HALL
Licentiate  Dental   Surgery
Doctor   Dental   Surgery
Member   Royal   College   Dental   Surgeons
212  STANDARD  BANK  BLDG.
Seymour 4679
mmmmummmmum 	
PURE MILK DAIRY CO. \
Pure Pasteurized Milk anil Cream delivered daily to all
parts of the city
Try Our BUTTER MILK, fresh daily.     It aids digestion.
���    Our CREAM is the Purest.   Our WHIPPING CREAM the    ��
U Richest
��� Also dealers in BUTTER and EGGS
M   Office and Store     -     522 BROADWAY EAST
I   Plant        - 515 TENTH  AVENUE EAST
���II!
mi
PHONE SEYMOUR 900
MacDONALD, HAY & WEART
BARRISTERS,   SOLICITORS,   ETC.
1012 Standard Bank Bldg. Vancouver, B.C.
International Correspondence Schools
W. H. Coulter, Mgr.
ID
Room 10, Burn* Block 18 Hasting* Street West
1NCE the governments of the different countries have started
mobilizing their forces, innumerable young girls the world over
find themselves in the position of Marie-Odile, in the play of
that name, who some lime after the sojourn of the soldier in the convent, exclaims in her innocence, "A miracle has happened to me;
God has sent me a child."
What to do with the war babies, the first consignment of whom
is about due to arrive here, is a question which is confronting those in
authority in Vancouver as it is elsewhere. This is only one of the
many exceptional situations created by the present war, and that the
powers that be will find some effective means of coping with it, as
they already have with the financial situation, the care of the wounded, the securing of necessary supplies and ammunition, and the other
problems of the war, there is no reason to doubt.
* * *
Alas! the lass who loves a soldier. The period of her courtship
is brief and troubled. The day of departure arrives all too quickly
and although he may look forward with curiosity and eagerness for
the excitements of foreign travel and the camaraderie of the camp
and the trenches, she has nothing ahead of her but loneliness and uncertainty as to the fate of her lover. While under ordinary circumstances she would be settling down after the bliss of courtship and
the honeymoon period to the happy routine of married life, she finds
ever before her the question "Will he come back? Will my child
have a father?" Yes, it is the woman who pays, always the woman
who pays.
THE LURE OF THE UNIFORM
In all ages the soldier has been a popular idol and an especial
favorite with women, nor is this to be wondered at, for in addition to
the halo of romance which in the mind's eye adorns those ready and
willing to sacrifice their lives on the altar of their country's honor,
they represent, physically, the very cream of the nation. And, as
everybody knows, robust health is the greatest factor in winning the
love of woman���woman who is ever dreaming not of herself nor of
her husband, but of her children���the coming race.
Our Canadian soldiers, especially those from British Columbia,
have excited the most admiring comments on account of their physique
and smart appearance, and it is therefore only natural that they should
have worked havoc with the fair sex during the period of mobilization in Vancouver. Since the beginning of the war and for the first
time in the history of Western Canada, any number of uniformed
men have been seen on our streets and in the cafes, and the modern
uniform is one which shows a well-built man to best advantage.
Bravery is a characteristic of man which the opposite sex are quick
to recognize and that our boys possess that quality has already been
demonstrated on the blood-sodden fields of Europe. Can we, therefore, blame some of our young women for a willingness to sacrifice
their chastity, infinitely precious though it would be under ordinary
circumstances, for what is in our country's hour of need the higher
duty of replenishing and perpetuating the race, the vitality of which
must otherwise be greatly impaired through the enormous losses of
the battlefield. From the most ancient times, long before the pyramids were built, or Caesar conquered Britain, man's function was to
fight and woman's to bear children, and sociologists and psychologists claim that in periods of martial enthusiasm like the present, women temporarily lay the rules and conventions of society aside and
act in obedience to the higher law.
* * *
ARE WAR MARRIAGES DESIRABLE?
The governments of several European nations have taken the
bull by the horns and officially encouraged "war marriages," which
are celebrated frequently on the brink of departure for the front, after a courtship which may have lasted for years or only for a few days,
according to circumstances.
The moral advantage of the war marriage seems to be that if
a child is born there can be no question as to its legitimacy, nor can
the finger of Mrs. Grundy be pointed in scom at the unfortunate mother, whose lot is hard enough in all conscience. Nor are the material advantages less important; the wife receives a portion of her husband's wage, and should he fall in battle, will inherit his property, if
any, and perhaps be the recipient of a pension from the government
which will aid her in bringing up and educating her child.
The disadvantage of the war marriage apply chiefly in the case
of the husband returning from the front, for it is quite possible, if
there is any truth in the old saying that to marry in haste is to repent
at leisure, that not a few of the brides would be quite disillusioned
on better acquaintance with their husbands. The man who appeared
almost a god in his natty uniform, ready to defend his country from a
foreign foe or to carry fire and sword into neighboring countries,
would likely be prosaic and commonplace enough in civilian garments
following the peaceful vocation of farming or cobbling, and it is conceivable that his wife might often vituperiously regret a hasty alliance
with one who followed the profession of arms.
So far as is known, the Canadian government has not officially
urged the advisability of "war marriages" upon those enlisting for
active service, nor have steps been taken lo prepare for the "war ba-
bies," the fruit of the irregular unions taking place, thc support of
whom and their mothers is, under the circumstances, a sacred duty
which the people of Vancouver will undoubtedly face in the right
spirit when the time comes. i
SHOCKING MRS. GRUNDY
Mrs. Grundy has the reputation of being a lady who is easily
shocked, and of course we expect her to blush and to raise her hauls
aloft in holy horror when the subject of "war babies" is mentioned.
But Mrs. Grundy has a lot to answer for, and those people who believe that life is too important to be taken seriously will not pay much
attention to her expostulations, for babies are needed by the Empire,
badly needed, more badly needed, perhaps, than at any time in ihe
history of the grand old flag. It is a purblind civilization that sneers
at maternity, no matter how achieved, and the loveliest figure in the
gallery of high priestesses of humanity is the virgin mother of Bethlehem.
Satisfy the Public _
This is the object of every business house that     jjj
aims to be successful.   But to satisfy the public it is necessary, first of all, to have something the public needs.
Bread is one necessity in every household.   Our business is thc making, and selling, of   bread.      Thc    name
"Dominion" on a loaf of bread means the same as "Linton"     H
on a package of tea, or "Stetson",on a felt hat.   Any housekeeper who has tried "Dominion" will gladly recommend its     |H
flavor and quality.    When deciding on buying bread for
thc summer months, why not decide on having only the
best bread?   It costs no more, and is the only method of insuring satisfaction.    Health is a vital matter.    You cannot     H
afford to disregard its rules.    Violate the laws of nature
and nature will have revenge.   If you desire to be well, and
to keep well, you will find it necessary to use food that is
clean and wholesome.   Order a "Dominion" loaf from your     jtt
grocer, and if he can't supply you, phone us Fairmont 872     jjj
and have our wagon call.
Dominion Bakery    |
giffin & McDonald,
Proprietors. HI
Dr. W. J. CURRY
DENTIST
Ring up Seymour 2354 for Appointment
Suite 301 Dominion Building, Vancouver, B.C.
CANYON  VIEW  HOTEL
CAPILANO, NORTH VANCOUVER, B.C.
II. LARSON, Manager. P. LARSON. Proprietor.
Elevation  625  feet. One hour's  trip  from  Vancouver. Telephone  146
SCENIC   DELIGHTS.   FISHING.   HUNTING.   MOUNTAIN   CLIMBING,   Etc.
Unequalled Retort for Holiday, long or short.    Family Rooms
e�� suite with special rate.
Modern appointments throughout, spacious grounds,  high-class service  at moderate
rates.    Easy trail to top ol Grouse Mountain, altitude 3,000 feet. '���
SATURDAY, MAY 29, 1915
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
THREE
���
^nfi
STOVEWOOD
14 inch inside fir
$2 so per load $2-59
Coast Lumber & Fuel Co., Ltd.
Phone Fair. 2500        Phone High. 226        Phone Fraser 41
Tt    Cost of Operating  Electric
Household Appliances is
Merely Nominal.
The actual cost of current for Electric Household Appliances is
out of all proportion to the comfort and convenience provided, this
being  especially  true  during  the  summer months.
Look over this table of hourly cost of operation.
Coffee Percolator
3%   cents  per  hour
Electric Grill
4 to Sy2 cents per hour
Electric Iron
4 to S cents
per hour
Electric Washer
3  cents  per  hour
Electric Toaster
5  cents  per  hour
N.B.���Appliances used for cooking are operated only a fraction of
an hour per meal. The cost of others depends upon the duration
of their use.
We will be pleased to demonstrate these appliances at our salesrooms.
B. C. ELECTRIC
Carrall and Hastings St.
1138 Granville St. (near Davie)
The
Telephone
THE ADVANCE AGENT OF
Comfort and Convenience
FORMS  A  CLOSER  UNION  OF HOME,
BUSINESS AND FRIENDS.
FOR A LIMITED TIME, BUSINESS AND
RESIDENCE TELEPHONES WILL BE
INSTALLED UPON PAYMENT OF $5.00
RENTAL IN ADVANCE.
FOR PARTICULARS CALL UP
SEYMOUR 6070.
CONTRACT DEPARTMENT
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
W
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
AH trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St, Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A, Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass. Agent, Vancouver.
Criminal Libel Action
Against Chinook Editor
Follows Gold-Flag Incident
* * * H-
Gold Resents Charge that he Insulted
British Flag���Preliminary Hearing
Comes Up Tuesday Afternoon
Edward Gold, the present reeve of South Vancouver, has commenced criminal libel proceedings against
George M. Murray, editor of the CHINOOK. Mr.
Murray was served with a summons Wednesday to appear before Magistrate T. F. Johnson, at the Municipal
Mall, for a preliminary hearing.
Upon application from the defence, the hearing was
adjourned until Tuesday afternoon of next week.
It is understood that the charge, if proven, will have
serious consequences, the maximum penalty being two
years' imprisonment.
The case is an outgrowth of recent sensational developments in municipal circles in South Vancouver.
The summons served upon Mr. Murray sets out that
he "did publish in a certain newspaper called the
CHINOOK, and dated Saturday, May 22, A. D.,
1915, a defamatory libel on, of and concerning Edward
Gold, he the said George M. Murray well knowing the
same to be false, which libel was contained in the said
newspaper in an article commencing as follows:
"With a picture of the British flag and with the
words:
"The British Flag Insulted by the Reeve of South
Vancouver."
"And which libel was written with the sense of imputing thai the said Edward Gold insulted the British
Flag and was disloyal lo His Majesty the King of Great
Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond
the Seas, and that the said Edward Gold was an alien
enemy and which libel Was published without legal justification or excuse and was likely lo injure the said Ed-
ard Gold by exposing him to hatred, contrary lo the
form of the Statute in such case made and provided.
'These are therefore to command you in His Majesty's name to be and appear before me on Friday, the 28th
day of May, A.D. 1915, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon,
etc., etc.
"Signed, T. F. Johnson, Police Magistrate in and for
the Municipality of South Vancouver."
Mr. Murray was undefended at the preliminary
hearing, his solicitor, Mr. Joseph Martin, being out of
the city.
The full text of the article, which was headed by
the British Flag, and which contained the alleged libel,
appeared in last Saturday's paper and ran as follows:
THE BRITISH FLAG INSULTED BY REEVE
OF SOUTH VANCOUVER
Clacking his teeth together, the Mad King of South Vancouver made the following statement at the council meeting this
week: "The CHINOOK���hal I am on their trail. The dirty
rag.   I vill haf dem out off pissness in von week!"
There is only one way in which the Mad King can injure
this family publication. He might mount some of the guns that
the Huns are, using so vigorously against our boys in France
upon the parapets of Von Kalenberg's hall and throw a few gas
bombs into the office.
The Mad King insulted every Britisher in British Columbia
when he stated at a public meeting some time ago that "the
British born of South Vancouver came here from England because in that country they had to live on the smell of an old rag"
���in other words, the Union Jack.
Fine language for the first citizen of the second largest municipality in British Columbia to use.
South Vancouver has sent more than a thousand men to the
firing line to give their blood for the flag which is protecting
the Von Kalenbergs and the Golds.
What! must we stand this from the impudent and disloyal
fellow?
Did we British born come to this country because in England
we had to "Live on the smell of an old rag?"
Is there not enough manhood left in South Vancouver to
stop the mouth of this disloyal, this ill-bred, this contemptible
cad whose agents stand at the doors of the Municipal Hall and
hurl insults at our women!
News of the Province
own
LAdL-ADF   SFFii   is brewed from these
choice Fraser Valley hops grown at Chilliwack and
Agassiz.    We   buy   over   110,000  pounds  of   these
hops^ yearly   for   this   beer   alone.     Hops   are   a
splendid nerve tonic���so is this pure beer.
Vancouver Breweries Limited
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
MEMBERS VANCOUVER STOCK EXCHANGE
MEMBERS VANCOUVER GRAIN EXCHANGE
MEMBERS OF CALGARY OIL EXCHANGE
DEALERS IN ALL ACTIVE CALGARY. STOCKS, BONDS, ETC.
OIL STOCKS
BOUGHT   AND   SOLD
Stock Department, Seymour 6913
EXCHANGE BUILDING,  142 HASTINGS WEST
FAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General  Agency  Transatlantic  Steamship  Lines
C. B, Jenney, G. A. P. D.
Phone:   Sey.  8134 527   Granville  Street
LOOK OVER LAST WINTER'S
GARMENTS
If yon did not have your garments
cleaned before you put them away for
the summer get them out now. Every
dress suit or overcoat that is not worn,
threadbare  you   should   send  to  us  for
DRY  CLEANING   AND   SAVE
CLOTHING  BILLS
Our perfect cleaning and repairing
service is the most wonderful saver of
"new clothes money" on earth because it
will keep every garment in its new-
beauty  until   worn  out.
Pan-Co-Vesta Club
Seymour  2834
547   HOWE   STREET
A. E. Harron
J. A. Harron
G. M. Williamson
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS
Vancouver���Office and Chapel: 1034 Granville St.     Phone Sey. 3486
North Vancouver���Office and Chapel: 122 Sixth St. W.     Phone 134
Corporal Arthur Waddington and
Bugler   Arthur   Davidson   of   Nanai-
mo, have been wounded at the front.
* * *
Word has been received that Private R. W.| Horton, formerly of
Three Valley, has been wounded.
His father, who is now living in Edmonton, was shipper for the Mundy
Lumber Co. for six or seven years at
Three Valley.
Mr. and Mrs. Copping, wealthy
manufacturers of Toronto and Peter-
boro, who arc reported lost on the
Lusitania, arc relatives of Dr. J. H.
Hamilton, of Revelstoke.
* * *
Thc Queen's Hotel, of Phoenix, has
been taken over by Thos. Oxley, of
Chase, who will nuke substantial improvements to this well-known hostelry.
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can  supply  your   needs   at  right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right at Station)
Lieutenant James G. Ross, who had
charge of a machine gun battery, was
wounded in thc last engagement near
Ypres. Lieutenant Ross is a native
of hmbro, Ontario, the son of D. R.
Ross, who has many friends and acquaintances throughout ��� British Columbia. Two other brothers are at the
front���Major J.  M.   Ross,  second  in
One  cent  per   Fowl,  per  Week
Poultry   Keepers
will get best results from constant
use of
"ir&B"
Poultry Spice
And  EGG   PRODUCER
A Hen tonic, Pick-me-up and
Diop-cm-down
Once Tried Always Used!
Guaranteed   to   produce   results,   if
fed   according   to   directions   (in
every sack)
3 lb. sack, 45c.    &/, lb. sack, 90c
100 lb. sack, $12.00
Manufactured in Vancouver.
Everywhere
Sold
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for public meetings, dances,  etc., to Let
Apply W. J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
command of Tobin's Tigers, the crack
Vancouver regiment, and Captain Robert Ross, who is attached to an eastern  Canadian regiment.
Privates Keith, Arnold and Royds,
of the Chilliwack district, have been
killed in action at the front
tfc
sWir��%<*i^Mitfwl-.l- .
FOUR
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
SATURDAY, MAY 29, 1915
1
a i
���
u
yi
.
;'.��
,.if
Glazed Cement
Sewer Pipe
Is the choice of property owners in
every city where its value has been
demonstrated. It gives good service
and has durability.
0*��*njnion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.
,.ONT STREET WEST
Phone Fairmont 122
A chiel's ainang ye takin' notes
An' faith he'll prent it."���Burns.
APLE LEAF DAIRY
PURE PASTURIZED MILK
We arc Milk and Butter Specialists
A. Tommason, Mgr. Phone Bay. 1417
1935-2nd AVE. WEST
A phone call will have prompt attention
COAL!    COAL!
OUR POLICY is to supply only fuel of the highest grade. We pay
special attention to screening and weight, and delivery is mode by our
own experienced drivers.
WOOD
We also have a small quantity of dry kindling wood for sale.
MacDONALD, MARPOLE CO., LTD.
Phone Seymour 210
427 SEYMOUR ST., City
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
19��9 ALBER��� CT. TELEPHONE  HIGH.   131
ENGINEERS, MACHINISTS AND FOUNDE-RS
IKON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND Sl'ECIA.-S
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTION'
Keeler's Nursery
Grower and Importer of Plants, Bulbs, Roots and Shrubs
Cut  Flowers and  Design
Work a specialty.
Flowering and Ornamental Shrubs for Spring and
Fall  planting.
One hundred varieties of
Roses  of  Choice   Sorts
and  three  hundred  varieties   of   Dahlias.
esse
Phone Fairmont 817
���   YOU WILL FIND OUR PRICES MODERATE
Cor. FIFTEENTH AVE. and MAIN ST  :: MOUNT  PLEASANT
VIOLIN EXPERT
Old and valuable violins carefully repaired.
GuStars and mandolins repaired. Bows rehaircd.
Violins bought.
JAMES TAYLOR
531  RICHARDS ST. Phone  Seymour 3415
WE seem to be al Last in the way of getting lined up for some relief from our unemployment problem. There arc a very large
number of unfortunate Russians stranded in our midst who arc
urgently wanted in their own country in this hour of its need. Steps
are being taken to have these shipped home by the first available steamer
for Vladivostok. Numerous Italians are being called hack to serve their
country now that she has ranged herself with us in the war. Mr. George ||
Barnes, M.P., and a colleague, are now in Canada on a mission from the
British government to recruit and transport mechanics for service in the
Old Country in making war munitions. An effort is in progress here
to bring these commissioners through to the coast lo engage men here.
There are in Vancouver and vicinity from 1700 to 2000 idle mechanics
whose services would be invaluable in Britain at the present crisis and
who could earn big money over there. They should immediately he transferred. The Looker-On hopes for thc day when there will b a department of labor in the British government charged with the duty of transferring labor from one part of thc Empire where it is in excess to other
parts where it is wanted. This would he sound economics and would go
a long way towards banishing unemployment within the Empire. The
Pacific Great Eastern Railway arc stated to be on the eve of taking on
1000 men for construction work on the section of their line north from jjj
Lillooet. They have recently arranged for $2,300,000 through the Dominion Government. It is stipulated that only British subjects must be
engaged for this work and it is said a government official will stand
over Mr. Pat Welch and sec that this proviso is observed.     There is
much need for this check in view of the people involved.    Between one
*
thing and another therefore, thc outlook for labor   seems    somewhat
brighter.
* * *
But for the deplorable fact that the finances of this City have been
muddled by incompetent and unbusinesslike management we would not
he in thc mess we arc. As an example of the present position, the
Lookcr-On cites the following. Up rill recently Vancouver municipal
bonds stood regularly on the London Stock Exchange quotations at
98 1-2. Since then wc have sold bonds at 88. By a stroke of the pen,
as it were, wc have depreciated the investments of those who put their
money on us by 10 per cent, and made these bonds unsaleable. They
have now been withdrawn from the Exchange List! No more money
will be got by Vancouver from the Old Country. Then again our Civic
Financiers (?) have allowed thc taxes to fall into arrears until these
have attained the colossal proportions of over $1,800,000, with the certain prospect of the arrears reaching $3,000,000 this year! The banks
refuse any further overdrafts until a tax sale takes place and this our
council is scared to order. Their resource is to put forward money bylaws and heap up more debt on an already overburdened community.
Suppose these bylaws are turned down! What then? We sure are in
a critical condition.
��� GET YOUR ���
CAMPING TENTS
Camp Furniture, Canvas Hammocks, and other Camping Supplies from
C. H. JONES & SON Ltd.
Manufacturers
CANVAS GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
PHONE SEY. 740. 110 ALEXANDER ST.
Opposite North Vancouver Ferry Landing
THIS SPACE RESERVED
for the
I
South Vancouver Milk Co.   I
Phone Fair. 1602 L
Watch This Space Next Week
Theatrical Notes
Pantages Theatre
One of the latest of the prominent
legitimate stars to enter vaudeville is
Miss Sarah Paddcn\iml the Pantages
management was fortunate enough to
book her for a tour over the circuit
in her brilliant playlet, "The Little
Shepherd nf Bargain Row." Consequently ^be will appear at the masthead of the coming hill at the popular
Hastings Street theatre. Miss Padden
has created a furore in all thc cities
in which she has appeared in "The
Little! Shepherd," and her coming is
an event which will be hailed with
great satisfaction by all who are wise
to theatrical matters.
PANTAGES
Unequalled       Vaudeville      Meana       fantagri
Vaudrvllle
E.  D.  Graham,  Resident  Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
DREAMLAND
H.  H.  DEAN,  Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
ALL THAT IS BEST IN THE
MOTION PICTURE WORLD
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
All the Latest in Motion Pictures
SOUTH HILL PALACE OF
VARIETIES
(Three blocks south of Municipal Hall)
ALL THE LATEST WAR SCENES AND BEST OF
MOTION PICTURES
AMATEUR NIGHTS, WEDNESDAYS AND SATURDAYS
Some time ago, in these columns, thc Looker-' )u dealt with a proposed money bylaw which was tabled at thc City Council to provide
$150,000 for an addition to the present discredited City Hall to be built
on the existing site. In view of the fact that the citizens had been asked
a year ago to vote on the matter of a civic centre and had decided for
the location running south from the Old Court House grounds, the proposal referred lo was nothing short of an insult to their intelligence.
Do thc Mayor and corporation rank the sense of the citizens of Vancouver so low as to imagine they can't maintain continuity of purpose for
one short year? The Looker-On advised them then not to play fast and
loose in this fashion with the decisions of the citizens. He is glad now
to note that his advice has been taken and that the foolish proposal is
not to be included in thc bylaws about to be submitted to vote.
* * *
We Vancouverites pat ourselves on thc back as being in possession
of the finest port in the world.   That, sure, wc have. Land-locked harbors
capable of sheltering the fleets of thc nations.   The jumping-off. place
for the Orient and its countless millions needing the products of this
favored Province, and the fruitful prairies beyond the Rockies.    But
where arc the ships?   The waterfront presents mostly a desolation of
vacant wharves.   The Looker-On strolls around these frequently.   The
other day the visible shipping consisted only of a couple of coasting liners and an antedeluvian craft flying the Stars and Stripes.   Only that
and nothing more.   What is the matter with the port?   The world is
calling for our lumber, for our copper, for the wealth lying latent in our
land.   What intervenes between producer and consumer ?   We are told
it is want of ships to carry away our products.   That orders are plentiful, but bottoms are not available to ship them out. If this be so, it is
an opportunity for the Dominion government to promote a line of subsidized steamers from Eastern Canada to this coast via the   Panama
Canal.   The trouble is that little cargoe offers for this coast and vessels
chartered for outgoing cargoes have to come mostly in ballast.   Therefore they prefer going to the Gulf ports to the south of us where business is doing.   The fact is a port like Vancouver requires nursing.   A
subsidized line would help here.   If protection is ever justifiable it has
a legitimate sphere in this direction.    Meantime why cannot interned
enemy steamers be used for our necessities?   If maritime law forbids
the confiscation of these vessels they could be operated and the earnings
paid into a fund to be disposed of later on.   The prime necessity is to
get the use of every possible ship for the requirements of this coast and
to do it now.
Dorothy Vaughn, a dainty, delightful little lady with an irrepressible
charm of manner and a plentitudc of
prettiness will grace the programme
with a well selected group of songs
that haunt the memory. Her repertoire is all new and fresh as a daisy,
You wilbnot be able to resist Dorothy,
so why try.
A team of top notch comedians are
i riend & Downing, who have left a
trail of laughter around the world.
They can't help being funny, their wit
is spontaneous, and their jokes unhackneyed, They are sure hitters, in
fact Ty Cobb has nothing on them in
the average column. Jusl take a little
tip and a little trip to Pantages next
and find out for yourself that this is
true.
A sure enough musical novelty is
in prospect, the name heing "The
Rose Garden," and the interpreter!
are West St Van Siclen, They are
songbirds of the kind you rave about
and you may lie sure they will he a-
niong the favorites- with Vancouver
audiences, Ii they weren't good they
wouldn't be on this big, carefully selected bill.
The Rainbow trio have an unique
act which is entirely surrounded with
laughter. The blues and this triumvirate simply catt't exisl ill Ihe same
room, so begin gelling your things
on early so as not to miss these happy entertainers.
You can bet they're good if they're
Japanese for the children of Nippon
have the world beaten when it comes
to acrobatics and the allied sciences.
The Ishkawa Troupe arc Japanese,
and they are about the best that have
���sver sought Occidental audiences for
favor. They will add distinction and,
interest to the bill in large quantities.
In addition there will be the usual
fine showing of motion pictures.
THE DISTINGUISHED STAR
Miss Sarah Padden & Co.
IN
The Little Shepherd
of Bargain Row
6 ���  OTHER  GREAT ACTS ��� 6
Three shows daily 2.45. 7.20, 9.15
Admission���Matinees, 15c; nights,
15c and 25c; boxes, 50c.
FIGHTING  DISRASE   ON  THE
BATTLEFIELDS   n
Two carloads of pedigree blood
marcs were "tirchased at thc Coast
and will be used to stock the Hast*
ings Ranch in the Nicola Valley.
A Running Story
\
"Your wife is the best informed
woman I ever met. She seems to
be able to talk endlessly -on any
subject."
vYes, that's just the trouble^
there isn't any end."
When the history of this war come
io !>,��� written in all its phases, writes
Philip Glbbs to ihe London Chronicle, not ihe least absorbing chapter
will deal with ihe influence of medical science on  the fields of battle.
Il was with this thought that 1 went
recently lo the I'asteur Institute in
Paris lo see a ltian whose life work
lias had a profound effect in the pre
venlion of disease. This is Professor
Metchnikoff, whom all scientist:
would acknowledge, 1 think, to he tin
greatest  living bacteriologist;
I found the old man alone in his
laboratory, lie raised his hands when
I asked him lo tell me something
about the health of the French army,
and Ihe methods adopted to keep the
troops fne from disease.
"My business is not with war," he
said. "I have seen HOthino of thai
horror; and, as you see, I stay in m>
laboratory studying my microbes,"
Out of all this misery, however,''
said Professor MetchnikoC/, "one
thing is good���the health of our ar
mies in thc field is remarkable, apart
from typhoid, which is diminishing
rapidly, owing to the system of inoculation organized by your English
doctors. There is nothing in the nature of an epidemic, which might have'
been expected from a war with S'i
many millions of men in the field,
and so many corpses encumbering the
ground. This, indeed, is a victory
for science, though put to a sad use.'
It was not only'l'rof. Metchnikoff
but also from Prof. Roux, that I. oh
tained the cheering assertion that tin
health of the British and French ar
mies is wonderful, considering tin
hardships of thc campaign and tin
immensity of the operations.
They both agreed that this war en
tirely reversed the statistics obtains
from all previous wars.
"Former!.. said Prof. Roux, "th
number of killed and wounded ws
comparatively insignificant compare
with the number of those who die
or were put out of action by discasi
i his was seen, for example, in till
South African war, when the arm!
was swept by enteric. But in tli
present war the very opposite has ti
ken place. The number of killed an
wounded is enormously greater thn
that of men stricken with disease.
"This is a greater paradox and
great irony of modern science. Whi
scientific genius has brought the m;
cautery of death and destruction I
astounding perfection so that men a:
slain or wounded in prodigious nun
bers, so has science discovered no
means of keeping soldiers free fro
disease and healing them after the
wounds.!' ."SATURDAY, MAY 29, 1915
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
FIVE
British Columbia Chinook
PUBLISHED
Every' Saturday by the Greater Vancouver Puhliahera Limited
Gtorfc M. Murrif, Editor
HEAD OFFICE:
earner Thirtieth  Avenue  and  Main Street,  South  Vancouver,   B. C.
Bdltor'a Office Burnt Drug Co., Vancouver Block, Phone Sey. 5490
TELBPHONE: All departmenta Fairmont 1174
MIOHT CALLS Fairmont  1946 L
-BcfUtered   at  the  Poat  Office   Department,  Ottawa,   aa  Second  Claaa
Mall Matter
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
To ait pointa in Canada,  United Kingdom.  Newfoundland,  New
Zealand, and other British Poaaeaaiona:
$1.50 a Year
Poatafe to American, Europaai and other Foreign Countries, fi.M
���per year antra.
"The truth at ail timci firmly ataada
And shall (ram are to ate cadure."
EIGHTY LIQUOR LICENSE
APPLICATIONS
IN a recent issue of one of Vancouver's dailies
were set forward some eighty advertisements of
liquor concerns who are applying for renewals of
licenses.
On an opposite page appeared an interview with
the Attorney-General wherein that official stated
that he was about to visit Vancouver to personally
investigate the unemployment question.
Another page carried a statement from the Attorney-General to the effect that he was urging the
Federal authorities to intern all aliens employed in
the coal fields on Vancouver Island, with the double purpose in view of placing dangerous individuals
where they could do no harm to the country and
opening jobs for British-born workingmen.
Just what relation exists between the liquor business and the unemployment problem in British Columbia would be a subject worthy of the attention
���of the Attorney-General.
'THE VICTORIAN"
THE handsomest weekly paper printed west of
Toronto is "The Victorian," launched five
weeks ago at the Capital by Mr. F. E. Simpson,
veteran editor. "The Victorian" is printed upon
-expensive coated magazine paper, is well illustrated
and capably edited. It is unique among British
Columbia newspapers in that it is of interest to every
part of the Province. Mr. Simpson seems to keep
in touch with all the development from the Boundary to the Klondike, and every inch of his space is
used to set forward what in the opinion of the editor
of "The Victorian" are the best interests of British
Columbia.
COAL MINE STRIKE
ONE of the striking instances of the incapacity
of the McBride-Bowser government in an emergency was afforded in the case of the lengthy coal-
miners' strike on Vancouver Island, in connection
-with the Extension and Cumberland mines, owned
l>y Mackenzie and Mann. This is an instance which
has cost the people of the province close on half a
million dollars, to say nothing of the tremendous
loss in output, the reduction in revenue to the province from that source, and the sufferings and hardships endured by the miners and their families.
Most of these miners, it must not be forgotten, were
Britons, and among the finest class of workers in
British Columbia.
Through the dismissal of members of a gas committee���miners elected to report on the gaseous condition of workings���who were engaged in the mines
of the Canadian Northern magnates, labor troubles
were precipitated on the Island in the summer of
1912, although the miners had sent a deputation to
interview the premier and minister of mines before
proceeding to this course. The operators claim
that the men struck; the men assert that they were
locked out. Whatever the fact, it is indisputable
that the mines department made no effort to effect
conciliation, notwithstanding that the government
had been made aware that the law for the protection of the lives of the miners was not carried out.
The government up to this point was entirely to
blame, and the miners becoming incensed and under
provocation, extended the strike to Nanaimo and
South Wellington, with the result that riots and general disorder took place throughout the whole district, which necessitated calling out the militia. Had
the government taken proper steps at the right time,
and acted against the Mackenzie-Mann company,
and thus protected the miners, no strike would have
occurred. All the cost of the action that was taken,
the disturbances, the imprisonment of miners, the
starvation of families, would have been avoided if
British Columbia had had ministers with the ability
to see the right thing to do and the courage to do it.
The financial cost of this timidity and blundering
of the government will be very heavy in the sum
total. Part of it has been paid by the province,
while the sums which have been paid by the Dominion for the pay and maintenance of the militia are
a charge on the municipalities within which the militia operated, or on the province where their work
was done in unorganized districts. So far as the
figures are available the cost has been $270,527 to
lh? province and $187,857 to the Dominion, from
the time the trouble began in 1912 until March 31,
1914. There will be a considerable sum to add to
this, as the troops were in the field until the outbreak of the war and there were other expenses in
connection with the matter, legal and otherwise, in
the fiscal year ending on March 31 last.
In the capacity of strike-breakers for their Canadian Northern friends the McBride government involved the province in an expenditure of $47,100 up
to March, 1913. For Pinkerton detectives ���
sleuths imported from a foreign country to work a-
gainst Canadian citizens���there was paid $1,145,
for special constables at points on the Island $22,-
554, for special constables and their upkeep at New
Westminster $7,162, and for the lodging and transport of special constables on the Island $16,239.
For the twelve months which followed the figures
are, of course, much greater.
It took $126,502 to pay the special constables
employed in connection with the strike and the trials
of miners���some of these constables, by the way,
were anything but a credit to British Columbia���
and the lodging and fares of constables and prisoners came to $53,968. The Pinkerton detectives
that year cost $3,423. The trial of the strike prisoners, including the expenses of jurors, automobile
hire for jurors, counsel fees, interpreters, stenographers and other items, cost $35,666.   Fares for re-
umnifljuHit
AN APPEAL
TO FAIR-MINDED CITIZENS
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
THE CHINOOK IS PLAYING A
LONE HAND IN A FIGHT
FOR THE PEOPLE.
TODAY WE SEND OUT A CALL
FOR HELP TO THOSE WHO WISH
TO SEE THIS PAPER GO FORWARD,
A FREE AND FORCEFUL JOURNAL.
YOU CAN HELP US BY FILLING
OUT THIS COUPON.
The Greater Vancouver Publishers
LIMITED
4601  MAIN STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Send your paper weekly for nine months to
Name.
Addre
For which I enclose $ 1.00.
fugees from Extension and their maintenance aggregated $3,868.
While labor conditions on the Island were in this
state and a depression was setting in, as everyone
but the premier could see, the government was paying out considerable amounts, such as $ 14,682 to the
Salvation Army, to assist immigrants to reach a province in which the labor market was at the time congested and to still further augment the number of
unemployed to be looked after in the cities by charitable organizations.
The provision in the law for inspection by miners
has always worked well in Britain, as there the
mine operators co-operate with the men to disclose
all dangers and assist the gas committees to detect
explosive gases for the general interests of the companies and the men alike. For years the gas committees had to be appointed from among the men
employed in the particular mine to be inspected, but
this was later extended to include miners employed
at other collieries. To this the mine operators took
no objection, as it was not considered an interference by outside persons any more than the inspection
by the government inspectors.
There the mine operators union and the miners'
union work together in the carrying out of the requirements of the Coal Mines Regulation Act. But
here in British Columbia the miners are not permitted to organize, and the companies can avoid annoyance by dictating to the government. This makes an
independent inspection of mines all the more necessary, to avoid discrimination against gas committees
by the operators, especially where the coal companies are so closely connected with the government.
This must be provided if effective examination is to
be made of workings for gas, in the interests of the
safety of the miners.   Sir Richard McBride, as late
as the recent session, refused to consider an amendment to the law submitted to the House.
This is so manifest a reform that the Liberal party, if elected to office, will lose no time in having it
placed among the coal mines regulations.
In the legislature last year the Speaker of the
House came to the rescue of the government and
prevented free discussion of the strike and the
causes leading up to it. A resolution was placed
before the members, urging upon the government
that it take such action as would bring about a termination of the troubles. The Speaker ruled this
out of order as involving an expenditure of public
money, saving the administration from criticism and
showing at the same time a partizanship which ought
to have been remote from his high office.
KAMLOOPS LIBERAL CONVENTION
LIBERALS of the Cariboo district met in convention Thursday at Kamloops for the
purpose of selecting a candidate for the coming
federal campaign.
Reliable reports say that when Mr. Joseph
Martin's name was brought before the convention
it was not received with any great warmth.
Later in the proceedings Mr. Martin was allowed
to make a speech and his utterances stirred the men
of Cariboo to such a pitch that they cheered Mr.
Martin lustily.
It was announced that the convention was
adjourned sine die, the Cariboo Liberals believing
that to nominate so early in the game would not be
good politics.
It will be interesting to watch political developments in Cariboo during the next few months. The
appearance of Mr. Martin in that constituency is
sure to add ginger.
i   ai i
SMOKE A B. C. CIGAR
BRITISH COLUMBIA citizens should start in
supporting British Columbia manufactories by
buying the little things produced in this province.
Men who smoke cigars should bear in mind that
British Columbia manufactures the best cigars on the
market today. It is not necessary to mention the
brands but there are turned out in Vancouver and
New Westminster factories cigars of excellent
quality.
Local cigar makers have not the capital to enable
them to advertise widely and are therefore placed at
a disadvantage in competing with eastern factories.
Nor have they the money to employ flashy cigar
salesmen who put up at the best hotel in town and
dispense lavish hospitality by way of assisting their
goods into the market.
The cigar making industry in British Columbia
is today having a hard fight and many of that trade
are out of employment.
It is up to the citizens who smoke cigars to demand
B. C. cigars. In doing this they will form a habit
which will assist a desirable industry and when they
are confronted with the necessity of making larger
purchases will have a sure influence which will be
for the benefit of all local industries.
 1  aw  ���	
MOST COSTLY PROVINCE
T-HE GOVERNMENT of British Columbia
* costs each person in the province as much for
its maintenance as the other eight members of Con
federation do. It costs much more than does the
running of the Dominion and the three prairie prov
inces put together. Here are the figures as given by
Mr. G. G. McGeer, Liberal candidate in Richmond.   What do you think of them?
Expenditure of the Dominion per capita $14.45
Expenditure of Manitoba per capita     8.80
Expenditure of Alberta per capita     8.10
Expenditure of Saskatchewan per capita     6.70
Expenditure of Ontario per capita     3.80
Expenditure of Quebec per capita     4.15
Expenditure of New Brunswick per capita     4.00
Expenditure of Nova Scotia, per capita     3.75
Expenditure of Prince Edward Is. per capita    5.60
British Columbia'spends yearly $40.15 per head.
THE KAMLOOPS SENTINEL IS AFTER
MR. JOSEPH MARTIN
SOME critical writer with a memory and a taste
for useful suggestions has been commenting in the
London Daily Mirror on the disposition of the funds
drawn as a British M. P. by our esteemed friend
Mr. Joseph Martin, K.C. The general proposal
that the 400 pounds���say $1,950���should be contributed to the "war fund" seems a good one, but as
we are all one in the great campaign and there are
many agencies which help to swell the sinews of war,
our suggestion is that   the   proposed   contribution
I    For This Week Only
BI     We  will  make  up  from  any  material  in the     j|j
Bi house
LADIES'   SUITS   from $25 to $30   ���
Regular $30.00 to $40.00
GENT'S  SUITS  from  $18 to $25   ���
Regular $25.00 to $40.00
WORKMANSHIP THE BEST
SATISFACTION  GUARANTEED
I DUCK YUEN & CO.
952 Granville St. Phone Sey. 9280    jjj
should go back through B. C. channels, as a free-will
offering from one of the great fighters of the West.
As Mr. Martin is likely to devote his activities to this
centre���making it his headquarters we trust if he
should by any chance become the local member���it
will be a suitable spot in which to differentiate himself from some of the other wealthy patriots of the
province. We should be very pleased to add $650
to our now much neglected Belgian Relief Fund,
and believe excellent use could be made of a similar
sum by each of the other leading organizations for
national war service and charity���the Red Cross
Guild and the Patriotic and Relief Fund. Cheques
should bear war stamps.
��
BY THE WAY
���
not th:
ine own
"LET OTHERS PRAISE thee;
lips."
IT WOULD BE interesting if Sir Richard McBride came back to British Columbia and fired out
a bunch of his ministers and built up a new cabinet.
T   V   V
SIR RICHARD MAY return and take a leaf
out of Asquith's book!
"THE VICTORIAN" SAYS that any paper
publishing the contents of the "Crisis in B. C."
would lay itself open to ten different kinds of libel
actions.
SO FAR AS we know there is little contained in
"The Crisis" which has not been printed in the columns of this paper.
IT WAS PRUSSIA who forced the Jews to a-
dopt surnames. This fact is of interest in view of
the tax sales about to be held throughout the municipalities adjoining Vancouver. In ancient times in
Prussia the Jews were known by such names as:
Isaac, son of Joseph; Israel, son of Jacob or Solomon, son of David. Unscrupulous Jews would
evade the Prussian tax-collector by alleging that
they were not the owners of properties assessed.
Isaac, for instance, would allege that he was not the
son of Joseph, but the son of Solomon. The Prussian nobles put an end to this deception by passing a
aw forcing all the Jews to adopt names by which
they might be clearly identified. It was only natural therefore, that the tax-dodgers should appropriate unto themselves the names of great Prussian
families. Hence we find among the Jews Rosenbergs, Goldsteins, and other families bearing purely
Prussian names.
FOREIGN MANUFACTURED goods sold in
Canada last year amounted to the enormous sum of
$465,198,785. Thirty millions of this stands for
food stuffs imported into British Columbia last year.
PROF. RIETHDORF of Woodstock College,
although by birth a German, denounces the destruction of the Lusitania as murder, and says the authors
of the crime should be treated as murderers. In this
he is quite consistent with his own attitude ever since
the war began. As a German he has denounced
Kaiserism, Prussianism and militarism as the curse
of Germany. As a man whose natural sympathies
are with the German people and all that is great and
good in their lives and characters, he sees the terrible
evil that the Prussian system has imposed upon them,
and he can heartily pray for the utter destruction of
that system, which, as he says, is worse than slavery.
It is a pity, for the sake of the German people, that
there are not a good many more German professors
of the Riethdorf type. The German people, at
home or abroad, have no worse enemies today than
the men who are seeking to excite their approval of
German war methods, and by so doing earning for
them the distrust and even hatred of civilized
people throughout the woild.���Woodstock Sentinel
Review.
We are manufacturers of
DIAMOND  CHICK FOOD
which has no equal   for   chickens.
The Best  SEED  POTATOES
which are guaranteed to grow.
LAWN  GRASS SEED which
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F. T. VERNON'S
MOUNT PLEASANT
FEED STORE
255 Broadway East (cor. Kingsway)
Phone Fairmont 18S V
six
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
SATURDAY, MAY 29, 1915
41
Nil:;
::JW
J :���
SUCCESS
Awaits those who are prepared to accept their business opportunity
when it presents itself.   Hundreds of
OPPORTUNITIES
Will present themselves in the great revival of business following tht
war. If you are wise, yoi will get your training now and be ready
for your opportunity.
Our Winter Term Opens Monday, Jan. 4
See us about it NOW.     The information costs you nothing.
Success Business College
Limited
E. Scott Eaton, B.A., Principal
CORNER TENTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Fairmont 2075
EDUCATION
PARENTS SHOULD HAVE THEIR
DAUGHTERS
ATTEND THE
Burrard School for Girls
1242 BURRARD STREET
Miss B. H. CARTMILL, Principal.
FOR TERMS, Telephone Seymour  1847, or call in person.
Phone Seymour 1946
ENGLISH COLLEGIATE SCHOOL
1150 ROBSON STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Miss HILDA A. POMEROY, Principal
Certificated at the Board of Education, England.
Trained at Bishop Otter College, Sussex.
Associate of Arts at Oxford University.
Certificated at Trinity College of Music���Piano and Harmony.
English Literature and Science Distinctions at Examination.
SUBJECTS TAUGHT.
ALL ELEMENTARY STUDIES (Preparatory ��nd otherwise).
and
NEEDLEWORK (Plain and Fancy).
DRAWING AND PAINTING (All branches).
MATHEMATICS.   Matriculation Syllabus, London University.
BOTANY AND NATURE STUDY.   With Microscopy if desired.
LANGUAGES (By arrangement).
TAILOR DRESS-CUTTING AND MAKING  (London Academy).
SWIMMING, PHYSICAL CULTURE, ATHLETICS, ETC.
ENGLISH LITERATURE (Poetry and Prose).
Pupils of any age prepared in any of the above subjects, by arrangement, DAY or EVENING.
TERMS
Parents are requested to call in person and interview Miss Hilda A.
Pomeroy, Principal English Collegiate School
GLADSTONE   HOTEL
TIME :: THE AVENGER
A Wreath and a Souvenir By Donald Downie
"The Angel of Death is abroad in
the land. You can hear the very
beatin* of hi�� wingi."���John Bright.
The simple words of the great tribune that Bright was touched the
House, wc are told, like a Spell. Is
not the truth of that phrase, in that
memorable speech of his (in the conduct of the Crimean war), felt forcibly again today, from ruined Ypres
to Vancouver, and from Langemarck
to the rude, wild coast oi Kinsalc.
This is a solemn moment, and for
few words. As I sat and listened to
my favorite pastor last Sunday morning (I do not listen to him with sufficient regularity, 1 confess), I think
he said: "It is a moment when it
seems fit for God to speak and for
men to keep silent."
Yes, my dear pastor, I know. And
I intend to be silent here for half a
column, like that great general, of
whom it is said that he knew how to
be silent in seven languages. And is
it not being silent���eloquently silent���
when one only expresses what everyone else is thinking? And yet must
not one needs raise his feeble voice
of indignation also? Though in the
shock of peoples and wreck of things
it may be only vox clamantis in de-
serto.
"Do we well to be indignant?" one
asks. And the answer is���"Yes, we
do well!" And have we not reason?
"I like an honest hater," said honest,
brusque old Dr. Johnson.
"Have  wc  not  suffered  things  to  be
forgiven?
Have wc not had the brain seared, the
heart riven?
And only not to desperation driven,
Because not altogether of such clay
As rots into the souls of those whom
we survey.".
Have we not been duped, and spied
upon, and betrayed: and trustful and
tolerant of the enemy oil our borders
and in our midst quite long enough?
The London Slock Exchange did well
indignantly to fling, him out, neck and
crop. But here, is he not enjoying
immunity and tolerance and protection
and profit?
Against all those impudent Seattle
barons and pachydermatous swashbucklers, who on the very eve of war
were still toasting the kaiser at the
Vancouver hotel, and abusing "Old
Bobs," and against whom we then
hurled this poo.r "grey-goose quill" of
ours at a time when it^wiis not nearly
so safe and popular to do so as it is
now���there is only one safe course,
and that is segregation. And one reprisal which is not imbecile, and that
is���confiscation.
The Kultnred German Doktors, in
Toronto, thanks to the obstinacy of
President Falconer, still retain their
professorships, and enjoy their emoluments and teach submarine
philosophy, and poison thc wells of
our patriotism. And those for whose
suppression we clamored, when our
clamor was lonely; who published thc
German Press; and led our civic pageants; and cornered our timbers; and
depleted our banks and trust companies;  and  flattered onr  statesmen;'and
banqueted our mayors���they are not
all fled to Germany or Seattle. Some
of them occupy positions���social, commercial, military and political���where
espionage is easy. The German army
is not all in Europe. Nor can it put
upon its chiefs alone the burden of responsibility. One unhealthy and ill-
balanced mind, obsessed with "la foile
de grandeurs," may have led a whole
people to moral and political ruin. But
is it possible to absolve the race, as
some would do, and hold only a caste
responsible? No; every nation has
the government it deserves.
But now they haeve shot their bolt,
they have lost the precious inspiration of success and of great leaders
and great ideals. These philosophic
professors of efficiency (against
whom from long contact and for patriotic reasons I dared to inveigh when
it was a question of selecting university professors) thought they had
provided for every contingency in
this campaign. There was only one
enemy and one obstacle to their
scheme which they had overlooked.
They di'd not know that they would
come into conflict with the universal
conscience of humanity .
And now their last Hohcnzollern,
descendant of the petty Musgraves
and of Brandenburg, he shall return
to the ooscurity whence he sprang.
As his crown and empire Avere won
one aggressive campaign they
shall be lost in another. With his
worthy ally, the last of the Osmanlis,
he shall be driven forth to wander
once again on the face of thc earth,
accursed of God and man, a byword
and a shaking of the head to the
nations.
As for us. our allies are only increasing. And the greatest of these
allies is Time. He fights on our side.
And here is an invocation to him
from the inspired pen of a patriot
poet, called by Macaulay. "Ihe most
celebrated Englishman of the nineteenth century."
"0 Time! the bcautifier of thc dead:
Adomcr of thc ruin, comforter.
Ami only healer when the heart hath
bled��� .   ,
Time thc corrector where our judgments err.
The test of truth, love���sole philosopher���
For all besides are sophists; from
thy thrift .
Which never loses, though it doth defer��� ...
hue    Ihe  avenger  unto  thee  we  lit
Our hands, and eyes, and heart, and
crave  "f thee this gilt:
or that deep wreck where thou hast
made a shrine _
And temple so divinely desolate
Allium: thy mightier offerings here is
mine���
if thou hast even seen us ton elate,
'Hear us not: bllt if calmly we    have
borne
Good  and reserved our pride against
tire bate
Which   shall   not   whelm   us���let     us
not  have worn
The iron  in  our souls in vain���shall
they not mourn?"
Hampton Court, Vancouver.
SPACING OUT BABIES
By Mary Alden Hopkins in "Harpers'Weekly."
IPLING'S poem "The Mary
Cluster" is an excellent illustration of ihe laissez faire doctrine of
birth. The old, successful sea captain
on his death bed is reproaching his
only son for having a childless wife.
| (So there isn't even a grandchild, an'
the Gloster family's done)
Not like your mother, she isn't, she
carries  her  freight  each  run;
Biit they died, thc pore little beggars,
at sea she had 'em���they died.
Only you, an' you stood it; you haven't  stood much beside���
Weak, a liar, and idle . . .
FIRST CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS R. CURRY, Prop
Mill: Foot of Ontario Street, Fraser River Phone: Fraser 97
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
CANADIAN   CEDAR
LUMBER CO.
Manufacturers of
BEVEL SIDING, BOAT LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
Wholesale and Retail
GRIMMETT P. O., SOUTH VANCOUVER
P. M. HAMILTON F. WILLIS
One becomes sad reflecting upon the
ucl blow which fate dealt the old
I sea dog in this puny son Willi his
i equally unsatisfactory wife. But on
: second thought one may consider how
! the case would he stated in a coldblooded medical report:
"Mother, healthy, intelligent, industrious; married young; husband healthy; yearly births from marriage to
death; died in childbed in Macassar
straits by the Little Paternosters as
you come to thc Union Bank; no medical attendance; all the children but
one died in infancy; causes unknown;
thc one who survived is sickly and
mentally inferior; no offspring in thc
second   generation."
Viewing the matter thus, one's pity
shifts from the old rascal calling his
son's wife names with his dying breath
to thc wife who was done to death
with child-bearing and thc poor little
corpses dropped into the sea all a-
round the world. The child conservationists would say flatly that if Captain Gloster had had fewer children
at the start, he might have had more
standing about his death bed, and even possibly a choice assortment of
grandchildren. They say that limiting
the family increases the family.
They base this statement, not upon
poetry���though the death rate of babes
is almosl as high in poet lore in general as in "The Mary of Gloster"���but
upon statistics gathered in the United
States, in England and on the contin-
ncnt. In the previous article studies
made by the Children's Bureau at
Washington of Infant Mortality in
Johnstown, Pa., and by Dr. Alice Hamilton of Child Mortality in Chicago,
were presented in some detail. 1 have
it hand tables showing similar conditions compiled in Denmark by Dr.
S. de Bruin and Dr C. de Lange;
in Saxony by Dr. A. K. l'loelz; and in
Berlin by Hamburger.
These studies have been made a-
moiig the working people who form
ihe large majority of the population
iii all countries. Whether the same
ratios bold good in tile professional
and landed class we do not know Wc
are not justified in making statements
on one side ir the other until research
has been carried on among Ihe large
families ol ihe wealthy and leisure*
class.
With the realization of the extravagant suffering and death that accompanies extravagant breeding has come
a new ethical standard. A woman's
right to exist is no longer considered
wholly in her fertility. Mothers are
held more admirable for the number
they raise than for the number they
bear. It seems doubtful if stillborn
children will ever rise up to call their
parents blessed. Men who brag of a
twenty-fivc-fold paternity risk a grilling in the daily press. Thc Equitable Life Assurance Society cautiously suggests to its policy holders that
civilization needs not necessarily larger families, but more and bcttei families.
This is a right-about-face from the
old ideal. A century ago, Hannah
More who loved above all else that
which was established, was goaded by
the new women's rights movement
into the cry,
"Rights of Women! Why next we'll
be hearing of the Rights of Children!"
Her imagination did not foresee the
lengths society would travel. Today
the rights of children are written in
the laws. The rights of unborn children are recognized. And thc regul-
ationists actually argue the right of
a child not to exist! The crudest
form of this regulation of conception
appears in the sterilization of the criminally insane, in the segregation oi
the mentally defective, and in refusing marriage licenses to the syphilli-
tic. On the positive side it manifests
itself   in   the   feeling     that     children
parents shouldn't be allowed to have
children unless they want them!
What would Hannah More have said
to that?
It is noteworthy ��� and somewhat
confusing���to find that Dr. R. J. Ew-
art, the English physician who offers
the most definite constructive plan
for improving thc quality of children
by limiting their number in a family
does not believe that contraceptives
are used to any extent in England or
ever will or should be. Thc alphabet which trails after his name lends
weight to his statements. He is M.
D��� M. Sc, F.R.C.S., D.P.H.,, and he
gives it as his opinion that thc fall
in the English birth rate is in no way
attributable to thc use of "certain artificial methods." He thinks decrease
of births comes from the increase of
education, thc establishment of mental pleasures, and a general desire to
control passions. To these determin-
���inating factors he adds, with less approbation, women's disinclination to
undergo the repeated ordeals of childbirth. He believes that the regulation
of birth can be accomplished by educating children in thc mastery of self
and bv "a few hints as to the direction
of their' efforts in later life."
In his study of children's development in Middlesbrough, England, a
manufacturing city of about a hundred thousand inhabitants. Dr. Ewart
found just what other investigators
have found in America, Denmark and
in Germany. Thc more children born
into a family the less chance each has
of living. Dr. Ewart thinks that prenatal conditions are responsible for
this state of affairs. When births
come rapidly the mother is too worn-
out to give the unborn child its full
share of vitality. Born weak, it
quickly succumbs to pneumonia or
diarrheal diseases.
He calculates that when the age of
the mother is under 23 or over 38
pregnancies naturally space themselves
at intervals which allow the mother
time 'for recuperation. But between
those years, especially in thc period
between 25 and 35 and culminating
at 29, her fertility is in excess of her
ability to bear strong children. Exhausted herself, she launches an exhausted child upon the world.
"Thus one child, as it were, spoils
the next," says Dr. Ewart.
To avoid this danger, thc children
to be born into a family must be spared the swarm of possible brothers and
sisters who would drag down the vitality of the mother, perhaps without
ever coming to live birth themselves.
This can be done, .says Dr. Ewart, by
spacing out the family.
The child nursery should be arranged with growing room just as is a
garden nursery. Imagine a florist
who tried to grow all the plants whose
roots he could jam into his green
house!
Dr. Ewart has figured out an adequate spacing scale. He. does not insist on arbitary measurement, for many circumstances must be taken into account, but in general he recommends an interval of from two to
three years between pregnancies. He
bases this not only on the negative
evidence of the high death rale when
suitable spacing-is neglected, but upon positive evidence of health where
spacing  has been  maintained.
From measuring, weighing and testing a large number of the children of
working people, gentry and paupers
being excluded, he found that children
born in spaced-out families are superior to children born in haphazardly
occuring families, in height, weight
and intelligence. In a group of 866
boys and girls aged six years, the
children from families where an average interval of three years or over
occurred surpassed the children from
families where the average interval
was under two years, by,3.1 inches in
height and 2.2 pounds in weight!
When Dr. Ewart proceeds to compute from his inspiring tables, thc
height, weight, vitality and intellect
of a hypothetical family born under
scientific management, we feel thai
the race of supermen approaches.
This intrusion of Ihe efficiency spirit
into a .realm formerly held too sacred
(or indecent) for regulation, may
cause some romantic souls lo sigh for
ihe good old days when birth was uncontrolled. In colonial times the
country was free from many of Ihe
conditions which today raise the children's death rate. No tenement house
problem existed, nor unemployment,
Every one had plenty of sail pork to
eat in winter and garden truck in
summer, homespun and linen to wear,
and fuel for the culling. Sunshine
was not hogged by Ihe rich, nor need
hildreu hunt fresh air in parks.
Prof. Thcodatc L. Smith, Director
of Ihe Library Department, Child
Study Institute, Clark University, destroys our retrospective envy of that
period, in a monograph on the families of Ihe early graduates of Yale,
1701-5, and of . Harvard, 1658-90.
There was no "foreign element" to
confuse results in those days when
immigration was almost exclusively
from the churches and gaols of England. These men were the flower of
onr geological charts. History records their virtue. But baptismal registers and family Bible entries record their���dare we say, vice? Nearly every man possessed two families,
one in the house and one in the graveyard.
Considering that the chronicles from
which the data is drawn makes no
mention of miscarriages, premature
births, still births, and children dying
before baptism, the death rate is
shocking. Of the Harvard wives, 37.3
per cent died under the age of 45
years. Of the Yale wives, 40 per cent
died before they reached 50. One
man had four times as many wives
dead as alive. The wives' only escape from child-bearing was death
and many availed themselves of it.
Many of thc children who left traces of their lives by reaching the age
of baptism, gave up the struggle soon
after. The chronicles run: family of
ten children, nine died in childhood,
wife at forty-five; family of thirteen
children, seven died in childhood, wife
at forty-seven; fourteen children, first
wife died at twenty-eight after having borne eight children in ten years;
eleven   children,  wife   died  at   forty-
first wife died at twenty-four leaving
six children; first wife died at nineteen leaving three children.
An unexpected showi��g of Prof.
Smith's monograph is an apparent
tendency for families very large in
the first generation to die out in the
third or fourth generation. ��� One family of twenty children, by two wives,
has living descendent by one son only, one daughter being untraceable. A
family of ten brothers and sisters,
only two of whom lived till over fifty,
produced three surviving children who
in turn have produced one, and that
ickly   specimen.      Another  family
had fourteen in thc first generation;
eight in the second; six in thc third;
and is now down to two.
While one is justified in no assertions on this matter save those verified by census returns, one ponders
whether the high death rate and the
sometimes flawed quality of large families is not symbolically presented
in some of the classic tales of the
ancient world. Cornelia displayed
but two jewels, ihe Mother of the
Gracchi was honored on but two
counts. While Niobe, starting as a
more generous citizen producer, finally bestowed upon her country nothing but a fountain.
In British Columbia's
Mining Camps
The last lot of silver-zince ore sent
by  the  Utica  to the States gave returns of about $2,600.
*. * *
Work at the Rio has had to be discontinued for several days pending
the making of some repairs to the
gasoline engine.
* * *
Utica stock is in considerable demand at prevailing prices ranging at
from five to ten cents and some buyers are on the outlook for what can
be picked up at those figures.
* * *
J. T.  Tipping has secured a three
years' lease and bond on the Black
Prince and Two Friends group of"
mineral claims, which is situated ore
the divide between Lemon and Springer Creeks; A crew of men will be
put to work just as soon as thc roads
will permit of a pack train getting into the property.
* * * ,   .
A car of ore recently shipped to
Grand Forks from the Western Star
on Copper Mountain, brought returns
of $1,300. or about 52 per ton. This,
has greatly encouraged the owners,,
who wilj commence real development
work'as soon as spring'op'ens. They
hav'e an excellent showing and should
make a paving mine.
' ��� ,*��
J. C. Dalgleish, of Patterson, N. J..
has interested some New York and
New Jersey capital in the Alice and
Patterson mineral claims on Springer
Creek, in the Slocan. A crew of men
is now at work erecting cabins for
thc accommodation of miners. As
soon as the cook house and bunk.
house are completed, a crew of men
will begin development work. This
property has had considerable development work done in years gone by
and has a showing of good ore. Some
of the representatives of the company arc expected here within a few
days.
* * *
The silver lead ore of the Silver
Queen mine, near Hope, assays $11(>
a ton. This ore will be treated, at
Trail, when transportation is effected between  Hope and Trail.
* * *
The miners on Fourth of July-
Creek, in the Alsek mining district of
Southern Yukon, have petitioned the-
Yukon territorial council to put iit
and operate Tin the creek a Keystone
drill, with the object of finding bedrock, as they claim that although $200.-
OOfl in money and labor have been expended on the creek since its discovery in 1905 bedrock has never been
reached. The petitioners recite that,
whatever Ihe glacial action has left
a little shelf of clay or a more compact bunch of sediment in the creek,
men have found no difficulty in taking out from $5 lo $20 per day. Geologists and experts who have visited
this creek have expressed high opinions of ils possibilities.
should be born to healthy parents. Its'
extreme   form   is   the   assertion   that I seven  after long and painful  illness
The Yukon Placer Act has been
amended, to read as follows: "Any
person who may be accepted for and:
who continues in active service in defence of the Empire during war.
whether with the "British or allied
forces, who may he a holder of mining rights acquired under the provisions of this act, shall be permitted
to hold such free from risk,of cancellation owing to failure to comply with
any of the requirements of- the act
under which the rights were acquired,,
until six months after the final termination of the war and the final declaration of peace."
* * *
It is possible that the Greenwood'
smelter and the Mother Lode minev
mav be started up in the near future.
* * *
A car of ore recently shipped to
the Granby smelter from the Western
Star on Copncr Mountain, brought return* of $1,300, or about $552 per ton.
* * *
Considerable development work is
planned  this  season  on  the    Freddy
Lee grtnip, up Cody Gulch.
* * *
Hazelton  Herald:  This  week  thirteen cars of copper ore,, four hundred
and  fifty tons, were  shipped by  the
Montana     Continental     Development
Co.,   from  Rocher  Deboule  miner to
tlie Granby smelter.   This is the first
shipment from that property or from
Rocher Deboule Mountain.   The    ore
was  loaded   at  Carnaby   where    the
tram  comes over the mountain Lorn
the  workings.    The  Rocher  Deboule
property  is  now  a  hive  of industry.
Every  department  is    working    and"
from now on there will be big shipments  every few days,  aS  the  company is in shape to take out a hundred tons of ore a day.
TTiiffiiTTW ~ ^~
^w
�����
SATURDAY, MAY 29, 1*15
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
SEVEN
EVERY TIME
YOU MAKE
PURCHASES
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Y
OU WISH TO SELL?
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Robert Blatchford On The
Drink Question
Famous English Socialist Writes from Viewpoint of
Moderate Man
Robert Blatchford, the famous English Socialist, editor of thc "Clarion"
and writer of books which, including
"God and My Neighbor" and "Mcrric
England," have run into many editions, contributes a page weekly to the
London "Dispatch" on ihe war and
questions connected with il. He it
was who several years ago sounded a
trumpet call to Britons through the
columns of thc "Daily Mail" to rouse
from their self-satisfied complacency
and prepare for the day when Germany would bring her rivalry with the
British Empire to the issue of arms.
Derided and ridiculed at the time as
a hair-brained alarmist, his utterances
have proved to be prophetic, not merely in general terms but in wonderfully
detailed particulars, and his articles
are now read with appreciation and
respect. One of his most recent writings is upon the drink question, particularly with regard to the effect of
alcohol upon the efficiency of workmen engaged in the manufacture of
munitions of war. It presents an interesting discussion of a question
which is agitating statesmen and all
ranks of society in the Old Land,
from the point of view of a moderate
user of alcoholic drinks.
If we are to talk about drink wc
shall have to speak not as advocates
but  judicially  and   with  a  sober   reti-
meal eating, but none 1" a reasonable
indulgence in liquor. Many extreme
temperance advocates seem to regard
thc drinking of a glass of beer or
whisky as a disreputable act. I think
that is a baseless prejudice. We must
remember, too, that circumstances
make a great deal of difference as to
drink. A man leading a quiet, sedentary life, such as a clerk or an author,
ought not, unless in cases of overstrain, to require much liquor of any
kind. Bui a navvy, a docker, a pud-
dler, a blastfurnace man, any man
whose work implies severe physical
strain and violent muscular effort, is
in a very different case. A puddlcr
who has been sweating in an ovenlike heat lor four or five hours wants
drink, and prefers drink with a bite
in ii. To such a man a quart of ale
or stoul means less than a single glass
means to a city clerk or a shop assistant. It is mere impertinence to tell
a blast-furnace man or a hammerman on heavy chain work that he
ought to drink oatmeal and water. He
has as much right to his pot of stout
as a dressmaker has to her pot of tea,
and  gets  no  more  harm  from  it.
We come now to the question of
thc effect of drink on the war. Are
the British workers guilty of excessive drinking? Is thc shortage of
ammunition due to drink? Ought thc
Government  to  prohibit  the  sale   of
Mrs. (Senator) Ham Lewis "going down the center" with Uncle Joe Cnnon, former
speaker ol the House of Representatives -on the deck of the trans-Pacific liner that bore the
Congressional party of 21 statesmen, their' wives and- friends, to the mid-Pacific Islands .and
the city of Honolulu.
cence, like men who seek truth rather
than polemical victory. What is the
Until about drink and its effects in
our own country? Let us consider
first the subject of moderate drinking. Whai are the facts about moderate drinking as regards health and
as regards morals?
As regards health, I suppose it is
pretty generally conceded that most
men arc better without drink than
with it. When a man wants lo be at
the top of his form he takes no alcohol. It is, 1 believe, the invariable
rule of all trainers when preparing a
man for any athletic task to forbid
alcoholic drink of any kind. A man
training for a boxin��� match, a boat
race, a foot race, or a football match
is forbidden to drink wine, -eer, or
spirits. My own personal experience
endorses this method. I never touch
liquor during working hours, a single
glass of wine or spirits would spoil
me for the day.
But we must remember that moderate drinkers do not take liquor as
medicine; they take it as a luxury.
A moo does not drink his pint of stout
or bottle of wine with a dietary object, he drinks for pleasure. He drinks
as he smokes; because he likes it.
And while a man drinks in moderation
there is no more to be said against
him than may be said against a smoker. Doubtless one's bottle of Bass or
glass of whisky does one more harm
than good. But so does one's pipe, or
cigar, or cigarette. "Don't inhale,"
says one doctor. But the question one
asks is: "Is it worth it?" Is the great
comfort and satisfaction of a pipe
worth the small detriment to one's
health? I have been a heavy smoker
for forty years. If I were a young
man again 1 should smoke. It is a
pure matter of profit and loss. I like
a pipe and I smoke. I like a glass of
claret, but I don't take it. I am afraid
of the gout, and though claret is a
divine drink it is not worth as much
as all that.
As for the ethical side I can see
no moral objection to moderate drinking.    I  can  see  moral  objections  to
spirits, or of all liquors; in fact, we
come to questions about which there
has been so much excited controversy
during  the last   few  weeks.'
Here I shall speak with more certainly and decision. The working
���lasses are not given lo drunkenness,
The shortage of ammunition is not
due to drink. The Government ought
not lo prohibit the sale of spirits or
of alcoholic liquor,
My own personal experience and
observation of ihe superior person,
as of thc successful person, is that he
is mostly an ass. .Sometimes he is a
conceited ass; but he is generally
some kind of an ass. And it is to
the superior person and thc successful person that most of the impertinent nonsense written and spoken about
drink and the war is due. Here is
"Punch," for instance ,a paper written
by superior persons for superior persons, .the most snobbish paper in England, with a cartoon in which a hideous giant, marked "Drunkenness," is
rising out of a bottle and hanging
like a vast cloud of shame over a manufacturing city. The legend under
this pictorial ebullition of ignorant
impertinence is "The Enemy's Ally";
the suggestion is that the drunkenness
of the British workers is, as another
superior organ puts it a few days
since, a more dangerous enemy than
the Germans.
This is of the bosh, boshy. The
British workers are obviously not
drunken. They are obviously industrious and skilful. I say obviously
and I mean obviously though the superior persons have failed to perceive
the obvious.
Let any superior person cast his
superior eye over the figures relating
to British trade and commerce. Those
figures show that Britain manufactures 'and exports immense quantities
of machinery, cutlery, tools, textile
fabrics, cloths, boots, nails, chains,
motor cars, armour plate, crockery,
glass, china, woollens, and a host of
other things. Those goods are among
the best in the world. The workmanship is good and honest.    Then again
we build the best ships in the world.
We own a very large proportion of
the carrying trade of the world. Are
all those ships sailed or stoked by
drunken seamen? Are the railways
run by drunken railway servants?
Are the cotton and woollen and silk
and lace goods marie by drunken1 operatives? If our people were the
drunken, lazy, shiftless mob the superior persons suppose them to be how
could our country hold her pride of
place in the world's markets and the
world's work? The bulk of our workers MUST be diligent and sober, and
intelligent, or we could not he as
wealthy anil a- law-abiding and as
successful as we are. Thai is obvious:
it is 10 obvious that there is no need
to argue about it. Even "Punch" or
the "Referee" can see il���when it is
pointed  out.
I could say a great deal more about
these scandalous libels on our working women and men. for I know very
well what I am talking about. Bui "l
leave ihe subject to deal with another
question: Ought the Government to
prohibit the sale of drink? To which
I answer with an emphatic Nol Why
not? ror two reasons. Firstly, pro'-
hlbition is not necessary; secondly
the working men  would  not  stand  it.
Bui (here is another kind of legislation which is necessary, and to which
Ihe working people wouM give their
heartiest support, and that is the prohibition of the sale of adulterated or
poisoned liquor. A very large quantity of the beer sold to the workers is
heady rubbish. Most of the sprits
sold to the workers are poison. Rogues
make vast fortunes out of this mean
villainy, and build churches and gel
into Parliament and become social
and political lions on the infamous
proceeds. Our highly moral and unctuously respectable Parliament knows
that quite well. Our Chancellors of
the Exchequer know it, and have long
known it, and have ballasted -their
rickety budgets with the dirty taxes
thc fraudulent successful persons have
paid.
I have been into thc public-houses
and gin palaces which thrive in the
big towns near the big works, and
have sampled the poison they sell for
whisky and the ullage they" sell for
beer. Whisky is made of maize instead of barley and is sold when three
months old. It is rank p ijson. I
have lasted it but never swallowed it.
The flavor would frighten a Red Indian Such stuff injures men's health,
maddens them in a kind of insane intoxication. If the caterer at a West
End Club dared to offer such stuff to
the members some irascible colonel,
admiral, or doctor would brain him
on the spot.
Give the people pure liquor and
pur. Iieer, healthy houses, and cheerful
surroundings, and we shall hear no
more of drunkenness. I have seen a
journalist drink sixteen whiskies and
sodas in an afternoon and talk half
the time about the drunken habits of
the workers. And when he had finished his sixteenth glass he went and
did a hard night's work and went home
sober to bed. 1 have known a man
sit up and play^cards and drink Navy
rum all night and then go out in thc
morning and hit a six-inch bull's-eye
nine limes in succession ai 200 yeards.
If he had taken a quarter the amount
������>' Gateshead, or St. Helens, or Oldham, or Leeds, or Burnley "pub"
whisky he would have been ill for a
week.
Knaves who sell poisoned liquor to
hard-working men in dull and gloomy
towns ought to get at least eighteen
months' hard labor without the option
of a fine. Atid it would be an act of
public usefulness to begin with a few
of the richest and most reputable rascals in the business.
Of course, the remedy for all these
evils is State control of the drink traffic. All distilleries and breweries
should be Government concerns. All
"places within the meaning of the
Act" should be stale owned. Tin
drink quick and drink often, ugly, vulgar, or blatant "inns." "hotels,'" "pubs,"
and gin-palaces should be abolished,
and good hotels and cafes should be
opened ill their place. 11 that were
done there would be ii" need tot prohibition,
CLIPT   FROM   COL.   LOWRY
Thc use of furnace slag is coming
into general use in England as railway ballast.
* * *
George Petty is spending the summer working on his claims near
Three   Forks.
Harry Tuck now has a Little Davenport  restaurant in   Rossland as well
as  Xelson.
* * *
At Calumet, Michigan, 1.200 copper
miners   have   had   their   wages   raised
1(1 per cent.
��� * *
Bob Logan, ihe railway contractor,
will  start  a  cattle  ranch  in  the   Peace
River district.
* * *
The  tax  levy  in   Rossland   for    last
year is nearly $29,000.     More   than
half  of   the  amount   has   already   been
paid.
# * *
W. G. Gillett is a candidate for the
mayoralty of Prince George He was
Mayor of Nelson for two terms about
ten years ago.
* * *
Xat Tucker has been discharged
from the New Denver Hospital. He-
rode a snowslide last winter, but did
not land in a soft spot when he jumped off.
Al Teeter died on April 19. in Hay-
ward, California, aged 54 years. His
body was taken lo Oakland for cremation Decease^ lived for nearly
20 years in Slocan City.
��� * ���
Paul Greyer, manager of the North
Gilumbia Gold Mining Co., was in
Skagway recently, and took in .10 men
to work in Pince Creek. Later 20
more will go in as a large amount of
development work will be done during the Slimmer. The company's property is on ('jne Creek and O'Donnel
River in the Atlin District.
* 4    *
The first assays received on samples from the placed deposils in the
Entiat district of central Washington
indicates good values Thc report indicates that the ground will average
better than $2 50 a yard. E. T. Hin-
ton, the head of a company controlling about 4(1 acres on thc east side
of the Columbia, states that all their
claims will  run $2 a yard and better.
PONTO THE PURP
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Weel freens, it wud seem as if the
war wis enterin' on a new phase,
frae the accoonts in the papers this
week or twn back. Noo that the in-
eeshial excitement incidental tae the
openin' stages is past, when everybody wis on the tiptae o' expectashun
as tae what wis likely tae happen,
we're a' commencin' tae realize that
it's gaun tae be a bigger job even than
we thocht.
The folk thcmsels hiiinie been the
only yins thinkin' that for if we pey
ony attenshun tae the reports frae the
auld country in conneckshun wi' the
formashun ���>' a coalishun government,
a fellie can easily gether that even
the government didnie fully realize
the immensity -o' the undertakin'.
Weel posted as they were as tae
the gigantic preparashuns the Germans, had been makin' an' were makin', it wud seem as if we were gaun
through the same phase as that which
occurred at the beginnin' o' the Boer
war, when it wis thocht that a wheen
regiments o' kilties an' a few batteries
o' antedetuvian guns wud be able tae
effectually squelch the Boers. It wis
only efter wc had got wan or jabs
in the nose ah' sacrificed a guid wheen
precious lives that the "powers that
be" seemed tae wauken up an' realize
the importance o' the undertakin'.
This, 1 consider, is jist exactly the
same phase we are passin' through
thc noo.
Ask ony Britisher a month or twa
back his opeenyin as tae hoo long
he thocht thc war wud last, and he
wud mare than likely tell yae that he
thocht it wud be a' owre aboot the
month o' June or July. Never at ony
time wud he tolerate a thocht aboot
thc result���an' quite richt tae. That
wis a foregone conclusion-���an' is a
foregone conclusion now.   ,
But, for a' that, it's plain tae be seen
that thc auld country wis coppit a wee
bitty on thc hop, an' besides there
has been a hale lot o' slackness displayed in regaird tae thc cairryin' oot
o' thc campaign. It's no' for me tae
criticise, but wan can plainly see
there's been a wheen square men in
roon' holes an' roon' "men in square
holes. Hooevcr, as I said afore, there's
nac fear but that we'll "muddle
through" aricht but���we're peyin' the
price o' oor muddlin' wi' guid British
bluid.
I think thc idea o' thc coalishun
government a guid yin. At nae time
in the auld country's history has she
had sae mony men o' ootstaunin' merit as politceshians as she has at her
service the noo, an' party partizan-
ship shouldiiie be allooed tae interfere wi' the welfare o' the country
at large. This is nae time for split-
tin1 hairs on'ckynomic or social quest-
yins. Oor very lives are at stake in
this war an' the nashun want thc men
wha hae the brains, irrespective o'
whether they're Tory, Liberal, Socialist or Labor.
Thc composition o' the coalishun
government certainly brings thegither
some  very    diverse    men   wi'    very
Sandy thinks a Coalishun Government
Is Needed in British Columby
diverse views. Wha wud ever hae
thocht that Lloyd George wud sit at
thc same table conferrin' wi' Balfour?
Wha wud hae thocht that Asquith wud
be in a cabinet wi' Carson? Or that
Churchill an' Austen Chamberlain wud
discuss maitters frae a non-controversial standpint?
It jist struck me that the idea o'
a coalishun government wud be a very
guid thing for B. C, wi' the proviso,
of course, that the present government
wud be totally eliminated.
B. C. is in a terrible state at the
present time, an' the men in control
'11 hae tae be shifted afore ony improvement can be brocht aboot.
An cleckshun's pendin' an' is likely
tae be pu'd off in the next month or
twa, an' frae what wan can sec an'
learn, the issue '11 likely be sae mixed
up that there's a big danger o' the
auld gang bein' able tae pit' the wool
o'wre the eleckturs e'en an' slip back
intae offis again.
Noo, that wud be a calamity. What
wc want oot here at the present time
is men tae realize the truth as they
see it. The Province bankrupt, industry at a staunstill, workin' folk slerv-
in'i an' the Prime Minister fiddlin' a-
wa the Province's money on a big
junket���an' incidentally tryin' tae peddle off some canned saumon tae the
French, fish that has been caught an'
canned an' packed maistly by alien
labor.
Bowser at liame is tryin' tae consolidate the machine again wi' the
view o' ridin' intae pooer himsel���an'
a' thc time the workers are stervin'
an' staun'in' by sayin' nacthiiv.
What we want in B. C. is for men
tae forget their politics for a wee
whilcy an' realize thc seriousness o'
the crisis the Province is in. There's
jist as muckle guid level-heidcd Tories as there is Grits, but the trouble
is that instead o' they men expressin'
their opecnyins an' takin' an active
pairt in the cairryin' oot o' their ideas
o' richt government, they hue been
content tae become members o' their
respective pairty organisashuns an'
allow the big guns tae play ducks an'
drakes wi" them.
What we want in B. C. is a coalishun 6' the people. What we require
is for the common folk tae forget their
views on Toryism or Liberalism an'
get thegither in wan united pairty
that'll mak a clean sweep o'1 the present gang o' blunderers an' misfits,
an' that'll elect men frae their ranks
that'll sec'that the Province '11 get a
chance tae rise oot o' the morass she's
sunk sae deep in at the present time.
On nae considcrashttn should ony
o' the present government be allowed
tae occupy a sate in the next Provincial legislature, an' the suner the pop-
ulaslum rouse themsels an' tak steps
along that line the suner will we pu'
oorsels oot o' this terribly disastrous
state.
Yours through the heather,
SANDY MACPHERSON.
HILLCREST DAIRY
THE   DAIRY   THAT   STANDS   THE   TEST
PURE PASTEURIZED
ilk, Cream, Butter & Buttermilk
DELIVERED DAILY
INSPECTION INVITED
A TRIAL SOLICITED
131 FIFTEENTH AVENUE WEST
Phone Fairmont 1934
Radical Views on Social Problems
By Dr. W. J. CURRY
HOUSEHOLD GOODS and OFFICE FURNITURE
BY CHEAPEST   ROUTES  OVER THE   ENTIRE  WORLD
CAMPBELL STORAGE COMPANY?
MOVING - PACKING- STORAGE-SHIPPING
B PHONE SEYMOUR 7360. OFFICE 857 BEATTY ST. g|
: It is feared that G. M. Smart, formerly of the B. C. Express Co., of
Ashcroft, took passage on the Lusitania, has been drowned.
he Kamloops District Stock Breeders' Association will hold the annual
summer stock show at Kamloops on
July 1, Dominion Day.
Why Don't the Unemployed Go to
Work
It is estimated that there arc now
over five million unemployed workers
on this continent, the majority of
whom arc suffering from extreme poverty. We know that there ate hundreds and probably thousands in the
same condition in this city.
The last issue of the "Federation-
ist" contained an item headed as follows:
"Starving women and children cry
for bread, while out-of-work husbands
search for employment of any kind,
at any price."
This problem is today universal,
but there is probably no part of this
continent where the workers are in
a more hopeless and yet ridiculous
position' than in B.' C, and nowhere
on earth would the representatives of
labor put up such a despairing howl
as we are hearing here. This begging
of the political agents of our corpora-
ations to provide work or hand out
to thousands of able-bodied men in a
new country like B.C., where we have
one inhabitant to the square mile, is
at  least interesting.
We are now importing nearly all
the food and everything else we use.
There are hundreds of acres of land
cleared and level even within the city
limits, which are growing* rank crops
of weeds which might as well be vegetables, or other food products. We
can organize armies of workers to go
across continents and seas to slaughter their brothers in the battle lines
of Europe. WnV cannot the working
class of this Province organize itself
into an army to produce food and to
remove   famine  and   poverty? .
In this Province the workers seem
to know of nothing between selling
their labor to a corporation, taking a
hand-out, or starving to  death.
That celebrated mule which famish'
cd for want of a drink when there was
no one to ride him to water, was an
exception to the mule family, while
the workers of B. C. who see nothing
but starvation awaiting them unless
they can be straddled by a boss is the
rule, and yet we wonder why so many
intelligent people baulk at the Darwinian theory of the descent of man.
Can you imagine a tribe of monkeys
so degenerate, that they would quietly
starve to death because a few pompous members of their tribe held a
title deed to the cocoa nut grove on
which they had formerly fed? No, the
moral and intellectual gulf between
man and his supposed progenitors
seems too great. We prefer the special Creation theory, especially when
we see people starving in this land
of opportunities, and think of what is
goinrr on in the shambles of Europe.
Results of Selling the Earth
Conditions in B. C. are somewhat
unique and the truth is that few of us
came here with the intention of doing
anything in productive work, from the
Hindoo mill hands to our honorable
Premier and Minister of Finance, the
idea has been to "get rich quick," either through re_al_ estate, or some other
game of a parisitic nature, and these
games are necessarily demoralizing to
the, individual who plays them, and to
the community as well.
The result is the condition of organized labor here today proves t6 us
that this Province is probably more
barren of the co-operative spirit and
initiative, of practical knowledge of
our industrial and economic problems
than any part of the English-speaking
world.
A few years ago the exploitation of
the .natural resources began: and now
we awake to find ourselves, pressed
forward to the brink of a chasm which
can only be bridged by co-operation,
public ownership, and production for
use, and yet wc seem to lack thc essential quality to prepare to pass over.
Unfortunately those who have been
selected and the self-appointed managers of public affairs have been inspired more by self interest than for
the common good, anil have proved
themselves ignorant of thc cause of
the real crisis in B. C, which after
all is not owing to the grafting propensities of any Individual or political party, but is inherent in our social
economic system, in our property relations, and especially in our ignor*
ance of economic laws.
The  Industrial  Revolution
Unemployment as it presents isclf
today is a modern phenomenon, and
can only be understood by a sir vey
of industrial evolution.    ���
A century ago there was no lack of
employment on this continent or elsewhere, in fact all through thc centuries of chattel slavery and feudalism
the search was not for work, but for
workers. Thc chief prizes in ancient
conquests were male and female
slaves. Myriads of black savages
were captured in the jungles of Africa and compelled to toil under the
lash for the master class of this continent less than a century ago.
For two generations thc jails of old
England were frequently emptied and
thc convicts whose principal "crime"
was debt, were bound over to the industrial captains of thc new world,
and the lot of these British subjects
during thc term of their servitude
was as slavish as that of their black
brothers, and thc one difference between the scarcity of labor in those
days and its superabundance today,
is entirely due to the difference in the
productivity of the tools' of wealth
production which were used then and
now.
In fact the thing that started man
on the mad gallop of commercial rivalry, which in the final analysis was
thc cause of the European war, was
nothing else but thc application of
steam power to the machinery of
wealth production, and this has so increased the productivity of the workers that the search today is mainly
for markets.
The Difference between Hand Labor
and Machinery
Thc following comparison has been
supplied by thc U. S. Government Report, compiled by the late Carol i).
Wright, Commissioner of Labor:
"One man and two boys With machinery does the work of 1100 hand
looms.
"One cotton printing machine dois
the work of 1200 men.
"One nail machine which can be op-
crated by a boy does thc work of
1500 men making nails by hand.
"Thc bread making machine can
produce 20,000 loaves a day."
This marvellous increase in wealth
production applies to agriculture as
well, and machinery has improved
prodigiously since these figures 'were
furnished by the V. S. Government.
But there are doubtless portions of
the world where handicraft still prevails.
When I was a small boy down way
East, there were some old women in
the neighborhood who still spun and
wove in' the old way, and the men
tanned hides and made them into
boots and harness by hand. They
hewed logs and sawed lumber with
whip saws. They caught thc sap of
the rock maple in the spring t me and
made sugar, and they made their own
candles, in fact they manufactured
practically all the food and everything needed in their simple way of
living. They knew nothing of unemployment and were always well fed
and comfortably clothed and homed.
They were artizaus rather than wage
slaves.
A few years ago t went back to
the old place, but all was changed���
the spinning wheels and looms were
silent, and the old workers had all
gone to rest, the industrial revolution
was complete.
The present generation in that settlement used factory products almost
exclusively and know nothing of the
work of their grandfathers. They are
as dependent on thc factory system
as arc thc Indians of this coast.
But why should this increase in our
powers of producing commodities be
accompanied by famine and disircss?
Why should so many in Vancouver be
hungry today? Just because we have
motor ploughs and steam threshers.
Why arc so many dressed shabbily
when a man or woman can weave as
much cloth today as 1100 could in the
days of our grandfathers? Why
should so many De homeless when our
mills can turn out millions of feet of
lumber every day? ' The reason is
this���The hand tool of our grandfathers was owned by the worker and
the products were his also. Today
the machinery of production is owned
by corporations and commodities are
not made to supply human needs but
made to produce dividends on capital.
The worker today sells his labor
powers as any other commodity is
sold and the law of supply and demand
keeps bis share of the products estimated by his wages at the point of
subsistence, just what it was a century ago, or even less, and the reason
why the army of unemployed is ever
growing larger is because the values
created by the workers beyond what
their wages enable them to buy back
is ever increasing and cannot be disposed of, and therefore there is over
production and the factories, mills
and mines close down.
Manufacturers in order to undersell
their competitors are ever endeavoring to reduce the cost of production
through improved machinery, and reduction of wages, and so this surplus
value which must be marketed is ever
increasing.
From the U. S. Government reports
referred to wc learn that in 1890 four
million men. women and children operating in 35000 factories and mills
produce commodities the retail value
of which was 14 billion dollars, and
the wages of   these 4,000,000 workers
that year amounted to only one and
three quarter billions, so that this army  of  workers  could  only  buy back
about one-eighth of their products.
The Yellow Peril
For many years the surplus values
due to machinery was absorbed in the
production of constantly improved
machinery and in ihe exploitation of
foreign markets, hut today this machinery is practically perfected and
half the industrial plants on this continent arc now said to be idle.
At the same time countries sucli as
India, Japan and China, which were
formerly the dumping ground for the
surplus products of countries such as
England, Germany and the U. S��� and
which included quantities of machinery, have been fully exploited and are
now Beginning to manufacture goods
and threw them back into the markets
of the Western world.
It is quite evident that in a commercial warfare the forces that will win
the fight must be those races that'Can
produce thc cheapest, and it is also
evident that in this contest the white
race, with its relatively high standard
of living is no match for the hordes
of cheap Asiatic labor which arc now
his rivals in the industrial and commercial fields, and which are practically as efficient under the machine as
t'* people of Europe and America.
Next week I will show the only solution to the problem of unemployment
and poverty.
BASEBALL
Athletic Park
Vancouver vs.
Tacoma
GAMES
June 1-2-3-4
June 5
At 4 p.m.
At 3 p.m.
Classified
Advertisements
MONEY TO LOAN
MONEY LOANED, LARGE OR
small amounts, diamonds, jewellery,
etc. A quiet, respectable place to
borrow money. Old gold bought.
Established 1905. Star Loan Co., 812
Hastings West.
BORROW ON YOUR DIAMONDS,
jewclery, musical instruments, etc.
401 Dominion Bldg. Business confidential.    .
FLORISTS
BROWN BROS. & CO., LIMITED,
Seedsmen, Florists, Nurserymen, 48
Hastings St. E., and 782 Granville
Street, Vancouver, B. C.
WATCHMAKER
ENGLISH WATCHMAKER AND
Jeweller when you think of watch,
clock and jewellery repairs think
Appleby, 438 Richards St., hilf block
from Hastings. All mainsprings and
cleaning jobs guaranteed 12 months.
MUSIC
RAPID METHOD MUSIC STUDIO
Free trial lesson. All ages. Opportunity to practice successful teaching
by correspondence. Sey. 4132. Empire Building.
AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES
VANCOUVER SPEEDOMETERS
Service Station, Stewart speedometer, Warner auto-meter; repairs executed promptly, 516-518 Howe St.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
B. C. INDEPENDENT UNDERTA-
kers, Limited���Successors to" Sill &
Miller, Limited. Funeral directou
and embalmers. 652-654 Broadway
W.   PHONE FAIRMONT 738.
KEARNEY, T. J. &Co��� DOMINION
Parlors, 802 Broadway west. Phone
Fairmont 1098. Night calls answered.
OUTFITTERS
FOUND���THE CHEAPEST PLACE
in town to get your Spring Suit on
easy payment; little down, little
weekly. Lester Outfitting Co., 1037-
39 Pender West.
COLLECTORS
NATIONAL COLLECTING COM-
pany, 202 North West Trust Building. Established 1907. . We collect
current accounts, rents and bad debts
in town or country. NO COLLECr
TION, NO PAY.    Phone 4980.
FOR SALE
A SNAP, 2 GOOD BUILDING LOTS
all cleared and ready for garden.
Inside city, near three car lines and
school. $400; $10 cash, $5-monthly.
Hamilton Exchange, 1012 Holden
Building.

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