BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Greater Vancouver Chinook Aug 22, 1914

Item Metadata

Download

Media
gvchinook-1.0315515.pdf
Metadata
JSON: gvchinook-1.0315515.json
JSON-LD: gvchinook-1.0315515-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): gvchinook-1.0315515-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: gvchinook-1.0315515-rdf.json
Turtle: gvchinook-1.0315515-turtle.txt
N-Triples: gvchinook-1.0315515-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: gvchinook-1.0315515-source.json
Full Text
gvchinook-1.0315515-fulltext.txt
Citation
gvchinook-1.0315515.ris

Full Text

Array D^Sia CHINOOK
Vol. Ill, No. 15
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 1914
Price 5 cents
.=a==&=
mM
RULE   BRITANNIA!
When Britain first, at Heaven's command,
Arose from out the azure main,
This was the charter of the land,
And guardian angels sung the strain:
Rule Britannia, Britannia rules the waves!
Britons never shall be slaves.
The nations not so blest as thee
Must in their turn to tyrants fall,
Whilst thou shalt flourish great and free.
The dread and envy of them all.
Rule Britannia, Britannia rules the waves!
Britons never shall be slaves.
Still more majestic shalt thou rise,
More dreadful from each foreign stroke;
As the loud blast that tears the skies
Serves but to root thy native oak.
Rule Britannia, Britannia rules the waves!
Britons never shall lie slaves.
Thee, haughty tyrants ne'er shall tame;
All their attempts to bend thee down
Will but arouse thy generous flame,
And work their woe and thy renown.
Rule Britannia, Britannia rules the waves!
Britons never shall be slaves.
To thee belongs the rural reign;
Thy cities shall with commerce shine;
All shall be subject to the main,
And every shore it circles thine,
Rule Britannia, Britannia rules the waves!
Britons never shall be slaves.
The muses, still with freedom found,
Shall to thy happy coast repair;
Blest isle, with matchless beauty crowned,
And manly hearts to guard the fair.
Rule Britannia, Britannia rules the waves!
Britons never shall be slaves.
-
aiiiirigiBlip
HC3>P=
oa=n=
=r��v,
w>mz
South Vancouver Sends Her Contingent to the Front
Ten Sturdy Lads Leave this Week w^n
Eleventh Irish Fusiliers���Several Reservists
Answer the Call-Men are Sprinkled in All
B.C. Units Now Under Arms
~~-r~' T   is  estimated  that   from  South
I      Vancouver alone   more  than   a
hundred men   have   enlisted  for
active  service abroad.
Police Constable Flack, one of the
most popular officers on thc local
force lias lefl for England where he
will jeiin bis regiment. A brother,
Staff Sergeant Flack, of Collingwood
East, leaves this week witb a detachment nf the Irish Fusiliers for camp
.at Valcartier, Quebec, freim which
point Canadians for active service in
Eureipc  will leave.
In tine company of the Eleventh
Irish Fusiliers the feilluwing names
of Smith Vancouver men may be
found on the roll oi those who wcre
to   leave   this   week    for   Valcartier,
Quebec ���
Staff Sergeant FLACK
lingwood.
Sergeant  II. J.   PIKE,
Avenue and Main Street.
Pte. EDGAR WALUS, Twenty-
tight h   Avenue Fast.
Pte.    P.     NUGENT,     Collingwood
Kast  Col-
Forty-first
Kast.
Pte.
East.
Pte.
Pte.
erines
J.   FOWLER,    Collingw,, ���d
A.  GEDDES,   Dumfries   St.
R.   SHOESMITH,   St.  Cath-
Street.
Pte. TRUMI'OUR, Sixty-seventh
Avenue  and   Main  Street.
Pte. HOLLAND, No. 1 Fireball,
South Vancouver.
Pte. J.  TAYLOR,  Argyle  Street,
One of thc men from South Vancouver, a sergeant who has seen active service, enlisted the very moment that war seemed Imminent
He is a married man with a small
family. "They will look after thc
wife and the kiddies," said be to the
CHINOOK at the camp at the Exhibition Grounds. "I fought for the
Queen and 1 am glad that I have Ihis
opportunity   eif    lighting     for     King
George."
Owing to strict secrecy attending
all development! in the local militia
it is impossible to secure a complete
list of the volunteers from South
Vanceeiiver.
Private John M. Edwardi is with
"ll" Company. Seventy-Second Scale erths. garrisoned at the Arena Kink,
l'ender Slreel. Pte. Edwardi is a
Soulh Vancouver man, lieing connected with the CHINOOK newspaper.
Ile was called out over twei weeks
ago.
Militia men have expressed pleasure at the way in which the call to
tbe colors has had a response from
South Vancouver.
The Western Triple Choir���Leader, Mr. George Taggart
"Chinook" Will Print Daily Paper
For Vancouver Exhibition Assoc'n
Paper Will be Issued Every Day of the Big Fair and Will be a
Prominent Feature    Printing Office Will be Arranged in
Prominent Place on the Grounds
Sir Richard McBride and His Worship Mayor ISaxtcr have been invited
to occupy the honorary editorial
chairs of the elaily newspaper to be
issued by the Exhibition Association
at Hastings Park eluring the progress
of the big fair which opens September
3.
This paper will be printed by the
Greater   Vancouver     Publishers     and
will be an absolutely new  departure
in the way of an industrial feature,
The paper, a name for which is
being chosen by a committee made Up
of tbe city edit.irs of the Vancouver
daily papers, from thousands of suggestions scut iu freem all parts of the
Province,   will   contain   news   of   the
exhibition together with late foreign
news   which   will   hc   received   at   the
Exhibition grounds over s private
wire.
This  year,  Vancouver's  exhibition
will be the only event of its character
on the Pacific Coast. New Westminster, Victoria, Seattle and the other
coast   cities,   with   the   exception   of
Prince  Rupert,   have decided  to  cancel their fall exhibitions.
Tax Sale Fever Does Not Hit
Corporation of District of
South Vancouver
South Vancouver stands out prominently these days as being one of the
municipalities eef Greater Vancouver
which will imt hold a tax sale. The
civic officials have decided thai a tax
sale ibis year is not necessary and
the way in which the taxes for  1914
are pouring in at thc Municipal Hall
would point to the fact that it will
be some years before South Vanceeiiver will hold such a sale.
Richmond is holding a sale of property tor taxes and so is the City of
North Vancouver.
S.  Rolston,   General   Manager  of
the   Exhibition,   Vancouver
Local Items of Interest
The Rev. Mr. Johnston, of Sooke,
Vancouver Island, will occupy the
pulpit of St. David's Church on Sunday, August 23. at both services,
morning and evening.
it it *
Mr. James Graham anil wife, of
1217 Howe Street, City, who accompanied Mr. McMartin to Howen Islam!, had to return sooner than was
expected, to take bis place in his regiment which was being mobilized.
* * *
The many friends of Miss May
Miller of 4425 Quebec Street will be
pleased tei bear of her return home
after a painful operation at the General Hospital. She is doing as well
as  can  be  expected.
* e*   *
Miss Jessie Cameron, daughter 'if
the Rev. J. H. Cameron of James St.,
who after spending her vacation ot
two months at home with her parents,
has returned to resume her duties
.in the teaching staff in Winnipeg.
Mrs. li. R. Shoove and family, of
4109 Sophia Street, accompanied by
Mrs. Piatt and Mrs. Millington, of
Montreal, Que., have returned afler
a very pleasant visit tei Mrs. G. H.
Webber.  Langley   Prairie.
* *    *
Miss Margaret Williamson, of 3919
Welwyn Street. Cedar Cottage, has
bad a very enjoyable time on her
vacation visiting North Gabriula Island and Nanainiei. She has returned
borne very much benefited and will
take up her studies at the High
School on Monday.
* *        e^
The schoeil board resolved this
week to keep open the places of three
teachers and one janitor of the school
staff, while they arc serving with the
militia.
* ele       el:
Payrolls and accounts amounting
to $30,095.08 were passed by the finance committee for payment this
week. Ward payments were $7122.25;
salaries $3851.25: waterworks, etc.,
$4547.15;  general  accounts  $14,574.43.
Take Notice!
The following gentlemen have been appointed
('oniinissiimers for tubing affidavits lo hate names
placed mt the Voters' List for South Vancouver:
Eugene Cleveland. 338 Kerr Road.
W. Morris. Collingwood.
J. J. Fitzpatrick, 41o7 Main St.
R. Horrell, 4138 Main St.
11. Kay. 4524 Main St.
S. F. Henderson. 245 28th Ave. E.
J. N. Mowat. 79 28th Ave. E.
A. Frederickson, 4615 Sophia St.
R. M. McGregor, Cor. 27th and Ontario St.
C. \V. Feast, 3387 Quebec St.
J. A. Robertson, 120 55th Ave. E.
J. Cashon, Cedar Cottage.
C. F. Broadhurst, 3495 Commercial Drive.
T. Peters. 3530 Victoria Drive.
J. Flemming, Cor. 15th Ave. and Flemming St.'
J. Lewis, 41 Wilson St.
Dr. \V. A. McConkey, 4403 Main and 441 Ferris
Road.
A. E. Carr, 676 66th Ave. W. and Municipal Hall.
F. E. Russell, Bee Hive Shoe Store, Cor. Fraser
and 48th Ave.
R. R. Spears, 5418 Prince Edward Street.
S. J. Middleton. 298 62nd Ave.
H. A. Lyons, 43rd and Inverness Street.
J. C. Gibson, River Rd.
IBEiUUiMlMJUl "-
TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,    AUGUST    22,    1914
MILK
How  Satisfactory it is to tht Housekeeper   to   be   sure   that
the MILK, CREAM and BUTTERMILK    she    receives    is
Pasteurized and Germless.
Delivered in Sealed Bottle8, Perfectly Sterilized.
BEACONSFIELD HYGIENIC DAIRY
905 Twenty-fourth Avenue East
Phone Fairmont 2391 L PRICE & GREEN,  Proprietors
GLADSTONE    HOTEL
!
FIRST CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS H. G. BROWN, Prop.
��� ������iiiiftiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMitfiiiiifiiiiiiititiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiii
miidiwPuriMiw
SAVE 25% BY SHIPPING YOUR HOUSEHOLD GOODS
EAST OR SOUTH IN OUR COMBINATION CARS.   GIVE
US YOUR PACKING MOVING STORAGE AND SHIPPING
WE KNOWMOW
Campbell Storage Company
OFFICE   8571   BEATTY ST.
PHONE   SEYMOUR 7S60.
TF^nr^i iu ui iu
U   U   b  GI
B. C. EQUIPMENT CO.
MACHINERY DEALERS
CONCRETE MIXERS.' StKEL CARS.  ROCK CRUSHERS. ELECTRIC. STEAM.
AND    GASOLINE   HOISTS.       WHEELBARROWS,   TRANSMISSION
MACHINERY,   GASOLINE   ENGINES,   PUMPS,   AND
ROAD MACHINERY
Offices: SOS-607 Bank of Ottawa Bldg.   Phone Sty. 9040 (EicH.njela all Djpsrtmeejl.)
Special
Night Rates
OVER OUR
Long Distance
Lines
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
BETWEEN 7 P.M. AND 8 A.M.
Three times the regular day period
for the regular day rate
Make Appointments anytime during the day
FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS CALL
LONG DISTANCE
British Columbia Telephone
COMPANY, LIMITED
Notes from Here and There
Mr. Maxwell, Choir Leader of
Mountain View Methodist Church, is
visiting friends in Eastern Canada.
* * *
Mr. and Mrs. Connor, of 24th Ave.
Kast, are spending their holidsyi visiting  friends ill  Toronto.
�� * ��
Mr. Sherdain, superintendent of
Mountain   View   Sunday   School,   has
returned from the General  Hospital,
convalescent  alter  a  serious  illness.
* * *
Mrs. (',. I,. Greenlay ami daughters
returned home from  a  trip  tee  I'uity.
Sask.,  Auguit  14th.    Mrs.  Greenlay
was visiting her mother, Mrs. M.
Hamilton, who is very ill Imt is able
to be around again after live weeks'
convaleicing,
* * *
Crops in Saskatchewan and Alberta
just medium. Straw sheert and heads
not very well filled out on account
iif dry weather.
it *  *
Mr. T. Bidwell has renteil No. 35
39th Avenue Kast and moved his family there. W'e welcome all new neighbors.
+ * *
C. J. Xewbery of 222 39th Avenue
Kast lelt San Francisco last week
where hc is employed in tbe electric
business owned  by  his  brother.
e��    ��    *
Mr. J. W. Goosetrey, we are seerry
to record, is ill with grip and bronchitis.
���     ���I.     *
Mrs. Gill Curry left last week to
join  her husband at  Golden,  B.C.
el"    e(e    *
Miss Warwick, cor. of Bodwell
Road and Prince Kdward Street, is
spending part of her bolidajs visiting   friends   in   Chilliwack.
* * *
The stork visited Mrs. X. W.
James em August 2 and brought her
a bouncing baby boy. Mrs. James and
son will leave for their new home at
Whale Town, 11. C, em Saturday,
August 22.
St     *     St
The W. M. S. eif Mountain View
Methodist Church met at Stanley
Park last Tuesday afternoon feer
their monthly meeting. The supper was served at the pavilion, the
ladies   providing   the   substantial.
* St      Sr
Mr. anil Mrs. Gibbons, e,f 4.S 39th
Avenue Kast are receiving congratulations em the arrival eif a .-em. Until
lining   well.
+    *    *
When you gee le, the peelling booth
em election day and you are told your
name is not on the list there will be
some tall swearing,
On Saturday, August 15, a fire
broke out in the roof of a home at
thc corner of 30th Avenue and Joyce
Road occupyed by Mr. Norman, The
fire was caused by a spark falling on
the dry roof and starled what might
have been a serious blaze but for the
timely arrival e.f the firemen from
No. 1 I'irehall. The building was
owned by Mr. Parr and the damage
amounted tee about $15 or $2(1 <l<.1-
lars.
* * *
The time is drawing to a cbise sei
get a move e,n and have your name
��� tided   te.   the   voters'  list.
COLLINGWOOD DISTRICT
VANCOUVER CREAMERY
ICE CREAM
Pure and Delicious       Insist on Having It
Mr. E. Hurrell and family, who
have been on a vacation trip in Gibson's Landing for the past 3 weeks
have returned home.
* *    *
Mrs. Bowell and children have returned home after an enjoyable outing   at   Gibson's   Landing.
* *       H,
Miss Brqnson, eif Rupert, has had
to return borne to. Ontario hurriedly
on account of the illness of her
father.
* e,,        *
Mr. Wm. Menzies will lill the pulpit of the Knox Church, turner
Joyce and School Road at both services  Sunday,  August  23rd.
* *    *
Mr. J. Francis Bursill, ..f Colling-
wood1 Kast. entertained a number of
small children tee a trip to the city
And a visit to a picture show where
they could gaze on the pictures tn
their lill, which they did, and thoroughly  enjoyed  themselves.
* *      ef
A rather unusual thing happened
this week in Collingwood East, when
a cow, 12 years old. belonging to Mr.
Wm. Scott, calved twins. Bossy is
lining her best to reduce the high
cost of living. The war spirit is at
its  height here.
ek        *        *
A  Patriotic  Night
()n Tuesday night. August 25, in
the Bursill Library at Collingwood
East, there will be held a Patriotic
Nighl and Whist Drive, for which
valuable prizes will be given. A full
orchestra will be in attendance and
an enjoyable evening is assured in
all  who come.
ete ete +
See to it and have your application
made SO that yuur name will bc on
the voters' list.
Tennis Tournament
In the Presbyterian Church Tennis
League of Vancouver and district,
the Westminster Church of South
Vancouver have enured contestants
in the following series : Men's singles,
men's doubles, mixed doubles and
Ladies'   single.
In the lirst round of mixed doubles
Westminster won from West Vancouver and in the Ladies' single
Westminster wun from St. Paul's
Church, Vancouver, In the second
round' of doubles Mt. Pleasant won
from Westminster. Thc balance of
the tournament will be finished on
Saturday, August 22. There is keen
rivalry between the different churches
as there are a number of valuable
prizes  offered   for  each  event.
OFFER    FORTUNE   IN    PRIZES
AT VANCOUVER FAIR
Entries Being Sent in From All Over
British   Columbia���Will   Publish
Little  Daily  Newspaper
Entries are literally pouring intee
the city offices of the Vancouver Kx-
hibitinii Association. This year the
Exhibition plans to reward merit.
championships, firsts anil seconds and
thirds with cash, over Sixty Thousand Dollars having already been appropriated   for  prizes.
In addition to that small fortune
exhibitors are being attracted by several very valuable and substantial
special prizes. To go into tlle details
of these would necessitate the publication of the bulk of the prize list
issued by tbe Exhibition and that
beeok is a publication of 188 pages
with inserts, indexes and supplements.
It may fairly be said, however, that
more than one hundred thousand dollars is to be competed for, when the
cash prizes, the special prizes, the
gold and silver medals are taken into
consideration.
One of the most unique competitions announced was that arranged
by the news bureau of the Exhibition.
It was planned to publish a litlle
daily paper at the Exhibition, something that would not be big enough
tn compete with the Vancouver dailies, who plan to give an elaborate
news service, yet something good
enough to take home as a souvenir
���a small newspaper in short, but a
very  live  one.
So a competition to name this
newspaper was put on. It was advertised throughout tiie province and
it was found that within a few days
nf tiie publication e.f the advertisement  replies  poured  in.
At the present time it is perfectly
safe to say that the Exhibition will
be a magnificent success. Enough
entries have already been made and
enough space in the various buildings bid in by exhibitors to insure
the success of the Exhibition, Closing Day, lhe day on which the big
rush of entries will be made, is August 20, and after that date thc Exhibition staff will be busied with
Straightening out and arranging exhibits.
Carloads after carloads of live
stock will be shown at the Exhibition,
The Dominion and the Provincial
Governments will both have big displays and so will the commercial, industrial, educational and art interests
of Vancouver and the province generally. The attractions will be finer
than  ever  before.
New Branch Bank
The  Bank  of Vancouver  opened  a
branch   at   Milner,   B.C.,   last     week
under  the  temporary  management of
Mr.  H. G. Collins.
"That    fellow   always     takes     tlle
worst   view   of  everything."'
"What  is   he���a   pessimist?"
"N'aw!    lie's an amateur photographer."
Correspondence
Break  Rock or Starve
Tei  the   Editor of  the  "Chinook" :
Sir.���Kindly allow me space in your
paper   for   a   few   lines   ill   regard   tn
tiie unemployed in South Vancouver.
Xow they have closed all road work
what are these men going to do when
they were only getting 11) days a
month? This morning 1 was at 49th
Avenue when Mr. McKay Started
13 on what he calls relief work. One
of the men as' ed liim why il was
that lie had sn many em steady when
thousands were seeking wnrk. Ile informed tlie gentleman that all the
Steady ones were experienced men
antl they musl have the work in
preference tn the rest. Of course we
all know the headquarters fnr the
waterworks (old men's home) is at
the Municipal Hall. I would like to
ask Mr. McKay on what night he instructs his men so one could be on
hand1, ll we have such men-as Mr.
McKay at the head of our affairs I
think it is time for liim to take his
ticket. What South Vancouver wants
to do her work is willing workers and
let Mr. McKay and his time killers
take a back seat. From now on all
ratepayers in South Vancouver must
go on the street and break stones for
$1.50 per yard or else go hungry. This
is the verdict of the Council. I would
suggest a mass meeting bc called' of
the unemployed and demand our
rights. Thanking you Mr. Editor.���
I  remain,
A Disgusted Ratepayer.
Little Girl Badly Bitten By Dogs
Gladys Jarvis. the 3-year-old daughter of Mr. Walter Jarvis. 1940 Kings-
way, was badly bitten by dogs on
Tuesday. There were three dogs
fighting on thc sidewalk and when
thc little tot attempted to pass shc
was knocked down and badly torn
on the arms hefore bystanders could
rescue her. Shc was carried into Dr.
Hunter's office where aid was at
hand and the wounds dressed'. She
is  in  a  serious  condition.
CENTRE & HANNA
LIMITED
Established 1893
Refined Service   New Location
1049 GEORGIA ST.
Opposite new Y. M. C. A.
Fireproof     Columbarium     and
Mausoleum
OPEN  DAY  AND  NIGHT
Seymour 2425
SIX   REASONS
WHICH ACCOUNT FOR THE SUPERIORITY OF
CREOSOTED WOOD
BLOCK PAVEMENTS
ITS DURABILITY���Does not crumble or pulverize under the densest traffic; second only to granite
blocks
ITS EASE OF REPAIR���No difficulty being experienced in removing and replacing the blocks; no
expensive plant or skilled workmen required.
ITS SANITARY QUALITIES���Creosote being a
highly antiseptic and waterproofing material instantly destroys all germs, prevents the absorption of
street filth and consequent decay.
ITS NOISELESSNESS���The rattle and bang of
vehicles passing over its smooth surface absorbed
and muffled till the quiet of the din load is obtained.
ITS DUSTLESSNESS���Does not pulverize; the
heaviest traffic only pounding down the wood fibres
to offer the greater resistance.
ITS CLEANLINESS���Having a smooth surface and
being waterprooi it does not differ in this respect
from asphalt.
We manufacture blocks of the highest possible
standard, the verv best materials only being used and
in the DOMINION WOOD BLOCKS we believe
we produce an article that has no equal.
DOMINION CREOSOTING
 COMPANY LIMITED	
Vancouver, B. C.
n
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
MEMBERS VANCOUVER STOCK EXCHANGE
MEMBERS VANCOUVER GRAIN EXCHANGE
MEMBERS OF CALGARY OIL EXCHANGE
DEALERS IN ALL ACTIVE CALGARY STOCKS. BONDS, ETC.
OIL STOCKS
BOUGHT   AND   SOLD
Stock Department, Seymour 6913
EXCHANGE BUILDING,  142 HASTINGS WEST
CLEANLINESS   IS   NEXT
TO GODLINESS
ESPECIALLY AT THIS TIME OF THE YEAR YOU WILL
APPRECIATE THE SCIENTIFIC MANNER BY WHICH OUR
MILK IS HANDLED.
MILK AND CREAM PASTEURIZED BY THE LATEST
METHODS KNOWN TO SCIENCE.
SOUTH VANCOUVER MILK CO.
29th and FRASER STREET
Phone Fairmont 1602 L
HIGH-GRADE
BUILDING MATERIALS
Boultbee-Johnson & Company, Ltd.
Johnson's Wharf
Phone: Sey. 9145
BASEBALL
Week of Auguit 31 to September 5
Vancouver vs. Taeoma
ATHLETIC  PARK Sth and HEMLOCK
South End Granville St. Bridge
Games start week days, 4 p.m. Saturdays S p.m. SATURDAY,    AUGUST    22,    1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
Mill :   Foot of Ontario Street, Fraser River
Phone :   Fraser 97
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
CANADIAN   CEDAR
LUMBER CO.
Manufacturers of
BEVEL SIDING,  BOAT  LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
Wholesale and Retail
GRIMMETT P. O., SOUTH VANCOUVER
P. M. HAMILTON
F. WILLIS
The Editor does not necessarily Endorse
Column
he   views   expressed   in   this
CANYON  VIEW   HOTEL
CAPILANO,   NORTH  VANCOUVER, BC.
11.  LARSON,  Manager. P,  LARSON,  Proprietor.
I
Elevation  625  feet. One  hour's trip  from  Vancouver Telephone  146
SCENIC   DELIGHTS,   FISHING.   HUNTING.   MOUNTAIN   CLIMBING,   Etc.
Unequalled  Resort for  Holiday,  long  or  short.      Family  Rooms
en suite with special rate.
Modern  appointments  throughout,   spacious  grounds,  high-class  service  at  moderate
rates.    Easy trail to top of Grouse Mountain, altitude 3,000 feet.
If the Workers Unite
While the working man lias ho
sympathy with war and the war lords
there- jre few among the workers
whe> are not at one with thc Old
Country in it- aim tee crush the German Emperor.
Teee, long has this autocrat
trampled 'en the hopes and aspirations 'ef his own subjects and' in
their support of thc war the working
men who do a little quiet thinking can see a brighter (lay dawning
after, shame to say it. thousands of
their class have been ruthlessly
slaughtered.
After all, this is the price the workers have to pay feer their apathy of
the  past.
If  they   brought  jusl   half  the  enthusiasm to bear in organizing e,n the
political  field  as  they bring to bear
I in   their   various   sports   and   recrea-
I tiiens  there  weittlil  lie an  end  to war
once and  for all.
The cry that "it was bound to
come" is sheer nonsense. Certainly see long as the masses stood stolidly by watching the piling up of
machines of war���it was bound to
come.
The fact to be borne in mind, however, is that 75 per cent, of the civi
lized weirld are of the working class
specie and it can easily be seen that
with some thinking and organization
this grim spectre of war could be
relegated  to  the  background.
GRAND   fENTRAL   HOTEL
GRAUER  and  GRAUER
The place where they "keep hotel"���
A fully modern hostelry, near at
hand to South Vancouver���it's the
"Grand Central" when you go to
Eburne.
EBURNE   STATION,   B.C.
Adopted by Nanaimo local union,
N'e 2155. United Mine Workers of
America,  August  6.   1914.
J   RATHLIFF,  President.
WM.    WATSON,    Secretary.
*    *    *
Dumping   of   Immigrants    Into   the
Cities
In the opinion ot John Keane, of
the Ottawa. Ont., charities department, the present system of dumping immigrants into Canadian cities
and leaving them to shift for them-
lelvea is responsible feir much of the
distress manifested in our larger centres of population. During the present spell of general depression the
condition has been much more noticeable than at other and more pros- j
perous times, and Mr. Keane, who ]
has made a study of the characteris-i
tics and dispositions of many of the
foreigners whe, have come uneler notice in thc capital recently is con-
vinced that the system, not the immigrant,  is at fault.
Mr.   Keane   considers   that   a   very
large   proportion   of  the  foreign   element  came lee Canada  under the impression   that  they   would  engage   in
agricultural pursuits.    Most of them
arc  small   farmers  e.r   farm  laborers.
Hut dumped into the cities with lit-'
tie money, no means of earning more
except  as  ordinary  laborers  in  con-;
structi<,n  or  similar  work,  they  hive1
together because of a  common  bond ;
of   language   and   sympathy,   and,   inl
times   eef  nei  work,  become  a  public
problem.
Mr.  Keane would have the govern-!
ment   put  such   immigrants   on   farm
land  in  western    Canada.    The  new- '
ing Out  a  champion  f.er elay labear in   c,mu.r, ���.������,,, ho    iven ,.,���,, on a
the  Council, In  the person of Coun-  tcm ,,,- yl���rly pavments and by this'
. Winram. ,   means  would be  encouraged  to build
It is pitiful to think lhat a body of ��� ., hll,,R. fnr ,nernscivcs. The lan-
men elected to look after the inter- uagc ,|Ucsti,���, and tne "c���i���ny'>
ests and superintend the spending of probleni could be obviated by keeping
thc monies in the municipality can- thc different nationalities well scat-
t trust themselves or their servants u.red alul ������ thc carcflll di���tritnlti.in
tei   get   a   job   done   properly   except   ,,,- |-nJ
through   the   medium   of   an   outside      The  s.iluti.en l.eoks a sane one.    It
ntractor. ,     is obviously not paternalism of    the
While  we  stand absolutely  for  the   ki,���i advocated by the Lond.eii Times,
execution   of  all   municipal   work   by   whjch   c,���ls;(ier5   ,ililt     ,|,c     colonies
lay   labor,   yet   we   must   admit   that   ihould take citv-bred youths from the
the   system   under   which   municipal   British  c.jtics.  educate  them jn  farm.
work  is  done  at  present  would  not   ;���K  methods.    They are  willing and
revert  one  to  the  principle. anxious  to do agricultural work, but
The  system  of appointing of ward i thcy  have ha(| absolutely no encour-
bosses and  other under strappers by'agement   ���r  any   assistance.        They
the   councillors   is   the   prime   cause   i,ave oeen invited to work as ordinary
of thc  failure  of day labor.    It  is  a   laborers���good, honest work, but not
pernicious  system which eats at  the  tne 3ort 0f wori< t0 wyctj thev have
very vitals of efficiency, yet we have   bcen  accustomed.    We are, in  short,
not   heard   one   councillor   raise   his   speeding good farmers to make indif-
voice in  protest. fcrent  laborers on  railway and other
Then again, when a contractor un- construction work,
dertakes lo do a piece of work there The matter is one that is deserving
is not a st.me turned until he has nf investigation and prompt attention,
his plant thoroughly organized and Canada, by its policy of turning out
in proper place so that the work can | hundreds of willing but misunder-
progress aleeng in an uninterrupted. stood immigrants, is doing herself an
wav. injury   which   will   cost   many   years
Hut  when   the   municipality  under-1 and much money to repair,
lakes anything of that sort how dif-! * * *
Councillor   Winram   and   Day
The contract feer the paving >
teeria Road was responsible' feer
Labor
,f Vic-
bring-
Milk! Milk! Milk!
Turner's Pasteurized and Germless Milk and Cream is thc best
diet for Infants and Invalids.    Superior for tea, coffee and cocoa.
AND GOOD FOR EVERYBODY
Sold at 10 quaits for $1.00.
Visit our big new modern dairy and we will show you why it
is we can supply you with the best milk and cream and buttermilk
and butter sold in Greater Vancouver.
TURNER'S DAIRY
OFFICE AND DAIRY :   Cor. ONTARIO AND 17th AVENUE.
Phone Fairmont 597
fcrent. A few shovels and picks and
perhaps a steam roller and there you
arc���fret to it. Would any of thc
councillors conduct their own private
affairs in the same way? I Irow not.
Councillor   Winram   is   to   be   con-
I gratulated on  the stand he took and
though  not successful at  the  present | go  dry
j time his action mav be the means of lent.
Stirring up the electors and make!
them take an interest in the question.
To say that the municipality cannot get the same out of a man as
when he is working feer a contractor
shows there is something wrung���
anel that something to us appears
very eebvious. that the opponents of
it in the council arc not big enough
feir  their  positions.
The State Eight-hour Day
Thc referendum vote now being
taken in the stale' of Washington will
result in favor of the- eight-hour day
law. also state prohibition will carry
by a big majority. Even the saloon
men of Seattle concede the state will
tlle   correspond-
WTI
es
a  Sea
*  *  sr
Cats
���    IS
a
geiod
Patriotic   it
They
Nanaimo  le
United   Mine
the   Hour   of   Need���If
Are   Only   Miners
local   union.     No,     215S
Workers   of   America
JOINT SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
Incorporated
1908
A Joint Savings Account may be opened at the Bank of Vancouver
in the names of two or more persons. In these accounts either party
may sign cheques or deposit money. For the different members of
a family or a firm a joint account is often a great convenience. Interest paid on balances.
THE
BANK OF VANCOUVER
Order your Wines, Liquors or Cigars
By Phone (High. 555)-Free Motor Delivery
To South Vancouver every Friday
Cascade Beer (on Ice)      pts SI doz., qts $2 doz.
Heidelberg Beer          "    SI     "        "   S2   ���
B. O. Export Beer     "   85c ��       "S1.75"
HIGHLAND LIQUOR COMPANY, LIMITED
758 POWELL STREET
at  Iheir meeting last Thursday night.
adopted the following resolution dealing with  the  war  situation  anel  their,
eewn trouble een  the Island.
"Whereas���The British empire, eef
which we arc an integral part, now
faces the greatesl crisis of its history in the struggle in which it i- at
present  engaged;  and
Whereas���We, as loyal British subjects, have no desire to embarrass
thc government of the empire, or any
part thereof, in this day of trial:
therefore be it
"Resolved���That we. the striking
mineworkers of Nanaimo. assure the
government and the public that we
will use our influence to promote the
peace and welfare of the community
and maintain order, thereby relieving the military forces, whose presence here is entirely unnecessary and
uncalled feer. t'i the service of the
country: and be it therefore
"Resolved���That we protest against
the filling of our place; in the mines
''There is a geeod deal of human
nature in cats," said emr friend the
Philosopher. "Take two kitten- that
have been brought up together. If
they arc sleepy they will curl up in
the nieist amiable heap of fur ye.u ei er
saw. Bul ii you elreep a piece eef raw
meal iu front of their noses thev will
be -pitiiti" ami growling ai each
other ill a minute. Thev are perfect-
Ij friendly until Ihey both want the
same   thing.
"Sometimes I think money is tee
seeme men whal raw meat i- lo cats,
They are- ge.i.ii citizens anel they love
their neighbors ami weeuleln'l have j
anybody in want if they could help it.'
leui ihey bristle .unl sink up their
backs   anel   spit   anil   scratch   if   they
smell money,
"My  wile never gives her cats raw,
meal.    She says it spoils their dispositions.   I'el like to experiment along
that line wilh some men   I  know."
Greater   Vancouver   Inter - Municipal
Kield Sports a Great Success
The tield and track events of the
inter-municipal athletics were keenly
contested from the drop eef the Hag
in  the lirst race until the finish.
The banquet and smoker was held i
in the Eburne Hotel at which abeiut j
one hundred contestants, together with:
the reeves and councillors attended.
Reeve   Churchill,   in   lhe   chair,   said;
some very nice things and expressed
his   appreciation    'if   the   manner   in
which   the  meet   was   conducted   anel
the manner in which it was attended
by  men  drawn   from  the  very  coun
with   which   the   empire   is   at|w��  ;l  s��u��* "<  gratification  to  th
tries
Another difference between" a' summer girl and the others is that she is
siiiihuY"rfcd   in
places.
Polly is a ii' 'i>y maid wholholhcrs
us tirst with hcr laughter, then  with
lier   sobbing.
war today; ami we also pr.'lesi
against the maintenance of an armed
force in "iir midst such as has been
stationed here taking the view that
their presence is more needed in other
places. Anil we further protest
against the employment of specials
aiid armed Ihtigs. whose presence
only serves tei irritate the men on
strike and increases friction and disorder; and be it  further
"Resolved���That wc. as minework-
crs. would petition the government
to endeavor to bring about a conference between thc two parties to
this strike with a view to bringing
about a satisfactory , adjustment en"
this local trouble, which would enable us all as British subjects I" act
as a unit at this critical time."
committees who bad it in charge.
Reeve Kerr made some very appropriate remarks,  stating  thai  next
year South Vancouver and Hurnaby
would furnish the prizes feer the
events which would be run off in
Se 'at li Vancouver.
That Point Grey annexed the
Churchill Cup. after thc strenuous
manner in which the either municipalities were training was quite a >ur-
prise to llie knowing ones, but it was
quite evident that they were trained
too line. The Turkish bath had rc-
iluccd thein loo much and they could
not   stand  the  strain.
One eif tlie ni"-t exciting events
was Ihe 100-yard dash open to councillors of the different municipalities.
Reeve    Kerr ,   got      eeff      on      his
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM  /ANCOUVER TO
ALL F��\RTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
W
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W.  BRODIE,  Gen.  Pass  Agent,   Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
H. G. Smith. C. P. & T. A.
Phone : Sey. 8134
C. V  Jenney, G. A. P. D.
ill   Granville Str.et
FOR
Sashes,  Doors,
Windows, and
al I   kinds   of
Mill   Work
SEE
1
H. N. WALKER
167 TWENTIETH AVE. W.
We  have  the  most  up-to-date
machinery.
All Doors, Windows and Sashes
morticed.
We  guarantee  all our work.
PRICES RIGHT
Call  and see  us���We put you
wis";
Phone  Fpirmont 836
ESTIMATES  GIVEN
Hamilton  Bros.
Embalmers and Funeral
Directors
Parlors and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Office Phone:    FRASER 19
Residence Phone:    FRASER 25
(Day or night)
JCS. H. BOWMAN
ARCHITECT
910-11    YORKSHIRE    BLDG.
SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for oublic meetings,  dances,  etc., to Let
Apply W. J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
FOR GOOD
ROAD BUILDING MATERIAL
We claim we have the best.
The largest Plant and a downstream haul.
GILLEY BROS., Limited
Dealers in
Coal, Cement, Plaster, etc.
NEW WESTMINSTER
Phone 15-16
wrong feeot. Imt when he struck his
pace it kept the other contestants
stepping high, wide and crooked tei
heelil on. Hail the tape been about
live yards further on there is no telling where the winner would have
been, but as thc time was 10 3-5
-ece.nels (unofficial I it was sure going some.
In tbe tug-of-war it was hinted
areumil that Point Grey hail the
Stock "watered" up to the last ditch
anil they carried off the palm. Im!
in 1015 we may expect a change as
practice makes perfect anil tiny an
all  in  line   feir   the  practice.
After   the   events   Mrs.   Churchill
WE ARE
Liberals
IN THE SENSE OF GIVING
FULL AND
LIBERAL
VALUE FOR MONEY. WE
WORK ON THE SMALLEST
POSSIBLE MARGIN OF
PROFIT BECAUSE WE
KNOW PRICE IS THE
GREAT QUESTION ON
WHICH YOUR FINAL VERDICT WILL REST.
Frank Newton
��� FAMILY ���
SHOE   STORE
823   GRANVILLE   ST.
AND AT
CEDAR   COTTAGE
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can   supply  your  needs  at  right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right   at   Station)
Anderson Market
The Family Butcher at
the Sanitary Shop
Try our mild cured Hams and
Bacons, machine sliced.
The place to get your Cooked
Hams and Jelly Tongue.
Don't forget we carry the finest
New Zealand Butter and Local
Eggs.
FOR  A   SQUARE   DEAL   AND
QUALITY, TRY
J. E. ANDERSON
Prop.
Tel. Fair 1634
4192 MAIN STREET
presented the prizes to the lucky winners which were very handsome anel
useful. Mrs. Churchill was presented
with a beautiful bouquet of flowers
at the close of the distribution of
prizes.
��������������� FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,    AUGUST    22, ��� 191$
^p^aCHINOCHC
PUBLISHED
Every S��turdiy by the Oreiter Vancouver Publifhen Limited
George M. Murrey. Editor
HEAD OFFICE:
Corner   Thirtieth   Avenue   ind   Main   Sireet.   South   Vancouver.   B. C.
TELEPHONE:  All department! Feirmont   1874
NIGHT   CALLS Feirmont   1946 L
Kcgiitered  ��t  the  Po��  Office   Depirtmenl,   Ottewi.   et   Second   Clin
Mill Metier	
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
To  all   pointi  in   Canada.   United   Kingdom.   Newfoundland.   New
Zealand, and other Britiih Poiaeaaioni:
One   Year    f2-��0.
Six  Montha       100
Three   Montha     W
Postage to American. European and olher Foreign Countriel, $1.00
per year extra.
"The truth at all timea (irmly atanda
And shall from age to age endure."
THE QUESTION OF LOYALTY
THE Vancouver School Board at a recent meeting
placed a resolution on the books of the J loan I
to the effect that henceforth Hag drill and the singing
of patriotic anthems will be part of the Vancouver
public school curriculum,
Before this resolution was passed there was a warm
discussion during which Trustee Stewart placed himself on record as being opposed absolutely to the plan.
Trustee Stewart took the stand that true loyalty
was displayed in actions, rather than in words. "From
the moment you make the teaching of loyalty a task-
then you frustrate the object yon have in view,"
argued the former Provincial School Inspector. "My
sense of patriotism today exceeds my religious sense,
I believe, and 1 was never taught loyalty as this resolution suggests the children of our schools shall be
taught it."
Trustee Stewart is to be very much respected for
his bravery in standing alone among the members of
the School Board as opposed to compulsory adoration
of the' Hritish Flag. So long as the Hritish Flag
stands for justice and liberty the Canadian school boy
Will take his hat off to tbe colors without the goad of
a school master.
The loyalty smacks very much of Fourth-of-Julyism.
It was by issuing such mandates that the Kaiser Wil-
helm has made it necessary for the armies of Europe
to gather again on the field of Waterloo.
Xew Zealand and Australia, liritish Columbia seemed to be in about much the same condition as if a German fleet were lying in the waters of Burrard Inlet.
It is with no intention of entering into any party-
politics that one should seriously ask himself the question, Why this should be.
Have we not a province of vast agricultural resources tbat could easily supply the wants of the people resident therein?
Have we not the wealth in minerals sufficient to
provide the sinews of war necessary for a government to put settlers on the land to help produce these
commodities?
Is it not a fact that here in the City of Vancouver
and in the municipalities adjacent big, strong men
are wasting their energies and shoe leather in an attempt to keep the pot boiling so that their little ones
might not starve?
This in one of the richest���if not THE richest
provinces of Canada.
While war with the sword and tbe bullet is a fiendish thing yet it serves to show how the people can be
aroused into enthusiasm when an object is to be attained.
We want war in 1'ritish Columbia���war, aye, war
to the final ditch, but not with the modern implements
of war.
Our war in I!. C. will be a peaceful one when the
lines of the old psalm. "Tbe Lord's my Shepherd, I'll
not want" will become a realism.
When the rich valleys in the "Seas of Mountains"
will be brought under the plow and made ready to
bring forth the fruits of the earth.
When the job hungry man can be brought into contact with the land "which produceth all wealth." When
the overlord and the parasites "who toil not, neither
do they spin," who thrive on the blood of ill-fed women and children shall be made lo disgorge their
fraudulently acquired wealth, then and only then will
war cease and British Columbia will take her place
as one unit of the Empire, self-supporting and self-
sustaining, instead of having to "beck and bow" for the
iiie.-ins of existence.
The war has taught ns a lesson in enthusiasm- -
let us be enthusiastic!
THE WAR OP THE VALLEYS
Tl 11*. war has been responsible for some curious
occurrences in the realms of domestic politics.
Only a short month ago the government and the people in the Old Country were almost at their wit's end
to devise some means by which threatened civil war
could be averted.
The suffragettes during the past six or seven years
have made the life of cabinet ministers almost unbearable. Starting their campaign with well-reasoned ar
gmnents showing the justice and righteousness of
their cause, latterly, through want of success in their
propaganda, they resorted to methods of reprisal
which kept the people in a continual ferment wondering what was going to happen next.
To come nearer home and only to go back a few
weeks, we had an "incident" which threatened at one
time to bring about national, if not international complications. People were still talking about it when as
quick as lightning the scene changed, local politics and
domestic incidents were forgotten in the one-absorbing subject of war, a world war one might say, a
war in which every civilized being on the globe had
an interest���in the outcome of which rested the destinies of nations.
At no time in the history of Britain has an event
happened which brought forth such a spontaneous
outburst of enthusiasm���patriotism as distinguished
from sordid jingoism. The war lias been responsible
for bringing into prominence the fact that "blood is
thicker than water."
The drums had barely sounded when Irish I lome
Rulers and L'lsteHtes, .Militant Suffragettes, Established and Free Church men were exchanging handshakes with one another���all their little wars forgotten in the newer and bigger dangers which threatened the little sea-girt island.
Politicians dropped their politics and instantly
united under one common head���with one object in
view, that of upholding the integrity of the motherland in her defense of right and justice.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier lost no time in assuring Canada's prime minister of his unstinted support in any
scheme which the government might devise in helping the motherland in her time of need and abjured
his followers at the same time to drop all party politics for the time being.
While we have no intention at this moment of transgressing into the field of politics, still we cannot shut
our eyes to some of the lessons which have been taught
us already iu the first stages.
The proclamation declaring Britain to be in a state
of war had barely been heralded in the streets of Van
couver before one and all���business man and merchant, tradesman and laborer were asking themselves
the question in the language of the street "Where was
Vancouver going to get off at." It was not very long
before a small panic started and the grocers and other
dispensers of eatables were "having the time of their
life" rushing out extraordinary orders for their customers who were afraid of what seemed all too obvious to them at the moment���a soaring of prices and
perhaps a famine.
With  the  threatened  stoppage of shipping  from
OTHER PEOPLE'S MONEY
THE most striking-looking paper currency in the
world is that of Russia, its one-hundred-ruble
note being barred from top to bottom with all the
colors of the rainbow. In bold relief in the centre
stands out a finely executed vignette in black, j he
remainder of the engraving is in dark and light brown
ink.
The Bank of England notes arc simply printed in
black ink ou Irish linen, water-lined paper, plain
white, with ragged edges. A badly scrolled or worn
Bank of England note is rarely seen, for tlie reason
that notes which in any way find their way back to
the bank are immediately conceited and new ones issued in their stead.
The notes of the Bank of France are made of white
water-lined paper, printed in black and white, with
numerous mythological and allegorical pictures.
South American notes resemble those of our own
country except that cinnamon brown and slate blue are
the prevailing colors.
German notes are printed in green and black. The
one-thousand-mark bills are printed on silk fibre paper.
It has been averred that it takes an expert or a
native to distinguish a Chinese bill from a laundry
ticket if tbe bill be of low denomination, or from a
firecracker label if the bill be fit large denomination,
the print being in red on white, or yellow on red, with
much gilt and many gorgeous devices.
Italian notes are all sizes, shapes and colors. The
smaller bills are printed on white paper in pink, blue
and carmine inks.���Vancouver World.
It is said that Canadian five dollar bills still resemble
the back of a toad���green being the prevailing color.
The Highgraders   Corner
One M. P. Who Has Chucked Up Ilis Job
Montreal Daily Mail
An Ontario member of the House of Commons
has notified liis constituents that he will be unable
to represent them any longer at the present indemnity paid members of the House. It is possible that
some self-sacrificing patriot will be found willing to
serve at the present scale.
# *    *
Datum���Cood
Toronto Star
William Datum and Lena Gootl were married re-
centlv at Listowel.
# *    #
One 'Thing That War Teaches
Edmonton Journal
Liits of people have learned more geography in the
past   fortnight  than  they  had  forgotten  in  the  last
twenty  years.
#   *   #
. Ind Vienna, Wien
Montreal Daily Mail
( lur  American  newspaper  friends are now telling
the public bow to pronounce geographical names, but
ihey will never really get them to enjoy calling Austria "Owstervich" or calling Paris "Paree."
* *    *
They Will Probably be Divorced Later Ou
Vancouver Province
A man and a woman in South Bend, Ind., were introduced while waiting in court for their divorce decrees, and were married a few hours later by a justice of tbe peace.    I lope springs eternal, etc.
* *    ��
My Word!
Toronto News
( Ixygeil was discovered by Joseph Priestly, a dissenting clergyman, who secured thc hint which led to
his  success by  experimenting  iu  a brewery.     Isn't
dissent a frightful thing?
A    ��    ��
The Answer is, NO
Minneapolis Journal
In  Berlin the  Kaiser docs with stroke of his pen
or  a   wave  of  liis  sword  what  Great  Britain  does
through  her representative assembly.    Can this despot block the inarch of this democracy?
Eating Flo'cers in London
Victoria Colonist
It is re|x>rted that the latest craze in London is fur
eating Mowers. This is confined to the homes of the
rich and luxurious. Flowers are eaten at dances anil
receptions. Chrysanthemum petals are regarded as
one of the chief delicacies.
��� 4   4
The Rise and Pall of thc Moustache
Montreal Herald and Telegraph
The moustache is now common with English physicians, though until a few years ago it was under the
ban. The ban still continues in the case of bishops
and judges, and in the navy tiie moustache is taboo-
uiiL'es worn with a beard.
* *    *
Eye Openers
Philadelphia Public Ledger
"In choosing his men." said tbe Sabbath school
superintendent, "Gideon did not select those who laid
aside their arms and threw themselves down to drink;
he took those who watched with one eye and drank
with the other."
* * *
Strong Language
Ottawa Evening Journal
The Chicago Baptist association makes this strong;
assertion in a report made public tbe other day: "Baptist women are in many cases falling victims to the
vulgar and suggestive styles of the gay, and frequently our places of worship are suggestive of
Oriental harems rather than Christian churches."
*    *   #
The Sun and the Hat.
Montreal Telegraph-] lerald.
It will be a comfort to many to know that science
has subjected the straw hat to a severe test antl has
found that it is belter than most other hats for use in
these blazing days in July. Science in this case is
represented by a committee of doctors at the Dresden
Health exhibition, who have heen experimenting with
a view of discovering the coolest form of headgear.
Golf caps they have found the hottest covering of
all, the beat of the head under one of these being 37
degrees centigrade, or one degree more than the surrounding atmosphere. Further tests taken iu the same
atmosphere of 36 degrees show a temperature of
36 1-2 degrees under a peaked cap, 33 1-2 degrees
under a bowler, 32 degrees under a silk hat, 30 degrees under a solf felt hat, 26 1-2 degrees under ,i
straw boater, and 25 degrees under a Panama hat.
If coolness is what we are aiming after, therefore,
that Panama of ours was worth the price.
u
BY THE WAY
M
THE L1TTI.K OLD Rainbow, despised and rejected
for so long, has become the greatest vessel sailing
under the liritish Hag. in the estimation of liritish
Columbians.
* ��   -.
THE HON. W. R. ROSS. Minister of Uncla in thei
McBride Government, maele a woiuleiful display of1
his ignorance of the land situation in lhe recent police j
court case where it was proved that settlers were
brought into British Columbia to settle on land sold I
to them under false pretenses with the apparent consent of the Provincial Government.
* *    4
JUDGING FROM THE photographs published of
prominent German officials, it is apparently necessary, in order to qualify for a job as a German admiral, to produce a set of whiskers luxuriant and
heavy enough for the purposes of a chest protector.
* *   *
WHILE NATIONAL TIES are being broken on
the continent of Europe the old street car ties on
Main Street will provide many a cosy "ingle neuk"
in the long dreary winter nights.
* *   4
WHEN ASKED BY ONE of the lawyers what were
conditions in the Chilcotin country it is said that the
Minister of the Crown was astonished that such a
question should be put to him and haughtily replied
that he did not know as he had no jurisdiction over
lands beyond the borders of British Columbia.
THE
Vancouver Exhibition
Association
OFFERS
���* SIXTY **
THOUSAND
DOLLARS
IN PRIZES.    GOLD MEDALS, SILVER MEDALS
And Many Special Prizes
The Exhibition will be formally opened on the night of September 3 with
suitable and appropriate ceremonies.
It will close the night of September 12.
night.
Those nine Exhibition days will be big days.    Every night will be a big
VANCOUVER EXHIBITION ASSOCIATION
H. S. ROLSTON, General Manager 424 Pacific Building SATURDAY,    AUGUST    22,    191+
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
Hastings
and
Gore Ave.
EMPRESS
Lawrence 4 Sandusky, Lessees
MA T1NEES WEDNESDA Y ani SA TURD A Y
Phone
Sey. 3907
Week Commencing Monday Evening, August 24, 1914
Mr.  LAWRANCE D'ORSAY with
THE   DEL. S.LAWRENCE    .      I
STOCK  COMPANY AND
MISS MAUDE
LEONE
In a brilliant scenic production
The Embassy Ball
MR. D'ORSAY as CAPTAIN KELLIE
Matinees 25c Any Seat
Prices 25c and 50c
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
All the Latest in Motion Pictures
Sometimes   a   thrill,   scmetimes   a   smile,   always   pictures   you   are
pleased to see, always a sure entertainment
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   DEAN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
ALL THE BEST AND NEWEST   IN   MOVING   PICTURES
MATINEE  SATURDAY AT 2 p.m.
Cedar   Cottage   Theatre
"THE HOUSE THAT PLEASES"
20th Avenue and Commercial Street
SATURDAY MATINEE. 2 to 5
... We show the best, cleanest and most up to date pictures with a
complete change daily.
COME AND  SEE
Evans,   Coleman   &   Evans,   Ltd.
IF   YOU  WANT  AN ECONOMICAL   FUEL
WHEN   PLACING   YOUR   NEXT   ORDER,   ASK   FOR
AUSTRALIAN COAL
EVANS,  COLEMAN &  EVANS
Limited
Phone 2988 Foot of Columbia Avenue
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
Vancouver Breweries Limited
A Worthy Presentation to a Worthy
Man
A couple of surprises was handed
to Police Constable R. J. Flack of
llle South Vanceeiiver Police Force,
this week. His first surprise was
when he received his orders to report to the mobilization headquarters
at Quebec for feireign service. Ilis
second was when he was confronted
by a deputation of his comrades and
friends to say goodbye to him and
wish liim God' speed. They presented him with a small token as a remembrance of the friends he was leaving. Magistrate Johnson made the
presentation and in a few well chosen
words handed to Mr. Flack a pair of
field glasses and a fountain pen, the
former to be used when on the lookout and the latter to be used to keep
iu touch with his many friends here.
His worship, in a short address, said
that it was with much regret and
pride that we see you leaving our
midst after your faithful services in
our ranks. We can only trust that
in the great fight you will remain
faithful to the flag and trust in God.
We wish to assure you that while
yem are leaving your wife and children, we will do all in our power to
aid and protect them until you return home. With a final handshake
and many kind expressions of all sorts
of good luck his friends retired and
he took his place in the ranks of
defenders of the  empire.
THEATRICAL
AWTICAL
Empresr. Theatre
Next week- attraction will be one
"l ihe moil notable of Mr. I.awrancc
DOrsay's entire engagement, It
will lie the enormously popular spec-
tacular play, famous in two ce,mi-
nenta, -The Embassy Kail" It will
be pul ..ii al tin- Hmprcss 'I'll, air,
wiili all in uriginal wealth eel scenic,
lostumc anel lijilitink effects, and wilh
an augmented anel especially -��� lei ted
cast, headed, oi e-..ur-c, by thai mow
entertaining e,f English comi dians,
Mr   Lawrance  D'Orsay.
EXHIBITION NOTES
New Westminster ariil no.-1 certainly hold an exhibition ne m year
and Mr Rolston, m making the announcement thai he hael extended an
invitation to t Ji.- Westminster ]������. .],!<-
tee  visit   the   Vancouver   Pair,  added
| helping   ihem   make   a   bigger   cxhibi-
| tion  than  they  had  ever  held
Nothing has so far been heard from
\ ictoria as t., tbe intentions of the
exhibition people there te, bold a fair
thii year, but it is sincerely hoped
that they will pr.,cecd. Exhibitions
in the coasl cities have, in the opinion of a great many, done a great
deal te, advertise the extent and value
"f British Columbia's agricultural
anel industrial resources.
The invitation to the-
min-e,.r people wa- tent
I day.
PANTAGES
Uctqualled
Vaudeville      Mettle
Vaiideetnlc
PeoUfM
New   West-
forward i"-
Correspondence
Editor "Chinook":
Sir,���A  ve-ry  sae!  accident  befell  a
little  girl  in  this  locality  this  week
when  m  passing ab.ng the  sidewalk
she wa9 knocked down anel her arm
badly   bitten   by   ile.gs.    Now   iir,   I
think u i- about time that ilu- auth-,
oritiei woke up anl got busy with the
|vagrant cur- thai abound in ihi- municipality.     A   person   i-   not   really
safe   walking   along   llu-   streets   with
I the snarling eurs running among your
j feet as all curm-rs.    Then- i- a license
j iee   for  dogs,  but   1   will  venture  to
t say   iliai   of   ilu-   thousands   of  dogs
j running  at   large   there   i-   nol   one
I half that  have a  license paiil  lur  anel
' I  think if ilu- right  effort  were ma.!,'
I on behalf nf tlu- license department,'
i a - ...el revenue would Ik- turned in'."
j tli��- municipal treasury 'er there- would
l be- los curs.    Now a man  wh ms
������"I dog will p,y for ii anel the-
j curs would I.'- culled ��� en t ami th--
troyed', thereby conferring a bless ng
"n ilie community ai large. We will
i)e- in an awful state if raliie-s break-
out here, a- it eliel in ' Intario abe ml
two year- ago when cattle and horses
had in be destre yed em account e,f
badly bitten by dogs with the germs
of rabies in them. The expense of
sending  individuals   to   the   hospitals
E.   D.   Graham,   Resident   Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
ALL NEXT WEEK
The Night  Hawks
A   STORY   OF   LIFE'S   OTHER
SIDE
Three   shows   daily   2.45,   7.20,   9.15
Admission���Matinees,     15c;     nights,
15c and 25c; boxes,  50c.
te,   undergo   the   Pasteur     cure    is
tomething  the  people  cannot  afford
al  this time, so that  the expense  will
fail   'ii the   municipality,
fours, etc..
J    IIKHWN.
Cedar Cottage, 19th August 1914.
MISTAKE       IN      EXHIBITION
ADVERTISEMENT
Through a typographical error in
lasl week's advertisement of the Kx-
Inliitieen Association, the prize-money
was made to re-aei Six Thousand De.llar- inatead of as i' should have been
SIXTY   THOUSAND   DOLLARS.
The error would let- understood of
course by the se whu have been in
the habit of exhibiting at thc Exhibition and who are aware of the mag-
nificent prize-money offered'.
Mr. and Mrs .1 hn McMartin and
family, of 173 i 27th A\ i nue Mast,
with their friends, Mrs Granger and
Mr-. Thompson, of 31st Avenue Salt,
have returned home after an enjoyable outing "ii  Bowen  Island.
'
Ray  Collins  at  the  Empress
"The' Embassy Ball" was written
especially For Mr. D'Orsay by Augustus Thomas, the distinguished playwright, who, by the way. is also thc
author of "The Earl of Pawtucket,"
likewise written especially for tin's
distinguished actur.
Tbe part of the English officer,
Captain Kellie, is admirably adapted
to Mr. D'Orsay���he wears his uniforms as ho man on the present elay
stage can, and lias full opportunity
in the play fur the display of his talents as a comedian.
There is a charming love story, in
fact, two of them, and all the favorites of the Lawrence Company headed by Miss Maude Leone will appear
prominently.
The piece will be stageel with all
Ihe original effects, and it will be a
notable production in  every  way.
*    *    *
Pantages Theatre
Tu tlie Pantages Theatre comes
as the hcadliner the comedy drama |
"Night Hawks." "Night Hawks" was |
written by I. K. Friedman, newspaper man and author, whose stories
and articles have been appearing in
the Saturday Evening Post and either
periodicals.
This playlet is described as a vivid
picture of life iii tiie underworld, Its
rapidly changing situations centre
about the admit attempts of Jue' Daniels to evade the police and escape j
from their clinches wilh Kate, the i
girl he lines. The dramatic counterplot is furnished by the efforts uf a
cab driver, whom love makes jealous, lu frustrate Jue. Rex Adams
will be seen as Jeee Daniels and Mi-s
Ethel Adamson as Kate.
The fun starts when Palfrey. Itar-
tun anil Brown make their appearance. This trio will be seen in comedy bits of vaudeville, which includes
everything from singing to acrobatic
stunts un a unicycle.
The music-loving patrons will be
given a treat by Reizella anil Rozel-
la, the novelty musicians. They play
un violins and' harps.
Twu comedians. Quiglan and Richards, will be seen in a laughing ceem-
edy   skit.   "Thc  Quack   Dentist."
Dave Woods' animal actors will delight the kiddies and amaze the
grown-ups. Almost every animal freim
a dog to a monkey will be seen upun
the  stage.
* * *
Dreamland Theatre
Large crowds daily visit Dreamland Theatre at the corner of 26th
and Main Streets, where all thc latest
productions in films are shown and
which are changed every day so that
a person visiting this show does not
see the same picture twice.
As a special feature for Monday
night three cash prizes are given to
the holders of the coupons with the
lucky numbers on. On Wednesday
nights a suitable prize is given in the
way of crockery or jewellry. On
next Wednesday a china tea set will
be given to the person holding thc
lucky  ticket.
The house is fitted with electric
fans and the seating is very comfortable, so that the people who visit
this show invariably return to spend
a very pleasant hour where every attention is given by courteous employees.
ilie statement that he would most
cheerfully co-operate wiih the New
Westminster   people   next    year    in
Vancouver   Exhibition���Livj Stock  Will be a Feature
Summer
Race Meeting
AT
MINORU PARK
A BIG SOCIETY FEATURE
::     ::     EVERY DAY     ::     ::
Special Trains leave new Granville Street
Station at   12,  12.30, and   every   fifteen
minutes until 2 o'clock
ADMISSION, $1.25, Including Grandstand and Transportation
Ladies Admitted Free except on Saturdays
Races Rain or Shine SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
���SATURDAY,    AUGUST    22,    1914
E
iw===mi
]H^3SE
Facts, Figures and  a General Directory
Touching Upon the Nations of the Earth Engaged in Bloody War
Jocooc-ocoa^jjl* tffil
3=^=M
FLEETS OF THE BRITISH NAVY
First Home Fleet
First Battle Squadron, 8 battleships. Attached
Cruiser, 1. Attached Ship. 1. Firlt Cruiser Battle
Squadron, 4 battle cruisers.
Second Battle Squadron, 8 battleships. Attached
cruiser, 1. Attached Ship, 1. Second Cruiser Squadron, 4 cruisers.
Third Battle Squadron, 8 battleships. Attached
Cruiser, 1.    Third Cruiser Squadron, 4 cruisers.
Fourth Battle Squadron, 4 battleships. Attached
Cruiser,  I,    First  Light  Cruiser  Squadron, 3 cruisers.
Mine Sweeping Gunboats, 6.
First, Second, Third and Fourth Flotillas, each of
1 cruiser, 1 depot ship, and 15 to 19 torpedo-boat
destroyers.
Second Home Fleet
Fifth   Battle   Squadron,   8     battleships.       Attached
cruiser, 1.    Fifth Cruiser Squadron, 2 cruisers.
���Sixth Battle SqtiadT.ni, 5 battleships.    Sixth Cruiser
Squadron, 3 cruisers.    Second Light Cruiser Squadron,
4 cruisers.
Mine Layer Squadron, 7 ships.
Third Home Fleet
Seventh Battle Squadron, 8 battleships. Attached
cruiser,  1.    Seventh  Cruiser  Squadron, 6 cruisers.
Eighth Battle Squadron, 6 battleships. Attached
cruiser, 1. Eighth Cruiser Squadron, Ninth Cruiser
Squadron, 6 cruisers. Tenth Cruiser Squadron, 6
cruisers. Eleventh Cruiser Squadron, 6 cruisers.
Twelfth Cruiser Squadron, 5 cruisers.
Patrol Flotillas
Sixth, Seventh, Eighth and Ninth Flotillas, each of
1 cruiser, 1 depot or repair ship, 21 to 23 torpedo-boat
destroyers, except Eighth, which has 24 turpedo-boats.
Submarines (47 in all), 3rd to 8th and Lamlash
Flotillas.
Training Squadron, 8 ships.
Mediterranean Fleet
Second Battle Cruiser Squadron, 3 cruisers.
First Cruiser  Squadron, 4 cruisers.    Ligth cruisers,
4.    Attached ships, 2.    Destroyers, 10.
Eastern Fleet
China Squadron���Cruiser Squadron, 6 cruisers.    Attached  ships, 6.    River  gunboats,   10.    Destroyers, 8.
Australia Squadron���Cruisers, 4.
East Indies Squadron���Cruisers, 4.    Attached ships,
Cape of Good Hope Squadron���Cruisers, 3.
West Coast of America Squadron���2 ships.
HOW  CANADIAN  MILITIA  WOULD  BE  PAID
IN SERVICE
The fact that the militia units in Vancouver may be
called to the front has aroused a great deal of interest
and the pay of those who go is a matter that is also of
vital interest to those who may be affected.
Below is the list. It will be noticed that there
is an extra allowance for "active service."
Active
Pay.      Allowance.    Total
Per day.    Per day       Pay
Lieut.-Coloncl       5.00 $1.25 $6.25
Major (qualified)     4.00 1.00 5.00
Captain     3.00 .75 3.75
Lieutenant (qualified)    2.00 .60 2.60
Lieutenant (provisional) ....  1.50 .60 2.10
Rank and file   75 .10 .85
There are, of course, other special allowances, but
the average pay is as above, and covers the cavalry,
artillery, infantry, engineers, signal corps, A.S.C., and
the postal corps.
AN ITALIAN'S FIGURES
This is how an Italian officer summarized the military and naval strength of the Triple Alliance and
Triple Entente three years ago :
Triple Alliance
(Germany,  Austria  and  Italy.)
Soldiers    4,550.000
Field guns   9,544
Warships   411
Displacement of ships in tons   1,217,757
Naval big guns    4,202
Triple Entente
(Britain, France and  Russia.)
Soldiers     4,085,000
Field  guns     8,972
Warships     1.005
Displacement eef ships in teens    2,888,322
Naval  big guns  8,635
GREAT  WARS  COST  IN  LIVES  AND  MONEY
Duration    Loss nf       Cust in
in Days      Life Money
England-France     8,168    1,900,00   $6,250,000,000
(1793-18151
Crimean   War          731       485,000     1,525,000,000
(1854-56)
United Slates Civil War 2,456       656,000      3,700,(100,000
(1861-65)
Franco-German          405      290,000     1,580,000,000
(1870-71)
Russo-Turkish          334      180,000        950,000,000
(1877-78)
United States-Spanish   .     101 2,910        165.000,000
(1898)
Boer War      962       90,898     1,000,100,000
(1904-05)
Russo-Japanese         576     555,900    2,250,000,000
(1904-05)
Balkan   Wars         302      145,500        200,000,000
GERMAN NAVAL ARMAMENTS
As an example of the armament of a modern German war vessel, the following particulars of the latest
battle cruiser. "Goeben" are of interest; Length, 6I0"4
feet; beam, 96 feet; displacement, 22,640 tuns; speed
on trial, 29 knols; armament, ten 11-inch, twelve 5.9-
inch, twelve 3.4-inch, four torpedo tubes; main armor
belt, 7/j-ineh; coal, 3.100 tons; oil, 200 tons.
One of the latest German Dreadnoughts, tbe "Kaiser"
has the' following dimensions and guns: Length, 56414
feet; beam, 05'-J feet; displacement, 24,110 tons; trial
speed, 22 to 23 knots; armament, ten 12.2-inch, fourteen 5.9-inch, fourteen 3.4-inch, six torpedo tubes; main
armor belt, 12J$-inch; coal, 3,600 tons; oil, 300 tons.
From the above examples it will be seen that Britain
and her allies have a foe to meet that is worthy of
iheir  steel.
RECENT WARS
Franco-German War     1870
Chinese-Japanese   War     1894
The  Turkish-Greek   War  1897
Spanish-American   War     1898
S'.utli  African  War    1899
Russo-Japanese  War     1904
Italian-Turkish   War .,.,... 1911
HOW BIG NAVIES OF THE WORLD COMPARE
Following is given a comparison of the naval
strengths .ef the chief peiwers of the world at March
31st, 1914:
1.���Battleships
Great   Britain     60
Germany     33
France     22
Russia     12
Austria     7
Italy      10
Japan      15
2.���Battle Cruisers
Great   Britain     9
Germany     4
France      2
Russia      7
Austria     6
Italy      4
Japan      6
3.���Armored Cruisers
Great   Britain     34
Germany     9
France      19
Russia     6
Austria      3
Italy      9
Japan     9
4.���Protected Cruisers
Great   Britain        17
France         2
5.���Light  Cruisers  (of all kinds)
Great   Britain     92
Germany     45
France      10
Russia     16
Austria     9
Italy      18
Japan      21
6.���Destroyers
Great   Britain      232
Germany     132
France     74
Russia     140
Austria      12
Italy      33
Japan      57
7.���Torpedo Boats, excluding those of doubtful efficiency
Great  Britain     59
Germany      16
France      148
Russia     29
Austria     63
Italy      71
Japan      47
8.���Submarines
Great Britain    77
Germany      24
France     78
Russia      37
Austria      6
Italy      18
Japan      12
9.���Gunboats, River Gunboats, etc.
Great   Britain     53
Germany      10
France    ..'  11
Russia     28
Austria     9
Japan      9
Italy      6
10.���Sea-going   Fleet  Auxiliaries
Great   Britain     52
Germany      8
France    16
Russia     22
Austria   17
Italy    17
Japan     8
AEROPLANE FLEETS OF THE RIVAL POWERS
Triple Number
Alliance. of Craft.
Austria        150
Italy        200
Germany       350
Total        700
Triple Number
Entente. of Craft.
Great   Britain        130
France       750
Russia        380
Total   1,260
START OF THE WAR
Before and After the Declaration
On May 30, 1913, peace between the Balkan states
and Turkey was concluded) by which Turkey best practically all of her European dominions; Servia got all of
Central Macedonia; Greece got Bpirus, part of Southern Macedonia, Salonika and a strip eef sea-board in
Western Thrace; Montenegro got the west half of No-
vibazar.
Austria's attitude during the war was, of course, neutral officially, but her inveterate hostility to thc Balkan
states, especially Servia, was well known and hardly
concealed. Since the war Austria has strengthened
her fe irees, both military and naval, and presented to
Europe a more vigilant outlook and a more aggressive
attitude than she has ever done in modern times; all
the while preserving strict secrecy concerning her actual
designs.
On thc 28th of June of the present year, the Archduke Francis Ferdinand, heir presumptive to the dual
throne of Austria-Hungary, was assassinated in the
streets of Sarajevo, the  capital  of  Bosnia.
This event produced profound feeling in Austria
against Servia.
On the 23rd of July Austria demanded that Servia
shemld give formal assurance that it condemned the
Servian propaganda whose aim was to detach from
Austria a portion of its territory, stop the work of
those engaged therein and express regret tbat Servian
officers had shared in the comicmned business. The
Servian government was also called upun to suppress
anti-Austrian societies anel publications and to advertise the fact, and to eliminate freem its educational system influences hostile to Austria-Hungary. All this
programme was to be carried out immediately and
uneler thc supervision of Austro-Hungarian officials.
Servia at.once replied, accepting practically all the Austrian demands, but demurring at lhe participation of
Austrian officials in  Servian affairs.
On thc 28th day of July Austria declared war against
Servia.
War bas since been declared by Germany on Russia,
France, Belgium and England, with tbe possibility of
several other countries being involved at an early date.
THE TRIPLE ALLIANCE
Thc Triple Alliance was formed in 1883 between
Germany, Austria-Hungary and Italy for tbe purpose
eif cheeking encroachments by Russia and France. By
its provisions tbe three powers are bound to support
one another in certain contingencies.
Its terms were made more definite in 1887. Tbe exact
provisions of the Alliance have not been divulged, but
are said to have been modified as to France and Italy
in 1893. Thc Alliance was renewed in 1902 and in
1907, for certain periods, and the period of its last renewal extends to June 14, 1914. It would appear that
the recent demands of Italy agaiiist Turkey, followed
by Italy's declaration of war, were assented to by the
Alliance. For many years Great Britain, while not a
party to the Alliance, was closely linked with it through
apprehension of French and Russian aggressiveness,
but later, becoming disquieted by the growth of the
German naval power, adopted, in 1902, a decided change
of policy with a view to seeking in the Balance of
Power  greater   security   against  invasion.
In pursuance of this policy Great Britain entered
into an agreement with France'in 1904 and with Russia
in 1907. The aims of the Triple Entente, so called,
Great Britain, France and Russia, were substantially
as follows :
1. the  Balance of  Power.
2. The strengthening of the treaty law iu tbe interests of peace and the status quo.
3. Disarmament.
In some directions this policy has met with considerable success.
In the event of a war between the powers of the
Triple Alliance and those of thc Triple Entente the
land forces of the Entente would exceed by probably
a million men those of the Alliance, but it is doubtful
whether the vast army of Russia could be promptly
assembled for service in the theatre of war.
The strength of the combined navies of the Entente
in ships, tonnage, armament and number of men would
exceed the combined naval strength of the Alliance.
WAR DIRECTORY
MORATORIUM���A special act of legislation authorizing the suspension of payment by debtors and
banks for a given period. The period specified in the
present instance is one month in Great Britain.
SPY���A spy is defined as a person who, acting
clandestinely, or on false pretences, obtains or seeks
to obtain information in the zone of operations of a
belligerent with the intention of communicating it to
the hostile party. By the law of war a spy is liable,
if caught, to the penalty of death. By The Hague War
Regulations soldiers not in disguise, who have penetrated into the zone of operations of a hostile army,
are not considered spies (Art. 29), and a spy taken in
the act cannot be punished without previous trial.
(Art. 30), Soldiers or civilians openly carrying messages, even  in  balloons, are not considered  spies.
KING ALBERT OF BELGIUM���Who will lead
thc Belgian troops in person, succeeded to thc throne
on the death of the late King Leopold on Dec. 17, 1909.
He is the son of Prince Phillippe, Count of Flanders,
and was born on April 8, 1875. His marriage to
Duchess Elizabeth of Bavaria in 1900, caused great
rejoicing- in Belgium. He has two sons and one
daughter, tiie eldest, Prince Leopedd, being now 13
years old. King Albert has travelled extensively and
visited the United States in 1898. He is said1 to be of
a studious disposition and strikingly like the late King
Leopold in appearance.
ARMED LINERS���By arrangement witb thc Admiralty certain British merchant steamships have been
provided with guns to protect themselves against the
attack of foreign armed merchantmen, of which there
is good reason to believe that many exist. The R. M.
S. P. Company's Aragon was the first to be so equipped, while the La Corriente and thc Themistocles were
the first vessels leaving Liverpool and the Thames
respectively, to be armed. There arc approximately
160 steam merchantmen of over 12,000 tons register,
many of which would be included in this arrangement.
CZENSTOCHOWA���Stiuated on the river Warthe
near the Silestian frontier of Russia Poland, is a town
of some 50,000 inhabitants. It is noted chiefly for its
manufacture! of woollen and cotton cloths and paper.
A famous image of the Virgin in a convent there attracts over a quarter of a million pilgrims annually.
Te defence of this convent against a large Swedish
army in 1655 is one of the most heroic episodes in
Polish  history.
ALIENSTEIN���In K.ist Prussia, on the Alle, 65
miles south uf Konigsbcrg, has a population of 25,000
and  manufacture  matches,  beer and  machinery.
VERVIKRS���Close tee the eastern frontier of Belgium, and 14 miles east of Liege, is an important
manufacturing centre producing cloth and yarns. It
has a population, including the surrounding districts,
��� ef uver 70,000.
THIONVILLK OR DIF.DKNHOFEN���Is a forti-
licel town of German Lorraine, 17 miles north of Mctz.
In the Franco-Prussian War it held out two weeks
against thc Germans in November, 1870.
BONA���Is a fortified naval station of Algeria, and
has one uf lhe best harbors on the African coast. The
town is French in character and possesses extensive
trade and1 manufactures.
MARS-LA-TOUR���Fourteen miles west by south
from Metz, is a French village, where a great battle
was fought on August 16, 1870, known also as the
battle of Vionville.
CROMARTY���A Scottish burgh, beautifully situated at the south side of the entrance of Cromarty Firth,
is 16 miles from Dingwall.
WARSAW���The capital eef Poland, is beautifully
situated on tire left bank of thc river Vistula, and is
387 miles by rail from Berlin, and 695 miles southwest
of St. Petersburg. From a military point of view Warsaw is the chief stronghold for the defence of Poland,
and is defended! by a strong fort, across the river,
known  as  Sliwicki.
LUBIN���Is one of the handsomest towns of Russian Poland, and has extensive trade and manufactures.    It is 95 miles south-west of Warsaw.
METZ���Is the capital of the German province of
Lorraine and is 80 miles northwest of Strassburg. and
170 miles cast of Paris. Previous to the Franco-
German war of 1870 Met/, was the capital of the French
province of Moselle. General Bazainc, with a vast
army, surrendered to the Germans here on Oct. 27,
1870.
VLADIVOSTOCK���A first-class f.ntress and important naval station of Asiatic Russia, is the terminus
of one of the branches of the Trans-Siberia Railway.
It is situated on the eastern arm of the gulf of Amur.
Its harbor of the Golden Horn is one uf the must
beautiful in the world, but is ice-bound three months
in the year.
3S1=^
GREAT BRITAIN
Important questions of naval and military policy are
considered by the Ceimmittee of Imperial Defence, of
which the Prime Minister is exofficiee president. The
usual members are the Secretaries of State for Foreign Affairs, War, the Colonies, and India; the Chancellor of the Exchequer; the l-'irst Lord of thc Admiralty; the First Sea Lord of the Admiralty; the Chief
of the Imperial General Staff; the Director of Naval
Intelligence; the Director of Military Operations. Other
Naval and Military officers and high officials arc from
time to time called in. The Committee has a permanent secretariat.
ARMY
The land forces of the United Kingdom consist of
the Regular Army and of the- Territorial Army. Of
these, a large part eef the Regular Army serves in
British Dominions oversea, and it is customary to
refer to these troops as the "British Army." in contradistinction to the "Native Army" or "Indian Army"
in India and to tiie "Local Forces" in South Africa and
in British Colonies. The Regular Army, whether at
home or abroad, is paid for by the Imperial exchequer
except in India (although certain colonies pay contribution! towards its upkeep); India pays a contribution towards the cost of troops at home owing to these
serving as a depot for the regular troops in India. The
Territorial Army serves only at home in peace time.
Tbe rank and file fur both Regular Army and Territorial Army are obtained by voluntary enlistment.
The Regular Army in peace time consists of the
permanently embodied troops, the Army Reserve, and
the Special Reserve.
Service in the permanently embodied portieeti eif tlle
Regular Army and the Army Reserve is for 12 years,
with permission to extend to 21 years under certain
circumstances. Of the original 12 years, from 3 to
9 are spent "with the colon," i.e., on permanent service, and Ihe remainder of the time in the Army Reserve; the majority of the men serve for 7 years with
the colors and 5 years in the Army Reserve, which is
the rule for infantry other than the Foot Guards. Men
enlist between 18 and 25 years of age. The peace establishment of the regular troups at home is considerably below war establishment; in South Africa and
thc Colonies it is higher; in India it is practically the
same as tbe war establishment. On mobilisation for
war the ranks, after eliminating recruits ami young
seddiers. are filled up from the Army Reserve, and also,
to a  small  extent,  from  the  Special   Reserve.
FRANCE
��� France has a cuast line of 1,760 miles, 1,304 on the
Atlantic and 456 een the Mediterranean. Its land frontier extends over 1,575 miles, of which 1,156 miles arc
aluiig lhe Belgian. German, Swiss and Italian frontiers,
and 419 along the Spanish frontier.
The fortified places are specially administered by
a "service des fortifications." Paris, which is considered' as the centre of defence, is surrounded by a wall
ance
:hed
. _-...��.*,    .H    ���w> , neeiillCU    l,y    a    W.i
which has 97 bastions, 17 old forts and 38 new advanc
forts or batteries, tbe whole forming two entrenche
camps at St. Denis and Versailles.
The strong places of first class, each of them with
numerous forts, are :
On the German frontier���Verdun, Toul, F.pinal, Bel-
fort, forming an advanced line; Maubcuge, La Fere,
Reims,  Langres,  Dijon,  Besancan, in  a  second  line.
On the Italian frontier���Briancon and Grenoble are
the chief places, with Lyon in the rear. There are
also a few isolated "forts d'arrets" near Nancy, Lune-
ville. Remisemont, Nice, etc.
On the coast���Toulon, Rochefort, Lorient, Brest and
Cherbourg are naval harbors surrounded by  forts.
In recent years most second class and third class
fortresses have been dismantled or at least "dcclasses."
SERVIA
In Servia military service is compulsory and universal. Liability is from 18 to 50 years of age, but recruits join at 21, and complete their military service at
45. The National Army has three "bans." The first
is the active army and its reserve, constituting the first
line. The second) "ban" is supposed to provide reserve
troops. The third is the territorial army. There is
also the levee en masse, which contains all those who
have passed through the National Army, and all other
males between  18 and 50.
Continuous service for the infantry is for l'/j year
only; for artillery and cavalry 2 years. Service in thc
reserve i.s feir 9JJ or 8 years (to complete 10 years in
the lirsl "ban"I. After this the Servian soldier passes
successively tei tbe second "ban," iu which he remains
6 years, and to the third "ban" for 8 years.
The kingdom of Servia is divided into 5 divisional
areas, each supplying a division eef 2 infantry brigades
of 2 regiments of 4 battalions, a field artillery regiment of 9 batteries of 4 guns, and a regiment of divisional cavalry. The latter resembles the yeomanry
in Great Britain, and are not embodied in time of
peace. In war. the field army, consisting of 5 divisions,
a cavalry divisieen .ef 4 regiments and 2 horse batteries,
one regiment ot mountain artill'ry. and eme of howitzers, would amount lo about 110,000 combatants. If
thc reserve troops of the lecond "ban" are fit to take
the field, they we mid raise the total strength to about
175.000. The reservists of the first and second "bans,"
not required to form first line and reserve troops, and
therefore available to make good losses in thc field,
wemld amount to seime 95,000 men.
ITALY
The extent of the land frontier of Italy is as follows : French frontier 300 miles; Swiss 418; Austro-
Hungarian 484; fremtier of San Marino 24; in all (exclusive e,f San Marino) 1,202 miles. Thc coast line of
thc peninsula measures 2,052 miles; of Sicily, 630; of
Sardina 830; of Elba and the small islands, 648; the
total length eef ceeast is thus 4,160 miles.
^^k^k^^^^k^k^k^^^^^s^^^ssss^
 .. ...... Be.iiiiii are the follow-
infi fortified places; Vado, Genoa, Spezia, Memte Ar-
gentaro, Gaeta, works in the Straits uf Messina, Tar-
anio. T" ilie north oi Sardinia a gnmp of fortified
islands form ilu- naval station oi Maddalena. Rome
i-- protected ley a circle of forts.
RUSSIA
Russia ha' an extensive fnuilier bieth by sea and
laml, protected ley numerous fortification! of various
classes. On the west. Poland is defended by a sys-
1,'n uf feiur strongl-.ulds. sometimes called the Polish
Ouaeli ilat'ial���Novogtorgievsk en ihe right hank of
the Vistula; Warsaw anil Ivangorod each on both banks
uf the Vistula; Breat-Litavak "ii the Bug. There are
numerous other lurtified places, mostly neglecteel, een
the Vistula and  Bug SATURDAY,    AUGUST    22,    1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SEVEN
Facts, Figures and a General Directory -continued
GERMANY
Germany has a total frontier length of 4,570 miles
On lln- north it is bounded by the North Sea (293
miles), Denmark (47 miles), and the Baltic (927 miles!;
on the south well-defined nieeuntain-ranges and the
Lake eef C'einstance separate it freim Austria (1,043)
and Switzerland (256 mile!); on the east Germany is
Sounded by Russia feir 843 miles; on the west by France
(242 ���miles l, Luxemburg (111 miles), Belgium (70
miles), and  Holland  (377 miles).
Some of the ce.ast defence! and batteries have been
placed under the jurisdiction of the admiralty. The
empire is at present divided into ten "fortress districts' (teitungl-lnspcctionen), each including a certain area with fortified places. Tbe following is a list
of these districts, and thc names of the fortresses in
each, the fortified place! eif the first class, serving as
camp!, being distinguished by black letters, while those
specially designed for railway protection or obstruction are marked by asterisks (*) and coast fortresses
by a dagger  (t):
1. KONIGSBERG. Konigiberg, Danzig.f l'illau.t
Memel.t Boyen,
2.
POSEN :     I'e.sen,   GlogaU,*   Neisse,   Glatz.
3.
BERLIN :    Spandau,  Magdeburg, Turgau,* Kus-
trin.
4.
MAINZ :    Mainz, Ulm, Rastatl.
5.
METZ ;    Metz,  Diedenbofen,*  Bitsch.*
6.
COLOGNE (K.iln) :   Cologne, Koblenz, Wesel,*
Saarlouls.*
7. KIEL; Kiel, Friedrichsort,t Cuxliaven,f Gee-
.-lemunde,t Wilhelmshaven.t Swinemunde.t
8. THORN: Thorn, Graudenz, Vistula Passages
i Weichselubergange),  Dirschau.
9. STRASSBURG:    Strassburg,  New  Breisach.
10. MUNICH (Munchcn) : Ingolstadt, Germer-
-heim.*
These fortresses are all connected with each other
ley means of underground telegraphs, while strategical
railway lines lead from the principal military centres
toward1! the  frontiers.
Military service in Germany is compulsory and universal with the usual exemptions. Liability (Wcbrp-
llicht) commences at the age of 17, and ends at 45,
but actual service (Heerpllicht) begins at 20. The
term of service in the First Line, or active army, is
', years, 2 in the ranks and 5 in tlie reserve, except in
lhe cavalry anil horse artillery, in which the periods
are 3 and 4. During the period of reserve service the
soldier is regarded as belonging to his corps, and is
obliged t'i join it twice in the 5 (or 4) years for training. The duration of training is limited by law to 8
weeks:   it is usually 6 weeks, or perhaps only a month.
The next stage is 5 years (cavalry and burse artillery 3 years) in the first "ban" of the Landwehr, or
Second Line Army. The Landwehr men are twice
called eiut for exercise during this period, for 8 to
14 days un each occasion. Landwehr cavalry, however,
are not called "lit fur training in time of peace. After
5 years in tbe first "ban." ..I' ibe Landwehr, lhe soldier
passes to the second "ban," anil remains in it until
lie has completed his 39th year, i.e., for 6 to 7 years
(8 to 9 in the case eef the cavalry and horse artillery).
There is no training during this period.
Finally all soldiers are passed intei the Landsturm
(second "ban") in which they remain until they have
reached the age of 45, that is fur 6 years. Thc Landsturm is a purely home defence force. The first "ban"
I'Hisi.sts uf all those between the ages of 17 and 39
who feer eme reason or another have received' no military training. The second "ban" contains all the men,
whether trained or untrained, between 39 and 45.
AUSTRIA.HUNGARY
Austria-Hungary lies in the heart of Europe The1
land frontier is formed in the west by Bavaria, the
Canton of St. GalU-n, Liechtenstein, tin- Canton Grau-
bunilcn  and   Italy;  in the  smith  by   Italy.  Montenegro,
Turkey. Servia ami Rumania; iii ilu- east i,y Rumania;
in the north east ami north by Russia; in ihe neerib by
Prussia; anil  in   llie ItOfthwesI by  Saxony.
Natural frontier! are tlle Fiehtel Mountain!, the
Biehnicrwald, the Inn, ami llie Salzach te.warels Bavaria; lhe Saab-, lhe Alps, ami the Rhine teewarels Sl.
Gallen; the High Alps te,wards Graiibiinden anel Italy;
the Lago di C.arila and Carnie: Alps also towards Italy;
towards Turkey, the- Dillaric Alps, the l.'iina ami Save;
towards Servia, Save ami Danube; towards Roumania,
the Seiutheast and ICast Carpathian's; te,wards Russia,
Ihe Dniester and Vistula; towards Prussia, the Riesen
and Iser Gebrige; towards Saxony, tin   Brz-Gebirge,
The following are the chief territorial defences.
In Galicia���Cracow, fortified and entrenched camp
at Przemysl. Hungary, on the lefl of tbe Tisza, Gyu-
lal'ebervar, .ir.nl and Temesvar; on the Danube, Knin-
arom. l'ctervarad and Orsova.
In  Dalmatia  is  the coast fortification <,f Cattaro;
in I stria. Peela. fortified naval barhe.r. The- Alpine
frontiers in Tyrol have defences on all the mutes, and
also between Tyrol and the Adriatic. Serajevo is a
fortified place. The Austrian capital, Vienna, and the
Hungarian capital. Budapest, arc- undefended. Pola,
the chief naval port, is stn.ugly fortified, belli towards
sea and land, and has been recently enlarged, su as tu
be abb- to accommodate the entire licet. The arsenal
of tlle imperial and royal navy is als,o in Pola; Triest
is the great storehouse, and there is alsei an arsenal of
the navy.
FORCES OF NATIONS AT WAR
Tbe land strength uf nations now  at war is as follows :
Triple Entente
Great   Britain   (regulars)      800,000
Great   Britain   (unorganized)     3.000,000
Russia   (regulars  and reserves)     5.500,000
Russia   (unorganized)     5.200,000
France  (regulars and reserves)     4,000.000
France    (unorganized)      1,000,000
Belgium  (regulars and reserves)     22,000
Belgium    (unorganized)      400,000
Servia   (regulars   and  reserves)     300,000
Servia   (unorganized)     100.000
Total     20,522.000
Triple Alliance
Germany   (regular-   and   reserves)      5,200,000
Germany (unorganized)     1,000,000
Austria-Hungary   (regulars and  reserves i... 2.000,000
Austria-Hungary   (unorganized)     3.000,000
Total     11,200,000
Total population of the world     1,623.3(10.000
AREAS OF COUNTRIES AT WAR
Following  is   the  area  'ef llie  countries involve!
war :
Miles.
British   Empire        1.1123.712
German  Empire   '.        208.780
German  Africa          1,0.15,080
Austria-Hungary            261.029
Russian   Empire          8.647.657
Belgium    11.373
France and  Colonies         4,372.000
Servia    23,661
Total         28,083.298
I  in
GREAT BRITAIN'S "FIRST FLEET"
The  Admiralty  has given  "in  the  following details of thi   "Firsl   Fleet," *
lefl    Portsmouth   fe.r   an   unknown    rendezvous in "i   near llie  North  Sea:
Tonnage Completed Si>< ��� il Main Armamenl   Compfemenl
Ir..ii   link,    (Flag-ship) 25,000       PM4       n 10 13.5in. 12 6-in 900 men
FIRST BATTLE SQUADRON
Tonnage Completed Speed Main   Armament   Complei
Marlborough    25,iki<)       \<>u      22 in 13.5-in. 12 6-in. 900 men
St. Vincent     19.2.50       1910       219 in 12  -in. 18 4-in. 780 men
ColKngwood   19.25H       iwi      21.5 in 12  -in. ]n 4-iu. 724 men
Colossui    20,000      1911       215 lo :.'  -i��� 16 4-in. 780 men
Hercules 20.000       1911        21.5 lo 12  -in. 16 4-in. 780 men
Neptune  19,yno      1911       21.7 10 12  -in.        16 4-in. 780 men
vanguard    19,250       1910      22.1 10 12 -in. 18 4-in. 724 men
Superb    18.600        1909        21.6 10 12   -in. 16 4-in. 870 nun
Ana. he.l t.' the Firsl Squadron an- the light cruiser Bellona, capabli of ;, speed of
25.9 km,!s ami [he repair ship Cyclops.
SECOND BATTLE SQUADRON
Tonnage Completed Speed Main Armament   Complement
King George V  23.000       1912       22 in 13.5-in. 16 4-in.      900 men
"nun    22.500       1911        21 10 13.5-in, 16 4-in.      800 men
Ajax    23.000       1913      22 10 13.5-in. 16 4-in.     900 men
Audacious   23.000       1913       22 10 13.5-in. 16 4-in.     -'Kill men
Centurion    23.000       1913      22 10 13.5-in. lo 4-in      900 men
Conqueror  22.500       1912       22.12 10 13.5-in. 16 4-in.      xoo me-n
���Monarch    22.500        1912       21.XX 10 13.5-in. 16 4-in.      800 men
Thunderer  22,500       1912      21 10 13.5-in. 16 4-in.     800 men
Attached to tin- Second Battle Sepiaelr,,n i- the- light cruiser Boadicea, tonnage 3,300
and speeel 25.75 knots,
THIRD BATTLE SQUADRON
Tonnage Completed  Speeel Main  Armament    Complement
King Edward VI]    16.350        1905        19.04 4 12-in. 49.2-in. 106-in.     825 men
Hibernia    16,350       1906       I960 4 12-in. 4 9.2-in. 106-in       825 men
Africa   16.350       1906       18.95 412-in.49.2-in. 106-in.     825 men
Britannia    16.350       1906       18.74 4 12-in. 49.2-in.  106-in.      825 men
Commonwealth   16,350       1905       19.01 412-in. 49.2-in. 106-in.     825 men
Dominion    16.350      1905       19.5 412-in. 49.2-in. 106-in.     825 men
Hindustan    16,350       1905        19.01 4 12-in. 49.2-in.  10 6-in.      825 men
Zealandia    1-6,350       1905       18.59 412-in.49.2-in. 106-in.      825 men
Attached to the Third Battle Squadron is the light cruiser  Blanche, tonnage 3,350
ami speed 25.67 kiie.ts.
FOURTH BATTLE SQUADRON
Tonnage Completed Speed Main Armament   Complement
Dreadnought     17.900       1906       21.85         10 12-in. 77(1 men
Agamemnon   16.500       1908        I.s.75           4 12-in. 10 9.2-in.      865 men
Temeraire    18.600       1909       22.07         10 12-in. 10 4   -in       870 men
Attached iu the Fourth Battle Squadron is the light cruiser Blonde, tonnage 3,350
and speeel 25.43 km els.
FIRST BATTLE CRUISER SQUADRON
Tonnage Completed Speeel Main Armament   Complement
Lion    26.350       1912 28.5 8 13.5-in. 10 4-in.       980 men
Queen  Mary   27.000       1912 28.0 8 13.5-in. 16 4-in.       1000 men
Princess   Royal    26.350        1912 2H.S 8 13.5~-in. Id 4-in owl mm
New Zealand   18,800       1912 25.0 8 12  -in. lo 4-in.        7SD men
SECOND CRUISER SQUADRON
fonnage Completed Speed Main Armament   Complement
Shannon    14,600       1908      22.49        4 9.2-in.        10 7.5-in.      850 men
Achilles    13.55H       1907      23.27        6 9.2-in. 4 7.5-in.      704 men
Cochrane    13.550       1907       23.29        6 9.2-in. 4 7.5-in.       704 men
Natal  13,550       1907       23.33        6 9.2-in. 4 7.5-in        704 nun
THIRD CRUISER SQUADRON
Tonnage Completed Speed            Main Armament Complement
Antrim   10,850      1905      23.02        4 7.5-in.        6 6-in. 655 men
Argyle 10,850       1906       22.3S         4 7.5-in.         6 6-in. 655 men
Devonshire    10.850        lo:i5       22.97         4 7.5-in.         6 6-in. 655 nun
FOURTH LIGHT CRUISER SQUADRON
Tonnage Completed Speeel            Main Armament Complement
Southampton      5.400        1913        25 5                         8 6-in. 4110 men
Birmingham     5.440       1914       25 5                      9 6-in. 400 men
Make Your Gardens Beautiful
Don't procrastinate! Those whe have their gardens well cultivated should act quickly in secu-ing what their tastes prompts to
select to make home surroundings beautiful. This obviates a rush
the last weeks of the planting season and consequently confers upon
us a direct favor. Our staff, through generous patronage are taxed
to the limit every day, late and early.
Don't delay placing your orders quickly, thereby preventing a
rush and enabling us to give efficient service in meeting your wants.
Our stock of flowering plants (Biennial and Perennial) cannot be
surpassed on this continent.
This is not, to use the slang phrase���hot air���but a fact. When
you want cabbage, cauliflower and tomato plants order from us.
Catalogues mailed free on application.
ROYAL NURSERIES, LIMITED
Office���710 Dominion Building, 207  Hastings Street West Phone Seymour 5556
Store���2410 Granville Street Phone Bayview 1926
Greenhouses and Nurseries at Royal on B.C. Electric Kailway, Hburiie Line, about
two miles south of the City limits. Phone  Ebume 43.
Fairview Sand & Gravel Co.
Corner Front and Manitoba Streets
TELEPHONE FAIRMONT   552
BEST PRICES FOR SOUTH VANCOUVER AND
FAIRVIEW DISTRICT
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
19��S  ALBERT  ST.
TELEPHONE   HIGH.   131
ENGINEERS,  MACHINISTS  iLND   FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE  HYDRANTS AND  SPECIALS
REPAIRS OP ALL DESCRIPTION'
Hughes Bros' Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET  EAST, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We carry everything in Wines, Liquors and Cigars
No order too small, and none too large  for this popular Liquor Store
Store open every evening until 11 p.m.
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
Leaving our Store every Thursday and Friday morning at 9 a.m.
Price List mailed free on application
WILLOW  HOSPITAL
Corner BROADWAY and WILLOW
PATIENTS   RECEIVED  FROM  $15.00  PER  WEEK
Miss HALL and Miss WESTLEY, graduate nurses
Phone Fairmont 2165
BEER
BEER
YOU CAN GET ANY AMOUNT FROM THE
International  Importing  Company
303 PENDER STREET WEST
Bottlers of B.C. Export and Bchemian
Free Delivery to Your door in South Vancouver every Thursday
Phone Seymour  19">1
Dominion
Equipment & Supply Co.
LIMITED
Contractors and Municipal Machinery, Equipment and Supplies
Phone Seymour 7155
1150 Homer Street
Vancouver
Glazed Cement
Sewer Pipe
B.C.
'jims>
Is the choice of property owners in
every city where its value has been
demonstrated. It gives good service
and has durability.
Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.
155 FRONT STREET WEST
Phone Fairmont 122
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
CORNER 8th AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
Fairmont 189 Always Open
Furnishers of Complete Funerals for $55.00
This includes Burial Case, Hearse, Family Carriage, Removal
Charges and all  Personal Services.
We guarantee quality of goods, services and equipment to be first-
class. We make no misleading statements, and we have a staff of
competent men who are prepared at any hour to render the best service possible to  be obtained anywhere.
Mount   Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Always Open Use of Modern Chapel to All
CORNER 8th AND MAIN STREET Telephone Fairmont 189
P. H. GROTE���Formerly Center & Hanna's Branch
COME IN OUT OF THE DUST!
Fruits
Pure Ice Cream
ICE   COLD   SOFT   DRINKS.   COOL   FRESH   BUTTERMILK,
CANDIES, CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC.
" The Place with the Gramophone " Open Day and Night
Chinook Ice  Cream Parlor
4251  MAIN STREET
The Terminal Steam Navigation Co.
Limited
HOWE SOUND ROUTE
SS.  "BALLENA
lcives   Union    Dock  g ^
at   9.15   a.m.
SS. "BOWENA"
leaves  Union  Dock  at
daily, Sunday
daily, iat     10-''0     am-     ^or
' I Bowen   Island,   Britan-
Sunday at 10.3O a.m., I nia     Mines,     1'orteau,
i      et i, ��*:���-.! Mill     Creek.       (Anvil
for Bntannia Mines|Is]andi     Mon _     Wed _
and Newport. ! and Sat.)
SS.   "BRITANNIA"
leaves the Union Dock
at 9.15 a.m. daily for
Gt. Northern Cannery,
Caulfeilds, Eagle Harbor, Fisherman's Bay,
Bindlev's, Eagle Cliff,
lnvcrcraig. (Horseshoe
Eay,  Tues.  and  Fri.)
These trips afford passengers a magnificent view of the scenery
among the islands and glaciers all day. Do not miss these trips.
$1.00 round trip, good for day of issue only. For information phone
Seymour 6330.
75 per cent, of your Summer Cooking can be
done with Electric Household Appliances
just as well as with a Kitchen Range and
with much greater comfort and convenience
Electric Household Appliances are ready for operation, day or
ni��ht, on an instant'", attention to connecting the cord with the
fiuuse'.*��ld 3ockct.
ihey can do everything in the line of light cooking, preparing
tea or coffr?, miking toast, preparing eggs, frying chops, etc. You
don't want heavy meals during the hot weather and the appliances
just meet this demand and make it unnecessary to have a hot fire
going.
Electric Household Appliances cost only a few cents per hour
of continuous operation. To prepare an ordinary meal takes but a
fraction of an hour.    They are guaranteed   by   the   manufacturers.
See our full line of Electrical Household Appliances
Cirri]] ft  Hastings Sts.
113b Granville St, near Davie EIGHT
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,    AUGUST    22,    1914
FAMOUS "JINGLE POT" COAL
Costs you no more than inferior grades.   Quality only
is what has increased our sales
WE OPERATE TWO YARDS
COAST LUMBER & FUEL CO., LIMITED
Yard No. 1--4905 Ontario St., Cor. Bodwell Rd.
Phone:   Fraser 41
Yard No. 2���3612 Victoria Road, Cor. 20th Ave.
Phone: Highland 226
Vancouver   Exhibition���Omi,  from Hastings Park Kennels
Inter-Municipal Sports at Point Grey
The following is a complete list of
events and the names of the winners
at the Inter-Municipality Games on
Saturday :
Athletic Results
The programme for the afternoon,
together with the events and records
made are as  follows:
220-yard race, open to members
and residents of Point Grey���First,
S. Thornton; second, John Murdoch;
third,  W.  B.  Greig.
100-yards race, open to boys under
16 years���First, Mangold; second,
Kent;  thiril,  Huxtable.
100-yards race, open to girls under
16 years���First,   Miss   Lochlan;     se-
ond. Miss Frizellc; third, Miss Huxtable.
Hop, step and jump, open to club
members only���First, William Kean;
second, John MacDonald; third, Geei.
Gray.
100-yards race, open, inter-municipal championship���First, William
Kean, P. G; second, John MacDonald, P. G���; third, E. S. Palmer, S. V.
High jump, open, inter-municipal
championship���First, William Kean,
P. G.; second, E. S. Palmer, S. V.;
third, George Gray, S. V.
Putting 16-pound shot, open, inter-
municipal championship���First, J.
MacDonald. P. G.; Alexander Logan;
third,  J.   Murdoch.
Standing  long jump,  open  to  club
members���First, J. MacDonald, second, William Kean: third, W. Walker.
220-yards race, open, inter-municipality championship���First, Jack
Browne, Burnaby; second, Sam
Thornton, P. G; third, E. S. Palmer,
S.  V.
Throwing 16-pound hammer, open,
inter-municipal   championship���First,
A. Logan, 121 feet; J. MacDonald,
107 feet 1 inch.
Pole vault, inter-municipal championship���First, J. MacDonald; second, J. MacDonald; third W. B.
Greig,
440-yards race, open, inter-nuinici-
pal championship���First, Stanley
Ross; second, Jack Browne; third, W.
B. Greig.
Throwing  56-pound   weight,    open,'
inter-municipal championship���A. Logan,  28  feet  6  inches;  second,  John
Murdoch,   26   feet   4   inches;   George
Gray, 23 feet 8 inches.
100-yards race, open to councillors
of Richmond, South Vancouver, Burnaby and Point Grey���First, W. Ross,
Burnaby; second, J. A. Kerr, South
Vancouver; third, Councillor Welsh,
of Point  Grey.
Inter-municipal tug-of-war���First
heat, Point Grey Waterworks Department won from South Vancouver
Fire Department in two straight pulls.
Second heat. South Vancouver Police
won from Point Grey Police in two
straight  pulls.      Third     heat     Point
Grey Waterworks won from South
Vancouver Police.
120 hurdle race, open, inter-municipal championship��� W. Kean, P. G.;
second. George Gray; third, E. S.
Palmer.
Donkey race, confined to club members and residents of Point Grey���
First, Greig and White, second, Walker and Clouston.
Broad jump, open, inter-municipal
championship���First, George Gray;
second, W. Kean; third. W. B. Greig.
Mile race, open, inter-municipal
championship���First. George Gray;
second, C. B. Browne; third, F. O.
Bell.
75-yards sack race, confined to club
members���First, J.  Murdoch; second,
VV. B. Greig; third, A. Logan.
Novelty race, confined to club member!���First, W. Walker; second, \\.
Vallance; third, J. Whyte.
100-yardl race, Burnaby employees
���J.   Browne.
Departmental relay race, confincei
te, members of the club���First, Poinl
Grey Waterworks team, comprisint
Jack Edgar, James Whyte and Sam
Thornton.
High jump, open to club member
only���First. William Kean; second
W.  B. Greig; third, A. Logan.
Lady employees' race, 50-yard s
race open to all ladies employed' b>
thc four municipalities���First, Mis-
Martin,  S   V.;  second,  Miss  Hunter
S. v.
i
Irrigation in  Western Canada
The Western Canada Irrigation Association held ils Eighth Annual Convention in the City 'ef Perttlcton,
Okanagan Valley, Province nf British Columbia, August 1/. 18 and 19.
The meeting convened nn the morning of the  17th at 9.30 o'clock.
Experts in fruit culture, exponents
of alfalfa production and practical
students of modern farming in all its
ainilications attended. Questions of
greatest interest to irrigationists were
discussed and dealt with by prominent authorities from California, Oregon, Idahee, Washington and Utah,
as well as thc Prairie Provinces and
British Columbia. The splendid encouragement that the Association has
received in the attendance of delegates at its last two Conventions; the
fact lhat for the first time in history
the International Irrigation Congress
was held in Canada a month later,
anel that some of ils permanent officers addressed the Convention, and
the general interest that is steadily
manifesting itself throughout the entire West in the science eif irrigation
practically assured a successful meeting-
Irrigation is a science that is somewhat misunderstood, is the opinion of
one eminent authority. To a large
number of people it stands for "reclamation," as the only means of sal-
vatieen   for   lands     which     otherwise
would he useless. Irrigation, it seems
to be though, is merely a substitute
for rainfall, and is required only in
those countries which unfortunately
have none. The success of irrigation
in converting desert or arid areas into prosperous agricultural communities, lends color to this rather common   impression.
Without attempting to under value
this branch of irrigation progress, it
should be emphasized that irrigation
has another and higher mission���not
so much to create conditions of productiveness as to increase them
Firstly, it can suplement rainfall, and
secondly, it can he used as to make
agriculture   more  profitable.
The fac-t that irrigation can be and
indeed, often is, called into servict
in districts which have an ordinary
rainfall, establishes that irrigation
does not take the place of natural
precipitation, but rather helps it. Irrigation farming is a movement in
advance on farming by rainfall. Thc
farmer in a rainy country may suffer as much because it rains too copiously at thc wrong time, as he does
because it does not rain when his
creeps need moisture. Seldom does
he want all his ground watered at
the same time; some crops thrive
only when moist, and some are destroyed by moisture.    It might be said
that there are no two plants which
require exactly the same quantity of
moisture at exactly the same stage
of growth.
Under  irrigation,  the  exact  degree
of moisture ean bc applied to suit any
crop.     The   very   color   and'   texture
of fruits and vegetables can be regulated.     The   plants   can   be   kept   always evenly moist until they have attained   their   maximum   development
and   then,   with   the   water   shut   off,
can be ripened quickly.    For instance
onions   cultivated   in   this   way   have
, he  most  perfect  qualities  while  pontiles   which  are  kept   always  evenly
noijt arc smooth and free fremi sec-
end   growths.     Irrigation   farming   is
he only system that ordinarily permits of the intelligent treatment of
ivery   individual   crop.
Irrigation is beneficial to any country because it promotes intensified
methods of farming. If a given area
can be made to produce even ten per
rent, more than it could by the ordinary methods, then everyone.' ibarel
ill greatly increased prosperity. Firstly, the cultivator himself obtains bigger returns per acre, with a correspondingly bigger income. More labeir is required e.n the land Closei
settlement is caused���in fact, irrigation and thc "syndicate farm" are
not   compatible.    The   basis   of  agri
cultural prosperity is the small farm
worked by and supporting a large
family; and that is what irrigation
tends to strengthen. With a larger
number of people working on the.
land, all with a larger spending capacity there would be a greater circu
latiein of money and an increased
traffic in merchandise of every d��s-
criptiein. affecting not only the smali
country traffic which came into direct contact with the agricultural producer, but als.i Ihe iarger centres
from which supplies were obtained;
and thus the good results would be
like a inowball, getting bigger and
bigger as it went. Irrigation can do
these things, and neit on a ten per
cent, basis, but on a twenty-five, fifty
anel (,ne hundred per cent, increase
ll is often askeel why irrigation is
necesisry in Western Canada. In
the southern part of the province of
Alb' rta, the Canadian Pacific Railway has brought a large area of approximately three million acres mirier irrigaliem, this being the largest
individual project on the American
continent. Broadly speaking, intensive methods of agriculture have not
heen practised in Western Canada
anel this undertaking was. therefore
entered into ai part of a great dc-
vebipment  scheme.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.gvchinook.1-0315515/manifest

Comment

Related Items