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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Sep 20, 1913

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Array WSove* CHINOOK
Vol. II. NO. 1')
VANCOUVER, B.C
New Carline East and West
Will Traverse Wilson Road
Gangs at Work Laying Track from  Kerrisdale to Main
Street on Link of Line Planned to Run Right
Through to Victoria Road
rut' .1 cents
Arc yin intereited iu Wilson Road?I
he. ye.u  own    property    mi    this
street ?
Do ymi   live  on   Wilson   Koad?
W'e have some news for you.
At this present moment, the British
Columbia Electric Railway Company
has a big gang of men at weerk laying car tracks mi Wilson Koad���in
Point  Grey.
Now this line i- to be projected
right into Smith Vancouver. The
company will complete it from Kerrisdale   tn   Main  street   this  year.
This means that Wilson Road,
which   lias   been   the   hope   of   many
a homeseeker and investor and speculator fe.r many years is about to come
into its own, It will be another
Broadway, the optimists say. With
the completion of car tracks from
Kerrisdale t'i Main, the lirst step will
have been  made in this direction.
If one wen- to secure the colili-
dence of Mr. K. II. Sperling, of the
B.C.E.R., one would doubtless lind
from that gentleman that il i- the
company's intention t'i eventually
Bhoot double ear tracks right down
Wilson Road from the Point Grey
boundary to Main street, to the Municipal Hall, to Victoria Koad and on
into Burnaby.
Building of a car track on Wilson
Road, from  Kerrisdale to Main street I
will in- tin- lirsl  step, practically, in
the construction eef rn,-s car lines ill
Seeuth Vancouver, anil it will be welcomed by a good many thousands tit
ratepayer -
11 is likely that the service which
will be Inaugurated on the Wilson
Keead line will be similar tei that now
in force mi Sixteenth avenue from
Main street to the Shaughnessy
Heights  District,    opening nf    this
territory will assist the development
of  Main street in no small measure.
THE  PAVING  CONTRACT
Counsel for Mr. Edward Gold anil
other property owners of Smith Vancouver, who are endeavoring tee stop
paving operations on Main and
Fraser streets, state! that though Mr.
Justice Morrison, at the hearing
Monday, refused to enjoin the individual members of iln- council as
defendants, the paving contractors
have been enjoined, and in proceedings with the attempt to have- tile
council restrained from granting the
paving contract, the contractors will
lie  examined   for  discovery.
The plaintiffs will endeavor to
make goe.d insinuations made ill
court, Monday, which brought forth
mne frank criticism from Mr. Justice Morrison.
A New Industry in Sight        I	
On North Arm of Fraser
At Foot of Main Sireet Company Get Long  Lp"^    m
Local Man on Five-acre Site for Rubber Pc,ttory
To Eventually Employ Hundred" of Men
lh.   -    ne-e-ri'   :������<���   now   preparing
the b-..iiling of the factory.
Ktlbher    can    lie    LmiiuKi      ,-;,�����  	
South   America  and   shin,,,.,!   i,.   Van" I JjilTTor the \wtamg
^^^_^^_^^^^^^  , I
ber hoots   to  automobile   tin-     The
, investment  i- likely t'e run into Bev-
great *.-'"'"Kt.1 '"Peral   hundred!   of   thousands  of  dol-
ru i ii-r I-.,..el-  in   tjr,  a.1. t     unima as i, ,     , ,       ,
i mum   i_e."ei-  iii  tinLtpr     ^       f    tl)j I lars, anel  whin the plant is in
South  America  and   shipped  -..   Van    ��� ,]*"* ["r ""   l"'""n�� "'  tnc '���'"""'
couver jusl  as cheap!)   as it  caiUW-r"  ,s  pre."-'"  '"  manufacturi   ;
bought   and   shipped   tP   \l,. ���������,,;   -r   kim',.   ..'rubber   male-rials   fr .in   ru
X-     V...I. "" 1,..-    l.���,l.     1,,    .,,,!,,1,.,,l,il,.     sir. - 'I'I
New Vork,
There i> ju-t
in  any
jtK-T    l��
till
there
world.
The Xo����* -^n" "' the Frasi r offers
the lie:s' n'"' cheapest industrial sites
(,n |t*c market today.
It   t'.nik   a   er. <r w'U   local   man.
5!fvy owner of N'orth Arm waterfrontage, and associates to put these
three facts together, and the result
will In- thai Smith Vancouver will
get a new industry���the Iir-t rubber
manufacturing plant in British C.1-
uniliia.
This gentleman is leasing the company   five  acres  of  his  property   -
the  North  Ann of the  Fraser for
long   te
 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ pera-
tion,   several   hundred   workmen   will
be-  employed,
It  is  -tateel  that  the  new concern
is in ing financed by the Canadian
ift\).y Company, of Montreal, a
nige incern which practically controls rubber business in the Do-
minioi and with which tbe biggest
nmney"   men  of Canada are identi-
'��� s te   -bis,  no  authoritati. ������  ii for-
m : vailable at the present mo-
ii. ���
It is it it-t.eiiil thai the attention
of ti ������ ce pany was directed to the
N'orli Ar of the Fraser through information -ent   oul   by     the     South
of years, and the men be-' Vancouvei   Hoard  of Trad
CAR TICKETS GOING UP
BUT WALKING IS GOOD
No Three-cent Fare in Vancouver���
In Future it Will Be Five Cents
Straight���Street Railway Company
Declare They Must Bow Before the
Forces That are Raising their Operating and Maintenance Expenses.
While it is quite likely that the B.
C. Electric Railway Company were
driven by financial conditions to hoist
thc price of a ride on a South Vancouver or city street ear, the company
will not have to wait very long for
the howl that will go up from South
Vancouver.
Iu this municipality where the question of the validity of thc B. C. Electric Company franchise has been under discussion ipiie frequently, the
new rate is being accepted as a decided hardship by the working people. In other quarters, however, the
change has been accepted cheerfully,
many believing that the new schedule
places the city on absolutely the lame
footing as Smith Vancouver (South
Vancouver still having the advantage of the settlers' ticket, which
calls for a straight live cent ride.)
Councillor Dickinson, at the council meeting Wednesday, expressed
strong disapproval of the change, lie
declared it was up to the South Vancouver council to look immediately
into  the  company's   friinchi.se  in   the
municipality.
Other expressions of opinion were
more temperate but at the meeting
of the Voters' League at Collingwood,
several speakers declared that Smith
Vancouver should rise in arms
against  the new "oppression."
Reeve Kerr stated that he believed the new scale was probably justified and that South Vancouver would
not  suffer  much   from  it.
Wednesday was thc last day that
the red, green and white tickets
could be purchased at old prices from
the II. C. Electric Railway Company.
Thursday morning the new increased
car fares came into effect. Persons
using only green tickets, which are
Unlimited on the cars, instead of getting six for 25 cents, will henceforth
have to pay 25 cents for live only.
It will be possible however, to get
green tickets a little cheaper by buying live of them with live whites fo'
forty   cents,   but   the   white     ticke
(Ce in tinned  on   Page 9)
Mr. James  A.  Kerr,  P   -eeve o{ Soth    Vancouver,    whese    policy    of
public ownership of gas ?    nd electric plms am, industrial sites has br0ught
forth wide comment.    �� Mr   Kerr ig at resew servi      his second ,erm as I
Reeve of the Municip-  Ality
PORK  PACKERS  FOR ' "THERE  DWELT  A   MILLER
NORTH  ARM  OF FRASER HALE   AND   BOLD"
B.C.E.R . Co. Reduces Cost of
Electric Lighting in Municipality
Company I Decides to put South Vancouver on  the  same
Baf fiis as the City and Redution Ranges From
Twenty-five to Fiftr Per Cent
Whethe     r ,,r ,���,t ,|u. newiv formed
policy ol        t]R. suu,|, Vancouver coun-
, uy  a  municipal   electric  light
per plant has had any bearing
cil  to
and p
'    ' '       net plant has had any bearing
on tlie  ^situation, Wednesday morning
,:lu  "'   /.i announcement  from the B. C.
it,,   h   fcf,     ...   .i a....   .i....    i ���f.._.i.
~-   ~   $..   to   the  effect   that   henceforth,
rate:    f. ror ciectrjc ]jK|lt ;n South Van-
cou      eer would be reduced to the same)     Th   -ompam   has  also  decided   t
ale as charged in  the  city ol  Van-1 retUK ;ts   c|,,'rKl.   ,-,������   ,|,t.   rental   of
'UVer. I meter-iftside the  present   limit-  o
Vancw er from J.) cents  to  15 cent
qui, >umas, Cli'J iwack, Coquitlam,
Pori iloody anil other points on tin-
Mai: nd serleil by the company.
Tin abovejiediu-tion in lighting
rate- epresi.'it- a decrease of from
appr. matclyjj," per cent, tee 50 per
cent., tKordilg to the quantity of
ciirre   Consulted.
Big Packing Plant Ready to Locate
in South Vancouver If Present
Technicality in Health Bylaw can
Be Adjusted so that They May
Bring Live Pigs  Into Municipality.
That the Xorth Arm is being discovered by the men with manufactories to find sites for was further pro-
ven. Wednesday, w lien several packing men interviewed the council regarding plans in hand to build a packing house on the banks of the North
Arm.
The Mainland Packing Company is
the name of the concern seeking to
locate in the municipality, and the
gentlemen handling negotiations at
present say that they regard very
favorably the possibilities of the Fraser  waterfront.
What the initial investment will
be  has  not  heen  made  public.
Reeve Kerr stilted, after an interview with the packing mer.. that the
council would do everything possible
to facilitate the locating of the firm
in Seeuth Vancouver.
It i- pi ssible that the Mainland
Packing Company may be given an
exemption from taxation for a period
of years. As t��� > this, however, nothing authoritative has bein  learned.
For a start, the company will ein-
pli.y upwards ������! a hundred hands, it
is stat
K
-it
-warthy   cheek
li.Wll!"    -,liei
Burned the
, like lire.
"C'.uncilloi-   Milia     	
he.
For the lilnnith time during the
meeting. Councillor Millar again
opened his remarks with his favorite
phrase, "But before we gei on, what
I  want to know  is "
"Millar! Mill.,:' said the Reeve
quickly,  nervou-ly.
Just :i tritle se t in hi- ways, is
Councillor Mill -. and he did not sit
| down.
The Reeve g: ibbed for something,
Made a  forward  lunge.
The Do.tbti-i Thomas' lower lip
dropped almosl to his knees.
Like  a   comet,  it   flashed  through
the   electrically   charged   atmosphere
i of   the    Smith     Vancouver    council
. chamber
Councillor   Millar   did   not   turn   a
| hair and his 'eft eyebrow twisted it-
Iself  curie usly intei  the   familiar   Millar  interrogati in  mark.
Tin ae who vitnessed the incident
declare thai if the Reeve had fired
ii copy of the Municip 1 Clauses Act,
and had it strui the vorthy Millar,
it w mid have k 'leel bira. It turned
eeut. however, te be but the minute
book ..f the co- icil. ;ts contents
was of ton weig tj' a haracter to
permit e.f precipitatirW I any distance accurately and so a tragedy was
av. ided.
S OF THL \ANCOUVLR. HARBOUR. S, DOCK. EXTENSION COMPANY. LTD TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1913
Forty-two      year-      ago      William
Train was mi tin- editorial staff ol
an important London paper. He left
that position ior a more adventurous
life, Ai a journalist In- went to Paris,
wa- sentenced i" death over the Paris
Commune and had a narrow  ei :ap��
\r ��� travelling through India ami
other e-ieiiuti-ir- lu- has settled down
as I'..liei Magistrate fi Regina. Being on the Coast lie paid a visit to
hii ..hi friend, Mr. J. Francis Bursill,
wh.. succeeded him on the London
paper 42 years ago, and remained
on  the  editorial  staff  eef  that   paper
>r   twenty   vear-.     X..'.   having   met
tOl   ir-
many
'}   years   the
gentlemen    had
me.rics te. exchange of Wil-
ham  Saw       Thus   CatU��gi  GeQrge
S^tUS   Sa....iml   othef   ce,ebrUie,
Johnny Toole, Swinburne and others
',- in. mi el tn visit Lancing and mel
Mr. Bursill there. The combined
ag< - ..i the three ''(>ld Cronies" who
gathered at Collingw I on Saturday
was 209 yean and si they have all
moved In interesting lociety their
talk amounted to "history." The
younger .people wen- -.. interested
that they extracted from Mr. Trant
and Mr.' Bursill a promise that they
wmild write their "Reminscences.'
Tin-  interesting  company  included
Mr. W. II. Kent. Mr. Trant junior,
and Mr. and Mr-. G. Herbert Head.
Mr. Head is a London barrister now
settled in Vancouver. His wife is a
daughter of the keeper of the Tower
of London In which historical building   -In-   lived   before   her   marriage.
In the  oat harvest out on Lulu lsit.....
WELL-KNOWN MUNICIPAL EXPERTS
Health Inspector Pengelly, to the extreme left took suddenly ill during his vacation at Sacramento, California. Next to Mr. Pengelly is Mr.
L. F. Rawden, municipal electrician, who recently made a decidedly comprehensive report on the advisability of South Vancouver buying her own
electric light and power plant, coincidental with the tabling of which report, the B. C. E. R. lowered the Scuth Vancouver lighting rate to the
same as the city scale
of Fleet street. Mr Trant w: ��� much
���interested in tin library at Collingwood, especially in the colleition on
sociology. The lady who p'tured tea
was Mrs. Kent, mother of Br. W. II
Kent, of Collingwood Hist. She
came from Sussex where dr. Bursill at one time had a sunnier bungalow,  and   she  added   Memories  of
Mrs. Head wai much interested in
Mr. Bursill's London Prints and Mr.
Head promised to give an illustrated
lecture on "Thc Tower of London,"
at   the   library   at   an   early   date.
The library has just been decorated
and Mr. Bursill hopes to have many
visitors  during  the  winter.
ASKS FOR SWEEPER
''������Id Be Advisable for South Van-
, . -iiver Roads, Says Official
\ ei ing .
reporting to-ilth inspector Plemming,
Wednesday rnV health committee on
a road sweeper bjng, suggested that
the amount anoroihJCJBhjtsed put oi
equipments, and the out) ol Wfcrbage
and removing the sweepings fr'em'i'h'g
Westminster road pavement be dcl^ne
gated t.e the garbage department
The   matter   was   r. vrrctl   to   il
council.
(SCHOOL BOARD
GOES AFTER COUNCIL
��
Facts Wanted, Not Insinuations
Says Mr. Justice Morrison, in Dealing With South
Vancouver Paving Squabble
NUMBERING THE HOUSES
Work  Progressing  Rapidly in  Soilh
Vancouver District
In taking over three new schools
from the contractors, the Board of
School Trustees on Tuesday night
passed the following resolution: "That
this board officially accepts the report
of the school board architect In regard to Secord, Gordon and Sexsmith
schools, Now that our buildings are
ii;ill completed we take this opportun-
ili,.-- of complimenting Air. Bowman on
has OBeneral outcome of the work he
schoolluidertaken on our behalf. The
to the r . we are convinced, are a credit
the i-i.m\miiiii'iiiiilily. and do justice to
quate lui.emunity's aspirations for ade-
elricicnt foUdlngs providing the most
of the rislngfilities   for   the   education
The   res iluS generation."
Morris, and s\ tion  moved  by  Trustee
7
Before Mr. Justice Morrison, Tues-1be heard e.f the contract.   It  would
day,   counsel   for   Mr.  Kelwanl   Cold   appear  that   there  is   nothing to  prc-
who is endeavoring or behalf of cer-|vcnl   the   council   frmn   now     going
ahead with the signing of contracts
with the company���an act which has
been pe stponed frmn time to time
during the past few months because
of respect on the part of councillors
for the wishes Of certain property
owners  who  had  filed  objections.
Now that the contract has been
thoroughly considered by the council,
the majority of the board are of the
judgment that the deal with the contractor! will be a profitable one for
the  municipality.
Reeve Kerr says that the contract
will lie finally awarded when the
monetary situation improves, and he
is anxious to see the two main thoroughfares of South Vancouver put
into respectable condition just as
soon as it is  possible.
Tin- building permits iss.tul :rij-ii
the office of Building Inspector Y tfig
for the office week eni     today, nttn
bered   fourteen   and   called  for   mil-,    Beyond a littfyried unanimously
dings ..i a total val-.n   -i $5865, general   inforV routine business and
Inspector I'oung re|    is that ivprk   ,,,��� .,.. ;..���i,;i
f numbering the-  hoc- s and talcing
tain property owners to have the
South Vancouver coined restrained
from entering inte, I contract with
the l.)"niitii..ii Crecfoting Company
for the paving of Jfain ami Fraser
streets, insinuateil that tin- hand of
^jsyrSlt had intend into the negotiations with tin- company.
Judge Morrison reprimanded the
counsel in a spirited manner for endeavoring t.. conjure up irregularities
without having the necessary proofs
to back up liis insinuations.
"I am afraid it is not possible for
me to prove these suggestions by affidavit, although 1 believe that an examination will show that some consideration has been paid to some of
the councillors tee vote for awarding
this contract to the Dominion Creosoting Company,'' said Mr. W. Steens,
who appeared for Mr. Gold.
"Then I can not allow you to go
on a fishing expedition and make these
kind of charges*" saiel his lordship.
"I  have  reaSjbns  to    suspect    that
there   has  been  something  crooked
interposed Mr. Steens.
"It is a clear case of fishing. Yeiu
are only suspicious and smell fraud.
You merely want to join these councillors to the -suit in order to try and
prove your suspicions," continued his
lordship.
"I have more than suspicions," retorted   the  lawyer.
"Do not postulate guilt against supposedly respectable people without
backing it up with semi.- proper material," said his lordship, warmly. "1
can only judge a case by tbe material
that   is  filed,  ami   ce.un��ei   shouhl  be I the auspices eef the Ancient Order of
very  particular  nol  to  make  charges   Odd  Fellows.
i census ��� f the o :cupi n'.s is p ,---
ing rapid'./. Lip to dat'- the whole of
the houses have keen numbered and
a census taken from >'��� tindary road,
Central Par' . : i Victo ia road
Correspondence
De
any
Mr. "Chinook',���If >"U have
fin. I imlly place in yourself a
note ..I the fact that liar.. -I Home
Service will be held :i Fi ris Road
Methodist Church i5'-i V. uue, one
block west of l-'ra-e I hexl Sunday
at 11 a.m. anel 7..10 p.m. Special
music anel the churn suit .1 ly e'.cc-
orated.     Oblige
J. PYE.
DEATH  OF  OLD-TIMER
Herbert George  Bailson Was South
Vancouver Councillor Years Ago
The death occurred on Monday of
Herbert George Bailson, aged 66
years, of Westminster road, an old-
timer in Vancouver district.     ,
Mi. Bailson had been in the district
for about thirty years, and feir several years was a South Vancouver
municipal councillor. For about live
years Mr. Bailson resided near the
Junction Inn, Westminster road. He
leaves two young daughters and one
son.
The funeral took place Thursday
afternoon   frmn     Messrs.   Centre   &
n.oina's  undertaking   parlors  under
X..w to the hariest field
Gleaners are fastening,
Gathering thc scattered cars
None should he wasting;
Freely we all receive,
Freely we then should give;
On  Him in  Whom we live
All our cares casein^.
-  Anon
routine htis'nc
iln- desirability n nal talk concerning
ties of the pre.vine ' the school atttlmri-
tu manage their oi e being given power
��� d placing tin- fundi vu finances instead
the Miniii-i-ial Coun . | in the control of
ness was done -il no other busi-
Trustee Morris said
', the  failure  of the   Mn,    thai in view of
imt ..nly in Smith Vane   licipal Council,
in other municipalities,   ouver. but also
| lhe school bonds, anil to ilisp- se oi
failure of the councils 'hi' general
their finances in such a w tei manage
rive ii maximum eif bene ay as to de-
moiiev voted by the pt. it from the
time for a change in the de, it was
financing the schools. "Tl method of
Board is elected by thc pcop ie School
are the councillors, and I do i, le just as
that it can he rightly chinn''it know
thc men who compose the . 'd that
Board are less able lo nianag School
finances of the board than the c the
cillors," said  Mr   Morris. tOUn-
Trustee  McArthur  said  he    wee)
be   present   at   the   Convention       'ihl
School   Trustees,   and   if   the   matte(f>f
came   forward   he   would   voice   the" r
views  of  the  board   tbat  the  school
trustees   should   bc  given   control   of
their own funds.
Old-time Proverbs in Modern Phrase
The danger past. God i:. forgotten.
Riches arc the heavy baggage of
fortune.
A man of gladnes- seldom falls into
sadness.
Y.nttli ami whi'i paper take any
Impression.
Little sticks klnde a Iin-; great
ones put it out.
lletter go to bee Supperless, than
to  arise  in  debt.
BORN���To Mr. .Id Mi- James D.
Fraser, East Colling*'"ed, September  14. a  son   (Soil fcorn).
UNITED    UNDERTAKERS    LTD.
One of the new factors in the business  life  of Vancouver    and    South
Vancouver is the United Undertakers
Limited.     Organized   a   few   months
ago   to   operate   in   the    undertaking
business,  this  firm is  rapidly making
a name for itself by its sound methods
of doing  business.    The  firm  is  not
a member of the Undertakers' Association,  a   fact   which   they   have  kept
constantly  before  the public  in  their
campaign   of  publicity,     Such  a   fact
gives   them   absolute   freedom   in   the
: fixing of their charges and these they
claim are 5*' per cent,  lower than  in
j the ease  of the association members.
Thc   United   Undertakers   Limited
now claim e,ne of the most complete
and up-to-date establishments for the
care of the dead on the Pacific Coast.
At   the  main   office   at   225  Twelfth
Avenue,  Vancouver,  there  is a large
and varied assortment of caskets. The
firm   has   three   casket   wagons    ami
hearse,  while an  auto  hearse  is now
on  older and will be delivered soon.
In  ease of emergency calls, tin' company  has  also a  five-passenger  auto
ressed into service.
���
There is in British Columbia sufficient farming lands to support a population of 10.000.000 people���These lands lie dormant because of the
rapaciotsness of the British Columbia Government heeler, the land
speculator
Last week the company took ove
llie  business  "< A.   ! '"
Nanaimo and  M
charge  of  oi e
this city.
of
Hilbert  will  tak
their  branches  i'
I
that can not be shewn on sworn material. I don't want to hear any unsupported charges, and I don't want
to have anything to do with the municipal squabbles of South Vancouver.
The application to join the councillors as parties to the suit will be dismissed with costs. Next case, please."
With the passing, signing and sealing, Monday, of the necessary bylaw
for the paving of Main and Fraser
streets with creosoted wood block,
the majority of ratepayers will be glad
to know that likely little further will
High-class Millinery
The B. C. Millinery of Kast Collingwood held its opening last Monday when dozens eef ladies who visited the store refreshed themselves
with cups of tea.
They expressed their admiration of
hats and the low prices by stating
they were much below city prices.
Miss Rosa Knight, a lady of 10 years'
experience in England and Canada,
is in charge of this store wdiere she
will be pleased to advise on anything
pertaining to millinery.
Ex-Fire Chief After Council
A few days ago ex-Fire Chief Wai
applied to the council through hi
icitors for a recommendation ry?-n
he claimed had been promised/J "im
before he left the service of tW tnum-
cipality. The letter was ordered to
be filed. It is now stated that Mr.
Wand is applving for a mniniamtis
to compel the council to acknowledge
his past sen ice to the municipality.
    .   m  ���	
Our  ears  .ire  wide,  our  tongue  is
short.
Health inspector Pengelly
Friends/f  Health  Inspector   Pen,
gelly wilVlcarn with pleasure that hj
ring   from   a   severe   limes
ereanie'   him   while   on   hi
visiting his  brother  at   Sac1
..to   California.      The    populs
ini.ipn!   official   is     returning     te
uth Vancouver, and it is hoped, wilj
ie at  his office within a week.
Upon the return of the inspecto
the milk bylaw drafted by him ant
approved by the Municipal Council
.vill be put into force. This piece oi
legislation is regarded as being most
valuable to thc health of the community. *An inspector is to be appointed to pass upon the tpiality oi
all milk to be delivered to the municipality and to inspect herds and lln
quarters where are stalled the gentli
cattle which produce the local supply,
Greetings
Good Fellowship
ORDER t��hfe GOLDEN WEST
LODGE NO. 10 NOW FORMING IN VANCOUVER
The ORDER OF THE GOLDEN WEST is an excellent
social ami fraternal order.
All those desirous of becoming charter members shouhl
get  their application in at an early dale.
The feature of thii order i- the club, which will be em a
standard with the best loclsl clul - in this city,
[f you are considering joining any social or fraternal
order, it will pay you to investigate the ORDER OF
THE GOLDEN WEST.
You Will Find Nice Cosy Clubrooms for the Cold Winter
Evenings
Si ICIAL AND CLUB  FEATURES
Library, reading,  writing and  rest  rooms; billiard, chesi,
lawn tennis, bowling, dining-r. om, etc.    A band and drill
team, also athletic teams, will be formed.
A place i" meet ami entertain ymir friends
FRATERNAL FEATURES
$7.00 per week for sickness and disability
$100 funeral benefit for members
$50 funeral benefit for members' wives
Medical attention free to all members
A GOOD ORDER FOR GOOD MEN���An order for desirable citizens between the agei of IH anel 50
INITIATION  FEE
Now $5.00 After Charter Clcses, 525.00
Dues $1.00 per month There are no assessments
JOIN  NOW.    INITIATION  SEPTEMBER 22nd, 1913,
PENDER HALL, 8 p.m.
Organization  Headquarters
4(i2 HOLDEN  BUILDING,  16 HASTINGS ST. LAST
Send for Free Literature
Politics on a White Sheet
A Lantern Gossip about Political Personalities
Felix Penne will .give this popular chat for one hour
at the LIBRARY, COLLINGWOOD EAST, on
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24.
ADMISSION FREE
A Meeting to organize the Collingwood Parliament
for the season will follow at 9 o'clock.
��������
A VTURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
MOTOR  TRANSFER
We do all kinds of Transfer.     Special attention paid to
EXPRESS AND BAGGAGE
ALL   KINDS
OF
REPAIRING
AUTOS FOR
HIRE
AUTOS
STORED
A special car is run to Capilano on Sunday,    starting   from    Garage,
1 p.m., Return at 5 p.m.���Fare $1.75  return. We pay Ferry charges
Fraser Street Garage & Motor Transfer
6184 FRASER STREET (Opposite 48th Avenue)
TELEPHONE FRASER 251
GEO. SNIDER & BRETHOUR
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
909   Dominion   Trust   Building,  Vancouver,   B. C.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
Telephone!! :    Office 8497.    Work! 6203.      Worki 932!.    Worki 9179
BEER!
BEER!
YOU can get any amount from the
International Importing  Company
303 PENDER WEST
Bottlers of Cascade, 8. C. Exp ort   and   Bohemian
FREE DELIVERY TO YOUR DOOR IN SOUTH VANCOUVER
EVERY THURSDAY
PHONE SEYMOUR 1951
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
1949 ALBERT ST. ' PHONE :   HIGHLAND  530R
ENGINEERS, MACHINISTS AND  FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE  HYDRANTS AND SPECIALS
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
Suits From $13 to $25
MADE FROM THE BEST OLD COUNTRY
MANUFACTURED CLOTHS
Positively equal to any American Suits that arc priced from $25
to $55; perfect workmanship, style and lit absolutely guaranteed.
Suit or Dress Lengths of Old Country manufactured cloths sold
as required. Vour own Suit Lengths made up for $12. W'e sell at
Old Country prices, plus freight and duty.
Monday, September 8, wc opened our store at 5653 VICTORIA
ROAD, for Pressing, Cleaning, Repairing, etc.
DAVID ROSE
CORNER 47th and FRASER AVENUE
SOUTH VANCOUVER
B. C. EQUIPMENT CO.
MACHINERY DEALER8
CONCRETE MIXERS. STEEL CARS. ROCK CRUSHERS, ELECTRIC. STEAM,
AND    GASOLINE   HOISTS.       WHEELBARROWS.   TRANSMISSION
MACHINERY,   GASOLINE   ENGINES.   PUMPS,   AND
ROAD MACHINERY
Oflicei: 006-607   Bank ot Ottawa  Bldg. Phone Sey. 9040 (Exchange le) ill DepailmenU)
THE WORKERS' PAGE
All  Communications should be Addressed to "The Labor Editor"
Tbe strike situation r,11 Vancouver
Island up t" the time of writing iho�� a
ne, change from last week. The sub.
sidized press oi the owners and gov.
eminent have been working overtiihe
the last week or su conducting imaginary   interviews   with   striken   win.
:ile-   g'eillg    [ie   CUt   aWaj'    ItOW   t ill"   "f'-V-
e ign union dictation" as tlie- spineless
journals have it.
"Xe.t the sound of a drum or a
bugle ie, heard" from an) of the coal
masters. They couldn't get better
backing than Attorney-General Bow-
-iT i- giving them even if they employed one of tlu- "foreign element"
kind whei i^ giving us the revelations
on tbe other side of the line. Bow-
Ber's latest advice to the miners to
use tln-ir common-sense would appeal
to us as lieing somewhat ludicrous
if it  were  neit  sei  brutal.
To cap all we get a few members
fi so-called Conservative associations publishing resolutions commending the Attorney-General in tbe
'stand be bas taken to "quell the disturbances on the island." Not a word
of mention as to the justice of the
men's demands. Tbat doesn't concern them in the least.
However, all the Conservatives arc
neet the same way of thinking. A
steadily growing dissatisfaction is
making itself apparent in the rank
and file that threatens at any moment te> break into open revolt. This
government has been guilty of many
indiscretions, t'i put it mildly, but
this latest attempt to drum major the
miners is sticking in the people's
throats. W'e don't want to join issue with XIr. Bowser in thc manner
i if making, threats, but the old saying, "Coming events cast their shadows before" is becoming very apparent.
* *    4
When is the so-called labor commission going te. turn in its report.
They have been busy for about a
year now visiting tbe tops of mountains, crossing Indian bridges, hanging about Chinese gardens, and striking towns with inhabitants numbering about a dozen all told, including
the mayor. From time to time luminous reports have appeared in the
daily press of the wonderful country
up in the interior of B. C, no doubt
compiled by one of the commission,
but what lias this to do with the labor question as it affects three quarters of the entire population on the
lower  mainland.
* St      St
That the militia question is now
before thc working class in a form
that bad not appealed to them before
is very apparent Every day we read
of resolutions being passed in local
unions and Central labor bodies calling upon their members to light shy
nf thc militia. That it will react on
the whole of Canada can be clearly
-ecu and the Attorney-General of
I'.. C. will perhaps have something to
answer for from the powers tbat be
at   Ottawa.     "What   care   I?"   quoth
WE MAKE
AWNINGS
OF  ALL  KINDS
for  stores,  offices  and   residences
C. H. Jones & Son
Manufacturers of the
"Pioneer Brand"
Tents, Awnings and Canvas Goods
Phone Seymour 740
110  ALEXANDER  STREET
Geo. Jones
HORSE   SHOER
Lame and Interfering horaea will
receive apeciat care and attention.
All kinds of hand-made ahoea, running ahoea, running platea, toe
platea, etc.
All horaea entruated to me will receive every care and attention.
GOOD   WORK   GUARANTEED
571 Beatty Street
S.S. "SKEENA"
Leaves Ferry Wnarf Daily at 9.30
a.m. for Indian River and Way
Points.
Sunday at 10.33 a.m.
ROUND    TRIP
$1.00
NORTH    ARM    S.S.    CO.,    LTD.
NUNN & THOMSON
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS   AND
EMBALMERS
Day and Night  Phone,  Sey  7653
518 Richards St., Vancouver, B. C.
C. M. WHELPTON
BUILDING CONTRACTOR
ESTIMATES GIVEN
Pbone : Fra.er 34 - 46th Av*. and Frjeier
MACK'S
HORSESHOEING AND  GENERAL
BLACKSMITHING
SHOEING  A  SPECIALTY
DAVID   S.   McKAY,   MANAGER
South Hill P.O. Box 10]
NORTH ARM ROUTE
The convention of the American
Federation of Labor to be held in
Seattle in November, is expected to
be the largest in point of attendance
ever belli by the organization. It
has been suggested that an invitation
be issued from the organized workers
in Vancouver to the delegates to
spend a day here.
*        ele        *
Rayformers, HinnlSsy, is in favor
iv suppressin 'ivirything, but rale politicians believes ill suppressin' tiaw-
tliin' but ividence���Mr.  Dooly.
St     *     t
That the Brandon Trades and Labor Council has strong views on the
question of militarism in Canada may
be gathered by tbe following resolution unanimously passed on August
2S. and which will be brought before
tbe forthcoming Trades Congress at
Montreal :
"In view of the recent events in
Vancouver Island,  when   the militia
were used to coerce tbe Workers intei submitting to the conditions Ira-
posed upon them by the mineowners,
this council resolves that it i- entire
ly opposed i" militarism, and II  n
e Trades Con|        . at its con-
m   in   Montreal,  to  plae e   itsi II
e.n record as bei        pposed to union
ie i n j'ining  im   militia, and  thut it
approves the action of certain internal unions that forbids membership I- nn mbers of the militia."
* *   *
There is war on Vancouver island
between Bill MeKenzie and the coal
miners, The militia and regulars
haw In e n called out. It is time the
ife rernment t-���<>k charge of the coal
mines  of  the  province.    They   have
��� been the cause of more disturbances
than all the other industries com-
billed. While an exorbitant price is
charged for coal, the managers are
continually   at   war   with   their  men.!
''Ihey  employ   Orientals  contrary   to
��� law, ill tlie mines. 'Ihey import the
cheapest, lowest and must ignorant
of  Europeans   tej  take   tbe  place  of I
| liritish miners. They do everything
j possible to incite men to violence, and
then call em the militia to murder the
! men who ask for living wages and de-!
cent treatment.���Slocan Record (Conservative).
,1=    *    *
The labor agitator's job is about
tbe most thankless job going. Not
only is be generally vilified by employers and the indifferent public
which understands nothing about
unions, but those for whom he works |
rarely say "thank you" for bis most [
zealous efforts, obs.-rves the Industrial  Banner,
* *   *
A labor man who lias given many-
years ejf service says that the chief
teasun why union labor does not accomplish more is distrust. In the
lirst place, workers are slow to organize because they distrust one another's motives. When they do organize they elect officers and distrust them. They appoint committees and are suspicious of them. They
require a business agent and select
the man in whom they have the most
confidence, but as soon as they have
taken him front tht bench and made
him their paid servant, they begin to
watch him. and attribute outrageous
corruption to him. Instead of backing up his efforts, jealousy and suspicion begin to pull him down. He
may  work   sixteen  hours  a   day  and
| all   day   Sunday,   and  they  will   talk
I about his  "soft snap."
What   the   workers   need   is   more
j faith in each other. Reasonable care
should be taken to secure thc ablest
': members for the most responsible
positions, but after that the officials
ought to have the confidence and
support of th'ise who elected them.
*       s        S.
Anted cheers and applause and to
the playing of "Auld Lang Syne,"
the sixth annual Trade Union Congress   opened   at   Manchester,   Eng.,
mi September 1, with 563 delegates in
attendance. Unusual interest is being taken  in   this gathering, which  is
, the largest in thc history of the British trade union movement, because
oi the many important matters due
to the labor unrest through the entire United Kingdom which are to
bc discus-eel at the meet. This is a
record-breaking year in the history
of the labor movement in this country, the delegates in attendance representing a membership of nearly
2,300,000 men and women, the largest
number ever represented at .1 labor
congress. Thc congress was opened
by lln Lord Mayor of Manchester,
Samuel Walter Royse, who welcomed the delegates in behalf of the
corporation.     Thc   American     labor
j movement   was  represented  by   Char.
1 I.. Blaine, secretary of tbe Root and
Shoe Workers' Union, and Louis C.
Kemper, secretary of the United
Brewery Workmen, who are at the
congress as fraternal delegates from
the American Federation of Labor.
for the tirst time in the history of
the congress, Canada, German and
France are also represented by fra-
ternal delegates.���A. F. of L. News
Letter.
States   will   spend  in  tbe   next   forty
ihe- lift . bi ration, fe.r
upporl of armii - and nai ie - an
amounl   sufficient  to  build    2
country anel villain
cost   - :    -J:   1 h.      With
father, mother, and  four  childre
mn - they would furnish   homes   tor   12.ikiii.ikih     p,
which i- mr .r.   than the total pi
������" ition   of   thi ie   f iur   ��� ��� .11111 rie-s
living in village
try.     rhui   ���
sinning   the    1 r,��� ��� 1 ��� rural   and
\ iilage-  populatie ' It   na-
in a tingle generation���United
States   Bureau of   Helm
��   *    ��
1  have never been   able t'i regard
it as  anything else  than a plain up-
1     ��� i hristian   principles that
-   ���   1 harge upi m   any  trade   or
��� )        ihOUld     lee ..        '.'  Igl       feer      JtS
workers whi living
all it, if  you  will, a "living v ���  industry
t paj aragi
nol juitif) it- exlsti n< ��� . and that the
communit) ki  um
bop Lang
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandy  Has a  Crack  Aboot  the L~test  Faushuns in Weemen's Gear
"At ilu present rale of expenditure
the-    four    countries    of    Germany,
1 France, Greal Britain, and the United
Weel frei ns, the elark nicht
drawin'in again wi a vengeani
the mornin' an lias Jusl en mgh nip
in it tac mak yae realize that tlie claes
yae thocht were owre heavy twa or
three weeks ago are gettin' too licht
tae be comfortable. Of course everybody disna lay away their summer
claes in the winter���there's sometimes mare reasons than yin for Some
folk wearin' tbe same in winter as
summer. There's wan thing a fellie
wi' wan suit o' claes aye has wan thc
better  o'  the  ither  wi'  twa  or  three,
or maybe mare, lie never, leaves his
lead pencil in his ither waistcoat pocket.
I wis staundiu' dexm at the corner
o' Hastins an' Granville last Seturday, jist aboot twelve o'clock. 1 had
arranged tae meet a certain pairty
there, an' bein' a wee bit afore my
time 1 had a chance 0' gettin' a sweeg
at the various fashions in dresses as
their wearers were paradin' along the
street. It wis aboot tbe time o' day
tae see them at their best.
~ I min' when I wis a wee fellie my
aulder brither used tae sing a song
he had picked up in tbe auld gaiety���
tbe late H. E. Moss' first start in the
vaudeville bizness. At tbat time thc
vaudeville shows were lookit upon as
sort o' low cless affairs an' oor mith-
ers strictly forbade us tae enter them.
Of course that wis jist an extra incentive for us tae become a patron an'
my brither, bein' twa or three years
aulder than me, an' workin', wis a
regular weekly attender. Tbe song
ran something like this;
The girls of fifty years ago
They wore their hair in nets;
Their ears an' arms were studded
With diamonds and frizettes.
I dinna jist min' the rest o' it the noo,
but it ended up wi'
Oh, treat them as they should be,
They're as good as could be,
Thc world would be dead without the
nice yeiung girls.
Weel that song came back tae me
as 1 watched the passin' throng.
Shakespeare said "All the world's a
stage."    Mad  he  been  able  tae see
I Hastins Street he wud hae thocht
twa or three big companies o' comic
opera artistes had blawn in an' were
paradin' in their stage costumes. They
were walkin' along the street in every
shape, form, color an' size.
hirst wm! come a young slip 0' a
thing, elves-eel in black. Wi' her cutaway coat an' her weel fittin' hobble
, skirt, yae could see she wis either a
stenografer or of some ither "genteel" occupashun; wi' her wee short,
catchy steps an' the cocky wey in
which she had her $12 or $14 bat
poised yae could see  she thocht her-
��� sei the "Rale Mackay" as faur as the
. faushun wis concerned.
Then wuel come a wee thing aulder
dame. Vac wud maybe tak hcr for
a real estate man's dauchtcr. Hcr
faither had likely maele some easy
money sellin' some townsite up a
mountain or ferm acreage in "the
country/1 a mile or twa frae some
place that wis gaun tae be the hub.
Her slow, measured steps betokened
tae yae that she wis fatigued wi' con-
' tinually ridin' in her limousine an'
that siie would "Just take an aii ine
down town ami do senile shopping.
mama." Tall an' illigant lookin', she
wis in a cless by hersel. Wi' a dress
that musl hae k��-iet the silk worms
busy for twa '-1 three moons she wis
certainly a pictl r lae li n ik at A Strap
0' iln- Bame material  bt 1 icht  the- lefl
, siele- 0' her dress up sufficiently faur tae
let   yae   -ee   ihe   won ckini   tae
match an' white pumps Tae complete ilu- effect, a wee white potlicker
'iililin' along at her siele wi' a
silk '-rel attache-el tae its diamond-
studded collar. That dug must hae
been worth something itsel.
Then along came ;i couple 1 wiul
lake- tae aboot twenty years auld.
They were in the tirst throes o' luv.
Tluy hae funny weys o' makin' luv
nejt here. I can min when 1 had tbat
complaint I aye focht shy o' broad
daylicht an' the main streets. "In the
gloamin', oh my darlin'," an' a country road wis my motto, Hooever, I
guess they faushuns arc chengi i' tae
an' the wey this couple wis saunterin'
Ialong yae wml think  they were want-
i in' tae let the world ken a' aboot it.
Wi' his airm through hers an' leanin1
up agin wan anither, 1 thocht if a bit
orange peel happened tae be in the
wey  e,'  wan or  tbe   ither there-  wud
Ibe an awfu catastrory.    They were o'
I the clingin' vine variety.
Slit  skirts, hobble   skirts, diaphony
!-kirts, x-ray skirts an' auld cemtitry
skirts passed in'rotashun an' it wud
tak a fellie quite a thocht tac mak up
his mind what wis the "correct" faushun.
Passin' along the street yae wud
meet a man an' wife wi' wan or twa
bairns. Vac could see frae tbe wey
they walked an' the cut o' their claes
they werna "lang oot," an' hadna
dauebtcrs auld enough yet tae eddi-
cate them in tbe up-to-date style.
Yae wud sec the man gie the wife a
midge an' exclaim, "Here, yae see that
yin���isn't she a freak?" The wife wud
gie ber head a toss an' vac wud may-
lie hear her sayin', "the shameless
bizzy."
The auld country folk wi' their severely plain gear seemed tae be somewhat out o' place wi' the faushun
plates. It taks them a wee while tae
get acclimatized tae that like onything else, an' of course they hae their
auld country claes  tae wear oot afore
! they can line up.
i       - '
'1 In male o the species were almost
equally as remarkable, if they werna
sae attractive. In wan city block yae
could perhaps pick oot aboot a dizen
different nashunalities an' a dizen different styles. The "cocksure Englishman" wi' his Norfolk suit, twirlin'
his gold Albert, exclaimin' as he pas-
si - wan v the fairies, "By jove; ain't
I she a stunner?" Yankees, Canucks.
Swedes, Italians, Chinks an' Japs, a'
jabberin' their  different opeenyins o'
I the questyin o' the hoor. "Haw, Wull.
where  are- yae   graftin'  noo," an'  the
Farming in British Columbia is a fo rgotten industry���Ranches such as s hown
above are few and far between outside of the  Lower  Fraser
Valley,  though  there  are  millions  of  acres  of
fertile lands in the Province
wa Scotties wud adjourn tae discuss
he interval sin.-e they had last met
yin anither. Tion the young men
ab.mt te un wi' thi ir 50-cent f��� -lis an'
tln-ir Derby's or wide-awakes at jist
the richt angle- tae show off three-
quarters o' theii lomed locks,
wu.l go bye wi' an emphatic "She's a
peach."
There's an' anld sayin1, "yae micht
as weel ile deed as oot the faushun."
but for a' that I dinna think the world's
ony nearer destrucshun than it wis
sixty or secventv years ago when oor
forefaithers were sair bothered tae
mak the pavement lit the skirts that
were- weirn in they days.
1 Inybody that says this is a humdrum world maun hae a had liver. I'm
thinkin'. A fellie takin' a walk along
the main streets o' the city can .
muckle free entertainment in wan wee
short hoor as '11 keep him thinkin' fi r
a week,
"The- world would be dead without
the- live- young  girls."
Yours through the heather.
SANDY MACPHERSON.
Collingwood Socials
Tbe Collingrn I   Institute  opened
the fall and w in" er season with i - -
cial and dance on Thursdaj night of
last week. Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Price arranged the affair, which was
a complete success. The new mom,
which has heen added to the b
ment proved very convenient and Mr,
J. Francis Bursill was heartily thanked for what he bad done for tbe comfort eef visitors. The new beniks were
admired and many were pleased with
the way ill which the library i- painted. The evening opened with a
whist drive���handsome prizes were
won by Miss Eva llaig. Miss Read,
Mr. S. Payne, and Mr. Moscrop. Refreshments were served. Mr. \V. E.
Franklin supplied the music and a
company numbering close on a nun.
elreel enjoyed a very pleasant social
evening Among those present were
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Price, Mr. and
Mr- Jones, Mr. Fraser, Mr. and Mrs.
Foster, Miss Haig, the Misses Sutherland. Miss Tyson, Mr. Bert Kent,
Miss Maggie Muirhead, Mr. Alick
Jameson, Mr. Fred Cocroft. Mr. and
Mrs. Buckle, the Misses Pegg, the
Misses Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. Nelson, Mr. Moscrop, Mr. Salter, Mr.
Dady, Mr. Day, Mr. Stagg. Mr. and
Mrs. Falkner, Mr. and Mrs. Hilling,
Mr. Norman, Mrs. and Miss Padgeon,
Miss McNeale, Mr. J. Waters, Mr.
Pinfold, Mr. \Y. Ellis, Miss Mabel
Price, Miss Hazle Shirley and many-
others.
Look out for future announcements.
Some good lecturers coming on this
season. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
"V FIVE
Phone Collingwood 24
P. O. Box 32
W. H. BRETT & CO.
Successors to Fletcher & Brett
REAL ESTATE
LOANS.   INSURANCE, ETC.
Notary Public
Domnicn Express Money  Orders  Issued
JOYCE ROAD, COLLINGWOOD EAST
South Vancouver Builders' Supply Company
Dealers in Sand, Gravel, Fibre, Cement, Lime, Plaster, Vitrified
Pipe, Tile, Fire-clay, Lath, and Brick of all kinds.
Offices :   51st Avenue and Fraser Street.    Phone : Fraser 36.
Main and 29th Avenue.    Phone :   Fairmont 1940.
Fraser Street and North Arm of Fraser River.   Phone : Fraser 84.
Coal orders taken at all offices and delivered to all parta of South
Vancouver.
EVANS,COLEMAN&EVANS
Phone 2988
Limited        Ft. of Columbia Ave.
FOR
Building  Materials
Largest and Best   Assorted   Stock   in   British   Columbia
PROMPT DELIVERIES
VITRIFIED SEWER  PIPE AND
ALL FITTINGS
C. Gardiner - Johnson & Company
Johnson's Wharf
Phone :  Sey. 9145
Let us  supply  you  with  the  requirements of the season.
Water Cans, Hose, Garden Tools
The hot weather is coming.    Don't forget that we carry a full line
of Screen Doors and Windows.
C. B. FEARNEY
HARDWARE, PAINTS,   OILS  AND  COLORS
Dealer in  Stoves,  Ranges and Kitchen Utensils
JOYCE STREET, EAST COLLINGWOOD
ritone Coll. 19
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
SOLE AGENTS FOR B. C.
F^5THI5 IS ANOLO ONE BUT-
A German farmer lefl hi- horses un-
hiti ' d in front of n hardware stori
in Gary. Wh.n he- came e,ut. after
.in interval 'et hall an hour, they were
���-���< .in. There had been no sound of
a runaway, so the farmer surmised
that they might have gone borne Hi
telephoned bis wife, saying:
"Chaulia, i- eh- horses dere?"
A m gatit i i i ver the te lephone,
for In- added :
"Nor de vagon, eider?"
��   ��   *
A lady heard that her two ions
wer, iii the habit each, at separate
times and quite unknown to each
other,  e.i   taking   one   t.i  the   maids
"eelH      fe,I      ;i     hlll\.' ]���' f.l | i 11g     te,     brillg
dOWn     "II      ihell      1U'V e >U<1     heads        till
wrath 'ii their father by making a
bother ;ili"iu it. -.In- asked them quietly ii it was true, but could obtain no
satisfactory reply li occurred to her
that by a little strategy she might
gel the truth from the girl, su sin
saiel in a jocular manner, "Now, Mary.
I want v.,u to answer me candidly
Whieh of my iwe, sons <L> yen like
going "in with best���George or Wil
Ham.*" "Well, ma'am," replied tin
girl, reassured by the lady's manner.
"If ye maun ken, of the two I like
Maister George best; but i'ir a rale
dounricht guid spree, gie me thi
maister!"
ele        el<       *
Farmer Burr���How dee yuu like
your automobile,   Exra?
Farmer Root���Wal, I can't go to
sleep een my way home from town,
and wake up in the barnyard) like 1
could  with old  Dobbin.
* *   +
The American truth teller was in
form. "Talking .et ants," he .-aid.
"we've got 'em as big as crabs out
West. I've seen 'em light with long
hums, which they use as lances,
charging each other like savages."
"They don't compare with the ants
I saw iu the East," said an inoffensive individual near by. "The natives have trained them as beasts ul
burden. One of 'em could trail a
t.eii load for miles with ease, They
worked willingly, but occasionally
they turned un their attendants and
killed  ill in."
But this was drawing the long bow
a little too far.
"I say old chap," said a shocked
voice from the corner, "what sort ol
ants were they?"
"Elephants," replied the inoffensive
individual.
* *   *
"You don't make very guud music
with that instrument," said a bystander to the man with the bass drum, ;i��
the band ceased tu play.
"No," admitted the pounder of the
drum, "1  know  1  don't; but 1 drown
a  heap  ui  bad  music."
ele       =*       *
An old actor, who had been ulH of
aii engagement for sume time, was
standing in the bar of a well-known
public   house   where   une   can   always
find a few of the   profession   who
"rest"   lunger   than   they   wurk.
Suddenly a well-dressed man entered the bar and ordered a elrink,
putting down a sovereign. The barmaid ceiulel not change it. The man
turned tu ihe old actor and said :
Pardon me, but could you change
me a sovereign?"
The actor (after be had ge.t over
tile shuck) gravely stud : "I'm sorry
I cannot oblige you with the change,
but"���as he took off his hat���"1
thank yuu fur tbe compliment."
* *    *
A farmer, ill great need of extra
hands at haying time, finally asked
Si Warren, who was accounted the
town fool, it lie could help him out
"What'll ye pay?" asked Si.
"I'll pay yuu what you're worth,"
answered   the   fanner.
Si scratched his head a minute,
then announced decisively :
"I'll be darned if I'll work for that!"
>*   *   *
Recently a street car advertising
agency, in order to stimulate interest ill their cards displayed in the
cars, offered in cash prizes ber the
best epigrammatic definitions ol a
suffragette.
iierc tire  sume of the results :
A suffragette is a woman who
iliinks she has been de-voted long
enough.
Neet satisfied with the last word she
alse,  wants   the   lirst.
She is  the  corset  needcel  tu reduce
the Government waste.
She is a woman whee needs the
"pill" im- iur vaulting ambition.
A suffragette is a sting uf beauty
and ;i jawer forever.
A   Woman  wh"   would  rather  break
�� llllluu s    (hatt    ill    Ul     ill.  IU
\ woman whose troubles are cer-
tainlj   nol "huh   ones"
��� liu-   who   -p. ml-    re-  time  airing
her  views than viewing her heir-..
A w.eman who will spare no panes
I" g't   lu r right-.
A woman who would ratbi r r..ek
the country than the cradle
\ female creature, queer anel quaint
W ho longs to In jn-,1 what she ain'l
I he hen that would ielle ami never let
I- tin   we.man known a- a suffragette.
W'e . an'i efface, we can't  forget her,
We love h.r -till���the -tiller  the bn-
ter!
Early Manhges
Many people in these days uf stress
and hurry seem tu have the idea that
marriages will necessarily handicap
them in their struggle tu reach lhe
goal iheir ambition prompts them tu
aim at. Many instances could be cited
irom the past which illustrate the fal-
-acy   ut   such   ail   idea.      There   have
���iccu innumerable instances in which
an early marriage has spurred the
ambition uf the young couple and
made u successful career out of whal
might   have   heen   a   failure.
Having no higher responsibility
than catering tor himself many a
young man lias become careless in
nte, slip-shod in work, and gradually
lost all desire lor advancement Marriage has brought to him a fresh incentive, and this coupled with the encouragement oi a scnsmlc woman as
His wile, has frequently succeeded in
enabling htm to reach a position
which he had never thought of in the
elays of his bachelorhood.
Marriage brings great responsibilities, it is true; but tliese are lar inure
easily overcome in earlier than in
later life, further, the obligations
which are necessitated by the upbringing of a family arc ended in tile
case ol an early marriage al an age
win n the parents are in a position to
witness the sight of their children's
battle for success in life and to enjoy tlie unencumbered hours which
their growth to manhood or womanhood allows them.
Mr. Asquith's First Marriage
Although there are many married
men who could probably say, with a
certain degree of truth, let it be admitted, lhat "1 could have easily dune
tins, or that, ur achieved this ur that
pusition in life, if 1 hadn't been saddled with all the responsibilities of
married life," yet it is very interesting
to know til what ages our successful
men eef today have plunged into matrimony.
The Premier���Mr. Asquith���was
only twenty-live when bc married his
tirst wife, Helen Melland, and, as we
know, it is evident that Mr. Asquith
did met find any set-back to his career for he marrieel his second wife,
Emma .Mice Margaret Tcnnant, three
years after the death of the tirst. Mr.
Balfour is, of course, a bachelor, and
deees not come iu our category, hut
Mr. Joseph Chamberlain married
twice and he bas, certainly, not had
an unsuccessful career, no mailer
what our views as to bis political
faith may be.
Lloyd George Married at Twenty-five
Mr. Lloyd George was married at
the early age of twenty-live, as was
als" Mr. McKenna, the Home Secretary; Mr. Winston Churchill marrying rather later in life. Mr. Walter
Riine'inian, the President of the Board
of Agriculture, was twenty-eight, anil
his father���Sir Walter Runciman���
only twenty-one. Vet neither of
these gentlemen has been a failure!
Mr. John Burns was just twenty-
three ami Mr. Will Croeeks e.nly nineteen when tluy married, ami both
these nnn probably did more bard
and onerous work when tiny would
otherwise have been enjoying a honeymoon. Mr. Iluiiar Law married
somewhat later in life.
But these are cases ui Some few
years age., anil it is a fact that llle
veiling  man   of  today   wine  is anxious
:.. make- a name for himself is nut
sn ready t" share his confidences and
his honors with a woman. Whether
this is the result eef the growth uf
sports���such   as   rowing,   cricket,  ami
football���and the cheapness of motoring, ami the tit-Ids which arc open
lu the young through invention-, is
difficult to say. but there arc quite a
number uf eeur younger members and
politicians who, at the age of thirty
and over, still prefer tu remain "sin-
gie."
Vancouver - Nanaimo
New Submarine Telephone Cable
Furnishes fist-class Long Distance Service between    ;
VANCOUVER   ISLAND and the MAINLAND.
Long Distance Calls now received for
ALBERNI
COMOX
COURTENAY
CUMBERLAND
DUNCANS
LADYSMITH
NANAIMO
PARKSVILLE
SIDNEY
UNION
VICTORIA, and all other Island Offices.
CALL LONG DISTANCE
WHO WILL GLADLY QUOTE THE TARIFFS.
British Columbia Telephone
COMPANY, LIMITED
A. McFEE
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Phone 1038 : Edmonds, B. C.
I have the exclusive sale of large lots on Salisbury Avenue, close
to statics.   $1,000 each; on good terms.   See me about them.
MACADAM & COMPANY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
418 Winch Building Vancouver, B.C.
Wood Block
PAVING
The Robertson-Godson Co. Ltd.
Wholesale Plumbers' Supplies, Water Works
Supplies. Corporation Brass GocJs.
572 Beatty Street
'ancouver
View of the biggest lumber mill in the world.   The North Arm of the Fraser, in
South Vancouver, could support a battalion of such industries, and will doubtless do so following the carrying out of the advanced
policy of municipally-owned industrial sites FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, \<ns
^Toi^CHINOOtC
PUBLISHED
Every Saturday by tht Grtattr  Vancouver PubHihen  Limited
HEAD OFFICE :
Corner  Thirtieth   Avenue   and   Main   Street,   South  Vancouver,   B. C
George   M.   Murray.   President   and   Managing   Director.
Herhrrt   A    Stein    Vice-President anei  Managing  Editor.
John  jackion,   Buiineas  Manager.
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One    Year
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T?hou��hfnEvf.fn��   communication  on  current  events,  to  be   published
over the writer's signature.
WE WANT THAT TUNNEL
f��HROUGH the combined efforts of the Municipal
I Council, and the Board of Trade, there seems every
possibility that South Vancuuver will get the Canadian
Northern tunnel that will convey the last section of a
transcontinental railway from the North Arm Into the
big terminal at False Creek.
It is understood that negotiations are on at the present time with the proper authorities, and it is not improbable that the people will be asked to give an opinion
on the matter within the next  few month?.
If the tunnel entrance is placed in South Vancouver, it
will undoubtedly be thc greatest boon that the municipality could possibly receive. It would mean that the
company would possibly require, near at hand, a considerable acreage for freight terminals which would front
on what is even now being transformed Into a fresh
water harbor of world importance.
This having been accomplished there would quickly
spring up along tbe banks of the Xorth Arm a business
district and the future of South Vancouver would be
made absolutely secure.
Out on Lulu Island, a company is at work today, laying out plans for a gigantic harbor scheme. Six months
ago the promoters of this project���The Vancouver Harbor and Extension Company Limited���were dubbed even
in some responsible circles as being either visionaries or
wildcatters. But there is today every likelihood of this
great harbor scheme being carried to a successful completion. The Dominion Government is now assisting tbe
gentlemen behind the project and it is understood that
the financing of the enormous undertaking is now merely
a matter of the arrangement of details.
The Lulu Island ocean terminals will be located, fronting on the Gulf, the same distance from tbe North Arm
of the Fraser as the Xorth Arm is from Burrard Inlet. If
the development and growth of Vancouver continues as
in the past ten years, some day the Xorth Arm will divide almost in two equal parts a gtcat city. The river occupies a strategic position. Even today, new industries
are being located upon its banks. The Dominion Government has undertaken the task of making it into a suitable  harbor.
It is to be hoped that those in authority will leave no
stone unturned to put forward South Vancouver's claims
for the Canadian Northern tunnel entrance in a most
forcible maimer.
he definite statement that immediate steps will bc taken
iv the council to buy up Xorth Arm waterfrontage, wilh
i view "f creating an industrial centre and a Seeuth Vancouver payroll,
With the COUlicil in Ibis undertaking, all classes of
���leople in the municipality will heartily throw in their in-
luence.    At the council meeting Monday, h\e men, re-
iresenting the- lea.ling property owners of South Vancouver, appeared t" voice approval <��f the new policy.
Prom'the outset it must be underst 1 that the proposal to purchase North Arm watcrfruntage for industrial   -itis  is  one  that   is  being  fathered  by  no  clique   ur
trowd and is a policy calculated to benefit the whole district���indeed, the whole ������( Greater Vancouver. It Is the
natural outcome oi a decade of rather abnormal conditions in South Vancouver which have now reached a
point where the speculator must make way for the producer in this municipality.    It marks the turn uf the tide.
It is in be trusted that the council can successfully
finance thc project in hand.   Though definite plans have
not been made public, it is likely that Several hundred
acres of hind will be secured lying between the Kburnc-
N'ew Westminster Railway and the Xorth Arm. Possibly,
a way may be found whereby the vendors of the land may
he paid in municipal bonds, a practice which is not always considered good finance, bul which would undoubtedly be justified in the present instance, 'i'he council
promises to take the public absolutely into their confidence in their efforts to purchase this land.
Tbe purchase of industrial sites in South Vancouver is
an undertaking which will be for the common gn.nl. ami
it is trusted that all the citizens will hasten to sign up on
petitions being circulated to give the council formal authority  to proceed  with  actual  buying of properties.
'-ve been decimated during the past summer.    Any
good that will result from this, however, is offset  by the
tremendous increase in the number eef manufacturer's
agents.
An office len feet square, with a desk and a 'plume
represents the investment ,ef the typical eastern manufacturer's agent in Vancouver,   Sometimes be represents
but one firm and in other cases a dozen eastern concerns
who find a goeid market for their wares on the Pacific
Coast.
Loca' business men call al these offices, and Mr. Middle
Man, having taken their orders, forwards same to the
bead office. The goods arc shipped by rail or water, arrive in Vancouver, and when the local retailer pays Iiis
bill, he pays .Mr. .Middle Man from twenty to thirty per
cent for his courtesy in assisting in securing the shipment���moreover the local man also pays the freight.
Now, the man in  South  Vancouver who buys a suit
if underwear fur himself during these cool September
days, has tee pay the following items���local merchant's
profit, commission agent's profit, manufacturer's prulit.
the freight, the cartage and a half dozen other considerations,
The middle man rents no warehouse space, employs nu
men, pays nu taxes, produces ne.thing. Yet he lakes a
rake-off on the deals that pass between the retailer and
thc eastern manufacturer.
One way to drive Mr, Middle Man out of business
would be to build up a bunch of local industries. That,
however, cannot come to pass in a day. In thc meantime,
it is up to some very wise man to draft a law governing
ibis gentleman, forcing him to contribute something to
the upkeep of the city that pays him fatly.
THE ENGLISHMAN
Ml AT the Englishman has a bard time
-and
this
EXCESSIVE FREIGHT RATES
IP it costs $100 to ship a consignment ot goods from Calgary to Xanainio, $100 to ship the same consignment to Victoria, and $100 to land the sime goods on the
freight platform at Vancouver, why should it erst $115
to ship it to Dominion Mills, Sunt!: Vancouver, on the
Xorth  Arm of the Fraser?
Before the municipal council this week, Mr. John Armstrong, a local business man, told of tbe efforts be and
others were making to locate a furniture factory on the
Xorth Arm, near the foot of Fraser Street. This industry
is at present located at Eburne. Owing to a lack of capital, it is impossible for tbe proprietor to turn out the
orders with which he is literally swamped.
Mr. Armstrong and others are endeavoring to finance
a new factory to be located in South Vancouver. The
big item militating against the successful floating of the
industry is the fact tbat freight rates from and to South
Vancouver are such that they are likely to eat up the
profits of the industry. Mr. Armstrong told the council
that this fact alone was holding a certain capitalist back
from investing $50,000.
Mr. Will Harvey, of tbe Dominion Creosote Company
Limited, whose factory is located on the river, gave the
council the information that to send a car of goods into
South Vancouver meant to pay $15 more than to have
it sent from the same starting point to Vancouver, Victoria or Xanainio.
It would seem that this question is one for the Dominion Railway Commission to look into. That the Xorth
Xorth Arm of the Fraser possesses enormous opportunities from an industrial point of view, has become known
throughout the world. The fact, however, that freight
rates to and from these industrial sites, appear to be excessive will in itself be a big factor in keeping capital
away.
This matter has been discussed by the Board of Trade
of the municipality, but no action bas so far been taken.
Present conditions are said to work a hardship on the
several industries already located on the freshwater harbor, and a remedy should immediately be sought.
BY THE WAY
JUST TO SHOW you how' quiet living we are in South
Vancouver : A dazed young man called Sunday morning
at 4 o'clock at the municipal garage, roused the chauffeur,
and asked to bc taken for a joy-ride. The police promptly lucked him up.
HONEST JAPAXESE boy, experienced and references,
wants a small position in general housework and plain
cook; care for garden; speaks English strictly.���From the
want ad column  ol  a Vancouver daily.
*    ��   ��
SIR JOSEPH  BEECHAM, of Liverpool,  England, philanthropist  and  producer of grand  opera  and  pills,  is  in
Vancouver. We would prescribe a daily 'lose of the product of Sir Joseph's laboratories to those imperialistic persons whose "blood boils" at the way things are going
politically em this side-.
�� * *
THAT VICTORIA is behind the times, we have always
Suspected, but we were really shocked I" find that the
law under which they put the lid e,n in Victoria last Son-
day was framed in Cromwelt'l lime. They still use thc
stocks in Victoria for punishing rogues.
* *   *
SUCCESSFUL   EXPERIMENTS an   being  made  with
the wireless telephone.    This should be encouraging new*
iu subscribers on the other side "f Bodwell  Koad
��   #   *
"THE GOVERNOR OF Kansas advocates dispensing
with the legislature. Governor Sulzer, of Xew Yurk,
probably entertains the same opinion."���Vancouver
"Province." Under present conditions, might just a- well
el" away wiih it in  British Columbia.
* *   ��
FURTHER FOOD i" fatten Socialism in British Columbia was contained in the evidence given befure the
Minister uf Lands, while in the interior, by lumber birr Oil��
wine du nut want to see the government royally on timber
increased. If the government wanl more revenue, let
them re-introduce tbe poll tax, they argued, nnd make it
$5.00 a head instead uf $2.00.
* i    *
WHEN THAT MAIX STREET ce,rucr told for $3000
cash per front foot, a ripple uf optimism quivered from
l'ender  Street   righl  tu  the   River   Road.
* ��     *
"1 SHOULD WORRY," said the man on Ontari.. Heights
when it was announced that the I'., C. E, R was about to
lay a car track on  Wilson  He ..nl
* *    *
WHETHER  Till'.  Highlanders al   Nanaimo threatened
to strike, we know nut. If they are true tu their forefathers they'll doubtless refrain frum turning down any
extra "siller'   that may come their way.
i i i
ONE OF THE South Vancouver councillors said the
other day that it was too bad that Councillors Millar and
Thomas, constituting a minority, should be allowed to
swing the council. In other quarters the closure has been
found to be very effective.
* *    *
OF ALL THE ROADS that lead to Xew Westminster
Fair,  Kingsway will  doubtless  be  tbe  most  popular
THE HIGH-GRADER'S CORNER
THAT the Englishman has a hard time of it in Canada,
is thc claim uf the edit'er uf "Church Life," the official organ in Toronto uf the Church eef England. "He-
is frequently laughed at for his clothes, his accent-
above all fur his indifference," is the statement of
worthy editor.
While this may be true of the Englishman wlm lands
frum the Old Country in Toronti . it is decidedly not the
case throughout Canada. We find un the Prairies and
in British Columbia that Englishmen lire nut subjects tu
be laughed at. Their accent and the cul uf iheir clothes
are usually forgotten iu the West if tluy "are there with
the goods."
In British Columbia, we find the Englishman a fit subject tu send to the Federal parliament, a fit person to
run our big public utilities and departmental stuns. Ibiw-
uver the editor "f "Church  Life" goel on to say:
"There is such a radical difference between the Canadian and the Englishman in upbringing, in outloiek. and
in ambition tbat as a natural consequence- the Englishman
takl I a long time to assimilate, and sunn times fails altogether t" do so. Why should he need i" assimilate at
all? Because Canada is a new country with iis own ideas
and its own ways of (being things. Canada belongs to
Canada first, and to the Empire second, while many of our
fellow countrymen across the sea think that it is just tin-
reverse, and then there is friction. But on the score of
indifference thc accusation is frequently tuee true. When
it comes to churchman ship they arc very often quite indifferent, both men and women. They are out here to
make money and to get on and up, and for tbat they
spend their energies, and all else they neglect. Wc know
of many cases where it is next to impossible to do anything with those who, in the Old Country, have been
regular church attendants and communicants. If they
go anywhere they are quite indifferent as to whether it
is their own Mother Church. Their Sundays are given
up to loafing or amusement, and to remonstrance they
turn a deaf ear. Here where thc Canadian churchman
gives willingly and generously, they give little or nothing.
and expect the church to give them financial aid whenever
they want anything. The trouble lies outside Canada, for
thay develop these tendencies directly they arrive. There
must bc something radically wrong with their temperament, or with the way they have been bandied at home.
Partly it is accounted for by tbe freer life, tbe lack of restraint, and the breaking down of social barriers."
T
INDUSTRIAL SITES
INDICATIOXS that South Vancouver is about to make
the most of her opportunities are contained in the recent policy outlined by the Municipal council, outstanding in which is the promise to take immediate steps to
secure industrial sites along the Xorth Arm of the Fraser
River to be leased out to manufactories at reasonable
rentals.
Apparently after going in to the full facts of thc plan
and analyzing it cooly and thoroughly, Reeve Kerr, endorsed by every member of the council   comes out with
PROPOSED GAS SUPPLY
seems t'i he the unanimous opinion uf the members
1 of South Vancouver's present council that it would
he very inadvisable at this juncture to consider granting
tu a private company a long term franchise to supply the
residents of the municipality wilh gas. Though several
rompanies have made offers to the South Vancuuver for
lhe gas privilege, tbe reeve and councillors have decided
definitely to act upon the report made to them by their
gas engineers ard petitions are at present being circulated
among the ratepayers authorizing the council to introduce
a bylaw tu borrow money for the purpose eif building a
municipally  owned gas  plant.
Before the council at the present time is the project
to establish an electric light and power plant in South
Vancouver un the public ownership ba.sis. All the members of thc council are enthusiastically in favor of making an  effurt  tei thus  solve  the problem  uf  large  electric
light and power bills. Thc report submitted by the municipality's electrical engineer suggests that thc light anil
power plant he developed on iln- North Arm of the
Fraser.
It is encouraging to find thai Ibe present council are
endorsing the idea uf public ownership, If the gas and
electric projects can be carried through successfully and
operated profitably, then future generations will bless tinmen who are al present taking the initiative in endeavoring
lo give to thc people of the Municipality a system of
public  owned  utilities.
From information at hand it would appear tbat both
the gas and electric projects can bc worked out successfully. If such be the case, then the ratepayers of the
municipality to a man will be with the reev.e and council,
and will demand a speedy carrying out of plans in hand
The time for action on the gas project is the present. Today a foundation for a great gas producing plant in the
municipality might be laid, the capacitv of which might
be widened later on. Householders in South Vancouver
demand gas, and if we are to tempt industries to the
municipality, cheap gas would be one of the first itemr
to attract. Cheap lights and power would bc a great industrial boon to South Vancouver.
Standing in the way, of both projects, however, is the
question���the old, old question���of finance. Can the
present council finance at the present time a public owned gas plant and electrical concern?
With the present rates for electric light and power,
South Vancouver can put up for some time to come, but
the householders are demanding gas today. And as the
population of South Vancouver increases, the need is becoming more imperative.
THE MIDDLEMAN EVIL
/"^NE of the chief causes of the present high cost o
'"' living in Vancouver and the municipalities adjoin
ing is that the city houses a vast and increasing popula
tion of middlemen.    The ranks of the real estate   middle.
Merely a Fashion Hint
(Chicago "News")
Among the Central American Indians is a tribe tbat
gathers silk by permitting its members to become living
cocoons, the worm spinning its threads as it drags itself
over the naked bodies uf the human spools, until they
are covered with a seamless garment as neat fitting as the
skin. This bit of information is offered merely because
it is said that skirts will be worn tighter next season and
some lady of fashion may score a beat over her rivals by
sending to Central America for a couple of worms.
* ��    *
What Difference Would It Make Now?
(Victoria "Colonist")
Tbe suffragette movement is like to take a rather remarkable turn in Great Britain. Peeresses are now claiming a right to vote in thc bouse of lords, and constitutional
authorities say the claim i s perfectly valid. Both peeresses and abbesses have the right lu vote in the birds and
did vote up u> about the fourteenth century when tbe custom gradually fell into disuse. It would certainly provide some excitement if some suffragette peeress, if there
ire tiny, took a seat in the sacred upper chamber and announced her intention of exercising her constitutional
prerogative.
* *    *
A New Eastern View of the Matter
(Ottawa "Journal")
The western municipalities arc not foolish in wanting
to keep on spending lots, and in clamoring for it. They
ire nut foolish���they are wise. Tbe money is properly
needed.    A  country with a
third of a million mure people this, as it did last year, and
will next year.    To atop spending money in  tbe effort to
accommodate  such a  human  11 1  would met   be  sensible.
if the money could be gut.    It would be asinine.     If the
West  can  gel   the   money,   the   West   might   tu   have   il.
The West  ought  tu keep grabbing  fur  il.     And  until  the
first  creditor   of  lhe   West  can   throw  a   stone  by   saying
with  truth  "I   have  lust a  dollar  in  a   Western   municipal
Investment,"   the   rest   uf   the   world���the   rest   eif   Canada
anyway���shemld have mure sense than to mass like a pack
of   sheep,   bleating   sillv   and   injurious   platitudes   aboul
"tbe tendency of the West te, uverburrow."
��    ��    ��
Lots of Money But��� s%<-
(Montreal   "Herald")
Thc Ottawa Journal points out that the various savings banks of Canada held in May last $727,000,000 of the
people's money, and, further, that this money is not being used with which to buy stocks or bonds. Apparently,
therefore, this money stringency about which we have
heard so much is founded largely upon air with a high
temperature.
* *    *
Strenuous Advice by Sanford Evans
(Hamilton "Times")
The doctors are protesting against the written school
.examination and denouncing it as a "periodic scare," but
f that ten years of pick and shovel, advocated by San-
ford Evans, were added to the curriculum, a trance as well
is a "periodic scare" would probably be a part of the experience of every properly educated youth.
* *    *
The Ovations to Jack and Harry
(Montreal "Gazette")
Jack Johnson, accused of white slavery, is being nightly
:beered in London music balls, and Thaw has been given
an ovation in Sherbrooke, Que. Thc United States can-
lot be proud of these specimens of American citizenship,
but neither have Britain and Canada cause for pride in
the hospitality afforded them.
��   *   ��
Fastidiousness
(Diihtth  "Herald")
A  "society   woman"  in   North   Carolina   insisted   upon
raving the license tag of her automobile repainted in or-
ler to conform with the color scheme of ber automobile.
7!y and by the joy riders will decline to run over anybody
whose apparel  would   not   harmonize  with   the   tonal   atmosphere of a general mix-up.
V    *    ��
Clocks Not Needed
(Calgary   "Heralel")
When   a   Mexican   laboring   man   has   rolled   bis
cigarette he knocks off and calls it half a day.
��    ��    ��
One Theory
(Toronto "Telegram")
Enough   dynamite   to   fill   a   box   car   was   found
was probably intended to rai
It
265 th
the
the
Nanaimo mines.
price of coal.
* *   *
Financial Note
(Edmonton  "Bulletin"!
It i.s hard to detect a counterfeit $10 bill any mure because   thc  average   man  with  a   family   tu   support   can't
keep une lung enough lo notice whether it is Imgus.
��    .*    *
Ontario's Dreadful Cities
t Bowmanville "News")
Ontario  cities,  anil  Toronto  in  particular,  seem   to  be
infested with crooks, thieves, firebugs and thugs of various
ilk.
* *    *
Chicago Copesses Not Professional Beauties
(Windsor "Record")
One glance at the picture uf thuse policewomen of Chicago   is   sufficient   to   satisfy  anyone   that   Chief   Smith   is
million  people i.s getting in a i quite   right   when   he   says   policewomen   are   nut   wanted
here.
��    ��    ��
In Regard to a Couple of Guelph Aldermen
(C.uelph   "Herald"!
Tailors   predict    that   men   will   seeon   be   wearing   slit
trousers and colored hosiery.    Wc hale- tu mention names,
but there are a Couple of Guelph able-rnien  lhat  we'd like
to see lead the fashion
* *    *
Their Inseparable Monocles
I Montreal   "Telegraph")
Tbe London Standard reports that some of the dandies
summering  at   Seaview  wear  their  monoblea  even   when
bathing in the ocean.    These gentlemen should be awarded medals.    They are champions of dignity.
* ��    ��
Tut!   Tut I
(Montreal  "Herald")
Down in Xewport some of the ultra fashionable ladies
have taken to wearing watches strapped 'round their ankles.    Like to see one of them trying to find out, by listening, whether or not ber timepiece was going.
* *    *
"Buffalo on Head Liner"
(Boston "Transcript")
The headline "Buffalo on Head Liner" might easily
puzzle a reader. The item referred to tells of the shipment from Montreal of buffalo for thc Dublin zoological
gardens on board the steamship Inishowen Head of the
Head line. The headline, therefore, is correct, without
being cryptic or slangy.
��    *    ��
His Ability Not Hampered by His Silk Breeches
(Hamilton  "Herald")
Sir John Gibson's term as lieutenant-governor bas been
extended for a year.    Sir John is an able man, in spite of
his silk breeches.���London Advertiser.
Why "in spite of"?   Sir John's silk breeches, while making him look beautiful, do not detract from his ability.
��    ��    ��
Our Inimitable Minister of War
(Ottawa "Free Press")
"Director   of   Military   Operations"   is   the   Napoleonic
title of a new member of the headquarters staff.    But his
job can only last while the minister of miliatia is in  Europe.    Col Sam himself is the only and original Director
of Military Operations in Canada.   There is no other.
I SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
1  FIVE
Phone Collingwood 24
P. O. Box 32
W. H. BRETT & CO.
Successors to Fletcher & Brett
REAL ESTATE
LOANS,   INSURANCE, ETC.
Notary Public
Domi-iicn Express Money  Orders  Issued
JOYCE ROAD, COLLINGWOOD EAST
South Vancouver Builders' Supply Company
Dealers in Sand, Gravel, Fibre, Cement, Lime, Plaster, Vitrified
Pipe, Tile, Fire-clay, Lath, and Brick of all kinds.
Offices :   51st Avenue and Fraser Street.    Phone : Fraser 36.
Main and 2��4h Avenue.   Phone :   Fairmont 1940.
Fraser Street and North Arm of Fraser Kiver.   Phone : Fraser 84.
Coal orders taken at all offices and delivered to all parts of South
Vancouver.
EVANS,COLEMAN&EVANS
Phone 2988
Limited        Ft. of Columbia Ave.
FOR
Building  Materials
Largest and Best   Assorted   Stock   in   British   Columbia
PROMPT DELIVERIES
VITRIFIED SEWER  PIPE AND
ALL FITTINGS
C. Gardiner - Johnson & Company
Johnson's Wharf
Phone :  Sey. 9145
Let  us  supply  you  with  the  requirements  of  the  season.
Water Cans, Hose, Garden Tools
The hot weather is coming.    Don't forget that we carry a full line
of Screen Doors and Windows.
C. B. FEARNEY
HARDWARE, PAINTS,   OILS AND  COLORS
Dealer in Stoves, Ranges and Kitchen Utensils
JOYCE STREET, EAST COLLINGWOOD
Tlione Coll. 19
1CTS
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
SOLE AGENTS FOR B. C.
feTHIS IS AN OLD ONE BUT-
A German farmer left his horsei unhitched in front of a hardware ton
in Gary. When he came out, after
,ni interval .>i hall an hour, they were
lone. There had been no lound of
a runaway, io thi farmer surmised
that they mighl have gone home. He
telephoned his wife, saying;
"Chaulia, is de horses dere?"
A negative came over the telephone,
for In- added :
"X'er lie   vagon,  eiel::-'.'"
A lady heard that her twee lom
no,- iii the habit each, at separate
times and quite unknown t>e each
other, "i taking one 'ei the maids
"out for a lark.' Fearing l<< bring
down 'en iheir devoted heads tin
wrath e,i their father by making a
bother about it, she asked them quietly if it was true, but cnuld obtain no
satisfactory reply. It occurred to hei
that by a little strategy she might
get the truth irenn the girl, su she
saiel in a jocular manner, "Now, Mary
I want yuu in answer me candidly
Which "I my twu smis do you like
going 'ent with lust���George e,r Wil
liamr" "Well, ma'am," replied tlu
gni. reassured by the lady's manner
"If ye maun ken, of lhe two I like
Maister George best; but for a rale
tin
iounricht  guid  Bpre
maister
yu-
me
Farmer Hurr���How do you like
your automobile,  Exra?
Farmer Root���Wal, 1 can't go "to
sleep on my way heuue from town.
anil wake up in the barnyard, like I
could with ob! Dobbin,
* lie *
The American truth teller was in
form. "Talking .it ants," he saiil.
"we've gut 'em as big as crabs out
West. I've seen 'em light with long
horns, which they use as lames.
charging each other like savages."
"'I hey don't compare with the ants
I saw in tlie East," said an inuffen-
sive individual near by. "The natives have trained them as beasts nl
burden. One ui 'em could trail a
tun head feir miles with ease. They
worked willingly, but occasionallj
they turned un their attendants anil
killed them."
But Ihis was drawing the lung bow
a little  too  far.
"I say old chap," said a shocked
voice irom the corner, "what sort ol
ants were they?"
"Elephants," replied ilie inoffensive
individual.
ele       I,        *
"Vuii don't make very good music
with lhat instrument," said a bystander to the man with lhe bass drum, as
the band ceased to play.
"No," admitted the pounder of the
ilium, "1  know  1 don't; but 1 drown
a heap of bad music."
i*    *    *
An uld actur, whu bad been out of
an engagement ior some time, was
standing in the bar of a well-known
public house where one can always
tind a few eet the profession whu
"rest"  longer  than  they  wmk.
Suddenly a well-dressed man entered the bar and urdered a drink,
putting ilnvvn a sovereign. The barmaid could not change it. The man
turned to the uld actur ami said ;
Pardon me, but could yuu change
me a sovereign?"
The actur (.alter be had got over
tile shock) gravely said : "I'm sorry
I cannol oblige ymi with the change,
but"���as he took ofi his hat���"1
thank you fnr the compliment."
* *     St
A fanner, in great need nf extra
hands at haying time, finally asked
Si Warren, wlm was accounted the
town fool, ii he could help him out.
"What'll ye  pay?"  asked  Si.
"I'll pay you what you're worth,"
answered   the   farmer.
Si   scratched   his   head  a   minute,
then announced decisively ;
"I'll be darned ii I'll work for that!"
=1e * *
Recently a streel car advertising
agency, in e.relcr tu stimulate interest in their cards displayed in the
cars, offered in cash prizes fur the
best epigrammatic definitions nf a
suffragette.
lien- are senile  nf the results :
A  suffragette  is  a    woman    who
thinks she has been de-VOted lung
enough.
Not satisfied with the last word she
also  wants  the  tirst.
She is the corset needed to reduce
the Government waste.
She is a woman whu nee-els the
"pill"   for   her   vaulting  ambition.
A suffragette is a sting nf beauty
and a jawer forever.
A woman wine would rather break
windows than clean them.
A wi.man whe.se troubles are ecr-
tainlj   imt  "linle   ones."
Om- wlm -p.-nds more time airing
hei   eii-Ms than viewing her heir-
A unman wh., will -pare ne, pains
In   gel   her   lights.
A woman win, would rather r.,ek
thc country than the i radle,
A 1. male e-r.-aiure . qui . r ami quaint
\\ ho longs lu be jusl what sin ain't.
I in- hen lhat weiuld idle ami never set
Is the woman known a- a suffragette.
We can'l efface, we can't forget her.
We   love her still���ihe stiller the better I
Early Marriages
Many people in these days uf stress
ami hurry stem tee have the idea that
marriages   will   necessarily   handicap
them  m   their   struggle  tu   reach  the
goal their ambition prompts them to
ami at. Many instances c.uld be cited
irom the past which illustrate the ial-
.aey nt such an idea. There have
.leen innumerable instances in which
an early marriage has spurred the
ambition uf the young couple and
made a successful career out uf what
might   have   been   a  failure.
Having nu higher responsibility
than catering lur himself many a
young man lias become careless in
nie, slip-shod in work, and gradually
lost all desire lor advancement. .Marriage has brought iu him a tresb incentive, and this coupled with the encouragement of a sensiDle woman as
nis wife, has frequently succeeded in
enabling him to reach a position
which lie had never thought ut in the
days of his  Bachelorhood.
Marriage brings great responsibilities, it is true; but these are lar more
easily overcome in earlier than in
later life, further, the obligations
which are necessitated by tbe upbringing of a family arc ended in the
ease ot an early marriage at an age
when tlie parents are in a position to
witness the sight oi their children's
battle for success in lite and to en-
jeiy ihe unencumbered Ineiirs which
their growth to manhood or womanhood aliows them.
Mr. Asquith's First Marriage
Although there are many married
men who could probably say, with a
certain elegree ot truth, let it be admitted, lhat "1 could have easily done
llii.s nr that, ur achieved this nr that
position in life, if 1 hadn't been saddled with all the responsibilities ot
married life,""jet it is very interesting
to know at what ages our successful
nun ni today have plunged into matrimony.
The Premier���Mr. Asquith���was
only twenty-five when he married his
lirst wife, Helen Melland, and, as we
know, it is evident lhat Mr. Asquith
did not lind any set-hack tee his career for he married his second wife,
Emma Alice Margaret Tennant. three
years after lhe death of thc tirst. Mr.
Balfour is, oi course, a bachelor, and
elms in it come iu our category, but
Mr. Joseph Chamberlain married
twice and he has, certainly, not bad
an unsuccessful career, nn matter
what our views as to bis political
faith may be.
Lloyd George Married at Twenty-five
Mr. Lloyd Geeirge was married at
the early age of twenty-live, as was
also Mr. McKenna, the Hemic Secretary; Mr. Winston Churchill marrying rather later in life. Mr. Walter
Kunciman. the Presidenl ol the Hoard
of Agriculture, was twenty-eight, ami
his lather���Sir Walter Kunciman���
only twenty-one. Vet neither ui
these gentlemen has been a failure!
Mr. John Hums was just twenty-
three and Mr. Will Crooks only nineteen when they married, ami both
these nun probably did mure hard
ami onerous wurk when they would
otherwise have been enjoying a honeymoon. Mr. Bonar Law married
somewhat  later  in  life
Hut these are cases oi some few
years ago, and it is a fact that the
young man of today whu is anxious
I.,   make  a   name   for   himself   is   not
se. ready tei share his confidences and
his honors with a woman. Whether
this is the result nf the growth of
spurts���such as rowing, cricket, ami
football���and the cheapness eef motoring, and the fields which are open
lo the yieimg through inventions, is
difficult to say. but there arc quite a
number of our younger members and
politicians who, at the age eel thirty
and over, still prefer to remain "sin-
Vancouver - Nanaimo
New Submarine Telephone Cable
Furnishes fist-class Long Distance Service between    ;
VANCOUVER   ISLAND and the MAINLAND.
Long Distance Calls now received for
ALBERNI
COMOX
COURTENAY
CUMBERLAND
DUNCANS
LADYSMITH
NANAIMO
PARKSVILLE
SIDNEY
UNION
VICTORIA, and all other Island Offices.
CALL LONG DISTANCE
WHO WILL GLADLY QUOTE THE TARIFFS.
British Columbia Telephone
COMPANY, LIMITED
A. McFEE
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Phone 1038 : Edmonds, B. C.
I have tbe exclusive sale of large lots on Salisbury Avenue, close
to static!!.   $1,000 each; on good terms.    See me about them.
MACADAM & COMPANY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
418 Winch Building Vancouver, B.C.
Wood Block
PAVING
The Robertson-Godson Co. Ltd.
Wholesale Plumbers' Supplies, Water Works
Supplies. Corporation Brass Gocis.
572 Beatty Street
Vancouver
View of the biggest lumber mill in the world.   The North Arm of the Fraser, in South Vancouver, could support a battalion of such industries, and will doubtless do so following the carrying out of the advanced
policy of municipally-owned industrial sites FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1913
^T^CHINOOtC
PVBLISHfcD
Every Saturday by th. Greater Vtncouvtr Publllhcrl Itatfd
HEAD  OFFICE :
Corner Thirtieth  Avenue  .nd   M.tn   Street.   South  Vancouver,   B. C
George   M.   Murray.   Pre.ieient   .nd   Managing   Director.
He hert  A.  Stein.   Vice-President  and  M.n.jing  Editor.
John Jackson,   Businei.  Manager.
TELEPHONE : All   department.    F.irmont   1871
NIGHT   CALLS    F'irm0nt   lWl
COLLINGWOOD    OFFICE Collingwood   SSL
Newfoundland.   Nev,
SUBSCRIPTION  RATES
To .11 point, in Ca-ada.  United   Kingdom,
Zealand, and other  British Posuession. :
One    Ye.r     ���}���'!
Six Month.       '��� .
Three   Month.    ��� ',"'!. ��, ���.
Po.t.ge to American. European and other Foreign Countries. $1.00
per year extra.
i-i-i   rnHRFSPONDENTS :     We  will  not  print  anonymous  letter.
T?hou?hRSngcommun,ca.ion  on  current events,   to  be  published
over the writer',  signature.
Municipal
jf
WE WANT THAT TUNNEL
rHROUGH   the   combined effort! of   the
Council, and the Board of Trade, there seems every
possibility   that   Snuth   Vancuuver   will  set   Hie   Canadian
Northern   tunnel  that   will  convey  the  last  section
transcontinental railway from ihe North Arm into
big terminal at False Creek.
i, understood that negotiations are on at the pres-
wlth the proper authorities, and it is not ini-
be asked to give an opinion
the
.he definite statement that immediate steps will be taken
)>��� thc council to buy up North Arm waterfrontage, with
t view.of creating an industrial centre and a South Van-
���uiivcr payroll.
With the council in this undertaking, all classes of
people in the municipality will heartily throw in iln-ir in-
liRiice. At the council meeting Me unlay, live men, rc-
irescnting the bailing property owners nf Smith Van-
.-niiver, appeared to voice approval of the new policy.
From the outset ii must be understood that the pro
ie ial to purchase North Arm waterfrontage for industrial sites is one that is being fathered by no clique or
���re.uel and is a policy calculated to benefit the whole district���indeed, the whole of Greater Vancouver. It is the
natural outcome ol a decade of rather abnormal conditions in Seeuth Vancouver which have now reached a
point where the Speculator must make way for the |iru-
iliiccr in this municipality.    It marks the turn of the tide.
It is to be trusted that the council can successfully
finance the project in band. Though definite plans have
not been maele- public, it is likely that Several hundred
acres nf land will be secured lying between Ihe Eburne-
New Westminster Railway anil the North Arm. Possibly,
a way may be found whereby the vendors nf the land may
bc paid in municipal bonds, a practice which is imt always considered goeid finance, but which would undoubtedly bc justified in the present instance. The council
promises to take the public absolutely intn their confidence in their efforts to purchase this laml.
The purchase- nl" industrial sites in South Vancouver is
an undertaking which will bc for the common good, ami
it is trusted that all thc citizens will hasten tn sign up nn
petitions being circulated tn give the council formal authority to proceed with actual buying of properties.
It
cut  tune
probable that the people wi
on the matter within tbe next few months.
If the tunnel entrance is placed in South Vancouver, it
will undoubtedly be the greatest boon that the municipality cnuld possibly.receive. It would mean tbat the
company would possibly require, near at band, a cons.d-
erable acreage fur freight terminals which would front
on what is even now being transformed into a fresh
water harbor nf world importance.
This having been accomplished there would quickly
spring up along the banks nf the North Arm a business
district and thc future nf Smith Vancuuver would be
made absolutely secure.
Out on Lulu Island, a company is at wurk today, laying out plans for a gigantic harbor scheme. Six months
ago the promoters of this project-The Vancouver Harbor and Extension Company Limited-were dubbed even
in some responsible circles as being either visionaries or
wildcatters. But there is today every likelihood of this
harbor  scheme being carried to a successful  corn-
great
the
pletion. The Dominion Government is now assisting
gentlemen 'behind the project and it is understood that
the financing of the enormous undertaking is now merely
a matter of the arrangement of details.
The Lulu Island ocean terminals will be located, fronting on the Gulf, the same distance from the North Arm
of the Fraser as the North Arm is from Burrard Inlet. If
the development and growth of Vancouver continues as
in the past ten years, some day the North Arm will divide almost in two equal parts a gfeat city. The river occupies a strategic position. Even today, new industries
are being located upon its banks. The Dominion Government has undertaken the task, of making it into a suitable harbor.
It is to be hoped that those in authority will leave no
stone unturned to put forward South Vancouver's claims
for the Canadian Northern tunnel entrance in a most
forcible manner.
��� '--ve been decimated during the past summer. Any
,'ee.iel that will result from this, however, is offset by the
tremendous increase in the number of manufacturer's
agents.
An eeffice ten feet square, with a desk and a 'phone
represents tin investment nf the typical eastern manufacturer's agent in Vancouver. Sometimes he represents
but une firm and in other cases a dozen eastern cemcerns
who find a good market for their wares een the Pacific
Coast.
I.i.c-r business nun call ai these offices, and Mr. Middle-
Man. having taken their orders, forwards same In the-
bead eeffice. Tile g Is are shipped by rail nr water, arrive iii Vancouver, and when the local retailer pays bis
bill, he pays Mr. Middle Man from twenty tn thirty per
.-ent fur his courtesy in assisting in securing llle shipment���moreover the local man also pays the- freight.
Now, the man in Seeuth Vancouver who buys a suit
.f underwear fur himself eluring these cool September
days, has in pay the  following Items���local merchant's
profit,   Commission   agent's   prnfit.   manufacturer's   profit,
thc freight, iln- cartage and a hall dozen other considerations.
The middle- man rents no warehouse space, employs nn
men,  pays  no  taxes,   produces  nothing.     Yet  he   takes  a
rake-off on   the deals  that  pass between  thc  retailer  ami
the eastern manufacturer.
One way to drive Mr. Middle Man nut nf business
would he in build up a bunch of local industries. Tbat,
however, cannot conic to pass in a day. In lhe m'eantime.
it is up tn some very wise man to draft a law governing
ihis gentleman, forcing him to contribute something to
the upkeep of tbe city that pays him fatly.
THE ENGLISHMAN
THAT lhe Englishman has a hard lime of it in Camilla,
is the claim e,f tlu- editor nf "Church Life." the of-
ficial urgan in Toronto nf the Church nf England. "He
is frequently laughed at fnr his clothes, his accent���and
above all fnr his indifference," is thc statement nf this
worthy editor.
While  this  may  be  true  of the  Englishman  wlm  lands
frum the old Country in Tore.nt., it is decidedly not the
case throughout Canada. We lind on the Prairies and
in British Columbia that Englishmen are nut subjects to
bc laughed at. Their accent and the cut nf their clothes
are usually forgotten in the West ii they "are there with
the goods."
In British Columbia, we find the Englishman a fit subject tn send t'i the Federal parliament, a fit person to
run our big public utilities and departmental stores. How-
e.ver the cditeer e.f "Church  Life" geeii on to say :
"There is such a radical difference between the Canadian  and  the   Englishman   in  upbringing,  in   outlook, and
in ambition that as a natural consequence the Englishman
takes a long lime to assimilate, and sometimes fails altogether to do so. Why should he need to assimilate al
all? Because Canada is a new country with its own ideas
and its own ways of doing things. Canada belongs to
Canaela lirst, and to the Empire second, while many of our
fellow countrymen across the sea think that it is just the
reverse, and then there is friction. But nn tbe score of
indifference the accusation is frequently too true. When
it Comes to churchmanship they are very often quite indifferent, both men and women. They are out here to
make money and to get on and up, and for that they
spend their energies, and all else they neglect. We know
nf many cases where it is next to impossible to do anything with those who, in the Old Country, have been
regular church attendants and communicants. If they
go anywhere they arc quite indifferent as to whether it
is their own Mother Church. Their Sundays are given
up to loafing or amusement, and to remonstrance they
turn a deaf ear. Here where the Canadian churchman
gives willingly and generously, they give little or nothing.
and expect the church to give them financial aid whenever
they want anything. The trouble lies outside Canada, for
thcV develop these tendencies directly they arrive. There
must be something radically wrong with their temperament, or with the way they have been bandied at home.
Partly it is accounted for by the freer life, the lack of restraint, and the breaking down of social barriers."
EXCESSIVE FREIGHT RATES
IF it costs $100 to ship a consignment ot goods from Calgary to Nanaimo, $100 to ship the same consignment to Victoria, and $100 lo land the sune goods on the
freight platform at Vancuuver, why slinuld it cost $115
to ship it to Dominion Mills, Smitl: Vancouver, on the
North Arm of the  Fraser?
Before the municipal council this week, Mr. John Armstrong, a local business man, told of the efforts be and
others were making to locate a furniture factory on the
North Arm, near the foot of Fraser Street. This industry
is at present located at Eburne. Owing to a lack of capital, it is impossible for the proprietor to turn out the
orders with which he is literally swamped.
Mr. Armstrnng and others are endeavoring to finance
a new factory to bc located in South Vancouver. The
big item militating against tbe successful floating of the
industry is the fact that freight rates from and to South
Vancouver are such that they are likely to cat up the
profits of thc industry. Mr. Armstrong told the council
that this fact alone was holding a certain capitalist back
from investing $50,000.
Mr. Will Harvey, of the Dominion Creosote Company
Limited, whose factory is located on the river, gave the
council the information that to send a car of goods into
South Vancouver meant to pay $15 more than to have
it sent from thc same starting point to Vancouver, Victoria or Nanaimo.
It would seem that this question is one for the Dominion Railway Commission to look into. That the North
North Arm of tbe Fraser possesses enormous opportunities from an industrial point of view, has become known
throughout the world. The fact, however, that freight
rates to and from these industrial sites appear to be excessive will in itself bc a big factor in keeping capital
away.
This matter has been discussed by the Board of Trade
of the municipality, but no action has so far been taken.
Present conditions are said to work a hardship on the
several industries already located on the freshwater harbor, and a remedy should immediately be sought.
BY THE WAY
JUST TO SHOW ynu hnw quiet living we arc in South
Vancouver : A dazed young man called Sunday morning
at 4 o'clock at tile municipal garage, roused the chauffeur,
���mil asked tei be taken fur a joy-ride, The police promptly locked him up.
��    #    ��
HONEST  JAPANESE  boy,  experienced  and   references,
wants a  small  position  in  general  housework  and  plain
;ook; care fur garden; speaks English strictly.���From the
want  ad  column  ol  a Vancouver  daily.
M   ��   V
SIR JOSEPH  BEECH AM. of Liverpool, England,  philanthropist  and  producer  of grand  opera and  pills,  is  in
Vancouver. We would prescribe a daily dose eef the product of Sir Joseph's laboratories t" those imperialistic persons win se "blond boils" at the way things are going
politically nn this side.
Ml
THAT VICTORIA is behind the times, wc have always
suspected, but we were really shucked tu find that the
lav, under which they put the li'l on in Victoria last Sim-
day was framed in CrnimveH's lime. They still use the
^te.cks iu Victoria fur punishing rogue*,
��     ��     ��
SUCCESSFUL   EXPERIMENTS   are   being   made   with
the wireless telephnne.    This should be eneiiuragiug news
in subscribers mi the other side oi Bodwell  Road,
* * ��
"THE GOVERNOR OF Kansas advocates dispensing
with the legislature. Governor Sulzer, <>f New Vnrk,
probably entertains tin- same opinion."���Vancouver
"Province." Under present conditions, might just as well
ihe away with it in British Columbia.
�� * ��
FURTHER FOOD to fatten Socialism in British Columbia was contained in the evidence given before the
Minister eel Lands, while- in the interior, by lumber barons
wlm dn nut want tn see the government royalty on timber
increased If the- government want more revenue, let
them re-introduce lhe pull tax, ihey argued, mid make it
$5.00 a head instead e.f $2.00.
��     *    ��
WHEN THAT MAIN STREET corner sold for ?M0O
cash per frnnl foot, a ripple of optimism quivered from
Pender Streel  right  tee the  River   Re,ail.
��    ��    ��
'I SHOULD WORRY." saiel the man nu Ontario Heights
when il was announced thai the  II. C,  E,  R was about to
lay a car track  mi  Wilson   Reiad.
��     ��     ��
WHETHER THE Highlanders at Nanaimo threatened
iee strike, we know not. If they are true to their forefathers they'll doubtless refrain from turning down any
extra "siller'  that may come their way.
��    ���    ��
ilSh',   OF   Till'"   South   Vancuuver  councillors   saiel   the
olher day that it was ton bad thai Councillors Millar and
Thomas, constituting a minority, should be allowed to
swing the council. In other quarters the closure has been
found to be very effective.
��    ��    ��
OK  ALL THE  ROADS that  lead  te.  Xew  Westminster
Fair,  Kingsway  will  doubtless  bc  the  most popular.
THE HIGH-GRADER'S CORNER
���
INDUSTRIAL SITES
INDICATIONS that South Vancouver is about to make
the most of her opportunities are contained in the recent policy outlined by the Municipal council, outstanding in which is the promise to take immediate steps to
secure industrial sites along the North Arm of the Fraser
River to be leased out to manufactories at reasonable
rentals.
Apparently after going in to the full facts of the plan
and analyzing it cooly and thoroughly, Reeve Kerr, endorsed by every member of the council, comes out with
PROPOSED GAS SUPPLY
IT seems to be the unanimous opinion of the members
* of South Vancouver's present council that it would
be very inadvisable at this juncture to consider granting
to a private company a long term franchise to supply the
residents of the municipality with gas. Though several
���ompanies have made offers to the South Vancouver for
the gas privilege, the reeve and councillors have decided
definitely to act upon the report made to them by their
gas engineers and petitions are at present being circulated
among the ratepayers authorizing the council to introduce
a bylaw to borrow money fnr tbe purpose of building a
municipally owned gas plant.
Befure the council at the present time is thc project
to establish an electric light and power plant in South
Vancouver on the public ownership basis. All the members of the council are enthusiastically in favor of making an effort to thus solve the problem of large electric
light ami power bills. The report submitted by tbe municipality's electrical engineer suggests tbat the light and
power plant be developed on the North Arm of the
Fraser.
It is encouraging to find that the present council are
endorsing the idea of puhlic ownership. If thc gas and
electric projects can he carried, through successfully and
operated profitably, then future generations will bless the
men who are at present taking the initiative in endeavoring
to give to the people of the Municipality a system of
public  owned  utilities.
From information at hand it would appear that both
the gas and electric projects can be worked out successfully. If such be the case, then tbe ratepayers of the
municipality to a man will bc with the reev.c and council,
and will demand a speedy carrying out of plans in hand.
The time for action on the gas project is the present. Tee-
day a foundation for a great' gas producing plant in the
municipality might be laid, the capacity of which might
be widened later on. Householders in South Vancouver
demand gas, and if we are to tempt industries tn the
municipality, cheap gas would be one of the first items
to attract. Cheap lights and power would be a great industrial boon to South Vancouver.
Standing in the way, of both projects, however, is the
question���tbe old, old question���of finance. Can the
present council finance at the present time a public owned gas plant and electrical concern?
With the present rates for electric light and power,
South Vancouver can put up for some time to come, but
the householders are demanding gas today. And as the
population of South Vancouver increases, the need is becoming more imperative.
THE MIDDLEMAN EVIL
/^VNE of the chief causes of the present high cost of
^"^ living in Vancouver and the municipalities adjoining is that the city houses a vast and increasing population of middlemen.   The ranks of the real estate   middle-
Merely a Fashion Hint
(Chicago "News")
Among the Central American Indians is a tribe tbat
gathers silk by permitting its members to become living
cocoons, the worm spinning its threads as it drags itself
over the naked bodies of the human spools, until they
are covered with a seamless garment as neat fitting as the
skin. This bit of Information is offered merely because
it is said that skirts will be worn lighter next season and
some lady nf fashion may score a beat over her rivals by
sending to Central America feer a couple of worms.
* ��    ��
What Difference Would It Make Now?
(Victoria "Colonist")
Thc suffragette movement is like to take a rather remarkable turn in Great Britain. Peeresses are now claiming a right to vote in the house of lords, and constitutional
authorities say the claim is perfectly valid. Both peeresses and abbesses have thc right tn vote in the lords and
did vote up to about the fourteenth century when the ctts-
Inm gradually fell intn elisuse. It would certainly provide some excitement if some suffragette peeress, if there
ire any, took a seat in the sacred upper chamber and announced her intention nf exercising her constitutional
prerogative!
* ��    ��
A New Eastern View of the Matter
(Ottawa "Journal")
The western municipalities are nut fonlish in wanting
'.ei keep nn spending lots, and in clamoring I'm- it. Tluy
are not foolish���they are wise. The money is properly
needed. A country with a million people is getting in a
third nf a million mure people this, as it did last year, and
will next year. To stop spending money in the effort to
accommodate such a human Hood would not be sensible,
if the money could he gut. It would be asinine, if the
West can get the money, the West ought to have it.
The West ought to keep grabbing for it. And until the
lirst creditor eif the West can throw a stone by saying
with truth "I have best a dollar in a Western municipal
investment," tbe resl of the world���the rest of Canada
anyway���should have more sense than tn mass like a pack
of sheep, bleating sillv and injurious platitudes about
"the tendency of the West to overborrow."
�� �� ��
Lots of Money But��� ���<���
(Montreal "Herald")
Thc Ottawa Journal points out that the various savings banks of Canada held in May last $727,000,000 of the
people's money, and, further, that this money is not being used with which to buy stocks or bonds. Apparently,
therefore, this money stringency about which we have
heard so much is founded largely upon air with a high
temperature.
��    ��    ��
Strenuous Advice by Sanford Evans
(Hamilton   "Times")
Tbe doctors are protesting against  thc written  school
examination and denouncing it as a "periodic scare," but
f that ten years of pick and shovel, advocated by Sanford Evans, were added to the curriculum, a trance as well
as a "periodic scare" would probably be a part of the experience of every properly educated youth.
��    ��    ��
The Ovations to Jack and Harry
(Montreal "Gazette")
Jack Johnson, accused of white slavery, is being nightly
:heered in London music balls, and Thaw bas been given
an ovation in Sherbrooke, Que. Thc United States can-
lot be proud of these specimens of American citizenship,
liut neither have Britain and Canada cause for pride in
the hospitality afforded them.
��    *    ��
Fastidiousness
(Duluth "Herald")
A  "society  woman"  in   North   Carolina  insisted   upon
raving the license tag of her automobile repainted in or-
ler to conform with the color scheme of her automobile.
3y and by the joy riders will decline to run over anybody
whose  apparel  would  nut   harmonize  with  the  tonal   at
mosphere of a general mix-up.
��     ��     ��
Clocks Not Needed
(Calgary  "Herald"I
When   a   Mexican   laboring   man   has
cigarette he knocks off and calls it half a day.
��    ��    ��
One Theory
(Te ere into "Telegram")
Enough  dynamite  tn  lill  a   h.ex  car  was  found
Nanaimo mines.    It was probably intended to rai
price of coal.
��    #    ��
Financial Note
(Edmonton "Bulletin")
It is hard to detect a counterfeit $10 bill any more l>e-
���d  his  265th
the
tbe
cause
keep
the  average  man
me lung enough In
a   family  to  support   can't
whether it is bogus.
iih
Otic
��     i    *
Ontario's Dreadful Cities
(I'.eewmanville  "\cws"l
Ontario  cities,  ami  Toronto  in  particular,  seem   to  be-
infested with crooks, thieves, firebugs and thugs nf Various
ilk.
��    *    ��
Chicago Copesses Not Professional Beauties
i Windsor "Record")
(Ine glance at the picture eef those policewomen of Cbi-
cagn  is   sufficient   t"  satisfy   anyniie   that   Chief  Smith   is
quite right when he says policewomen are imt wanted
here.
��    ��    ��
In Regard to a Couple of Guelph Aldermen
(Guelph  "Herald")
Tailors   predict   tbat   men   will-  seion   be   wearing   ^lit
trousers and colored hosiery.    We hate to mention names,
but there are a eniiple nf Guelph aldermen that we'd like
tn see lead the fashion.
��    *    ��
Their Inseparable Monocles
I Montreal   "Telegraph")
The London Standard rcport> that some of thc dandies
summering  at  Seaview  wear  their  monocles   even   when
bathing in the ocean.    These gentlemen shouhl be awarded medals.    They are champions of dignity.
��    ��    ��
Tut I    Tut I
i Nie unreal   "Herald")
Down in  Newport  some uf the ultra fashionable ladies
have taken tn wearing watches Strapped 'rnund their ankles.    Like to see one of them trying to find out, by listening, whether or not her timepiece was going.
��    ��    ��
"Buffalo on Head Liner"
(Boston "Transcript")
The   headline   "Buffalo   on   Head   Liner"   might   easily
puzzle a reader.    Tbe item referred to tells of the shipment from Montreal of buffalo for the Dublin zoological
gardens on board the steamship Inisbowen Head of the
Head  line.    The  headline,  therefore, is  correct, without
being cryptic or slangy.
���    ��    ��
His Ability Not Hampered by His Silk Breeches
(Hamilton  "Herald")
Sir John Gibson's term as lieutenant-governor bas been
extended for a year.    Sir John is an able man, in spite of
his silk breeches.���London Advertiser.
Why "in spite of"?   Sir John's silk breeches, while making him look beautiful, do not detract from his ability.
��    ��    ��
Our Inimitable Minister of War
(Ottawa "Free Press")
"Director   of   Military   Operations"   is   the   Napoleonic
title of a new member of the headquarters staff.    But his
job can only last while the minister of miliatia is in Europe.    Cul Sam himself is the only and original Director
of Military Operations in Canada.
There is no other. SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 20, 1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THE NEW ADVENTURES OF
Get - Rich - Quick Wallingford
By George Randolph Chester
Nowadays it takes a smooth crunk to keep out of jail. The legal sharps
taj it is absolutely impossible to plan a crime- that will not leave- - >me
working clue. And yet Mr. Chester assures us that Wallingford in all
hi- exploits wiih other people's money bas dum just this.   He is immune
���within lhe law.    And this is only une ni the  tangle-   Mr. Chester has tee
straighten nut in giving ynu a wallingford  story.    For  example,  every
business deal of Wallingford*! is a bona-fide  business  proposition, which
Mr. Chester works OUt tn the last���very  smallest���detail.    Thai   the  result
is a spontaneous, fascinating, easy-moving st'.ry is only une mme tribute
tn Mr. Chester as a master story-craftsman.     Here  Wallingford  help-  a
t.ewnful  nf "straphangers"  tn  seats -ami himself tn sunn- cash.
What ii J. Rufus came tn Seeuth Vancouver?
lingford. "You'll never have- a liv.
burg until ynu introduce graft intn
the   city   council."
HI
As he neareel his room, Wallingford heard the doleful -trains mi
"The Death m A-���-." and opening
the elee.ir, In- found Blackie, saxophone
in  hand, entertaining  Kirby  Stanton.
"1 woke up Stan! boasted Blackie,
-le.pping in the middle of a note im
the purpos "II.- going in learn
I" play a life, ain! gu mit with me ill
ihe minstrel business"
"Anything'!   pr. ferable    tn    thi-."
piker" He- opened his wallet, am1.
produi ed live- . ne-thousand-dollar
l-i!l- "This i- a ii ri. it to iln- city, in
case I do not build car tracks within
ir,  uver  in. for  which
I  ask "II,-; e-hund-
red.bollar  hi'.'-     "Th:s    s in
Mire o( a bet," i^   explained, passing
Cine   e.f   the     Ine -huili'll ed-i'. ,|]a r   bill-   to
each e,f the .ih.e rmen. "I i j - i .-. -
me my fran hise, and 1 d n't build,
keep the money."
"What   happen-   i       ou build?"
squeaked old Ebenezer
"(ih. in  that  case,  I   1- -
led  Wallingford.    "I   don'l
-." chuck-
Drink   an.ether   little   j"ruin,
It'll du yeeu nu g 1;
Drink  another   little   jorum,
It'll do ymi im guud."
"Third verse," ordered the grinning
Blackie Daw, and the chorus came
lustily, led by the rich baritone of
young Kirby Stanton, who weerc a
w null  of mint.
"Drink   anothet   little  jorum,
It'll ihi you nee good;
Drini  another little jorum,
It'll  ihi  ynu  nee good."
Jim Wallingford paused in ihe door
of the rathskeller, to survey smilingly thai hilarious, smoke-laden scene.
lie and Blackie had been in town live
hours, ami Blackie had already elect-
eel himself president nf the ratll-
she-ller.
"Come in. stranger," invited Blackie. making room for Wallingford at
the triple table. "It's a Dutch treat.
Mr. Ilezunk," this tn Wallingford,
"meet the Queen nf the May Mr.
Kirby Stanton, the gentleman with
the fragrant wreath and the endless
thirst. He     invented     the     'mint
siinther.'    Order  une."
"Fourth verse," requested the inventor of the soother, as Wallingford ordered his drink, and the company immediately sang that pleasing
ditly.
Just in tbe middle uf the fifth verse.
however, the brisk bartender, wlm
was solemn of mouth, but whose eyes
grinned, came uver and pnunded the
table-bell. "Nix nn the concert," he
informed them.   "It's twelve o'clock."
"You don't seem to understand
this," expostulated Blackie. "One nf
the chief ingredients nf a mint s.eeithcr
is music."
The bartender, by way nf argument,
ruffled Blackie Daw's hair, and stepped back tu thc bar.
A pall fell on the assemblage after
tbat. The hilarity having been
checked, unity of purpose was Inst.
and they fell apart into little chatting
groups.
"What's your grouch. Jim?" asked
Blackie, taking a seat between Wallingford and young Stanton, who,
having removed bis wreath of mint,
was completely sobered.
"Everything," smiled Wallingford.
"I think this town has thc rntteuest
street-car system in the world."
"Piker," protested Blackie. "Why
did ynu ride in a street-car?"
"It  was   there,  and  a   taxi   wasn't."
explained Wallingford. "Four cars
went past, and Hung nn tn Ihe fifth
nnc   with  my  eycbmws."
"That's e,ur normal mode nf transportation," laughed young Stanton,
who was thin faced, and high browed, anil pointed nf chin.
"If   I   lived   here.   I'd   organize   the
indignation."
"1 don't see what gnod it would do
ynu," returned Stanton. "The car
enmpany has nn opposition, and if
ynu want tn go any place ynu pay
your nickel."
"I "see," mused Wallingfu-d. "I
suppose the car enmpany and lhe
city council are great pals."
"Not in this town." corrected Stan '
ton. "The car company hands no
favors In thc council, because it wants
no extensions or improvements, and
the town isn't big enough for opposition."
"Is this
midnight I"
"There's
befure   the
Stanton,
"My yuung friend's a lawyer without any business. Jim," stated
Blackie.
"I've   bad   sume,"   indignantly   de-
the kind of  talk  fur after
' protested Blackie.
always   a   serious   streak
foeilish     one,"     observed
nied Stanton. "I had a murder and
a breach-of-promise case."
"There's nn money in scandal." ad-
vised Wallingford.   "The commercial
lawyer has all the best oi it."
Stanton shrugged his shoulders, "A
yuung attorney doesn't pick his
client-.." he declared. "He can't se-
lecl a likely corporation and bring
suit against them nr fm them."
"Why not?" chuckled Wallingford.
"Il's unly a matter of a little iiig<-u-
uity."
II
With a combination monkey-wrench
lying befure him. J. Rufus Wallingford, wine had tried In charm by his
geniality anil impress by his bigness,
at last gave up. "It seems that there's
no chance t'e promote a new enter-
prise  in  ibis  town," he  complained.
"I've tried a burglar-alarm, an os-
trich-farni. a theatre, and this wrench,
ami ymi won't have- anything."
"1 reckon met," agreed Henry
Sniggs, who was a hardware-dealer
with a snub nose. "The town can't
support  lhe business it  has gut."
"What  the town needs is a punch,"
declared Wallingford, looking gloomily out the window al a passing streetcar.
"I reckon sn." admitted Henry
Sniggs, alsei frowning nnt the window at the car. It was still there,
and the conductor and motorman
were trying tn pry it back onto the
trail. "I'm a member of tbe city council, and the only important ordinance
we've passed ill two years was one
to put up four new arc lights."
"Just for that. I'll buy ynu your
lunch, at the Palace Hotel," chuckled Wallingford. "I had intended lo
try to take some money out of this
town, but now I'm ashamed of myself. Why don't ymi have a fire or
something?"
"I'm cussed if I know." grinned
Henry Sniggs, getting his wrinkled
old coat and bis dust-encrusted felt
hat. "We couldn't afford a fire,
though. The only ones in town that's
got any money is lhe street-car company."
"You wouldn't judge it from that
car," grumbled Wallingford, glancing
at the faded and splintered and peeled uld vehicle.
"That's why." explained Sniggs. as
they crossed the street. "They ain't
put in a new piece nf rolling stuck
since Ponto was a pup. They pay
seven per cent, dividends, and old
Pinkenhorn runs the First National
Bank   with   their   undivided   surplus."
The glint nf dawning ambition
came into Wallingfnrd's eyes. "I
used  tn be in the  traction business
myself." he remarked. "The punch
ymir   town    needs   is   tin   opposition
street-car line."
"There ain't business enough tu gu
round,"  objected  Henry  Sniggs,
"Competition makes business," Wallingford informed him. "You're a
smart enough merchant to know
that."
"Maybe it does," admitted Sniggs;
"but  it don't  make money."
Wallingford led him into lhe Palace
Hotel dining room, where he already
owned the waiters, and seated him
at thc tabic near the fern-window.
For just a moment he talked, in a
low tone, tu the pleased head waiter,
then he laid himself out to be highly
agreeable  to Councilman Sniggs.
"I don't suppose you own any
stuck in tbe street-car enmpany?"
suggested Wallingford.
"Not any," scorned the councilman.
"I've heard nf towns where the city
council held a few shares nf stuck,
but not here. In this place an alderman buys Iiis own tobacco."
"I never saw a cily more in need
of municipal  reform,"  chuckled  Wal-
smiled se.ung Stanton,   "There's onlj
one good legal job in  the city, and   ''''"'?,   ,���',
Judge   Guzzlum   handles   that."' .   "''   hl".".'.':''
"The  street-car  business,"  guessed   '��� :l  ''" "*"���   "��
Wallingford, and young Stanton nod
ded
"It'- a year-in-and-year-oul cinch,"
he envied,    "Three months' vacati
in thc summer and a mere matter "i
wis,- ad\ ice in tin- wintet
"I'll bet In- has \\ his! ers," inn rpn--
ed Blackie, trying u, remember ai
whal mete- he hael discontinued the
lugubrious  death  music
"You can always get the goozle ol   ,,���   llting    i��� own watch.
a smart old stiff like that.    Walling-      ,        :.,;,��������� |ookcd ,���, a, ,,,,. car
ford pointed out.    'He has probably  ,,,,.��� .:..,���     -si, . ven.. lu. hoarsely
many  bets, in  lhe pasl   .,;it,,]
-it   down.    "That's
sppi
V
lock one morning, Blackie
I law ial  oppositi rn in an
auto. At -even minutes after -i.v
the line,is ,,f the bain iipenid, and a
< ame out.
"Six Beven," said Blackie, producing liis watch, and shi m ii g it to
Kirbv Stanton.
"Six  seven," corroborati d  Sl
an   mtervew   e,u   t;-     streng
n ' re bulk.    "You      w   no franci
fe i your use of the streel in fr><ut ���..
Brightlight  Garden," began  W.-.l-
lingford suavely,  Betting  hi-   silk hat
n the corner of Pink-
enhorn's desV.
"Who  said   we   hadn't?"    sna)
thy Pinkenh irn, the kind
man who would ��ear spectacle
rims
"I've hail the matter looked up," re-  e-il  has a right  to rei
ported Wallingford,  smiling Moreover, you'ri
"V\ hat's   ii   your   busit by  either  tl     citj
thy   Pinkenhorn,    ��ho  the public."
poked his head forward when he talk-      "Poof  for thi   publi  I"
ddli      -   his chair b< -   i
"Moreover, you'n   passing anothei
"Yoi
while ..
dinam ���
di - r   tri
- than you
rather vin.licu.
a eh izi u waj - by w n
overlooked -
few yen - of confident ease
balloon leaks in  fifty placi s."
Young  Stanton   seemed   to   gathei
a   trace   of  hope,   even   a   trace   of  renewed   courage,   from   those   simple
little  remarks,    "It  isn't  professional
I ethics for me to hope that the gentle-
[man chokes, but  I  ihe." he observed.
"Then  make him  choke!" snapped
Wallingford, who was very much out
nf   patience   with   the   town.       "I'tc
heard   su  much about  the  street-car
company that I want in drop a brick
nn it- head, ami gu through it- p<eck-,
l',s".
Kirby Stand en went tn the window, anel motioned Wallingfe.nl in
hulk e,ut. Just below was a small
pile  nf red fire-brick.
"Shall   I  get ye.u one':" lu- offered.
IV
11 was iu the private ilining-runin
nf thc Palace lintel, an.l a glass of
champagne hissed al each man's hanel.
"Gentlemen, here's a health tee tlie
city council," proposed Wallingford,
lifting his glass, lie was pink ami
rnund breasted ami impressive, and
tin- cloth he w-eere was the best that
money could buy. It was his genial
smile, however, mure than the big
diamond in his red cravat, or the one
een Ilis linger, which the city council
appreciated, There was a smile with
warmth tee it. a smile nf frankness, a
smile nf human fellowship I
"Here's your own health. Wallingford," called Henry Sniggs. who was
dressed fur the occasion in the Prince
Albert  nf his  wedding  day.
A waiter lefl a quail in front of
each man. anil Plunk Walters saiel tee
Casper   Cane :
"Ci 1  gosh,   I'm   'must   busting!   1
thought that fancy beel was the last."
"This fellow  Wallingford don't du
anything   cheap,"   responded   Casper
Cane, wlm was breathing
was still determined.
"Of   Ciuirse,   gentlemen."   went
peechi - '
me'   Wait a minute!" and In  t- u
a button
A beiy who hi d gro�� n so fast that
he was all "in oi shape cami gangling in. ami stumbled t>\ft 'In- !��� g
nf th ess.
Tell I idgi  'iuzzlum I'''. liki  to see
led   Tin' enhorn, ami hud-
dli d I itica!  in-
specti in   - I   Wallingford     'I ��� ;
removed   hi-   sped icli -.    to
them for a keani r -. iew
Judge Guzzlum wa- a barrel-chcst-
e el   m: n,   h uii   cold  content   "ii   his
bl  1."     e-  tfmly      V. e  ��� 'it. .11.
"The ri-asnii I cami to you quietly
with my client's claims was out of
kindness. You eh,n't wan; the public
'n n alize thai they can sue > ��� iu for
damage - every timi tin v dont i_-i l a
ii at "
.Im'.. Gu; lum sprang from his
chair. "Thi- i- blackmail!" he fumed, puffing hi- cheeks ami pursing Ins
thick lip-.
"Call   it   what   you   like."   granted
ton,   with  a   -hrug  of  hi-   should-
" I  might  further add, how i   - ���
.,'"'" "is A yawning citizen in a hickory
shirt, ami with an aren as brown .'is
a sw e et potato, came by. Blackie
jumped mn of hi- machine,
"What time i- ii.  Bill?" In- asked.
Tin- yawning citizen looked up at
'.he ear ham clock. "Eight minute -
afler  six,"  he  grunted.
��� i- thai the iir-t car nut:" Blackie
wanted ie> know.
"Cmiis.- ii i-." growled ilu- yawner,
win. lived jusl across the -treet. "She'-
always late."
"Have a cigar." urge-el | ickie,
pressing a long ami rich one upon
him. "Write your name amt address
nn  this  card,  please."
The-   young   citizen   balked   at   that.
"What feer?" he scowlingly demanded.
"It's a In-i," Blackie explained, ami
shoved forward the card and pencil.
"(lh." accepted the man. and wreete
a-  requested.
Blackie and Kirby Stanton got them
some breakfast, hut came mit mi the
highway in time In catch the eigllt-
ii'clnck  rush.
Blackie alighted frum his machine
at the crossing, and hailed four cars.
N'mie uf them stopped, and he- maele
���, in ne- iif their numbers. By the
time the fourth one had Hashed by.
lu- hail been joined by other disappointed  travelers.
"Would VMU mind signing this." re-
quested Blackie, offering the card
with  the numbers nf the cars on it.
The little man with the fierce mustache almost jerked thc card mil nf
his hand. "I bet I'll sign it!" he declared.
A spinster-looking lady with a grim
jaw edged in. "Is thai a complaint?"
she inquired, in a voice which could
have  been   used   fur   saw-files.
"A complaint, madam." replieel
Blackie. eluding Irs hat with a sweep-
heavily, but 1 inB courtesy, "We people 'eiit this
way will have better service, nr know
m the reason why. Will ymi sign? It's
Wallingford pleasantly. "I did not in- the only way to get ymir rights."
vite you here for social reasons alone, Indeed she would, and so would
although it has never been my pleas-Une heavy-set old man with the
ure   t.e   entertain   a   m.>re   congenial bristling eye-brows, and S3 would the
party of friemls " g l-looking  tall  girl.
"Gu tn it, Wallingford!" yelled ('..      "Thank you," said Blackie gracious-
B.   Beiiz. whu hail only .me  eve.  and j'>' to all the-c kind peoole, and climb-
was not used te, champagne.   "We're ed "' tnc ,:lxl i"st in back nf them,
all for you!" ''   �����   during   the   evening   rush
hour,   however,   that   Blackie     Daw
committed his greatest adsurditv.  He
Wallingford,  with  a  cheery  bow  at |w,et,gftl,h,imself 1nt�� a c.ar ^ic.h was
the interrupter.    "First of ' all.    you f?wdcc from '"'1 '" end' "'"' hl,ma"
need   a   new   traction   line,   will,   new   beings   hanging   I
cars,   and   plenty   of   them.     1   come I .hls ,mckel,'
before ymi  to ask f
build  that car line."
, We.uld  you   like   In   havi
Old Ebenezer repperly rose.     We cbair or a roc'"er?"
elursn't be sn free with franchises no Only six people laughed    Th
more.' he piped.      Weve  gu.-  nan- ,,,- ,]��� ,���  ���,.,-,. ;,���, miserable
chises away,  time after time,  but  it "All right,' accepted  Blackie airily
always   turned   out   that   people   that ������ | \,.  ,,,',.,!   yon   for  a   sat.  ami  you
got em only wanted to sell em.' didn't  stive it  tn me; now  I'll  taki
"They never succeeded, did tluy?" the names of a iew witni ��� ���"
asked    Wallingford    with    a    smile,      He  might  have   failed  in  thai   at-
the.iigh  he  waited   with   inward  anx- tempt,   had   ml   one   of   his   old-time
'.en  from  ih'   first, 'hat  my client,   Mr   Daw, has intim-
:n- scented in Wallingford an enemy, atcd   ihat   he  would   have  no  objec-
Timothy   Pinkenhorn' wasted     no tions to -, i! i;; l^ his claims to the pi
time i; ' -- formalities e.f in. moter 'if '.!;������ new ear Inn-," and, with
"1 have come among yem tn enliven
yuur   business    interests,"      resumed
every   strap,   paiel
inductor, ami 1  mi
j traduction, "That man says we have
i . franchise fi r tin- street in fr- >ni
. I Brightlight Gardi n," In- advised
the judge, iin n ii. turni ei to Wallingford. "Xow nil him what concern
ii  is m' yours."
"I want it mys -If." obligingly
, stated Wallingfe nl. "I've hael thai
important terminal incorporated in
the franchise which tin- city council
granted me. in executive session, last
night."
"Oh." remarked Pinkenhorn, then
he ami tin- judge looked at each other,
ami   smiled.
"We don't want your franchise,"
scorned lhe judge, rising, as if in go
"Vim wouldn't get it if you eliel!"
promptly ret irted Wallingford. "If
you'll examine the minutes of last
night'- council meeting, you'll
that I elcpn-itcil live thousand dollars
as a forfeit tee the city, in case I don't
build  theese   ear  lines  within   a  year.
The judge sal down again. "There's
-mill- sort nf siring In that five
thousand," he guessed. "What kind
eef a  franchise eliel ymi  get?"
Wallingford rose angrily. "That's
nunc rn' your business! he told them.
"I want possession nf that Bright-
light Garden terminal at once, nr I'll
bring suit   t'i  make ymi  vacate!"
Thc judge and Timothy Pinkenhorn
looked at each . ither. but' they diel imt
smile.
"It's a bluff." declared ihe judge-.
VII
"I thought it only fair tn give- you
advance notice nf tin- claims oi my
���lie-ni," observed young Kirby Stan-
ton, knitting his brows over his thin
nose. "You might want tn settle mu
if court."
"I didn't know you hail a client."
retorted Judge Guzzlum, am! grinned
at Timothy Pinkenhorn.
"Ilis nam, i- lie.race- G. Daw. nf
New Ynrk anil Tarry villc." recited
young Stanton, "lie- claims damages
on the following counts; lir-t. that, iu
the pasl three days, twelve cars have
gone past, without stopping at his
hail, thereby causing him great inconvenience, humiliation, ami loss nf
valuable appointments; second, ihat
the Pebl le Avenue car number thir-
ty-two, carried Mr, Daw down Wood-
side   Street,   cm;,rare   t,i   the-   wishes
this parting shot, Mr. Stanton vvalk-
ed nut.
J. Rufus Wallingford sat, as a mosl
welcome giu-st, in the city council.
Every alderman present had a five-
hundred-dollar be; with Wallingford,
��� en th,- convenient proposition nf
"heads they won, and tail- he lost."
Moreover, they had ihe money in their
pockets in pay themselves the bet.
"I reckon we'll have Mr Wallingford explain his own self what he
wa;.'-,"   suggested   Henry   Sniggs
Big Jim Wallingford rose, with becoming diffidence. "I can't -peak BO
will without a glass in my hand," he
mid them, with that jovial smile
wreathing his big. round,'pink countenance.
Laughter ami applause. 11 ail they
mit sat under Wallingford's -peeches
when that genial bust hail hehl a
glas- in hi- hand, and did they not
know him in be a prince of good fcl-
li -.r, a genuine sport, and a liberal
business man! Why. .1. Rufus Wal-
ligford was just about the salt of the
earth!
"Get him a glass!" called G. B.
lieiiz. his one eye twinkling line two.
"Afterward," accepted Wallingford,
with a chuckle and a hnw. Darned
ii that fellow Wallingford wasn't a
pleasant onel "When the meeting
is uver. I hope to have as many of
ynu j. can come join me in a little
snack and a buttle uver at the Palace
lintel. Inn. just now, we'll talk business. Frankly, gentlemen. I don't
think it fair feir me tei be compelled
tn sue fnr the possession nf a right
which is already mine. It seems In
me that it would be much simpler,
and more effective, if ihi- singularly
direct, and prompt, and efficient city
ce unci! wniild merely pass an ordin-
ance, nr a hill, or an eerder tn vacate,
eir whatever ymi choose tn call it,
against the in-sent tracliem company, which occupies, illegally, the
street in front nf Brightlight Garden,
said street being covered in my franci ;-��� "
"Order 'i m off!" yelled Plunk Walters, who rode on the street-cars himself, ami hail twice .heen flouted by
,lne!ee-  Guzzlum.
"I do neet wi-h I., work any injustice  tn  the opposition  traction   cdm-
,       ���.his nickel to the conductor, ami buid-
u. v nine   , .    .
, ��� Iv demanded a seat.
Iranchise-  tn    -..,.,���   ,   ,.. .   ., ,
(. ertainly     snarled  the conductor
��� pany,"  wenl  on  Wallingford; "Imt   I
Miel expecatiors ol  Mr   Daw-, and to  d    ,,.,.. ,.,,,,   sinC(
iln- route laid down m ymir franchise
Morris
n sl
companions of the raths'teller leen
��� Mi tin- car. Imt that live young gentleman maele a joking matter of it
and  helped  iili  up tin- card.
Blackie   dropped   eiff   the   car.   and
hopped intn iln- taxi that was following,    "Now what eNe is there in the
Pinkenhorn jusl laughed at ihe fran" Iblooming  ..Id lis!  nf crimes? he de-
chisc peddlars." raanded of Kirby Stanton.
Wallingford produced a wallet, and] * '
held ii Impressively in his hand "You J. Rufus Wallingford ��-alked inin
have had must unfortunate exper- the eeffice .if President Pinkenhorn.
iences." he sympathized. "However, of hietn lhe traction company ami
this   time  you're   not   dealing   with   a   the  First  National  Bank, anil secured
iety fnr the answer.
"Nary a once," piped Ebenezer,
Stepping aside s.e that the waiter
would have plenty of room  to refill
bis glass.    "We hail lee repeal 'em all. I
N'n    outside    companies    was    fool
enough   In   eeeiiu    in   here;   and     old
my company i- ;
.provide   your   beautiful   city   with    a
for  ne-   Pebble  Avenue  line;    third.  street-car  service  of  which'    it    may
that East-End car number eleven, on   well  be  proud,  and  as,  moreover,  ]
Wednesday  night, looped back  with-  expeci   :very councilman hen  to have
ui  completing  its journey, transfer-   ,      ��� s, ���.k ,���; lhat ,.,,.���.
!'""- V, ' :i" :" ,h" car ahead, where  pany tlu-k,-,l in his hell, we���you and
he failed to sec,,,-,- , - at; fourth, tint   ,    shoul(| be encouraged as much as
Mr   Daw lias been repeatedly refused | possible."
; seal i'i the street-cars, after having       , . ,,       . ,
naid for the same For all these Laughing genially with them, he
damages, he as' s the sum of ten sat ��� wn and old Ebenezer Pepperly
thnrs nd dollars." was immediately on his feet
Timothy   Pinkenhorn   was  amused,      "Mov<   the passage of   an    ordin-
Inn Judge  Guzzlum wa-  furious ,PP impelling the P and K. Street
..,,-    ,,      , , Railway Lompany to immediately  -,���.-,-
'i,  all    the    trtimped-up-two-cent    ,,,,   the  illegally   occupied
hargi s. ill-  '- il,,- worsl      he dared.
egaih   ' ccupied   street   m
f   Brightlight    Garden,"    he
front
piped.
"Well,"   worried   Judge   Guzr/um,
his cheeks gray wiih somberness, "I
think   we'd In tier   srl   t|,j.   nrin   Wal
k's cheeks  -kaking w,th the violence
��� i hi- indignation.   "Stanton, 1 didn't
-ii'ite s'   vou'd   mix  in   with   a   cheap
little  hold-up  like  ihi-'"
"Why  not?      Tin se    offense -    an   :,
againsl  tin- ordinances laid down for      ,'.v ,    ,      ,.. , ....
the c, nu-. I . I streel cars, am! I ,1m,', ,""">."" P""k ~" snaPPed .Tim-
-,-,- why act,,,,, should noi be taken l'"'} Pl"k.enho.r"- thrusting forward
.,��� ,1,.,,," :I  his  chair  with   tic
"Poof,"   sneered   the   judge.    "'. (Continued  on
irtling elTee��
Page  s,
United Undertakers Limited
225 Twelfth Ave. W.,
Phone Fairmont
This Company lias every modern equipment for
the care of funerals given direct to us, attending
to all arrangements, furnishing hearse, carriage for
the family, casket (such as is sold by undertakers
for $125 to $250), embalming, care of remains, use
of chapel, music and other expenses of service, with
EARTH-BU&IAL, from $85.00 to $150.00.
When a crepe casket is used we will attend to
the disposition of the remains by earth-burial for
$50.00.
$75.00 to $175.00 will pay all the costs of preparing
the body for shipment. This will include the best
of professional attention to thc remains, casket and
outside casing. Heretofore the people have paid
from $250 to $500 for this same service.
This Company is not in debt���has no outstanding accounts, PAYS COMMISSIONS TO NO ONE
FOR RECOMMENDING THEM, avoids unnecessary expense, and will give those who have been
visited by sorrow such treatment as wc hope will be
given us under the same conditions.
Vancouver
738
of British Columbia
NOT MEMBERS OF THE
UNDERTAKERS TRUST
South Vancouver Branch
4263 Elgin St.        Phone Fairmont 2248R
Can the Undertaking Business Be Conducted Legitimately
Is it necessary for the undertakers to pay commissions in order to obtain possession on the remains of the dead���which commission must come out of the pockets of the friends or relatives of
the deceased? Is it necessary to charge ridiculously high prices for their service at this time���
when friends or relatives, because of their grief, are unable to protect themselves? Is it necessary
for undertakers to practice a system of body-snatching whenever the opportunity permits? Is it
necessary to charge from $75.00 to $150 for a casket which costs but $8.00 to $10.00 and then claim
they are selling it at the lowest possible figure? Is it necessary for the undertakers to charge $50.00
for embalming a body when the actual cost does not exceed $1.00���to charge from $250 to $500
when remains are to be shipped when this same service could be given for one-fifth that amount,
still allowing a handsome profit?
Is it necessary for them to practice a system of looting estates of the deceased whenever possible? Is it fair for them to have in their employ someone who has access to some hospital and
who will keep them informed as to the probable time some of the inmates will die���are all these
things necessary in order to make the undertaking business pay? We do not believe they are, and
will try to prove it.
Often death comes after a protracted illness with
its many unavoidable expenses and when economy
should commence, extravagance begins���the result
is that helpless wives and children are deprived of
thc necessities of life because of these follies.
UNFORTUNATELY THOSE WHO ENCOURAGE AND PROFIT BY THIS UNNATURAL
CUSTOM ARE NOT THE ONES WHO SUFFER
FROM IT.
A funeral is essentially a family matter and because of this simplicity and privacy should prevail.
Sincere grief is retiring and not comforted by extravagance and show. Flattery cannot soothe the
ear of DeaSi and a funeral conducted with all the
vanity one can devise adds nothing to the memory
of the dead.   One kindly act in life outlasts them all.
Death is solemn and impressive, but its impres-
siveness is not added to by extravagance���the most
sincere tribute to those whose eyes are closed and
voices silent, is love and fidelity to their memory. SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1913
USE ELECTRIC IRONS
FOR
Comfort, Convenience, Economy
The cost for continuous operation is only a few cents per hour.
The iron is operated from an ordinary household socket.
The irons sold by this company are constructed on the best principles; this means an appliance which is hot at the point and cool at
the handle.    The iron bears the manufacturer's  guarantee.
CARRALL  AND
HASTINGS STS.
PHONE 1138 GRANVILLE ST.
SEYMOUR 5000 (Near Davie)
"Snow is Coming"���Buy Your
STOVE WOOD
At summer prices, 3 Loads for $9
WE SELL VANCOUVER ISLAND^Q/\L,
COAST LUMBER & FUEL
COMPANY  LIMITED
4905 Ontario Street Cor. Bodwell (34th Avenue)
Phone:   Fraser 41
LOT NEAR CAR
$550���Easy Terms
This lot is situated on 56th Avenue,
close to Victoria Road, which now
has a 10-minute car service. This is
the best buy in this district. Let us
show you it at your convenience. We
can arrange very easy terms.
The Yorkshire Guarantee
& Securities Corporation Limited
440 Seymour Street
Phones: 6188 and 6189   R. Kerr Houlgate, Manager
TO HOUSE BUILDERS
We have the stock, the machinery and the men
to produce first-class
SASHES AND DOORS
SEE US BEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDER
Collingwood Sash and Door Factory
COLLINGWOOD WEST STATION
CAPP & TILBURY, Proprietors
WE HAVE IT!
Anything you wish in the way of Builders' Materials, Rough and
Dressed Lumber, Finish, Mouldings, Sash and Doors, Sand, Lime,
also 16in. Mill wood.
SHAW & CHELL
CENTRAL PARK, B.C.
P. O. Box 3 Phone Collingwood 16 L
Hughes Bros' Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We carry everything in the Liquor Line
No order too small, and none too large for this popular Liquor Store
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
leaving our Store every Friday morning at 9 a.m.
FINE   LOTS
ON STEPHEN  STRmET, AT $400���TWO BLOCKS FROM
VICTORIA ROAD.   EASY TERMS
Wanted���Good  building  Lots  in  vicinity  of  Knight   Road
at reasonable prices
THOS. Y. LEITCH
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Cor. Knight and Westminster Rds. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone : Fairmont 1653
NOTES OF INTEREST TO THE
LADY OF THE HOUSE
=^
Women and Progret*
The Training of Childhood���Are
Women Neglecting to Perform
Their Duties as Mothers Toward
Their Home and Children?
Many  have  been  the  achievements
of women in the last few decades.
Slowly she has conquered many fields
of business activity. In fact, there
are few pursuits closed to ber, and
there are many in which she bas excelled. We lind women of today taking an active part in all public affairs.
They arc frequently speakers at public meetings, as they have entered into every learned profession and almost every industry. They no longer look to tbat one-time, menially
superior being, called man, for sympathy. That woman has permanently
won her place in the business world
is no longer doubted.
Indeed, when one considers tbe remarkable progress made by women
during the last half century, they have
good reason for their exultation, Hut
a question recently asked by a reverend gentleman, and one which is occupying the attention of deep thinkers, is���what of our women of today
as mothers?
"Are they not, in their great ambition to aid in all affairs of state and
country, neglecting to perform their
duties as faithful and devoted mothers toward their home and children?
How many mothers are there who
realize their position���as a mother���
is the highest in the Kingdom of
Earth���Heaven's greatest benediction
being  a   consecrated   mother."
The home of every woman should
be her lirst consideration. As a
mother, it is she who must furnish
tbe love and sympathy to the helpless little ones whom God has permitted to come into her home, and
for whom she will be held responsible.
Mothers who fail in their duty in
giving their children the attention and
training they are entitled to in early
childhood, when their little minds and
hearts are plastic, arc in many instances, through their neglect, guilty
of paving the way for a life of crime.
Little children in the uncritical stage
of life look up to us as Gods. That
period passes, and they look down
upon  us as judges. .   ���
The indifference of so many mothers in thc matter of forming and
guiding the tastes of their children
in early youth, even of very intelligent women, is most remarkable.
Many mothers, of the present day
permit their children to select books
at will from the home and public libraries, the character of which they
know nothing, and which often contains things that should not be
brought to thc notice of immature
minds. It is the duty of every mother
to outline for her children, from their
earliest childhood, every course of
reading in which they must proceed,
and to guide them carefully through
it.
The undeveloped taste of a child
may be trained so that it will prefer
the pure and profitable things, to
those that are dangerous and worthless. The mind can be disciplined in
such a matter, quite as readily as its
little feet can be taught to walk, but
this can be accomplished only by
those who make tbe child's life a part
of their own, and who have the authority, and the tender solicitude which
only a parent can have.
It is only necessary to refer to an
account in the papers a few days ago,
of a case in the Recorder's Court,
when a mother made a strong appeal
to the Court to have ber son, a youth
of some fifteen or sixteen years, sent
to prison, stating be was beyond ber
control, and' thai prison was tbe best
place for liim, to make mothers realize how great are their responsibilities, showing as it does the loss of
love, respect and reverence of a mother for a child.
Il is true there are to be lound exceptional children, who are disloyal
and disrespectful out of a mere uncontrollable inclination to evil, but in
the majority of cases, parent* forfeit
the love, respect and reverence of
their children before losing it. For,
it is as natural ff>r youth to look up
tee age with reverence as for a flower
to look up to the sun in adoration.
To quote that well-known philosopher, Herbert Spencer. ��� "Do but
gain a boy's trust; convince him by
your behavior that you have bis happiness at heart; let him discover that
you are wiser of the two; let him experience the benefit of following your
advice and the evils that arise from
disregarding it, and fear not that you
readily guide  him."
If thc heime life of the majority of
our juvenile criminals were thoroughly investigated, it is more than likely
tbat in most cases it would be discovered that their immoral habits, practises and tendencies passed into their
lives through tbe open door of paren-
tial neglect.
Let us not forget in our great ambition to aid in civic and political progress, and in tbe affairs of the State
and Country, our duties as faithful
mothers towards our borne and children. Many mothers of the present
day are far more concerned in the
making of laws and the welfare of
the country at large, than in the
training of their children and tbe preservation of their homes.
ALICE  ANDREWS.
The Home Beau tif ul
Sl
In last week's issue the various
kinds of woods which are employed
in the manufacture of furniture and
interior fittings were discussed. As
regards wood defects, most of these,
such as knots, cheeks and holes filled   -    	
with shellac, are quite visible to any not get clieate
eene lee.iking feer thein, when they
exist As a rule tluy do neet weaken
the structure of tbe article e.f furniture in which Ihey appear anil are
therefore objectionable   only    when
they seriously mar the appearance.
In mahogany, there is eme wieeed defect, often occurring, which should
have the closest scrutiny. This i-
tbe "heart-shake," a natural break
across the grain that takes place when
the tree is griming. It is usually
visible in tbe shape eef a dark brown
or blackish irregular line intersecting
the grain, and is most dangerous when
found in the posts of chairs, tables,
desks, bedsteads, cheffoniers, side-
boardi or oilier pieces of furniture
designed to support weight where it
invariably makes itself visible in at
least Iwo surfaces eef tbe piece. Heartshakes should be rejected particularly when they occur in posts.
After making sure that Ibe weiod
is in good condition in tbe piece ��� ��� f
furniture t<> be purchased, tbe buyer
should loeek tei the joints. Not only
does an open joint look unsightly,
but it is very weakening. Shoulder
slinuld come snugly against shoulder
at all points; if not, no matter bow
good the glue that Ins been used, ill
time the adhesive will be likely tei
break loose under the strain, which
is placed entirely upon it.
Chairs, particularly, need close inspection for poor joinery. Every
one knows bow common, squeaky
and trembly chairs are at borne. Loose
joints, usually in the stretches, cause
this. If joints seem to be poor, test
them by twisting the stretches; if
round, in tbe band; if flat, by holding
with one hand and pushing the post
away with the other.
When selecting any article of furniture containing drawers, care
should be exercised to see that all
drawers draw out and push back with
entire freedom, sticking at no point.
It must be remembered, however, that
a frequent cause of drawers sticking
lies in the fact that they arc run on
two guides, one at each side of tbe
drawer. In'the best work there also
is a guide placed under the middle of
the drawer. In the best work there
is also from ziz-zagging when you try
to pust it in or pull it out by one
handle. A little apparent over-looseness is preferable here, as in time
they are sure to swell a little from
dampness. The same thing may be
said of doors, such as occur in china-
closets, book-cases, and the like. A
play of about one-sixteenth inch is
desirable.
Doors, especially large ones, should
be examined for warpage, and the
locks in both doors and drawers tried
with a key. Quite often, owing to
an oversight, on the part of factory
iriinmcrs who lit the drawers and
doors and their parts, a door or
drawer lock will not meet its socket
in the adjoining framework, and if
detected in the store, where tools are
at hand for such corrections, a great
deal of trouble and vexation will be
saved.
In buying a dining-table with leaves
it is best to ask tbe salesman to put
in all the leaves, tbat you may see
that every one fits closely to its
neighbor. All other articles of furniture coming in detachable parts,
such as bookcases with loose cbclves,
etc., should be set up intact by thc
salesman.
Upholstery stuffing is perhaps thc
most difficult part ot furniture to determine, as it can not readily be
seen, and practically all forms of it
look alike when well filled. Curled
hair, thc best and most expensive
filling bas a spring to it when the
covering material is compressed with
the fingers which the cheaper kinds
of filling entirely lack. Sometimes
the hair is mixed with seaweed or
moss. It is best to ask the salesman
particularly about the filling, and
whether thc covering is genuine leather or imitation. With Ihis small
acquaintance wilh the common defects and qualities of furniture, you
cannot go far wrong.
When Were You Born
If we are to believe some people,
we come intei ibis world with our future pretty well mapped out for us.
Tell these clever people where you
were bom, and when, and they seem
to know all the rest about you. We
don't believe in this nonsense ourselves, but it is none lhe less amusing to listen to it now and then. 11
seems that a woman born in a particular month (and we suppose all
women born in the same month) must
necessarily comply with following
predictions :
If in January, a prudent housewife,
given to melancholy, but good-tempered.
If In February, a humane, affectionate, and tender wife.
If in March, a frivolous chatterbox,
somewhat  given  to  quarrelling.
If in April, inconstant, but very
intelligent, but likely to be good-
looking.
If in May, handsome, amiable, and
likely to be happy.
If in June, impetuous, will marry
early and bc  frivolous.
If in July, passably handsome, but
with a sulky temper.
If in August, amiable and practical,
and likely to marry a rich husband.
If in September, discreet, affable,
and much liked.
If in October, pretty and coquettish,
and likely to be happy.
If in November, liberal, kind, and
of charming manner.
If in December, well-proportioned,
fond of novelty and extravagant.
 sr m. .	
What's a truly honest man?
Well,  I'll tell you if I can:
He is one in  whom  plain  dealing is
deep seated ;
He  is  frank  and  square and  true;
He's, in short, one with whom you
Could  trade horses  in  the  dark  and
LUMBER
BAKER & PRINGLE
COLLINGWOOD EAST SIDING
LUMBER AND BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
B. C. GRADES PROMPT DELIVERY
LET US FIGURE YOUR BILLS
i
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
H. O. Smith, C. P. S T. A.
Phone :  Sey.  8134
W. E. Duperow, G. A. P. D
527  Granville Street
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
^Canadian!
Tl
e Tonular Route to the���
Vpacifo
OLD COUNTRY
Xrailwayj^
HAWAII
M
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train S
-rvice
Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped
with
Standard and
Tourist Sleepers.
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. VV. BRODIE,  Gen. Pass Agent, Vancouver.
Gladstone Hotel
First Class Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
H. G. BROWN, Proprietor
Phone : Seymour 8425-8426
Western Plate Glass &
Importing   Co. Limited
Registered Office:
318 Water Street, Vancouver, B. C.
PLATE GLASS WINDOW GLASS
LEADED ART GLASS
Thome   Metal   Store  Front  Bars,   Bevelling   and
Silvering, Store Fronts Glazed
ALL KINDS OF GLASS
Warning to Housewives
CUT THIS OUT AND PASTE IN A CONSPICUOUS PLACE
DON'T start your fire with parafine or kerosene.
DON'T treasure up old rags, paper or rubbish of any sort under stairways, in attics or basements, or anywhere in your home.
DON'T put ashes in a wooden box or barrel, or close to walls or
fences.
DON'T neglect to overhaul your stove pipes once a month; see that
your chimneys are swept at least twice a year.
DON'T use gasoline for cleaning purposes in the house. It is more
dangerous than powder; powder will remain where you leave it,
gasoline vapor is shifted by air currents to all parts of the house,
and being heavier than air, lodges in out of the way corners
making trouble when you least expect it.
DON'T place your stoves or pipes within twelve (12) inches of any
wood or partition.
DON'T forget that ninety-five per cent, of our fire losses are caused
by poor and dirty stove pipes, and the placing of stoves, pipes
and furnaces too close to wood work.
DON'T have matches where they can be gotten at by children; keep
them in a covered tin.
REMEMBER, an ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure.
HELP US TO PROTECT YOU, BY IMPROVING CONDITIONS
AROUND YOUR HOME
CHIEF, FIRE DEPARTMENT,
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1913
GREATER VANCOUVF;R CHINOOK
X1XE
Geo. B. Howard
Manager
AVENUE
Phones   Sey.
4634 4633
Week commencing Monday, September 22
A   II n-alhmal   .'nine ely   drain;
Woman Against Woman
Matinees Tuesday and Saturday
DRINK
THORPES
DRINKS
WOOD'S ORCHESTRA DANCE
Did You Ever Dunce, at the
KALENBERG HALL
Corner Main and Bodweli Road
Then yuu know all about the fine  floor  there anel  the  excellent
music played by Wood's Orchestra.
This Orchestra opened the season  in  this  ball  last  Tuesday  and
will Hiv.  a Special Dance    EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
Best Floor in Town. Professional  Union  Orchestra  (4  pieces)
You are Invited.    Come Early. Dancing 8.30 to 12
Strict Ballroom Etiquette. GENT.'S,   50;     LADIES   FREE
BERTRAM G. wool).   Manager
FRED. ARCHER, Moor Manager.
CAR  TICKETS   GOING  UP
(Continued frmn Page 1)
hereafter   will   only  be  g 1  up   lee
8 o'clock in ilu- morning and will not
be accepted at all during the evening
rush hours. Il can thus be seen that
the man who goes to work after
8 o'clock In ihe  morning will  have
no use for the 40-cent half green and
half while arrangement, lie musl
nee ds buy al lhe straight 5 cent rate
The sale of ihe present tickets at
present rales closed Wednesday. As
th,- company will in future accept all
tickets -"hi up i" ilie' closing hours
Wednesday prudenl Vancouvcrites
with a few eh.liar- ahead spent time
ie. good advantage in buying a good
supply e.f green and red tickets. The
white euies were nol SO popular wilh
business men on account eif the restriction in hours l" be placed upon
this variety. The man whu use- only
green e.r reel tickets, by buying twenty-five tickets nn Wednesday saved
25  cents, as  the new price was $1.25.
Strung protests wore heard at Ihe
���City Hall this morning abemt the ac-
tie'ii e.f the B.C. Electric Railway
Cnmpany, although several aldermen
took the change philosophically, saying that it was a matter of business
with tbe .company.
Mayor Baxter has written to several
cities in Wester Canada and in the
Pacific coa'it states, seeking for the
Tats prevailing there for street car
fares. Letters have been sent to Calgary. Edmonton, Winnipeg, Seattle
"ind Taeoma. In Calgary and Edmonton the systems are municipally own-
til. The Seattle Street Railway Company give six tickets fur a quarter
but does not issue transfers on a ticket. In Winnipeg the same rates prevail as those existing here today and
"limited" tickets can bc used all day-
Sunday there.
The mayor stated tbat bc was sorry
that the company bad to raise the
rates but it had thc right to and it
bad to pay more for the money now-
just as tbe city had.
Aid. McSpadden, chairman of the
B. C. Electric committee of thc City
Council, advocated a vehement protest against tbe increase in rates by
lhe City Council.
"I think ii i- a great mistake,"
he' -aid, "t" raise the fares this year.
Tlu company may be losing money
but see what it has made in the past.
Ii ought i" make ii easier for the peo-
j pie these hard times. The officials
of the ceempany did neit say a word
about   this   when   ihey   came   before
i the  committee   for   favors  the  other
j day.
"I  am strenuously opposed tee the
|increase in fare-, but whal can thc
city do? The charter allows it but I
believe that if public opinion is Btrong
enough it can be prevented. It will
probably bc brought up in the City
Council next Monday night"
That the custom of selling six tickets for a quarter has become such an
institution in Canada that people fell
tbev were entitled to it of right, was
the opinion of Aid. A. P. Black. He
-aid that there was probably not another city in the Dominion where a
fare of a straight five cents was
charged and while the company's
charter might permit it here, he
thought the public ought to kick at
the present rates
Aid. Kirkpatrick looked at it as a
question of dollars and cents and a
purely business proposition for the
company.
"The ceempany is entitled to a reasonable prolit," be declared. "Living
and labor is higher here than in probably any other city in Canada. The
labor unions are demanding eight-
hour days and higher wages. That is
forcing thc cost up. I don't think the
increase is unreasonable. The company knows its business."
Love's Eyes
Whom  the  heart loves  it  beautifies!
And   someone   yet   (nay   deem   me
fair,
Who glances not with heedless air,
But with love's  penetrating  eyes.
Whom the heart loves it beautifies,
By piercing through the outer shell,
Revealing many a secret cell
Of loveliness which underlies.
Beauty of form  and face  I  prize,
These are denied, alas! to me;
Yet lair to someone I shall be.
Whom the heart loves it beautifies!
^TfluAtT VANCOUVER LEADING
"bP^
PCftY booses-
Empress Theatre
Fe.r these who haw not yet seen
"A l-'eee,l There Wa-." now ninnilig
at the Empress Tin:.tie. emr advice
i-. get your ticket- ai once for one
'it ilu- iew remaining performances
for it i- doubtful if a better, more
intensly interesting, or more finely
acted play will be -cell e,u the local
-lage     during     tbe     pr.-enl     -case.ll
From "the man" and "the woman" of
Mr. Lawrence and Miss Leone down
to the sailors of the Lusitania every
pan ii capitall) done, and in the case
eii the' principals above-named, i- fai
above the ordinary -neck companj
leads. It has been beautifully staged
and mounted and "A Pool There
Was" deserves a high place In the
long li-i  of Lawrenie Co   iuci
For nexl ��eek '... Empresi comi -
nearer home for ii- attraction. The
locale ��ill In Alaska, and tlie' plaj
that strong, rugged and true stage
picture of condition! and Hie on ilu
la-t frontier, "Tlie- Barrier." This
novel i- gencrallj ci nsidered his masterpiece, and the stagi version of the
leee.ik rank- as the most accurate exponent nf life in Ala-! a e\ er pn -��� i l
ed upon tl:. -:age, \1I tin- charactei -
of the romance, Captain Burrell of
the U. S. A. "Gale" the mysterious
with the shadow mi his past: Po-
leeiii. the light-hearted French Canadian who tings his way on tei the
stage and into ihe. heart- of all. anel
loves in vain; Stark, who has never
been surpassed as a stage villain;
Runnion, his confederate, who
faithfully pn-eni- the hewer life of
Maskan bad men; No Creek Lee, a
unique comedy character of ihe' last
West; Corporal Thomas, �� ho alb ������ -
his honest} t" overshadow Iii- dis
cretion; Alluna, tin faithful squaw of
('.ale' ami supposed mother of N'ecia;
and In -1 of all, N'ecia. herself, who is
led tei believe that he harrier to Captain Burrell and happiness, i- the
taint uf Indian blood running through
her vein-, will lit into the wonderful
stage pictures of this greal play. The
easl will be a strong one-headed by
Mamie' Leone as NTecia, anel Del
Laurence- i - Capt. Burrell and the
resources of ihe' Empress will be taxed i" furnish proper settings and atmosphere.
Orpheum Theatre
Nexl  we ek will bi   Scotch \v< i I
the  Orpheum   Theatre.    and    t \ erj
Scotch person in the City shoul
and see the bIiow.   The reason fi ir it
i-  that   Graham   Moffatt.  tin   au
of "Bunty   Pulls the    Strings"    will
-e-nil out his eewn Scottish Players as
the'   headline  attra :tion   in  a   -'��� el ch
written by himself called "The Concealed   Heel."     There   are   very     iff.
people  who havi   fi erg tun    "Buntj
I'ulis the Strings" when it  was here
twe. years ago, and  they will doubtless In- on hand this coming week I"
see  the  little  -ketch.
A  rare  treat   for  music-lovers   wi"
special engagement of Europe's Great-
d   Gerard ia known
as Hn' world's  heavy-weight manipu
1 ii it of artillei y, and, together with
hi- funny assistant, will add novelty
and merriment  to a   splendid   programme.
Th,  Ess and  See Scope  will offei
i picture- success, and
ef'fieri will In- made to presenl one of
the best programmes of the year.
Avenue Theatre
After ureal inducing and per
thi management of tin- Avenue Theatre have decided to close thi ii    I
seal .a September 27, and throw open
their house   to   the- road attractions,
booked by   Klaw and  Erlanger, and
John Cort.    In  their thirteen  wei ki
the Avenue   Players have    endeared
th mselves   ti    the  Vancouver  public
onl ii i- wit i i   regret Vancouver bids
ele Well   tee    till-    -] llellllid   llliel   t ill. lit t'i
organization, which have given so
many beautiful productions in their
short stay. For the closing week J.
Harvey's greal comedy-drama of
A oman Against Woman" will be
presented. This great play fi l-'.ng-
social life, with much of hear;
inten ���: and excellent comedy deals
.nth the great - icial problem that we
lace today. The piece has been a.l-
mirably cast and gives all the old
favorites splendid roles. The piece
will Ih sumptuously mounted and
the mechanical force will excell them-
in   a   massive production.
'��� a  *s& ���	
Imperial Theatre
The offering of the   Isabelle Fletcher Players   for the week beginning
Monday  evening will be the famous
Hal  Reed   n estern    drama    entitled
'The Cowpuncher," a play which has
sei n magnificenl success from the Atlantic to the Pacific inasmuch as it
e- i perfect reflection of western cow
life in ii- mosl interesting phase-.
All nt the characters represented in
ih- plaj are drawn freem life' ami the
happening- of lhe four stirring ae-;-
nrc -aiil i' ��� 1" based ijpon actual fact,
'lhe Cowpuncher has many times
in en compared with the "Virginian,"
" Vrbiona," "The Squaw Man" and
kindred dramas which go straight to
the heart �� ith a realism which is
scarcely equalled iu anything but the
favorite v.,--; em play.
Miss   Fletcher's  company  will  appeal' for tlu-  lirst lime in schapps an.!
pui ind each member will In- easl
in the h mg   li-i  of inten -tin-  char-
cters, Tu ., or three new members
rn' the ce impany will make their initial
appearance in iln- "Cow Puncher"
and I'.nii -: Glover will prot ni'- - :i n
cry ci th- un -i elaborate sort. The-
usual Thursday and Saturday matinees will 1 ������ given and seats will be
"ii Bide one  week in advance.
Hastings
and
' i    '��� Ave.
EMPRESS
Lawrence & Sandusky, Lessees
Phone
Sey. 3907
Week of September 22
Matinees Wed. and Sat.
Del    -    I.i vrence
Stock   Company    _
WITH
Miss
Maude   Leone
li   Ri -    Beach's greatest succi --
THE BARRIER
'% in \er a law   of God or man
Runs   North of  Fifty-thn t "
���Kipling
Prices 25c and 50c
Matinees 25c An\i Seat
IMPERIAL THEATRE
PHONE SEY. 4949
MATINEES WED. and SAT. 25c
ISABELLE FLETCHER PLAYERS
THIS WEEK
When Knighthood Was in Flower
NEXT WEEK
The Cow Puncher
Prices'  Nights 25c and 50c, Matinees 25c
SEATS ON SALE ONE WEEK IN ADVANCE
Week t,i September 22
SO ITCH  WEEK
Graham   Moffatt,   auth >r   i if   "Bunty
Pulls  llie  String-" pi''
"The Concealed Bed"
"Till'.   GIPSY   COUNTESS"
Presenting classical and popular
ii"ii-    nn    the    Hungarian
Czimbalom,    assisted    by
Counl  I'e  Szechy
Other Big S  *t C. Acts
Prices  13c 25c, 35c, and 50c
PANTAGES
Unequalled       Vaudeville      Meant      Pantagoa
Vaudeville
:    SHOW STARTS--2.45. 7.15. and  9 10 p.m.
Week of September 22
An  interesting feature
M.I.ISOX & TRUCCO
International   dancers,   featuring   So-
e iili'-   Latest   Craze  "The
'I ange .hi
Ameen   Abou  Hamid  and  troupe  of
Arabian   Whirling   Acrobats���
100 miles an hour
Season's   prices :   Mat.   15c���Evening
15c and 25c
Two Shows  Nightly, ":30 and 9.15     Three   Shows   Daily,   Matinee   2:45,
Matinee  daily  ?  p.m. Evening  7:15 and 9:15
ii
pre-
.\ rare treat ior um.-n.--i'ever- v
he t'i mini in thc special engagement
"Thc Gipsy Countess," whu will \>
sent classical anil peepular Belectio.,.
mi the Hungarian czimbalom, assisted by Count ele Szechy. Hasting- ami
Wilson will introduce singing, dancing and acrobatic work nf tlie whirlwind variety, ami it is safe tn remark
that many who -ee this clever team
will drift baek eluring the week fe.r
another hearty laugh.
One of the most delightful presentations of tbe seasnn will he Mr. Moffat's Scottish players, win. will be
seen in .Mr. Moffat's own playlet,
"The Concealed Bed." The skit deals
with thc life eif the tenement dwellers in Glasgow, and it is a delightful
entertainment, played by real artists.
Wc desire tee call the attention eif our
thousands of patrons tn the fact tbat
Mr. Graham Moffat's players were
secured by Sullivan ami Considine,
and come direct freem Scotland tn
tour the circuit.
Another jolly feature is the team 'if
Fletcher Norton ami Maud Karl.
These distinguished comedy -tar-
will offer their their latest success,
entitled, "Echoes from Musical Comedy."
We don't want you to overlook the
They will hunger in frost wlm will
liol work   in   heat.
He- lhat ha- love in his heai", has
spurs in   bis  side-.
He win. serves well need not lie as-
liamed to as'< fnr his wagi -
Do not rely em ..ihers for what you
ean eh.  fi er  yourself.
C.et your spindle ami distaff ready,
anil t'.nel will send flax.
All women are good���gnu! for
some-thing or u 1 for nothing
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   DEAN,   Proprietor
Cor. 26th AVE. AND MAIN ST.
FIRST CLASS MOTION PICTURES
PROGRAMME CHANGED DAILY
Matinees  Wednesday   and   Saturdav
fl The man who patronizes Local Industry neit
only gets the goods he buys, hut before very long
tbe money he bought them with, too.
fl The business man who finds it impossible to trust
bis printer may sume day find il impossible lo persuade bis printer to trust him.
fl Business is sure to bc "rotten" if you lei some
ntber section of the country do the work that can
be dune just as well in ynur own. What else do
you expect r
fl Place your printing orders locally���and all your
olher orders���each dollar spent at borne is an investment in your own behalf.
fl Tlie man who sighs for the good old days of throat
cutting always changes his tune when bis own
throat is likely to be involved. Such days are indeed
good���better���best old.
Louis Ancker at the Empress Theatre UKJiATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER X, 1<J\3
.ain St.
^^SP0��TIN6 ARENA
, With
>dnch
,  town to play  Billiards and
jol, when we have a more up to-
.Jaie and sanitary billiard and pool-
in. .m ia South Vancouver ?
Latest and most improved tables at
W. J. STOLLIDAY
4209  Main  Street
Near 26th  Avenue
Bicycles Repaired
We repair all makes of bicycles,
and stock a full line of parts and
accessories.
See our special $,c English
bicycle  with all accessories.
Bicycles for rent.
The "Samson" Cycle
COMPANY
Corner   Union   and   Dunlevy   Sts.
Vancouver, B. C.
Special Rates to Municipal Hall
and other South Vancouver
points.
R. B. LINZEY
JEWELLER
4132   MAIN   STREET
SQUARE DEAL REALTY CO.
Greater Vancouver  Specialists
R. G. Simm, Manager
Phone: Fair. 807 4132 Main St.
ROSS & MACKAY
-Kitchen and Builders' Hardware, etc.
Cor. 51st Ave. & Main St.
 Vancouver, B.C.	
k, WINNOTT STORE
AND  POST  ��FFICE
General Merchants
Sti-.ar.ping Powder Our  Specialty
Phone:     Fraser   100 46th   Ave.  &   Mail
Reeve & Harding. Props.
W. J. PROWSE
Real Estate, Loans,  Insurance
Houses  Rented Rents  Collectec
4609 Main St. Phone: Fair. 78-
ERNEST SHAW, D.C.
Chiropractor
HAS REMOVED HIS OFFICE TO
Suite 307 Lee Building (Cor. Broad
way and Main)
Vancouver, B. C.
Office hours :  1.30 to 5.30
Consultation  Free
SPORTING BRIEFS
Bill) Chandlier, the Vancom er mid
die-distance runner,  has accepted an
invitation  tee accompany  the all-star
Northwest  track  team  to S.m   Fran-
ciaco next month,
it    stt    ��
Then i- talk "i matching Joe Aa-
vi'ihe. a 'Frisco fighter, with Willie
Kitehie for November 30. Azevedo
recently earned a decision over down,
and-oul \'l. Wolgast, In making
matches for, Kite-hie- the California
promoters are overlooking Bill
Naughton's logical opponent, Tommy
Murphy, and other  top-notchera.
* *   *
During Pitcher Walter Johnson's
long run of 14 successive victories
and including the game with Boston,
whieh interrupted the run. he pitched
127 innings, in whieh only leS runs
were  maele  against   him, ami  X2  hits.
Ile had 7x strike-outs and Rave 10
bases on halls. In 10 of the 15 games
he pitched lhe full nine innings or
mure. In one of them be pitched 15
innings, in two, 11. and in one, 10.
it    it    it
Although he joined the Nationals
late in July. "Newsy" Lalonde finished near thc top in scoring in the
Eastern lacrosse league. In thc last
game, when Nationals defeated the
Tecumsehs. 10-9, the former Vancouver player scored seven goals for the
Frenchmen. When it comes to gagging goals there arc few in Lalonde I
class.
* *     Sj
Calvin Demarest. of Chicago, who
bas held three billiard titles in spite
of the fact that he was not 27 years
old until the 20th eef last June, is preparing for another assault on the
world's professional 18.1 and 18.2
balk  line    championships,    both    of
(.Tub show hehl la-t week. Charle-
mange i- iln only brindle ami white
French Im 11<1. -^ m Western Canada.
Mrs.  Halstead took ihe e!.-g - iuth a
few   week-  ago, ami  intends  In  take
lln-   il"K   In   ;,I1   ilu-   Iii;.:   shows   OH   lhe
Pacific O a-i In fore ieuirning back
iee  Vancouver again.
* *   *
frank I. I lough, sporting e ditor of
'The' 1'liil.nli Iplua enquirer," died al
In- In.me here today, after a I.eng ill-
nesa     lie' was 55 vein- old.
* *   *
Robert W. Emmons, Jr.. ..i Boston,
formerly wa- chosen hy the so-called Vanderbill syndicate in manage
iln ii candidate feer ihe America's
Cup honors nexl year. .Mr. Emmons,
if the syndicate boal i- selected to
meet Sir Thomas Upton's challenger, will be lln- lirst amateur in many
years i" handle a defender of the
"blue ribbeen e.f the -ca-." It is un-
eler-t'ieiel thai lhe yacht will be designed  t.e   spread   15,000  square  feet
fi   -ail.
efe        +       *
Mann  Cup   Matches  with  Victorious
Team
The V. A. C. Mann cupholderi will
I defend   the   silverware     against     lhe
j Oak Hays, champions nf the Vancouver   Park   on   Tuesday   and   Saturday
of next  week.    These dates were arranged  by  the  cup-holders  and  park
management   and   Victoria   will    be
[notified to be here to play.    It is proposed  lee  play   lhe  lirst   match   prior
to the ball game between  Vancouver
and Victoria with the second game on
the Saturday after the ball game.
He       *        *
Fistic Act is Barred by Esquimau
Council
The lid is chised down on the boxing game in Esqulmalt, and not even
the magic name of Freddie Welsh,
champion of Great Britain, can pry
it   open.
Whaling   Station   on   Vancouver   Island���Alongside   the
wharf, belly-up, is a day's catch of the great mammals
which are in the proud possession of
William  Hoppe, of  New  York.
He     *     *
Thc New Zealand Rugby team sailed for California last Thursday and
is due at San Francisco on October
2. The All Blacks will play a series
of matches in the Golden State and
may come North to Vancouver in
November,
Charlemange of N'evcr-N'cver-Land,
lhe French bulldog belonging to Mrs.
A. G. Halstead of this city, won the
open championship for French bulldogs   at   the   San   Francisco   Kennel
NOTICE TO   CONSUMERS
Water Works Department
Phrenology and Palmistry
Mrs. YOUNG
(Formerly  of   Montreal)
GIVES  PRACTICAL  ADVICE  OK   BUSINESS ADAPTATION,  HEAITH
AND   MARRIAGE
SOS   Granville  Street,   Conic.-   Robson
Hours: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m
Beaver Transfer Co.
LIMITED
112 WATER STREET
Furniture. Piano Moving and
all sorts ot teaming done.
Calls from any part of Vancouver or South Vancouver
will receive our closest attention.
All orders promptly attended
to.
MUNICIPALITY   OF   SOUTH
VANCOUVER
Water for garden sprinkling will only be
allowed between the hours ol 8 and 9 a.m.
and  7  and 9  p.m.  on the following rates :���
Up to 33ft. lot, $2.50 for season
Up   to   66ft.   lot,   $5.00   for   season
Anything over 66ft. to be specially rated by
the Superintendent. These rates are net,
payable in advance at the Water Works
Office,   Municipal   Hall.
Any person using water for this purpose
without a permit leave themselves liable to
having the water shut off without further
notice.
Notice is also given that at a meeting of
the Fire, Light and Water Committee it was
decided that seven days' grace be allowed
ratepayers to pay tax for garden sprinkling,
after which date water used for this purpose
and for which rates have not been paid will
be turned off.
J. MULLETT,
Water  Works  Superintendent.
This was the decision reached by
the municipal council when a communication came before it from thc
Central Athletic Association, asking
for permission to stage a fifteen round
bout between Welsh and Joe Bayley.
The decision was unanimous, the
only councillor who spnke in favor
of the contest refraining from voting
when the question was put.
Give Them Variety
Don't let meals in your house gneu
monotonous, make il a rule t.e try al
least two new recipes every week, am!
vhen   anything   is   specially   appro*,
.���I   ii.   make  a   mete  e.f  it   in   a   litlle
book kept for the purpi -.���
But there i- ihinger even in getlini
a particularly n I recipe.    Inr ther
i��   almost   "vi'i'M In Iming   i imptati i
n. use ii  .ie.nn and again, till r.ne't
family grott - aeary eei the' \ e;.
��� ef the resulting dish.
I make il a rub. in e er tn ri p al I
pudding within a fm might, unless
there is some vei y special n ai n foi
(being |0,
With meal dishes ii is more difficult
tei gei  variety,  bul  no    cold    joint
mIi'eiibl appear more than twice al the
outside. If a family reach the "Whal
cold beef again!" Mage, the housekeeper ii failing in her mis-inn.
GET-RICH-QUICK WALLINGFORD
Continued from Page 7)
FURNITURE
SOLD  BY  AUCTION  OR
PRIVATELY Upon COMMISSION
South Vancouver Licensed
Auctioneers
Goddard & Son Ltd.
"Duncan Bldg."     123 Pender St. W.
Central Park Bakery
When the times call for retrenchment in many directions, we must
still have bread. Economies in the
more expensive items of the family
larder increase the importance of that
Btaple��� :it must be pure, and carry
the  maximum  of  nutriment
All Collingwood knows the "Won"
quality bread, but few, even of those
wini use it at every meal are aware
thai il is the product of one of the
most up-to-date baking plants in Vancouver, and In some respects, unique
perhaps nil the Pacific slope. "Good
gear goes into small hulk." This applies to the Central Park Bakery,
which the.ugh small includes in its
bread and cake mixers the Fletcher
1913 models, the latest machinery for
securing perfect results in this important detail.
Especially noteworthy are the Duk-
rop Bake Ovens of latest design, with
Steam bath attachment which completely counteracts dry heat and resultant impairment of the flavor, in
those new ovens this is retained to
the full. Absolute uniformity of firing is only one of many other features of this latest triumph in the
weirld of breadmaking machinery.
The disposition of the various departments has been carefully studied,
especially in relation lo hygene and
observance of the latest scientific principles as applied to the handling of
food stuffs in process of manufacture.
As befit; a native of the Land o'
Cakes, Mr. Robertson specializes in
these dainty furnishings of the table
for which, with the "Won" Quality
bread he has been awarded three diplomas at thc Westminster and Vancouver  Exhibitions.
The fact that these were secured
under the old order of things indicate
that now be will soon eclipse his own
very excellent record, both here, and
in thc Old Country, where he won
at Glasgow Technical College a first
class certificate for his bread and
cakes.
Mr. Robertson is justly proud of
the facts recorded above. The proof
of tbe pudding is in the eating and
the best compliment that can be paid
Mr. Robertson is to put bis goods to
the test.
of a jack-in-the-box. "I guess young
Stanton was right! You've been ovcr-
looking bets for years! You were
supposed t" keep llle city council in
line!     Ynu   didn'l   do   it.     You   were
supposed to have antidotes feir all
poison ordinancesl Ynu didn't do it.
I thought you were going to send for
Wallingford!    Why don't you?"
Judge Guzzlum. after having bandied incivilities with Timothy Pinkenhorn for years, felt it time to assert
his independence. "I'm not your mes-
smger-boy,"   be   stated.
"I'm paying yotl for it!" snapped
Pinkenhorn, jabbing violently on his
push-button. "I don't see that you
do much  else of any value."
The youth who bad grown so fast
that a lot of him had not been given
time to catch up came into the room,
and  stumbled  over  the   letter-press.
Take this note over to the Palace
Hotel," Pinkenhorn directed, with a
voice which crackled; and bc grabbed
pencil and paper.
Forty minutes later, J. Rufus Wallingford, who had replaced his red
cravat and white waistcoat with the
gray ciavat and black vest of business, wa'ked briskly into tbe office.
"Well, gentlemen, I'm in a hurry,"
he curtly announced,
"Mr. Wallingford', there isn't room
in this town for two car companies,"
acknowledged   Pinkenhorn.
"I know it." returned Wallingford
shortly. "That's why one of us has
to go."
"Xow you're bluffing!" charged
Judge Guzzlum, bursting his way in-
tee the conversation, and receiving a
murderous glance from his chief.
"Xe.'l feu- a minute!" Wallingford
emphatically assured him. "I have
jusl purchased, from a certain Horace
G. Daw, information and proof of vio-
lalieeiis of franchise and ordinance,
which can cause the city council to
revoke yeiur permission to do business in this city."
"What's the matter with you and
the city council?" suddenly demanded
the traction president, turning on
Judge Guzzlum with horrifying suspicion in  his eye.
Judge Guzzlum shrank visibly.
"To the best of my knowledge," explained Wallingford, "the city council has never had any reason for
gratitude to the traction company."
President Pinkenhorn nearly had
apolcxy. "Where is it!" he shrieked
to the judge. "Where's all that fix-
it money I handed you, once a month,
for  the council?"
Judge Guzzlum had long been prepared for this tragic moment. "That
money is perfectly safe," be announced. "What arc you going to do
about it?" and the judge walked out,
with  great  dignity.
"You need a younger lawyer anyhow," advised Wallingford, with a
smile.   "Kirby Stanton's a good man."
Mr. Pinkenhorn paid no attention
to that advice. "Wallingford, how
much do you want for your franchise?" he said.
Wallingford grew gravely thoughtful. "Well, I handn't considered," he
responded.
"You're bound to have some sort
of price," shrewdly opined Pinkenhorn. "There's a point at which you'd
rather take your immediate profits
than fight for bigger earnings in thc
end.    Now, what's your price?"
"Since you put it that way, seventy
thousand dullars," returned Wallingford softly.
Timothy Pinkenhorn nearly had
spasms, but, in the end, he consented
to release that much of the undivided
profits of the P. and E. Street Railway Company.
_ "I've another claim," slated Wallingford, still gently. "I paid one
Horace G. Daw five thousand dollars
for evidence in your case."
Timothy Pinkenhorn gave but little attention, as he slammed on the
desk-button.
The youth who had grown so far
from his feet came in and stumbled
over the letter-press.
"Hunt up Kirby Stanton," Pinkenhorn directed; and then to Wallingford, "I want him to begin work by
tackling this franchise purchase."
Blackie Daw came with Kirby Stanton, and, carrying his saxophone-
case under his arm, studied Pinkenhorn with tbe eye of musical speculation.
"This is my friend, Mr. Daw," stated   Wallingford.
"Huh!" grunted Timothy Pinkenhorn. "Let's get down to business."
He rang twice for the gangling youth,
and then, in a temper, hc rushed out
to perform his own errand.
"How much did you get, Jim?"
hoarsely whispered  Blackie.
"Seventy-five thousand, including
your detective fee," chuckled Wallingford.
Young Stanton almost choked.
"Great Scott!" he exclaimed. "Why,
there have been half a dozen attempts
to hold Pinkenhorn up for a franchise."
Wallingford gave him a lofty look,
then chuckled. "Pinkenhorn never
met a pair of high-class franchise-
sellers until now," he claimed.
BASEBALL
WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22
Vancouver vs. Victoria
BITULITHIC
PAVEMENT
Has thc following attributes:
Durability; sure footing for horses; resiliency; noiselessness; easy drainage; dttstlessness; economy.
liitulithic approaches more closely than any other the
ideal of a perfect pavement.
Its notable durability makes it more economical than any
other paving.
The thoroughfares paved with bitulithic are an impressive
object lesson in fine paving.
liitulithic has been adopted in over two hundred cities in
the United States and fifteen cities in Canada.
See Granville Street, Fourth Street, Heather Street, Marine Drive and Magee Road in Point Grey; Georgia, Burrard
to Stanley Park; Tenth Avenue, Laurel to Granville Street;
Twelfth Avenue, Seventh Avenue, and Yenables Street, in
Vancouver City.
Columbia Bitulithic Limited
Phone :   Seymour 7130
417 Dominion Trust Bldg. Vancouver, B. C.
TABLE VINEGAR
Now that the time of salads and green stuffs is here you will want
vinegar that is pure and wholesome. We have this week put in a
stock of the finest vinegar procurable. It comes in strong glass jugs
with a handle, in half gallons and gallons.
Blue Grass Bell Cedar Vinegar, half-gallon jugs   50c
Blue Grass Belle, White Pickling, half gallon jug  50c
Pacific Belle Codfish Tablets, the package 20c
Fisher's Home Made Peanut Butter, the jar  15 to 45c
Pioneer Minced Clams, thc can    20c
Clark's Pork and Beans in Chili Sauce- two cans for  25c
French Peas, two cans for    25c
Swift's Borax Soap, the cake   jc
Old Dutch Hand Soap, the bar   Sc
Sheriff's Jelly Powder, all flavors, three for  25c
Dcuerr's Jams, two pound pots   snc
Strawberries, Cherries, Plums, Peaches
Fraser & MacLean,2��� *~ ��� ��*
BUY YOUR
BUILDING LUMBER
FROM-
South Vancouver Lumber Co.
(Manufacturers)
ALL KINDS OF KILN DRIED LUMBER, MOULDINGS AND
FINISH.
Mill and Office : Foot of Ontario S treet, on Fraser River
Phone Fraser 94 w. R. Dick, Proprietor
ALMOND
ICE
We  deliver to family
trade in South  Vancouver
PHONE:    HIGHLAND    930
A.  L. Amiel
Hamilton Bros.
Embalmers and Funeral
Directors
Parlors and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Office Phone:   FRASER 19
Residence Phone:    FRASER 25
(Day or night) TEN
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 20, 15
South Vancouver and Burnaby
Annual Fair at Central Park
At Central  I'ark  this week, thc big]
fair il on.    Anel it is the biggest and e
best in iin- history of the Association.
Thousands are attending daily.   The
event is the best advertising feature
that the two great municipalities onl
the North Ann of the  Fraser    has.
ever had.
Mr. J, J. Millar, of the Vancouver
Exhibition Association, opened tin-
fair officially Wednesday night when
there was a monster attendance. Mr
MilUr. wil.. was introduced by President J. S. Sinclair, expressed surprise
that South  Vancouver and  Burnaby
Should be able- to pre>ni..ti- so splendid
an   exhibition.
Entries arc larger thi^ year than
ever and the quality of the domestic,
garden   and   agricultural   exhibits   are j
��� if a very high average.
To the following board eef management, the success of the fair is lo a
large   measure   due :
11. .11. President, Hon. Richard McBride; Hon. Vice-presidents, Hem.
Price Ellison and Hon. h'. Carter-
Cotton; President, J. S. Sinclair; Vice-
president, J. II Thompson; Secretary-
treasurer,   F,   E.   Ilarnur;   Auditors,
Thus. Sanders.en and W. W. Ilurke;
Dircete.rs. J. A. Smith, A, Lomas, W.
II. Brett, L. F. Rawden. II. Emery.
Frank Rumble, 0. N, Sinipier, C. 11.
Rose, D. M, Ross, W. II. Loxton, T.
M. Tyson, Capt.  Fisher, C. M. Van
Home, M.  Boyd and Jessie Love.
Business  men  of South  Vancouver
and   Hurnaby     are     enthusiastically I
throwing  in   their   lot   tei   make   this
year's event as great an achievement j
as possible,  Collingwood and Central j
Park people being particularly active
in  this respect.
Valuable prizes are being awarded,
and  a  full   list  of  these  will  appear I
later.
The Agricultural grounds at Central Park present all unusually attractive scene.
Many visitors are in attendance
from outside points.
"The best exhibition we have ever
bad in the history eif the society. Entries have  come  in  in  such  numbers
lhat   we  have   had  t'e refuse many  of
them on  account  of limited  ��P��C<
Such vvas Ihe assurance of Secretary llarmer in reference t>��� the Central   Park   Agricultural   Exhibition.
Wednesday morning until n i was
the last occasion that exhibitors hael
to place tluir exhibits upon the tables,
and eluring the whole e.f Wednesday
linen i crowds continued te> arrive
wilh perishable' articles, that had been
kept until the la-t to ensure their being judged while in the very best
condition. Outside of the Agricultural Hall others were busily engaged
erecting and putting in order refreshment ami fruit tents and amusement
Ineeetlis, while within the ball the officials anil their assistants were winking at top speeel arranging the tables
and making every preparation lor lhe
judging, which commenced at noon,
ami continued all afternoon.
Judging from lhe appearance of
the interior of the hall yesterday, wilh
lhe tables literally laden wilh choice
fruits and mosl excellent vegetables
and flowers, this year's exhibition
will rank as the very best ever promoted by lln- association. A special exhibit whieh should attract considerable attention from all visitors, is that
of the school display, which consists
of about a thousand entries. Another
is the superb display of women's
work, entered hy the Central Park
Women's Institute, which will appeal
in a marked degree to all ladies.
Fruit Display Prize
The Hudson's Hay Company's
special prize eef a dining-room -i<l<--
board feer the best collection of fruit.
flowers   and   vegetables   grown   by   a
member nf the association on his own
plot, and in his own time, and not
with a view of making a livelihood eef
it. is especially worthy of attention.
The space allowed feer lhe exhibit is
about thirty se|iiarc feel, anil the var-
ieeus exhibits are beautifully arranged,
the combined display being an excellent 'inc.
The fldwer display is also a remarkable one. while poultry ligures largely in the exhibition, the birds being
of a  splendid  all-round  class.
New Fraternal Society is "The Order of
the Golden West"
Strong Lodge is Being Formed Locally of a Fraternity With Western Ideals for Western people, the Watchword of Which is
Brotherly love, with Which Many Oldtimers are Identifying
Themselves
A Western order of Western people with Western principles, exemplifying the Golden West���such is the
new fraternal order at present being
introduced in Greater Vancouver,
The Order of the Golden West.
The Order of the Golden West has
lodges in thc chief cities of the West,
and from the nature of its objects, it
is a good order for good people, a
fraternal order for desirable  citizens.
Many prominent citizens in Vancouver have become affiliated witli
the Order of the Golden West, and
in South Vancouver, a strong lodge
is being formed, and among thc men
who are identified with the fraternity
arc leading business men in the municipality.
Lodge rooms will be opened at
South Hill, it is said, and thc Order of
the Golden West is likely to gain a
high standing among the fraternal
organizations  in the community.
Mr. J. A. Charlesworth, who is in
charge of the organization in South
Vancouver, made the following statement :
"The order is one of the,great social and beneficial  fraternities,  which
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can  supply  your  needs  at  right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right  at  Station)
does not seek tei discredit other orders, but is always ready to join
hands in uplifting, elevating and advancing the cause of humanity. It is
not a class organization, but is open
to all good citizens, professional,
business and working men alike, who
arc of sound mind and body, in good
standing in the community, engaged
in   a   lawful   business,   and   who   are
B. C. Millinery
Shops
3539 Commercial Drive,
Cedar Cottage
Hats from London
AND
382 Joyce St., Collingwood E.
Hats from Paris
Hal- freem $1  tei $2M, anil we guarantee them I" be 20 per cent. below-
City   prices
HATS RE-TRIMMED and made to order.
FEATHERS CURLED, cleaned and dyed at reasonable prices
We   carrv   a   line of Children's  llai-
Coal miners at work at Cumberland, Vancouver Island, in
the bowe'.s of the earth following a risky avocation,
rendered more so through the failure of the Government ta enforce the act regulating the coal mines
male citizens able to speak and write
the   English  language.
���The Order of the Golden West believe the time to speak the kindly
word and to minister to humanity's
wants is while men are living. The
belated "Hc was a good fellow," will
not bring a smile to the dead man's
face, nor buy a loaf of bread for the
widow. Their cardinal virtue is to
inject sunshine into dark places. They
are not Saints, but they lend tintei
the Lord, for they give unto lhe poor.
There are no Neighbors in Potter's
Field or County Shroud. There are
no hungry Neighbors. A square meal
beats prayer for a hungry  stomach.
"The Order of the Golden West"
does not tolerate interference with
line's religion or political views. Political eer sectarian discussions are not
countenanced in the lodge room, but
patriotism, obedience to law, equal
rights and respect for the opinions
of others is insisted upon. As one
enters a lodge, sei he departs���a free
man."
COLLINGWOOD
A Tea Demonstration
At Praser's Store, Viy East Collingwood, they have been having a Tea
Demonstration. A lady sat at a table
decorated with flowers and dispensed
"Malkin's Best," purchasers also receiving a beautiful cup and saucer.
The tea wun high approval and many
Collingwood homes have a Malkin
cup and saucer. Messrs. Fraser are
to be congratulated on this innovation at Collingwood. Other demonstrations  will   feelleew.
PIONEER DRY
GOODS STORE
Season's Millinery
We have to announce to the ladies of Collingwood and
District a special FASHION DISPLAY OF NEW FALL
STYLES in latest designs and at most reasonable prices.
Trimmings in every shade and variety to suit the individual taste.
Departments
The largest stock in the district of General Dry Goods,
Gents' Furnishings, Rubber Goods, Boots and Shoes, Milliners' and Dressmakers' sundries.
270 JOYCE STREET
(James   Brinnen, prrprietor)
CAMERAS
From $1.50 up, that are sold the
World over
FILMS,
PAPERS
PHOXO
SUPPLIES
Your films developed and printed
by   Expert  Photographer.
Our  specialty, the Dispensing  of
Prescriptions
CHAMB ERS
DRUG CO.
Collingwood East
The last great blast in .Vgsing the Panama Canal���Seven   tens   of   dynamite   dislodged
mountain   ana, fig itauvdly, the waters of the Atlantic and Pacific ming:ed
Collingwood Pure Milk Co.
PURITY
CLEANLINESS
GUARANTEED REGULAR DELIVERIES
All our Milk and Cream is treated in the HOLDEN
PASTEURIZING PLANT, in accordance with the
new PROVINCIAL ACT'S REQUIREMENT.
Communications to
G. W. HAWKINS, Earls Road Post Office
EARLS ROAD, South Vancouver
Collingwood   Parliament
Thc session will, it is pretty certain, begin on Saturday, September
27, when an "Election" will be held.
There will be a preliminary meeting
on Wednesday, 24th, at the Collingwood Library. "Felix Penne" will
give a Lantern Gossip "Politics on
a White Sheet," and a talk about the
Parliament will follow. Candidates
for Parliament attend.
Collingwood Institute
Captain Mellish in the picturesque
uniform of the Seaforth regiment, lectured at the Collingwood Institute on
Tuesday night. He gave a most interesting and, at times, thrilling account of the Boer war. His personal
narrative held tbe attention of the
audience and a number of excellent
pictures added to tbe interest.
POLICE  WARNING  SENT
TO SCHOOL CHILDREN
Chief of Police Jackson is addressing a letter to each of thc principals
of the South Vancouver schools as
follows :
"1 have bad innumerable com*
plaints in regard to the destruction
of  private   property   by   school   chil-
RENOVATORY
(J. S. Lyle, prop.)
COLLINGWOOD  EAST
Dyeing and Cleaning
Garments called for on receipt
of Post Card
Satisfaction   Guaranteed
Charges Moderate
376 JOYCE STREET
dren. alsei horse play by the older
school boys. While I am unwilling:
to bring boys to court, yet the law
must be enforced.
"Under the circumstances your
might read the older boys a severe
lecture and impress upon them the
consequences that will follow any
violation   of the  law."

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