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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Aug 29, 1914

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Array "*^*-4.
Tfi&Z** CHINOOK
Vol.  HI,   Xo 16
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA, SATURDAY. AL'Ol'ST 29. 1014
Price 5 cents
PATRIOTIC CONCERT, KALENBERG HALL
SOUTH VANCOUVER, IS RESPONSIBLE FOR
TREMENDOUS OUTBURST OF LOYALTY
Never before in the history of
Smith Vancouver rlid the people give
such rein to their patriotism as at
Kalenberg Hall, Thursday night, when
hundreds turneil out t" the Wat Fund
concert held under the auspices of a
local   Liberal  Club.
Reeve Kerr occupied the chair anil
ihe meeting opened amid a skirl of
bag-pipe music which fairly fired Mr.
Malcolm Macdonald, the orator of
the evening to make patriotic utterances which brought forth rolls of
applause at various intervals during
his   speech.
That the patriotism of South Vancouver is of a most substantial character was indicated in llle substantial voluntary contributions given leewards  the  War   Fund.
"Indeed in these times" said Mr. M.
A. Macdonald. "with the work tei do
right in mir midst wc require the
minimum eef weirds and the maximum
of action. Kipling at the time of the
South African war when the same
duty���only to a lesser degree than
today���existerl of providing feer those
who required financial help by reason of war, cruel but imperative demands aroused the generosity of
Britons  everywhere  with  the words :
When you've shouted  Rule Britannia,
When   you've   sung   God     save     the
Queen,
When you've finished killing Kruger
with you mouth.
Will you kindly place a shilling in my
little  tambourine.
For   a   gentleman   in   khaki   ordered
South.
He's   all   absent-minded   beggar���
and so on, each verse ending with the
refrain :
Then   pass   the   hat   for   your   credit's
. sake and pay, pay, pay.
"It is quite true that we all to a
more or less degree feel the pinch of
straightened circumstances after passing through a period of financial depression now aggravated bv this war
and that many hanels anel hearts ever
se, willing are not able to respond to
the demand as they would like to.
But it is equally true that thc men
and women in Vancouver and elsewhere who give, not from their abundance but from their limited resources,
a portion tie this cause are from that
very fact doing service all the more
heroic���perhaps the only service they
can perform���and they will experience the reflex action on' their own
character and patriotism which always  follows a generous sacrifice."
Concluding a most eloquent speech,
Mr. Macdonald saiil. "Surely this
Empire, encircling the ('.lobe, which
has. by the establishment e,f free institutions w,,n tlle unquestioned loyalty and affection which wc see manifested today by thc tramp of armed
men from all lier dominions, neet by
constraint or conscription, but by thc
full play of free-will, freedom, justice
and equality; surely such an Empire
is worth lighting for t'i lire last trench
if need be! The Romans used lo
proudly say 'Civis Romanus Sum���
I am a Roman citizen!' A ten fold
prouder boast today may come from
those who say, '1 am a British citizen!' Let us sec t'i it that we may!
continue to say so through succeed- |
ing   generations."
Tlle collection taken up reached a
total of nearly $100. Little girls, prettily dressed, passed baskets.
Mr. Edward Gold and Mrs. Emma
Gold offered two lots em Ontario
Street, valued at $1,500 each for sites
for an old man's home and an orphanage. This gift brought down the
house and and a committee is being
appointed  tei administer  the  property
Mr. S. F. Henderson of thc
CHINOOK staff was master of ceremonies.
Tlie' following was lire program of
the evening :
Opening���Gathering   of   the   Clans
 By  Clan   McLean   Pipers
1���Anthem.   O.   Canada Audience
3���Chairman's Remarks	
 Reeve  James   A.   Kerr.
3���Chorus,  Gathering  of  the   Mac-
Gregor's 	
 Collingwood   Choral   Society
4���Seeiig. The  Veteran	
 Mr.  Magnus Irvine
5���Song,  Land of  Hope and Glory
 Miss   H.   Beswick
f>���Recitation..,, Mr,   Rowe   Holland
7���Song,  Angus   MacDonald	
 Mrs. W. W. Robertson
.S���Dance.   Highland   Fling	
 Master Albert Robertson
9���Scene   from   Henry   the   Fifth   in
full costume, Mr. Chas. Thompson
and   Miss   Daisy   Moore
10���Patriotic Address	
 Mr.   M.  A.  MacDonald
11���Song, On to Victory, composed
and   sung   by   Madame   Losier
12���Instrumental.   Patriotic  Airs...
    Orchestra
13���Recitation,   Patriotic	
 Noel   Robinson
\4���Song.   Patriotic Mrs,   Stirling
15���Song, Hail King George	
    Mr.  R.  Minton
lo���Chorus,  Scots  Wha  Hae ..
 Ceillingwood   Choral    Society
Pianist    Mrs. F.  Paterson
Main Street Paving Job Goes on
Regardless of Wars and Rumours
Blocks will soon be Laid to Bodwell Road and Meantime Large
Force of Men and Fifty Teams of Horses are Kept Jumping
From the front door of the
CHINOOK office, corner of Thirtieth Avenue and Main Street, right
to the corner of Granville and Hastings Street there is the finest piece
of paved street in the world.
This week sees the permanent pavement completed on thc west side of
the street from Sixteenth Avenue
right up to the intersection of Thirtieth.
Bodwell Road will be reached by
the end of next week and so, step by
step, the great paving contract goes
mi.
On lhe preliminary work towards
the River Roail a regiment of men
are at work and the many wagons
and dump carts passing hurriedly
liere and there in thc rear would give
the impression that the men were
backed up by a brigade of artillery.
Surely the paving pctmle are conquering mud and dust and South Vancouver is being traversed by an excellent   highway.
Subscribers will observe that this week the CHINOOK has been
reduced to six pages. Mr. Pessimist will say : "Ah, ha, I told you so.
Hard times.    This war will put them all out of business."
Listen  here I
Business is so brisk that we have been forced to cut the paper
down. As a matter of fact the CHINOOK is printing a daily paper for the Vancouver Exhibition Association, a real live daily paper with war news in it. The Exhibition Daily will be published
every day during the big fall Exhibition.
The demands upon our printing factory are consequently so
great that we have been forced either to reduce the size of the
CHINOOK until after the Exhibition or slight the Exhibition Daily.
The success of the Vancouver Exhibition is of most vital importance to Greater Vancouver. A feature which will contribute to
the success of the only exhibition being held on the Pacific Coast
this year is the Exhibition Daily. These be the times when individual interests must be sacrificed fct the general good. The CHINOOK
will therefore do its duty by the Vancouver 'Exhibition  Association.
Reeve Kerr and Coun. Rutledge
Return from Victoria Conference
T'under Un Blitzen! A German
Spy in a South Vancouver School
One i'f the lensations eef tin- si a-
lon is wound up in a yarn which has
received great circulation througheiut
the city anel Smith Vancouver to the
e ffi-i t that a certain South Vancouver
School teacher had been operating as
a German  spy.
It was claimed that this alleged
minion of the Kaiser had forced all
the members of his cia^s te, draw
maps of liritish Columbia. After re-
ceiving fifty e,r ilxty of these line
maps, hc selected the most accurate
and artistic .if the lot anel, it was
claimed, pur it in his pocket to send
it  later  right   to  Kaiser   Wilhelni.
As early as last Saturday, the sup-
posed spy, had been arrested, court-
martialed and was about to be shot,
so thc tale went. Wednesday, it was
said, the military had decided ii"t  to
shoot the man, but to hang him up
by  the  neck.
Investigation has proved that the
pedagogue really is a spy. His specialty is locating undeveloped spots
in the minds of a whole host of
Soulh Vancouver boys and girls.
Having founel these, he attacks them
.unl hrinus up mathematical artillery
anil grammatical cavalry and literary
infantry lo support him in the various
lights for the proper advancement of
the pupils. At the battle 'if the Entrance Examination this year, he won
a (jre-at victory.
Though the name has a slight hoch-
der-kaiser smack to it, the hero of
the story is a loyal subject oi King
George iln- Fifth and is such a
good Britisher that the stripling who
s'.arieel that German spy story isn't
even going t" be birched for his devil-
ni'-in.
Columbia Bitulithic May
Finance Paving of Victoria Road
Inability of the Council to Raise Necessary Money for Permanent
Work in the Middle Street of the Municipality May Not Be
An Obstacle to an Early Start Being Made on the Work
It was -tateel by Reeve Kerr today that there was a likelihood of
the Columbia Bitulithic Company,
with the endorsement of the Municipality, itself financing the paving of
Victoria Road. The Reeve stated
that this would be considered iit the
event of the municipality at this time
finding it inconvenient to raise- the
necessary money to proceed with the
work.   It is pointed out that the Bitu
lithic Co. is financially able to proceed
with the work on its own initiative,
with the backing up of the council.
The paving of Bodwell Road is
proceeding. The B. C. E. R. Company are laying thc permanent tracks,
j and as this work is completed, the
putting   down   of   the   concrete   base
|and the final layer of bitulithic will
go   forward.     A   large   force  of  men
I are at work on the contract.
Economic Situation Discussed with Sir Richard McBride and
Members of the Government Outlook Favorable and there
Is No Need for Alarm
Reeve Kerr and Councillor Rutledge returned Wednesday frmn Victoria where they attended the Provincial conference where stock was
taken of affairs as they now stand
in  British  Columbia.
Though not carried' away with optimism, Reeve Kerr stated that the
conference has been the starting
point of a large number of reforms
which will be likely taken up at an
early date for the benefit of the workingmen and the unemployed in thc
Province.
"I was much impressed," said the
Reeve, "with the stand the banks
have decided to take. Mr. Sweeny,
speaking for the banker's association,
told US that the policy woulil be to
give an extended line of credit t'e
legitimate industry, but to shut down
on all loans for speculative purpose-.
Sir Richard's remarks were reassur:
ing to a high degree." continued tin'
reeve. "Though it had nothing to
do with mir affairs in Seeuth Vancouver, thc Premier informed ns that
all provincial work and Dominion
Government work would be continued as before and that all tlie railroad construction at present under
way in British Columbia would be
pushcel   feerward.   war  .ir   no  war."
Reeve Kerr was asked his opinion
mi thc Statement of Mayor Baxter
that nothing had come out of the
conference which would prepare for
the feeding of the hungry next ��inter.
"I agree with the mayor," slated
the Reeve, "I fear, if I may say it,
that nothing of a constructive character was decided upon to meet emergencies which are bound to arise in
South Vancouver and the city during the coming winter months. I
am afraid that Premier McBride does
not know as much about the unemployed questions as we in Vancouver
and South Vancouver know.
"This is a matter for the Provincial Government to take up. The
municipalities have been doing their
best to provide work and keep the
wheels turning. We have some five
hundred men working in South Vancouver today.    And so long as South
Vancouver can finance we arc bound
to keep as many men as possible at
work. Hut when thc paving contracts are fulfilled, I am afraid that
a great many men will be thrown out
of employment and, then, if we cannot raise money, we will have lo pass
the problem up to the Provincial Government  to deal with it."
At the conference were representatives of all the municipal councils,
boards of trade, labor and industrial
organizations.
GOOD EXAMPLE OF LOCAL
LUMBER AND FUEL COMPANY
Yards   of   Coast   Lumber   and   Fuel
Company Placed at Disposal
of Soldiers' Wives
When Police Constable Flack, of
Smith Vancouver force, left for the
front, one of the first to recognize
hi- splendid martial spirit was Mr.
C, Bruce, Coast Lumber and Fuel
Company, who has offered Mrs.
Flack free wood during the absence
eef her husband.
The' offer i- not lieing made ill the
way of a charity, for Constable Flack
leaves the home well provided, but
rather as a token of appreciation of
the   efforts   of  a     South    Vancouver
man "to do his bit" by the Old Flag.
Mention might also be made of
Constable Wanl. who lately left the
South Vancouver Police force to take
up the chiefship of the Cumberland
police force. Being such a short
time resident in his new home and
realizing that his wife would find
herself a little strange in her new surroundings he brought her back to
Seeuth Vancouver to reside during
his absence. He has been called up
as a reservist.
Mr. Bruce extended the same courtesy to Mr. Wauls wife, which goes
iw that one industry of South
Vancouver at least is doing its share
nobly in helping the Empire at this
crisis
South Vancouver today stands
head and shoulders over thc neighboring  municipalities  in  thc  financial
line-up.
*    *    *
Sergeant John M. Lamond, Thirty-
ninth Avenue East, son of Secretary
K. Lamond. of the South Vancouver
Beiard of Trade, is one of the members of the Duke of Connaught's
Own Rifles who left this week for
Valcartier   Camp.   Quebec.
 1   a>   ���	
PUBLIC NOTICE
Letters sent to the Chinook for
publication must henceforth bear the
lull signature of the writer. A recent
letter criticising the Water, Works
Department was published in these
columns. The'iiame abet addreft of
the writer was neet printed, but is in
the possession of the editor and may
he had at this office.
YOU'RE perfectly
WELCOME   sir^
but Please
leave youk
watering
can behind.
^g^nUo^* SATURDAY, AUGUST 29, 1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
Glazed Cement
Sewer Pipe
Is tiie choice of property owners in
every city where its value has been
demonstrated. It gives good service
and has durability.
Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.
155 FRONT STREET WEST
Phone Fairmont  122
Vancouver Exhibition Chatter
Make Your Gardens Beautiful
Don't procrastinate! Those whe have their gardens well cultivated should act quickly in secu'ing ,vhat their tastes prompts to
select to make home surroundings beautiful. This obviates a rush
the last weeks of the plan-ting season and consequently confers upon
us a direct favor. Our staff, through generous patronage are taxed
to the limit every day, late and early.
Don't delay placing your orders quickly, thereby preventing a
rush and enabling us to give efficient service in meeting your wants.
Our stock of flowering plants (Biennial and Perennial) cannot be
surpassed on this continent.
This is not, to use the slang phrase���hot air���but a fact. When
you want cabbage, cauliflower and tomato plants order from us.
Catalogues  mailed  free on  application.
ROYAL NURSERIES, LIMITED
Office���710 Dominion Building, 207  Hastings Street Wett Phone  Seymour S5SG
Store���2410 Granville Street Phone  Bayview  1926
Greenhouses and Nurseries at Koyai on B.C. Electric Railway, Eburne I.ine, about
two miles south of the City limits. Phone Ebume  43.
Down by the oval anel very near
thi main entrance the skid-road
itn tchi - along the main roael to tbe
grandstand, and irom September 3,
when iii. Fifth \imual exhibition,
which the \ ar ivi r Bai bih..n Association pin on . \e ry year, until
ihe evening ol September i2. that
same   skid-road   trill   raise  its   voice,
a   III' illy   '.I   lOUlldS,   to   Kle-et   llle   I l-l
lor and hold him enthralled until he
has se e n ii rything that is te, be
-- ��� n
Every day will be a big day at the
forthcoming   exhibition.
Ai liig and as hue as this year's
attractions, and two eir three big
shows ��ill supplement the regular
features, the fair itself will excel
everything. The Dominion government, at an expense oi several thoul-
Hughes Bros' Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET  EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We carry everything in Wines, Liquors and Cigars
No order too small, and none too large  for this popular Liquor Store
Store open every evening until 11 p.m.
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
Leaving our Store every Thursday and Friday morning at 9 a.m.
Price List mailed free on application
Dominion Equipment & Supply Co.
LIMITED
Contractors and Municipal Machinery, Equipment and Supplies
Phone Seymour 71S5
1150 Homer Street Vancouver
Fairview Sand & Gravel Co.
Corner Front and Manitoba Streets
TELEPHONE FAIRMONT   552
BEST PRICES FOR SOUTH VANCOUVER AND
FAIRVIEW DISTRICT
WILLOW  HOSPITAL
Corner BROADWAY and WILLOW
PATIENTS  RECEIVED  FROM $15.00 PER WEEK
Miss HALL and Miss WESTLEY, graduate  nurses
Phone Fairmont 2165
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
CORNER 8th AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
Fairmont 189 Always Open
Furnishers of Complete Funerals for $55.00
This includes Burial Case, Hearse, Family Carriage, Removal
Charges and all Personal Services.
Wc guarantee quality of goods, services and equipment to be first-
class. We make no misleading statements, and we have a staff of
competent men who are prepared at any hour to render the best service possible to bc obtained anywhere.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Always Open Use of Modern Chapel to All
CORNER 8th AND MAIN STREET Telephone Fairmont 189
P. H. GROTE���Formerly Center & Hanna's Branch
75 per cent, of your Summer Cooking can be
done with Electric Household Appliances
Just as well as with a Kitchen Range and
with much greater comfort and convenience
Electric Household Appliances are ready for operation, day or
night, on an instant's attention to connecting the cord with the
household socket.
ihey can do everything in the line of light cooking, preparing
tea or coffee, making toast, preparing eggs, frying chops, etc. You
don't want heavy meals during the hot weather and the appliances
just meet this demand and make it unnecessary to have a hot fire
going. , ,
Electric   Household   Appliances cost only a few cents per hour
of  continuous  operation.    To  prepare an ordinary meal takes but a
fraction of an hour.   They are guaranteed  by  the  manufacturers.
See our full line of Electrical Household  Appliances
Carrall A Hatting! Sta.
113s Granville St.. near Davie
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
IMS ALBERT ST. TELEPHONE   HICH.   131
ENGINEERS,  MACHINISTS AND FOUNDERS
IKON AND  BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND SPECIA..S
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTION'
Cock o' the Walk
and deellars. i.s in scud te> the Vancouver show its big exhibits which arc
now being displayed at the Toronto
Fair. Tlu.se exhibits are national in
their  scope and value.
The Provincial Government will
spend Bomething like $3,(X)0 on the
laying nut nf a permanent timber and
wood finishing exhibit to be arranged
ill the big forestry building. The
display will include sample rooms
maele and finished in Iir and' in hemlock. There will be shingle-weaving
exhibits, big, bulky cedar and Iir
trees, nr segments thereof and a very
interesting illustration, consisting of
a raised map and numerous photographs nf the method which tlle government uses in combating the furious forest lires.
The agricultural exhibits will eif
themselves justify long trips from tlle
interior towns tu Vancouver when
the fair is opened. It is the announced intention uf the Dominion
Government lo have their experts in
attendance at its display. Photographs, and exhaustive treatises em
the various methods followed in producing the best crops, the best live
stock and the best dairy produce will
be distributed. So this one department of the fair will be a liberal education  in  itself.
A veritable revelation uf British
Columbia's industrial growth and expansion will be made in tbe manufacturers' building by llie B. C. Manufacturers Association, who have engaged the whole vast structure for
a display of the products uf mill,
Ilium, factory and plant in British
Columbia. Sei great and sei numerous are Ihe exhibits tu be placed in
lhat one building that many fair visitors will wanl lei spend a elay in that
nne  building.
With nine days at their disposal
tlie average visiturs will have plenty
of time tee dei justice to these big exhibits.
Tin- industrial building will be packed with commercial anel business <lis-
plays, That building has always
proven i'e be a great attraction during fair lime and litis year il is impeded   lhat   it   anil   iw   exhibits   will
bc fully fifty per cent, better.
Tu go from building tu building,
tu give a description ot each and its
contents wemld entail a longer article than i- possible t" give ipace to
here,  bul   il   may   lie  safely   said   lhat
every one ol tne bin buildings will
haw big features, features which will
mark a meterial improvement eever
last  year'- standards.
Iii lad, Mr. II. S. Rolston, general
manager nf the fair, has already authorized the statement that every department of the big annual show will
at least bc twenty-five per cent, ahead
uf lhe same department the prececd-
ing year and in many cases the fair
will bc eme hundred per cent, improved.
Thc harness horse races will include such animals as Dan Logan,
that famous horse of Grand Circuit
fame with many others who have
traveled with him. The horse show
will include the Pacific Coast champions, or many of them, and some
high-bred   British   Columbia   animals.
The 'nineteen-liftecn models of
many of the best kmiwn automobiles
will be shown at the fair and hundreds   will   cume   from   all   over   thc
province tu attend iln- om magni-
ficeienl display alone Tin i.i^ gUttty
cars, all read) iur the long, smooth
British Columbia r..ads. will I,. i. n
undei tplendid conditions' unl th,
automobile show will mrpasi even
Iin- Inn show  ..I last y.ar.
\ better balm- contest, tin babies
"il1 In judged ley thirtj different
doctors whe, will mark for points, is
!������ In featured Motor ne.. -, ,,,,
load after ear load ��� ,; jheep, sunn,
cattle and horses, an aquarium ~t���,ck-
"I ��;tli local fresh ami -alt water
fish, bands and a hundred different
e vents will make ui this tan one oj
llu- best recorded in Pacific Coast
cities.
Opening Day will iln, year (all un i
Thursday, September 3.    Friday  will i
be'   Manufacturers'  Day   ami   Saturday
Children's   Day      On   the   following
Sunday  tin-  fair will, uf course,    be I
closed.    Monday,  September   7,   will I
le-    Labor   Day.  and   that   day   will  be
featured  by a big parade     Farmers'
Day,   American   Day,    Citizens    oi
Greater   Vancouver    Day.    Visitors'
Day   and   Ladies'   Day   follow   in   the
'.'���der named.
��� * *
While regretting very much the
cancellation of ihe Westminster Exhibition by the exhibition people '���!
that cily, Mr. II. S. Rolston, general
manager of the Vancuuver Exhibition, announced ihat the Vancouver
Exhibition Association cheerfully extends an invitation tu all thusc exhibitors win. had planned tu exhibit
ai  the  Exhibition uf the  Royal City
"ll    September   29th.
When the report came in to the
Vancouver Exhibition office that the
Royal City fair was imt to be held,
considerable regret was expressed by
lhe Vancouver Exhibition staff. Vance.uver has co-operated with Xew
Westminster tei its best ability in
making both Fairs splendid successes,
In the early days nf the Vancouver
Exhibition, it was thought by both
Vancouver ami Westminster people
that the Vancuuver Exhibition would
conflict with the Westminster Ex-
hibiliun and some healthy rivalry developed, but by the time the second
Vancuuver Exhibition came tu be
hehl, it wa�� found that the two exhi-
bitions were of material aid te, each
eelher. In fact it was stated t.eelay
at the Vancouver Exhibition offices
that the In,lding .>f the Exhibition at
the Royal t'ity contributed nei small
measure tu lhe success of the Vancuuver Exhibition.
Vancouver's Exhibition is from
September .Ird  tu September  12.
Victoria's Exhibition is from September   21st   to   September   26th.
New Westminster's Exhibition is
from  September 29th to October 3rd.
By reason of the fact that these
three exhibitions come SO close together, they prove to be an irristible
attraction to many exhibitors who
would not care to cume to the Coast
just for une or two exhibitions. Consequently it is tu be regretted that
N'ew Westminster will nut hold their
Exhibition   Ihis   year,   although   it   is
Five  cases of  insects  have  already
arrived
readily conceded that  their decision
was made wiih  the very  best intentions in the world
When  ihe  announcement  that  no
Pair would be held this year in the
Royal t'ity was confirmed beyond a
doubt, Mr. Roliton immediately took
steps in see what accommodation he
could give iii lines,' exhibitors wlm
planned tu shnw at the Exhibition in
New Westminster. The invitation
lee visit and take part in the Vancouver Exhibition was ihen issued
and N'ew Westminster people will bc
welcomed very heartily.
The New Westminster Exhibition
has in past years been mure representative of the agricultural products
of thc lower valleys of British Columbia than any other Exhibition, and
if the exhibitors frum those valleys
will show their exhibits at thc Vancouver Fair this year, the Vancouver
Exhibition   will   gain   very   largely.
One of the fine steeds to be shown
Theory and Practice
Norman Angell has devoted his life
to convincing -the nations of Europe
that one nation cannot make a financial preilit by subjugating another.
All war is economic loss and waste.
His brilliantly-reasoned works have
had a wide circulation, and many people have thought that if only tiiese
doctrines were understood there
weiuld bc an end of war. Thc war
between Austria and Servia must dispel this dream of a millennium. Th
war was brought about not from hope
of economic gain, but fremi race hat
red and race sympathy. The Aus-
trians hate the Serbs, and the Serbs
sympathise with their kin who are
subject tei Austrian rule. War i- dictated nut by reason but by passion.
"I guess it is nothing more than an
idle rumor."
"Idle? I guess not. It is the busiest old rumor, that  ever happened."
GRAND   CENTRAL   HOTEL
GRAUER  and  GRAUER
The place where they "keep hotel"���
A fully modern hostelry, near at
hand to South Vancouver���it's the
"���Irand Central" when you go to
Eburne.
EBURNE   STATION,   B.C.
Milk! Milk! Milk!
Turner's Pasteuriied and Germless Milk and Cream is the best
diet for  Infants and  Invalids.    Superior- for tea, coffee and cocoa.
AND GOOD FOR EVERYBODY
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--
__________________ TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, AUGUST 29, 191*
W^CHINOCMC
PUBLISHED
Every Saturday by the Greater Vancouver Publishers Limited
George M. Murray, Editor
HEAD OFFICE:
Corner   Thirtieth   Avenue   and   Main   Street.   South   Vancouver,   B. C.
TELEPHONE:   All department, ....Fairmont   1874
NIGHT  CALLS Fairmont   1946 L
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
To  all   points  in   Canada.   United   Kingdom,   Newfoundland,   New
Zealand, and other British Possessions:
One   Year     $2.00
Six   Months       1.00
Three   Months     50
Postage to American. European and other Foreign Countries, $1.00
per year extra.
"The truth at all times firmly stands
And shall from age to age endure."
Xow at a time like this, when the nation is sending
her sons to the front, shedding their blood for the empire, surely this highway robbery is very much out of
place.
No words are too strong in which to condemn the
industry whieh takes advantage of the spirit of patriotism with which the war taxes are accepted in a
���_;ries, attempt te) fleece the public.
If that extra nickel were to go to the government
tet help make up the war deficit, the very meanest man
in the community wouhl give willingly, but when it
seems that it is being stolen in the name of patriotism
then wc call a halt.
THE VICTORIA CONFERENCE
WHEN representative citizens from all quarters
of the Province gathered at Victoria this week
to discuss the economic situation in liritish Columbia
the first truly representative parliament held in Hritish Columbia in the past eleven years was held. This
parliament was unofficial, but if the affairs of the
Province had been in the hands of such a body during
the past decade it is quite likely that the crisis now before the people would never have arisen.
Mayor llaxter, during the conference, attacked the
banks because of their tightening of purse strings
since the outbreak of the war. Though the outcome
of the conference has been favorable in a large measure, the mayor has given out an interview in which
he declares that nothing had been done towards a
practical solution of the problem of feeding the unemployed during the coming winter.
At the conference the plan was advanced to place
all the idle men at the clearing of lands under the
auspices of the Provincial Government. To this, Sir
Richard McBride objected that all the lands near at
hand were held by private interests. In the Upper
Country there were vast areas held by the Government, but these could scarcely be utilized at this time
for the benefit of the unemployed on the coast.
Mr. Campbell Sweeny, speaking for thc Rank of
Montreal and the other Canadian banks promised the
conference that there would be no further curtailment
of credit for legitimate enterprises in British Columbia, that thc old lines would be renewed and so far
as the banks are concerned, industry would be assisted
to the last cent. While this statement is of an encouraging character and while the promise of Sir Richard
that all railroad work and Government work would
��� be continued is heartening, the clouds have not been
completely dispelled.
One point was made plain at the Victoria conference and that was that Sir Richard McRride and his
government are not as familiar with the present wants
of the people of Hritish Columbia as some of the heads
of municipalities are who daily go through the ordeal
of turning the unemployed away. Our greatest concern at this time is not that we have the unemployed
problem, not that we have a temporary money tightness���Rritish Columbia weeps today because of the
fact that her contributions to the Empire in this hour
of peril have not been as large as they might have
been.
SUCH BLASPHEMY !
Tl IE German Emperor has a great habit of invoking Heaven to his assistance in all his projects.
The following is a copy of a letter sent recently by
him to thc Crown Princess:
"I thank thee with all my heart dear child ; I rejoice with thee over the first victory of Wilbelm. God
has been on our side, and has most brilliantly aided
us. To Hint the thanks and honor. I remit to Wilbelm the Iron Cross of the second and first class. Os-
kar also fought brilliantly with the Grenadiers. He
has received the Iron Cross of the second class. Repeat that Ina and Marie. God protect and succor my
boys. Also in the future, God be with thee now and
always.
"(Signed) PAPA WILHELM."
Like Alexander the coppersmith, of old time, the
Lord will in the end reward the Blasphemer of Europe according to his works.
ALVO NOS ALVEXSLEBEX. confidential friend
of the Kaiser, is coming back to Canada. We will let
him in on one consideration only. I Ie must sign a
bond that he will place upon every quarter section
of land held in 11. C. by himself and associates for
speculative purposes one family of German agriculturists���that within one year. He must further
promise to proceed forthwith in the development of
mineral and timber claims held by him in this province.
* 4   4
lh' ALVO IS pari or parcel of a German menace he
did his deadliest work in liritish Columbia during the
piping times of peace when he, with many a loyal
Britisher, engaged wholesale in the selling of subdivisions.
* #    4
AFTER THE WAR is over wc will benefit greatly
from a large immigration from Germany. Big Tim
Sullivan, the Tammany Leader, used to take the Alvo
von Alvenslebens into Xew York and make Mttrphys
and O'Rottrkes out of them. We'll take them into
liritish Columbia and make British Columbians of
them���loyal, true hearted British Columbians who
when the war drums beat again will line up with
their cousins from Berlin and Waterloo, Ontario, in
defence of the Union Jack.
*    #    ��
BRUSSELS, WHICH IS now in the hands of thc
Germans, has a population, according to the 1910
census, of 195,630, and with its suburbs 720,347. ll
is e>f this rich city that the Germans have made their
first  indemnity demands.    Forty  millions  of dollars
BY THE WAY
war imposition means $55 from every man, woman
or child or $250 from every family. And it will be
paid if Belgium is not protected by all. And for
what? That the gallant Belgians resisted the violation of her neutrality, guaranteed by the Kaiser. The
indemnity, we may be sure, will be collected, if the
Kaiser has the power, not only from Brussels but
from the 7,500,000 Belgians, the total population of
that kingdom. Only the power that Great Britain can
exert on land and sea will prevent this extortion by
the "Mailed Fist."
The Highgraders' Corner
Our Security
London  Morning Advertiser
We carry troubled faces in the present crisis, but
deep in our hearts we know that that long line of grey
monsters girdling the motherland is unbeatable.
*   4   4
Musl Be a Change
Rochester Post-Examiner
It is not inconceivable that after these nightmare
months are over, one man or two will ever again be
given power to set thc world on fire.
*   *   4
Cause of Kaiser's Madness
London   Morning  Advertiser
Somebody has discovered that there are a million
goats in Germany.    Perhaps this accounts for the
emperor's butting-in proclivities.
The Peace Movement vs. the War Movement: Which Will Prevail?
THE TOBACCO "HOLD-UP"
THE emergency session of Parliament at Ottawa
has completed its work for the time being and
who among the electors will say that they have not
done it nobly and well,
For the time being all semblance of politics was
cast aside and instead of having a government and
an opposition we were treated to the somewhat rare
spectacle of both sides of the house vicing with one
another in their support of thc motherland in the war
���Britain's war���Canada's war.
As was to be expected the time of the house was
almost wholly occupied in devising ways and means
of providing the necessary sinews of war in the shape
of finance.
The minister of finance with the assistance of thc
leading members of tbe government and the opposition met in conclave and devised a system of taxation
to meet the needs of the case and endeavored to find
a means of raising the money without unduly hurting
any section of the community at large.
That they succeeded very well is evident from the
way in which the finance minister's statement of the
new taxation was received.
If we except sugar the taxes were almost entirely
confined to what may be termed luxuries���albeit some
men will disagree with the idea^tftat smoking is a
luxury.
With the government's method of raising the money
we are in hearty accord but���when we come to the
point where we put our hands in our pockets and
pay, we have a kick coming and a mighty big
.one at that.
The extra tax on tobacco i$ something like a cent
a pound and yet what do we find when we go to pun-
chase the weed. The retailer tells you that owing to
the war tax the package you were in the habit of paying 10c or 15c for has now gone up an additional
five.
You expostulate with him, trying to show him the
utter absurdity of the transaction, but it is of no avail
���he even has the effrontery to tell you that he is making no more out of it than he formerly did.
LATEST SCHOOLBOY JOKE���"The Rainbow's
surrounded in the Pacific."   "What with?"   "Water."
* 4   4
THE TOTAL ABSTAIXERS are chuckling with
glee anent the war taxes on tobacco and whiskey.
* *   *
IT WOULD APPEAR as if the common domestic
hen had established a moratorium from the diminishing supply of eggs being trotted out.
* 4   4
WHAT HAPPENED to the oil company promoters when they allowed that seepage at English Bay
to become public before they sold any slock.
* *   *
THERE SEEMS TO BE some "sense" in the idea
of introducing "cents" in the coinage of liritish Columbia at this stage.
��   ��   #
WHAT IS HOME WITHOUT a package of Old
Chum. That extra five cents is likely to cause a
Dickens of a row.
* 4   4
.v'EXT WEEK THE Vancouver Exhibition will open
and the fat cattle, prize pigs, fast horses and plump
poultry will vie with the armies of the Allies for
space on the front pages.
* 4   ��
WE'LL TOLERATE pretty nearly anything in
South Vancouver, but running the price of Macdonald's chewin' up to fifteen cents a plug is goin' pretty
goi darned strong.
* *   4
BUT AS DRINKIXG whisky isn't a popular pastime
hereabouts they may run the price up to fifteen cents
a glass and then fifteen cents on top of that again.
* * 4
A REGIMENT WAS being recruited for active service abroad. Unmarried men only were accepted. An
office staff was being cut down because of tight money.
Unmarried men only were dismissed. Plainly, when
it comes to the firing line, the married chap has the
advantage.
4 4 4
SUGGESTION FOB THE Home Guard proposed by
the R. N. W. M. I', veterans���Colonel, Mayor liax-
ter; Major, Ex-mayor Finlay; Captains, Reeve Kerr,
South Vancouver; Reeve Fraser, Burnaby; Reeve
Churchill, Point Grey; Reeve Bridges', Richmond, and
thc Mayor of North Vancouver. Lieutenants might
be chosen from the various councils. Ex-reeve Bowser, chairman of the Joint Sewage Commission, might
be made quarter master. This line-up, with newspapermen as non-commissioned officers, would be hard
to beat. If the various dignitaries took with them
their liegemen, there would be little difficulty in securing a strength of a thousand or more.
* *   *
ONE EFFECT OF the great war will be the spreading of knowledge with regard to the countries of
Europe with which the average Canadian has but a
slight acquaintance. Among the Vancouver papers,
the News-Advertiser is doing a splendid service not
only by the careful way in which it presents accurate
war news, but as well by publishing many historical
articles which throw light on the causes of the present
war and tlie possible outcome. It is not difficult to
see that many of these articles are from the pen of
Mr. J. Francis Bursill, of Collingwood East, whose
knowledge of history won for him many years ago the
distinction of being made a rellow of the Royal Geographical Society. "In the Path of Napoleon," by
James A Morgan, which is featured in the Sunday
News-Advertiser, is a wonderful work. As its closing chapters draw near, Europe is again in the throes
of bloody war.
HUMAN impulse, ambition, and passion aside, the
world loves peace. War is an abnormal condition. Only those whose trade is wholesale killing,
whose chance of winning fame depends upon strife,
and those wdio are willing for the sake of gain to
make merchandise of the lives of their fellowmen, or
whose hearts are stirred by fierce passion, really desire war. The masses arc better pleased to have peace,
for it is upon peace that they thrive.
In this, therefore, as in many other things, conclusions are not reached through reason but by desire; the
wish is father to thc thought: men desire peace, hence
they see the future big with it.
But history, which repeats itself with great regularity, is largely made up of a record of wars, great and
small. In the thousands of years that the masses have
loved and wooed peace they have too often found only
ruthless, desolating war. One-eighth of the one hundred and thirty-eight years of our own national life has
heen spent iu war, saying nothing of thc border
troubles, Indian wars and our many strikes and riots
closely approaching war in their sacrifice of life and
destruction of property.
Much therefore as we all desire peace, what reason
have we to believe that conditions will be very different iu the future from what they have been in the past?
Are men becoming less fierce? The records of crimes
of violence do not seem to indicate it. Is humanity
growing less selfish? Thc history of "big business"
and the widening gulf between the masses and the
classes give us no reason to believe that this is so.
Are men more scrupulous and less ambitious than in
former generations? There is nothing to show any
such change, nor that men are any less ready now than
formerly "to ride through slaughter to a throne." In
short, human nature remains unchanged, and today
we see in things as they are and not as we might wish
them to be, little to indicate that the future history
of the world will be any more peaceful than its past.
Not until men come to love others as they do themselves can we hope that peace will prevail over war.
But we are not left to find the answer lo this question in the history of the past. We have also in the
prophetic word of God the history of the future, for
prophecy is only history in advance. Writing more
than twenty-five hundred years ago, of conditions at
they would exist in the lasl days, the prophet Jeremiah
exclaimed :
"My bowels, my bowels! 1 am pained at my very
heart; my heart inaketh a noise in me; I can not hold
my peace, because thou has heard, O my soul, the
sound of the trumpet, the alarm of war. Destruction
upon destruction is cried; for the whole land is spoiled."    Jer. 4:   19. 20.
What follows in close connection shows that the
prophet was speaking, not of his own time but of lhe
last days, for in verses 23-26 he says :
"I behold the earth, and lo, it was without form, and
void; and the heavens, and they had no light. I beheld the mountains, and, lo, they trembled, and all the
hills moved lightly. I beheld, and lo, there was no
man, and all the birds of the heavens were fled. I
beheld, and lo, the fruitful place was a wilderness, and
all the cities thereof were broken down at the presence
of the Lord, and by his fierce anger."
This shows clearly and positively that cruel, desolating war is to characterize the last days. Indeed
when the Lord himself conies he will find the armies
of earth engaged in deadly strife. The battle of Armageddon will be begun by men; it will be finished
by angels of God. Only the armies of Heaven will
"stand at Armageddon and battle for the Lord."
Those who at that time use carnal weapons fight
against God.
The apostle James describes another phase of the
strife that is to characterize the last days.   He says:
"Go to now, ye rich men, weep and howl for your
miseries that shall come upon you. Your riches are
corrupted, and your garments are motheaten. Your
gold and silver is cankered ; and the rust of them shall
bc a witness against you, and shall eat your llesh as
it were fire. Ye have heaped treasure together for
the last days. . . . Ye have lived in pleasure on
earth, and been wanton ; ye have nourished your hearts,
as in the day of slaughter. . . . lie patient therefore, breathren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold,
the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the
earth, and hath long patience for it until hc receive
the early and latter rain, lie ye also patient; establish
your hearts; for the coming of the Lord drawetli
nigh." James 5 ;   1 -<S.
It does not take a Bible student to see in these words
a prophecy of conditions as we know them to exist
in the world today, nor does it take a (rained ear to
hear the muttering of the coming storm. Oppression
has not reached its limit, neither has violence exhausted its resources. Speaking oi the same time and of
the same conditions the prophet Habakkuk says :
"Woe to him that increascth that which is not his f
how long?    .    . Shall not they rise up suddenly
that shall bite thee, and awake that shall vex thee, and
thou shalt be for booties unto them."   I lab. 2: 6,7.
It is folly to talk of peace between nations when the
units that compose the nations know no peace. The
Scriptures speak of this very principle. Says the prophet : "They have seduced my people, saying, Peace;
and there war. no peace." Eze. 13: 10. Again in
1 Thess. 5: 3 we are told that "when they shall say,
Peace and safety; then sudden destruction cometli
upon them."
It matters not how much men may talk of peace,
nor how many arbitration treaties are made, there is
a spirit of unrest in tlie world that means war. "The
words of his mouth were smoother than oil," says-
the Psalmist, "but war was in his heart." It is vain
to talk of peace while men's hearts are consuming with
that unrest that eventuates in thc war spirit. The
units of a nation must be at peace before the nation
itself can know real peace. Technically our own nation is at peace, but is it real peace? Ask the miners
of Colorado anil West Virginia. Ask the widows
and orphans of the men they have murdered in their
mad rage and in their vain elTorls to better their own
conditions. Yea, ask the idle thousands to be found
in every city, and they will all tell you nay.
Then turn to the over-taxed people of all the leading nations of earth and ask them if peace prevails.
They will point you to the millions of armed mere
withdrawn from the arts of peace to train for the
art of war. They will speak bitterly of the idle shipyards and of an insignificant merchant marine while
cruisers and battle-ships dot the seas and challenge
the world to a practical trial of high-power guns and
harveyized armor plate.
"The Peace Movement vs. the War Movement:
Which will Prevail ?" Let the facts answer the question. Which is prevailing despite the wide-spread desire for peace and the deceptive promises of peace?
"There is no peace, saith my God, for the wicked."'
The only hope of peace is in the coming and in the
reign of the Prince of Peace; but even then peace care
prevail only by the destruction of every power and
every agency that loves and makes for war. So far
as earthly powers are concerned, the war movement is
prevailing and will prevail until the present unrest and
strife shall culminate in the battle of Armageddon,,
which will be fought not by ballots but by bullets, not
between contending political factions striving for place
and power, but by real armies with real weapons in a
supreme and final test of strength, in the last contest
for the empire of the world. FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, AUGUST 29, 1914
MILK
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905 Twenty-fourth Avenue East
Phone Fairmont 2391 L PRICE & GREEN,  Proprietors
GLADSTONE   HOTEL
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Do You Know the "Ins" and
"Outs" of War
READ   THIS:   'TWILL TELL   YOU  EVERYTHING
Te> reach Paris, Germany has tee
iiiuve ber armies only the distance
between Vancouver and Ashcroft, if
she strikes via Alsace-Lorraine, or
tlie distance between Vancouver and
Seattle if she invades through Belgium.
Prance's chief military centre is on
the Alsaii-I.eeir.iinr lieereler in  Nancy.
Her chief military centre on the
Belgium beirder is Lille, and her central defensive post opposite Switzerland is  Beancon.
Hy turning the French map half
way are,iiinl. and covering it with the
Eastern states, Xancy would fall on
Xew Vork, Paris on Albany, Lille
wouhl about coincide with Boston
and Heanson with Allentown, Pa.
The French frontier has a triple
series of feertresses, between which
are twu wiele gaps, tei permit the Germans to come on.
The lirst leet e>f feirtresses runs from
Lille through Velenciennes to Mau-
heuge. Then freun Mauheugc for
about Hit) miles is a gap, which has
only subordinate defenses. The gap
ends ai Verdun.
The second defense line runs along
tiie Meuse river from Ver Dun to
Tout, on the Moselle.
Prom Tonl to Epinal, about 40
miles, is the second gap. ahnig the
Moselle.
Beginning at Epinal and running
to Belfeert and the Swiss frontier is
the   third   series   of   feirtresses.
Germany's attack must be delivered, therefore, through the Toul-Kp-
inal gap, eer through the Maubeuge-
Verduu gap, or else below Belfort
and' by  way of Switzerland.
By invading Belgium and Luxemburg. Germany apparently indicates
she has chosen the Maubeuge-Ver-
(luii gap as her principal route to
Paris.
This gap was criticised by Frenchmen last year as being too wide, and
not  having  sufficient  subordinate de-
feniei,
lhe military experts replied that
thc troops between La 1'ere anil Chalons could take care of all the Germans who wemld come through the
S^p.
ll was al��ei pointed1 out if the Germans invaded France that way, the
French  northern army at Lllle-Val-
eiicienues-Maubeuge would be able to
deliver Hank and  rear attacks.
The real reason whv the Maubeuge-
Verdun gap has been left Comparatively undefended by the French, is
said to have been to entice tlle German! to cross Belgium and by destroying the neutrality of the Belgian kingdom, force England to come
to  France1! assistance.
England couldn't afford to see Germany secure control of Belgium, because possession of the Belgian coast
would give tlle Germans an enormoui
advantage in striking at the English
coast.
England's interest in preserving
Belgium's neutrality is equal to America's in preventing a possibly hostile power seizing Cuba.
Germany's defenses ou her side of
the Alsace-Lorraine border, the only
place where the two countries join,
are as elaborate as the defenses on the
French side.
The chief centre is Metz. which
Marshall   Bazaine   surrendered  in   tlle
Franco-Prussian  war.
In the semth. Germany has just
finished new and secret fortifications
between Cedtnar and the Swiss frontier.
Xorth of Metz. Thionville and
Treves are fortified camps, and between them, at Saarburg, Germany
has built the finest strategic railway
station in the world for disembarking  her  troops.
There are \2 other strategic railway
stations between Cologne and the
Belgian   frontier.
Germany Before the War
There are political writers in British countries, who for the purpose of
inducing Britain to abandon her
splendid policy of trade freedom, have
been in the habit of quoting restricted1, taxed Germany as an example of
progress.
Protectionist German not only has
war on her hands, but shc has had
for months the unemployed problem
to  deal  with.
There are illuminating passages in
the consular report just published
(for 1913) for the disirict of Dresden.
It was a year of trade depression
���attributed to the Balkan war and
thc unemployed numbered, according to the census taken on October
12, 4,473, of whom 3,186 were men.
Out of this number 3,577 were able-
bodied persons, who would have been
at work but for the state of trade.
"In some of the federal States������
Bavaria, for instance," says the report, "the government gives money
grants to their communities, which
afford relief to unemployed, on whose
behalf the town of Dresden has spent
45,(100 marks."
It is noted' that this relief is only
given to married men, residents of
Dresden, who had been in steady employment previously for twelve
months. Moreover, those only are
to be regarded as unemployed whose
failure to find work kis solely due
to bad trade.    They must also prove
by a certificate���stamped daily by
tlle Central Employment Burneau���
that they have made efforts to obtain  work.
The extent of the actual distress
was obviously, therefore, only partially represented by the money spent
in  relief.
Olher indications of the failure of
the tariff to protect Dresden from
the ordinary vicissitudes of trade are
noted in the "diminished purchasing
power of the population, which was
very much fell by shops and factories." Another consequence was decreased coal consumption in the town.
"In order to counteract the dear-
ness of meat, experiments have been
made by the Dresden municipal authorities in importing frozen meat. A
special committee was appointed' to
obtain fresh beef from Denmark,
fresh pork from Russia, and fresh
frozen   mutton   from   Australia."
This is only an instance of what
has been general throughout thc
country.
We might go into taxation figures
and show the enormous burdens imposed on thc people in comparison
with the taxes in Britain. Time has
proven, anil time will prove, that
Britain's policy of liberty, in trade
as in other matters, is the sane, solid
policy that makes for the upbuilding
of a  great  nation,
BEFORE SEDAN
(By Austin Dobion)
"The dead hand clasped a letter."���
Special Correspondence, Sept. 1, 1870.
Here is this leafy place,
Quiet hc lies,
Cold,  with   his  sightless   face
Turned to lhe skies;
Tis but another dead;
All you can say is said.
Carry   his   body   hence,
Kings   must   have  slaves;
Kings  climb  to eminence
Over  men's  graves;
So  this  man's eye  is dim;���
Throw the earth over him.
What   was   the   white   you   touched,
There, at  his side?
Paper  his  hand  had  clutched
Tight   ere   he   died;���
Message  or  wish,  may  be;���
Smooth out the folds and see.
Hardly the worst of us
Here   could   have   smiled!���
Only   the   tremulous
Words   of   a   child;���
Prattle, that had for stops
Just a  few   ruddy  drops.
Look.    She  is  sad  to  miss,
Morning  and  night,
His���her  dead   father's���kiss;
Tries   to  be  bright,
Good' to  mamma, and  sweet.
That is all.    "Marguerite."
Ah, if beside the deail
Slumbered   the   pain!
Ah, if the hearts that bled
Slept with the slain!
If   the   grief   died;���But   nei;���
Death  will  not  have it so.
Vancouver Exhibition Notes
Vancouver's Exhibition will be
opened as announced. There will be
no change in the plans of tbe Exhibition Association because of the
war. Only a very serious reverse to
the British arms, in fact, nothing
short of a great international disaster can now stop the holding of the
Vancouver Exhibition. The directors and management of the Vancouver  Exhibition  have  sufficient  confi
dence in Britain's arms to believe
that ni) such great disaster will occur. The decision to proceed with
plans for the Exhibition is final. It
virtually amounts to a vote of confidence on the war-lords of lhe Triple
Entente, So from now on there will
be busy days in llie Exhibition offices.
Entries arc literally pouring in
from all over the country from as
far south as California and as far
north as Nome, Alaska.
The big Dominion Agricultural display shown at the Toronto Exhibition
this year and to bc shown al the Victoria Exhibil this year, will be shown
in Vancouver this year. The plans
for the Vancouver Exhibition this
year arc vastly more ambitious than
any previously laid out. More than
sixty thousand dollars will be expended in cash prizes and when thc
value of the gold and silver medals
and special prizes are taken into consideration, the prize list will represent an aggregate expenditure of
around one hundred thousand dollars.
Messages assuring the Pacific
Coast and Canadian papers that thc
Exhibition would open on time as
per announcement were sent out last
week. So in a few days time
the Vancouver Exhibition will
open witb an elaborate ceremony
and nothing but a German ship ii
Vancouver's harbor could stop th
Exhibition now.
A Presentation
It will be remembered that some
weeks ago a complimentary concert
was given to Mr. J. Francis Bursill
at the Collingwood Institute. Madame Losier on that occasion sang
"Here! a Ho, Vancouver," for which
she got a splendid reception. As a
memento of the occasion Madame
Losier has sent to the institute a
large portrait of herself clad in appropriate costume and singing the
song. The picture"-is a real work of
art beautifully framed and the central figure is so placed amid leafy
surroundings, that the picture will be
sure to remind one of the Pauline
Johnson, the poetess who wrote the
so"S- .......
SIX   REASONS
WHICH ACCOUNT FOR THE SUPERIORITY OF
CREOSOTED WOOD
BLOCK PAVEMENTS
ITS DURABILITY���Does not crumble or pulverize under the densest traffic; second only to granite
blocks
ITS EASE OF REPAIR���No difficulty being experienced in removing and replacing the blocks; no
expensive plant or skilled workmen required.
ITS SANITARY QUALITIES���Creosote being a
highly antiseptic and waterproofing material instantly destroys all germs, prevents the absorption of
street filth and consequent decay.
ITS NOISELESSNESS���The rattle and bang of
vehicles passing over its srnuoth surface absorbed
and muffled till the quiet of the dire toad is obtam-d.
ITS DUSTLESSNESS���Does not pulverize; the
heaviest traffic only pounding down the wood fibres
to offer the greater resistance.
ITS CLEANLINESS���Having a smooth surface and
being waterproof it does not differ in this respect
from asphalt.
We manufacture blocks of the highest possible
standard, the verv best materials only being used and
in the DOMINION WOOD BLOCKS we believe
we produce an article that has no equal.
DOMINION CREOSOTING
 COMPANY LIMITED	
Vancouver, B. C.
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
MEMBERS VANCOUVER STOCK EXCHANGE
MEMBERS VANCOUVER GRAIN EXCHANGE
MEMBERS OF CALGARY OIL EXCHANGE
DEALERS IN ALL ACTIVE CALGARY STOCKS, BONDS, ETC.
OIL STOCKS
BOUGHT  AND  SOLD
Stock Department, Seymour 6913
EXCHANGE BUILDING, 142 HASTINGS WEST
The Terminal Steam Navigation Co.
Limited
HOWE SOUND ROUTE
SS. "BALLENA"
leaves Union Dock
at 9.15 a.m. daily,
Sunday at 10.30 a.m.,
for Britannia Mines
and Newport.
SS. "BOWENA"
leaves Union Dock at
9.15 a.m. daily, Sunday
at 10.30 a.m., for
llowen Island, Britannia Mines, l'ortcau,
Mill Creek. (Anvil
Island, Mon., Wed.,
and  Sat.)
SS.   "BRITANNIA"
leaves the Union Dock
at 9.15 a.m. daily for,
Gt. Northern Cannery,!
Caulfeilds, Eagle Har-(
hor, Fisherman's Bay,:
Hindlcy's, Eagle Cliff,.'
lnvercraig. (Horseshoe
Eay,  Tucs.and  Fri.)
These trips afford passengers a magnificent view of (he scenery
among the islands and glaciers all day. Do not miss these trips.
$1.00 round trip, good for day of issue only. For information phone
Seymour 6330.
HIGH-GRADE
=cs*=
BUILDING MATERIALS
Boultbee-Johnson & Company, Ltd.
Johnson's Wharf
Phone : Sey
. W4S
i ���
B A
S
E
BALL
Week of August 31 to September 5
Vancouver vs. Taeoma  '""";.
ATHLETIC PARK 5th and HEMLOCK
South End Granville St. Bridge
Games start week days, 4 p.m. Saturdays8? fcrrf.' SATURDAY, AUGUST 29, 1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
1-TVK
Hastings
and
Gore Ave.
EMPRESS
Lawrence & Sandusky, Lessees
MA TINEES WEDNESDA Y and SA TURD A Y
Phone
Sey. 3907
Week Commencing Monday Evening, August 31,1914
l"i ft li   and   concluding   week   of
Mr. LAWRANCE D'ORSAY
With The DEL. S. LAWRENCE    STOCK    COMPANY
When he will appear in his new  play by  Salisbury  Field
The Rented Earl
Absolutely   its   first  production    on    any    stage
Prices 25c and 50c
Matinees 25c Any Seat
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
All the Latest in Motion Pictures
Sometimes  a  thrill,   sometimes  a   smile,   always   pictures  you  are
pleased to see, always a sure entertainment
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   DEAN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
ALL THE BEST AND NEWEST   IN   MOVING   PICTURES
MATINEE   SATURDAY AT 2 p.m.
Cedar   Cottage   Theatre
"THE HOUSE THAT PLEASES"
20th Avenue and Commercial Street
SATURDAY MATINEE. 2 to 5
... We show the best, cleanest and most up to date pictures with a
complete change daily.
COME AND  SEE
Evans,   Coleman   &   Evans,   Ltd.
IF  YOU  WANT  AN ECONOMICAL   FUEL
WHEN   PLACING   YOUR  NEXT   ORDER,   ASK   FOP.
AUSTRALIAN COAL
EVANS,  COLEMAN &  EVANS
Limited
Phone 2988
Foot of Columbia Avenue
t
/LX 3'hi W^ tytMttk
Mr. Lawrance D'Or say at the Empress
Miss Horton, of 79 32nd Avenue
East, has returned home after her
two weeks vacation at Bowen Island.
Miss Dawson, of 28th Avenue and
Prince Edward St. spent the last
week with her and both feel much
benefitted  by  the  change.
Building Inspector Hubbard is with
his regiment, the Irish Fusiliers, under canvas at  Exhibition Park.
*    *    ���
Five pupils from the vicinity of
Van Home School are going to Gor-
uon High School.
THEATRICAL
Emprers Theatre
For next week's .,(TerinK al the Empress rheatre, Messrs. Lawrence &
Sandusky Mk,- pleasure in announcing ilie- real sensation of the seat in
"I he Rented Karl." It will be the
first production on any itage of Mr
Lawrence D'Orsay'i newest play
written expressly for him.
The play was written by Mr  Salis-
| bury Field, the well-known play-
w��8ht, and author of "The Twin
Beds, and other very successful
Plays, li had been the previous intent!.m ol both author anel star to
mve "The Rented Earl" its premiere
in  New York City, but by Mr. D'Or-
t lay i expn ised desire, it will make
il- first appeal here in Vanee.uver.
anel on the Empress Itage, anel Mr
Field, with a number .,f his friends!
well known in the theatrical we,rid
will leave New Y.,rk in two or three
days. crossing lhe entire continent tei
; see this piece put een.
The strongest possible call will be
seen in the lUpport of Mr. D'Orsay.
Mr. Del. Lawrence will fiave a pan
ni the production, and Mrs. D'Orsay.
who accomoanied her huiband here
and i�� a well-known and popular Eng-
i lish  actress,  will   have  a  prominent
i rele.
. We might mention thai with "The
Rented Karl" Mr. D'Orsay'i engagement closes, and as he has already
contracted his services for several
seasons ahead, ii will be years before we shall have the pleasure eef wit-
ncssing him perform in Vancouver
ana in.
"The Rented Earl" will, with Mr.
D'Orsay heading the company, be
put "ii the' coming season, at a Broadway theatre, and please take note at
Broadway prices, while al the Empress Theatre lure, despite the importance of the- event, there will be
no increase in  the price  of seats.
Seat- for "Tin- Rented Karl" and
closing week of Mr. D'Orsay's engagement, may be booked one week
;,,   ...i ���
Pantages Theatre
The hcadliner t"r the ihow that
comes t" Pantages thi- week promises
to be one of the besl musical tabloids ' vet shown on thi Pantagei
circuit. It comel under the name eef
"Tiie Jolly Tars." and the company
is headed by Pony Moore, well-
known character in vaudeville. Miss
Moore hai in her act a delightful little- -i-ery woven round some catchy
inu-ie, and she -els e.tT llie entire offering with some unusual icenic effects.
The real thriller on the bill is Love
and Wilbur, acrobats. Tluy have
been termed the "Flying Meteor" and
"Aerial Venus." and they are said I"
be rightfully named. They will be
seen in a sensational acrobatic acl in
whieh they will introduce some new
j thrills.
Thc music-loving patrons will have
the opportunity of hearing what i-,
! said te. be a novel treat in Gilbert
Cirarel, mimic, Girard i- eme oi the
cleverest em thc stage. He has been
rightfully   dubbed   the  "human   clar-
i  tte,"   anel   his   ability   tee   imitate
musical instruments is saiel to be wonderful. The feature- of his aet is a
���election 'en his imitation aeolian
harp.
The comedy of tlie- bill is promised
by Coogan and Cox. They are singers and have -emu- whieh have- kept
other audiences in continual laughter.
When it comes to dancing, they are
perhaps the best couple that have
been sei n lure for Borne time. Cox
is an  eccentric  dancer.
The "added' attraction" promisci
t.i be a treat. It is Winsch anel Poore
ill a musical playlet entitled "No
Trespassing." Both principals can
sinje and 'lance- above the average and
the   icenic   effects   arc   pleasing.
LOCALS
Harold Harkness, drummer feer the
72nd Highlanders' band, left here at
/eeur o'clock Saturday afternoon fur
Quebec.
* *      st
Sergeant II. J. Pike also went Sat-
urda).
rr      St       st
A number of other officers expect
tn leave shortly.
* *    ��
The Lacy Refrigerator Manufacturing Company, at Se.uth Hill, is om
e.i the new additions te. the industrial
community in South Vancouver. Tin-
is a concern which employs a Large
number of men steadily and i- a real
|asset to the community, Mr. Jeihn
ll Lacy is the managing director ami
a capable business man.
.    *    .
Ex-councillor Edward Gold has
drawn the attention ot the CHINOOK
t" the facl that in the announcement
last week that Se.uth Vancouver
would not hold a tax sale, no mention was made of the itrenuous efforts put forward by himself while
in the council to postpone a tax sale.
"When the pre,],'.-iti-,ii to hold a
tax sale came up." said llu- ex-councillor. "1 t'eeught against It, My enemies accused me eef being selfish and
wishing only to advance my own
ends." said lie. "It was true that I
wa- in arrears in the payment of taxes. However, my efforts were on
behalf of the small holders. The
tax sale hael been proposed up
to and inclusive of 1911, All our
taxe- hael been paid up t" and inclusive of 1911. It i- creditable t"
Seeuth Vancouver that it is nut neces-
>arv   at   this lime   t-.   hold a  tax   sale
PANTAGES
Unequalled      Vaudeville       alcana      Paatagr*
Vaudevnlc
E.  D.  Graham,  Resident  Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
ALL NEXT WEEK
Pony' Moore
AND  HER
"Jolly Tars"
Three   shows   daily    2.45,   7.20,   9.15
Admission���Matinees,      15c;     nights,
15c and 25c; boxes,  50c.
Hamilton  Bros.
Embalmers and Funeral
Directors
Parlors and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Office Phone:    FRASER 19
Residence Phone:    FRASER 25
(Day or night)
and I think that se.nic of thc credit
i- due elsewhere than t', the municipal council as it now1 -tan.!-." he con-
cluded.
Patriotic Citizens of Collingwood
The spirit of loyalty is not lacking in Collingwood. Among the
Collingwood recruits for active
service, well known in the district
are : Mr. Fred Cocroft, who is a
South Vancouver veteran; Mr.
Frank Rutledge, son of Councillor
Rutledge; Policeman J. H. Flack;
Capt. Gray, of No. 2 Firehall, who
is a sergeant in the 72nd; Sergt. E.
Langford, H. Conway, W. Flack,
John Tripp, Geo. Jack, R. Kerr,
Herbert Osborne, Alf. Dady, W.
Hope, Percy Holland. Victor Baker, Fred and Harry Iggulden, W.
Hays. H. Norman, F. Price, W.
Price, R. Preston, W. Jones. H.
Arbone and  Harold  Powell.
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM  /ANCOUVER TO
ALL r-MRTS OF THE
WORLD
The Pop'jlar Route t" the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
tu
Up-to-date Train  Service between Vancouver and the East.
All  trains equipped m<h Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W.  BRODIE,   Gen.  Pass  Agent,  Vancouver.
10&
SYS?-6*1
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
H.  G.  Smith.   C. P. & T. A.
Phone I   Sey.  8134
C.  V   Jermey,  G. A. P. D.
It| Cranville Sir��et
Mr. James  Tait
The above portrait will be- recog-
nized as Mr. Jim Tait nf Collingwood |
East, who rendered yentnan service
at the Patriotic Concert in Kalenberg Hall nn Thursday night anil
whu is arranging a Patriotic Concert at Collingwood on  Friday, Sept.
18.     Mr.   Tait   is   organizer   and   enn-
ductor e.f the Collingwood Choral Society  and  conductor oi    the    South
Vancuuver Citizens'  Band, and he is
al.se, organist nf the Kims  Presbyterian   Church  and  is  well   known  as  a
teacher  nf the  violin  and  pianaforte
and choral music.    Mr. Tait's choir
did  splendid  service  at  tlie   Pageant |
Concerl  at  the  Horse  Show   Building.     We   shall   next   week   give   a i
sketch   of   his   choir   and   a   full   an- I
iiiitiuecnient of the Collingwood I'at-
rintic Concert,
The   Excelsior   club   of   Mountain
View   Sunday   School   held     an     Ice
cream   social   on   Thursday,   August'
27th.   afternoon   and   evening.    The
yuung   ladies   had   three   booths   freem
which they served he nne made candy,
cakes and ice cream. A very enjoyable time was spent. All hope thc
pmiiis will be enough t" encourage
the   girls  tn  trv  again.
��    *    *
Mrs.   Saunders  and  baby  returned
home Saturday. Mrs. Saunders has a
great many friends here, having lived in Cedar Cnttage feir some years.
She now resides at  llazclmere,  B.C.
Anderson Market
The Family Butcher at
the Sanitary Shop
Try our mild cured Hams and
Bacons, machine sliced.
The place to get your Cooked
Hams and Jelly Tongue.
Don't forget we carry the finest
New Zealand Butter and Local
Eggs.
FOR  A  SQUARE  DEAL  AND
QUALITY, TRY
J. E. ANDERSON
Prop.
Tel. Fair 1634
4192 If AIN STREET
Su
mmer
Race Meeting
AT
MINORU PARK
A BIG SOCIETY FEATURE
��� ���        ������
��� ���        ������
EVERY DAY
Special Trains leave new Granville Street
Station at   12,  12.30, and   every   fifteen
minutes until 2 o'clock
ADMISSION, $1.25, Including Grandstand and Transportation
Ladies Admitted Free except on Saturdays
Races Rain or Shine SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, AUGUST 29, 1914
COAL -
No. 1 NUT
FAMOUS
JINGLE POT
77
$7.25 per ton
$6.75   ���
We are supply contractors to all of South Vancouver's Schools
COAST LUMBER & FUEL CO., LIMITED
4905 ONTARIO STREET (Cor. Bodwell Road)
Phone Fraser 41
WE ARE
Liberals
IN THE SENSE OF GIVING
FULL AND
LIBERAL
VALUE FOR MONEY. WE
WORK ON THE SMALLEST
POSSIBLE MARGIN OF
PROFIT BECAUSE WE
KNOW PRICE IS THE
GREAT QUESTION ON
WHICH YOUR FINAL VERDICT WILL REST.
Frank Newton
FAMILY
SHOE   STORE
82-j   GRANVILLE  ST.
AND AT
CEDAR   COTTAGE
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can  supply your  needs at right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right at  Station)
FOR GOOD
ROAD BUILDING MATERIAL
We claim we have the best.
The largest Plant and a downstream haul.
GILLEY BROS., Limited
Dealers in
Coal, Cement, Plaater, etc.
NEW WESTMINSTER
Phone 15-16
CENTRE & HANNA
LIMITED
Established 1893
Refined Service    New Location
1049 GEORGIA ST.
Opposite new Y. M. C. A.
Fireproof     Columbarium     and
Mausoleum
OPEN   DAY  AND  NIGHT
Seymour 2425
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandy has nae true doobts aboot the   Kaiser  bein'  a   darned  sight
worse than  he's ca'd
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for public meetings,  dances,  etc.,  to  Let
Apply W. J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
Weel freens, I guess yaell be like
mysel this weather, yaer thochts a'
centred on the war.
There's nae use tryin' tac discuss
onything else when yaer talkin' tae
onybody, ior as sune as yae meet
them that's the lirst subject they introduce.
I notice there's wan or twa apologists appearing in the papers on behalf ei' the Kaiser. They're tryin' tae
mak oot that he's no' responsible for
the war���that the common folk o'
Germany urged him on se, that he
couldna restrain  them ony longer.
They mak a great sang ahoot the
wey he hae encouraged manufacturin'
an' a' kins o' industry in Germany an'
wud mak oot that his sole endeavor
was aimed at makin1 the German worker weel aff.
Thc writers dinna tell yae that wi'
a' lhe so-ca'd encouragement o' industry the German worker is in a
very much inferior poseeshun tac his
brither across the North Sea baith in
comfort an' in the measure o' independence they hae.
Noo as I size up this son of a gun,
it's no' wi' ony thocht o' servin' the
workin' man directly that he's been
sae anxious tae capture a' the industry he could lay haunds on, but wi'
the sole ambeeshun o' gettin' the necessary sinews o' war in the shape o'
thc bawbees for tae cairry oot his
warlike purposes.
My answer tae these apologists is
that they're talkin' through their hat.
Onybody that has lived in the auld
country durin' the last fifteen years
or so an' followed the ravin's an'
rantin's o' that high-binder (thc ruler
by divine  right as  hc yince  had  the
d d cheek tae ca' himsel) kens fu'
weel that it's' him an' him alone that
has been responsible for Ihis huge
tragedy.
Yae only need tac look at ony foty-
graf ii' thc beggar tae ascertain for
yersel his nature. Wi' his very much
cultivated, curled up whuskers, an' the
hard, brutal look o' his e'en wan wudna need tae be telt what he wis���a
tyrant o'  the tyrants.
1 dinna ken if ony o' you folk hae
had thc honor���or dishonor maybe
wud bc thc proper word���o' seein'
this teuchtcr.
I min' o' seein' him on wan occasion at Leith efter his return frae
Balmoral on a vcesit tac the late
Queen   Victoria.
A chum an' mysel were doon there
for a double purpose���we were gaun
tae fish for rbmnders at the end o thc
east pier an' wi' the intenshun o'
seein' the royal yacht which was
lyin' oot  in  I.eith  roads.
We had nae noshun that he wis
gaun aboard that nicht until we saw
the preparashuns bein' made by the
authorities an' the steam launches
gettin' ready tae tak his nabs on
board.
Wc had jist time tat kC intae a
guid poseeshun when the launches
put off. There wis aboot hauf a
dizen o' them, a' painted white except wan an' that yin wis the boat
containin' his  serene majesty.
They passed doon atween the twa
piers an' we had a fine view o' them.
Never will I forget the look o' utter
contempt, as it seemed tae us, that
beggar had on his face as the launch
made its wey oot tae the ship.
Hc occupied a poseeshun by himsel
on deck, wi' his hack up agin the
superstructure that covered the engine hoose. The crood wis cheerin'
tae hate the baund, the sully beggars,
but nary a smile or a wave o' the
haunil did Wilhclni deign to return.
I thocht he wis the maist conceited
pup  I   ever saw.
lie can hae as mony apologists as
he likes among his toadies, but yaell
never get an auld country man tae
believe that this war wis brocht a-
be)ot by onything else than the vanity an' uncontrollable ambeeshun o'
this survivor o' the dark ages. Hooever, there's nae true doobts aboot it
he'll get what's coniin' tac him this
time.
Things hinna been gaun owre braw
for the allies this week but efter a'
this is only tae be expected in a
campaign sic as this where yae side
has had its plans cut an' dried for
years an' years back.
Hooever, thc Kaiser an' his advisers wi' a' their plans an' millyuns
o' sodgcrs maunna forget that they're
fechtin' a different lot than the disorganized muh they encountered in
the Franco-Prussian war.
When I hear a man talkin' an' be-
wailin' the fact that the allies hae
had a slight reverse, sic as at Namur,
1 jist tell him tac hould his whcesht|
���that's naethin', it's a' in the game,
an' when the war's fcenished an' the
heid hoch in a padded cell we'll forget a' aboot  it.
Vac min' the wey he used tae blaw
an' bounce aboot his navy tae.
Whenever a German battleship wis
launched he cleared his throat an'
gave us wan o' they high-falutin'
talkfcsts aboot the German empire
an' its emperor, an' extolled the bravery o' his sailors.
They're provin' thmesels a brave
lot. They hae jist as muckle fecht in
them as a spring cockerel ,vi' ils neck
rung.
"Thev   may   build   their   ships,   my
lad,
And think they know the game;
But  they  can't  build  the  boys  of
the bulldog breed1
That made old Britain's name."
Xoo freens, Sandy's nae booster
for war, but in this wan instance I'm
in wi' them haunil an' fit tae sec that
shyster fas Eddie Gold wud ca' him)
get his deserts.
Nae fear aboot whae's gaun tae
won. Onybpdy that thinks that the
Lads in Navy Blue an' Tommy Atkins wud ever permit that (can
yae gie mc some ither stronger ad-
jective tae use than shyster) tae
humiliate them needs tae be taken
in haund an' gien a lesson in history
Go to it boys an' knock the "hochs'
ool o' him. He's a darned sight worse
rlian he's even made oot tac bc.
Yours through the heather,
SANDY  MACPHERSON
SPEND THOUSANDS  OF
DOLLARS  FOR  EXHIBITION
European Situation and Consequent
Depression Only Served to Spur
Vancouver Exhibition Management
to Greater Endeavors���Serious
Shortage of Prize Lists
ate a finer Fair than was ever opened
previously   in   British   Columbia.
So an order for eighty thousand
prize lists went forward to the printers right away and today that big
order has already proven to be too
small so that the management is asking for the return of some of those
mailed out earlier in the summer, It
is too late to have more printed as
Exhibition entries closed on August 20.
Of the Fair itself, the Exhibition
Association's news bureau announces
that every department is nearly ready
for thc reception of the thousands of
exhibits which will bc displayed. Both
the Dominion and the British Columbia government! will spend several thousand dollars on exhibits
Every  phase  of   British  Columbia's
Commercial, industrial, professional,
art anil educational life will bc represented. Prizes totalling a value
of one hundred thousand dollars are
offered   for   competition,
The Exhibition grounds are large
enough to hold one hundred thousand people at one time with ease and
thc walks are large enough, the buildings roomy enough and accommodations big enough te, take care of this
little army without any trouble.
Every day, from September 3 to
September 12, is to be a big day.
Every night will  be a big night.
Thousands and thousands of dollars are being expended this year by
the Vancouver Exhibition management tei make an Exhibition which
will exceed any other show of the
kind ever held In Western Canada.
These big expenditures are backed by
hard work on the part of directors,
management and the large staff of
Exhibition employees. Everybody is
helping Vancouver to put on a big
Fair and the development of tiie European war situation in the last few
days with its consequent depressing
effect has only spurred the management on.
The effect of the early start made
this year, the cumulative endeavors
of previous years and the policy of
boosting by every conceivable method and on every possible occasion
has resulted in a tremendous demand
for prize lists. This has been taken
as indicative of the success of thc
Exhibition.
Last year some fifty thousand prize
lists were printed by the Exhibition.
A few score were left on the hands
of the management. This year, starting early and with everything to
favor them until the war broke out,
the Exhibition directors determined
to make a tremendous effort to excel
themselves in  every way and to cre-
Stone-throwing   in   the   Municipality
Considerable annoyance has been
experienced1 in the municipality of
late hy some of the younger generation indulging themselves in the dangerous and destructive pastime of
stone-throwing.
Especially is this the case at 25th
Avenue and Main Sireet, where the
youngsters arc making themselves a
nuisance and have already caused
damage   in   breaking   a   window   next
lo the Dreamland Theatre.
People passing up and down the
street are very much annoyed and it
is hoped that the youngsters will take
heed   and   stop   this   dangerous   habit.
FOR
Sashes, Doors,
Windows, and
all  kinds  of
Mill   Work
SEE
^
Mrs
R. If. Ilorrell was unexpected*
ly called to Spokane, where her
daughter, Mrs. Allen, formerly of
Soulh Vancouver, now resides, Mrs.
Allen has undergone a serious operation, hut is recovering very rapidly.
Mrs. Ilorrell expects to visit relatives
in Phoenix, B. C. before returning
when she will bring hcr grandson,
Donald   Allen,  home  with  hcr.
The Rev. Mr. Collings will occupy
the pulpit of Knox Presbyterian
Church, Collingwood East, on Sunday  at  both   services.
The Westminster Presbytery will
meet in Knox Church, Collingwood
East, on Tuesday, September 1, instead of September 8, as previously
arranged. The ladies of the congregation will provide luncheon.
H. N. WALKER
167 TWENTIETH AVE. W.
We   iiave  the  most  up-to-date
machinery.
All Doors, Windows and Sashes
morticed.
We  guarantee  all  our  work.
PRICES RIGHT
Call  and see us���We  put you
wis^
Phone Ffirmont 836
ESTIMATES GIVEN
JCS. H. BOWMAN
ARCHITECT
910-U    YORKSHIRE    BLDG.
SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER
Tlu
An Illustrated Lecture
people   of   Collingwood
East
will be glad to know that Mr. Bursill
is preparing an illustrated lecture on
the war and is engaged by the proprietor of one of the Vancouver picture theatres to lecture on the European struggle. The title of Mr. Bursill's lecture will be War On a White
Sheet.
THE
Social and Dance
We wish to draw attention to thc
social and dance which will take
place at the Collingwood Institute
on Tuesday night. On this occasion
some professional dancers from Vancouver will attend and1 give some flag
and  other  patriotic  dances.
Mill:   Foot of Ontario Street, Fraser River
Phone :   Fraser 97
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
CANADIAN   CEDAR
LUMBER CO.
Manufacturers of
BEVEL  SIDING,  BOAT  LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
Wholesale and Retail
GRIMMETT P. O., SOUTH VANCOUVER
P. M. HAMILTON F. WILLIS
VANCOUVER
EXHIBITION
Will  be formally opened on  the  night  of
PT   SEPTEMBER 3   -p
With Suitable and Appropriate Ceremonies
It  will  Close  the night of   September   12
Those Nine Exhibition Days
will be Big Days
Every  Night   will   be   a
Big  Night
VANCOUVER EXHIBITION ASSOCIATION
H. S. ROLSTON, General Manager 424 Pacific Building

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