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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Mar 22, 1913

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Array T&fcm* CHINOOK
* A   Half   Millir.n   In    1Q17
Vol. I., No. 45
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  CANADA, SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 1913
Price 5 cents
Fertile Fraser Valley,
The Garden of British Columbia
Opening Up of This District a Boon to Greater Vancouver
���What the Valley is Capable of Producing
For fertility of soil and variety of
its agricultural products there arc
few, if any, districts of thc same extent which surpass the Fraser Valley.
Comparisons while often "odious"
from personal points of view, are
sometimes helpful when they relate
to material conditions. They constitute the barometer of a country's
progress. Comparing, therefore, the
Fraser Valley, which is the agricultural hinterland and garden of Greater Vancouver, with other districts of
British    Columbia,    its    pre-eminent
position is undoubted,
In a recently issued bulletin of the
Provincial Government, the average
production per acre of grain, hay,
roots, etc., in the various districts of
British Columbia in 1911 is given.
These districts are the following: Islands (Alberni, Comox, etc.); Lower
Mainland (Fraser Valley); Thompson River Watershed (Ashcroft,
Kamloops, etc.); Northern (Cariboo,
Hazelton, etc.); Dry  Belt and Boun-
Small fruits such as strawberries,
raspberries and currants find a congenial soil and climate in Mission,
Hatzic and the Maple Ridge districts.
Those fruits, indeed, reach the Vancouver market about two or three
weeks earlier than from any other
part of the province, such as the
Okanagan Valley. Early apples, pears
and plums arc also being now extensively and most successfully cultivated in both the lower and upper
Fraser Valley. In Chilliwack and adjacent territory the growing of small
fruit has reached a high water mark,
and Vancouver can take all that is
yet produced. The difficulty, indeed,
is that Vancouver can not get a sufficient supply of fruit or market garden produce from thc Fraser Valley
to even approach the demand. That
condition, of course, is largely a matter of inadequate transportation
facilities as regards some districts,
but is also caused by lack of enterprise on the part of land owners.
Sewerage Commissioner
It is now announced that a Sewerage Commissioner has to be
appointed from each of the municipalities interested. As a certain
salary is attached to the office and the duties will be light, we consider
that at this time the Council will only be making recognition of the
sterling qualities of Reeve Kerr, by appointing him as their Commissioner. The duties of Commissioner will in no way conflict with his
civic duties as Reeve of South Vancouver, and as he has shown himself a man capable of undertaking such duties, the Council will only
be showing their commonsense by making such an appointment.
Brilliant Scene at St. Patrick's
Night Fancy Dress Carnival
Patron Saint of Ireland Fittingly Honored at Collingwood
Function���A Kaleidoscope of Color
SETTLEMENT OUT OF COURT j    WARD VII CONSERVATIVES
The charge against William Yates,
of Cedar Cottage, of stealing a
Pomeranian deeg, the property of Jennie Craig, has been withdrawn by
consent of all parties concerned. Mr.
Campbell, who appeared for thc defence, said his client only wanted
compensation feer what he had expended and fe,r services rendered. It
was decided to call in a third partv
with Mr. Campbell and Mr. R. L.
Maitland, Jr.. who prosecuted, t<> decide what the owner of the dog
should pay. upon the de>g being hand-
eel back  to her.
A meeting of the Ward Seven Conservative Club was held at the North
Arm School, River Road, under the
presidency of Mr. H. B. A. Vogel.
Addresses were given by Reeve
Churchill eef Point Grey, and Mr.
Cluxton, president of thc Richmond
Central Conservative Association.
The meeting then went int<> the
question "f the registration eif voters,
anil arrangements were made t,i secure as far as possible the registration of all Conservatives in the ward,
A further meeting will be held em
March  26.
"There was a sound eef revelry by
night." Really one ought to u-e the
poetic language e.f Byron to ele, jns-
tice tei the gay. festive and brilliant
St. Patrick Night festival at the Collingwood Institute. Mr. and Mrs.
Price, Mr. and Mrs. Musto, Miss
Sutherland, Miss Peggy Muirhead
and all whee teeok part in the arrangement musl be heartily congratulated
nu a splendid success. The pretty
little hall was decorated with hund-
dreds of colored streamer-, green
predominating. Mr. J. W. Burness
must be thanked for his skill and
taste as will as his generosity in making these. The committee provided
excellent refreshments, the Pierce
Orchestra played charming music, Mr.
Langford contributed capital songs,
and from abemt 8 until sume In ear-,
later (no matter heew many) all went
"merry as marriage bells," and the
best -ert e,f bells at that. The company numbered over 200 and nearly
all  we.re  fancy dress.   Cold black and
R.   Kerr       Negro   Minstrel
Mr-    II.   I.   P.,well       Spring
V. C.  Russell   .. Jacobean Gentleman
Chas.   Caldwell       Pierrot
F.  Cocroft      "An  Irish  Mick"
C. Holme       Sailor
Zelda Traer   "Buster Brown"
Mi--   Dobson       Sunflower
Mr. L. C, Salter "The world at peace"
(This deserves special mention for
the ingenious construction of the
decorated battle-hip and the splendid
array  'if small  flags)
Mr-.   Muirhead       Spanish  lady
L.  G.  Fowler     Jap
Mrs.   I,.   Ilattan...   Little girl in pink
Mrs.   Sullivan       Saihir  girl
Reise   Wilton        Irish   colleen
Margaret   Anderson         Pierrette
Miss  Muirhead      Fortune teller
Louie   Pegg       Fairy
Mrs.   Hutcnins       A   geisha   girl
Mrs. J, Jones   \  Sp;eni-h lady
D. Rogers        Mexican   toreador
Mrs. C. J. Bond      Mexican lady
E. Barron       "Bridge"
Today lhe Forests
Primeval Line the
Shores of the North
Arm of the Fraser
River -��� There are
Few Industries on
the Broad, Fresh
Water  Stream.
What Will the
Future Have for the
North Arm ? Close
Observers Say The
Awakening is at
Hand. Here are the
Only Cheap Industrial Sites in Greater
Vancouver.
North Arm of the Fraser River from Mitchell's Island
dary (Fairvicw, Okanagan, etc.);
East and West Kootenay. These
figures show that in nearly every
agricultural product the Fraser Valley
considerably heads the average yields.
As regards wheat, the Fraser Valley
average per acre was 36.8 bushels, the
next nearest being the Islands, 29.5.
In oats, the Fraser Valley yield was
S5.9 bushels, the next highest being
the Dry Belt district with 38.4. In
rye, the Fraser Valley yielded 40
bushels per acre, thc next highest being the Dry Belt district with 25.0
bushels. In hay, the average is given
as 2.1 tons per acre for the Fraser
Valley, Thompson River Watershed
and the Dry Belt. Since these figures
were prepared, however, extensive
dyking in Langley, Matsqui and other
districts has considerably raised the
average of the hay yield in the Fraser
Valley. Last season, for instance, as
high as from 3'A to 5'A tons per acre
wcre easily obtained in the Matsqui
municipality. In potatoes, other root
crops and market garden crops, Fraser Valley and the Dry Belt are credited with nearly similar averages,
which arc considerably higher than
all  the  other  districts.
There are. of oetirsc, some districts
of thc valley more fertile than others
Thc Delta district is probably unrivalled throughout Canada for its
potatoes and other root crops. It has,
indeed, successfully challenged the
world, in the person of Mr. Asahel
Smith of Ladner, by winning the
Stillwell trophy. But the significant
point is that the average production
of all agricultural products has risen
more rapidly in the Fraser Valley
than in any other part of the Dominion.
With regard to fruit cultivation,
remarkable progress has been made
during the past few years in particulars    parts  of the  Fraser    Valley.
Transportation, however, is the
alpha and omega of the development
of the Fraser Valley as in other new
countries. It is the beginning in tak.
ing settlers and their goods to the
virgin soil; and it accomplishes the
end of such enterprise in bringing the
much needed produce of the land
tillers to thc city toilers of Vancouver
or elsewhere. Much has already been
achieved by the C.P.R., G.N.R. and
R.C.F.R. in the settlement of the
Fraser Valley and more is promised
by the C.N.R. But it is the B. C.
Electric Railway which has done the
lion's share in the remarkable development of the lower mainland.
From Vancouver to Chilliwack it has
blazed the way for the opening up
of magnificent residential, agricultural and industrial districts through
South Vancouver, Burnaby, Surrey, Langley, Matsqui and Sumas. It
was the making of Chilliwack and its
fertile locality. It has peopled and
helped dcvclope the agricultural and
industrial resources of numerous
towns along its lines from Vancouver to Chilliwack and from Vancouver through Eburne to Steveston.
And it is constantly extending its
lines  of communication.
What the B.C.E.R. is doing for the
southern side of the Fraser Valley,
the C.P.R. has been performing for
the northern portion. From Vancouver, through Coquitlam, Pitt Meadows, Maple Ridge, Mission, Dew-
dney and Nicomen the C.P.R. has
helped much in the exploitation of the
wonderful resources of these municipalities. In numerous towns and settlements along the track of the railway, saw mills, brick yards and other
industries are being established. Port
Haney, Port Hammond, Whonnock,
Ruskin and  Mission  City are rapidly
(Continued on Page 12)
Around the Municipal Hall
BY SCRUTATOR
Discrimination against a man or a
nation is at all times to be deplored.
In our opinion it raises obstacles that
should never exist in the free interchange of commodities or labor, and
is at all times detrimental to the best
interests of mankind as a whole. It
is through the free interchanging of
commodities and the blending of peoples' opinions, whether in business or
labor, that tends towards the world's
peace.
At the same time, there must always bc certain privileges to the native-born citizen of any nation or
community, and our smypathy is with
the resolution passed hy the School
Hoard of Vancouver on Monday
evening, viz., that nothing but British
subjects be employed by the Board.
Thc motion would have pleased us
better had it gone a little further, and
alsee embraced contracts. Alien labeir
has itself to blame for this. We have
many geiod and reputable citizens
freun across the line, citizens whom
we are proud to have amongst us and
who have been allowed equal rights
along wilh ourselves whilst remaining in Canada, yet they never allow
an opportunity to pass of showing
that while they are partaking eif all
we have and reaping of our wealth,
they consider themselves a people
apart.
Tn see this a person has only to
visit one of our picture shows The
moment a star-spangled banner is
shown applause is heard from many
quarters. No objections can be
raised to this cheap loyalty if it were
allowed to stop there, but disparaging
remarks  arc   often   made   about   Bri
tish subjects and British institutions
whenever the opportunity occurs.
Thc flag, to the British subject, is a
sacred emblem not tee be made a
mockery of in   the  dime  show,
We never advocate our School
Board to copy Vancouver, considering Chairman Whelpton progressive
enough to strike out em lines suitable
for his own board, but in this case
we would advocate the insertion of
the clause in ;ill contracts, as it woulil
save us from the humilation of seeing nearly all eetir schools being built
by alien labor, whilst many of our
ratepayers in Semth Vancorvcr can
neit obtain employment.
*    *    *
We- are pleased to sec that Commissioner Crehan is putting Iii��� foot
down on the useless waste eef the
Commissioner's and officials time by
the asking of silly questions. If a
few more weiuld take' tlu linn stand
of F. E Elliotl and tell Mr. McBride that it was none eif his business to ask for such information i'
would help some. Nearly the whole
time of the present sitting has been
entirely monopolized by Mr. McBride.   making   it   look   nieirc   or   less
like   a   farce.     The   Commissioner
should charge him up with the ensis
of the cenirt, also the hess of time t'i
those attending. Whilst Mr. McBride would fain pose as thc figure
eif "Justice and Purity" in South Vancouver Municipal affairs or seem to
pose as such in thc ratepayers eyes,
yet the many transactions that he
has attempted  to inveigle  the  Coun-
(Continued on  Page 12)
white print cannot do justice to a description eef thc costumes. Imagine
all thc rainbows you ever saw. shining mi an acre eef enchids and then
an Oriental procession winding
through the centre and yem will get
some idea of the scene, when Mr.
anil Mrs. Price led the Grand March,
Mr. Thomas and several friends.
! well known as officers eef "The Lie.ns."
I acted as judges. They awarded the.
Ni ladies' prize, ami a handsome
prize it was, to Miss Delora, whee
wore' a beautiful Spanish costume,
' complete in every detail, and she
be.re herself with such graceful elie,-
nity in keeping with the character I
that nobody could possibly dispute
tin justice of the award. The tirst
prizt for gentlemen went to Mr. A.
l' McCormack, who was the very
type of a fine "Oulel Irish Jintleman"
e'f the olden times. There was plenty "i shamrock in evidence, anel it
is difficult indeed te' pick out for
special mention any of the costumes
Let   it   be   Stated   in   terms   ..)   warm
ii that most of ilu- beautiful
dresses wen home-made, anel showed
conclusive!} that tlie people of Col-
line" 1 have taste, skill, ami industry. Many visiieers were-    present
from the city, ami they were warm
in their congratulations that Collingwood could give such a really splcn-
eliei  elre-s   carnival.
Here is a list of the company anel
the costumes as far as our representative' Oeiilel compile them in a ni'em
which was a perfect kaleidoscope of
ceilor and a symphony of sweet
sounds :
P.   Price   ....   St.  John's  Ambulance
Mrs.   F.   Price       Quakeress
Mrs.  Musto       Spanish  Gipsy
C. H. Benton. Adj. London Volunteer
I.    Hattun         Clown
Miss    II.   Owen         Summer
Miss   Annie   Kerr        Morning
;
Mrs. IC. Langford Flags of all Nations
B.   Pegg       Queen   of   Hearts
Eleanor   Hague       Ireland
James   Muirhead       Pierrott
Mis-   Clements        Irish   Colleen
Stanley Cocroft  ....   British Admiral
Mabel  Price      Broncho girl
' i    i isborne  ....   Shakesperian Jester
II.   S.   liail.y       Cavalier
Mabel   Flack        Geisha   girl
Marion   McCabe       Cowboy girl
Florrie   rones        Indian  girl
Mrs. V   C. Russell .. Wihl Irish R.ise
Edith    Wilkinson         Milkmaid
Mr.   John  Join's       Indian  chief
II    S    Kent       Jack  of  Hearts
E.   Sutherland       Redwing
Mrs    ]���'   Buckle       Geisha girl
Mi--   Jones.Little   Lord   Fauntleroy
!..   Holmes   ....      Spearmint
"Kiddie" Brown Flags of all N'atiiuis
Mr.   I- lack     Japanese
Mi-s   Nightingale..Red   Cross  nurse
Mrs.   Cocroft       Lady  Teazle
Mrs.   Oswald    Nurse
Dorothy Eagan    Sailor
Martha   Anderson       School  girl
G   I'. Jameson       Spearmint
P.   S.   Smith       Cadet
IC.   S    Sims       Coon
A.   James.,n       Flunkey
(.'.   I !.it lis. ,n       Hallowe'en
(.'luster  Holmes     Coon
S.  Anderson     Sailor gii I
Miss Marclay    Evening dress
Mi-ses   Smith       Irish  twins
i",.   F.  Livingstone    \ senator
Eva  Hague      Baby mine
E.   A.   Bayford       Saih.r
E. B. Langford     Fireman
Ethel   McCabe       Folly
F. Major       Country  school girl
Mrs. J. II. Foster    A Boquet
J.  Francis  Bursill..The  Scotchman
who found thc North Pole (A
small mixture of Capt. Cook and
Harry  Lauder)
(Continued on Page 12)
V
Our Map Shows Portion of South Vancouver Affected by Canadian Northern Railway Planer���Property in "330" Changed Hands This Week at $5,000 Per Acre TWU
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  MARCH  22,   1913
In Vancouver the Girl Who Toils
in the Great Shops is Treated
With Canadian Fairness
M.. H. T. Lockyer, of the Hudsons' Bay Company, Testifies Before Provincial Labor Commission���His Willing Statement
Regarding Working Conditions in the Company's Large Store
Should Set at Rest Fear That Vancouver, as Far as the Larger
Department Stores is Concerned, has a Girl Labor Problem
���Is Thanked by Members of the Commission for Giving
Evidence
That section of the American and
Canadian Press which panders to that
class ot the public which loves the
seiis.r.ie'i'al and the sordid, strive to
bring out a kinship between the
modern departmental store and many
of the ills fr.em wh i 1 Iht social system  suffers.
Wild letcrs in the Vancouver
Press from those who would style
themselves reformers, and from
others more erratic, would leid the
casual reader to believe that Vancouver, as regards the departmental
store, was on a par with those congested centres of Eastern United
States.
Conditions  uf employment  of girls
and   women   in   the   large   stores   of j
Vancouver  were  ably  set  forth  last!
week   before   the   Labor   Commission I
in  order  that  the  public  might  have
a clear conception of the facts. Those
testifying   in   this   connection   before,
the   commission   were   the   managers j
of  the  large  stores.    Among others,
Mr.  H. T.  Lockyer, general manager |
of   the   Hudson's   Bay   Company   in
British Columbia, gave evidence with j
the   authority   of  seventeen  years   at!
the head of Hudson's Bay commercial;
activity in the West.    In his evidence
he frankly placed all the facts at the
disposal of the commission, the mem-!
bers  of  which   thanked   him   heartily
for attending.
Mr. Lockyer's examination was as
follow s :
Thc Chairman���What are the minimum wages paid to the girl employees  in your store?
Witness���We have girls who start
at 14 or 15 years of age, whee are virtually apprentices, who receive $3
per week and in six months are raised to $4. They arc taking thc first
step toward store life. Further progress depends upon the aptitude
shown  in  the  different  peesitions.
Mr. Harper���Do all girls of that
class  live  at  home?
Witness���Yes, all live at home. We
du not engage any girl who is not
living at home. They come voluntarily to apply and in a great many]
cases are accompanied by their
mothers, who urge us to give them
employment, We always have a
larger supply than a demand to fill.
As far as we are concerned the new
girls for a month or two arc more
trouble than  they are worth.
Mr. Stoney���How many girls do
yen   employ?
Witness���About   150.
Mr. Stoney���What proportion of
these are in the younger class?
Witness���About   ten   per  cent.
The Chairman���How do salaries go
after the first raise to $4? Does it
depend  on   their  ability?
Witness���Yes. They ��� get $6 and
from that graduate upwards to $25
per week.
Mr. Jardine���How long are they in
your employ before they get $6 per
week?
Witness���From a year to eighteen
months.
The Chairman���What is the lowest wage you expect a girl to work
for when she does not live at home?
Do you drop that condition after she
is raised to $4?
Witness���When  any one  is engaged,   particularly   a   woman,   the   most I
complete   enquiries   are   made   as   to
their standing and respectability, both
for our protection and  theirs.
The Chairman���I suppose you understand what we want to get at?
'I here has been a good deal of complaint made about the girls, especially the young ones, and wc would1
like to have your view of it.
Witness���It was largely to remove
misapprehension in the minds not
only of this commission, hut of a;
certain section of the public that I
volunteered to come and give this
evidence. There teems to bc an im-
pression on the part of the puhlic
that girls who go into these big stores
are paid starvation wages and have
to engage in an irregular life to cam
a livelihood. I am perfectly satis-j
fied such is not thc case. In twenty j
years in Vancouver I have never
heard of a girl employed going wrong
from the fact that she was not paid
sufficient wages or otherwise as far
as our employees are concerned. I
have yet to come in contact with one
myself.
The Chairman���What would be the
result if you refused to take these
girls whose parents bring them and
ask you to give them employment?
Suppose you refused to employ any
one not worth $10 a week?
Witness���Thc larger stores are
adopting mechanical equipment to
replace these girls. In our new store
we will have equipment which will
largely do away with the necessity
of  employing  these  young  girls.
The Chairman���Suppose you did'nt
give these girls employment, what
would they do? What would you do
to fill their places?
Witness���We wofcld simply have
to fall back on the available help that
offers.
The Chairman���Is there enough
experienced work to be had?
Witness���No, not enough of it to
be had here. We have continually
to get them from the East and from
the' Old  Country.
The Chairman���It is necessary
then to take these girls and teach,
them  the  business?
Witness���Yes, it is largely "necessary to train our own staff.
The Chairman���If you yourself and
others like, jrburself did not teach
tbem .the" "business what would thev
djtf
Witness���That is a difficult question to answer. They certainly have
to serve a preliminary training or apprenticeship in order to bc eligible
for these positions. They have to
make a commencement the same as
in  any other  business.
The Chairman���I suppose there are
many girls without a home who have
to compete with those better situated?
Witness���Well, a young girl of 14
with no parents or home or guardians, and no experience would certainly be placed iu a very awkward
position   here   or  anywhere  else.
Mr. Harper���Are you in favor of
a compulsory half-holiday every
week?
Witness���Absolutely, if it is compulsory. You will find the large
stores arc in favor of it. But the
smaller stores will have to be compelled to observe it also. It is still
a question whether Vancouver is ripe
for a Saturday half-holiday. Saturday
still seems lo be the shopping day in
Vancouver. If there is to be a weekly half-holiday Saturday is the best
day for it, because yeeu can close at
noon, and do not have to open your
store until Monday morning. To
close for half a day in the middle of
the week must dislocate business.
Mr. Stoney���If all had to do it
would it not work itself out after a
little-
Witness���I think it would. The
conditions would have to shape themselves to meet the new arrangements.
Mr. Stoney���Nearly every one
likes to get a half-holiday on Saturday afternoon?
Witness���Yes. The unfortunate
part is that some of the people who
slnmlel lie enjoying that kind of thing
are the worst offenders. 1 have seen
clergymen and leaders of social
movement often in our stores een Saturday night, lleiw do vou account
for that?
Mr. Stoney���What arc the hours
of your employees?
Witness���Fifty-two hours a week,
8:30 to 5:30, and on Saturday to 9
o'clock.
Mr. Stoney���Do the younger girls
work  the same hours?
Witness���Yes.
Mr. Stoney���In the case of overtime,  do   they  get   paid?
Witness���Yes.
Mr. Stoney���Do they have holidays ?
Witness���After they have been
one year in our service they get one
or two weeks' holiday, according to
their  position.
Mr, McKclvie���If one girl asks for
an increase in salary and another
equally as good does not, would they
be  treated  both  the  same.
Witness���Yes, We keep careful
records of everyone in the service and
we make increases voluntarily. That
was done recently at the end of our
fiscal  year.
Mr. Lockyer then read from the
books of the company a list of wages
paid to salesgirls in the store during
the year. These ran from $537 to
$1189.
The Chairman���Is a woman getting $800 or $900 a year the head of
the department?
Witness���No. These arc ordinary
salesgirls.
The Chairman���What time do they
have for a meal in the middle of the
day?
Witness���A very serviceable lunch
is served at a small rate, and by that
means we are able to do with a "tO
minutes  lunch   period.
The Chairman���Are they expected
to stay in  to lunch?
Witness���It is not compulsory at
all. Wc did it to meet a demand coming from the employees themselves.
who preferred to take a wholesome
meal on the premises rather than go
out in the rain and slush and have to
hurry to get back in an hour.
Mr. McKelvie���It has been asserted
that while scats are provided in many
of the stores, thc act is, nevertheless,
a dead letter because the girls are
not allowed to sit down.
Witness���It is obviously a fact
that a man or woman engaged in a
selling capacity has to work standing up. When they are not busy
there is nothing to prevent them taking a rest as the opportunity may
offer.
Mr. McKelvie���You have no objection to any of your girl employees
taking a rest when they have a
chance?
Witness���None at all. Of course,
you appreciate the fact that when
they are not selling the stock must
be attended to, but there is no discrimination against their sitting down.
In some of the slack hours of the
morning I have repeatedly seen women employees sitting down. It is
not held against them in any sense
of the word, They might as well be
sitting down when they have nothing to do.
Mr. Harper���What would be the
effect of the minimum wage for girls
in  stores?
Witness���I think it would tend to
eliminate the employment of younger
girls. It would raise the standard and
would wipe out the inexperienced and
less-efficient  help.
Mr. Harper���If a minimum wage
became law, would you be inclined
to hire boys  instead  of young girls?
Witness���No. We find younger
girls more efficient than the young
boys. They take more interest in
their work and are more reliable.
Mr.   Harper���Suppose   such  a-~krw"
wen'  enforced,  would  it  affect  your
1 llsiness t.e any great  extent?
Witness ���I don't think it would. If
/mi adopted a minimum wage of $5.
it would simply mean that thc employer would discriminate more in
the selection of employees than he
does at present, and the same tiling
Would apply to :. minimum wage 'el
$10 feer the sales clerk. As a matter
'if fact, we have few engaged in a
selling capacity below $10 per week.
It is all the other way about
Mr. Lockyer explained that in addition to their salaries the selling
clerks receive a commission een their
sales and a premium as well.
Mr. Jardine���What is the amount
of  the  commission?
Witness���The commission is paid
on their own individual sales during
each  week.
Mr. Jardine���Is there much difference in  the commissions  paid?
Witness���Yes. Obviously the more
expert they are from a selling standpoint the more commissions there
arc.    The  commission  is   1   per cent.
Mr. Jardine���What do you mean
by   thc  premium?
Witness���It is a charge fixed on
the sale of certain goods. For instance, if there is a new line of
goeids the firm wants to introduce,
the firm may pay a premium on it.
Or it may be, at the end of the season, that a line of goods is to be
cleared out, and a premium is paid
on that.
Mr. McKelvie���I do not know of
anything in this enquiry which has
pleased me so much as the statement you made a few minutes ago in
regard to thc moral condition of thc
employees. You stated that during
twenty years' experience you never
knew a girl  tee go astray.
Witness���It is absolutely so. I have
never known of any one of our em.
ployees who has taken up an irregular life during the twenty years. I
think this is something that can not
he given too much publicity because,
unfortunately, there has been a lot eef
talk along that line.    Wc welcome in-
(.Stigation   into   wan  s     paid.       The
:itieism   which   is   made  aben^   these
net is quite misdirected.    It is not
true   at  all   that   the  girls   are  driven
into   wrong-doing   through     not     reliving such incomes a- would place
them beyond temptation,
Mr.  McKelvie���Dei yem believe this
applies to other establishments?
Witness���Yes.   I   think it  does.  The |
situation  is  that   there  is  not   enough
experienced help to gee around. Any
woman who has been trained in thc
store business can command a good
salary.
Mr. McKelvie���Would yeeu consider a $10 minimum salary per week
about right for a girl who has no
home of hcr own to live in?
Witness���It  is  little  enough.
Mr. McKelvie���Would you consider  $12 too  little?
Witness���1 think myself thc higher
you place the minimum the more
you will discriminate against the semi-
efficient and semi-experienced help.
At thc same time if you establish any
at all you want an equitable one. I
should think it a very reasonable
minimum.
Mr. Stoney���Do the girls get any
discount   on   thc   clothing   they   buy?
Witness���Yes. In some cases the
girls in the departments have dresses
furnished   them.
Mr. Stoney���That is a dress to use
while they are in the store?
Witness���Yes, but they don't have
to leave them in the store. We give
a liberal discount to employees on
all their purchases. In the case of
married men that is extended to
their wives and  family.
Mr. McKelvie���What is the average   pay  of  male  clerks?
Witness���It is practically impossible to secure any man at less than
$16 per week. It would range from
that tee $25 per week. Window dressers range from $1200 to $1800 a
year.
The Chairman���We are very much
obliged to you, Mr. I.ockyer, for
Coming here and giving us this information.
WALKER   BROTHERS
REALTY   AND   INSURANCE   BROKERS
Have helped sun-kissed  Burnaby and South Vancouver develop Irom
virgin forest into busy districts of homes.
They believe  Burnaby  possesses all the factors necessary to make
her one day thc hub of the peninsula.
VANCOUVER:
Dominon Trust Block,
341  Cambie Street
EDMONDS:
Edmonds Station,
Burnaby
A. McFEE
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Phone 1038 :
Edmonds, B, C.
I have the exclusive sale of large lots on Salisbury Avenue, close
to statics.   $1,000 each; on good terms.   See me about them.
PATTERSON   &   FISHER
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
tjt',   acres in  Edmonds district,  near   Power   House and facing on  Vancouver
Road.    All cleared.    Price $16,000.00.  $5,000.00  cash;   balance  6,   12,   18,  and  24
montha.
POST OFFICE BUILDING, EDMONDS Phone :  No. 664
WARNER, BANGS & CO.
REAL ESTATE AND COMMERCIAL AGENTS
PHONE 1024
COLDICUTT  BLOCK,  EAST  BURNABY
SEND US YOUR LISTINGS
LOANS AND INSURANCE
AOONTeOOS ftOftNAQYS
Bonnie Qanksano
SRA6S
Contracts have been let during this
week by the Board of Works for the
supply ot , idier feir sidewalks in the
various districts as follows: Ed-
iiiemils and Eat Burnaby district.
Burnaby Lumber Co.; Central Park
district, Shaw & Chell; Central Burnaby and outlying parts of East Burnaby, Bradford Ik Taylor; North Burnaby, Burrard Lumber Co.; Broadview and southerly parts of North
Burnaby,   Enterprise   Saw   Mills.
*      A      ef
The question of continuing Sixth
street to Burnaby Lake was the sub-
csted with regard to the setting back
eif any  power  and   telephone  poles.
*       *       *
The members of tlie Council constituting the sewerage committee, at
i their meeting on Monday, strongly
|criticised the way in which the business of the joint sewerage committee
is being carried on. Councillors Mac-
Pherson, MacDonald and Eau Vel
freely expressed their opinions, and
I Councillor MacPherson, the chairman
Iof the Burnaby committee, not having
I heen notified of a meeting of the
I joint   committee,  the  clerk  was    re-
Highland   Park   Acreage
We have a number of SMALL ACREAGE PARCELS on and
near the new cut-off line of the B. C. Electric Railway.
1 aire, just off Railway, $2100; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
months,
Wa acres, on Railway, $3500; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
month*.
E.   W.   MacLEAN   LTD.
Exchange Building
142 Hastings West
GEO. SNIDER & BRETHOUR
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
909   Dominion   Trust   Building,   Vancouver,   B. C.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
Telephones I     Office 8407.    Works 6203.      Works  9328.     Works   9179
HARRY CORNELL, at the Avenue Theatre
ject ol a deputation, and a special
committee was appointed to look into the matter and report to the
Board.
*       He       *
The Kingsway paving operations
being now in full swing a labor bureau has been established by order of
Reeve MacGregor at the Municipal
Hall, where ratepayers may register
names and addresses. The subject
of the contractors for the paving employing local men was before the
Board of Works, the Reeve stating
that the contractors were perfectly
willing to do so, and that they hoped
very shortly to be able to employ all
available surplus labor in the Municipality. During thc discussion it
was remarked that while some were
quite willing to engage in this work
others did not care fox :the hard contract work, and very quickly left
it. The engineer said .that many of
the men were inexperienced at the
work, and the contractors informed
the Council that some of the local
men. brought the wrong kind of
wagons, quite unsuitable ones, for the
work, those required being what are
known, .as dump wagons. It was
stated that 300 names were on the
waiting list of the bureau, and these
would he given work in order of application, preference being given to
the  married men.
Fences which encroach on the
road reservation _will have to. bc set
.back, and" a spe'efal committee will
ii terview   the   two   companies   inter-
*WUHUI,,i. -. ���������
quested to write the joint committee
pointing'out  that  fact.
The possibility of the expenses exceeding the $35,1X10 was regarded as a
serious one, especially by Councillor MacPherson, but Reeve MacGregor said that the only sum with which
Burnaby could be charged was its
share of the original expenses, $7000.
*    *    *
A special meeting of the Council
has been called by Reeve MacGregor
to consider the new proposals of the
B. C. E. R. Co., at which the delegates from the various wards will also be present. It is very . possible
that these proposals will necessitate
a fresh appeal to the electors on the
subject of the street railway franchise. Iti his letter ��� Mf\ Sperling
stated that "The terms 'which my
board authorize me to agree to are
practically identical with the terms
offered  in   October  last.
"The other matters which .you
brought to my attentiori at our meeting on February 28th, referring to
light and power rates, car services,
eje, are receiving careful attention
and will be dealt with in due course.
"On account of the financial stringency which I referred to at our
meeting on February 28, and for
other reasons, my, company cannot
undertake any further responsibilities in the matter of tramway construction than provided for in the
Burnaby Electric Bylaw, 1911. Further extensions than those therein
set out  must necessarily await better
financial conditions and justification,
by increased settlement and industrial
development."
In the event of the aforesaid bylaw receiving the assent of the ratepayers the following reductions in
settlers' fares wcre to operate at
once : Between     Vancouver     and
Central Park, ten rides 80c; fifty
rides $3.50. Between Vancouver and
Royal Oak, ten rides $1.0(1; fifty rides
$4.00. Between Vancouver and Power
house, ten rides $1.25; fifty rides
$5.50, Between Vancouver and Westminster limits, ten rides $1.50; fifty
rides $6.5(1. Between Westminster and
Royal Oak, ten rides 60c; fifty rides
$2.5(1.
The charge from Vancouver to
Central Park applies to all stations
in what used to be known as the
Central Park reserve, that is, up to
and including Jubilee station, and
the rates respecting Royal Oak are
applicable also to Highland Park ami
Gilley.
 s  mi  i 1	
Edmonds Notes
Mr. and Mrs. MeFcc were the host
anil heestess of the Edmonds Whist
Circle last week. The prize winners
were Mrs. P. B. Brown and Mr. Appleby, Mrs. II. Sworder, booby; Mrs.
Disney, consolation. A number of
songs   concluded   the   evening.
��        *        ef
J. R. Wilson & Co., a company of
local actors, presented a piece entitled "Thc Imperials," It) the Burnaby Public Hall, on March 13 The
entertainment was enjoyed by an appreciative  audience.
AAA
The members of the Edmonds Bap-
list Church regret to hear that the
Rev. Reid McCullough is leaving the
district for thc upper country. He
intends to fill a position at Fort
George.
et       ef       *
The Ladies' Aid of the Baptist
Church are holding a Cap and Apron
Social this afternoon in the Heather
Block,   opposite   the   Municipal   Hall.
* *      ef
Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Patterson gave
a delightful whist drive to their many
friends last week. The lucky ones
in the contest wcre C. B. Brown and
Miss M. Armstrong; Miss G. Bailey
was  the  winner  of  the  booby  prize.
* ef       *
Mr. and Mrs. Chas F. Sprott and
family, of Burnaby Lake, have returned from California, where they
have   been   spending  the   winter.
* *       ef
Mr. and Mrs. Pummell, of Wise
Road, are returning from Californa,
where they have been sojourning during the winter months.
* *      ef
R. A. Heather is leaving for Victoria at the end of this month. He
intends taking up his residence there.
* *    *
The Burnaby Ice Hockey team
went down to defeat to the Fraser
Mills team by 8-0 last Saturday.
* *        ef
The people of Edmonds celebrated
St. Patrick's Day in great style. An
Irish concert was jjiven in the Public Hall at '8 p.m. Rev. D. J, Gordon
took the chair, and after-a.jew words
introduced the various artistes. Some
good old Irish songs and recitations
were rendered. Those taking part
were : Mr. Fry, Mr. Crawford, Mr.
Moore,  Mr.  T   R.  Wilson,  Mr.   Pa-
heni, Mesdames Currie, M. Grier, G.
i ami Morrison. The sketch entitled
| "Biddy  from  Cork" was a great sttc-
e  e>-.
s,     A      it
Tin- East Burnaby Auxiliary gave
a delight ful concert and whist drive-
in aid eef the Victorian Order of
Nurses in ihe Moreton Hall, VV. T.
Weart occupying the chair. The
artists, vocal and instrumental, who
toeik part in the concert were Mesdames Mansfield, Gildersleeve, Mitchell, Miss M. Smith, Messrs Gildersleeve, T. Graham and W. J. Mc.Clay.
The hall was (lee'..rated with bunting
anil  (lags of real  Irish  color.
* *    *
Mr, B. (',. Walker was the guest of
honor at a meeting of the Overseas
(.'lull, held in the Conservative Club,
Xew Westminster, on March 17. Hc
was the recipient of a case of handsome gold-mounted pipes as a mark
of esteem on his retiring from the
honorary presidency of this branch.
Mr. I'. B Broun presided and made
the presentation, and moved that a
vote eif thanks be also given. Mr.
James R. Duncan seconded, and it
was carried with enthusiasm. The
meeting closed with the National
Anthem.
 S    ^     I	
Central  Park  Jottings
Twu yeiung ladies eef Central I'ark,
Mis- N'eiiah Aleock and Miss Olive
Thompson, graduated as fully train-
eel nurses on Wednesday night, the
occasion being the closing exercises
oi" the lirst graduating class of the
training school for nurses, Royal
Columbian Hospital. The gathering
was held in the Richard McBride
School, Sapperton, New Westminster,
and was followed by a reception in
the Nurses' Residence, Royal Columbian Hospital, both affairs being
largely attended and thoroughly enjoyed.
* ef       *
A meeting of ladies was held last
week to promote the interests of the
newly-formed Presbyterian Church
at Beaconsfield, in the house of Mrs.
Preston, where a new branch of the
Ladies' Aid Society was formed. The
meeting appointed Mrs. Peters as
president, Mrs. Baxter as vice-president, Mrs. Fisher, secretary, and Mrs.
Murray, treasurer. A monthly meeting was arranged for the first Tuesday in each month, and a special 10c
tea will be held on Friday, the 28th
inst., at  Mrs,  D.  Robertson's house,
ef       *       *
The Central Park Women's Institute will meet on Thursday afternoon
at Mrs. Toderick's house, Central
Park.
* ef       *
Mr. Tom Prentice is expected to
arrive in Vancouver this week after
his holiday of nearly four months in
the  Old   Country.
* *    *
Another Central Park resident is
also due to arrive this week, Mr. J.
O. Tripp, who has been five months
in  England.
* ��     At
Many friends will be glad to hear
that Mrs. Willis is happily recovering from her sharp attack of illness.
 Mr, "George   Chaffty,   who  is  well
known to Central,Park residents as
a fine baritone, is'announced as Singing throughout this week at the i*ew
K;"emacolor in the city. SATURDAY, MARCH 22. 1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
Boys' Department
Shirt Waists
A large selection of the new spring effects in shirt
designs and
waists are now in
styles are neat and
stock. The shades,
dainty.
Cap*
We have caps suitable
newest shapes are here
leather, etc., etc.
tor all ages of hoys.   All the
in  serges,  tweeds,  checks,
Odd Pants
Odd bloomer and plain pants
serges, etc.
in tweeds, cordur
)ys,
CLUBB & STEWART
THE WORKERS' PAGE
Kdited by J. VV. Wilkinson, to whom all communications should
be  addressed,   Room  2!tJ,   Labor Temple, Vancouver, B. C.
Mellon, It C. is the besl organized
town in ihi-. province from the trade
union standpoint, and fe.r some time
past various plans have' been .if.,,,t
having in new the erection ol ��� Laboi
Temple.     The   matter   is   to   be    m:
orously pushed thi- spring, and it is
hoped to incorporate a company with
a -bar.- capital   ei $20,000.00.
Tin' iini.iii bill-posters of Montreal
an een -trike fe,r a raise m wages.
ie. have full liberty to transfer men
between  iheir various branches   Tin
-i'ike lie- been remarkable in many
ways.   11 has been described by trade
lllli'.ll   e,lTie-i.il-   a-   the   epiiele -t    -Hike
<.ii record considering the number "i
men involved. The cosl ol 11 j ��� - strike
io the district Involved bas bun
great   Calculated on the figures given
ni the re-pe.rl- of the Bradford Dyers'
Association  fe.r 1911  and  1912 the as-
lociation ha- lost in profits alone
$250,000. The- men have lost a similar
The  Twin   Cities   "f   Port   ArthurIamount in wages during thai period,
anil  Fori  William have a labor paper  anel   iu   addition   the   funds  eef    their
known as the "Wage Earner," owned  Union  are   reduced  by  abeiut   SlOO.tHKi
and   controlled   by   the   trade   union- disbursed in strike pay.
i-t- of tlusc cities.    A  special edition j ��    ��    *
is to be issued in conjunction with The strike at the Britannia Minei
plan- to erect a Labor Temple, and j, Btill ,,���. protn ,|���. reports of the
it is expected that the project will re- official strike committee there are
suit m boosting both propositions,       no��  aboul  fifty men working at the
1 mines  among   them   being  many   ne-
A strong local of the Musicians groes The full working staff be-
L'nion has just been established at tore thi -irike- wa- about seven hund-
N'elson, B. C. ieel men.
Rates of pay to in-, -ingle horse carter-. Pi 2? per week, elouble' team
elriver-.   $7.00;   coal    bag    talesmen,
$7.00.     Three-  elay-'   liolielay   are  te,  be
en. n each year a- compensation fot
-table      work     e,n      Sunday-        The
trouble had caused a number "f null-  twentv-o'uc'  c
and  factoriei i" be closed down  for  \e
������{ Hi-  hill.     Vear by year  the cadet!
oi  Cbapultepec   strew   flowers   upon
till-   -epulchre.
lack e.f lupplii i
though
�� *        A
, year-,
me, img ..I carpentei - was i,���j|| ,,
nighl in ih- Labor Temple  covery
The  College  Men  of  1413
Oxford  University i-  compos el ol
Among    the
argesl   .,i   il   i-  th< e   ileal, al-
\  nia-
luld last
f��' the pur     of considering ways  VVyk'eham
and means o) lecuring a rise in wages ,,,- ,|��� ���������, advan ,
in May.
it   ha-  -t'..,.l  for  live  hundred
-  -till  called    Xew."    It  w.-i-
hundred yearj before the dis-
i    Vmerica   by   William   de
e pression
of eiluca-
ii.
i   entertained   in   hi-   elay.     So   far
*   *   * a- the architecture      I plan  e.f th."
lhe local lathers are heilelmg open buildings are- concerned, the live-
meetings regularly for the purpose centuries thai have since elapsed
"i gathering their forcei together te, have -ugge-te-e| but little thai i- bet-
negottal
ipring,
wage
scale
the
and  American  college-
follow   ele    WykeHam's
MEN'S AND CHILDREN'S OUTFITTERS
Sole Agents for Twentieth Century Garments
men
lor
309-31S Hastings St. W.
Phone 702 Sev.
A   meeting  was  held   iu   the   Labor!     A   union   of  carriage  anel   waggon
Temple, Vancouver, last Wednesday K�����er> ha�� just been formed at JVic
night   with   the   object   .if  forming  a|
union   of  all   women   engaged  in  thc
domestic services in the city
torta,
| from
[.ah..
and
the
barter has been sent  ior
American   Federation    of
Plans
vention
ef
cypress
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
Thc Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains ccpiipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE,  Gen. Pass Agent, Vancouver.
From repe.rts received then   i- pos- Castle
sibility "i trouble in connection with tezum;
iln   vessels  fi the  Union  Steamship the surroundin
Company   whose  boats    travel    be- where, .lining nearly Hire.- e'enturi!
tween   \.-w  Zealand, Australia, (an- lived the successive viceroys of Spain
a.la and the United States,   The en- Und  where  Maximilian  made  hi- im
gineer-  are-   asking  lor  an  eight-hour perja|     |���,m���   |];is     .���.,.,,     ,hl.     iy    ,
elay.  bill   the   company   shows   no  in- |��,.;,,t   ,,j   Mexico
Iclination  to accede to their request.      Winn r,,,,.,.,! <.���,,<< i,., i ,.i.      o
���  reside  in  .he City of Van- Efforts l.av,- been made to settle Hu- place  bv  storm  ?,,    V     .r
and your name is nol  yet on   differences   bv   friendly     conference, had   surrendered  '-,     \l
new  Voters' list, you can  get  oiij|,llt ���,, ,,, ,|, .  present  have  failed
list at  Room 2111,  Labor Temple.
are afoot to bring the con-
of iln- International Typographical Union to Calgary in 1914.
The local members have- put up $1,000
and the Industrial Bureau has put
up ,iti-.ther $1,011(1 for the purpose of
furthering the project.
11   y
mver
The lists will be
.,11   April   17.
closed for revision
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
G. Smith. C. P. * T. A.
Phone :   Sey.   7100
W. E. Duperow, G. A. P.
527  Granville  Street
That    portion   of   the   membership
of the Amalgamated Society of Carpenters, which is situated In the Old
Country has decided not to take any
further part in plans for the amalgamation of all union.; in the building trades over there.
*    *    *
The strike of thc employees of the
Bradford Dyers' Association which
has lasted seven weeks, is now at an
end. A ballot of the men has been
taken upon the question of accepting
the provisional terms of settlement
agreed upon by their representatives
with the result that 1668 voted for
acceptance and 1667 against. The
substance of the settlement is that a
system of piecework is to be Introduced based on collective work and
collective payment, by which is me;.nt
payment for work performed by
groups of men. Thc Bradford Dyers'
Association guarantee that the rates
of payment for piecework shall not
be less than will enable a full rateel
man to earn a minimum of 14 cents
per hour. There is to be no displacement of adult labor consequent
on or subsequent to the intn duction
of piecework, but thc association are
Th.- retail clerk- in Victoria are
making great effort- to organize, and
with the assistance of the Victoria
Trail's and Labor Council they have
succeeded in getting together two
hundred  members.
Bravo
exican cadet
only fifteen year- of age, seeing the
flag of his country in peril, mosl of
his comrades being already slain,
climbed the flagstaff, tore the banner from ii- place, wound ii around
his body, and slid down, intending
to plunge over the precipice in order to save the colors from falling
into the hands of the enemy.
The act of heroism being frustrated, the brave- boy, with the banner
-till wrapped around him, fought
until he was cut in pieces, Forty-
eight of these schoolboys, ranging
Manitoba, and now the light,,,, age from fourteen ... twenty vear:
lie-   buried   in   one  grave  at   the   f
The employment of white girls by
Orientals has been fought by the
Trades and Labor Congress e,f Canada for many years. Legislation covering the evil has already been en
acted i
is to be commenced in Ontario by
the introduction of a bill bv Dr. God-
frey.
ter. English
builders -lill
model.
The undergraduate in dc- W'yke-
li.-un'- time, in <erdor.ie. obtain hi- I!
\. degree, -nieiieel the logic of Porphyry and Boethius, - imething e.i'
Aristotle, ami enough ..i arithmetic
t" enable him io find Easter. Three
years more were usually spent in
studying geometry, astronomy and
astrology.
He lived in college. I li- allowance 'ef money leas one -billing a
week. His breakfast wa- a piece of
lire,,el ami a pol of beer at dawn.
Hi- dinner wa- eaten at ten in tin
morning. He wa- given one suit of
clothes yearly. Three- times a year
each -tueleiu was required secretly
io tell iln- masters of tin- misbehavior eif hi- fellows, win. then re-
many years tlu- celebrated ccived "competent ...-ligation."
o Cbapultepec, where Mon- The rule- laid down bv de- Wyke-
n ham prohibited li-ii- to taverns or
"spectacles," the keeping of dog-,
ihe playing of chess and other
"noxious and illicit sports, -hooting
with arrows or other missiles, dancing, running, wrestling, or other
incautious anel inordinate amusements."
The ..nly recreation permitted was
the assembling around the tire- on
winter night- to indulge in "singing,
rn- tin- reading of poems and chronicles   nl   llle-   le-ri 1 Ml   anel     of     tile-     weetl-
eleT-     nf    the     Weerlll."
Tie- college wa- summoned to
dinner by two poor scholars, who
ran around the quadrangles shouting in bad Latin ami French, "Tem-
pus e--t vocandi a manger, t' seig-
neurs!" The "seigneurs" were obliged   tee  eat   in  absolute  silence.
Tl.e- local union of the United
Brotherhood oi Carpenters ami Jeein-
er- ha- submitted an amalgamation
proposal t.. the local union of the
Amalgamated Society of Carpenters
anil   Joiner-.
 C     el���i    ��	
The  Mexican  Cadets at
Chapultepec
Many incidents iu the Mexican
War are -till recounted lo fire the
lii-ari- of Mexicans, One of these
occurred during the defence of
Chapultepec, a defence thai was as
gallant a- was the attack. In this
attack forty-eight .Mexican cadets
among others, I���.-1 their lie es. The
-te.rv is a stirring i-i ���
F
Almost  any man  can   succeed
has   a   little   good   sense  and   a
i | good   nature.
if belittle
SATISFACTION���A TRUE STORY
After a long chilly ride on a draughty street car, you reach your home, step inside thc door,
then as the bright genial warmth surrounds and envelopes you, all the cold and dampness is forgotten
and. happiness  reigns. VOU  ARE   SATISFIED.
Dinner is served, thc dining-room is warm anj comfortable (without being unduly hot and dry),
the children arc bright-eyed, happy and hungry, flowers bloom on the tabic and in thc windows���the
meal is excellent. ONCE MORE VOU ARE SATISFIED.
After dinner your favorite chair with your pipe in thc cosy and warm sitting or living room,
chatting with your wife over thc day's events���the children playing or busy with their home lessons.
everything  calm  and serene. AGAIN   VOU  ARE   SATISFIED.
The children arc put to bed, all is quiet. Outside you hear the wild whistling of the wind, the
whirling snow i.s fast covering the ground and the timbers and swaying trees creak and snap with
reports that speak of rapidly lowering temperature. Inside, the kiddies, your wife anil yourself are
warm and contented. VOU ARK FULLY SATISFIED.
Then comes bedtime. Vottr bedroom is just as warm as thc rest of the house. Vou undress
with leisure and comfort. You retire, all through the long night the heat remains constant and your
family and  yourself are enabled  to enjoy plenty of  sound   healthy sleep,
SLEEP THAT MAKES YOU SATISFIED.
All this satisfaction is brought about by the man who has a
PEASE "ECONOMY" HEATING SYSTEM
installed iu his house.
Hodgson Plumbing & Heating Co. Ltd.
HEATING AND SANITARY ENGINEERS
1136 HOMER ST. Phone Sey. 2412 Vancouver, B.C.
The Slate of Washington has the
best Workmen's Compensation Act
in the world. The principle feature
wherein it differs from all other legislation of its kind is, that industry is
taxed according to the risk there is
in it, and any compensation due to
| an injured workman goes direct to
him. For the six years previous to
the passing of the Act it has been
shown that out of $64,088,74X38 in
premiums collected by employers'
liability companies, men and women
injured got approximately 24 per
cent, lawyers got 24 per cent., and
the insurance companies got 52 per
cent. No wonder the latter were the
most vicious opponents the measure
had to meet during its passage to
law.
CENTRAL PARLIAMENT
Discussion   Continued  on   King's Speech���Mr.    Plemming,    Liberal
Member   for   Saanich.   Delivers a Telling Speech���Attorney-
General Resigns
C;r
At Winnipeg a labor representation committee has been formed eluring lhe last month for the purpose of
securing labor representation upon
all public bodies for the purpose of
organizing the working class into
one consolidated political body. Officers were elected as follows : Chair- I Cariboo 2,.
man. VV. B. Simpson; vice chairman, Chilliwack
A, E. Moore; secretary, R. A. Rigg;|Ymir  -
The second session of the Central
Parliament opened punctually at
8 o'clock last je'riday night. Prior tei
the lieiu-e sitting the labor party had
a meeting in camera, the result of
which was not made public. Mr. F,
Way. speaker, was in the chair when
proceedings started. The house was
crowded and the ladies' gallery was
occupied by a dozen women who
evinced keen interesi in the proceedings.
The following is a li-t of the members and  ihe constituencies they re
tained.
speech
was .easily     the
evening, and  th
congratulated
best
Libit their
present :
Seats
Atlin --.-
Alberni -_
C.iril  -.
treasurer, A. W. Puttee; and the Following as executive committee : R. S.
Ward, W. S. Bartlett, G. Barlow. J
V. Johnson. O. Reynolds, J. R McBride, and I'.. McGrath.
*   *   *
The Vancouver local union of the
Municipal Employees has made application lo the Labor Department
for lhe appointment eef a board "f investigation under ihe Industrial Dis.
pute Investigation   Vet,    They allege
e. I'llluX     	
Cranbrook .
Columbia    .
Delia	
Dewdney --
Esquimalt --
Fernie 	
Greenvi. >��� >e
Grand Fori -
Islands   	
Kamloops
Kaslo	
... Mr
... Mr.
.  Mr.   K
Mr. R
_   Mr.
--   Mr.
..   Mr.
Names
Christie
Cera vile m
Lamond
.1. X, irris
Batehelor
v'   Feast
llnll-t
liscriininalion  on  the part  of certain | Lillooet
officials in lhe scavenging
works departments.
ami water.
Il
TRY- NEW- LIFE
The  whole family can use it.    Every   "TRY-NEW-LIFE"   is
made of the very best material and by the most skilled workmen,
and if given reasonable  care every  one  of  the  machines   will
last a lifetime.
"TRY-NEW-LIFE" will relieve pain.    No matter whether it is
a splitting headache, rheumatism, indigestion, neuralgia, or many
other ailments, "TRY-NEW-LIFE" will bring relief.
Write for particulars or call at the office of the Hamilton-Beach
Sales Co., 707-708 Bank of Ottawa Building.
Also on sale at
HAMILTON-BEACH  SALES CO.. 721  Yates St.. Victoria
BARBERS'  SUPPLY  CO.,  617  Robson  St..  Vancouver
BURNS   4    CAIRNS'    DRUG   STORE,    Vancouver    Block,
Vancouver ,     ,
CEDAR COTTAGE PHARMACY,  South Vancouver
NORTH   SHORE  DRUG  CO.,  North  Vancouver, B.C.
PEOPLE'S  DRUG  STORE, 25th and Main Street
Vancouver
Hamilton-Beach Sales Company
707-708 Bank of Ottawa Building Vancouver, B.C.
is rumored thai some preeminent
labor official  will  he'    appointed    as
Minister ol" Labor under the' new Wil-
sun government in the United States,
and it is further slated that the choice
will be either lohn Mitchell, .if the
United Mine Workers ,,
or .lames Lynch, president of the International Typographical Union of
America.
* e|e       *
A general election is expected in
Alberta shortly, and it is rumored
that Clem Stubbs, president of District 18. of thc United Mine Workers
of America, will be the candidate of
thc  workers   in   Lethbrldge.
* *    *
Thc Trades and Labor Council, of
Vancouver, at its last meeting instructed the secretary to write asking for the appointment of six of
their number as commissioners for
placing the names of citizens on the
voters' list, and the commissions
have been  received  from  Victoria.
V. ,v castle
Nanaimo -
Nelson 	
Vale   	
I   >k   II     ,-   Ml
Revclstoke
Richmond
Rl --land   .
Skeen i
Vmerica, Saanich   -
   Mr.  I   Fackson
   Mr.   R.  Neise
 Mr. N. 1'.   Neise
    Mr.    Ilurrv
- Mr. J. VV. Franklin
Mr   R. Il   Champion
.- --   Mi.   Young
  Mr. A  .1. Phell
-    Mr.   Payne
    M.    Neelands
Mr   I!  C. Bracewell
- Mr.  VV. Thompson
Mr.   Wav   i Speaker I
ivcrtiincnt
's. 11
Mr.   I
  Mi
ni
The secretary of the Stevedores
Union of Great Britain states that all
ports throughout the kingdom arc
being visited by various leaders wijh
a view to the amalgamation of all
the unions connected with transport.
The question is to be submitted to a
vote of the membership. If the
scheme is adopted thc Amalgamated
Transport Workers' Union will include a quarter of a million members
The ultimate object is fusion with the
Railwaymcn's LTnion with a view to
ending partial strikes. The leaders
consider the failure of the dock
strike of last year was due to the
multiplicity of unions.
��    *    ��
The strike of carters at Ashton-
under-Lyne in Staffordshire has been
settled on the following terms. The
union   is  to  be   officially  recognized.
Similkameen
Slocan   	
Vancouver 1.
Vancouver 2.
Vancouver 3.
Vancouver 4,
Vancouver 5.
Victoria 1. --
Victoria 2. _.
Victoria 3. ..
Victoria 4, _.
Cowichan       Mr.   Lew
The leader of thc Opposition (Mr.
McGeer) took the floor in the opening of the debate, and criticised thc
speech in detail. Mr. Kay (Skecna)
followed, and referred to the Attorney-General's     previous     speech     in
This
f the
rals are to be
stalwart.
The Prime Minister replied, ami
endeavored to show thc House that
while the speech diel not cover the
whole ground they had purposely
br. .tic.In forward the three bills mentioned believing that if they could
carry them through they would do
inestimable g'...el to the Province.
li then moved that the question
be now [int. The division she.weel the
Government had a substantial majority which was as follows : For
ih,- speech, I.i; against, 7. The labor
parly abstained from v..tine, giving
as their reason thai they did nol
wish io defeat the G
this juncture.
I he I louse then wenl into ci im-
miiiee. Mr. R. II. Neelands, labor
member for Kamloops, being >���!-.
unanimously to lake tin- chair,
( Mr. Lamond, Liberal member for
Cariboo, chairman of the House
Committee thai had been formed al
tlie opening session, an I which was
composed .ef all parties, brought in
a report in whieh he stated that they
would Ilk.- their duties to be more
fully defined. It was unanimously
���'igrvi .1 t., thai the committee have
complete charge if ihe finances, along
with thai going tin- arrangement fi
halls ior meetings, printing, an.I
mus other things. The commit-
elutie- wen- quite apart 111un
vernment, which might change
ai any time. Tlie committee was
then maele ,-i permanent one They
will be known as tin Ways and
Means Committee.
The constitution was then taken
up, and alter some discussion the
Clerk was instructed to read through
the Collingwood constitution, clause
by clause. They were almost unanimously adopted with some slight ,-,|_
terations. One clause that caused a
greal amount eel" discussion was that
fixing the number of members at 42.
The member lor Cariboo (Mr. Lain, .ml i moved that it be 62, and in
Mr. Messenger doing so intimated that there were
.- Mr. Jenkins twenty gentlemen who wished to
join but who were unable to get
seats, the forty-two scats being alf
taken. This caused a lively discussion, the Attorney-General (Mr.
Thomas I hotly disapproving of such
a move, but despite his efforts the
House  agreed  to  increase  the
M
VV, Thomas
Mr.   James
Henderson
-   Mr   Jacques
.   Dr,   Murphy
.  I   Robertson
Mr     II.    Kay
Mr.   Plemming
J.   Henderson
    Mr.   Payne
Mr. I II. Lester
Mi. J. J. McGeer
Mr. J. 0. James
..  Mr. 1. Rankin
  Mr. C.  Hill
 - Mr. Diffin
tee
the
Go
mem-
prcvious
bership  to 62.    Mr.  Thomas  itnmed
which hc had stated that thc y.
Liberal Government' in thc Province I ,'']te'-v handed in his resignation to the
had done absolutely nothing. Mr. ! Lr"��e Minister. This is the first
Kay refuted that, stating that theK1*" ��* dissension in the cabinet. The
only time thc Liberals had been in Att��rney-General usually has the fat-
power was with a coalition .test salary in all governments, and it
Mr. Hemming, Liberal member n^T,��� "''T , ;iurj,risin& that Mr.
Saanich. was in fine form. Taking S���.T V ��^ ,,lr"w "'' such *
the Clauses in the speech seriatim, he '., C"' ",c "v'""y ,"cw members will
went over it Trom start to finish in i PILto~" under the process of bal-
a style which was not particularly I v,'"1\, ? *\ Provuled !��� ���" the
pleasing to the government. One'
clause in particular, wherein it referred  to  the  high   esteem  in   which
British Columbia fruit was held in
thc markets here and in the Old
Land, hc asked if the printer had not
made a typographical error. He
thought it should have read "high
price." This witty sally "brought
down the house," and going on in a
racy vein he practically tore the
speech to pieces. He declared that
it was more remarkable for what it
did not contain than for what it con-
was
The committee having risen, the
Speaker then again took the chair,
and on the motion of Mr. Campbell,
Provincial Secretary, the main question was put to the House, and the
Constitution Act as amended
agreed to.
The House adjourned at 11 o'clock,
the members being well pleased with
the night's work.
The next session will be held on
Thursday. Good Friday being the
usual  meeting night. I'liUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 1913
TJ^^*CHINOOK
PUBLISHED
Every  Saturday  by  thc  Greater  Vancouver   Publishers   Limited
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TELEPHONE :    All departments  Fairmont 117/
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Postage to American, European and other Foreign Countries, ll.OO
ftr year eatra.
TO CORRESPONDENTS I We will not print anonymous letters.
though Inviting communication on current cventi. to be published
over the writer's   signature.
FALSE CREEK
THE passing of the False Creek agreement signifies
that the people are anxious to make terms which
will attract railways to the City of Vancouver. While
much was said for and against the terms of the agreement, the popular feeling was that the way should be
made clear for the Canadian Northern Railway to make
its Pacific Coast terminus at Vancouver. Whether the
C. X. R. should occupy thc f'"alse Creek Hats or not was
after all more ur less of a secondary consideration; the
main issue was that Vancouver was in need of the C. N,
R. and that that railway should come to that city.
South Vancouver will be a large benefactor by the
ratification of the agreement by the voters of Vancouver a week ago. Not only will it mean that the terminus
of a second transcontinental line will be located close to
the borders of South Vancouver, but the fact that the
C. N. R. railway will probably enter the city through this
municipality will excite activity incidental to all railway
construction.
The passing of the bylaw must also be construed as a
victory for Mayor Baxter. Mayor Baxter was one of the
keenest supporters of an agreement with the C. N. R.
before his election to the Chief Magistrate's chair. Since
that time he has not wavered in his convictions, but has
consistently been one of the foremost lighters n have
it passed. Its success at the hands of the voters a week
ago therefore is a tribute to Mayor Baxter who waged
a vigorous campaign in its favor.
With the False Creek tide Hats problem now solved
ami an early coming of the C. N. R. railway, Greater
Vancouver should enter upon another era of prosperity.
Railroads are a big factor in the upbuilding of any large-
city. The C. P, R. will always be the recognized pioneer.
If the C. N. R. can only accomplish as much as thc
C. P. R. did in its early stages there will be no reason to
regret the C. X.  R. agreement.
issail   the   newcomer;   temptations   to   live beyond     his
mans, i,i lose his all in efforts to get rich too quickly;
temptations   to  squander  his  patrimony  in ways   which
city life make easy.
FEMININE HEADGEAR
P"VKX angels might well fear te, walk in where a con-
C* troversy concerning feminine headgear, or any other
kind of feminine wearing apparel, for that matter, is
raging; but the late announcement that women arc to
wear smaller hats is too tempting to pass masculine notice.
The big hat has had a long and variegated tenure
Millions eef dollars must have been squandered annually
on headgear surplusages; and the worst of it is that women have gained nothing in beauty by a resort to extravagances which have made purses lean; on thc contrary, often the lines of fine, fair faces have been broken
and  marred  by  too much  hat.
It would not bc fair or truthful to say that the big
hats worn by women in recent years are immoral; but
are they not unmoral?
They deface beauty; they have been prolific breeders
of headaches; they swelter the scalp and thin the hair;
they have increased the pad bill and the rat bill; they
have bulled the Oriental hair market, and have ushered
in upon us that monstrous projection, the swollen and
elongated Psyche knot.
What with their deep recesses, blind passes, floundering feathers, long pins, buckles, birds, flower gardens,
elusive horizontals, mysterious curves, flubdttbberies, gro-
tesqueries, symbolisms and rioting colors, we shall gladly say good-bye to the big hats.
BLOODLESS BATTLES
OWIXG to the use of high-velocity projectiles and
other things the wars of the future may be bloodless, so thinks Garrett P. Serviss, who writes :
"The experiences of the surgeons at the field hospitals
in the Balkan War have again demonstrated what was
shown during the Spanish-American War, namely, thc
combined mercifulness and effectiveness of the modern
small-calibre,  high-speed bullet.
"It is merciful because it produces small wounds, which
heal rapidly, even when important organs are penetrated,
and it is effective because, when it does not kill outright,
it renders the victim of its stroke unable to continue
lighting while it leaves him in condition to quit the field
and to become a serious charge upon the resources of
the enemy, since his friends must, necessarily, nurse and
care for him.
"It costs more, both in labor and in money, to care for
-wounded soldiers than to bury dead ones. And so the
modern rifles, which dart bullets that resemble short,
thick needles, with velocities that might almost be compared with those of meteors, tend to abolish war by
making it more costly.    .   .    .
Thc humanity of war could bc promoted by substituting for bullets some other form of projectile which would
merely stun without wounding or killing. If it were
possible to shoot some kind of stifling smoke, or vapor,
into the faces of thc enemy, which had thc effect of rendering them temporarily incapable of action, a glorious
victory might be gained without the shedding of a drop
of blood.
"Who can be sure that something of this kind may not
be done before another century has passed? Then a
great battle would become no bloodier than a fight with
snowballs, and yet the result might be just as decisive,
for one side is victorious and the other beaten even in a
snow battle. It is thc moral element that controls in
either case, for tlie side that can stand the most pottnd-
ing is the side that wins, whether the missiles consist
of balls of lead or balls of snow."
^M CIVIC CO-OPERATION
FOR seime time past there have been propositions made
looking to the co-operation of the various Municipalities of the Lower Mainland in adopting the idea of
the County Councils of England. F.x-Reeve Weart, of
Burnaby, has been a persistent advocate of this idea with
regard to Burnaby and the adjacent Municipalities of
Richmond, South Vancouver and Point Grey, believing
that such a body could co-operate with a view to dealing with the many important matters which affect these
Municipalities jointly, There is no question but that
some such method of solving the various inter-municipal
questions must come in the very near future, and it is
to be hoped that at no distant date this very important
question will bc considered very carefully with a view to
evolving some legislative body along the lines suggested.
This same idea has been further promoted by thc Council
of Maple Ridge, which at its last meeting suggested that
adjoining Municipalities affected might get together to
approach the Provincial Government with a view to the
establishment of a rock crusher at Pitt Lake for the
supply of crushed rock for road making purposes which
might be secured more cheaply and conveniently than
hitherto. There are many such problems which the various Municipalities and cities of the Lower Mainland
might get together upon by the establishment of a central council made up of an equal number of representatives from thc various communities represented. At the
present time there is very little cohesion or co-operation
in the solving of the many municipal problems which
confront the various civic bodies, and which in many instances are interurban. and as a result each community
tackles and solves in its own way the questions before
it, and often without regard to the rights or interests of
the adjoining communities, with the result that time and
money is lost, and the best results difficult, if not impossible, of attainment. With the rapid development that
is going on in this section of the Province it is imperative that some immediate steps be taken with a view to
co-operation in the solving of the questions of sewerage,
water supplies, franchises for public utilities and thc
building of main highways. By thc getting together in
this manner the people could be better protected in
many ways, and much time and money saved. As the
various communities on the Lower Mainland continue
to grow and "prosper, their interests will become more
identical, and it will become more and more imperative
for concerted action looking to the preservation of their
rights and interests. Such a movement should therefore
be encouraged, and it is to be hoped that in the very
near future some one person or council will see fit to
move actively in the matter with a view to making this
co-operative body an accomplished fact.���"Coquitlam
Star."
GUNPLAY
WHEN Herman Rosenthal was murdered in New
York, and revelations as to police crookedness
ensued, every writer in the country seems to have snatched bis pen, dipped it in blood, and started to write gunplay fiction. While the daily newspapers were still
screaming forth the wickedness of Lieut. Becker, and the
moral reformers denouncing the corruptness of the administration, these white-hot manuscripts began to pour
in upon the magazine editors. With their own minds
keyed up to a keen interest in the exposures, the editors
seized upon the stories as "great stuff." Large checks
were written and mailed. It was "good hunting" for the
writers wdio had grasped the opportunity; good hunting
indeed.
The shooting took place last July. Magazines nowadays are printed months ahead of time, so it was fall before the epidemic of gunplay literature reached thc public in full virulence. It has raged ever since. Readers
at first welcomed the stuff with that mild interest which
attaches to events a month or two old. Then they became irritated by it. It was too much of a good thing
to find a shooting in every dozen pages, and a corrupt
policeman lurking around every corner, A lot of people
are hungry for the good old stories which wcre sweet
with romance that did not smell of gunpowder.
It is to be hejped that the smallpox of killings has
sp;nt its force. It has done much to give the public a
false idea of thc dangers of great cities. The real perils
of these places are not the armed bandits wdio occasionally take life at the bidding of political bosses. Rather
does the menace lurk in the manifold temptations which
LOCAL PARLIAMENTS
TTHE "Leader of the Opposition" in the Central Parlia-
��� ment paid a visit to Collingwood on Saturday, had
a cordial reception and gave some very sensible advice.
Mr. Jas. McGeer gave as his opinion that in ils "Constitutional Bill." Elections Bill," and "Naval Bill" the Collingwood Government had been a little too ambitious.
The visitor gave the very sensible counsel that an amateur parliament would do well to pay most attention to
the matters which affected their daily lives���wages, hours
of labor, good roads, extension of markets, pure food,
education, encouragement to art, literature, education,
all these are matters which can be discussed with zest, and
their discussion will have an educational effect on the
debaters, and may even have an influence in moulding
the lives of the people.
Mr. McGeer spoke to the point, too, when he advised
"honorable members" to think about and study the
subject on which they speak. "Get your facts from the
best authorities, get the latest statistics, verify your quotations, put your arguments in the most telling order, and
learn to condense so that every moment of your time
may be effectively occupied." This was quite a little
treatise on the art of public speaking, and it may be said
of our local parliaments that they are not only eloquent
themselves, but that they incite eloquence from thc lips
of very welcome visitors.
The  curator  of  the   Collingwood  Library  has  received
from  Mrs.  C , of  Port  Haney, a very pleasant  letter
and a welcome present of books for the Reference De-
partment. The books arc on Mining, Arithmetic, and
Mechanics, and will prove very useful. The lady who
has kindly remembered that books are always welcome
at a public library, reads "The Chinook," and like our
ither readers, near and distant, she appreciates the column "Men, Women and Books." The letter, a truly and
sweetly feminine ep'stle, gossips of Old London, "the
little village for which she has the affection shown by
'Felix Penne.'" "The Chinook" is glad to be the means
if awakening memories of the Old Land. We are glad, too,
that we can call attention to the fact that the Collingwood
Library welcomes gifts of books and magazines. Our
friend, the "gentle reader" at Port Ilancy has set an ex-
unple wc htfpe many will follow.
Canadian Ideals
(Toronto Star Weekly)
Francis W. Grey, writing in the
University Magazine, on education
and nationality, thinks there is senile
danger in our system of Provincial
control "f education.   Our provinces,
he says, lack the three supreme lieeiiels
of unity���race-, religion, and common
education. There is "no real, but only
a superficial and political unity or
community of ideals and interests,
and without that common mentality
which goes to make a nation, just as
surely as blood and blood eeiily goes
to make a race."
Mr. Grey's remedy is a national
council of education and a more
thorough study of Canadian history
through a Dominion Historical Commission, which would publish and distribute free in every province a "documented"  history  of  Canada.
I do not wish to antagonize these
ideas, but to point out that those who
fear that the bond of Canadian unity
is too weak, do not always take into
at count two great unifying forces���
Canadian nationality and common
humanity.
Nothing could be more foolish and
dangerous than thc attempt that is
being made by some people to belittle
and discourage Canadian nationality
���to endeavor to show that Canada
can never be a British nation, but
must   be  a   provi of  the   Empire.
Such an idea inv i a confession of
inferiority to the United States, and
thus weakens one of the strongest
defences   against   annexation.
But the greatest bond, after all, is
common humanity, If we think of our
fellow-Canadians, met as Nova
Sceitians or Albertans, Catholics or
Protestants, French or English, but j
as men, women, and children, we j
shall  not  quarrel  or be  cold-hearted.
For this reason, all our Parliaments
and  municipal councils ought  to pay i
great   attention   to   social   reform���to |
all   those   movements   which   help   to i
uplift   humanity;  to  give  every   man,
woman,  and   child   iii   Canada   a   fair i
chance to grow.   This is the essential
thing,   which   is   at   the   root   of   all
movements for housing the poor, and
for    abolishing  food   taxes,  and     for
belter  wages,   for  insurance    against
sickness  and  unemployment,  and  for
old-age  pensions,  and   for   sanitation,
physical    and    moral���for    the    fight
against   thc  white  plague,     and     the
fight   against   white  slavery.
If the Dominion Parliament, and
the Provincial Legislatures, and the
city and county and township councils, will pay more attention to these
things, they will find new temptations
to quarrel and many opportunities to
co-operate.
I have just been reading again some
of Carlyle's furiietis diatribes against
the spirit of his age���against democracy and the extension of the franchise, against free and abundant food.
Carlyle was right in saying that men
could not be saved by the franchise
alone, nor by plenty to eat alone.
What he failed to sec was that these
are both elements of growth, and that
the cure f jr gross materialism is more
growth.
Some splendid speeches against
gross materialism have been made by
men who were inspired by turtle soup,
Burgundy, mushrooms, peas, and asparagus out of season.
Workingmen do not demand these
things, but they and their children
must have abundance of wholesome
food if they are to become strong men
and women, citizens who would make
Canada strong. They must have con.
venicnt, spacious, and sanitary
houses, their children must have playgrounds, All these are elements of
growth.
Thc franchise is of little use if it
merely means marking a piece of
paper with a cross. But the franchise
is a tremendous thing if it means the
record of the thought of millions of
men, and evidence of the growth of
millions of souls, and a means of
stimulating that growth. That is the
problem of democracy. There lies the
hope of making Canada the greatest
democracy in the world.
 s   ^    s	
Child Labor
(Ottawa Citizen)
The story of child slavery in the
New York canneries is a reminder
that Ontario has similar establishments, with similar perils to the
young lives frequently employed. Ontario cannot afford to make a cent of
profit by thc employment of cheap
child labor. Child labor is always
dearest in the end, so far as society at
large is concerned.
 a   ^   s
Might Do It Well at That
(Amherst, N. S. "News")
Sir William Meredith, in his report on the Farmers Bank, makes the
significant statement that the incorporators had no experience in the
business of banking or in any other
business in which they would have
acquired the knowledge essential to
the successful launching of a bank.
The commissioner is evidently of thc
opinion that a banker should understand farming. Most people think
as he does, although there are individuals who talk at times as if they
thought an amateur without experience capable of managing successfully anything under the sun from a
one-man establishment to a nation.
 s sits ���	
A Warning to the Doctors
(Medicine Hat "Call")
In the Dominion House tbe other
night the doctors came in for some
hard knocks. We do not believe they
were all deserved, but there is some
ground for some of them, and the
doctors would do well in their own
interest to see that all possible
grounds for such criticisms are removed so far as possible. In every
body of men some black sheep are
to be found, and we believe tbat the
proportion amongst the doctors is
very low. By a united effort it might
be  made  lower still.
HARRY KAY
PAINTER   AND   DECORATOR
Phone: Fair. 326       4518 Main St.
Watch This Space Next Week
We are going to put on the cheapest sub-division in Collingwood East; meanwhile, for the cheapest homes and lots in this
vicinity consult
Fletcher & Brett
OFFICE:    JOYCE ROAD PHONE:    Coll. 24
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, LOANS, ETC.
NOTARIES PUBLIC
DOMINION EXPRESS MONEY ORDERS ISSUED
HEIDELBERG BEER
Always keep a bottle or two on ice at
your home. It's ready when you need
a refreshing and invigorating beverage.
Costs less than 9 cents a pint bottle.
As pure as money can buy. Order from
your dealer today.
Canadian Brewing and Malting Co. Ltd.
South Vancouver Builders' Supply Company
Dealers in Sand, Gravel, Fibre, Cement, Lime, Plaster, Vitrified
Pipe, Tile, Fire-clay, Lath, and Brick of all kinds.
Offices :   51st Avenue and Fraser Street.    Phone : Fraser 36.
Main and 29th Avenue.    Phone :   Fairmont 1940.
Fraser Street and North Arm of Fraser River.    Phone : Fraser 84.
Coal orders taken at all offices and delivered to all parts of South
Vancouver.
ROOFING TILE
California Mission Roll
Spanish Roll Plain Square
In Colors Red and Green
EVANS,C0LEMAN&EVANS
Phone 2988
Limited        Ft. of Columbia Ave.
VITRIFIED SEWER  PIPE AND
ALL FITTINGS
C. Gardiner - Johnson & Company
Johnson's Wharf
Phone : Sey. 9145
B.C.   EQUIPMENT   CO.
MACHINERY   DEALERS
CONCRETE MIXERS, STEEL CARS, ROCK CRUSHERS, ELECTRIC, STEAM,
AND    GASOLINE    HOISTS.      WHEELBARROWS.    TRANSMISSION
MACHINERY,   GASOLINE   ENGINES,   PUMPS,   AND
ROAD  MACHINERY
Phones :  Seymour 7050-7818 Offices :  606-607  Bank of Otuwi Bide.
FINE   LOTS
ON STEPHEN  STREET, AT $400���TWO  BLOCKS  FROM
VICTORIA ROAD.   EASY TERMS
Wanted���Good   building   Lots   in   vicinity   of   Knight   Uoad
at reasonable prices
THOS. Y. LEITCH
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Cor. Knight and Westminster Rds. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone : Fairmont 1653
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
SOLE AGENTS FOR B. C. SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
Donaldson   &   McDonald
Dealers in
HAY, GRAIN, AND FEED
All Kinds of Chicken Feed
4213 Main Street
Phone : Fairmont 1514
The Robertson-Godson Co. Ltd.
Wholesale Plumbers' Supplies, Water Works
Supplies. Corporation Brass Goods.
572 Beatty Street
Vancouver
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
1949 ALBERT ST. PHONE :  HIGHLAND  530R
ENGINEERS. MACHINISTS AND  FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS  AND SPECIALS
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
TO HOUSE BUILDERS
We have the stock, the machinery and the men
to produce first-class
SASHES AND DOORS
SEE US BEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDER
Collingwood Sash and Door Factory
COLLINGWOOD   WEST  STATION
CAPP & TILBURY, Proprietors
Lumber ��� Lath ��� Doors
Buy Our Shingles
SPECIALTY-
PROMPT DELIVERY
We Have the Equipment
COAST LUMBER & FUEL
COMPANY  LIMITED
4905 Ontario Street Cor. Bodwell (34th Avenue)
Phone:   Fraser 41
Buy Your House
Cleaning Materials
Alabastine, Hall's Distemper,
Liquid Veneer, Step Ladders,
etc., etc.
G. E. McBride & Co.
Corner Sixteenth Avenue and
Main Street
Corner 49th Ave. and Fraser Street
OUR QUALITY IS THE ESSENCE OF CHEAPNESS
���Bgk THIS IS AN OtO ONE BUT-
George H. Doran, the New York
publisher, had a call not long ago
from a young friend just out of college, who confessed to an ambition
to write a modern novel. He wanted
to know Doran's views touching on a
popular treatment.
'Well," said Doran, "it seems to me
that in a novel such as you contemplate writing you should endeavor to
enlist the attention of the reader
from  the very  start.    Try  to  make
your opening paragraph unusual and
bright."
Thc prospective author thanked
him ami departed. Shortly thereafter
he sent Doran for consideration the
finished draft of his novel. When he
saw the first sentence of chapter one
Doran realized how thoroughly his
young friend had absorbed his advice.
It read as follows:
"'Oh, hell!' exclaimed the Duchess,
who up to this point had taken no
part in the conversation."
"Then I'm te, tell the- firm." ilie- bill
collector laid, making a memorandum
in his note-book, that you'll pro.
bably settle this account nest week?"
"Well, IM hardly put it that way,"
hesitatingly    answered    the    other.
'"Probably1  is  a   pretty  stpeiiK  weird.
Heller   make   it   'possibly.1 "
* *    *
\ witty judge eef the municipal
court of Bolton stoutly declared that
"a patriol wai a man who refused t'e
butte,n  his wife's  lingerie  waist."
"A martyr." he wenl un, "is one
"he. attempts and fails, while a lure,
irie^ anil succeeds."
"Then what is a coward?" asked a
CUrioUi   bystander.
"Oh, a coward," replied the judge,
"is a man  wine  remains single su he
won't have to try."
eSe.Se
"A cat sits on my back fence every
night and he yowls and yowls and
yowls. Now, I don't want to have
any trouble with neighbor Jones, but
this thing has gone far enough, and 1
want yuu to  tell  me  whal   to do."
Thc young lawyer looked as solemn
as an ��.1 ��1 sick owl, and said not a
word,
"I have a right tee shool the cat,
haven't  I?"
"I we.idel hardly say that," replied
young Coke Blackstone. "The cat
does not belong to yent, as I understand it."
"No, but the fence does."
"Then." concluded the light of law,
"I think il sale to say yeeu have a perfect right to tear down the fence.
* *     *
The little man had taken his wiiV
anel children to sec the traveling show.
After viewing all the sights that
could he viewed for nothing, the entire family lined up in freeiit e,f a large;
booth, which advertised in huge letters een the outside : "The Crand
Elk���the wonder of thc  world."
On a small ledge in front of this
booth paced the showman himself entreating all and sundry t.e "come Up
an' view." Presently his attention
was attracted by the little ran who
gazed earnestly and wistfi'Hy at hire.
"'Ere, yon." he called. "Ain't yer
comin' up?    It's emly sixpence."
But thc litt.c man only Bhook liis
head.
"Can't." lit whispered. "It 'ml cost
me eleven shillins' If I did. Ver iee,
there's mc an* my wife an' twcni;'
children.''
"What!" exclaimed the showman,
hoarse with incredulity, and pointing
to the long line of earnest laces. "Are
all of them yours?"
A nod was the little man's sole answer.
"Good heavens!" cried the man of
the booth, as he bounded tei ils entrance. "Don't yer move, gu/'nor!
Just stay where y'are. I'm going to
give the Great Elk a treat. I'm going to bring 'im out to 'ave a look
at yuu."
* e.       *
Tommy  had   commenced  again.
"Dad," he asked, "does it cost much
to keep a lion."
"It docs, my son."
"A wolf would make a good meal
fur a lion, wouldn't it, elad?"
"Yes."
"And a fox would do for the wolf,
wouldn't it. dad?"
"I  suppose su; gu and play."
"A fox would he satisfied with a
hawk, and a sparrow would be enough
for a hawk, eh, dad?"
"Yes.     If you  don't  go away "
"And a spider would make's meal
fur a sparrow?"
"Yes, yes.   Now "
"Wait a minute, dad. A spider,
weiuld he satisfied with a fly, wouldn't
it?"
"Yes, my  sun."
"And   a   drop   of   treacle   would   be
enough feer a fly?"
"Well, supposing it would?"
"Yes, that's just it, dad.   N'uw whal
I  want yeni lo tell mc is this.    Ceiuld
a   man   keep  a   lion   for   more   than  a
year with a pound of treacle'"
And then the sound of a falling
slipper awoke the echoes "i the stilly
night.
* A      A
Il was in eme eii tlie garrison towns
where a gun is fired every evening
at sunset. An aunt from London
came down on a visit lo her young
seelelier nephew, and they were out
walking together thc first evening,
when Ihe sunset gun went off. The
old  lady was greatly  startled,
"What  was  that?"  she  gasped.
"Oh. only sunset," replied the nephew.
"Sunset." repeated thc eeld lady.
"Dearie me! I suppose it's because I
live in London, where there are so
many other nuiscs, that I never heard
it before. I'd no idea the sun went
down with such a bang."
* *    *
"Say, Snibbs, let me use your
'phone, will you?"
"Certainly. What's the matter with
yours?"
"It's all right. I want to telephone
to my wife that I'm going to bring a
man from out of town to dinner."
"Well?"
"He's sitting in my room now, and
I hate to have him watch my face
when my wife tells me what she
thinks of the proposition."
ef       *       *
Angry old gent: "Constable, didn't
you see that boy hit me with a snowball?"
Policeman: "Oi did, sorr. It's
wonderful how straight them _ young
varmints  can  throw, begorra!"
* *    *
"Now, Jim," said the old lady to
her son who was about to leave the
countryside to try his luck in London, "there's plenty of money in that
big city, for the streets are said to be
even paved with gold."
Jim, like the Scotchman, "had 'is
doots," but these were quickly removed, for he had barely got out of
Euston Station when, to his surprise,
he espied, slily reposing on the kerb,
a bright, glittering sovereign.
Eagerly he picked it up, and walked
a   I,nie   further   on.   when   he   eaini
across a blind man win, was begging
At once hi- sympathetic heart went
eeut to the unfortunate man, anil as
In- pul the sovereign into his hand, he
���aid:    "Take ilu-. my friend.    I eau
-ee'   Ym,  thee  can't."
* ��    .
"I've neet a poem,'' !����� -aiel, when he
hail     se. tired   the   attention     of     the
eelilor.
"My   dear,   sir.   lhat   pigeon .hole   is
filled  with  poem-  awaiting publication."
"Hut this describes the virtues of
ihe Ache Destroyer, and I will pay
five dollars a line to have it printed."
said the author.
"Ah. charming I I'm glad to see yeeu
turn your attention te, verse. I wish
all  had your gift."
* s>    *
He- saw her sitting in the dark
corner, and knew that his chance- hail
come-. Noiselessly he stole up be.
hind her, and almost before she was
aware e,f his presence he hael ki-sed
I er
"How dare you'" she shrieked, delighted.    "You saucy  buy. you!"
"Pardon me," he bluffed, readily
stepping emt inlee the light, "I though!
ye .ii  were- illy sister."
"You silly idiot." sin- snapped, step,
ping into Ihe light beside him, "I
am I"
* e.        *
The mistress came downstairs and
tried tin- ih.e.r of the sitting-re eom.
only tee fitnl it locked against her,
while the key, which was usually in
tin- lock, was missing.
"Bridget, I can't get into Ilie- par.
lor."  she cried.
"Shure it's ineself knows that; an'
ye won't, lur 1 have the kay in me
pocket."
"Open   the   door   immediately."
"\\ ill    VIZ   U'e   i"   il    I    d'e?"
"Certainly I will."
"Then   yez   don't   get   the   kay."
"Open the door immediately! What
iln  you  mean?"
"Shure it's by your orders. Ye said
yesterday, 'Don't let nie conn- downstairs in the meirnin' an' see any dusl
on the parlor furniture!' S<> I just
puis the kay in nu- pocket, an', says
I, 'Then  she  sha'n't.'"
* *    *
At the cle.se 'if his talk before a
Sunday    school    thc    bishop    invited
questions.
A tiny boy with white eager face
[at eence held up his hand. "Please,
sir," said he, "why was Adam never a
baby?"
The bishop coughed, in doubt as to
j what answer tu give, bul a little girl,
the eldest uf several brothers and
sisters, came promptly  tu his aid.
"Please, sir," she answered, smartly, "there was nobody to nurse him."
* a    At
"What an extraordinary curve your
horse has in the spine," said a gentleman to an Irish farmer. "Can you
account for it?"
"lly the powers, sir. and to be sure
I am able. 1 have heard, sir. that before the beast was my property hc
was backed against another heerse.
your honor, whee beat him hollow, and
I daresay it's the reason that his back
never   got   straight   again."
iu  the history of thc
"What  have we goi
dear?"     askeel
Mi
^^^^^^ him    with
"h was t<> have been
poor    cook's
It was early
��� new household
I for    breakfast,
Xewlywed.
His    wife    lo.eked    at
Ire'llbled  e-vesi
bacon,"   sin-   said,   "Im!
burnt   it." W
"Poor cook! 1 ihould think so. indeed." exclaimed Mr. Newlywed.
"Confound lur! Have yeeu given her
notice?"
"Oh, no; we mustn't be cross with
her, darling," saiel his wife, "She's so
young and inexperienced Won'l you
be satisfied with a kiss for breakfast?" she coaxed.
"All right. dear.
Newlywed, suddenly
her in?"
replied
pacifii d,
Mr
'call
"I understand yeeu went over to
I Crimson    Gulch   and    lynched    the
wrong   man."
"No," replied Three-finger Sam.
"You can't lynch the wrong man in
Crimson Gulch. W'e- jesl got Piute
Pete a little bit ahead "I In- linn."
* *    *
Midline was quite bald, with tin-
exception of a single lock which he
Combed carefully over the siele oi his
head. A short time ago seeme young
ladies asked him for his photograph,
and. having a peculiar sense of humor,
hc had a picture taken eif thc top of
his head. About a week afterwards
he went past the photographer's shop
and noticed an immense crowd studying a picture in the window.
He looked and found that the discourteous artist had printed a greatly-enlarged picture of his bald head,
with the black luck running around
thc edge, and had labeled it :
"Eclipse of the Moon. The phenomenon as it appeared at a quarter-
past   eleven."
* *    *
The tramp sat, serene and dirty, on
thc backdoor step eating the breakfast fur which he had asked, and thc
servant stood looking at him curiously.
Presently the knight of the road
observed the attention she was paying him.
"vVotter yer lookin' at me for?"
he asked in idle curiosity. "Think
I'm  a   long-lost  cousing?"
"No," replied the maid, cooly; "but
I must say you remind me of a man
I used to know."
"Sweetheart?" asked the tramp,
coyly.
"None of your business!" was the
maid's retort. "But something happened to him which'll ne er happen
to  you."
"What's that? Died a millionaire,
did he?"
The  maid's re-'- was crushing.
"No; he was accidentally drowned
while bathing."
JIM THORPE
Jim  Thorpe,  who  was  proved    to
have    accepted    meeiiey    for    playing
ha- ball     and     whose   fall   fre,m   the
racks e.f amateurism    has    created a ���
profound sensation,   is   undoubtedly'
one of the greatest athletes the world
has produced    Ai the I Hympic gam -
last  year  tin-  King of  Sweden  grasp-
nl   his   hand  ami   said.     You.   -ir.   an-
the greatest athlete In the world."
In a moment of enthusiasm eulogies
ale    api te,   be   passed     that     second
though* would not approve, but in the
Case   of Thorpe  it   is   to  be  admitted
that   he is  the greatest  athlete  of his |
day, if he i- not the greatest all-round]
man of all time.
There are men today who can run |
faster  than Thorpe at all distances. [
men who can jump farther and higher,
throw   lhe   -hoi   farther,  swim  better."
and   hurl   the  javelin   a   greater   dis-1
tance.    There is ne, one man who can j
do   all   these   things   as   well   as   the I
young Indian,    lie is also a basketball
player of lhe first rank, a good skater.1
a lacrosse and baseball expert, and a
first-class  swimmer
Hundreds, if not thousands, of thc '.
readers  of this article    saw    Thorpe!
play   football   on  that   memorable  occasion    when   the   picked    Canadian i
team was made to lueik like untrained '
schoolboys playing against  the  Car-j
lisle   Indians.    On  that  day  Thorpe :
did not have tu exert himself, but he
did  met  fail  le, impress the critic * as
lhe  greatest  football  player   who  had '
ever been seen. His punting, tackling,
and dodging were s.i remarkable as t"
leave Canadian critics with nee Rugby
hereees   eif   the  pasl   to   compare   with ,
him.
At the close of the football season
last Fall several authorities picked
what they considered tee be the best
team in the l'nited States. Thorpe
was placed on every team. Captain!
Devore, '���!" ihe West Poinl team.
which played a game against Carli-h .
said after a game that Thorpe- was
lhe greatest player he ever saw. "lie
i- superhuman, that's all," he said.
ami further expressed thc view thai |
Thorpe wa- as good a man as two
of the redoubtable Ted Coys.
This athletic marvel is now 24 years
old. lie was born somewhere in the
Middle Western States, and is a full-
blooded member of the Fox and Sac
tribe. When the tribe moved to Oklahoma the Thorpes went along, and it
was in Oklahoma thai young Jim lirsl
attracted local attention as an athlete,
lie was fonder of hunting anel lishing
than of other sports, and had no idea
that his ability to run and jump and
swim were at all extraordinary, until
after he became a member of the Carli-h- Scheeeil, at the age of fourteen.
At that age the statistics show that
he was five feet and half an inch tall,
and weighed 115 pounds. At the present time he is 6 ft. \'A inches, and in
condition weighs 181 pounds. Incidentally his inspiration and expiration
measurements are 42! j and 35'/j
inches. It was one day in the spring
of 19118 that Thorpe was "discovered"
by Glen Warner, the coach and trainer of the Indian athletes.
Warner was putting his training
squad through a stunt at the jumping
bar, and when thc point had been
reached where none of them could
clear it, one of the spectators, dressed
in a working blouse and overalls,
loped out eif the creiwd and sailed uver
lhe bars     It was Jim.
Thenceforth, it may be said, Thorpe
belonged I" athletics. Everything else
was stinoi [mated t" the task of making a j. eat athlete out of him, and
how well Warner succeeded is Bhown
Iby tin- wonderful results at Stockholm when Thorpe, against the best
amateurs in the world, won the pentathlon anil the decathlon, the twee
events that demand all-round athletic
ability
His victories were all ihe more
gratifying to his countrymen because
thej hail little hope ot winning the
all-round championships. The Swedes
had paid pai ticular attention t-> thi se
events, and were ri port el to have
developed some great champions So
when   'I   was  announced   thai   Martin
Sheridan, who had won the all-round
e liampti mship of the United States in
1909, would nol compel.-, the last
li"i"- "i ihe Americans fled.
However, when Thorpe- won first iu
four "in eei iln- five e-irnis i,, ii,,- pen
tot hie eii. anel as sec. .ml in   tin-  fifth, u
'mis plain thai a greater than Sheridan had been discovered. IK- won
I:;r 'I. ..ithi.ni jusl a- easily.
_ i 111 his return to lhe L'nited Slates
Thorpe captured ihe all-round championship of America, just to show
that there had been no fluke at
Stockholm. In doing s.. he rolled up
a total score of ".478 points, which
surpassed the previous rccurd of
Sheridan by 91 points.
Thorpe has run the hundred yards
in ten and one-fifth seconds; the 120
yards high hurdles in fifteen and
three-fifths seconds, and the 220 yards
low hurdles in twenty-five seconds.
He has run a quarter of a mile in
fifty-two and three-fifth seconds, has
put the 16-pound shot 45 feet 1 inch;
has scaled the .discus 125 feet 8
inches, has thrown the hammer 125
feet, has pole-vaulted 10 feet 8 inches,
has jumped 6 feet 4 inches high, and
has covered 23 feet 3 inches at .the
broad jump.
Athletic records fail to reveal any
other man who approached this all-
round performance. Incidentally, it is
worth noting that last fall Thorpe
broke training in Washington, and
was "painting the town red" when
caught by Glen Warner, who went
after him in a rough and tumble fashion, and soundly thrashed him on a
bar-room floor.
In a certain town the local forecaster of the weather was so often
wrong that his predictions became a
standing joke, to his no small annoyance, for hc wan very sensitive. At
length, in despair of living down his
reputation, he asked headquarters to
transfer  him  to another  station.
A  brief correnpondence  ensued.
"Why," asked headquarters, "do
you wish to be transferred?"
"Because," the forecaster promptly
replied, "the climate doesn't agree
with me."
Your
Best
Chance
To get doors cheap. Make
your openings io suit these
doors and save money. A few
odd sizes; like 2 ft. by 6 ft.
8 inches, and 2 ft. by 6 ft.
6 inches. Regular price $2.40.
While They Last $1.25
or we will give one free with
every $20 order.
��   ��
McGibbon Hodgson
Lumber Company
20th Avenue
CEDAR COTTAGE, B. C.
Phone :  Fair.  1659
C. M. WHELPTON
BUILDING CONTRACTOR
ESTIMATES GIVEN
Phone: Fraier 34 - 46th Ave. And Fraser
GREENE & MERKLEY
UNDERTAKERS
SOUTH   VANCOUVER   OFFICE
AND CHAPEL, 16th AND MAIN
STREET
DOWN TOWN PARLORS :
305 PENDER STREET WEST
Phone :   Sey. 340,  Day or   Night
Telephone Fairmont 718
McKean, Holt & Co.
Painters
Paperhangers and
Decorators
4246  FRASER ST.,
Vancouver
Estimates  Free
Public Notices
CORPORATION   OF   SOUTH
VANCOUVER
NOTICE    TO     THE    RATEPAYERS     OR
OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE IN THE
MUNICIPALITY    OF    SOUTH
VANCOUVER
The Government Auditing Commissioner ol
Ihe above-named Municipality will have his
office open from 10 to 11 in the forenoon of
inch day (except elays on which the Public
Inquiry is being helel) for the purpose of
passing accoun'.s; and any Ratepayer or
Owner may be present anel may make any
objection to sue:h accounts as are before tha
Auditor.
JAS.  B. SPRINCFORD,
C M. C.
DR.   A.   J.   BRETT
DENTIST
S.-E.  Cor.  25th Avenue  and  Main  Street
Phone:     FAIRMONT   2056
Phrenology and Palmistry
Mrs. YOUNG
(Formerly of Montreal)
GIYES PRACTICAL ADVICE  ON   BUSINESS ADAPTATION. HEALTH
AND  MARRIAGE
SOS   Granville   Street.   Corner   Robson
Hours:  10 t m. to 9 p.m.
Clara���"May I borrow your beaded
belt, dear?"
Bess���"Certainly. But why all this
formality   of   asking   permission?"
"I can't find iti" SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   MARCH  22,   1913
ONLY A RUNT
-������ a                                                                     ���
	
By Helen Topping
Miller
 0
Jim Bates' wife set her iron de>wn
upon the brick by the side of her
little cob fire. Pushing back her limp
hair, she gazed off down the glaring
trail.
"I 'low Sim's comin' down yan,"
she said, shading her eyes with a hand
as red and gnarled as the foot of a
turkey. "I heerd the wagiti a-
scrcakin'."
On the cabin doorstep, Simeon
Bales thc younger, sixteen years old,
and known to men as Buddy, withdrew a greasy rag from the barrel of
a long rifle he was cleaning, and,
smoothing the black iron of the gun
with caressing fingers, set it against
the door.
"Mam-my," he said wamingly as the
Sound of the approaching wagon
came to his ears, "don't you dast to
tell him I was down to the still."
The woman poked the little blaze,
and changed her iron.
"J reckon thar's enough beatin' and
tattlin' goin' on round hyar 'thout me
helpin' out," observed, with a scornful twist of her thin lips. "But I tole
you to keep away from that thar
still."
Buddy  hid   the  cleaning   rag  carefully   under   the  doorstep.     Then   h
regarded the creeping progress of the
coming wagon, and menially measured the time before it should arrive.
"I reckon he'd beat me plumb to
death ef'n hc knowed I went down
to that still," he remarked. "He said
1 were a white-livered runt, and didn't
have sense enough to keep my mouth
shet."
The woman flung the iron down
with a sullen thud in the middle of
hcr husband's best blue shirt.
"Well, you're his own young one,"
she snapped.
Buddy bumped his shoulders with a
patient movement. lie was a wizened
little fellow, with thc peaked face of
a very old man and the body of a
child. Jt had been bitterness in
Simeon Bates' cup that his only son
had grown up dwarfed in body and
childish in spirit.
"He alwus 'lows I'm kin to the
Weavers," Buddy continued bitterly.
"He 'lows all the Weavers is white-
livered."
A red flame flared in the woman's
face. The Weavers were her people,
and the knowledge that one craven
Ulick Weaver was known to the
mountain people as a coward and a
spy, and that thc reproach of his
cowardice had descended to her son,
bit into her soul like acid.
"I reckon the Weavers is as good
as the Bates!" she retored, thumping thc iron down sullenly. "Ef Sim
Bates didn't think so, whttt fur did he
give you a Weaver for a mammy?"
Sim Bates drove leisurely up the
rocky lane toward his cabin, his gaunt
mule flapping its patient ears at every
step,    the    agonized    wagon    wheels
shrieking at every turn. Sim sat at
thc back of the wagon bed, danging
his long leg's over the side, his elbows
crooked about his knees. Nature in
making him had been sparing of
tints. His hair, ragged and long, his
loose skin, his stubble of beard, and
his little vulture eyes were all a
monotonous shade of sun-baked yellow, a hue that was repeated iu his
shabby garments.
In the tiny patch of shade in front
of thc cabin thc mule stopped and
planted its four feet out squarely, its
iiead hanging down. Sim lurched forward, shifting his tobacco to a more
advantageous position, and surveyed
his family indifferently. Then he
shook himself as if there were a remark concealed somewhere within
him that he wanted to dislodge, /it
last hc spoke.
"Ole Mis' Morgan's daid," he said.
For a long minute his wife left hcr
iron sitting upon the bosom of the
shirt where it smoked, unheeded,
while she stared in palsied amazement
at her husband. Buddy sat a frozen
image eif astonishment upon the doorstep, his lips parted wide, his face a
ghastly yellow. If old Bald Knob,
perched so grim and gray against the
eastern sky. had suddenly flown down
upon the cabin roof, his small world
could  not  have  been  more  upset.
"Waal"���Simeon's voice broke thc
spell upon them���'"tain't no use stan-
in' thar gawpin'. She's plumb daid,
and you all cayn't bring her back nohow. Shet up you' mouth, you. Bud,
and give this here mule some dim."
Mechanically Buddy obeyed. lie
led the listless animal out of the
shadow of the rail pen, and fed it a
sparing meal of soft white ears. But
continually, as if a mill wheel were
turning in his head, lie heard over
and over:    "Ole Mis' Morgan's daid."
Dead! The word had a strange and
numbing sound to him. Nobody
whom he knew had ever died before,
and a sense of personal loss was upon
him. He wondered what old Daddy
Meirgan weiuld do now���poor, old,
lonely Daddy Morgan, who was to
Buddy more like father and mother
than the boy's own, and whom the
youngster loved with the passionate
loyalty of a lonely and ill-treated
child.
Daddy Morgan was Buddy's solitary friend. He it was who had taught
the boy to shoot���straight and true,
as the hillmen shoot. He it was who
had initiated him into the mysteries of
thc great dripping "worm," and the
making of mash���and all the other
mingled material, method, and machinery of thc moonshiner, He had
even hidden Buddy away in the loft
of his cabin on a day when Simeon
Bates stalked the hills, drunk and
ugly, seeking his son.
With old Mis' Morgan Buddy had
not been so intimately acquainted. He
had known hcr only as the loud-
voiced, hard-handed wife of old
Daddy Morgan, a woman with a tongue of vitrol, who brewed dissension
and strife even as her patient, silent
old  husband  brewed  corn  liquor.
Buddy was not much concerned on
her account. Hc was not sorry for
her. All his grief was for the old
man left desolate. Who now would
cook Daddy Morgan's greens and
wash his shirts?
He tied thc mule to the wagon
wheel and walked slowly back to the
cabin. His father sat on thc doorstep, smoking.
"I reckon hit's a good thing that
old woman's daid," Sim was declaiming from the midst of a pillar of
cloud. "She was about thc meanest
old piece on this yere mounting. I
'low she led the old man a dawg's
life; her tongue was a plumb yard
long, and p'son cl'ar to the ind."
His wife ironed, her thin, red hands,
swollen and inflamed at the joints,
moving  swiftly  along the board.
"They do say," she agreed, "as how
she druv her son Danny out, and that
hit like to broke the old man's heart."
Sim spat ieito the cob fire. "They
cayn't nobody blame her for that," he
argued. "Dan was sich a triflin' scoundrel, jist like the old man his daddy.
Alwus settin' round and readin' books.
These here scholards is alwus no
'count."
Buddy winced. This last remark
he knew was intended for his particular benefit. He cast a cautious
glance at the chink in the logs where
he had hidden his precious lirst reader, but the green cover was still safely out of sight.
"Ad Kite says," Sim continued, "as
how the old man is teched in his haid
sence the old woman died���says hc
jest sets on a bench and says nary
weird to anybody. I reckon he's
grievin' after Danny. 'Tain't natural
he's frettin' after the old woman���
such a triflin' old rip as she was."
"Mammy!" Buddy's voice sounded
very thin and far away as he sidled up
to his mother. "I reckon I better go
down to Daddy Morgan's. 'Pears like
he must be lonesome all  bv hisself."
His father's voice rose like a blare
of trumpets. "I reckon you'll git a
hoe and git out to that thar cohn
patch!" he shouted. "Old man Morgan
kin 'tend to his own business without
no triflin' runt like you pesterin'
round.   Git that hoe!   You hyar me?"
Buddy shouldered the hoe, and
trudged down thc hot hillside, rebellion consuming his very soul. If
only the strength of his body were as
great as the might of his spirit, so
that he could order his own going and
coming! _ Other mountain boys were
men at sixteen, while he must remain
a child, beaten and despised for his
weakness.
He crossed the rocky turnip patch
to the distant cornfield, a tiny square
of sun-baked earth, where young corn
sprouted, sparse as pinfeathers on the
breast of the mountain. The spring
sun was hot on his back, and burned
his skin through his thin shirt. The
rough hoe handle blistered his hands.
At the end of the second row he
halted and glanced up toward the
cabin. He saw his father swinging e,ff
down the eastern path a smali jug in
his hand. "Pap's goin' to the still,"
hc said to himself. His mother still
ironed tinder the walnut tree. Before
him stood the crooked rows of corn,
green between springing weeds, the
dry soil crying out for the cool stirring of the hoe. And over there beyond the crook of the trail Daddy
Morgan sat, desolate, in his cabin.
Only a moment Buddy hesitated.
Then, flinging the hoc into a swarming clump of honeysuckle, he leaped
off down the hill as fleet as a rabbit.
The Morgan cabin stood, dreary
and lopsided, at the very top of the
trail up from Lower Turkey. Thc
door was tight shut, the window curtained with a yellowing wisp of
stringy muslin. There was a strange
air of solemnity about it that Buddy
felt instinctively.
A few curious men and snuff-dipping women sat on the doorstep in
thc sun. He slipped through them
without speaking, and lifted the latch.
In the front room the dead woman
was laid out upon a window bier of
calico quilts. Buddy shrank back. He
had never seen a corpse, and even in
life the old woman had inspired a
wholesome fear within him. He
slipped around thc wall, his eyes upon
her, and pushed himself through the
door into the kitchen.
There, upon a bench bv the back
door, gazing off into thc purple distance, where unnumbered hills leaned
their misty heads against the sky, sat
old Daddy Morgan. His long, white
hair and beard swayed a little in the
breeze.
Buddy slipped to the bench by the
old man's side, and straightened his
spine, patting his old friend on the
shoulder. Bui Daddy paid no heed to
his presence. The old man's eyes,
sunken and black as night, were fixed
upon the far pine-rimmed hills, where,
beyond their cloudy brows, lay a
strange world of which he had heard
much, but which he had neved beheld.
Hy profession, Daddy Morgan was a
distiller of a nefarious beverage, but
his soul was the soul of a seer and a
prophet. And now that soul wandered in alien paths. In the world of
cities and of marvelous and awful
wonders, seeking and seeking through
unfamiliar places for thc lad who had
been his son.
lie did not hear Buddy's timid
whispers beneath his elbow, nor thc
voices of the neighbor women tiptoeing in to look upon his dead. His
old ears were tuned to strange voices
���those which left no echo in the
empty rooms���the shrill chatter of
the boy who had played there, and
thc voice of his wife laughing as she
once  had laughed.
Ah, desolate laughter that lives
only in  memory!
The mountain women peered in at
thc door, awed by his silence; and
Ad Kite's giggling wife, bolder than
thc rest,  came into the room.
"We-all air wan tin' to know when
the buryin' is goin' to be?" she said.
"Thc old man's teched in his wits,"
the others tittered behind her. "He
cayn't hear nothin'."
Resentment flared in Buddy's face.
But Daddy Morgan roused himself
like a sleeping lion.
"Thar ain't goin' to be no buryin',
Sallie Kite," he said, in the booming
voice they knew. "You-all mought as
well go home. I don't aim to bury
maw  tell  Danny comes home."
"The old fool's plumb crazy!"
Ulick Weaver voiced this sentiment
i f all thc ridge as, on foot and horse-
buck, thc mountain folk set out down
the trail. "Dan Morgan ain't comin' Lack up thisaway. I heerd he was
down to Knoxville, and had a right
smart job with the gover'ment."
"J 'low we jest better bury the ole
woman to-morrer ef Joe Dancls gits
the b< x done," Ad Kite advised, as he
dangled his long legs from the rear
of his wagon. "Hit's goin' to be powerful hot when thc moon changes, an'
I aim to plant sorghum come a Sat'-
day."
Back iu thc kitchen, Daddy Morgan
rose and shook himself as one who
shakes off a bad dream. Then he began searching among thc litter of a
shelf.
"Sallie Kite never did have good
sense," he observed as he turned a
collection of tin cans upside down
and shook them each industriously.
"Buddy, kin you write plain writin'?"
Buddy slipped from the bench. "I
kin make all the letters," he answered, turning his back to shut out the
grisly view in thc front room, "but I
cayn't spell much long words."
"Thar uset ter be a leetle scrap of
a pencil tip hyar." Thc old man still
rummaged busily. "I 'lowed we'd better write Danny a letter and tell him
his maw's daid."
The pencil proved to be a tiny
stub, remnant of Danny's "scholard"
days. But with its aid Buddy painfully negotiated a message presently
upon the flyleaf of an old spelling
book.
"I jest says 'Mammy is daid; come
In une.' he said, wiping the dampness from his brow. "D'ye reckon
that's enough? I'll put 'Pappy' to the
ind of hit."
The old man nodded. "I reckon
fianny'll come a-runnin' when he sees
lhat thar," he assented, watching the
laborious pencil tracing the wavering
line of the signature, which bore no
meaning to his untaught mind. "Now,
put Kroxville to the outside of hit,
and we'll go down to he railroad and
give it to Jed Haslett that tends the
water tank.    He'll git it to Danny."
The sun was setting, sending its
slanting rays over the top of the
ridge, when the two set out down the
tangled trail which skirted the crest
of the hills above the river. A warm
wind came down from the uplands;
the air smelled of grass and of blooming briers, and over the top of Bald
Knob hung a tiny, thin moon like a
silver thread.
They walked slowly, threading their
way through the thick cedars, the boy
ahead,   lugging  the   long  rifle  which
had served Daddy Morgan through
thiee-score years. He had pulled a
great coonskin cap down over his ears
so that his thin little face looked out
like the face of a squirrel. The old
man trudged wearily behind. At the
top of every rise hc would stop,
breathless and panting, while his
knees shook under him and moisture
stood out upon his face.
" 'Pears like 1 must bc gittin' old,"
hc sighed as hc sat down on a rock
at ihe crest of the ridge and wiped his
face with trembling fingers. "I've
tramped this here trail for sixty year,
and 1 never got so beat out before."
Far down below them, gray and
still, ran the river. Behind them
Buddy could sec the familiar slopes
of his native hills stretched out like
a map, and his father's cabin resting
like a martin house against the slant
of the ridge. Smoke waved faintly
from the chimney.
"1 reckon mammy's cooking supper," he said to himself as he watched
the gray wisp float upward. "I reckon
she's hollcrin' at me right now, and
pap's a-cussin'. I wusht I had a piece
of bacon and pone right now," he
added rather sadly. For something
in Buddy's small soul had swelled,
making him feel very weary and
homesick. As he looked at the feeble,
tottering figure of Da'ddy Morgan,
and thought of the long miles before
them, he wished that hc had stayed
and finished the hoeing of the corn
patch.
But no weakness of the flesh could
utterly subdue old Daddy Horgan.
Clutching the letter in his fingers, he
struggled to his feet and hitched his
heavy pistols abort him.
"We better be getting along," he
said. "Hit's a powerful long ways to
the railroad, and hit's comin' on
night."
Before they reached the river, with
its swaying footing, darkness was
upon them. Buddy tried the uncertain log wilh his foot, and then regarded the wavering, breathless old
man, who leaned against a tree, exhausted. A troubled fear grew to a
certainly in the boy's mind. Daddy
Morgan could never cross on that
log. Ilis feeble limbs would not carry
him a man's length from shore. It
was evident (hat hc must go on alone.
So, establishing the old man, now
loo weary to protest, upon a dry rock
upon the bank, he tucked the letter
into his shirt, and sprang upon the
log, teetering and balancing himself
as it swung.
Then, sudden and sharp through
the night, a single shot rang out upon
the  ridge.
For a moment Buddy clung, wavering and holding tight to the rope,
while his limbs shook. Then an answering report came from the lower
hill. lie could see the flash of it
ihrough the cedars.
"That was mighty near," he said to
himself.    "I kin smell the powder."
War seemed to have broken out
upon the hills. Shots echoed among
the    rocks    and    roared    upon    the
(Continued  on  Page 9)
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4601 MAIN STREET (Cor. Thirtieth Ave.)        SOUTH VANCOUVER
PHONE FAIRMONT 1874
J        e.i      ���     ���
t tl��� ���.-.���
II
.   !9(i ttlCt    .-i :   bu   ������:������ .
: i       ���.'-,.! I'I .'(!.'       'I' SATURDAY,  MARCH  22.  1913
Gladstone Hotel
First Class Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
H. G. BROWN, Proprietor
CAMBIE STREET SOUTH
We have a fine subdivision bounded on the North by the C.P.R.
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Ash Street Lots, 33 x 192, $750 each; 1-4 cash, balance 6, 12, 18,
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GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SEVEN
���
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandv Passes His Opeenon o' the False Creek Deal an Takes a Bit
Jab at the Kirk
d/
"I was walking down a street once,"
said the hypnotist, "when I Saw a
man just in front with whom 1 wished to speak. So I just straightened
out my arm, concentrated my will,
made a pass���thus���and the man
stopped instantlv. and waited till 1
overtook  him."
''Well, you don't call that much of
���'. trick, do you?" said one of his
listeners.
"Personally I call it a very fair
demonstration," affirmed thc hypnotist. "But perhaps you arc not fam-
'li��r with the science?"
,No, I can't say I am," replied the
other, who happened to bc an Aincri-
rjin. "though one day I saw a man
Sup, and fall from the top of a sis-
-turey building. When ho had
' Kut a pout half way down. I made a
Pass jUSt as y0l] jj^ an(| |]c st0pp0d
ailing instantly. ' However, being
"usy at the lime, I went on without
thinking any mure about it; which
reminds me���next time you're in
Xew York, you might look out for
him and rescue him!"
Margaret, dear, tell nie what was
your  principal   reason   for   accepting
me?" . ,
"Well. Pcrcv, yuu see, sonic girls
have money and could marry brains
while  others   have   brains  and   could
marry me nicy.
1  had neither."
It's surprising how surprised a
girl can be when a man tells her he
l,,vcs her���just as ii she didn t know
it all the time.
"Has your wife many speaking acquaintances?" . ��� ���        . ���
"Noi very mliiy: tWy .ire neatly
all' listening ones."
V\ ill fricn's, I've nae doobt you've
a' been foUoWuV the discusslli'itl lhat's
been gaun un this week or twa ill the
papers tboot this False Creek bis
ncM, I never muni o1 OBJ/ bylaw
bein1 sae much discussed afore.
Wherever yae went yae heard it an'
noo that the votei went in favor o'
it I think the folk in Sooth Vancouver can afford tae shake hauns wi'
themsel's.
At the start o' the ncgoshiashuns I
wisna very favorably disposed tae it
mysel', an' even efter t passed the
Council I thocht Vancouver wis gien
awa ower mucklc. But there's aye
twa sides tae a story, an' efter at-
tendin' wan or twa o' the meetin's an'
readin' through the bylaw I came tae
the conclushion that it wis a guid
piece it bisness for Vancouver an'
Sooth Vancouver.
The main question that resolved
itself ill my mind wis "Could Vancuuver dae onything in the wey o'
lillin' in the held o' the Creek hersel',"
an' a fellie disna need tae gaun very
faur oot frae the hert o' the city tae
see that she has gejt quite enough on
he, hauns in the wey o' sewerage,
water, roads, pavements an' ither
things tae keep her spendin' a' she
can get for the next ten years onywey.
I luring a' that time wc wud hae that
stinkin' muk-hole there Wan or twa
ei' the speakers fur thc eipposislitin gut
Iheir puggy up when the Mayor referred tae it as such, but it's easy seen
they dinna live within twa ur three
lilucks off it ur they'd sune change
their tunc. Yae jist want tae be
ridin' e,n the car when the tide's met
an' the sun's sliinin' tae ken that the
Mayor was raither complimentin' ii.
It disna smell like sweet peas. Many
a time hae I sat on the car wi'a fellie an' a lassie coortin' in front. They
wud be busy sayin' sweet things 'ac
yin anither till the car wis within a
block or twa an' then the fun wud
begin, I aye carred a bottle o'
the wife's smellin' salts in my tremser
pocket (no mentiuniii' ither beettles
1 hae cairried hame), an' it kept my
hert batin' till we got ower. lint it
wis different wi thc couple. The chap
wud gie a cough an' the lassie wud
Suddenly Iin somethin o' interest in
the advertisements. They kent there
wis somethin' wrang an' they wudna
look at each other or say a word
till they were weel up the hill. It
wis a  tryin' time.
Apairt frae that Sooth Vancouver
slatins tae benefit in a big degree an'
it disna require mc tae go intae ony
explanashun here. It's patent tae a'-
body.
Wi' the passin' o' the North Arm
Harbor Hill an' the Creek bylaw, it
wud look as if the next move wis
Smith   Vancouver's.
1 wis at twa o' the meetin's during
the time the bylaw was under dis-
cttshion an' I must say that Vancouver is tae be congratulated un her
choice o' Mayor whether it wis by
accident or no. He's the best yin
they've had for a long while, an' he
deserves a' credit for the wey he's
managed  the bisness.
eS        *        *
Tae be a "journalist" a fellie has
got tae hae a pretty thick hide. It
wudna be sac bad if yae thocht yae
were apprecchiated, but thc amount
o' abuse yae hae tae staund is no
canny. There wis a letter came to
me this week addressed Alexander
MacPherson, Esq. Gee whiz ! it's a
lung time sin I wis ca'd jy my Sunday name. The last time I was so
addressed was when I wis up afore
the bailie wi' some mare o' my chums
for playin' fitba in the street wi' a
tin  can.
I wis startin' tae open the missive
when the editor came ower. Ilis
hert was in his ecu tae see whal was
���in it. Il disna maitter hoo much yae
dae for they fellies they aye seem lac
be feared there's onythin gaun past
them. He got a nice caird the ither
week requestin' him tae lend lac a
certain distillery. They had a buttle'
ei' wluiskey lyin' there thai they'd
like him tae sample. That lets yae
see the graund rcpulasliun he bai acquired, Vac should hae seen the tears
rinnin' down his checks. "Oh!" he'
says, "that folk sheiuld bc see bad-
hearted." On the quiet, atween yuu
an' nie 1 kent he didna mean it, an'
wud yae believe me, 1 saw that bottle
staunin' on his table hauf empty thc
next week. I thocht he wud hae the
ordinary commonsense tae offer a
fellie a dram, but he never said
"Collie, wild yae lick."
Hooever, tae get back tae the letter, it wis frae a lady subscriber tae
the paper. She said she'd been
grievously disappinted aboot my
writin' a couple o' weeks ago advo-
catin' that a hotel should be established up in Sooth Vancouver. She
said I wis tryin' tae undae a' the
guid work the church had been daen
in the wey o' temperance an' sh ��� intimated pretty strongly that unless
I mended my weys she vud discon-
tinyae her subscripshun tae the
paper. Well, I'm no gaun tae lake
that lyin' doon. onywev.
In the first place, it's jist a moot
pint wha's the maist temperate, an'
if her langwidge in that letter was a
sample o' her natur then I'm a tee-
tottler, which is an honest fact, besides. Yae maun bear in mind that
that bottle o' the editors' wis Canadian rye, an' yae can hardly expect
that tae dae ony harm tae a man that
likes "a wee drappic o't."
Put. jokin' aside, dis the kirk honestly believe that there daen ony
ruid by tryin' tae prohibit the establishment o' hotels up here. It's a
recognized fact that yae'll no mak
a man a teetottler by Act o' Parliament., ah' sae long as a man wants a
dram or a gless 0 beer he'll tak weys
an' means o' gettin' it. If it wis here
when he wanted it there >vud be less
temptashun. but when a man had tae
ganc doon toon for it there wis aye a
fightin'chance tl at he wud tak marc
limn wis guid. for him. Apairt frae
tftat, I think it wud be a'michty. guid
thin- for Sooth Vancouver the estab
lishment   it   twa  or  three  guid  class
hotels.    Felix's auld pal, Shakespeare
says :
To thine own self be true
\nd it  must  follow as the night  the
day
Thou can'tt not then be false to any
man."
Wan u' the prime factors in intemperance is the competitive system
under which we live an' work. Everybody's up agin it���the boss an' the
workin'-inan, an' if the kirk wud get
down an' dae some spade work in
the wey o' tryin' tae pit things on a
proocr, equitable level it wud dae
mare for the temperance cause than
anything else. But the kirk is wan
o' the gr?atest sinners themsel's in
this respect. A fellie wis tellin' mc
jist the ither week that a big member
in wan o' the denominashuns had
askit him tae fcegur on a certain job
he wantit dune for the church. He
gave him as sma' a quotashun as he
possibly could, wi' a very sma' margin o' profit. There wis practically
nacthin' in the job an' he wis asked
tae gie1 a discount intae the bargain.'
He agreed, but jidge o' his surprise
when walkin roon the next week tae I
see anither contractor on the job.
Noo, the question comes tae this,
that if a contractor has tae pay his!
men a dacent wage he must get a
reasonable price for the job. Other-!
wise, the wurkin-man has tae suffer'
in the shape o' reduced wages an'
lunger h.eurs o' wurk. Noo, I think
the kirk could show a guid example
in this respect, t he- maun bear in
mind that wc canna live on religion
alone, we've got tae hae beef an'
spuds wance in a while. The kirk
are aye cryin' that poverty is the result ee' drink, but I think if they turn
it roon aliue,t an say that drink is the
result o' poverty they'd come nearer
the truth.
.Yaw, naw, my fair frien, yaill no
frichlen me wi yaer threats. There's
waur vices in the world than drink,
an' when vae eliminate the cause o'
poverty in the shape u' this rotten
competitive system then a man '11 be
able lac devote himself tae somethin
higher an maybe turn his attenshun
tae the breedin' o' prize cocks an'
hens. Hut irrespective o' that, the
big majority o' men that likes a dram
noo an' then are the inaist respectable citizens, an' for --on an' the likes
o' you tae come an' say yae wunna
let them git it is no hauf guid enough.
Because wan or twa go aside is nae
reason why we should condemn it
hiilus bolus. Whiles yae even hear
o' a minister gaun aside, no wi' drink
either, but that's nae reason why we
should condemn religion. A wee bit
mare tolcrashtin wud dae a hale lot
u' guid.
Vietirs   through   the  heather,
SANDY MACPHERSON.
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
HEAD OFFICE, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Authorized Capital      $2,000,000
Subscribed Capital       1,169,900
Paid-up   Capital            840,000
Spccia' attention given to savings accounts.
Interest paid at the highest current rates.
Your account very cordially solicited.
I    W   ShWofd. (-n���.l Msusitr W   E. JtidlM. A���l   Cn��,.l   Misw
CEDAR COTTAGE  BRANCH W. H. Ronald, M.n.gtt
LUMBER
Eburne Saw Mills  Limited
Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of
FIR, CEDAR AND SPRUCE LUMBER
Shingles, Lath, Sash, Doors, Turnings
and House Finishings
PROMPT  DELIVERY   BY TRAM, WAGON OR SCOW
PHONE : EBURNE 14 R
EBURNE, B. C.
ODE TO A LYRE
Parody    un    the    latest    "Chicken
Story" as told by one of the members
of the Burnaby  Municipal  Hall staff.
(By  a   "side-kick")
Dick Turpin is a truthful chap.
He never told a lie
In all his innocent young life;
1 think he'd sooner die
Than take a liberty with Truth,
Or say what was not right.
Hut once he fell away from grace,
[This poor and luckless night.
i
j He said he knew a man at home
W'hii kept some cocks and hens.
I A  real good breed, il  was a treat
| To see  those  chicken  pens.
One day his wife said. "Jack, my lad,
iGo out and kill a cock,"
So eeff Jack goes and gets the bird,
And puts him on the block.
lie teeeek his trusty keen-edged axe
And  smote  him  on  the  neck.
The luad  flew off, the noble bird
Kan  home tu ruust���by  Heck!
In passing through lhe little hole
While served  him   fur a  door,
A cobweb struck ihe gory place
Where  his  head  had  been  before.
This slopped the flow uf his red blood
And saved his blooming life.
The wound healed up, and now Dick
says
He's married tee a wife.
They feed the bird by dropping corn
Right down his little crop,
With  bits of sand and broken glass
io help him grind it up.
The  question  is,  suppose that  he
Is  father  of a  chick,
Will it have a head, or will it not?
Vou'd best consult  friend  Dick.
You Can Talk Over Our
Long Distance Lines
Three Minutes
From Fraser
To Steveston for 15 cents.
To Port Moody for 20 cents.
To Coquitlam and Ladner for 25 cents.
To Cloverdale, Hammond and Milner for 30 cents.
To Abbotsford and Mission for 40 cents.
To Chilliwack and Bellingham for 50 cents.
To Agassiz and Harrison Hot Springs for 55 cents.
British Columbia Telephone
Co. Ltd.
Above rates are subject to change without notice.
Mrs. McWhuskcy (watching a
couple spooning): "Et's juist dis-
gustin'. I'm verra glad ye didna mak'
sic a fool o' yerscT when ye wcre
walkin' oot wi' me. Sandy."
Mr. McWhuskcy: We manna jtiidgc,
wife.   I hadna the same provocation."
"Good marni.i', Mrs. O'Brien. How-
are ye? How is 't ye're not at yer
job   this   marniii'?"
"Good mamin' to ye, Mrs. Fitzgerald. Oi'm fine. Oi'm sorry oi can't
be standin' talkin' to yc. Oi'm on mc
way to Jay Tarepoint Morgin to
borry a thousand dollars."
"Are ye crazy, gone out o' yer
sinses?   What's the madder with ye?"
','Did Oi say a thousand? Oi mint
a million. Oi've got es foine a character es enny on the block,, an', Oi
nade the money."
"Ye're shure gone mad," Mrs. Fitzgerald."
"It's only character is needed, he
sis, Tin childer���a no-'count man���
hard workin'���al'ays paid rne bills���
eggs is high���an' Oi'm short : this
wjeek.,...Good-bye���Qi can't be loiter-
in''!    Tis office, hours is horter'n mes
MACADAM & COMPANY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
418 Winch Building Vancouver, B.C.
Wood Block
PAVING
own. Meet me 't the corner o' Fift'
Avcuoo and Tharty-fourt', we'll have
a boite at the Walldorf after me sccin'
him���Good-bye!"
A Scotsman went to a solicitor, laid
before him a question, and asked him
if hc could undertake the case, reports
the Birmingham "Weekly. Post."
"Certainly," replied the solicitor. "I
will readily undertake the case. We're
sure to win."
"So ye really think it's a good
case?"
"Most decidedly, my dear sir. I ^m
prepared to guarantee that you will
secure a favorable verdict."
"Ah. weel, I'm much obliged tae ye,
hut I dinna think I'll go tae law this
;time, for, you see, the case I've laid
.before ye is my opponent's."
"1'
Mrs. Timothy Talker was an ardent
upholder of lost causes, and a consequent ardent neglect of her home
and her Timothy Talker. Now she
was reading a treatise on electricity,
and, after perusing it through, she removed her glasses, and remarked:''
"Wonderful, Timothy!" glancing at
her better half, immersed in his evening paper. "Do you hear? Soon we
shall be able to get everything by
merely touching a buttonl"
"Umph!" grunted her husband,
"wouldn't do here!"
"Why not, I should like to know?"
Mrs. Timothy waited to crush her
spouse with the sledge-hammer of an
incontrovertible argument.
"Because," murmured Timothy, as
he sidled to the door, "nothing would
ever induce you to touch a button.
Look at my shirt!"
.: EIGHT
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   MARCH  22,   191
Short Lesson in Household
=Economy=
Are you using carbon lamps for lighting ?
Do you know that Tungsten lamps give three times the amount
of light obtained from the carbon lamp with the same consumption
of current?
Would it not be advisable for you to secure this improved form of
lighting ?
After you have considered thc above queries visit our salesrooms
and ask the lamp counter clerk to demonstrate the difference between the Tungsten lamp and the ordinary carbon lamp.
For convenience of our customers we carry a full line of Tungsten
lamps, of an improved type, in stock.
Carrall &
Hastings
Streets
1138 Granville Street
(Near Davie)
Vancouver
Removal Notice
We beg to announce that on and
after the 10th inst., we shall occupy
the ground floor of our new building,
known as the "LONDON BUILDING," 626 Pender Street West.
London & British North America Co. Limited
With which is incorporated Mahon, McFarland & Procter Ltd.
LONDON BUILDING, 626 PENDER STREET WEST
Insurance Money to Loan
Agreements For  Sale Purchased
A Better Garden
than you ever had before
can be had by sowing
Ritchie's Seeds
Write today for this beautifully
illustrated catalogue
Brimful with cultural directions
FREE ON REQUEST
RITCHIE BRAND & CO.
SEEDSMEN
723 ROBSON STREET
Phone Sey. 1892
Phone : Seymour 8425-8426
Western Plate Glass   &
Importing   Co.   Limited
Registered Office:
318 Water Street, Vancouver, B. C.
PLATE GLASS WINDOW GLASS
LEADED ART GLASS
Thome   Metal  Store  Front  Bars,   Bevelling   and
Silvering, Store Fronts Glazed
ALL KINDS OF GLASS
NOTES OF INTEREST TO THE
LADY OF THE HOUSE
A young married lady one morning
gave her husband a sealed letter,
which he was to read when he got
to his office, He did so, and the letter
ran as follows:
"I am obliged to tell you something
that may give you pain, but there is
no help for it. You shall know everything, whatever be the consequences.
For the last week I have felt that it
must come to this, but I have waited
until the last extremity, and can remain silent no longer. Do not overwhelm me with bitter reproach, for
you will have to put up with your
share of the trouble as well as myself."
Cold perspiration stood in thick
drops on the brow of the husband,
who was prepared for the worst.
Tremblingly he read on:
"Our coal is all gone. Please order
a ton to bc sent this afternoon. I
thought you might forget it for the
tenth time, ard therefore wrote you
this letter."
But he didn't forget it that time!
 ��-^s^-��
The fat man puffed up to the window of the ticket office. He looked
at the clock and saw that it was
2:31.
"Have I time to catch the 2:30
train?" he gasped.
"You have time," smiled the ticket
agent. "But I don't think you have
4he speed."
Squashed
Miss Clara was voting, and decidedly
fat,
One day she went out, in a tram-car
she sat
With a youth she had met, close beside her.
He was empty of head, very lanky
and thin,
And he ogled the girl with an ignorant  grin.
Then he said out aloud, to deride her:
"What food do you take, now, to
make you so stout?
I'll try it myself, for there is not a
doubt
What you eat is remarkably feeding.
Pray tell me the secret, I'm longing
to know
The way to get fatter, and rounder to
grow,
Your advice is just what I am needing."
"Indeed," said Miss Clara, "the thing
I'd advise
Is  there in  that advert, in  front of
your eyes."
He  looked  up  at   the   words���('twas
most riling)
'"Tis the best patent food for young
puppies," he read.
Then the passengers laughed, and the
young puppy fled,
And  Miss Clara  rode    on,    sweetly
smiling.
For  the   Baby
Nothing makes a more appropriate
gift fur the baby than an embroidered  article  of  some  description,    An
exceedingly dainty little buiinet, simple in design, can be made by anyone
who embroiders at all. Cut the linen
over a pattern which laces up the
sides with ribbons, so that it can be
e.isly laundered, Trace a simple design on the front and back of the cap
and embroider it in eyelet and solid
embroidery. Round or square medallions of Irish crochet lace make an
effective addition where set in the
cap. Rosettes and tie strings of ribbon complete this pretty bit of headgear.
Bootees of embroidered linen a;'c
simple in construction, and can be
purchased at the needlework shops,
stamped ready to work, for a small
sum. Work the design with the eyelet stitch and on the top of each
bootee set a square motif of Irish
crochet. .Make the straps and bows
of pale or blue ribbon. Bibs have an
annoying habit of creeping up about
the neck unless there is danger of
tearing the little dress.
Now there is an attractive bib made
with :t belt which fastens about the
waist. Embroidery and buttonhole-
stitch thc edges. Border the bib and
belt with narrow Valenciennes lace.
Baby's mother will be delighted with
such a gift.
* e,        #
Cod  Fish
Because cod costs less than halibut
is no argument that it is cheaper or
more economical to buy.
h'eer instance, five poundi of cod
contains more than two-thirds of its
weight In waste in the sape of head
(which is large in proportion to the
body), skin, tail, and bone, while two
poundi of halibut is solid fish, with
practically no waste at all, It costs
more a pound than cod, it is true, but
in the cud it is quite as cheap, if not
cheaper.
* *    #
Stained   Floors
It is said that sawdust makes the
best cleanser for a waxed or varnished floor that has become too dirty
for the \tsual treatment Soap and
water will ruin the polish, bul if clean
sawdust is scattered over the floor
and a person gets down and us,cs a
scrubbing brush with the same move.
ments as though using water, every
bit of dirt and soil will come way.
The sawdust is then swept up and destroyed, and the floor polished in the
general  way.
* e|e        *
Recipes Worth Trying
Potato Tea Biscuit���Mix well together three-quarters of a cup of hot,
sifted potato, a quarter cup of butter,
a teaspoonful of sugar and one of salt.
Add to this a cup of milk that has
been scalded and cooled, a quarter
ounce of compressed yeast, and the
white of one egg slightly beaten.
Again mix well and add enough flour
���about one quart���to knead smooth.
If this dough is set about ten o'clock
in the morning it will be ready to
shape and bake for tea. The sponge
should be cut down once, and when
it rises again should be cut with a
small biscuit cutter, each biscuit being
given plenty of room in the pan and
let rise in a cool place till very light.
Hake in a quick oven.
Buttermilk    Biscuits���.Mix    a    tea-!
spoonful of soda into a quart of flour
with   half  a  teaspoonful  of   salt  and
form a dough  with a  pint of buttermilk.    Take care to make the dough j
as  soft  as  possible  in   rolling it  out,'
pressing flat with the hands lo knead I
it.    Set  aside  for  ten    minutes    and I
knead  again.    Cut  into   shapes    and
bake in a moderate oven.
Egg Cromeskies ��� Boil hard six
e^gs anil when cold, shell. Mix three
talilcspoi'iifuls of sifted bread crumbs,
Ihree dessertspoonfuls each of chopped onion ami parsley, a teaspoonful
anil a half of mixed herbs and a seasoning of pepper and salt. Sprinkle
this over six slices of lean bacon,
each slice being three inches wide and
eight inches long. Place one of the
hard-boiled eggs in each slice' ut
bacon and fasten with small skewers. Then bake iii a moderate oven
for three-quarters of an  hour.
Eggs, Aurora���Hard boil and shell
half a dozen eggs, cut them in halves,
remove the yolks, and run thc latter
through a fine sieve. Put four ounces
of butter ill a saucepan with a breakfast cupful of cream, a teaspoonful of
flour, a little grated nutmeg, salt and
pepper and simmer the whole gently
until thick. Throw in the whites of
three of the eggs, chopped fine, and
stir well. Put the remainder of the
whites on a dish, pour over the mixture, add a little butter and place in
the oven for a minute. When the
butter is melted serve.
Omelet, Celt���Take three of four
large boiled potatoes, peel, drain and
mash them. Beat four eggs in a tea-
cupful of milk, mix in with the
potatoes and flavor with salt, pepper,
and herbs. Cut four ounces of lean
bacon into dice and fry them crisp
and brown with a lump of butter.
Then mix in the potatoes and stir
over the fire until well set. When
nicely browned on both sides fold the
omelet over, place on a hot dish and
serve.
Baked Stuffed Ham���After having
soaked a small ham in a good supply
of water for from twelve to fourteen
hours, trim off the uneatable parts
from the underneath side and boil it
till it can easily be skinned. Remove
the skin, gash the ham to the bone,
and fill up the cuts with a force meat
made of bread crumbs, a little thyme,
finely chopped parsley, a seasoning of
salt and pepper, and enough butter to
mix these ingredients to a paste.
Brush the ham over with thc well-
beaten yolks of eggs, dust it with
bread crumbs, and bake slowly until
quite done. If a hot boiled ham is
desired in the first place and only a
portion  baked,  the  spaces  where  the
slices have been cut away may bc
filled   with   thc   force   meat,   brushed
over wiih the egg, dusted with bread
crumbs, and this put into the oven
merely until browned, because ill this
east the ham is already stifficcntly
cooked.
*    *    ���
How to Make Good Tea
Thai the drinking of tea in Canada
is steadily on the increase is proved
by the fact that 1912 shows a con.
s.uiiption eii from four and a quarter
pounds to four and a half pounds per
capita, against three and a half
pounds per capita for 1911. Ill Great
Britain there is more consumed than
in all the European countries put together, about 600,000 pounds of tea, or
4,000,000 gallons, being used  daily.
Tea is obtained from a shrub- or
plant called Thet, eiften growing from
eight feet to thirty feet in height, but
kept pruned to a convenient height
for picking. The varieties of tea depend upon difference in age and leaf,
time of gathering, and position of leaf
on the stem. Differences in soil,
method of manipulation before and
afler gathering leaves from the same
] tree, produces black and green tea,
according to treatment.
The young shoot of the tea branch
| has two small leaves at the tip, which
contain the least fibre and most juice,
and therefore produce the finest tea.
In Ceylon and India tea produced
from these leaves is called flowery
and orange Pekoe. The tea from a
somewhat larger leaf just below is
called Pekoe. The next largest leaves
produce Souchong; the leaves below
Congou, and the leaf at the base of
the shoot used to yield Bohea, which
is  seldom  seen  now on  the  market.
In the production of black tea the
leaves are brought to the point of
fermentation, but no fermentation
takes place, as the leaves arc then
dried and subjected to heat. In the
production of green tea the leaves are
not allowed to approach the fermentation  stage at all.
After the tea is cured it is packed
into boxes lined with lead, each box
weighing from ninety to a hundred
pounds, and shipped. London is the
largest tea market in the world,
handling one-half the trade; Colombo
and Calcutta the other half. After the
tea reaches the wholesale house, it is
mixed according to blend. All so-
called dust, which really is the tea
leaf broken during shipment, is driven
off by air. the various blends arc sent
ihrough shoots to the packing room,
where it is put up in one-half to two-
pound packages and labeled ready for
shipment to all parts of the country.
It is one of the most interesting
sights in Toronto to go through one
of the large tea houses and-sec the
method of mixing, packing,' and di*.
tribution.     The   men   work   in   khaki
uniforms in rooms constantly supplied with fresh air.
It is advisable to always buy good
tea, because the adulterations used in
cheap teas arc many. Sweepings of
tea houses and almost any kind of
leaf rolled and dried can bc mixed
with it.
The making of a cup of tea depends
n the kind of tea used, the water, the
teapot, and ihe length of time the
water remains on the leaves.
The water is of first importance. It
lioiild just reach the boiling point;
prolonged boiling makes it soft. One
teaspoon of lea was once the general
rule lo one cup, hut now the teas oil
the market are so much stronger, one
teaspoon of tea will make enough for
two or three cups. Two teapots should
be used, one for making the tea in
and the oilier for keeping it hot An
earthenware teapot is the best for
making tea.
In thc directions given for making
tea the use of two teapots is always
emphasized Yet their use is generally ignored. People make tea in
such an indifferent way. Sometimes
the teapot isn't even heated, and very
often the tea is allowed to stand on
the leaves for an hour or more.
Heat the teapot, put in the tea,
pour out the freshly-boiled water and
iet stand for not longer than five minutes, when it may be poured off the
leaves into another teapot and kept
warm with a cosy. How many
people use this method? Doesn't the
tea always stand on the leaves? If
allowed lo stand on the leaves longer
than five minutes tannic acid is extracted, which has a harmful effect
upon the lining uf the digesting organs, coating or tanning them, thus
impairing digestion. In making tea
the object is to get as much of the
delicate flavor as possible from the
tea leaves with the smallest amount
of the harmful products.
To illustrate the amount of tannic
acid left in the leaves take the method
employed by the Chinese' ill making
lea. They simply pour the water on
the leaves and then off immediately.
They then use the tea leaves for tanning leather. The drinking of too
much badly-made tea (tea that has
Stood un the leaves) is something
which requires serious attention. People drink from four to eight cups
daily and then wonder why they don't
feel well. In Ireland a great number
of the people in the asylums arc there
from tea drinking.
revenue cutter.     It was unexpect
luck for the fishermen, and the il
i.er seeeiu found Iiis  hands full settii
bones, administering   medicines.   :,
treating Stubborn "gurry sores."
No e,1 her nation  allows her  filli
men   to  run   the   unnecessary   as  w
as   the   necessary   risks   of   the   tra
The   neutral    fishing-banks    of
N'orlh   Sea   are   patrolled     by     thi
hospital    and    four    dispensaiy   \|i
sent  out   from   England,    and     e
spring   when    the    French    fleet
sail there sails with her the St. Prai
cois d'Assise,  with  her complete d
pensary and hospital equipment a
lier seventy-five  cots amidships
���Umme(   she   cruises   off   Icelanel   .-.
the    Grand    Banks,    and    ichoon
from all ports, when they have a ii
or wounded man abroad, hail her ��
a half-masted flag.    Many a school
out  of  an   American   port   has   In
fortunate  enough   te,   fall  ill  with   I
in   time   of   need,   and   there   is   I
one  opinion   among  those  who  hn
experienced ber hospitality as to i
kindness   and   expert   care   dispen
by their French host.
Codfish costs something like fifl
cents  a  pound   to  you  and  me  tt
cat it.    Obviously it is not you ai
j I   who  cat  it  who  really  pay  for
! For in the terms of risk of life ai
limb it is the most expensive arii.
of f 1 in  common  use today.    I':
jdotibtedly   those   who  begrudge     tl
fishermen  this  appropriation  for  tl
hospital-ship   will   point   to   the   f
that  most  of  them  are not  citizei
Well, on shore we do not leave an ii
jured workiiigman to die by the roae
i side  because  hc  is  a  foreigner.     \
rush  him  to  a  hospital  as  fast  as
he  voted  regularly.   Either  our  con
mon instincts   eef   humanity   get   tl
better of us. eir else we consider il
: hc  is  engaged  in   digging  ditches
laving   rails   to   facilitate  the    trail
portalioii eef citizens, and lhat, thei
fore, lie has some righls.   The men
i the    fishing    fleets    are   contributii
I five million dollars' worth of food
the   markets   of    the    United    Slat
every   year.      If    the    Ntwfoundlai
Hanks should  rise mil  eif Ihe sea  '
morrow  and  be  thickly  planted  wi
grain,  ihey  could   Iced  only  a   stn
proportion   of   the   people   who   in
subsist  mi  the  tons  and  tons of c<
which  are  taken  each  year  from  i
cold   depths   of    the    Atlantic   alio
these    submerged    islands.���Harpt
Weekly.
������,
CODFISH AND HUMAN LIVES
A few years ago, when the United
States was engaged in one of those
periodic disputes which arise with
England over the fishery rights off
the Canadian coast, a representative
of the State Department went to the
scene of the trouble to ascertain
points which could not be settled
from Washington. He went from
Boston on a revenue cutter, and Dr.
Thomas W. Salmon of the United
States Public Health and Marine
Hospital Service was medical officer
of the vessel.
Word passed about the fishing
fleet in the treaty bay in Newfoundland   that   a   doctor   was   aboard   the
The   kindly   familiarity   of   the   n
jgrocs  of   Barbados   shines  out   in
j brief excerpt from Mrs. C. Cameroi
i "A   Woman's   Winter  in   South   Ar
I erica."
An old colored woman, whose h
was  wrapped  in   a   stately  red-an
yellow     turban,  and   who   carried
basket of yellow and red bananas, a
costed an English officer on the strc
and proffered her wares.
"Not today," he replied, shaking I
head.
"It's all right, sweetheart," rejoin
the smiling old woman; "you buy a
other  day."
What a star instructor in an Anv
can school of salesmanship that i
black woman would make!
DOMINION
Creosoted Wood Block
PAVING
Wood Block Pavements always attract traffic wherever they are in use.
The reduction in the noise accomplished by the use.of Dominion Wood
Blocks greatly improves the value of
stores and offices, facilitates the transaction of business, frequently brings
about higher renting values and higher assessment values. It attracts pedestrian traffic as well as making the
streets a more important thoroughfare for vehicles.
Wood Block Pavement has the extreme advantage of noiselessness and
great durability under heavy traffic.
Competitive tests have repeatedly
shown it to be superior in durability
to granite block, which formerly was
the most durable pavement known. On
streets like Broadway, New York;
Dearborn Street, Chicago; Tremont
Street, Boston, and Market Street,
Philadelphia, it is now demonstrating
the superiority of its resilient resistance to the hammering of heavy
traffic.
il
Dominion Wood Blocks are Manufactured
in South Vancouver
by the
Dominion  Creosoting  Company,   Limited SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
NINE
Special Rates to Municipal Hall
and other South Vancouver
points.
A Mild Smoke  Qbah*
T^ ^mW. ARENA
���   ^   s	
The hockey leason  will close with.of the bludgeon, as the record is writ,
bells  at  tbe  Coast  this  year.    With'Inn	
Quebec  at   Victoria  engaged    in    a     Once-    upon a time in his    he,me
struggle   for  the   worlas  champion- town,   London,  (int.,  wire  gathered
ship   with   the   Coast   champions,   and   hit   cumins  and   his   aim'-   anil   either
Art   Ross'  All-Stars clashing  *nh a rich and p'ee.r    relations, and  thou.
botham   wreathed
smiles   for   thc
nonce.
The second Gibson fiasco rammed
he,me tin- certainty e,f defeat into
nearly every faithful rooter, those
who wcre just a little extra faithful
being tin exceptions, The team bc-
lunel "Hiirg," at first nervous and
1. picked lip 1'iur.ige: when they
::   i.ei     ihe   f    way   in   which     their
ilabman was performing, and offered
a solid defence
There-   was   nothing   ele.mg   for   Gib-
illc until the ninth inning when
ting caused iln -tcrling
n, develop a  few  errors,
the celebrity.   They lung the Halelu- when   the   Gibson  clan   saved  itself
jah  chorus of baseball in  expectation   from   :i   shutout   by   putting   One   run
air.iss     Hut  Gibson and  his  big  lea
wcre
mil-   of   ardent   admirer!   who
mil  merely because they happenedIfrenzied
ie. -nek around in tin- same town with|Chathamite
CHARACTER CIRCULATION
There is a difference between
the hastily read street car paper
and the paper that is delivered
into the home; the paper that is
absolutely independent and wholesome; that the men respect and
the women admire���that is the
paper whose advertising columns
carry confidence to the reader���
that is the paper whose advertising
patronage is valuable.
SOLD   EVERYWHERE
Charlie  Brown  has opened  a  Barber
Shop at  the
Fairmont Pool  Room
19th Avenue and Main  St.
Cigars,  Tobacco,  Cigarettes,   Candies
and Soft Drinks
D. D. DENMAN, Proprietor
e.i >.euig the-  1'ittsburg deiiioii in ac
don,     Vet   Gibson   struck   out   twice
bases.
And  the  hurler
ewn  calami,y
that caused this home t
never   was  within   a  mile  of  pitchingIdownfall  has never been printed out-
profenional ball in a good league,    j b|(]e 0f (he Gibson.Hlggyille papers,
classic "
picked   team   from     Vancouver     anil
New  Westminster  there  ihould    be
plenty <<f excitement for thc hockey
fans.
The series at Victoria will be the
lirst of an annual world's championship series between the champions
of the  Kast ami  the  West  patterned  with  men on
! after   the   annual   baseball   argument
i between the champion clubs of the
National   and   American   leagues,   and
I for that reason just as much interest will attach to the scries as though
the historic Stanley Cup was at
stake.    Three   games   will   be  played
at Victoria. The first will be on j himself, Gibson hied himself to his
Monday. March 24. and the next on home hamlet, where honors came to
Thursday. March 27, with a final, him with the case of a hen laying
game if necessary on Saturday. March iCggs when the laying is good.
29. The winner of two games will j Every year, if the northern wea-
take the championship, and both thcrnian is not suffering from in-
eastern and western rules will be'digestion, there are a few playing
used, one game being played with days left after the regular big league |
the seven-men-aside style, and one'Season is over. This is a windfall for
with   the  six-men   fashion. ja  local  manager,    who    immediately
The mainland all-stars left  for ihe | gets to work and gathers a conglom-
Kast   on   Saturday.     The   party     in-  cration of mastodonic beauts from the
eluded both the Vancouver and West- celebrities that live within hailing dis-
minster  teams.    They  played  in  Cal-, tancc
gary    Monday   night   and   in    Regina
gucrs   were   let  down   with   only   font
hits, which is pretty good for a bank :
lerk.     This   story   of   Gibson's   only'
CHIC
Table Showing the Wonderful  Growth  of  the
C-H-I-C in less than Twenty Months
r-0/
Al)   Loans   Ma'le   Bear tU^k     / Interest   at   the
Rate   of qW   i Q Per   Annum.
First Loan made April 22nd,  1911  $500011
Loans   made   during   month   of   December,
1911    $4,000.00
Loai .   made  during   month   of  June,   1912 $17,000.00
Loans   made   during   month    of    August, <fe?? 000 00
Loans   mode   during   month   of   November, 0>oa   orirx f\f\
1912   $34,31*1*.UU
End   of   November,   1912,   Loans   pending ����*�� aaa /\/\
(being    put    through)  $00,UUU.UU
Loans   made   and   other   Loans   in   process Aa**   ** *v a    ** **
thereof   during   the   month   of   Novem- S*)Q    lOfl  00
December   15th,   1912.     Loans   made,   and tf'OQ.r*   AAA  A A
in   process   to date JpZfcD.UUU.UU
See Our  Representative
Canadian Home Investment Co.
LIMITED
Head     Office:     2nd     Floor,     PACIFIC     BLK.,     VANCOUVER,      B.   C.
LB.C.   Offices:     Victoria,   Prince   Rupert,   Kamloops,   Nelson
and  New Westminster
I OfTICE OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL NINE O'CLOCK I
���)m .
One Lot, Block 7,  D.L.  195a, price $650.    Quarter  cash,  balance
6, 12 and 18 months.   Owner will accept $525 all cash.
Victoria  Road���Six-room house,  33-foot  Lot,  cleared,  Block  16,
D.L. 352.   Price $3,300.
Agreements for Sale Purchased and Money to Loan
at Current Rates
The Yorkshire Guarantee
&  Securities Corporation  Limited
440 Seymour Street
Phones: 6188 and 6189   R. Kerr Houlgate, Manager
An article in lhe "Journal of tbe
American Medical Association."
which charges that American college
athletes die y.umg because of thc
training system followed, has started
a lively debate on the merits of the
training methods employed in the
prominent colleges in this country.
Thc coaches and trainers who have
been priding themselves on the development of a system that enabled
them to turn out the best athletes in
the world have come right back m
defence of their methods in an effort
to ward off the blow that was aimed
at the very root of the system that
has made America great in athletic
competitions.
The article states that men who
make the great records seldom live
beyond middle age, that sprinters frequently die of heart failure before
they are forty. "Instead of building
up thc body the prevailing method ol
training tends to break it down," the
article reads. "Europeans have a far
happier expression for thc employment of their bodily activities in thc
word 'sport,' which implies the combination of a healthy spirit with what
we call exercise. Such an attitude is
almost unkonwn here. Instead there
exists a form of overdoing that finds
its chief reward in the applause of
the multitude and later physical
trouble,
"Athletics have long been under the
influence of so-called 'trainers,' frequently men of keen judgment and
technical skill, but without any systematic acquaintance with physical
truths. The best intellectual feature
���of rival contests���thc encouragement
for each man to put forth the best
that is in him and to exercise his own
ingenuity    in    the    development  and
��� maintenance of an efficient, superior
body���is suppressed by the advent of
that guardian saint, the trainer."
Replying to the statement, Dr. R.
Tait MeKenzie. one of the most noted
men in the world on physical development, said:
"I have statistics of the men who
have won their 'Y' at Yale, the oarsmen at Harvard for many years, the
track and field men of Oxford and
Cambridge, many club runners, jumpers, and vaulters, and they prove past
all doubt that the athlete lives longer
than the average man. Insurance
companies, the closest tabulators of
facts, assert that the athlete outlives
the average man. Xow and then a
sprinter dies at thirty from heart
trouble, but he would probably have
died at 25 had hc not taken up athletics. I am firmly in favor of athletics as a prolonger of life, health,
and   manhood,  and  a  general   benefit
to all communities."
"Look here, now, Harold, said a
father to his little son, who was
naughty, "if you don't say your prayers you won't go to Heaven."
"I don't want to go to Heaven."
sobbed the boy; "1 want to go with
you and mother."
"I believe that phrenologist is a
fake."
"Why?" . . .   .   .
"He asked me in an absent-minded
way if I didn't want a shampoo. Tried
to laugh it off immediately, but 1
have  my suspicions."	
A young man should learn to paddle his own canoe, even if Ins father
does  own  a  me>tor  boal.
n Tuesday night. In Winnipeg the
>/ancouver team will probably be
sent against the hastcrn All-stars,
lirst on Thursday night, with the
New Westminster club taking on the
X. II. A. cracks on Friday evening.
The lirst real iame between the Eastern All-stars ami tin- Western picked se|tiail will be reserved for Vancouver on   March 25.
The Eastern All-stars left Montreal een Meenila ��� unili.T tlie leadership of Art Ross of thc Wanderers.
The X. II. A. All-star team will he
composed of the following players :
Benedict, Broadbent, Reman (Ottawa). Cameron, Neighbor (Toronto), |
McXaniara (Tecumseh I, !'!"��>. O
ami  S. Cleghorn  (Wanderers).
Oil eiff freem the outr-ielc world
during the long winter months, residents of Nome, Alaska, arc busy just
now discussing tin' chances "i" the
various entries iii the annual dog
team race, probably tlu- strangest
sporting event held in any pari of the
world. Drop into Nome, the starting and finishing point of the race,
along about this time, and you will
hear the coming race discussed on all
sides, the contest overshadowing
every other event up thai way. When
one considers that the race is virtually
an endurance contest for the men and
beasts it is easier to understand the
great  interest  of lhe  natives.
Some time between April 1 and 15,
when winter is beginning tee relax its
grip anywhere from a dozen to a
score of dog teams will start from
Neime over the dreary course ol 404
miles, and the one that crosses thc
finish line first will receive $10,000
and a five hundred dollar loving cup.
The team that finishes second wins
$5,000 for its driver, while the third
prize is half thai amount.
Occasionally there is a fourth prize,
the hardships endured by the contestants and the weather conditions governing this award. Every man that
enters the contest realizes he is flirting with death, and it is this risk that
adds  to  the  interest.
Drivers and dogs arc being con.
jelilioned for lhe race and the residents
of Nome arc spending most of their
time at the respective training camps.
livery team has ils admirers and a
great deal 'if money changes hands
on the resull. Save for a stretch of
thirty-six miles, says E. R. I Human,
an Arctic explorer, the course lies
through a barren, treeless waste and
ihe contestants arc compelled i" cross
a  mountain  range  twice���going and
coming���before     the     end     of     the
journey.
Loose, dry smew ce.vcrs the course
and the entire country as far as the
eye can reach. Kept in a constant
swirl by the bitter Arctic winds, il
blinds dogs and drivers and compels
Ihcm 1.1 -lagge'i along ami trust tee
luck. The trail is staked with Im- of
bunting,   bill    lhe   shilling   -now    I're-
quently buries these guides and the
teams  wander around  aimlessly   for
hours at a  time.
Leaving Nome lhe first fifty-two
miles   of   the   journey   lie   across    the
ice of Bering Sea. Candle, 202 miles
away, is the turning point. Every
precaution is taken to sec that the
race is honestly run. Each driver
is photographed with his team at the
starting point and he must bring under the finish wire all the dogs with
which he starts, dead or alive. The
receipt of any assistance on the journey disqualifies him and he must have
all his dogs with him every foot of
the journey. At Candle each outfit is
photographed again and the pictures
ond.    Th
It was this way.   When the Nation.  wlR.re the game is dubbed
al  league season  ended and  the  Pir-1     Now   one   might   ask,   why    hasn't
atcs   wcre   deprived   of   the   pennant j Connie Mack grabbed the bank clerk?'.
because Hans Wagner couldn't win it   Probably he never heard of him.  And ���
it will be noticed that Pittsburgh
didn't get him either, or didn't want
him.
The truth is. the slinger has never
slung in the fashion since. He was
offered a berth in the Michigan league, but refused saying the salary was
not sufficient and that he figured
working in a bank was a life job and
that some day he might be a bank
manager.
But the glory of that feat���striking
out Gibson twice in one day���sticks
with the lad, though his arm prowess
has  since  declined.
If there is any moral in this tale���
in spite of the fact that it is distinctly
unliterary and a sign of out-of-date
taste to hook a moral on to any story
���it is this: That you can't tell what
a big leaguer will do on a back lot,
���"Montreal Standard."
Tin:
personage thought he would
do a great thing for London, Ont.,
because besides the great Gibson,
three others, players of first-class
calibre���two from lhe then Eastern
league and one from the Western
league'���abided  in   that  section.
It I'ei eked to London folks as if no
town in the province could muster as
much talent as that. The local magnate figured lhat any backwoods team
within a radius of 100 miles surely
weeuld have tei bite the dust so hard
that it would lose its collective teeth,
should it stack against his 18-karat
combination.
It didn't require much coaxing to
lix up a combat with a team that represented the best to be found in
Chatham. Ont., a smaller town eighty
miles away. London deemed the
Chatham gents to be quite superior
athletes, and what-not because without Gibson and the other stars no
particular trouble had been experienced by Chatham in putting the Indian sign on London. In fact, the
Chatham bunch was recognized as thc
champion amateurs of Ontario.
Hut with Gibson and the other big
guns in the line-up���particularly Gib.
son���there would be a difference, all
right, said London. After a year's
grind in the big league, "Georgie"
weiuld be in fine fettle, argued the
prognosticators, growing happy in
mere contemplation. "Come out and
see Gibson in action," read the local
magnate's ads. in the local papers.
The rabble "came out" with the
strength of an army corps. Nobody
had any doubts how about the game
would gee; rubes slipped in the treasury merely to see "Georgie" knock
the ball over the fence several times
and nip embryonic basc-stealers with
that marvellous whip of his.
When the battle started, all there
was to the Chatham toilers was eight
scared men that wobbled in the field
like the pendulum of a clock, and a
rube topped pitcher that was determined to stick to the ship till it
le Hindered and then die will a smile
on his beak.
The name of the Titian-hued person was Hubert Higginbotham, a
hank clerk���which he is yet���and it
was due to him that the able-bodied
Londoners, led by Brother Gibson,
did not make fifteen runs and thirty
hits in the first inning.
lly the time the first round was I
nearly history, somebody in the
bleachers hissed lhe allegation lhat
the hated Chalainites had employed a
ringer from the big league. This
charge was based that not a Gibsonite
made a hit, including none by the
mighty prime favorite himself.
Things slipped along at a lively
rale,   the afternoon  party  quickly bc-
ONLY A RUNT
(Continued   from   Page  6)
ing brand
lhe odds
eel as a pitcher's battle, with
ill favor of the brick-topped
person.
By lhe lime Ihe hostilities were half
over, ihe hopes, aspirations, expectations and plumber's cinch of the
crowd filtered to exasperation, surprise, discomfiture and sorrow. For
in that time the visiting outfit had put
two runs over lhe pan. Also, in that
time the home machine once got two
men on the sacks, and Gibson came
to bat amid deafening plaudits. At
this moment it looked like three runs
sure; at least, that was thc expectation of both Gibson and his townsmen.
But the red-head on the firing line
merely took an extra hitch at his
trousers, gave three extra twists to
his bony fingers, wound up with the
dignity and precision of a clock and
put as much stuff on the sphere as
Gibson cared to look at just then.
Thc gladiator from Smoky Village
hit hard once, twice, thrice, and even
the home umpire didn't get a chance
ore than "Out."   This retired
must correspond.     1 he race is a go
as  you  please  affair,   thc   teams   be-jt0 sav "
ing started   within   fifteen   minutes  of.' n��J'9c;   . ...
one  ���mother "    because I didn t have a mind
���, .        , ; to slam it hard." intoned Ihe depress-
There   are   nine   dogs   to   a   t^.'"-j ed Pirate on gelling into his clutching
Most   of the  animals  are   the  native  machincry.  ..j jllst  cnu|dn-t  sce  >cm
dogs of Alaska, but occasionally there But n, j0 bctter nex, ,ime ���
are   teams    ot    Siberian     hounds   and      . ,
bird  dogs  in  the race.    Teams  com-!      " due course Gibsons opportunity
posed  of  the  latter  breed   wein   first
and Second prizes five years agee. and,
that  race  was  run  under  conditions I?'?re '" hls ��yc tlm matched the et
'ers   wcre   on   the   cushions.     With
fulgcncc of the hair of Higginbotham.
Gibson pushed his bread basket out of
the way and tried to lean on the ball.
It was a bold attempt, but frustrated
the contestants had perished. I J* ,the. "HHgence of the herculean
��� ii     ,m' hurl
Ihe  winning team  covered  the 404
that make it the most famous in thi
history of thc event. Soon after thi
start a blizzard set in which con
tinned for two days, and it was feared
miles in 61 hours 7 minutes and the
actual travelling time, after allowing
for brief rests, was 42 hours 16 minutes, and average speed of 9 1-4 miles
an hour,
"Georgie" Gibson, backstopper of
the Firates and credited by fond fan-
dom with being the peer of living
wearers' ol the bird -cage and breast
protector,  is  a   fairly   sturdy   wielder
er down iu front. Thc same thing
happened twice again���Gibson again
had struck out.
Now, honestly, isn't this a terrible
thing for a big league star to do in his
home town with the immediate family, relatives, friends, and would-likc-
to-bc friends looking on?
Thc howl that went up from the
crowd when the Pirate missed three
for the second time was fit to accompany a funeral. And on the promontory   stood   Heaver   Hubert   Higgin-
heights; and a stray bullet, singing
ihrough the cedars, whined above his
head and dropped, splashing, into the
river.
Hi   thought of old  Daddy Morgan i
alone upon tJie shore. Suppose a wandering ball should strike the old man
and send  him toppling into the  river !
He clutched thc long rifle tightly, and'
made    his   way   back   to   the    shore.
Daddy sat huddled upon the rock, too
utterly exhausted to trouble about the
shooting.
"It reckon hit's Ad Kite liuntin'
wild turkeys," hc replied to Buddy's
puzzled questions. "You jest go 'long
with that letter, and don't you fret
about rae. 1 been whar thar was
shootin' before now, and never got
kilt yit."
There came a rending of branches
from the hillside, a roar of repeated
sluits. and, half running, half falling, a
man came crashing down and rolled,
panting, to their feet.
"Damn it! Throw up your hands!"
he cried, springing to his feet as he
discerned the two figures against the
rock. "I sec you thar agin' them
bushes. Put up your hands, and keep
'cm thar!"
By his voice they knew him, It was
Click  Weaver,  the  coward.
"Put down your gun, Click," Daddy
Morgan drawled in scorn. "Hit's nobody but me and Buddy, and we
hain't goin' to hurt you none."
Ulick put down his gun and staggered toward them. He was still puffing from his flight down the hill; his
clothes were torn and streaked with
soil, and his hat was gone.
"Gawd! 1 thought you-all was rc-
venoors!" he gasped. "The revenoors
is em the ridge. Tile woods is full eef
'em. They've tore up Lem Swithin's
still and shot Lem in the laig. lie's
layin' up thai now, and his wife settin'
sereamin' with her ap.ern eever ber
haid. They're goin' toward Bald
Knob ti.iw.    I  reckon they're    after
Sim   Hales."
Buddy sprang up, the thrill of battle
in  his soul.
The revenue men���those arch enemies i f the peace of mountain feelk���
were em the ridge! Ah, now he would
show them whether he were white-
livered  or a  coward!
lie straightened his bent spine, and
lhe weight of the old gun in his hand
inadi him thrill with savage satisfaction 11 was as ii he had grown to be
a in in- -a  hillman in one breath.
"Come 'en!" he shouted, ramming a
cartridge into the gun. "They doin't
in, revenoor git my pap's still���met
this corn-plantin1 time!"
Ulick fell back, lingering his pistols.
"Wine you got with you, Margon?" he
asked. "Is that thar Sim Bates' runty
brat?"
Buddy drew himself up. quivering
with rage. "This here is Sim Bates'
son," he stated slowly, "an* I ain't no
runt, nor no coward, ef I am kin to
the Weavers." He turned to the old
man.    "You comin' with me,  Dad?"
Old man Morgan would have risen
from his grave to fight the federal
| officers; so, feirgetting his tremulous
limbs and dim old eyes, he drew both
his big. black pistols, and loaded
them. Then he sprang up as lightly-
as a boy.
"I'm with yem through hell and
high water. Buddy!" he cried. "Jest
as long as I kin tote a gun and thar's
a pesky revenoor walks this yere
'arthl    Ceenic on, Ulick!"
But Ulick hung back.
got no ca'tridges," he
"You-all go on, and I'I
house,   and  git  some."
"Ef Ulick conk, shoot as fast with
a gun as he kin with his mouth, thar
wouldn't be a revenoor left this side
of kingdom come," Daddy Morgan
observed dryly as the two climbed up
the steep slope 'hrough the tangled
vines and  cedars.
The pale moon shed a faint gleam
upon the night, but under the trees
the darkness was thick. Twice Daddy
Morgan fell crashing among the rocks
and briers, but each, time he struggled
up again, shaking off the dew and
cursing the darkness.
"Yander they he'" he cried, as they
gained the crest at last. "I heerd a
shoi over thataway toward your paw's
cabin."
The  underbrush  was  thick . on   the
"I���I ain't
stammered.
go  by   the
downward slope, so Buddy trailed the
long gun behind Mm. lie had thrown
away lhe fur cap, and his ragged hair
Stood upright. At la>: they staggered
into Sim  Bales' turnip field and Stood
for a minute, spent and breatbfa -
"Thar'- a man yeink-r; gii down,
quick!"  the eeld  man  In
They dropped into lhe loft dirt and
crawled noiseless!) toward a pile of
rock covered with ���warming lieeiuy-
���uckle, Tin man stood on a little use,
hit form dimly outlined against the
siarlit   ik)      With  lhe inborn  instinct
of a hillman, Buddy knew him for a
Stranger and an enemy.
lie pulled the great gun llowly to
his shoulder, a savage hereditary joy
in his bean. The man was standing
still, a broad target against the sky.
Buddy glanced aheng the sights of the
weapon, and raised himself to his
knees, while hc old mall crouched behind him, grunting with murderous
glee, like an old Indian who hears the
scalp yell  of his young braves.
The man on the hill turned suddenly. The rustling of the honeysuckle
had reached his quick ears. Three
shots rang through the air, and lead
spattered upon the rocks before them.
The blood of generations of moun-
taiin fighters boiled in Buddy's veins.
Scorning an ambush, he stood boldly
upright, and sighted thc heavy gun
across a rock. Twice he pulled the
stiff trigger, and twice the old weapon
sent its roaring challenge up the hill.
The man above staggered a little.
Then he fell, and rolled into the turnips just as Sim Bates came charging
up thc hill, scattering the earth in his
wild climbing and curdling lhe air
with  muttered  profanity.
"Stay back here, pap!" Buddy ordered briefly. "I've got him! I hit
him!"
Climbing the rise, Buddy found liis
quarry where lhe man lay bleeding in
lhe' soft dirt.
"lie ain't hurt much," lie observed
lo bi5 father, who came panting up
behind him.
Sim bent and swiftly felt the officer's wound, "lie's bleedin' bad," he
said. "Thar's a right smart hole in
his laig. We better ie.iv him to the
house and let maw fix hit."
There was a strange new quality of
respect in Simeon's lone thai Buddy
had never heard before. Old Daddy
Morgan marked it, and shrugged his
old shoulders in triumph. At last the
lad he loved had ceeme in to his heritage���the  brave  heritage of the  hills.
Together they lifted the revenue
man and bore him off down the hill.
The other men had evidently gone
away down thc ridge, for scattering
slmis marked their progress through
tlii- domain of Ad kite.
Into ihe cabin they carried the limp
form, the old man staggering after
them, carrying the guns. Buddy's
mother, terror-stricken and trembling,
laid out her best bed, and they put
him on it, his streaming wound making a widening circle upon the quilt.
"I'll sw'ar that old gun makes a
hole you kin put your haid in at,"
Sim remarked as he straightened the
twitching limbs of the enemy. "He'll
come to directly. Maw, you put some
cold water on his haid."
Buddy came close to the bed and
surveyed his capture coolly. The man
seemed very young to be a revenue
officer. Somewhere Buddy had gleaned the idea that government men
"ere old, fierce, and piratical; but this
one's hair was lhe color of ripe wheat,
and his face, drawn and damp as it
was, was the face of a boy of twenty.
Buddy noticed his hand which picked
restlessly at the quilt. On one finger
was a ring���a strange ring made from
a flattened bullet. The boy looked
at it curiously. Daddy Morgan knew
how tu make rings like that.
lie stepped back to make way for
his mother. But her hands shook so
lh el she spilkd the water on the bed;
in Buddy took thc gourd from her
ami bathed the hot forehead and the
great, gaping wound, smiling proudly te. himself to sec how steady his
hands were, and because the blond
did nol make him sick. Then the man
opened  his eyes and looked at  him.
'Hullo, s.in!" hc said faintly, "Did
they gel me?"
"I   Bhol  you,"    Buddj     innounced
briefly     "Don't mn,', or you'll make
hit bleed wusser"
_ The     man     laughed   and   Stirred   a
link.    Bui ih.   movement brought a
tense   look   of  agony   to  his   face,  and
gnat drops ut perspiration came out
mi his forehead,
"We'll lie hii up," Buddy laid, ".mil
then you  kill  move all you  want   to."
Willi rude Surgery, Sim bound up
the wound, while Buddy held the light
close and occasionally moistened the
patient's brow with water. Then
when il was done they called Daddy
Morgan   I.i  see   that  it   was   right.
The old man came slowly, dragging
his tired feet across the floor. His
face was white with fatigue, and his
long beard matted and powder-stained; hut at the sight e.f him the man on
the bed sat suddenly upright, forgetting his wounded limb and spilling
the moist cloth from his head.
"Dad!" cried the revenue man.
"Dad!"
And then old Daddy Morgan reeled
a little, and fell upon the bed, gathering the wound.ed lad up in  his arms.
"Gawd!" he cried, .ind the cry was
like a prayer. "Gawd! Hit's' my
Danny come back again!"
Buddy, stumbling out of the cabin,
ran into his father, who came around
the corner with a gun and a hatchet
in  his hands.
"Come along, you, Bud," ordered
Sin.eon Bates. "Wc-all got to go
down and sec ef they got we-uns' still.
I reckon you mought l'arn to run hit
mew- as well as any time. Gwad kn.ews
you're old enough ef you hain't nothin' but a runt."
Buddy trudged obediently behind.
But in his small heart there rang a
wild anthem of joy. His father had'
never spoken like this before.
"You carry this yere gun," Sim ordered bluntly. "And recollect thar
ayn't no coward carry my gun."
Buddy sighed in ecstasy as he cuddled the cold barrel "iri the hollow of
his arm.
"Thar ain't no coward goin' to git
to carry this here gun." he replied
earnestly.    "Don't you  fret,  pap."
���"The People's Magazine." TEN
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 1913
Progressive Men and Firms who are making MAIN STREET
Greater Vancouver's Big Business Thoroughfare
LEST YE FORGET
We call for and deliver, thoroughly clean and press gent's suits, $1.50
each; or sponge and press same for
75c each. Ladies' suits from $1.50
to $1.75.
Province Renovatory
"None   Better"
4136 Main St.     PHONE:    Fair. 1163
STREET BROS.
Builders and Auctioneers
4258 Main  Street
Phone:    Fairmont  1492
LITTLE   MOUNTAIN   REALTY
COMPANY
Real   Estate   and   Commission   Brokers
H. N. Hallberg. Manager
MAIN  STREET  SPECIALIST
Cor.   Main   Sc   29th   Ave.       South   Vancouver i
Main Sireet is taking- a decided
spurt these days. With the ceuning
��� ���I spring, real estate activity has II 1
in with a bang and while wc have
heard of one or twu big deals in
revenue producing property, prices
have   also   remained   very   steady.
If anything  was   required  to    set
a crackerjack pace, the passing of
lhe Falie Creek agreement will do it.
Xumct'eeus enquiriet on the part of
the investing public will nenv take
definite shape and before long    wc
will see a rush for Main street property that will knock all previous
efforts into a cocked hai.
The fact of the new C. N. R. sta-
lion being located on this main
thoroughfare, its easy grade, and its
being  one  of  the  widest  streets    in
Vancouver, will ail tend tei   make   it
more   and   more   the   great   main  artery  from river  lo rail.
.Needless lo say, the various business houses located there at present
will all participate in this advauce-
incnl and before lemg the property
that has been held wailing will bc
built on and become a factor in the
bneineai life of Main  street.
An  Enterprising  Store
Main street is a thoroughfare of
big things and among lhe many thai
are to be found there special mention might be made of the Winnolt
Stores, corner 46th avenue and Main
street. Situated in a large, roomy
block, with an immense area for steerage purposes, they are able to handle ail kinds of articles that go to
make up a general store.
While dealing more generally in
the grocery line, they handle alnieest
everything that is required in the
modem home. To use the old proverb: from a needle lo an anchor���
although   wc   don't   know   that     they
have got any of the lasi mentioned
article in steeck yet, but with the development "f the Xorth Arm, that
also might become a necessity. A
thing to he borne in mind in this rapidly building districl is that they
also handle stumping powder by the
carload. Coupled wilh the store,
which is run on modern lines, is the
Winnolt Post Office. Reeve & Harding   are   the   proprietors,   and   they
announce a  pre-inventory sale    for
otic week only, commencing March
24th.
J
W
GOOSTREY
Broker
5604 Main
St.
(41st Ave. & Main St.)
S.
Van
couver
Phone:   Fraser
64
Try
LIBBY'S GROCERY
Cor. 50th Ave. & Main St.
For   First-Class  Provisions,   Flour,
Feed, etc.
Experiences of the Pay Clerk
Toronto  Furniture
Company
Furnish   Houses   at   Very   Moderate
Prices
Call and See
M. H. COWAN, Proprietor
3336 MAIN STREET
Phone :    Fairmont 1660
ROSS & MACKAY
Kitchen and Builders' Hardware, etc.
Cor. 51st Ave. & Main St.
Vancouver, B.C.
SOUTH VANCOUVER
PRIVATE HOSPITAL
MEDICAL,   SURGICAL,    MATERNITY
Twenty-eighth Ave. and  Main Street
Misses  Hall and Westley,  Graduated Nurses
Terms Moderate
Phone : Fairmont 2165
NURSES SENT OUT
Talent, like wooden legs, runs
in some families. When Felix
Penne goes to his "rest," a long
time hence wc all hope, the. pen
name he has used so long will probably descend to his son, Bernard
Bursill, who seems to have the
skill with the pen his brother Noel,
while in Vancouver displayed with
the pencil. The following racy,
descriptive article is contributed
by Mr. Bernard Bursill to the
London "Tit-bits." It will be read
with interest not only because of
the name of the writer, but because
of the picture it gives of municipal employment in London. We
commend the article to the attention of South Vancouver municipal
employes and regret we are not
able to give the clever illustrations.
���Editor  Chinook.
IF YOU ARE SICK, CALL ON
ERNEST SHAW, D.C.
(Doctor of Chiropratic)
25C    22nd    Avenue    East,    close    to
Main Streel
Hours : 1.30 till 6.   Consultation free
Chiropractic succeeds where medi
.ine fails. For all complaints, whether
acute or chronic, Chiropractic is just
the thing.
South End Cleaning Co.
First-class    Cleaners,    Pressors    and
Tailors
A  trial   will    convince  you.    Prices
Reasonable
Open  Evenings
4375 Main Street   .   South Vancouver
MACK'S
HORSESHOEING AND GENERAL
BLACKSMITHINO
SHOEING  A  SPECIALTY
DAVID   S.   McKAY,   MANAGER
South Hill P.O. Box 105
"James,   there's   a   burglar   downstairs.    I'm going for help."
"Wait a minute.  I'll go with you.'
"Please, father says he cant come
for his money, as 'is chest's so bad.
Can I take it?"
"Got his ticket?"
"Yes, sir."
A thin little arm discloses itself
from beneath a threadbare shawl, and
the metal ticket is handed up. I empty the wages tin on the pay board.
"Thank you, sir���oh, sir, is this all?
There's only half here.    Poor daddy!"
Borough councils cannot help bad
chests. If it had been an accident
while on duty it might have been full
pay, but a bad chest! Why, scores of
men with chests like steel are waiting for jobs and cannot get them.
The grimy workmen shuffle up a
little to fill the gap caused by the retreating maid, and before 1 can get
the piping voice out of my head a
burly, blustering navvy planks down
his brass ticket with a force that
bends thc pay-board, and grunts,
"My brads, gttv'iiorl"
1 turn out the small tin box corresponding with his ticket.
"What's this?"
An   angry  grunt  this   time.
"Brads you called them, didn't
you?"
"Where's the other 'alf hour?"
"I'll see.   What's your name?"
"'Ampton." It is wonderful how a
man cannot pronounce his own name
after bearing it for half a century.
"Well, that's all that's booked for
you.    See the timekeeper.    Next!"
So they come and go. The long
line gets shorter and shorter as the
different hands are thrust through the
pay-box window. And what hands!
It needs no expert palmist to read
Ihcm; they tell their own story. Here
is a carpenter's hand���a careless man,
probably, from thc cuts about thc
fing.'rs. Here i.s the battered hand uf
a fitter, the black hand of a "slopper,"
or dustman, thc tarred hand of a
wood pavior, and the massive, horny
hand of the picker and sweeper It
is quite a sight to watch the huge
digits   struggling   to   pick   up   a   half
sovereign  as  it lies    flat    upon    the
board.
Some Curious Rates
Sometimes thc workmen complain
how much is due to them; and no
wonder, when some boroughs pay
such extraordinary rates. There is
one London municipality which pays
paviora at nincpence and eleven-
eighteenths per hour, laborers at sixpence and two-thirds, and other
workmen at the rate of sevenpencc
of short money, not knowing exactly
and two-ninths! The municipal work,
man's wages average something between twenty and thirty shillings per
week, and it is gratifying to note i
some boroughs are very considerate
to their employes���Camberwell, for
instance, having humanely laid down
the rule that 30s. being the minimum
living wage, all workmen ihould receive at leasl that amount per week.
It is remarkable how spruce and
smart some men keep themselves and
families on a small wage, while
others, even skilled mechanics paid at
Trade Union rates, will live in perpetual squalor and misery. One Saturday I noticed a mason, a repulsive-
looking individual, was unable to pick
his money up from the board. He
had been drinking on his way to thi
depot.
I put the money in his fist and told
him to clear off before the foreman
caught sight of him, or it would be
his iast lot of wages there. There is
a tavern near the depot, of course,
and I have seen many anxious wives
looking for their husbands in the
vicim'tv when passing homeward after
paying. But I noticed a marked improvement of late years, many
borough councils having popular athletic clubs, which induce the men to
rush away to the cricket or football
field instead of hanging about in the
public-houses.
There is one borough in the suburbs whose club netted $250 profit on
their annual sports, and the amount
was used subsequently for the purchase of a set of instruments for a
brass band. It was certainly a surprise to me at a garden party I once
attended to see the dustman who removed the refuse from my house bedecked in a smart uniform and piping
a  few bars  solo from "Lohengrin."
Paying wages is a big operation.
The money is usually put up in small
tins, 501) of which are placed in trays
in an iron box of convenient size to
be carried from the town hall to the
various depots. By this method the
workmen can be paid very quickly
and mistakes avoided. However,
errors do creep in occasionally, but I
have always found the men very honest in such cases.
Workmen's Tragedies
Some time agei I was paying a man.
and I policed he was a day short in
his wages, lie looked very troubled,
and very soon told me the cause. Thc
previous day he had just finished his
breakfast on the job when his little
girl came running up saying that
Mummy was tied lo thc ceiling." Ile
rushed home and discovered that his
wife   had   hanged   herself  directly  he
Not an Enterprise for the
"Quitter"
1$ "If there is one enterprise on earth," says John Wanamaker, "that a
'quitter' should leave severely alone, it is advertising. To make a success
of advertising one must be prepared to stick like a barnacle on a boat's
bottom.
fl "He must know before he begins it that he must spend money���
lots of it.
fl "Somebody must tell him that he cannot hope to reap results commensurate with his expenditure early in the game.
fl "Advertising does not jerk; it pulls. It begins very gently at first,
but the pull is steady. It increases day by day and year by year, until it
exerts an irresistible power."
had left home that morning, leaving
behind a baby a week old. On the
facts being laid before the borough
engineer the poor man recovered thc
lost day's pay. In London municipalities accidents are very frequent
and illness prevalent. It is certainly
no uncommon occurrence to pay a
man one Saturday and be told he has
gone to his last account the next.
Pay-clerks see a deal of the sordid
side of life. To me the unemployed
cause the most trouble and provoke
the deepest sympathy, although we
get fairly used to the most heartrending poverty cases. The "out-of-
works" come sneaking into the yard,
and it is a cruel task to turn hungry
men away when they come begging
for work.
"I'm starving," one fellow said to
me once. "I'm a lawyer by profession, but if I could get a broom I'd
be content. See here"���he lifted his
foot up under my eyes and showed it
absolutely bare beneath the shabby
uppers. "I've a wife and five children at home, and if I don't get work
we shall all have to go to the
'house.' " And they did.
Another time I had closed down
and was preparing to go away when
a man knocked gently at the small
window. It was an "out-of-work"
knock, trembling and .servile. I opened the window, and a nervous-looking little man asked for work, and,
of course, was dnly referred to the
town hall. He told me that he had
just completed fifteen years as a
Portland convict. In his younger
days he had "done for" a comrade in
a foolish love quarrel, and was sentenced to penal servitude for life, but
liberated after serving fifteen years.
Prison life had taken all the bravado
out of him, and he looked incapable
of killing a mouse, let alone a man.
"Prison's better than this," he said,
"and I  wish  l  was back again."
I believe work was eventually
found for him, as he was a skilled
pavior and mason, which was not
surprising seeing he had received such
an excellent apprenticeship in the
quarries at Portland.
At the depot I keep a small hospital collecting-box on the pay-board,
and many of the men drop a copper
in when they have received their
money, I have noticed, however, it
is Ihe older men who contribute most.
One old fellow told me he could not
cat his Sunday's dinner contentedly
if he had missed putting his copper
in; and as he fumbled for the coin
with a shaky hand I wondered if another year would still sec him at the
window���indeed, whether hc would
not he better off at rest than dozing
in the dead of night before the unhealthy glow of a watchman's fire.
Then there is a carman, quite a
J'lhn Bull type, whom I noticed always
looks remarkably smart and clean,
lie has a full, round face, generally
shaved to shining point, atlliough I
have seen him al times suffering from
an epidemic of cuts and scratches on
his chin, lie confided to me one day
lhat during the evenings he hired
himself lo a local barber who trained
youthful tyros t,i shave on his face.
I congratulated lhe man on his nerve.
Thai is hereiism of one sort, and wc
arc not  without examples of heroism
of greater magnitude,
A Hero in a Man-Hole
A man once stretched out a bandaged hand to receive his wages. I
observed he was receiving accident
pay. and asked him what had occurred. It appeared that the tar-pot
had caught alight and he had rushed
forward to shut the lid. He succeeded, but his hands and arms were enveloped in boiling tar.
Only a short while ago four
borough sewermen were almost suffocated in a man-hole. A young
laborer who was passing at the surface descended, and at the risk of his
life brought the four men out almost
dead.
The council, as a reward, gave the
laborer a permanent job as a sweeper and a five-pound note. Thc sewer-
men were presented with a small sun
each, and when receiving the gratuity
at the hands of the council one of
them modestly said, "Thank you,
gentlemen, and I 'ope it won't occur
again!"
The cheerful agent stepped into
the business man's private office and
set his grip on the floor.
"I have here," he said, "a patent
glass cutter for 25 cents. It is known
as "
"Don't need any glass cutter," snapped the business man.
"Ah, vou don't need a glass cutter!
Well, then I have here a vacuum
cleaner that sells for $40. It is now
in use in thousands of homes.    It is
"I  don't  need a  vacuum  cleaner."
"Well,   perhaps   not;   but   then   I
have   something   else   here   that   will
certainly interest you.    It is a phonograph that retails for the small sum
The Up - to - date Grocery Store
Try our Special
Blend of
40c TEA
STUDY OUR   PRICES
BEFORE GOING
ELSEWHERE
40c Coffee
i�� Invigorating
per   sack $l.(.m
Ulli
HIGHLAND  POTATOES	
SPRING-BROOK BUTTER   3 lbs  for
RANCH  EGGS   3 dozen for   (l.9ti
SKIPPER SARDINES  2 tins for   025
TWO LARGE TINS OF SALMON  2 fo
FINEST SUNKIST ORANGES  "'l6 fo
0.25
or   0.25
MOTTO:    "We Lead, the Others Limp Along"
SLOAN'S   GROCERY
4493 MAIN STREET (Corner 29th Avenue)
PHONE:   FAIRMONT 1657
Lawson's Cash Grocery
Good things to eat. Best of provisions
at  lowest prices
CORNER 32nd. and MAIN ST.
Between   General   Brock   School   and
the "Chinook" Office
D. S. McPHERSON
PRODUCE   MERCHANT
Try our Butter,  Eggs, Cheese and Provisions.
For quality, these will please you.
Orders  Solicited
Cor.   26th   AVE.   &   MAIN.   VANCOUVER
THOS. J. HANRAHAN
Concrete,  Cement  and  Sewer
Contractor
Phone: Fair. 807       109 26th Ave. E.
R. B. LINZEY
JEWELLER
4132   MAIN   STREET
JOHNSON  BROS.
General   Sheet   Metal   Workers
Furnaces   a   speciality���installed   by   cxpe
Cornice,  skylights  and  roofing,  electric
signs   and   ail   kinds   brass   and
copper fixtures
Cor. 27th Ave.  ��  Main  St..  South  Vancou
Phone:     Fairmont  2386
WINNOTT STORE
AND   POST   OFFICE
General Merchants
Stumping  Powder  Our  Specialty
Phone:     Fraser   100 46th  Ave.   44   M..
Reeve Sc Harding, Props.
Pre-inventory   Sale   Starts   March  1
PEOPLE'S CARTAGE
Cor. Bodwell and Main
Phone:    Fairmont  1544
W. J. PROWSE
Real Estate, Loans,  Insurance
4609 Main St. Phone: Fair. 78
SQUARE DEAL REALTY CO.
Greater Vancouver  Specialists
R. G. Simm, Manager
Phone: Fair. 807 4132 Main St.
Don't object to a little abuse. Many
a man has been kicked into prominence.
See
M. A. BEACH
FOR   SPRING   SHOES
26th Ave. & Main St.
For   Everything   That's   New  in
MENS AND BOYS'  FURNISHINGS
Go  to
LAWSON'S
Next   door   to   Temple   Theatre
Cor. 26th Ave. 4 Main St.
The   Gardening Season is  Near
Get your supply of Tools from us
ALL SORTS OF HARDWARE FOR BUILDING
PURPOSES
C. B. FEARNEY  For���Tr&aMrr��oba
HARDWARE, PAINTS, OILS, STOVES, RANGES, ETC.
Joyce Street, COLLINGWOOD
5 ROOM HOUSE
On 48th Avenue, modern;  only $2,800;
$200 cash,  balance arranged.
Lot is 34x126.
R. J. McLauchlan
4123 Main Street
Phone: Fair. 1607
MONEY
CANT
BUY
BETTER
AH Grocers
Kelly, Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
of $11. There isn't another phonograph in the world that "
"I wouldn't buy a phonograph on
a bet!" growled the business man,
getting red in the face.
"Well, I am surprised! But then, I
have here a camera that sells for $27.
It  will  take the widest  scope "
"No camera today!" yelled the
business man.
"Well; then, I have a four-hundred-
and-twenty-three-dollar automobile,
which combines all the necessary
points of the higher priced machines
and "
"For the love of Mike!" screamed
the business man. "I'll take a glass
cutter. Here's your quarter. Now,
get out I"
"Thank you," said the agent.
"Thats' all I had to sell in the first
place." SATURDAY,  MARCH   22,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
ELKVEN
Geo.  B.  Howard,
Mgr.
WEEK OF MARCH 24
THE DHL- S. LAWRENCE
AVENUE
THEATRE
Main   and   Harris
l'hone : Sey. 7012
STOCK  CUMI'.WV
WITH
MATINEES WED  & SAT
MISS MAUDE
LEONE
IN THE SENSATIONAL COMEDY-DRAMA
DOWN BY THE SEA
PRICES:    25c, 35c, 50c
MATINEES:    25c Any Seat
Mere Selling
Of merchandise is not our whole desire. Wc aim to give more in
exchange for dollars and cents; absolute and unconditional satisfaction.    We arc never satisfied until you are.
SOME HANDY  SPECIALS FOR THIS WEEK
DILL PICKLES, 3-lb. cans the can $0 25
ONION  SALT, something new bottle   0.20
GOLDEN   EGG   MACARON the   package   0.25
HOLBROOKS'   GREEN   PEAS two packages   0.25
B1STO, "Thc Gravy Maker," the tin    15c and 25c
XOELE'S BLACK CURRANT JAM large jar   0.45
FINEST HIGHLAND SUTTON POTATOES the sack    1.00
RIDGWAY'S  5   O'CLOCK  TEA the  pound   0.60
FRENCH PEARS    two cans   0.25
BROWN  BERRIES  COFFEE the pound   0.50
NEW  SEASON'S  JELLIES the  jar   0.25
PEEK    FKKAX'S   BISCUITS the package 15c and   20c
Fra<w��r Rr MorI pan   26th Avenue and Main
llaOCI      IX     lHaLLlCall., Phone:   Fairmont  781
TEMPLE THEATRE
Cor. 26th AVE. AND MAIN ST.
FIRST CLASS MOTION PICTURES
PROGRAMME CHANGED DA 11 A'
W^T   LADIES
A few words aboul your
EASTER HATS
.Before going down town call al tlie
Richmond   Stores
,      . 45th.AVENUE AND FRASER STREET
Ami see whal we can (lu al $4.50, $5.50 and $6.50.
All that is new in milliner}'.    Don'l  forget the
address.    The
richmond~storeT
Specializes in Ladies' and Children's Outfitting.
Garden Tools
Wejiave a large stock of the following
Just arrived
Lawn
Roller
Vacuum
V    1 I'll 11C I
to Rent
Hose
Rakes
Spades
Shovels
Scythes
Buck Saws
Cultivators
Lawn Mowers
Pruning Knives
Wheel Barrows
to   Rent
We Guarantee any ancTevery Tool
sold by us.
G.E. McBride & Co.
Corner 16th Avenue and Main Street
Corner 49th Avenue and Fraser Street
Week's Building Permits
The building permits issued from
i"e office of Building Inspector
joung {or tlle week ended Wednesday, numbered forty-three, and call-
buildings of a total value of
ed f0
$40,000
New Fraser Avenue Store
Mr. C. M. Whelpton has just commenced to build a new store for Mr.
W. H. Hilbert on Fraser Avenue, between Forty-fifth and Forty-sixth
avenues, at an estimated cost of
$4200.
HfenATVANCOUv-eRS LEADING
 p^y Hooses-
fP>
Mutt and Jeff
The record-breaking musical comedy hit nf the leason comes i" the
Imperial Theatre for two night-, and
Saturday matinee, March 21-22. It ii
"Mutt and Jeff," cartoon play made
from Mud rfsher'i famous newspaper
cartoons which appear daily iu five
hundred cities nf the United  Statu
and Canada. The piece will lie presented here by Oils Hill's fine company of fift) people, including i
Broadway chorus of yeuuig women
handsomely gowned feir each e,f the
fourteen song numbers with which
the piece is replete, The stage settings anil costuming are all new this
trip, and the production in its entirety is easily in lhe front rank with the
dollar and a half attractions
this season.
nil    teellr
Pendleton Round-Up
A   wonderful     record    of    Western
range    life,  wild  bucking    bronchos,
plunging steers and  elariug riders are
tlie motion pictures of the 1912 Pendleton Round-Up, which will he seen
feir tlie first time in Vancouver at the
Imperial Theatre four nights, commencing Monday. March 24.
Then; is a matinee also every afternoon at 2.30 There is mil a feature
of Ihe big festival that has not been
caught by the moving picture man at
this last round up. Frequently in the
pictures themselves one will catch a
glimpse   of  the  operator  of ane.tlicr
itonable offence. Kicolia is condemn-
I jd to Siberia in consequence, The-
lexl lal h an sinews the burning of
i fewish quarters. This i* followed by the palace of the Coventor-
General.    Then is seen  the prison  of
the Palace of Justice and the condemned Nihilists and political of-
fendeis, on their march to Siberia
The nexl act presents a wonderful
scene. This shows Siberia and the
mines where the convicts work.
Tlnrc i- a revolt and the convicts at-
| tack the soldiers who arc guarding
I them. The last act takes place at
' 'lit ss;. This subject is a novel one,
as Russia is seldom treated in drama.
The entire company did splendidly,
and the whole production is a difficult one and worthy of fine patronage.
Xext week will be another banner
week at this theatre as that celebrated comedy drama "Mrs. Wiggs of
thc Cabbage Patch" will be the attraction. When given last season at
this theatre hundreds were turned
away nightly and it is now reproduced owing to the large number of
requests received at the box office.
Mrs. Wiggs. thai cheerful philosopher, win. finds life happy, although;
she lives in a shack between railway !
tics, will again be played by Mary'
Stevens, who was so successful before. V T. Henderson will repeat
his very funny performance of Hiram
itubbins, while Miss Hazy will be
impersonated  by   Maln-I   Whiting.
i will be provided in the appearance
of Tin- Great Patterson Troupe of
Lad)   Aeroplanists.
I Tin- third extraordinary feature
will be found, it is said, in "The' Wise
Guy." -.t screening comedy playlet,
ire.iii the pen of George M Cohen,
played here for the first time by
t'..li..n Darre.w and Company.
Wolf anel Zadella are booked  f"r
what they are- phased lo call "OM
Antics." This pair will sing and dam I
ill the way lhat was popular twenty
years ago.
licrt   (Gone)    Mclburn,   hailed   as
Tin-   Good   Time   Hoy,"   will   be   on
hand wilh some patter and songs that
promise well
For the acrobatic entertainment,
there will be Brooks and L. Lorella,
billed as acrobatic comiques. Pathes
Weekly and gazette, a right up-to-
date record eif events both local and
foreign, a high-class, full-reel picture
entertainment, will complete  the bill.
+       ef,       *
Josef Lhevinne
The audience that greeted Josef
Lhevinne, thc eminent Russian pianist, at the Imperial Theatre on Thursday evening last was not a large one;
but it was a most enthusiastic one
and gave the artist of the evening a
most attentive hearing throughout
the long programme of high class
piano music.
Lhevinne played a programme of
piano music embracing every school
of composition from ancient to modern times, opening with a Bach-
Liszt Prelude and Fugue, and closing
with a transcription from Grand
Opera, Robert Le Liable, arranged
for piano by Liszt.
Besides these two Liszt arrangements, the programme embraced a
Beethoven Sonata, Opus 81, the
Brahms Variations on a Theme by
Paganini, a Mozart number, and four
Chopin compositions, comprising, as
will hc noted, a me>st complete and
comprehensive evening of pianoforte
music,
Most critics maintain of this eminent artist that he is in a class with
the famous Rubinstein. Whether
this is see or in.I. certain il is that the!
���iiii great Rubinstein might well be
l-i"'.nd to hand down to this artist
���mil fellow countryman the mantle
of his fame as teacher anel concerl
pianist. Lhevinne's playing on this
occasion was nothing short of mar-
vellous. Ilis execution as exemplified in the Brahms Variations was al.
mosl superhuman in its entirety.
EMPRESS
Hasting, & Gore     Phone Sey. 3907
BEST RESERVED SEATS 25c, 50c
Tonight 8.15       Matinee Sat. 2.1S
This  Week
"SIBERIA"
Next  Week
MRS. WIGGS OF THE
CABBAGE PATCH
PANTAGES
Unequalled       Vaudeville       Meant
Vaudeville
Pantafa
SHOW STARTS���2.45. 7.IS. aad   ���JWp.ni.
Return   Engagement
THE  CARO   MILLER   FAMILY
The Five Columbians, Inc.,
Presenting a series of artistic  diver-
tisements,  embellished  with  costumes  and  scenery  of  rare
elegance
The Great
PATTERSON TROUPE
World-renowned  Lady  Aerialists
4���Other Pantages Acts���4
Week   Beginning   March   24
PATTEE'S DIVING GIRLS
Beautiful  Women  ami   Expert
Swimmers
LA  VINE-CIMARON  TRIO
In   "Imagination"���A    Physical
Culture Travestj
4���Other   Big   S.   &   C.   Acts���4
: Correspondence
Interior View of the New  Orpheum  Theatre
machine   calmly   working   under
very   feel   of  the  rearing horses.
lhe
Avenue Theatre
Versatility    is   the'   prime   requisite
fen-  every   high-class  stock  actor  anel
Lovey Mary will he played by
Mii.i Marsky and Isabelle Fletcher
will lee ihe Mis- I.ue'v. while Charles
Ayres will be iln manly editor, I * < ��� J >
Redding, Tilly Armstrong will convulse the audience again as Mrs
Schultz, who weighs 300 pounds,   Mr.
To the Editor of "The' Chinook"
Dear Sir.���Will you kindly through
your columns allow me to vent a
grievance that I have, which not only
affects myself but a great many of
the Conservative voters in South
Vancouver. I have, consistently
voted thc Conservative ticket in the
last two elections, hut 1 have never
yet heard the Provincial Member
-peak. Is it fair or just that wc
should have a member representing
us who treats his constituency in
Midi a manner?
I am a life-long Conservative,
working and voting for my party,
Imt unless seune change in tin tactics 'if the leaders take place in regard to our member coming before
the electors to lei us sec what kind
if a speakei he is. ihen there will
le,- a change if party. Nothing
tends to tin- disintegration of a
party s.e mn. h as the treatment
"hich is meted oul to the Conservatives  of South Vancouver.
PHILLIP WOODROW.
DENTISTS
Drs. Howie & Hall
Have   opened   up   new   and   up-to-date
Dental   Parlors  in  the   Williams   Block,
Corner Granville and Hastings
We have installed all the latest and
best appliances, and are prepared to
give you the best there is in the denta!
profession.
A share of your patronage is
solicited.
Gas    administered    for    the    painless
extraction of  teeth.
P. O   Howie, DD.P.
Wm. 8. Hall, DD.S.
Phone   Sey.   3266   for
appointment
iI^mO^i^^
HAMILTON BROS.
Embalmers and Funeral
Directors
Parlors and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Phone : Ffaser 19
(Day or night)
r'.'.".!.!1!6.. .!"!?"V��/_ "ie..h!!wr,cn.,i0  Wiggs, the renegade husband, will be
taken by  Louis  Von  Weithoff, while
makes his
Company possess it iu a marked degree is shown by their splendid presentation    Of   <el'ee.    M.   ('chcll's    [aiTtOUS
musical    play,    "Forty-five    Minnies
j From Broadway," al the Avenue tins
week.   Since iln  opening nighl it has
I heen  greeted  by  capacity  houses  al
veiy  performance anel   for  the   few
remaining   like-   conditions   will   undoubtedly  prevail.    Il  has  been  one are already rapidlj
ieef the greatest successes ever achieved in slock iu this city, anil the' pro-1
dUCtion has gone With a snap and
precision that has made il wonderfully attractive. Maude Leone has
made a  tremendous  hii  as  "Mary,"
she has never looked prettier anil her
singing was a delightful surprise Del
' Lawrence made a great hit as "Kid
[turns." and lhe rest of the company
wcre admirable in their respective
parts. It has been a splendid production of a very difficult show. A
word of praise is due the stage force
for the scenery and settings and also
to the Avenue orchestra, under the
direction eif J. Percy Harvey feer their
splendid  work.
For   next   week   Lawrence   &   Sandusky    announce  an  elaborate    production   of   the   sensational   comedy-
drama,  "Down  by tlie  Sea."     It   is  a
romance of the  Xew England  coast
and  contains   every   requisite   for   a
successful   antl   popular   play.     11   is
especially  stnmg  in   the  heart  inter
est, has a sweet hive
thrills   and   an   abundance  ot   go
clean  comedy.     There  will  be   some
very     elaborate   scenic   effects     anil
practically every member eif Ihe company is fitted with a strong role.
Chauncey Southern ,\ill again
Cooper. Lily MacPherson will impersonate Asia. All Ilu principal
features of tl .��� stories ��ill be cm-
hodied iii ihe play. The scenes will
in' very realistic, Including the real
freight   car  in   which     Mr     Stubbins
T.e tin' Editor of "The Chinook":
Dear Sir,���Will you allow me to
euler my protest against the useless
waste oi time thai not "illy our busi-
men imt our civic empk
--   ���... ���... v....- employees arc
be I subjected  to  in  connection  with   the
exit from the Patch   Seals
selling
Empress Theatre
One of the most gorgeous scenic
dramas ever seen in this city is being
presented at the Empress Theatre,
this week. This is the Russian drama
"Siberia." and it tells a powerful
story of life in the land of the Czar
It is in six acts and tableaux and the
many dramatic situations are magnificently illustrated. The first acl
shows the Jewish quarters at Mos
cow, and thc plot devehips immedi
ately. Nicolia Niagoff. a student, is
in love with Sarah, the daughter of
David, a Jewish patriarch. e>3nf the
girl's beauty has attracted the ��� attention of Jaracoff, the GovetnW-'Gen-
eral., He tries to force his Unwelcome attentions on her ami Xicolia
Strikes him.    In  Russia thicis .vtrea-
Orpheum  Theatre
A    big    spectacular    diving    act.
wherein three beautifully formed women participate, will he the headline
attraction al the Orpheum during the
oeining week, when Pattee's Diving
('���iris make their debut. The big
tank contains lll.(KK) gallons of water,
intei which these young women will
disport.
Thc La Vine-Cimaron trio of
grotesque fun-makers will present
their big hit of a year ago, "Imagination," which caused Orpheum patrons to tilt back and forth in their
.hairs from  laughter.
The   "Belle   eif   Kentucky,"   Marie
Russell, will bc seen  in brown    face
shuffling and singing the best of the
Southern melodies, such as might fit
hcr ability as an exponent of Southern  character.
Valentine   Vox.   Jr..   the   whistling
i story?pVenty"ofivfn?ll,'9}|iat' who was one,of the hits
ndance of   good "'   hc l>,U "n hl* tyroer vunt, will be
with  us   again   during    the     coming
week.
The La Pla trio of musicians will
offer a musical ensemble that is said
lo be both splendidly rendered and
artistically   presented.
Claremont Brothers, who will have
some fun on a revolving ladder, are
jumping here direct from Chicago,
and will be one of the features of
lhe week's  offering.
commissioner's enquiry; Is it just
it right thai Mr. Roden shouhl make
certain grave accusations against cer-
laiu officials, Ihen when these ac-
:usatii mi wi re i ebutted, sni ak out by
., bai k dooi by saj ing he could not
betraj the people who informed him?
If Mr Roden is such a man of
honor that he can nol inform the
Commissioner thc name of his informant, then Mi Roden's honor
shouhl have been shown before he
made the accusation. A debas d
mind lemks for a debased action. The
only way to sleep such as Mr. Roden
is lo charge them up with the witness's costs which it is to bc hoped
ihe  Commissioner will  do.
THOMAS FORD.
To thc Editor of the "Chinook":
Dear Sir,���As an Old Country
bowler and a lover of the game, is it
not possible that a club can be formed in South Vancouver? Can the
Council not lay off a green in each
of the wards? Surely something can
be done in the way of providing recreation for the inhabitants.
Geo. Jones
HORSE   SHOER
Lame and Interfering horses will
receive .special care and attention.
All kind* of hand-made shoes, running shoes, running plates, toe
plates,   etc.
All horses entrusted to me will receive  every  care   and  attention.
GOOD   WORK   GUARANTEED
571  Beatty Street
SUCCESS
Business   College
"The School of Certainties"
COURSES IN BOOKKEEPING.
SHORTHAND     AND   TYPEWRITING.
CIVIL   SERVICE   AND   ENGLISH
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded
DAV   AND   FVENING   CLASSES
HARRIS   BUILDING
Oorner Main St. & 10th Ave.
Phone :   Fairmont   2075
Pantages Theatre
All indications point to another bill
eif features at Pantages next week.
The new show, opening with the
natince Monday, will mark the return engagement of the Caro Miller
family; known as the Five Columbians, who will present a series of
artistic divertisements. in which
music and dancing will Come ih fOf
the   most   prominent  attention/
The extra added feature next week
also promises  to be a corker.      This
ALEX. SCOTT.
To thc Editor of "The Chinook":
Dear Sir.-���I sec the versatile R.
McBride thinks that the Municipality
of South Vancouver can be ably managed by one policeman. I understand
Mr. McBride speaks from practical
knowledge, as I am informed he was
Chief eif Police for Steveston, where
he had a very brilliant though short
career.���Yours  truly,
TOM KING.
FOUND
Brindle Bull pup. Owner may have
same by proving ownership and paying keep and advertising. Apply 198
Rupert Street. South Vancouver.
BIRTHS
Kerr���On Sunday, March 16, 1913,
to Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Kerr, a son.
McLaughlin.���On Saturday,, 15th
March, to Mr. and Mrs. R. J. McLaughlin, a son.
Peach���On Sunday, 16th March,
to Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Peach, a
daughter.
' Slater���On Monday, 17th March,
to Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Slater,
4604 Walden Street, a son.
SCHEDULE
PROVINCIAL    ELECTIONS    ACT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
list of voters for thc Vancouver City Electoral District has been cancelled, and that
application! to be placed 011 thc voters' list
will be received at my office at 501 Pender
Street West, Vancouver, where printed forms
eef affidavit to bc used in support of an application   to   vote   will   be   supplied.
The list of persons claiming to vote will
be suspended from and after the seventh day
eif April. 1913. and a Court of Revision will
be held on the nineteenth day of May, 1913,
and notice of objections to thc insertion of
any name on the register of voters must be
given to me thirty clear days before thc holding of the Court of Revision.
Dated  this  fourth  day of March,   1913.
J.   MAHONY,
Registrar  of   Voters  for  the   Vancouver   City
Electoral    District. 3-8, 15. 22
Shack is Burnt
A four-room shack belonging to
Mr. Nelson, of Selkirk1 street. and
Wilson road was totally destroyed,
and" a new modern bungalow on ffte
next lot was practically destroyed
by a fire. Fire Chief Lester and the
firemen attached to No. 3 fireharll assisted by Chief of Police, - Jackson*,:;
worked hard to save the property. TWELVE
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
CHAMBERS'
Iron - Health
Pills
The  Best  Blood Purifier
*
50 Doses   -   -   25c
CHAMBERS
DRUG CO.
COLLINGWOOD
::    Collingwood Parliament   ::
A Lively Night���The Naval Bill���Resignation   of   the    Conservative
Government���Mr.   Wm.   Morris Will    be   "Sent   for"   by    the
Lieut.-Governor,  Mr. J. J.  Wilbers
Fertile Fraaer Valley,
Garden of British Columbia
(Continued   from   Page  1)
It was ��� lively night at the Collingwood    Parliament,     Saturday        The
I ladies'  gallery   was   Riled,   there   were
many   \i-iteeis,   among   ihcm   Mr,  Jas
McGeer, * leader eef tne opposition In
the Central  Parliament
The Naval Bill
This  Hill has led t'e ihe resignation of the Government.   Briefly the
Government   proposed   to  give   fifty
j million dollars (they do things on a
generous scale at Ceellingwood) lei the
m.    -r -u . n    i-       t u British  Admiralty for the building of
The Tribute to  Pauline Johnson    I ,,at|,cs,lipg_     M/  UlM,,n(1,    ���,,���%���.
The clerk of the House reported f���r Revclstoke (who hails from
that, accompanied by several mem- South Hill) was not going to let Col-
bcrs of the House, he had attended , |ji,gW,���,d outdo the environs of the
th.-   f���n-r.l   ~f  p-..i:_.   i-i. -*'Municipal   Hall.    Ile thought a  )iun-
Collingwood
Feed Store
HAY, GRAIN, POULTRY
SUPPLIES
No Order too Large; None too
Small
CITY PRICES
Warehouse and  Office:
B.  C.  ELECTRIC  SIDING
EAST   COLLINGWOOD
Phone: Coll. 40 P.O. Box 4
J. POSTLETHWAITE, Prop.
the funeral of Pauline Johnson ami
taken a beautiful wreath of maplt
leaves, ferns, violets, and wild flowers.
The tribute had been gracefully acknowledged by the friends of the late
poetess.
A Tribute to Livingstone
The member for Grand Forks, Mr.
Lister, drew attention to the approaching centennial of David Livingstone. In a new country like
British Columbia, the work of the
explorer was much appreciated, the
explorer who opened up new country,
new fields for commerce, new sources
of wealth. David Livingstone was
a great pioneer in Africa; hc was the
enemy of the slave traffic, the friend
of humanity. To the generous support of the Royal Geographical Society we owed such pioneer work as
Livingstone, Franklin, and Scott
had clone, and he moved that a suitable letter be written by the clerk,
appreciating the work of the Society
in celebrating the Livingstone Centennial.     Carried   unanimously.
The  Electors Bill
The Bill was after some discussion
passed.     Its   provisions  need   not  be
repeated���all   that   need  be  said  is :
Come   this   Saturday   night   to   the
dred millions should bc voted, and
really there was no reason why Collingwood should not vote a billion,
ill imaginary money. But Collingwood only voted fifty millions, remembering perhaps that something
must be held for water supply.
The member for Comox, Mr. Lister,
Jr., argued that small cruisers, torpedo boats, and other vessels of more
service to Canada than battleships
should be built, and the member for
Grand Forks (Mr. Lister) did not
think there should be any special
manner stated as to how the money
should bc used. Perhaps in the near
future, aeroplanes might be more
necessary than battleships.
The Minister of Justice said there
were greater differences of opinion
on the naval question that the Government anticipated. Ile thought that
before Collingwood gave away fifty
millions thc people should be consulted. (Hear, hear.) After various
motions the Government resigned
and were warmly criticised for lack
of courage to carry their policy
through.
The leader of the Opposition will
form a cabinet and hopes true "Grits"
will rally round him. The future is
"in  the  lap of the  gods,"  for Tories
Collingwood   Parliament   at' the   In-'and   Independents  are  determined  to
stitute, Collingwood East. Have your
name registered. There is an election
next week. So become M. P. ol Collingwood.
give  Premier  Morris a warm time.
Men  of all  opinions  come  to  thc
parliament in force.    It will be lively.
"GOD SAVE THE KING"
CHARGES  RESIDENTS
STOLE LUMBER
Councillor   Dickinson   Accounts,   for
Lumber Complaints
NOTICES
Young girl, 8 to 10 years, wanted
to mind three-year-old boy; good
home and clothes. Apply 6304 Quebec Street.
Harris'
Pool Room
Come and enjoy a game at
KARRIS'   NEW   ROOM   AND
NEW TABLES
"Hurr/-Up" Barber Shop
JOYCE ROAD
COLLINGWOOD EAST
TAILORING
JOHN ANDERSON
6018 Fraser Avenue
(Established two years)
Cleaning and Pressing
Reliable Repair Work
Suits Made-to-Order
A NEW SUIT
���i
FOR EASTER
WILLIAM  CLEFT
Experienced  Ladies' &  Gent's
Tailor
Corner Fifty-sixth and Fraser
Ladies' or Gent's Suits, $25 up
Sealed Tenders
TENDERS will be received by Capt. J. McLean up to
and including Friday, March
21, to erect store 30 x 60, at
Joyce Street, East Collingwood.
Plans and specifications
can be seen at furniture
store, near Carlton School.
Tenders will be received
for carpenter work only, or
also to furnish all materials.
The lowest or any tender
not necessarily accepted.
Charging that residents in South
Vancouver stole thousands of feet of
lumber in 1909 and thereby gave rise
��� | to rumors that the lumber contractor
was delivering short of the quantity
ordered, was the explanation offered
hy Councillor Dickinson Wednesday
morning to account for complaints
which Commissioner Crehan stated
had been made that thc Council had
been guilty of grave irregularities in
not checking up the quantity and
quality of lumber delivered.
Councillor Dickinson stated that
he, together with P.C. Lee (now sergeant), located in thc back yards of
residents quite a quantity of lumber
which was missing from places where
there was a shortage of lumber for
sidewalks, and he said it was his
opinion that similar thefts were re-
iponsible for a shortage of thousands
of feet. Ex-Reeve Pound corroborated this statement.
Mr. Robert Campbell, formerly accountant for Mr. W. H. Day, lumber
contractor, gave an outline of the
lumber orders supplied to the municipality during thc period between
March 28, 1911, and October 14, 1912.
Ile stated that he got delivery slips
for all lumber sent out, but in some
cases the slips were not signed because there was no one representing
the municipality on the spot where
the   lumber  was  delivered.
Commissioner Crehan���If I suggest
to you that your firm bought third
class lumber from thc American side
and shipped it as first lumber, what
would  you  say?
Witness���I would say most decidedly no; though, of course, it could
have been done without my knowledge.
Commissioner Crehan���Will you
swear that you delivered all the lumber that was paid for?
Witness���I am certain that all the
lumber that I had tallies for was delivered, or at any rate it was sent
out.
Thomas llarkncss, formerly yard
foreman for Mr. Day, stated that invariably the quality of lumber scut
out was what hc understood to bc the
quality  required.
Witness said he did not remember
any lumber being delivered to members of the Council or Municipal officers  privately.
Mr. Robert Campbell was recalled
and stated that when councillors or
Municipal officials bought lumber
from Mr. Day he sent out the accounts to them in the ordinary way
and no special allowance or discount
was given.
Councillor Dickinson���Do you remember sending out lumber privately
to a man named Dickinson in Ward
II?
Witness���No, I never did.
In answer to ex-Reeve Pound, the
witness said that in no case was lumber sent out either short in quantity
or deficient in quality, his instructions from Mr. Day being to fill all
orders as required.
Mr. W. H,. Day corroborated the
evidence of the previous witnesses
and stated that hc had never given a
councillor or municipal official any
presents nor had he supplied them
with lumber either free or at a less
cost  than  the usual  market price.
In reply to Councillor Dickinson,
Mr. Day said in 1909 he delivered
2,000,000 feet of lumber to the municipality and in very many cases he
had to make rough roads in order to
deliver the lumber at the places required.
The enquiry was adjourned until
Tuesday, March 25, at 10 o'clock.
WORK TO START
ABOUT APRIL 1
Reeve  Kerr  States  That  Council  is
Now Awaiting Funds
A deputation waited upon thc
Roard of Works in regard to the
prospects of employment in the
Municipality, at a meeting on Tuesday afternoon. Mr, A. Messenger
said the deputation represented the
municipal employees, who were anxious to know what the prospects
were. The men would either have to
get work or leave the district and get
employment elsewhere.
Councillor Miller said the Council
was in the same position as the men,
and the Council could not start the
men in work until the finances were
assured, which they hoped would be
on April 1. That was the best the
Council  could promise.
Reeve Kerr said work would commence, in a limited degree, April 1.
The Council was placing bylaws before the people, on which they would
endeavor to raise money. Then there
would be employment. If the necessary money was raised, thc Westminster Road proposition would start
and that would provide a lot of work.
All the surrounding municipalities
were tied up with the money trouble,
but thc best that could be done would
be done.
Councillor Dickinson said the mu-
cipality was never in such a position financially as now, but it was
hoped thc money market would improve and that they would have work
shortly.
A deputation interviewed the board
as to the gratling of Rupert Street
and the R. C. E. R. crossing, and it
was decided thai the members of the
board with the engineer inspect the
street  and  report.
A letter was read from thc secretary of the Ward I Ratepayers' Association, protesting against the
Council holding their meetings In
private.
Reeve Kerr said if the Council
could   not   hold   a   private     meeting,
without criticism of the ratepayers, it
was time for the Council to resign.
It was decided to ask the secretary
to supply the dales of the private
meetings  referred   to
Main Street Improvements
Reeve   Kerr  and   ex-Reeve   found
were   the   principal     speakers    at    a
meeting of the Main Street Improvement Association   held   on   Monday
becoming Important Industrial towns.
lhe splendid agricultural resources
of I'ill Meadows, Maple Ridge, and
Mis-.i.ni arc being extensively developed. It has been found that the
very fitusl market garden crops and
fimi can be mosl profitably produced
in these fecund parts e.f the Eraser
Valley, while dairy cattle and s.vine
ire successfully raised. Here, as in
ither pans of the Eraser Valley, the
agricultural wealth tei he derived from
a I 'il and average climate unequalled
through the province is even now not
adequately realized.
Willi regard to the G.N.R., its service in opening up the sections of
Surrey and Delta through which it
runs has not been so conspicuously
successful as the railways already
mentioned. But its transportation
facilities are being improved, and it
is bound to be an important factor in
aiding the development of the fertile
country through which its tracks arc
laid.
There has been considerable discus,
lion in the Vancouver press during
the past twelve months as to the in
different transportation service between that city and Delta. The main
point advanced was the delay in
Delta produce reaching its chief market. At present, Ladner, the principal town in Delta, is reached by the
B.C.E.R. via Eburne to Steveston
where a boat conveys passengers and
goods across the river. As to the
G.K.R. service from Port Guichon
(near Ladner) to New Westminster,
the route is not only long and round-
abenit, but entirely inadequate in its
times of schedule for the quick conveyance of produce which should
arrive not only fresh but promptly
on thc market. It is now proposed,
and the Provincial Government has
recently included in the estimates a
sum for the purpose, to establish a
ferry service between Woodward,
nearly opposite Ladner, and Delta.
This scheme, in conjunction with an
extension of the B.C.E.R. line in more
direct connection with the Vancouver main line, will undoubtedly greatly increase the freight and passenger
traffic between this opulent farming
section of thc Fraser Valley and Vancouver.
While   considerable     advance     has
been made in the milk production recently throughout the Eraser Valley,
especially in Chilliwack, Sumas, Rich--
mond and Surrey, importations from
outside the province show that there
is still a large margin for greater production.    But what appears to be the
most striking neglect of a highly remunerating industry is that of poultry. During the year 1911 (the figures
for  1912 being not available) out of
total   imports   of   dairy  and   poultry
produce into B.C. amounting to over
$4.0011,000,  more  than  half this  sum,
namely $2,115,868,  comprised poultry
and   eggs.     Moreover,   the  writer    is
authentically     informed     that      the
figures for the year 1912 are likely to
show an even greater sum of poultry
and  egg importations  into the province,    lhe population and the consequent demand has, in  fact, increased
greater   than    the    supply.    As   the
Hon.  Mr.  Scott,  Deputy Minister of
Agriculture,  has  frequently    of    late
urged   upon   the  attention  of  Fraser
Valley farmers and others, here is a
big margin    for   an    addition    to   a
settler's income    Thc soil and other
conditions   obtaining  in   thc    greater
part of the  Eraser  Valley are highly
favorable   for   poultry   raising,   while
the   capital   required   and   the  attention   necessary are  considerably  less
than  in other branches of a  farmer's
wcrk.   The price of eggs in Vancouver and New Westminster last summer  and autumn,  when  they soated
up to 75 and even 85 cents a dozen,
and scarce al that, is sufficiently suggestive.    And  yet   the   humble    hen
which lays those golden eggs is still
sadly neglected as a source of income
throughout   the   Eraser   Valley.
The wonderfully varied character
of the products and industries of thc
Eraser Valley is, perhaps, its most
impressive feature. Wheat, oats, rye
and hay arc successfully grown all
eiver the valley, besides roots and
vegetables of every description. Small
fruits of the highest quality arc successfully . grown in various parts,
while grapes are being increasingly
grown in Mission, Hatzic and other
districts. Thc hops of Agassiz and
Chilliwack  are  of  the  best  kind  ob
t!,ln.J '1- '
SATURDAY,   MARCH  22   19jj
ASK  FOR PERMANENT
SEWERAGE COMMISSION
Attorney-General   Promises  to   Confer  with  Premier  at   Early  Date
At a conference of the Joint Sewerage Commission with Attorney-
General Bowser the other day the
latter promised lo interview Premier
McBride  soon   with  reference  to  the
appointment of an enginfci to examine the plans e,f the joint '.ewerage
committee, and with regard tei the
issuance of a proclamation putting
the new act into force thereby establishing     a     permanent     sewerage
commission.
Those in attendance wcre Aid.
Hepburn, Reeve Kerr, Councillors
Campbell and Dickinson of South
Vancouver; Councillor McDonald,
Burnaby; Reeve Churchill and Councillors Cunliffe and Wells of Point
Grey and Assistant-Engineer of the
staff and Consulting Engineer R. S.
Lea. Mr. Creer has charge of thc
work  here  under  Mr.  Lea.
Aid. Hepburn acted as spokesman
for thc deputation. He explained
that the committee wished to have
thc proclamation issued at once in
order that a permanent commission
might be established and thc trunk
sewer construction gone on with. He-
explained that it was also necessary
for such a commission to make arrangements for funds with which to
proceed with work prior to the disposal of bonds under the provincial
government's  guarantee.
The city of Vancouver in starting
two of the trunk sewers, that at
China Creek and the Balaclava main
had, he added, expended $200,000 together with $35,000 in the preliminary expenses, of which only $70000
had heen repaid as the share from
the other districts, this amount being one-fifth of the preliminary costs
came  from   Point  Grey.
Some objection to the proposed appointment of a secretary-treasurer
for the commission by the provincial
government was raised by Chairman
Hepburn. He said that in this event
the official would be independent of
the commissioners instead of being
their servant.
Hon. Mr. Bowser asked a number
of questions regarding thc salaries
expected, Hc said he would like to
know how much the chairman would
get and what would probably bc paid
the commissioners and the secretary,
treasurer, according to the views of
the present joint committee.
Aid. Hepburn thought that a salary
of $5000 per year would do for the
chairman who would naturally spend
all his time at the work. The other
commissioners might get $2500 or
$3000, and the secretary-treasurer
something less.
Other members of the committee
proposed $1500 or $2000 for the commissioners and the same for the secretary-treasurer.
That the government give the commission a temporary loan so as to enable it to go ahead with work was a
suggestion made to Hon. Mr. Bowser.
Aid Hepburn expressed the view
that the bond guarantee should have
been for four and one-half per cent,
instead of four per cent, as debentures at the latter rate were hard to
sell.
He claimed that the commission
would spend between $750,000 and
$1,000,000  this  year.
After stating that the government
would appoint an independent engineer to go over the t'ans prepared
by Mr. Lea and his assistant, Mr.
Creer, Hon. Mr. Dowser declared
that the matters brought up by the
committee would receive attention
very soon. He would consult the
premier on the subject within a few
days
Around the Municipal Ha!
Br  "SCRUTATOR"
I Continued  fre,m  Page  i
:il  'er  School   II,��.-ir<i    into    ha
sprung from a  philanthropbic
Robert     Mcllrule's     interests
looked  after.    This   ha-   been  -
vious that his propositions hat<
always   turned   down.
��    ���    ��
Mr. J. Frauds Bursill made
Statement in Ceillingwood Parli.i
on Saturday night last, that he
the only one in Collingwood
night who had seen Dr. Living-
Well, 1 spent my boyhood daj
the edge of James Voting's Liin
estate, and it was in bis emph.j
earned my  first  money,    Dr
���Id
pul
��� 	
ingstone,  when   in   Ihe   Old  Ci
spent most of his time with Sir
affin,  as our old  friend  terms J
Young.    James  Young was thi
to  build  oil  works  on  a  large
building the chemical works al  I
gate,  afterwards    opening    extci
works  at   West  Calder,  which   I
derstand are still in operation,
building  of  these   works   comim
about   1865, being nearly the sanu i
Mr.    young    bought    the    Linn
estates as a residence.
��    *    *
"For ways that are dark and ti
that are vain the Heathen Chin
peculiar." The late governmcni
Collingwood could give points
beat them at their own game
Saturday last, with their autoi
majority, the Government
through a financial bill. It lookcn .i
bill of no consequence but, as alter
events showed, it was one of the
neatest piece of legislation thai r
was foisted on to an Unsuspecting
opposition.
After the financial bill was pa-iil
the Government immediately v ent
into committee on the naval question.
The Opposition was both willing ind
anxious to assist the Governmcir in
their grant to the Mother Com try.
Instead of giving $50,000,000 as pre),
posed by the Government, some nf
the Opposition proposed to raise ihe
contribution     to    $100,000,000.       Die
Premier n>sc in the midst of tin discussion and informed the members
that owing to the divergence of opinion Ile thought it was best to pi rogue parliament.
The leader of the Opposition
posed this and the members .it
cre.ss benches seeing how they
been tricked, joined issues with
Opposition, with the result that
jp.
lhe
had
the
l
I!'.
evening to discuss way and means of  '��"ver,  Victoria  and   New  West
  ...i: ucai Kinn obtained on the continent. The potatoes
of Delta have taken premier position
at both American and Canadian
shows, The Clydesdale horses, the
sheep and swine of Delta have also
secured the highest honors at Vancouver.   Vi****-**      -   t    tf
POOR RELIEF FUND
AT   COLLINGWOOD
Many  Families  Assisted  During the
Winter Months
division there was an equal vote. Th
Speaker gave his casting vote ii
favor of the Opposition and tlu no
tion was lost. The Government im
mediately resigned. The Oppos ioi
was then asked to form a Dove-m
ment. Thc leader of the Opposiiioi
appealed to the cross bench n "
bers to form a coalition govcrnn
but the leader of the cross bene
after conferring with his colleagues,
refused to join issues with the ' imposition. The leader of the Opp ni-
tion accepted office, appointing Mr.
Kenneth Lamond Secretary of State
.and immediately dissolved Pa;lia-
Unent. The election will take pine
in the Bursill Hall between 9 am: ID
p.m., on Saturday evening. Norn.nations will take place between 7 ind
8 p.m. There will be rather an interesting hour or two as each of lhe
members address their constitu nts.
On Saturday evening the stan ling
rules wcre suspended, so that il vas
after II p.m. before the meeting "il
adjourned. The 11.20 car had lefl before the South Vancouver enhtin
got to the station, so they had to
until 12.30, some of them reac
home al 1.3(1 a.in. It takes a li
convincing by a husband to his
lhat he has been out to such at)
without any evil intent.
.-nt
.ait
ing
nf
.ife
Some people are so lucky they can
jump from tfie frying pan into the
fire and  find  the  fire  out.
developing   that   thoroughfare     from
the  city  to the  Fraser  River.
Reeve  Kerr  urged  the  association
to  adopt  a   broad   view  of  muncipal
matters, pointing out  that  thc development   of   one   thoroughfare   helped
rather than retarded the development
of other  thoroughfares  in   the  municipality.     Referring   to   the   running
of through  cars from the city to the
river  the  Reeve said  that he did not
think      that     Twenty-fifth      Avenue
would   suffer,   but   would   benefit   by
through cars.    He suggested that the
name Main Street be exhibited on the
cars and it was resolved to make this
request of the B.C.  Electric Railway.
Dealing with municipal matters the
Reeve     said   that   South     Vancouver
must now look to her own resources
for   future  development  and   not  depend   upon   Vancouver.     They   must
keep pace with all progressive movements  and  be   ready  to  take  advantage   of   the   passing   of   the   C.N.R.
agreement,    which   would    establish
Main  Street as  the  terminus of another great transcontinental railwav.
Ex-Reeve   Pound   referred   to   the
work already accomplished in widening  and   improving  Main   Street  and
he loo'ed  forward  to the time when
a   permanent   bridge   at   the   font   o'
Main   Street   would   connect     South
Vancouver     with     Richmond.     With
this    object  in   view,  he  said,    they
should   press   for   the   paving  of  the
street.
ter exhibitions. It is in the Fraser
Valley, in fact, where mixed or
"truck" farming is prosecuted with
the most successful results obtainable in any part of the province.
Referring briefly to the matter of
industries, it is noteworthy that the
largest saw mills and brick yards in
British Columbia are situated on or
near the Eraser River. To mention
only two, there are the Fraser Mills,
probablv the largest saw mills in the
world, and the Clayburn brick yards
which are certainly the largest in
British Columbia, if not in Canada.
No story of the Fraser Valley
would be complete without at least
<ome passing reference to the salmon
ndttstry which has carried the name
of the river to every quarter of the
globe. This year, being a fourth year
or extra season for the run of sock-
eyes, there is expected to be an exceptionally heavy haul of the suc-
a ready market throughout Greater
Vancouver.
Collingwood, March 17.���In January of this year, a fund was collected by the residents of this local
ity tei aid any families who might be
in distress, owing to lhe I ivere
winter Most of the money was
raised by Miss Verna Carter, a public
School pupil, and Iwo or three girl
friends.
The subscriptions were placed in the
hands of Mr. J. D. Eraser, Mr. Chambers and Dr. Baird of Joyce street.
They report having received from
lists $66.70, from the local Women's
Institute $15.00, form various other
sources in smaller amounts $48.10,
making a total of $129.80. They have
given aid where need was found to
14 families living in South Vancouver,
Hastings Townsite and Burnaby. The
fund although now exhausted, was
sufficient for all the deserving cases
that could be discovered.
.1,1-
ice
ml
Councillor Third. Mr. Richardson.
Mr. Winram, Mr. Clough, Mr. James
and others addressed the meeting, it
being pointed out among other things
that bv ta'ing a car to the font of
Main Street either Eburne or Westminster may he reached very quic'- ly.
A number of new members were
elected. The next meeting will be
held on  March 31.
Brilliant Scene at St. Patrick'*
Night Fancy Dreaa Carnival
(Continued  from  Page  1)
A. C. Kerr      British blue jacket
P. G. Stagg   A hobo
W.  Buckle    ,...   Tramp
Mrs. Gillies      The pumpkin girl
E.  C.  Mitchell       Domino
Mrs. Timberley   ....  "Sweet sixteen"
Mrs.   E.   H.   Hart       Rainbow
Messrs. Holland  ....  Heavenly twins
H.   Cocroft         Minstrel
D.  Sutherland       Irishman
NEW  EDIFICE  FOR
COLLINGWOOD DISTRiCT
Knox   Presbyterian   Church   Prepare
to Erect New Structure
The congregation of Knox I'n by-
lirian Church organized a little ver
a year, and al present worshipping ia
Carleton Hall, are taking step-
wards the erection of a church b
ing. They have secured a C\
site mi Ihe corner of Joyce
School Roads, and have had it cl ir
ed recently by voluntary labor. I hey
hope to be able to build this mi
mer.
The minister, Rev. Geo. C r.
Pringle, is preaching a seric- ol
evening sermons on the Ten Cuiii'
mandmciits. Next Sunday being
Easter, appropriate services will be
held in which there will bc seime
special music. In view of the large
and talented choir, numbering twenty-
five voices, this should make the
service   very  attractive.
Golden Link Rebecca Lodge N'"-
27, I. O. U. F., South Vancouver.
met as usual on Tuesday evenmgi
and the members were honored by a
visit from Mrs. Langham, of Nanaimo, president of the Rebekah Assembly of B. C. Mrs. Langham nave
an eloquent address, and was presented with a bouquet of flowers by
Sister Wickwire on behalf of the
members of the lodge. A dainty repast was partaken and enjoyed by
11 present, after which speeches
were made by visiting sisters and
brethren.
I
LUMBER
BAKER 4 PRINGLE
COLLINGWOOD EAST SIDING
LUMBER AND BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
C. GRADES PROMPT DELIVERY
LET US FIG'JRE YOUR BILLS TWELVE
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   MARCH  22
CHAMBERS'
Iron - Health
Pills
Collingwood Parliament
A Lively Night���The Naval Bill���Resignation   of   the   Conservative
Government���Mr.   Wm.   Morris  Will    be    "Sent    for"    by    the
Lieut.-Governor,  Mr. J. J. Wilbers
Fertile Fraser Valley,
Garden of British Columbia
I Continued   from   Page   II
ASK  FOR PERMANENT
SEWERAGE COMMISSION
The  Best  Blood  Purifier
50 Doses
25c
CHAMBERS
DRUG CO.
COLLINGWOOD
li ��as ;, lively night al the Colling
vv I   Parliament,    Baturda)       Tin
ladies' gallery was filled, there wen
many visitors, among them Mr Jas
McGeer, leader eef tlu- opposition in
ilu-  t'euiral  Parliament.
The Naval Bill
This    Bill    has    led   tee   th
li.eii of the Government.
Governmenl proposed i
million dollars (they di things on a
generous scale at Collingwood) t<i the
liritish Admiralty for the building of
haitleships. Mr. Lamond. member
for Revelstoke (who hails from
^^^^^^^^ .South llilli was in.t going iii let Col
bert of the House, he had attended | lingwood outdo  the environs of the
Municipal   Hall.     He   il might  a  hundred   millions   should   he   voted,   and
The  Tribute  to  Pauline Johnson
The   clerk   of   lhe    House   reported
that,   accompanied   by   several   mem-1
Collingwood
Feed Store
HAY, GRAIN, POULTRY
SUPPLIES
No Order too Large; None too
Small
CITY PRICES
Warehouse  and Office:
B.   C.  ELECTRIC  SIDING
EAST   COLLINGWOOD
Phone: Coll. 40 P.O. Box 4
J. POSTLETHWAITE, Prop.
the funeral of Pauline Johnson and
taken a beautiful wreath of maple
leaves, ferns, violets, and wild (lowers.
The   tribute   had  been  gracefully  ac-
Iknowledged by the friends of thc late
i poetess.
A Tribute to Livingstone
The member for Grand Forks, Mr.
Lister, drew attention to the approaching centennial of David Livingstone. In a new country like
Hritish Columbia, the work of the
explorer was much appreciated, the
explorer who opened up new country,
new fields for commerce, new sources
of wealth. David Livingstone was
a great pioneer in Africa; he was the
enemy of the slave traffic, the friend
of humanity. To the generous support of the Royal Geographical Society we owed such pioneer work as
Livingstone, Franklin, and Scott
had done, and he moved that a suitable letter be written by the clerk,
appreciating the work of the Society
in celebrating the Livingstone Centennial.     Carried   unanimously.
The  Electors  Bill
The Hill was after some discussion
passed. Its provisions need not be
repeated���all that  need be said is :
Come this Saturday night to the
Collingwood Parliament at the Institute, Collingwood East. Have your
name registered. There is an election
next week. So become M. P. of Col-
j lingwood.
really there was no reason why Collingwood should not vole a billion,
in imaginary money. But Collingwood only voted fifty millions, remembering perhaps that something
must  be held  for  water supply.
Thc member for Comox, Mr. Lister,
Jr., argued that small cruisers, torpedo boats, and other vessels of more
service to Canada than battleships
should be built, and the member for
Grand Forks (Mr. Lister) did not
think there should be any special
manner stated as to how the money
should be used. Perhaps in the near
future, aeroplanes might bc more
necessary than battleships.
The Minister of Justice said there
were greater differences of opinion
on the naval question that the Government anticipated. He thought that
before Collingwood gave away fifty
millions the people should be consulted. (Hear, hear.) After various
motions the Government resigned
and were warmly criticised for lack
of courage to carry their policy
through.
The leader of the Opposition will
form a cabinet and hopes true "Grits"
will rally round him. The future is
"in the lap of the gods." for Tories
and Independents are determined to
give  Premier  Morris a warm  time.
Men  of all  opinions  come  to  the
parliament in force.    It will be lively.
"GOD SAVK THE  KIXG"
becoming important industrial towns.
lhe splendid agricultural resources
     eif   Tin   Meade,ws.   Maple   Ridge,  and
Mission   are   being     extensively     de-
veloped.    li  has been found thai  the
resigns-   very  Inn si  market   garden  creeps and
Briefly  lhe   f nil I can be iiie.st  profitably produced
give   fifty' in  these fecund parts of the  Prater
Valley, while dairy cattle and swine
ire S-tCCCSSfully raised. Here, as ill
.thir pails e,f the Fraser Valley, the
agri illlural wealth to be derived freim
a I t.\ and average climate uueipiatled
through the province is even now not
adequately realized.
With regard to thc G.N.R., its scr-
cicc in opening up the sections of
Surrey and Delta ihrough which it
runs has nol been SO conspicuously
Successful as the railways already
mentioned. Bul its transportation
facilities are being improved, and it
is bound to be an important factor in
aiding the development of the fertile
country through which its tracks are
laid.
Attorney-General   Promises   to   Confer  with   Premier  at   Early  Date
There
in
CHARGES  RESIDENTS
STOLE LUMBER
Councillor   Dickinson   Accounts
Lumber Complaints
for
NOTICES
Young girl, 8 tei 10 years, wanted
to mind three-year-old boy; good
home and clothes. Apply 6304 Quebec Street.
Harris'
Pool Room
Come and enjoy a game at
HARRIS'    NEW    ROOM   AND
NEW TABLES
"Hurry-Up" Barber Shop
JOYCE ROAD
COLLINGWOOD EAST
TAILORING
JOHN  ANDERSON
6018 Fraser Avenue
(Established  two years)
Cleaning and Pressing
Reliable Repair Work
Suits Made-to- Order
Charging that residents in South
Vancuuver stole thousands of feet of
lumber iu 1909 and thereby gave rise-
to rumors that the lumber contractor
was delivering short of the quantity
ordered, was the explanation offered
by Councillor Dickinson Wednesday
morning to account for complaints
which Commissioner Crehan stated
had been made that the Council had
heen guilty of grave irregularities in
not checking up the quantity and
quality of lumber delivered.
Councillor Dickinson stated that
he, together with P.C. Lee (now sergeant), located in the back yards of
residents quite a quantity of lumber
which was missing from places where
there was a shortage of lumber for
sidewalks, and he said it was his
opinion that similar thefts were responsible for a shortage of thousands
of feet. Ex-Reeve Pound corroborated  this statement.
Mr.  Robert Campbell, formerly ac
WORK TO START
ABOUT APRIL 1
traffi
section
the
the
the
mutant for Mr. W. H. Day, lumber ! minster Road
Reeve  Kerr  States  That  Council
Now Awaiting Funds
A deputation waited upon
Board of Works in regard to
prospects of employment in
Municipality, at a meeting on Tuesday afternoon. Mr. A. Messenger
said the deputation represented the
municipal employees, who were anxious to know what the prospects
were. The men would either have to
get work or leave the district and get
employment elsewhere.
Councillor Miller said thc Council
was in the same position as the men,
and the Council could not start the
men in work until the finances were
assured, which they hoped would be
on April 1. That was the best the
Council  could promise.
Reeve Kerr said work would commence, in a limited degree, April 1.
The Council was placing bylaws before the people, on which they would
endeavor to raise money. Then there
would be employment. If the necessary money was raised, thc West-
proposition would start
contractor,   gave   an   outliti
lumber orders supplied to th'
pality   during   the     period     between
March 28, 1911, and October 14, 1912. j but the best that could be done"w
Ile  stated  that  he  got  delivery  slips
for all  lumb
the I and lhat would provide a lot of work.
munici-1 All   the   surrounding     municipalities
were tied up with the money trouble,
A NEW SUIT
FOR EASTER
WILLIAM  CLEFT
Experienced   Ladies' &  Gent's
Tailor
Corner Fifty-sixth and Fraser
Ladies' or  Gent's  Suits, $25 up
Sealed Tenders
TENDERS will be received by Capt. J. McLean up to
and including Friday, March
21, to erect store 30 x 60, at
Joyce Street, East Collingwood.
Plans and specifications
can be seen at furniture
store, near  Carlton School.
Tenders will be received
for carpenter work only, or
also to furnish all materials.
The lowest or any tender
not necessarily accepted.
er sent out, but iu some
cases the slips were not signed because there was no one representing
thc municipality on the spot where
lhe   lumber  was  delivered.
Commissioner Crehan���If 1 suggest
lo   you   that  your   firm  bought   third
class lumber from the American side
and  shipped  it  as  first  lumber,  what
i would  you  say?
Witness���I would say most decidedly no; though, of cemrse, it could
[have   been   done   without   my   know-
i 'e4?8,
Ceimmissioner Crehan���Will you
swear that you delivered all Ihe lumber  that  was paid  for!'
Witness���1 am certain thai all the
lumber thai I had tallies for was delivered, eir at any rate it was sent
out.
Thomas llarkness, formerly yard
foreman for Mr. Day, staled that invariably the quality of lumber sent
out was what he understood to be the
quality required.
Witness said hc did not remember
any lumber being delivered to members of thc Council eer Municipal officers  privately.
Mr. Robert Campbell was recalled
and stated that when councillors or
Municipal officials bought lumber
from Mr. Day he sent out the accounts to them in the ordinary way
and no special allowance or discount
was given.
Councillor Dickinson���Do you remember sending out lumber privately
to a man named Dickinson in Ward
II?
Witness���No, I never did.
In answer to ex-Reeve Pound, the
witness said that in no case was lumber sent out either short in quantity
or deficient in quality, his instructions from Mr. Day being to fill all
orders as required.
Mr. W. H. Day corroborated the
evidence of the previous witnesses
and stated that he had never- given a
councillor or municipal official any
presents nor had he supplied them
with lumber either free or at a less
cost  than  the usual  market price.
In reply to Councillor Dickinson,
Mr. Day said in 1909 he delivered
2.000.000 feet of lumber to the municipality and in very many cases he
had to make rough roads in order to
deliver the lumber at the places required.
The enquiry was adjourned until
Tuesday,  March 25, at  10 o'clock.
ould
i^^^^H^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Councillor Dickinson said the mu-
cipality was never in such a position financially as now, but it was
hoped the money market would improve and that they would have work
shortly.
A deputation interviewed the board
as le, lhe grading eif Rupert Street
and the II. C. E. R. crossing, and it
was decided thai ihe members of the
board with thc engineer inspect the
street  and  report
A letter was read from the secretary of the Ward I Ratepayers' As-
sociation,     protesting     againsl     the
Council   holding   iheir  meetings    in
private.
Reeve Kerr said if lhe Council
could nol hold a private tne.ting,
without criticism of the ratepayers, it
was time feer the Council lo resign
It was decided to ask the secretary
to supply the dales e,f the private
meetings  referred   tee.
has been considerable discussion in the Vancouver press during
the past twelve months as to the indifferent transportation service between that city and Delta. The main
point advanced was the delay in
Delta produce reaching ils chief market. At present, Ladner, thc principal town in Delta, is reached by the
U.C.E.R. via Eburne to Steveston
where a boat conveys passengers and
goods across the river. As to the
G.N.R, service from Port Guichon
(near Ladner) to Xew Westminster,
the route is not only long and roundabout, hut entirely inadequate in its
times of schedule for the quick con-
vcyartce of produce which should
arrive not only fresh but promptly
on the market. It is now proposed,
and thc Provincial Government has
recently included in thc estimates a
sum for the purpose, to establish a
ferry service between Woodward,
nearly opposite Ladner, and Delta.
This scheme, in conjunction with an
extension of the B.C.E.R. line in more
direct connection with the Vancouver main line, will undoubtedly greatly increase the freight and passenger
between this opulent farming
of the Fraser Valley and Vancouver.
While considerable advance has
been made in the milk production recently throughout the Fraser Valley,
especially in Chilliwack, Sumas, Rich-'
mond and Surrey, importations from
outside the province show that there
is still a large margin for greater production. Hut what appears to be the
most striking neglect of a highly remunerating industry is that of poultry. During the year 1911 (the figures
for 1912 being not available) out of
total imports of dairy and poultry
produce into B.C. amounting to over
$4,0011,000, more than half this sum,
namely $2,115,868, comprised poultry
and eggs. Moreover, the writer is
authentically Informed that the
figures for the year 1912 are likely to
show an even greater sum of poultry
and egg importations into lhe province. The population and the consequent demand has, in fact, increased
greater than the supply. As the
Hon. Mr. Scott, Deputy Minister of
Agriculture, has frequently of late-
urged upon the attention of Fraser
Valley farmers and others, here is a
big margin for an addition to a
settler's income. The soil and other
conditions obtaining in the greater
part of the Fraser Valley are highly
favorable for poultry raising, while
the   capital   required   and   the  atten-
less
 ^^^^^^^^.mer's
c price of eggs in Vancouver and  New  Westminster last  sum-
am!  .-11111111111,  when  they  soaied
even 85 cents a d
and scarce al that, is     ^m^^m^,
hen
ggs is still
tion   necessary  are   considerably
than  in other branches of a  farn
wcrk,   Th
mcr
up  to 75 and vr��u au cans a notetl.
^^^^^^^^^^      sufficiently suggestive.     And   yet   the   Ininibl
which lays those golden  e
sadly neglected
throughout  the
The
Some people are so lucky they can
tump from the frying pan into the
fire  and  find  the  fire  out.
Main Street Improvements
Reeve Kerr and ex-Reeve Pound
were the principal speakers al a
meeting of the Main Street Improvement Association held on Monday
evening lo discuss way and means of
developing that thoroughfare from
the  city  to the  Fraser  River.
Reeve Kerr urged the association
to adopt a broad view of muncipal
matters, pointing out that the development of one thoroughfare helped
rather than retarded the development
of other thoroughfares in the municipality. Referring to the running
of through cars from thc city to the
river the Reeve said that he did not
think that Twenty-fifth Avenue
would suffer, but would benefit by
through cars. He suggested that the
name Main Street bc exhibited on the
cars and it was resolved to make this
request of the B.C. Electric Railway.
Dealing with municipal matters the
Reeve said that South Vancouver
must now look to her own resources
for future development and not depend upon Vancouver. They must
keep pace with all progressive movements and be ready to take advantage of the passing of the C.N.R.
agreement, which would establish
Main Street as the terminus of another great transcontinental railway.
Ex-Reeve Pound referred to the
work already accomplished in widening and improving Main Street and
he loo'-ed forward to the time w-hen
a permanent bridge at the font nf
Main Street would connect South
Vancouver with Richmond. With
this object in view, he said, they
should press for the paving of the
street.
 t^M
grown   all
roots   and
cscription. Small
inalily arc suc-
is a source of income
Fraser   Valley,
wonderfully   varied    character
..f the product! and industries of the
Eraser   Valley   is,   perhaps,   its   most
impressive  feature.    Wheat, oats
and   hay   arc   successfully
eivcr   the   valley,   besides
vegetables of every d
fruits of the highest 	
ccssfully. grown in various parts,
while grapes are being increasingly
grown in Mission, Hatzic ami other
districts. The hops of Agassiz and
Chilliwack are of thc best kind obtained on the continent. The potatoes
of Delta have taken premier position
at both American and Canadian
shows. Thc Clydesdale horses, the
sheep and swine of Delta have also
secured the highest honors at Vancouver, Victoria and New Westmin-
;ler exhibitions. It is in the Fraser
Valley, in fact, where mixed or
"truck" farming is prosecuted with
the most successful results obtainable in any part of the province.
Referring briefly to the matter of
industries, it is noteworthy that the
largest saw mills and brick yards in
British Columbia are situated on or
near thc Eraser River. To mention
onlj' two, there are the Fraser Mills,
probablv the largest saw mills in the
world, and the Clayburn brick yards
which are certainly the largest in
British Columbia, if not in Canada.
No story of the Eraser Valley
would be complete without at least
some passing reference to the salmon
industry which has carried the name
of the river to every quarter of the
globe. This year, being a fourth year
or extra season for the run of sock-
eyes, there is expected to be an exceptionally heavy haul of the suc-
a ready market throughout Greater
Vancouver.
At  a  conference  of  the Jeeinl   Sew
erage Commission with Attorney-
General Bowser lhe other day the
latter promised i" interview Premier
McBride   * i   with   reference   tee   the
appointment eef an engineer tee examine lhe plans of the joint sewerage
Committee,   and   with   regard   to   the
issuance  of  a   proclamation  putting
lhe new act into feercc thereby establishing a permanent sewerage
commission,
Those in attendance were Aid
Hepburn. Reeve Kerr, Councillors
Campbelj and Dickinson of South
Vancouver; Councillor McDonald,
llurnaby; Reeve Churchill and Councillors Cunliffe and Wells of Point
Grey ami Assistant-Engineer of the
staff and Consulting Engineer R. S.
Lea. Mr. Creer has charge of the
work here  under   Mr.  Lea.
Aid. Hepburn acted as spokesman
for thc deputation, lie explained
that the committee wished to have
the proclamation issued at once in
order that a permanent commission
might bc established and the trunk
sewer construction gone on with. He
explained that it was also necessary
for such a commission to make arrangements for funds with which to
proceed with work prior to the disposal of bonds under the provincial
government's  guarantee.
The city of Vancouver in starting
two of the trunk sewers, that at
China Creek and the Balaclava main
had, he added, expended $200,000 together with $35,000 in the preliminary expenses, of which only $7(XKK)
had been repaid as the share from
the other districts, this amount being one-fifth of thc preliminary costs
came  from   Point   Grey.
Some objection to the proposed appointment of a secretary-treasurer
for the commission by the provincial
government was raised hy Chairman
Hepburn. He said that in this event
the official would be independent of
the commissioners instead of being
their servant.
Hon. Mr. Bowser asked a number
of questions regarding the salaries
expected. He said he would like to
know how much the chairman would
get and what would probably be paid
thc commissioners and the secretary-
treasurer, according to the views of
thc  present joint  committee.
Aid. Hepburn thought lhat a salary
of $5000 per year would do for the
chairman who would naturally spend
all his time at the work. The other
commissioners might get $2500 or
$.3000, and the secretary-treasurer
something less.
Other members of the committee
proposed $1500 or $2000 for the commissioners and the same for the secretary-treasurer.
That the government give the commission a temporary loan so as to enable it to go ahead with work was a
suggestion made to Hon. Mr. Bowser.
Aid Hepburn expressed thc view
that the bond guarantee should have
been for four and one-half per cent,
instead of four per cent, as debentures at the latter rate were hard to
sell.
Hc claimed that the commission
would spend between $750,000 and
$1,000,000  this  year.
After stating lhat the government
would appoint an independent engineer lo go over the J'ans prepared
by Mr. Lea and his assistant, Mr.
Creer, Hon. Mr. I.ovvscr declared
that the matters brought up by the
Committee would receive attention
very soon. He would consult the
premier on the subject within a few
days
Around the Municipal Ha!
By   "SCRUTATOR"
(Continued freem r
ige
cil   ..r   Scl I   lb..nel     int.i    ha
sprung from a philanthropic
Robert McBride's interests
looked   after.      This   has   been
vioui that bis propositions havi
always  turned down.
*   ��   ��
Mr    J.   Francis   Bursill   inaeh
statement in Collingwood Parli
on   Saturday   night   last,  that  lie
the  only  one  in  Collingwood
nighl  who had leen  Dr. Living
Well,   I  spent  my  boyhood da
the edge of James  Young's  l.n
estate, and it  was in  his etnplo
I   earned  my   first   money.    Dr
ingstone,  when   in   the  Old  Co
���pent   most of his  time wilh  Sr
affin,  as  our old   friend  terms j
Young.    James   Young  was  tin
to  build  oil  works  on  a  large
building the chemical works al
gate,  afterwards    opening    cxte
works  al   West  Calder,  which
dcrstand  are  still  in  operation,
building  of  these  works comtne
about   1865, being nearly the same
Mr.    Young    bought    the    Liim
estates as a residence.
M
nt
'Fi
that
ways that are dark and
are vain  the  Heathen  CI:
peculiar."    The   late
Collingwood   could
beat   them  at   their
Saturday   last,   with
majority,
through a
bill  of  no
shi
goveruiner
give points
own  game
their   autoi
the       Governmenl
financial  bill.    It  looki
consequence hut, as
events   showed,   it   was   one   of
neatest   piece  of  legislation  thai
was   foisted   on   to   an   unjuspe
opposition.
After  the  financial  bill  was p
the   Government   immediately
into committee on the naval quesi
Thc Opposition was both willin.
anxious  to assist   the  Governmenl
their  grant   tei  the   Mother  Com I
Instead  of giving $50,000,000 as
posed   by   the   Government,   sum
lhe  Opposition  proposed  lo raisi
contribution     to     $100,000,000.
Premier rose in  lhe inidsl of the
cussion  and   informed  the  menil i
thai owing tee the divergence eif
Pi
POOR RELIEF FUND
AT COLLINGWOOD
Many  Families  Assisted  During  the
Winter Months
ion  hc thought  it  was best ti
gue parliament. i^^^^
The leader of the Opposition
posed this and the members oi
cross benches seeing luevv thej
been tricked, joined issues with
Opposition, with the result thai
division there was an equal vole
Speaker gave his casting vote
favor of the Opposition and the
tion was lost.   The Government
mediately   resigned.     The   Oppo!
was   then   asked   to   form  a   Gov
ment.    The leader of the Oppo-
appealed   to   the   cross  bench   in
hers to form a coalition governm
but  the  leader  of the  cross ben
after  conferring  with  his  colleat
refused   to  join   issues  with  the
position.    The  leader of the Opi
tion   accepted   office,   appointing
Kenneth   Lamond   Secretary of S
and     immediately   dissolved     I'
ment.     The   election   will  take   ;
in the  Bursill  Hall between 9 an
p.m., mi  Saturday evening.    Non
tions  will  take  place  between  "
8  p.m.    There  will  be  rather  an
teresting hour or two as each ol
members   address   their   conslitn
On  Saturday evening  the stai
rules  were  suspended,  so that i'
after  II  p.m. before the meeting
adjourned.   The 11.20 car had lei
feire the South Vancouver eolith
got to the station, so they had P
Until    12.30,   seeme   of   them   rea.
home al   1.30 a.m.     It  lakes a  le
convincing by a  husband  to lu-
that he has been out tee such an
without any evil Intent.
rhe
nd
Collingwood, March 17.���In January of this year, a fund was collected bj the residents of Ihis locality to aid any families who might he
iii distress, eewing to ihe severe
winter. Mosl of the money was
raised by Miss Vcrna Carter, a public
school pupil, and two or three girl
friends
The subscriptions wen-placed in the
hands of Mr. J. I). Eraser, Mr. Chambers and Dr. Baird of Joyce street.
They report having received from
lists $66.70, from the local Women's
Institute $15.IX), feirm various other
sources in smaller amounts $48.10.
making a total of $129.80. They have
given aid where need was found to
14 families living in South Vancouver,
Hastings Townsite and Burnaby. The
fund although now exhausted, was
sufficient for all the deserving cases
that could be discovered.
Brilliant Scene at St. Patrick's
Night Fancy Dress Carnival
(Continued   from   Page  1)
Councillor Third. Mr. Richardson.
Mr. Winram. Mr. Clough. Mr. James
and others addressed the meeting, it
being pointed out among other things
that  bv  ta' ing a  car
to the  foot  of
Main  Street either  Eburne or West
minster may be reached very quickly
A  number    of    new    members
elected.     The   next
held on  March 31.
were
meeting   will   be
A. C   Kerr      British blue jacket
P. G. Stagg   A hobo
W.   Buckle       Tramp
Mrs.  Gillies       The  pumpkin  girl
E.   C.   Mitchell       Domino
Mrs. Timberlcy   ....  "Sweet sixteen"
Mrs.   E.   H.   Hart       Rainbow
Messrs. Holland  ....   Heavenly twins
H.   Cocroft         Minstrel
D.  Sutherland       Irishman
NEW   EDIFICE  FOR
COLLINGWOOD DISTK
Knox   Presbyterian   Church   Prci
to Erect New Structure
Tin  congregation of Kneix I'i
urian Church organiced a little
a year, anil al  present  tvorshlppm
Carleton    Hall,   are   taking   Steps
vv.oil- ihe- erection of ., church h
ing      They   have   secured   a     e
sile   oil   the   corner     ol     Joyce
School   Roads, anil  have hail il  i
ed recently by voluntary labor. 'I
hope   to   he  able   to   build   11">i������
mer.
Thc minister, Rev. Geo. C
Pringle, is preaching a series
evening   sermons   on   the   Ten   t
mandments. Next Sunday I !
Easter, appropriate services win
held in which there will be -
special music. In view of the la
and talented choir, numbering twci
five voices, this should make
service   very   attractive.
CT
Golden Link Rebecca Lodge \"-
27, I. O. V. F., South Vancouver,
met as usual on Tuesday evening,
and the members were honored bj a
visit from Mrs. Langham, of Nanaimo, president of the Rebckah ��-
semhly of B. C. Mrs. Langham gave
loquent address, and was resented with a bouquet of flowers hy
Sister Wickwire on behalf of t"e
members of the lodge. A daiiH.v ���'''
past was partaken and enjoyed by
all   present,   after     which     speech
were   made   by   visiting   sisters
brethren.
nd
LUMBER
BAKER & PRINGLE
COLLINGWOOD EAST SIDING
LUMBER AND BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
B. C. GRADES PROMPT DELIVERY
LET US FIG7RE YOUR BILLS

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