BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The British Columbia Chinook May 9, 1915

Item Metadata

Download

Media
gvchinook-1.0315487.pdf
Metadata
JSON: gvchinook-1.0315487.json
JSON-LD: gvchinook-1.0315487-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): gvchinook-1.0315487-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: gvchinook-1.0315487-rdf.json
Turtle: gvchinook-1.0315487-turtle.txt
N-Triples: gvchinook-1.0315487-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: gvchinook-1.0315487-source.json
Full Text
gvchinook-1.0315487-fulltext.txt
Citation
gvchinook-1.0315487.ris

Full Text

Array %U�� CHINOOK
EXCLUSIVE LATE SATURDAY NICHT WAR NEWS SUPPL'ED TO THE CHINOOK BY THE UNITED PRESS ASSOCIA1 ION
Vol. Ill, No. 52���Established 1911
VANCOUVER. B.C., CANADA,     SUNDAY. MAY 9. 1913
Price Five Cents
LONDON. MAY 8.���ADMIRALTY ANNOUNCE THK IJESTROYEK "MAOKI," WAS MINEU AND SUNK YESTEKDAY AFTER STRIKING A MINE OFF WELLINGHEN. BRITISH WARSHIP "CRUSADER," LOWERED BOAT TO ASSIST CREW BUT THE GERMANS OPENED FIRE FROM SHORE BATTERIES AND THE "CRUSADER" WAS OBLIGED TO ABANDON BOATS. AFTER BEING UNDER
FIRE FOR A  HALF  HOUR.    THE BRITISH CREWS  SURRENDERED.    SEVEN   BRITISH   OFFICERS AND  EIGHTYEIGHT   MEN  TAKEN   PRISONERS.
Washington, D.C., May 8.���State Department tonight announced that 225 Americans were lost on the Lusitania.
Washington. May 8.���Secretary Tumulty gave out following statement from President Wilson: "Of course the President feels distressed and feels the gravity of situation to utmost and is considering very earnestly but very
calmly the right course  to pursue.    He knows the people of the country wish and expect him to act with deliberation as well as with firmness.
Can A Working Girl
Live Decently On
$3.00 a Week?
Grasping Employers Underpay Working Cirls in Vancouver Driving
Them to Poverty, Shame and Death���Can a Ctrl he "Decent"
on $4.00 a rvcel(, the Wages Paid many in Department Stores
of this City?
ift| rORKING GIRLS in Vancouver are up against the hard-
1/1/ est kind of a problem," says Miss Gutteridge, ol the
Trades and Labor Council, who is a regular encyclopaedia of facts and figures on everything relating to woman's work and
conditions of employment in this province. "They are being slowly
ground to powder between the millstones of low wages and high
Jiving costs.
"How can a young woman live���really live���on seven or eight
dollars a week? Yet that is about the average wage for a working
girl in Vancouver, and many are receiving as little as three or four
(Continued on page 4)
SATURDAY   ^wo hundred and Twenty-five
MiruT cvtd a   American Citizens Passengers
Muni laIKA t    .,
                on Lusrtania
S. Cowper, Secretary of Depositors'
Committee of Dominion Trust and
Liberal Candidate for Vancouver
N'ew York, May 8���That Elbert Hubbard even; to his death calmly writing at> article calling upon the Christian nations to rise and crush German militarism i- stated m a coble to lei- family from a prominent American sur-
\ i\i.r.
Elberl Hubbard, the head of tlie' Roycrofters, had many followers and
friends in Vancouver.    He lectured here over a year and go al a time
when the Titanic disaster was "'.ill fresh in the minds
Charles M. Hays. President of the Grand Trunk, had been brought up
in the same town as Elbert Hubbard. Thej manner of the railroad magnate's
death in tlie Titanic disaster was touched upon by Mr. Hubbard in liis Vancouver address.
"Charlie- Hays." said he, "went down with a smile: upon Iiis face. He did
as you Britishers are wont to ei".    Women and children first!"
Hubbard referred feelingly to the deaths in the Titanic disaster of his
( friends, Jacob Strauss and his wife. Mrs. Strauss refused to leave the side of
| Iht husband when they tricel t.e persuade her to enter a life lee,at. stating that
she had ben so l"iin with htm that she would nol part fremi liim now.
"When I read that," saiel Mr. Hubbard in his Vancouver address, "1 sent
a wire of congratulation iee his s.m Percy, in New York. Never was such heroism shown by any woman. 1 congratulated Percy upon being the son of
such a noble woman."
Do Cily Officials Allow  Chinatown  To Run
Wide Open ?
Citizens eef Vance,mer's Chinatown are making up a purse of sever.,:
sand dollars to finance a fight against the City Police and other civic officials.
They charge that $5Q00 bribe money was paiel by a certain Chinese gambling li'iusc feir protection.
It is charged that gambling opium smoking and the usual vices supposed
t'i be associated with Qlinatown are openly encouraged.by officials who, they
allege, are paid to keep quiet.
Que land,   May 8.��� ft  is
I  in t'.night that  German  submar-
irfare claimed \3M, victims in the
sinking of th.   leviathan,  Lusitania.
Americans wh m  ���
losl nun bi .��� ���    official re-
port,  more  than   137. among  them, in
'addition to Mr   Frohman, A. G. Van-
It, Charh - Klein and Elbert Huh-
bard,   n ise  coming!
ings   ever ted   the     American
R. public.
Germany' heavily not on-
: ly   <������ -it   many   subjects   of
neutral nations.
"I founel." writes Wilbur p. l-'e,rrest,
United    Press    staff        rrespondent,
"the body of Charles Frohman, great?
:   all   American  theatrical  niana-
It   lay   in   one  of  the   crowded
ui - equal in de-ath with the poor>
if   third   cabin   victims   who   were
fi How   passengers.
"In the morgue where Frohman's
body lay, I saw tu-.e little children
clasped tightly in each others arms,
united in elcath.
"I looked al mothers clasping tightly at  tiieir still  forms babies���nursing
bii 5���that 'bey clung despairingly
to as the undertow from the sinking
liner carried them down tee death in
the cold waters of the ocean at the
very entrance to St. George's Channel
���at a time when they felt certain
that within n few hours they would
meet their loved ones on  British soil.
"Latest reports tonight of number
saved is given at "06. It is possible
only possible that this number may
later bc increased. The Admiralty
holds out hope that fishing schooners
and steamers not equipped with wireless may be picked up and that they
may carry survivors. At most this
is a faint  hope/'
Dominion Trust and Hon. W. J. Bowser
The Part the^Attorney-General Played in
the Scheme Whereby Four Thousand
British Columbian Depositors Have Been
Swindelled out of Their Savings, as Shown
hy Official Records and Statements of
Mr. Bowser Himself���By ]. S. Cowper
F< (REWORD
THIS is a plain, unvarnished statement of Mr. Bowser's connection
witli the Dominion Trusi Company, in which nothing is sei down
in malice. Every statement herein sei down is capable of prooi
bv document or by affidavit of witnesses. Many of the statements are
admissions by Mr. Bowser in his own defence em the fl ii the U -.<������
lature on February -1, 1915. Mr. Bowser, it is fair to say, insists that he
is innocent of wrong-doing, .-11��� ��� I wis in ��� If an innocent victim
..i the Iui.' \\ ��� R. Arnold. This is intended ti  be read in conjunction with
Mr. Bowser's published defence.   The impartial reader .should havi  no
difficulty in arriving al a conclusion on the two  tatements.
WAS N< IT \ LIBER \l. ATTACK
Mr. Bow*er in dealing h ith I lominion Trust matters in hi- platform
���speeches, represents tlie attack made on him as a Liberal attack, made
from motives of party politics.   Whal is the fact?   The truth is thai the
first public iiii'iiiieeti made of the  Attorney General was made by an ol
iiier of the Supreme Court of British Columbia, on December 10, 1914.
Mr. IL L. Drayton, who had been appointed provisional liquidator e.i
the company by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, in his report
to the shareholders, creditors, depositors .-mel contributories of the company, after reviewing the causes which led to the collapse of the company and the loss of the depositors' savings, said:
"I have interview. .1 the Premier and Attorney-General of British
Columbia, and have tried te. make them see the situation in the same
light as I do, namely, that as the Dominion and Uriiish Columbia governments knew that deposits should never have been taken, and as they
were aware that this was being violated, 1 think they should reimburse
the depositor-, with the exception of the directors. If the government
do not do this, the question will arise as to whether thc deposits taken
on and after January 1, 1913, will have any Standing at all."
This was the first intimation given to tlie depositors that they had been
swindled out of their savings, and that ihis swindling had been done
with the knowledge of and without any interference from the Dominion
and Provincial governments. ,
HOW THE SWINDLING WAS DONE
Every incorporated joint stock company must have authority given
it before it can do business, and the scope of its business is strictly confined within thc limits set out in its charter. The Dominion Trust Company Limited had for years been doing business under an old charter
which allowed it to accept deposits. The company wished to expand its
business into other provinces, and therefore in 1��12 obtained a federal
charter from the Dominion Government. The Dominion government
charter did not grant authority to accept deposits. It confined the company to strictly trust business.
At this time, Mr. Bowser's firm, Messrs. Bowser, Reid and Wall-
bridge, were solicitors for the Dominion Trust Company. Mr. Bowser
was Attorney-General for the Province, and there was nn Opposition in
thc Legislature, except Socialist members from Newcastle and Nanaimo.
A private bill, giving the Dominion Trusi Company power to accept deposits was prepared anel put through the Private Bills Committee, anel
the Legislature without dissent or protest, despite its illegal character.
This bill was despatched to Ottawa for ratification.
The federal government reserves to itself the right iimlcr the British North America Act to deal with hanking matters, anel Mr. Bowser
knew at the time lie allowed the bill to pass the house without protest
thai the Provincial Governmenl had no righl to pass the bill.   He says:
"At  thai iifnc   I   held the legal view thai  no pn vii
ci uld i ilidlj  gi\ e power adding to that al ���-% i.i, bj  I
minion Ce.'.eminent.   This      3 tin    i   nt tha   ivoriied ���
no power to givi   tdded rights  on a matter defined I
governmenl '   Speech in  Legislature,  February -1. 1915.
The Attorney-General, as head of thi   aw departmenl       cli
with the special responsibility of protecting the pul lie  xom bein
timised by fraudulent concerns: he is also sworn to I
adviser to his government.   Mr. Bowser's lutj   vas clear.    lo hii
admission he knew thai his governmenl had no  po   ei
powers "ii tin' 11 inion Ti nst C       I need for wm i
I Its duty to the governmi nt
his dut} i" thc depositor    if the Domini	
!i id sworn ii��� protect   ��� ��� ������ ���-��� 'i.e j
floor of ihe Legislature.
HOW THE PUBLIC U \S BETR VYED
Whal did Mr. Bowser do al thi i in  when bj
sion his duty was clear?   II   saj >, in the language of h
speech:
".My view nas mel by various op] guments.    T
Trust final!,  expressed its evilingness tee take lb., chances and lhe burden e if disalle wance."
To a committee of depositors who waited on Mr. Bowser shortl)
after the collapse of the company, Mr. Bowser made a differenl explanation, He said that the members of the Private Hills Committee were
unanimously in favor of the bill, and that ha.l he opposed it on the floor
of the house it would have meant that the government would have been
defeated "with all that that means."
Mr, llowser has given two different explanations for his betrayal
of the people when the Dominion Trust charter was before the 1913 Legislature. In the one case he says he di.l it in oblige the Dominion Trust
Co. (for whom his private law firm wcre acting as solicitors), and in
the other case he says he did it to save the government from defeat
"with all that that means."
The next step in the matter came as a consequence of the refusal
of the Minister of Justice at Ottawa to ratify the illegal legislation which
the McBride government, without protest from Mr. Bowser, had passed
to oblige the Dominion Trust Co. Had Mr. Bowser heen anxious for
an opportunity to make a strong stand against a further continuance of
the illegal powers his government had conferred on the Dominion Trust,
one would think this would have been a powerful opportunity. What did
Mr. Bowser do? According to his own statement made to the depositors committee, he took no puhlic steps to warn thc depositors. Instead.
he sent for Mr. Arnold, the managing director of the Dominion Trust
Co., who discussed thc .situation with the Attorney-General, who. of
course, was also head of the firm of legal advisers retained by the Dom
inion Trust Co. The outcome of that interview was rh.it Mr. Bowser���������
wrote to the federal Minister of Justice at Ottawa, and proposed an arrangement whereby the Federal minister was to allow the illegal legislation, on the undertaking of Mr. Bowser that Arnold would take n#
more deposits, and that at the nexl sitting of the Legislature the deposit powers were to be annulled. The Ministers of Justice of the two Conservative' governments ma . i arrangement whereby this illegal legislation was ratified. In whose interests It
would be a gha tly joke to ;uggi st I is done in the inti re ts of
the thousands ol                                                                  thereby.
Thi- im] the Dominion Trust Co.
was not mi Bowsi Why
was it not n tion to offer?   1 hi   cir-
pass
I later making himsel
���
. i. |
���
.���������.'
the Do
���
the bill
I
:
���
Trust chai te ' the
eral ministei vva t of Mr. i".< ��� w ser's dul    to see
thai the peo] :ted I
'��������������� he ci ill t] >e ��� ti the Bankers'
Trust   md List, tin      positors and customers of trust com
panies had been feeling nervous about iheir security. Even the D min
ion Trust, which hael a board of directors composed of well-known and
highly-respected business men, shared in the general apprehension. At
tlu- juncture Mr. Bowser announced on various platforms that he was
going to bring in a new Trust Companies Regulation Bill of a drastic
character, Substantial deposits of money with the government woulil
be required and compulsory inspection of books by government inspec
tors insisted on. Absolute safety for the puhlic was to be ensured in all
companies which came under the new Act. Thc Dominion Trust management announced its satisfaction with the new act. The Attorney-
General was head of the firm of solicitors of thc Dominion Trust, his
law partner was a director, whose speech at the annual meeting held on
February 24, 1''14, ha.l been circulated as part of the company's literature. The puhlic felt reassured in regard to the Dominion Trust Co.,
when on March 4, 1914. the Trusts Companies Regulation Act was passed. Not until the crash came and the report of Mr. H. L. Drayton, thc
provisional liquidator, was made public, did the grim irony of affairs
reveal themselves. THEN FOR THE FIRST TIME THE THOUSANDS OF DEPOSITORS LEARNED THAT IT WAS ON THE
VERY DAY THE TRUSTS COMPANIES REGULATION ACT
(Continued on page 6) TWO
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
SUNDAY.  MAY 9, 1915
REX
THEATRE
H^h,,ATVAN(OUV��RS LEADING
��"    PtAY HOOSES-
P*
Scene   hum    "TUUe'l   Punctured    Romance"
ALL WEEK BEGINNING
MAY  10th
"Tillie's Punctured
Romance "
SIX REELS  OF  THE  GREATEST  COMEDY
EVER SCREENED
Shows Commence 11���1���2.30���4���5.30���7���8.30
And 10 p.m.
^Jo&cs
The sooner you learn to come to our drug store ior everything you need in the drug line, the sooner you will come to
the store that carries none but the purest, freshest drugs and
choicest drug store articles. We want your drug business only
because wc give you reliable medicines and merchandise for
your money.
Come to OUR Drug Store
BURNS DRUG COMPANY, LTD.
Phone 3902
732 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phyllis  Davis will become Vaudeville
Star
Another British Columbia artist haa
througii aheer ability won her way to
the   front   in  Inr  profession  an.l  her
��� tir-n-ni'l-   'et   irienils   here   and   elsewhere   Id   tin'   province   ..ill   rejoice
greatly  thai  dainty, delightful Phyllis
Davis 'ia- signed a long time contract
eat  a  handsome  salary  with  ihe  Pantages circuit.
Miti Davis for -��� iin. time haa been
the pet of theatre patrons through
11 lur capital "ml. in numerous amateur
'��� and semi-professiimai entertainments
given here ami in Victoria. Before
���he came into t>i��- ken of ihe local
public, Nanaimo dlacovered the rare'
talent possi --eel by tin- clever girl and
the priil. felt liy the cal town in her
achievements was something of an Institution. She found a larger field
here' a- leading ingenue with the Keel-
lies sinews given al lhe Imperial during tin- winter, ami reached Ihe |ei]i
rung oi popularity in "Stop, Look ami
Listen." the splendid charity performance stage-el recently hy society amateurs. This latur production was
transported bodily l" Seattle for three
nights, and the Sound metropolis :it-
testeel ils approval "i liritish C'e Im il ���
Ilia's talented sona ami daughters by
crowding ihe theatre where their performances were given.
Tiie bright particular star "1 "St"i>.
Look ami Listen," according t" the
Seattle press was Phyllis Davis, anil
Sayre of the "Times." a most exacting critic, gave her a mil iee that many
a star of long established prestige
would have given much inr. It was
througii the' success she sc.��� r.��� < 1 mi that
V. T. Henderson, another man e.i'
splendid ability, known for labors ofl
ami excellent in local theatrical iu.it-
tera, has also formed an organization
fe.r a summer tour throughout the
Northwest. Our local showahoppera
whee have long admired this sterling
acleer will wish him the best of good
[i ii lune,
*   *   *
Mamie Leone ;-, taking a much needed rest at Seal tl".
Isabel Fletcher ami Charles 1).
Ayres were in New York at last accounts.
* s, *
Reab Mitchell and Clara livers are
meeting with great success in the
"movies."
* * ed
Will Lloyd, formerly a well-known
figure along   Vancouver's   Rial to, has
just  cleescd a satisfactory season with
the   Maker olayers at Portland.
Mrs. Isabel I'aterson, formerly dramatic critic mi ihe "Province," i- now
associate elite.r of Hearst's magazine
iu Xew Vork.
Will s. in.��� good, kind philanthrq-
pi-i please give Vancouver a theatre
which is ca]ialile ol" housing first class
travelling "legitimate" attractions. In
ihe matter e.f vaudeville we are nretty
well iireeviele.il for, hul there is no place
feer the drama t'> call home.
the    But    lhat    sin     seldom    make-   a
| tour  te,  the   West   ami   till   local   public
i-  doubly  fortunate  in  being  ..lie   to
; see   her  al   this   nine      She   Ila-  a   mOSI
attractive array ol popular smig nun-
: l,ir-
\ strong drawing ean! fe.r the new
>lleeU      |-     ; 11 , .1111:-, ll     III     "ConSl  le   lee
powerful  dramatic  ski tch   ��ritti n  bj
Ralph P. Kettering,    I ���  will
lee presented l> yRodnej   Kane.us ami
Marie   Nelson, th.  latter an rxtremi
ly pretty girl.
Harm- ami Robinson, the "two linj
tuneful tots." will alao accepl a mil
share  of  the  burden  attendanl   upon
lhe   slice--   nl   the   week.
Florence   Rayficld,   ilu-   singer,   line-
Se ellU-     neW     Se'llg-.     a      III!.       VOICl       .lllll     .'l
stunning wardrobe to attract discriminating atiiusi in. iii  seekers.
Pern, Mehan, ami Higele... will open
the show with some novelty tumbling
ami   acrobatic   stunts   that    will   link.
your  hair  stand  mi  end.
Comedy  pictures by  ihe   Pantag
cope will complete the bill.
ANNETTE  KELLERMANN
STARS  IN   "MOVIES"
Bound Hand and Foot she is thrown
off Sixty-foot Cliff
"Neptune's Daughter," a photo-play
iu which Annette Kellermann, the
aouatic expert, lakes the leading pan.
will be shortly seen here foi the first
time. From a mermaid, a daughter
��� if Neptune, who undertakes to a-
venge the death of lier Bister, win
was killed by fishermen, \nnette
which is also llie name -In' bears i'i
the play, is changed inl" a mortal by
I means   "f   a   .harm   which   thc    Sev
Witch gii ef her,    Her intention
Ikill  th.   King  v,h" i-  responsible  for
in r sisti r'i death.
King   William,   wlm  is  a   neighbor
eef   Neptune,   i.elis   iu   love   with
I mile,   Inn   met   before   she-   ha-   fei:   a
limilai n for him
\f'e r ihrilling adventure - nn land
ami sea, \nneiie rescues the Kmg
when   h.    is   liirio.n   i��� 11��� ���   prison,   cir-
I e lllll. I Ills     his     uoulel-ler     -lave:-,     and,
after being  hurled, I nd  hand    ami
' if-,,   from    e   sixt) -i""i   cliff,   hi
i alee.ui     ihe      "live-happil) -��� .��� i
climax.
Mi-s  K. ll. ruieinn took  lhe   comp
in   Bermuda   in   make   'he   pi''
I ami three  montha  were neceaaary  to
fini-h  the  play,     ll   ..ill  lee'  shown  fnr
!n.e, days, Monday .onl Tuesday, afay
in .onl  11. ai  iln-  Broadway Tin   l
I'.;  i leiu.iy.   near   Main   Su. e t.
South Hill Palace of Varieties
Thi- popular place ia once ni're-
making a special eforl i ��� > please iti
niein. patrons this week. The large
audiences which have been filling the
[house every nighl show thai the efforts ni the management are being;
appreciated ami they recognize this
and are endeavoring in make their entertainment iln premier one in Greater Vancouver. The Country Store
item is siill proving very popular ami
will be continued and valuable prizes
again are being offered 1" lhe lucky
holders. Special attractions will he
mil i en nexl Wednesday night when
Josephine Berc, a popular serio-com-
edienne. ami another high-claas lady
artist, will enti rtain the audience.
MONEY TO LOAN
In Multiples of $5,000  at  8  per cent, on
inside revenue producing business property.
Our client will only consider property  that
is now paying its way.
CANADIAN   FINANCIERS   TRUST   CO.
HEAD OFFICE, 839 HASTINGS ST. W.        VANCOUVER, B. C.
Patrick Donnelly,  General  Manager.
Arfiiiu   Ke \.
n-t.-iirc.   r,Cu.-<!;y   and   Tuesday.   Mr.y   10   an.l   11
Dr. W. J. CURRY
DENTIST
Ring up Seymour 2354 for Appointment
Suite 301  Dominion Building, Vancouver, B.C.
�� Nature Testh"
and skilled
painless service
My "Nature Teeth" wlueh are entirely different from ordinary
artificial teeth, because they are built into the mouth to match
Nature's own in size and shape and exaet tint���my skilled service and modern equipment���my absolute guarantee of painlessness, both during and following all dental wurk ��� these
things
--���cost no more
than ordinary dentistry
Read these Prices
Full    Set   of   Nature   Teeth,   upper   or       ����� -w  y m   m       ,/-,       V   W    A    Y     V
j-���"  ��w.m WM S HAT I
Gold    Cronus      5.00 TT   1T1��   kj.   1  IrlLlLj
IlrulRc  Work,  per tootli     5.00 Licentiate   Denial   Surgery
Golel   Fillings,   per   tooth     2.00 Doctor   Dental   Surgery
Torcclain   Fillings,   per   tootli    .. 1.50 Mcmb"    R��yal   College   Dental   Surgeons
Armalgam  Fillings,  per  tooth   .. 1.50 212   STANDARD   BANK    BLDG.
Painless Extraction, per toeeth .. .so Seymour 4679
occasion   that     Alexander     Pantages, i
than whom there are fewer shrewder
or   more   enterprizing   managers,   sat
Up  and  took  notice of  the  litlle  lady;
from the north.
Mrs. Pantages, the magnate's wife,
was one nt the patn in ss< s "i the j
"Stop, Look and Listen" performan- ''
ces, and through her the negotiations
with Miss Davis were- consummated.
The latter- is Mill in S. attic and lhe
date of her opening oil tile Pantages
circuit is nol yet announced, hut it
is probable lhat Vancouver will have
occasion to felicitate itself nn a visil
from ihe charming entertainer via tin
Pantages circuit. Tlu- news of Miss
Davis' success comes through letters
to p. rsonal friends in ihis city.
Del.   S.   Lawrence,   fi r  - im-  j ��� ars
stock   actor-manager   of   Uriiish   Col-
junibia. has formed a new stock organization ami taken a lease nn the Wig-
] wain theatre, al  Sen   Francisco,    The
persi ami I   eef   the   new   company   include^ a  number nf othi ���  Vancom. r
I favorites   including   Howard     Russell
and  his talented   wife,   Minnie Town-
send; Richard Vivian and Dimple Kel
: ton.   The Lawrence sea- n is now in
I full   swing  and   according   to  n
; is proving highlj   succi ss ful.
* �� *
Edward   Lawrence,   Ge Clei
land, and a numbi r nf ither pi
sionals who are justly populai
Vancouver's public, have formed a
company for the purpose of louring
the province in a repertoire of reccnl
successes. Mr. Lawrence is a capital
actor, i- thoroughly familiar with llie
producing business and his venture
should meet with success.
PANTAGES
Unequalled       Vaudeville       Meant       Pantaic*
Vaud.vHle
E.  D.   Graham,   Resident   Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
Marie Dresshr at the Rex
The most ci nspicuous success in a
motion picture comedy sn far presented to ihe public is Marie Dressier,
supported by Charley Chaplin and
Mabel S'ormand. which Berl Levey,
the- San Francisco vaudeville and picture magnet, will bring- to the Rex
Theatre, all week commencing Monday. Maj 10th. in a six-reel farce,
"Tillii s Punctured Romance." ��hich
has broken all picture records all
through the country.
X" such combination of comedians
has ever been seen in a single comedj
feature before, so tin re 1- little doubt
that iln- picture is ,1 veritable
"scream.1. "Tillies Punctured Romance i- an adaptation eet" Mi-s Dress-
I r's tremendous stage success, "Til-
lie- Nightmare." whieh ran for two
yi ar- in X. iv York cily atom. ami
tin i who saw the famous commedi-
enue iii the farce can well imagine
how funny the picture really is, t
pei i ell. -.iih thai prince i
an-. Charley Chaplin, playing oppos-
iti   the geni  I star.
"Tillies   Punctured   Romam e"    ��.-.-
produced bj   Mack Sennett, the gn   l
Key sl  in    director,   and   ci ml tins   all
he j  ���' me     favorites,   in   addition
pul ites ne mil,m i| .-
In ive    It w as produci .1 w ith the put
a national hii. ami il
PHONE SEYMOUR 900
MacDONALD, HAY & WEART
BARRISTERS,   SOLICITORS,   ETC.
1012 Standard Bank Bldg. Vancouver, B.C.
Richard the Great
"The Monk Who Made a Man of
Himself"
Winona Winters
The "Cheer Up Girl"
And
J5  ���  OTHER  GREAT  ACTS  ��� 5
Three   shows   daily    2.45.   7.20.   9.15
Admission���Matinees,     15c;    nights
15c and 25c; boxes. 50c.
MONDAY, TUESDAY
Annette Kellermann
In
NEPTUNE'S
DAUGHTER"
7 Acts
Broadway
Theatre
114 BROADWAY (Nr. Main)
FRIDAY, SATURDAY
"THE BLACK
BOX"
By E.  Phillips Oppenheim
The  Photoplay  Serial
Supreme
Standard Milk and Purity
Milk is the food of mankind. Everywhere���in the
wilds and in the centres of modern civilization���-milk is
the one universal food. Upon pure milk lies the great
responsibility ol transforming new-born infants to strong,
healthy men and women.    Milk is truly nature's food.
Milk is on your table three times each day, and in the
case of bottle babies with good healthy appetites, somewhat oftener. It is, therefore, of extreme importance to
know lhat the milk you use is pure milk���not supposedly
pure���but absolutely pure. There should be no question about it.
Scene   Irom   "Ti"ie'ji   Puncliircil   Rotniflfl
Rex  Theatre
lias dune 80 in every respect. There
is a hearty laugh in every foot eef the
mx reels, and in every instance the
picture  makes  good at  once,
The producer did not make any slow
spots in "Tillies Punctured Romance."
therefore it is no wonder it is the
most talked nf picture ever shown in
America. Whoever fails to s.e this
picture lias something to live for.
win
Pantages Theatre
Richard the Great, the monk-
made a man e,f himself, is to headline
the bill at Pantages next week, opening Monday afternoon, i.s said lee lie
the   must   wonderful   trained     simian
in the world, in addition to being
almost human, Richard is said to have
a wide variety of extremely amusing
stunts to display. Advance reports
say the monkey is the biggest kind of
a hit wherever lie appears.
Keir the added attraction of the week-
Manager Graham announces dainty
Winona Winters, the famous "cheer
up girl," who made such a tremendous success in Xew York with Sam
Bernard in "lie Came from Milwaukee."    Miss  Winters is  such a hit  In
" 1
Bottling   and   Capping   by   machinery
Standard Milk Co., Ltd.
405-425 Eighth Ave. West, Cor. Yukon
VANCOUVER, CANADA SUKDAY. MAY 9, 1915
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
1'IVE
British Columbia Chinook
PUBLISHED
Every  Sunday morning by the  Greater  Vancouver Publishers  Limite'l
George M. Murray, Editor
HEAD OFFICE:
Corner   Thirtieth   Avenue   and   Main   Street.   South   Vancouver,   B. C
Editor's Office Burns Drug Co.,  Vancouver Block, Phone Sey. 5490
TELEPHONE:  All departments Fairmont  1874
NIGHT   CALLS Fairmont   1946 L
kegistered   at   the   Post   Office   Department,  Ottawa,   as   Second   Class
Mail Matter
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
To  all  points in   Canada.   United   Kingdom,   Newfoundland.   New
.Zealand, and other Biitish Possession!:
$1.00 a Year
McCROSSAN'S DIPLOMACY
EVERY lime that Mr. George E. McCro-
well-known Liberal.opens his mouth in public
the editor of the News-Advertiser faces him with a
statement supposed to have been ma. !c Iv Mc< roi
san after the last Provincial election in which the
electorate was referred to as being composed to ���
large extent of foolish virgins.
The shrieks of misery which are goini' up from
every city in this Province today, the tirnlil. regi
ments of bread-liners upon our streets, the cessation
of all manner of development in the Province, the
disgraceful quarrel among the members of llie Mc-1
Bride Government, the inefficiency and personal in-1
Postage to American, European and other Foreign Countries, $1.00   Ipmnpnnro  r\i   ,,,   ,   I f   il     i   f WWW
temperance ol members oi that Governmenl all
���9tt year extra.
"The truth at all times firmly stands
And shall from age to age endure."
MR. STEVENS' GREAT WORK
[V/| R. STEVENS, M.P
*"���*��� loudly of his prowess in saddling Vancouver
with a $350,000 drill hall and several Post Offices,
the upkeep of which institutions will be expensive
during thc next few years.
It is difficult to figure where the great drill hall
is going to be an asset to us. We have mobilized
a large army in British Columbia without the comforts of such a building and have managed to make
a successful record in this connection. The war
will likely be over before Stevens' drill hall���or
M.cSpadden's drill hall���will be completed.
Stevens' Post Offices cost $100,000 or so each.
The department pay some $40.00 a month rent for
premises which serve today just as well as these ornate buildings will serve tomorrow.
Historians of the future will say: "Stevens
brought many institutions here to Vancouver whose
building made much profit for party contractors."
Stevens boasts of some of the things which he
brought here to Vancouver.
He does not mention the Federal
Charter for the Dominion Trust
Company which Greatly Enhanced
the Prestige of that Institution,
which was brought to Vancouver
in 1912.
EXPLOIT INC SOLDIERS' WOUNDS
IT sort of dampens our patriotism when we consider that Members of the Canadian House of
Commons stooped to steal money upon the purchase
of bandages and Red Cross supplies which are being
used to stop the gaping wounds of Canadian heroes
on the battle line.
We are indebted to the British Columbia Pharmaceutical Record for some of the facts in connection with the affair.
Madame Plamondon, the woman in the case,
said to be a sister of the Deputy Speaker of the
House of Commons, got $80.88 for four pounds
of glycyrrh extract. A fair price for this material
would have been $6.60.
Others who were in on this game of exploiting
the wounds of heroes got $1.50 per pound for zinc
to prove that the people made a grave error in theii
reckless endorsement of McBride at the lasl elo
tion.
We are not interested in the exact wording of
Mr. McCrossan's expression after the last Provin- \
cial election, but we believe that before the next
,      a .l   i Provincial election the editor of the "News-Adver
boasting   rather   .     ���    .,, , ,        , ,.
'tiser   will hear many statements along the same line
more lacking in diplomatic phraesology than that
of Mr.  McCrossan���statements which will   come
from the mouths of the very men who supported
McBride in 1912.
PUBLIC MARKETS FOR VANCOUVER.
W ANCOUVFR has one of the largest public
��       markets in the world.    It is some sixty-six feet
wide and extends from False Creek to the North
Arm of the Fraser.
It will be necessary to rise before six o'clock in
the morning to see this market in full swing.
Upon this market, the Chinese growers meet the
Chinese retailers and dispose of wagon loads of garden truck, meats, eggs and other produce from the |
Chinese farms in the neighborhood of the city.
The market occupies the whole of Main Street.
The Chinese farmers drive their heavily laden wag-!
ons over the white man's pavement and draw up at
the street intersections. Here they are met by the
merchants and the pedlars and bargainings go
on from four o'clock in the morning until six. By
that hour the coolies who carry the great baskets of
vegetables from door to door in the city are loaded
up and ready for the day's business.
In older countries the white farmers have been
known to arise before daybreak and cart their pro- j
ducts into the city to market. In Vancouver, however, the truck garden business is in the hands of the
Orientals exclusively. The war may have had a
bad influence over other lines of business in this city,'
but neither the war in Europe or the prospects of a
war between China and Japan seem to have any
bad influence on the business of the Chinese vegetable growers locally.
One would imagine that the fat Chinese farmer,
as he drives his cart past the foul old City Market
on Main Street, smiles a broad smile.
Throughout the length and breadth of Greatef
Vancouver there is only one recognized market���the
rickety old premises which sits on False Creek. It
has several times been condemned as an unsanitary
old shack. The City Fathers believe, however, that
it serves very well as a public market, a place where
the white growers and white consumers may meet for
their mutual benefit.
A system of properly built, properly managed
public markets throughout the city and adjoining
municipalities would be a great boon to the householders. It would deal a body blow to some of the
food grafters on Water Street, would reduce the
cost of living, and would encourage the white man
to go in against the monopoly of food production in
the Vancouver district held by the Chinese small
farmers.
MICAWBER SHOULD HAVE CUT HIS|MR. SHAW, OF KAMLOOPS, M.L.A., stat-
THROA T !e<^some ten days ago that there had been no change
W  ,,,�����.. .-.ii l      n   i ir- 0,f public opinion since 1912.    We suggested that
I 11.N the London coach pulled oul   il Can- ,,       ,     , , ' ..   .   , i ��� i i i i-i   i
,   , .,.,,        ..-       I ii '��� had Leen a radical change which would likely
terburv,   Wilkins  Micawber and  ms  good ,     , i , .   .i .-        T \n    ci c
, ��� ,   i ..,,     ������� .1 brought to the attention of Mr. bhaw.      borne
-.���.ill- were up beh.ud      Mr. Micawber. the very , , r, ,,      ,
t . i i .mm' days ago a convention ot Conservatives gathered at
picture ol tranquil enjoyment, smiling at .Mrs. l\]i- ,,     , ,  , . ..    c,
ii ��� , iloops and denounced Mr. bhaw.
' <iul ��� liny walnul   oul     a    ipi i
bag, with ,i bottle -inking out of hii bread po
li ,, long tine unce we dined with Mi< iwbei 'N THE LEGISLATIVE buildings at Vidoria,
,..d the wife and Mastei I opp. field at the ("an- J�� be reached by a short stair from the Legislative
terbury inn, nervously waited while Micawber Shamber' "a ""'* eqipped bar-room. Whiskey,
stalled oil his bill, and in the morning, much reliev- p* beer, champagne, absinthe, ale and the whole
ed, -..u the Micawber family well on theii wa) out ,ami|y of Headache makers are on sale there.
of the town, * * *
Mr. and Mrs. Micawber lived before the days IN THE PUBLIC ACCOUNTS this year is a
of race suicide and they headed a large family, des- lar��e <tem f��r soda-syphons. These instruments,
cendants of which arc sprinkled pretty well over commonly associated with Scotch whiskey, were
the British Empire and a whole colony of them to- llkeb' purchased for the adornment of the Govern-
day find themselves in the Province of British Col- ment owned bar-room.
umbia.     And a  goodly portion of the  Micawber! * * *
population in this Province reside with us in Van-1 IT IS JUST POSSIBLE that all the wines served
couver. in the House were bought by the Government and
The Micawbers came to British Columbia with Paid for ljy tne people.    It is understood, however,
something of the same object in view as their illus- that the bar-room and restaurant are leased out to
trious forefather when he looked over the field at a private individual who buys his own stocks.
Canterbury.    The first Micawber went to Canter- * * *
bury to go into trade. 'To coals," as his wife put WITHOUT POSING AS being Puritanical, we
it. 'Mr. Micawber was induced to think on en- do not hesitate to say that a great deal of the bad
quiry that there might be an opening for a man of legislation now on the law books of the Province
his talent in the Medway coal trade . . . My opinion would not be there if honorable members of the
of the coal trade on that river is that it may require House had not had the little old Government bar-
talent, but it certainly requires capital. Talent,, room so near at hand in the course of the debates.
Mr.  Micawber has; capital,   Mr.   Micawber   has1 * # *
nol/l'     .,,.., , ,       ,        JUDGE HOWAY OF New Westminster recent-
Our local Micawbers are heavy on the talent. |y granted  natura)ization papers to a German at
ol the line, have a port CoquitIanii joseph Shearer by name      Mr.
something to turn up.
SOAK ENTERPRISE EVERY TIME
THE Reeve of South Vancouver believes lhat
as the owners of buildings in the municipality
are the only individuals directly benefiting from the
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^       Municipal  Fire Department,  they should pay the
ointment which sells at twenty-eight cents a pound. I |?xes f��r. tne uPkeeP of that   department.      The
Reeve, himself an owner of a large tract of vacant
property in the municipality, would take the burden of keeping up firehails off the shoulders of himself and brother owners of wild land.
It is not surprising that the announcement of this
policy has caused some alarm in the district.
The Reeve would put a high tariff on ratepayers
who are progressive.
He would arrange it so that owners of ugly va-
Tincture of ginger which is listed usually at ninety cents a pound, went for $6.50.
Compound cathartic, pills which usually sell at
$2.00 a thousand, went to the government at $3.50
a thousand.
In practically all the purchases of drugs for the
first contingent,  graft was rampant.     Particularly
r local     ^^^^^^^^^
short on capital and like thc firs
positive dislike for all manner of profitable labor,     cr ���   d.   n _L n'    -a      l   i '
-ri- -. :..      ���    o , ,  bhearer is the rort Coquitlam barber.
1 his war is the greatest proposition in the world _
for our Micawbers.    They blame everything on the   .   ..��,., Ic n. ITI -rx/
war.    Their debts which were outlawed long be- A MAIN lb ~      a        U"     .    ��� ^T" lnnocent
fore the war broke out, have been saddled on the ls the ru,1I)8 "f an Arizona judge.   While this the-
European conflict.    Meantime they are waiting for or-v "rff"* harmonizes with that of British justice.
it would be a sale postulate from which to advance
     __ in dealing with politicians by chance hauled into
court.
IS OUR MILK SUPPLY WHOLESOME * * *
VANCOUVER milk dealers have been wag- A CAMPAIGN  IS being started for   a   "Dry
ing a war against each other in the advertis- B.C."    The home of the movement is Kamloops
ing columns of the newspapers, a war which is not which, of course, is in the Dry Belt.
going to help the trade generally. * * *
In looking over the tests of Vancouver milk made AGED 245 YEARS and still hale and hearty is
during the past few months, we find that the worst' the record of the Hudson's Bay Company.    This
sample of milk tested by the bacteriologists is near- company is the parent of all monopolies and vested
ly a hundred per cent, ahead of the best sample of interests,
milk sold in Montreal during the month of April. * * *
For instance, during the past month the official (VANCOUVER HAS SETTLED the "jitney"
test disclosed the fact that one dairy sold milk to problem. Not more than 7 persons, not including
Vancouver householders which contained 29.000 the driver, to ride in a 5 passenger car; not more
bacteria. This was the least wholesome sample in, than 10, excluding the chaffeur, in a car equipped
the list.    The prize bottle tested 2.500. with 7 seats.   No one at all to ride on the door, ex-
One dairy in Montreal last month sold a milk cept the door be permanently fastened and a per-
which contained 9 824.000. The most wholesome | manent seat fixed on same. That resolution, citi-
sample sold in Montreal during that period con-j zens, has been laid before the City Council in all
tained some 54,000 bacteria. 'seriousness.    Don't laugh.
 , ^ ,  * * *
THE CRY FOR FOOD THERE ARE SOME things impasse even for a
I N the summer, British Columbia's wooded areas'Lloyd George.   One of them is a prescribed bever-
1   abound with natural fruits, nutritive roots and!a8e. and another a proscribed still.    The Dean of
bulbs, manv of which make good eating.        The Canterbury bluntly refused to "swear off."   "I did
streams of the Province abound with fishes, ranging once" He said. " and I am not going to do it a-
from the slick, speckled trout who rise to the fly in ?ain-"    Stimulants cannot be so exhorted although
the swift flowing mountain streams to the big salmon ; confessedly "evil spirits. '    Temperance remains a
of the large riverj
Whv should the unemployed of British Colum-  ruTC-r ., , rMMAM ic     c m J^H
ii ,   , ,i       :.   ,i,  a ������.l .jn ,   CHIEF  M.I I.W.W lb, < if course, entitled    o
bia make protest when there is at hand such an a-  , . ..      ,    '. '      .
,, i     tti     L-L���.i    l,j r���,- iL. inis ovvn views regarding the destruction o   the C on-
bundant supplv ot ioods which mav be had Ioi the ,,,., ... ...
. , ���     . naught bridge.     IV publicilv given to   electrolv-
taking? '  ��� "      i ���  , ������ ,i
lis   anel   stripped wires   tneones may serve a pur-
This idea no doubt entered into lhe mind ol that  |10S,.: |,ll( ,jM, bridge was   lestroyed in exactly the
South Vancouver councillor when he urged a com- \ rjght place, in exactly the righl way. in exactly the
mittee representing the unemployed to "cheer up.  most favorable time, and oil a highly suitable occas-
ron.    I���.!.���. trolj -is be jitneyed,
Fvil
matter of education.
* * *
heavy percentages were taken down on such arti- j cant lots would go free.    Working men, however,:
cles as thc threads which are used in surgical operations ��� delicate lesions bought to bind together
wounds from the shrapnel of the Germans.
All manner of anaesthetics yielded splendid profits, as did also the pills and tablets which are prescribed in certain cases where it is necessary to artificially stimulate the wounded man.
Rubber appliances yielded well to the money-
grabbing pharmacists, and upon the delicate instruments and cases for the surgical departments, rich
takings were recorded.
It was ghoulish business throughout, but the Members of Parliament were equal to it, and not a word
of protest was registered by our Mr. Stevens or the
others of the solid seven from British Columbia.
who build tidy cottages upon their lots, would have
to pay the shot.   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
If such a policy as this latest proposal from the
head of the South Vancouver council is adopted, all
enterprise in South Vancouver is likely to be permanently deadened.
If fire were to wipe out the South Vancouver
lumber yards, houses, stores, churches, schools and
the like which surround the reeve's own vacant property, which is served by municipal water mains,
sidewalks and paved streets, for which all the people
pay, this property would sink in value to about a
hundred an acre.
As it is, the enterprise of others has made the
reeve's property worth seven or eight hundred dollars per thirty-three foot lot.
Yet he would shirk the burden of paying his
share of the fire department upkeep!
the berries will soon be ripe!
The Lord in his wisdom will no doubt see I" il
that the wild berry crop of the Province will be unusually large this year.
Any Government who in ten years time .an bring
about such conditions that the working men of a
state with their families must take pot-luck with the
black bears in the proposition of getting a living
should receive the hearty support of that class and
should be returned to power with an increased majority.
In the meantime, the Government of British Columbia spends thousands of dollars in British newspapers advertising the excellent features of British
Columbia life and coaxing mechanics to come with
their families and settle in our midst.
Cheer up, the berries will soon be ripe!
INTERN IA ERY MOTHER'S son of them
- and do it now.
o|   BY THE WAY
FORTY-TWO Liberal candidates are in the field j
waiting anxiously for the McBride-Bowesr party to
start something.
AN EXPERT ON live stock writing in the "Kelowna Courier," says: "We should not jump at the
conclusion that because a certain breed is good on
the Colony Farm that it is necessarily good here."
The Hon. Price didn't think so.
We are manufacturers of
DIAMOND  CHICK FOOD
which has no equal   for   chickens.
The Best SEED POTATOES
which are guaranteed to grow.
LAWN GRASS SEED which
will make your lawn beautiful,
F. T. VERNON'S
MOUNT PLEASANT
FEED STORE
255 Broadway East (cor. Kingsway)
Phone Fairmont 186 SIX
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
SUNDAY.  MAY <>.  1115
SUCCESS
Awjits those who are prepared to accept their business opportunity
when it presents itself.   Hundreds of
OPPORTUNITIES
Will present themselves in the great revival of business following the
war. If ymi are wise, you will get your training nnw and be ready
for your opportunity.
Our Winter Term Opens Monday, Jan. 4
See us about it NOW.     The information costs you nothing.
Success Business College
Limited
E. Scott Eaton, B.A., Principal
CORNER TENTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
Fairmont 2075 VANCOUVER, B.C.
EDUCATION
PARENTS SHOULD HAVE THEIR
DAUGHTERS
ATTEND THE
Burrard School for Girls
1242 BURRARD STREET
Miss B. H. CARTMILL, Principal.
FOR TERMS,  Telephone  Seymour   1847,  or call  in  person.
TERMS
Parents are requested to call in person and interview Miss Hilda A.
Pomeroy, Principal English Collegiate School
GLADSTONE    HOTEL
Phone Seymour 1946
ENGLISH COLLEGIATE SCHOOL
1150 ROBSON STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Mias HILDA A. POMEROY, Principal
Certificated at the Board of Education, England.
Trained at Bishop Otter College, Sussex.
Associate of Arts at Oxford University.
Certificated at Trinity College of Music���Piano and Harmony.
English Literature and Science Distinctions at Examination.
SUBJECTS TAUGHT.
ALL ELEMENTARY STUDIES (Preparatory ��nd otherwise).
and
NEEDLEWORK (Plain and Fancy).
DRAWING AND PAINTING (All branches).
MATHEMATICS.    Matriculation Syllabus, London University.
BOTANY AND NATURE STUDY.   With Microscopy if desired.
LANGUAGES (By arrangement).
TAILOR DRESS-CUTTING AND  MAKING  (London  Academy).
SWIMMING, PHYSICAL CULTURE, ATHLETICS, ETC.
ENGLISH LITERATURE (Poetry and Prose).
Pupils of any age prepared in any of the above subjects, by arrangement, DAY or EVENING.
FIRST CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS R. CURRY, Prop.
Mill: Foot of Ontario Street, Fraser River
Phone: Fraser 97
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
CANADIAN   CEDAR
LUMBER CO.
Manufacturers of
BEVEL SIDING, BOAT LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
Wholesale and Retail
GRIMMETT P. O., SOUTH VANCOUVER
P. M. HAMILTON F. WILLIS
DOMINION TRUST AND HON. W. J. BOWSER
(Continued from page I )
VVAS PASSED���THI': DAY THEY HAD REGARDED AS ENSURING THE SAFETY OF THE DEPOSITS���THAT MR. B( >W-
SER AND HIS ASSOCIATES IN THE OPPOSITION-LESS
LEGISLATURE, WITHOUT A WORD OF WARNING OR A
NOTE OF OPPOSITION, HAD CANCELLED THE DEPOSIT
POWERS OF THE COMPANY. Today, umler the obiter dicta oi
Chief Justice Hunter, the ilcpositors of the Dominion Trust Co. have
not even a claim as creditors on the assets of the Dominion Trust. They
are outlawed by reason of the ultra vires legislation which was cancelled
on March 4, 1914.
M R, BOWSER'S EXPLANATIONS
It is not suggested for a moment thai Mr. llowser brought in the
Trust Companies Regulation Act for the purpose of deceiving the Dominion Trust victims. That were an offence too diabolic for consideration. But it is charged that Mr. llowser. whei at this time was profiting
through his private firm hy handling Dominion Trust business, was recreant in hi-, duty to the general public by failing to warn them that the
Dominion Trust no longer had even a pretence of authority to accept
deposits. It is charged that hc was recreant in his duty to the public in
not stopping the Dominion Trust from continuing to accept deposits.
What is Mr. Bowser's explanation and reply to the charge?
"Well, il never entered into my lic.-ul tbat deposit! woulel be taken.
Arnold told me personally when the bill was before llie House that lie
would not take another dollar frum depositors.   Arc we supposed to assume that a  company  is going tu act  illegally?    Am   I.  as  Attorney-
General, going to post a detective in every concern of this kind tee feel-
low every move?   That's what the stockholders are for.    Thc directors
hael absolute knowledge of the loss by Lie ceimpany of its power to take
deposits," says Mr.  Bowser.���Speech in  Legislature,  February 4,  1915.
To the depositors' committee Mr. llowser said he was not supposed
to put a policeman in the entrance of the Dominion Trust to see that
they obeyed the law.
All this may be true. Arnold may have made this statement. Mr.
Bowser may have believed it. It may not be his duty to put police officers, even of the "special" variety, mi thc track of wealthy corporations. Although his own Vancouver office was in the Dominion Tin 'I
lluilding, hc may never have noticed thc crowds lined up at the deposit
wickets. Although his own law partner was a director of thc company
anil therefore, had "absolute knowledge of the loss by thc company of
its power to take deposits." hc may not have informed Mr. Rowscr that
the company was still taking deposits. Everything is possible. Mr.
Bowser may even have been made thc victim of an innocent and trustful
nature.
BUT, ANSWER THIS. MR. BOWSER
But, there came a time when, according to Mr. Bowser's own admission, made in his own defence speech in the legislature on February
4, he became aware that the deposit business was alive in th Dominion
Trust Co.    These are his words:
"On August 3 I was in Vancouver and Arnold came around to interview  nie about another  company  more or  less  connected  with  the
Dominion Trust.    As a result of this conversation  I began  I.) be very
suspicious, and when next day I returned to Victoria I at once sent for
Mr.  Runnells  (inspector of trust companies)  and asked him  to go to
Vancouver and make an inspection e,f the Dominion Trust.    On August
31, Mr. Runnells was able to make a verbal report and on September 1
presented an official report that lie had found that deposits in tin- concern were mixed  with  the general  funds of the company,  which  was
contrary tee ihe Trust Act, and that the company also failed In have 23
per cent, of its deposits held in liquid form with some chartered bank."
This makes it clear that by September 1. 1U14. Mr. Bowser was in full
possession of the information that deposits were being taken by tlie
Dominion Trust Co., AND THAT THESE DEPOSITS/ILLEGALLY
TAKEN, WERE BEING CRIMINALLY DEALT WITH.
The Dominion Trust did not close its doors until October 14, the
clay after Mr. Arnold's death. What was Mr. Bowser doing between
September 1st and October 14 to prevent the Dominion Trust from taking the savings of the poor, and misappropriating them. During those
six long weeks he knew that the company was taking the money of the
poor illegally, dealing with it criminally, and that if the concern collapsed, the depositors were outlawed as ultra vires depositors. Did he
put a policeman at the door? Did he make a demand upon the company to cease its illegal acceptance of deposits ? Did hc by mouth or
pen warn a single person of the risk they ran? Did he fulfil his sworn
duty as a Minister of Justice to protect the innocent and confiding?
These are questions Mr. Bowser has made no attempt to answer, nor
can he answer them without discredit. A tearful chapter could be written of thc life tragedies of the victims who placed their life savings into
thc coffers of the Dominion Trust in the last six weeks of its existence,
WHOSE MONIES MICHT HAVE BEEN SAVED HAD MK.
BOWSER TAKEN STEPS To STOP THE ILLEGALITIES OF
THE rv^'"\\'Y WHEN 1IF, BECAME ADMITTEDLY AWARE
OF THEM.
QUESTIONS FOR MR. BOWSER
Much more could be said about the part Mr. Bowser has played in
connection with the closing stages of the Dominion Trust, but this statement has been intended to avoid the controversial and to deal only with
THE FACTS AS ADMITTED BY MR. BOWSER HIMSELF, or
suiii as are easily capable of documentary proof. That Mr. Bowser is
on trial in this election is evidenced by Mr. Bowser's own defence
speech. The indictment charges that throughout the history of the
Dominion Trust legislation Mr. Bowser was recreant in his duty toward
the public he was paid and had sworn to serve as head of the law department of the province. The questions which are submitted to the electors, the jury, are these:
1. Was Mr. Bowser acting in the interests of the people, or in the
interests of the Dominion Trust Co., his clients, when he allowed the illegal legislation to pass unchallenged through the Legislature in 1913,
knowing it to be illegal ?
2. Was Mr. Bowser acting on behalf of the people or on behalf of
his clients, the Dominion Trust Co., when he became guarantor for Arnold to the Dominion government, as a condition that the illegal legislation secured by the Dominion Trust should not be disallowed?
3. Was Mr. Bowser acting on behalf of the people, or on behalf of
his clients, the Dominion Trust Company, when he took no steps to see
that the company ceased to accept deposits after its deposit powers were
cut off by the amendment of March 4, 1914?
4. Was Mr. Bowser acting on behalf of the people or on behalf of
his clients, the Dominion Trust Company, when he kept silence during
thc last six weeks of the company's existence, when to his admitted
knowledge, innocent people were putting their savings into a company
of which he himself had taken its deposit powers away under pressure
from Ottawa?
On the answers accorded these questions, hangs thc guilt or innocence of Mr. Bowser.
EVERY TIME
YOU MAKE
PURCHASES
From these FIRMS
t^TOT^
Classified
Advertisements
Y
OU WISH TO SELL?
Auctioneers
ll' yen wi-Ii !., e!is|ieesc of your Furniture. Stock ir Fixture! by Auction
to the best advantage, coniult
KING & CO.
Auctioneers, who guarantee satisfaction and cash day uf Mile. Eatimates
anel  Valuation!   lie,      I'lieeiic Sev. 507
MONEY TO LOAN
.\in.\KY   LOANED,   LARGE   OR
���Riall .illleiiuils,   diamondl,   jewellery,
etc. A quiet, respectable place i<j
borrow money. "Id no\,\ bought.
Eitabliihed 1905. Star Loan Ce>., S12
Halting! West.
0
BORROW ON YOUR DIAMONDS,
jewelery, inusii-.-il instruments, etc.
401 Dominion Bldg. Business confidential.
FLORISTS
BROWN  BROS. & CO., LIMITED,
Seedsmen,  florists, Nurserymen, 4S
Masting Si.  I-:., and 7H2 Granville
Street,  Vancouver,  B, C.
WATCHMAKER
ENGLISH   WATCHMAKER   ANU
Jeweller when ynu think of watch,
clock and jewellery repairs think
Appleby, 438 Richards Si., lull block
fremi Hastings, All mainspring! and
cleaning je ,li> guaranteed 12 months.
MUSIC
RAPID METHOD MUSIC STUDIO
Free trial lesson, All ages. Opportunity tee practice successful teaching
by correspondence. Sey. 4132. Empire Building.
AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES
VANCOUVER SPEEDOMETER?
Service Station, Stewart speedometer, Warner auto-meter; repairs executed   promptly,  516-518   11,,we  St.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
B. C. 1NDEEENDENT UNDERTA-
kers, Limited���Successors to Sill &
Miller.   Limited.     Funeral   directors
anel  embalmers,  652-654   Broadway
\V.    PHONE  FAIRMONT 7.18.
KEARNEY, T. J. & Co., DOMINION
Parlors, 8f*2 Broadway west Phone
Fairmont 1098. Night calls answered.
OUTFITTERS
RDER Your MEATS
From   The   Family   Butcher
at  the  Sanitary  Shop  today.
Telephone   Fairmont   1634
Anderson's Market
J. E. Anderson, Prop.
4192  MAIN STREET
U
SHOULD PATRONIZE
HOME  INDUSTRY
F. FAULKNER
THE      MECHANICAL      REPAIR      SHOP
Autos,   Bicycles,   Lawn   Mowers,  etc.,   Repaired
Locks   and   Ktiv   Fitting
We   Buy   and   Sell   Second-hand   Bicycles
Stove    Connecting. All    Work    Guaranteed
Give  us   a  trial   and  be  convince!
4095     MAIN     ST.,    VANCOUVER
FOUND���TIIF. CHEAPEST PLACE
in town to gel your Spring Suit on
easy payment; litlle down, little
weekly. Lester Outfitting Co., 1037-
.W l'ender West.
COLLECTORS
.NATIONAL COLLECTING C'OM-
pany, 202 North West Trust Building. Established 1907. We collect
current accounts, rents and bad debts
in (eewn eir country.   Nu collection,
nn pay.    Phone 4980.
FOR  SALE
A SNAP, 2 0001) BUILDING LOTS
all cleared and ready for garden.
In<iile- city, near three car lines and
school. $400; $1(3 cash $S monthly.
Hamilton Exchange, 1012 Holden
lluilding.
s
EE US FIRST I
JOHN S. RANKIN
D. S. MACDONALD
Auctioneers
800  PENDER  STREET  WEST
Phone  Seymour 3111
Furniture Bought for Spot Cash
A TELEPHONE Fair. 720 for
NGUS
PLUMBING   ::   HEATING
ELECTRICAL REPAIRS
A SPECIALTY
No order too large or  too small for
prompt service
V
ancouver
Creamery Co.
Our Ice Cream cannot be beat.
Our Butter is of the best quality.
Our Factory is lhe cleanest in the
city, No hands touches our Butter
as it is all wrapped and put up in 1-lb.
packages.
E
XPRESSING
and HAULING
B. R. GRAY
42  TWENTY-FIFTH   AVE.   EAST
Furniture. Piano Moving and Express Work.
Work promptly attended to and our prices
���re   right. Phone:    FAIRMONT   801
M
RS. ARMOUR
Doctor of Electricity
25     years*     experience     Removing
Diseases   and   their   Causes
SPECIAL    TREATMENTS. MASSAGE
Appointments  can  be  made  for  Treatment  io
your own home.
Terms   on   Application
Residence:    3837    MAIN    STREET
(Cor.  22nd  Avenue  West)
0
NLY     THE     BEST     OF
MATERIAL     USED      IN
REPAIRING YOUR
BOOTS AND  SHOES
AT MY  STORE.
JOHN STEPHEN
3324 MAIN STREET
Satisfaction Guaranteed.   Prices Right
N
ONE BETTER I     TRY
LIBBY'S GROCERY
6404 MAIN ST. (Cor. 50th>
For FIRST CLASS PROVISIONS
FLOUR AND FEED, Etc.
Give us a trial and be convinced of
quality and quantity. All Orders
promptly delivered. Try our special
Ceylon Tea. Leave your address and
have our solicitor call for your order.
E
VERY Man should patronize
Antiseptic Cleaning
and Pressing Co.
Manager - F.   W.   BIGBY
2900   MAIN   ST.   (Cor.   13th   Ave.)
Guaranteed Best Work only
Reduced Prices. Goods called for and delivered
PHONE   FAIRMONT   812
Open   ��   a.m.   to   7   p.m.      Saturday   9   p.m.
Y
OU WILL GET VALUE
AND SATISFACTION BY
PATRONIZING
Bugler   Boy   of   104th   Regiment
Crossland's Store
4520 MAIN STREET
A nice clean stock of Groceries,
Candys and Tobacco. SUNDAY. MAY '). 1915
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
SE\ J.
GUNNER'S ALL
By   R.   J.   Fraser
: llu
i
Willi handi that tremble
grey-haired   lady   ��� ��� j > > 11 e < 1
envelope
���d, the little
the yellow
���Fnein Jack ;ei Kingiton,"
the murmured softly. "My boy."
Tlie'ii -ii,- read: "Beaten out or the
batti rj . have t" take ci mmission
witli the' line. \\ e leave here next
weele
The telegram fluttered te, tli���- floor
and -lie. grasped the table edge to
iteady herself. Not to k" with the
nuns!    Ih- father's s6n���a  Burnham
���;iml  iieei   wilh  the   Hritish  gunsl
"O Jack," sin- sobbed. "You shouhl
have made the battery, A Burnham
was always with the nuns."
Slowly -lie- stooped rtn��I picked up
the papef, "He.iv disappointed liis father wemld have been wire he living
lee see' this (lay." she iiiiiniiureel and,
Rieinn over lo a desk in Hie corner,
opened one of ii- drawers. She drew
forih three photographs, and stood
them in a row on the mantlepiece.
Soldiers all they wcre as their different uniforms showed. "Heroes," she
proudly saiel. and the tears glistened
in hcr eyes. She drew a chair up lie-
fore the fire anel sat, with hands loosely clasped, looking into the flames
Well-founded was her pride', fe.r tin-
Burn hams hael heen a race of s> ,1-
diers. When Jack was but a hoy of
seven his father, William Burnham,
had won his gunner's stripes al Col-
cns.i. A little later, ai Paardeberg,
he was laiel in a Ipncly grave. .Tack's
grandfather had helped drag his fmir
bronze cannon througii the Crimean
snows; his father before him, on that
memorable I7tli of June', at Quatre
Bras, stood by his unwieldy muzzle-
loader till Napoleon's horsemen cut
him down. A noble record���.���mel gunners all.
"Enlist with the nuns, my lie.v. fir
that is a Bumham's place." she heid
saiel when, on that August morning,
ihe lad had rushed home with the
news thai Ihe call fur vplunteers was
given. And Jiiek. fired wilh llu- mar-
tial spirit of his gallant sires, hail
gained the trailing corps. Six weeks
faithful study ai ihe Kingston barracks and the crucial day arrived, lie
passed, lull on lhe lisl was seventh.
and unly six were called. "I shall not
wail fe.r the second crowd," he said,
when lhe firsl keen pangs eif disappointment had passed, "I'm going lee
the front."
So he entered the infantry class,
Unknown to iiis mother, who wailed
for word of her hoy's success, While
the long weeks followed 'ine another.
And neiw it had come���this yellow
paper in her hand. Peenr Jack, she
knew he. too, musl have felt it keenly.
Not until he had joined his corps
at Valcartier camp did his little mother write him. "Vou should be wilh
tlie guns." he read, "but Heid bless
you, my son. ynu will iln ymir duty
with the line."
Tu his leisure heeiirs, which were
hut teen few, the yuung lieutenant hung
about lhe artillery camp. His regiment, the 1 Rt li Light Infantry, was
stationed next to the latter, ami at every opportunity lie followed the batteries in manoeuvres. He loved tn
linger about the dark green guns anil,
whenever there was man-handling tn
hc done with the wagons, he was the I
first to lend his aiel. lie might bc
an officer nf infantry by commission
���he was a gunner by blood anil at
heart.
On thc troopship, when nol nu duty, the lower decks saw him oftenest.
There Ihe batteries were stalled.
Though far frum popular wilh bis nun
males, in the gunners' mess he became the  favorite guest.
On Salisbury Plain he regularly
heard from iiis mother. "Keep Irving
for a transfer." was repeated in her
letters. "You may get a chance to
join the guns." But no opportunity
offered and, still with the 18th, Jack
crossed the Channel, and eventually
found himself along with the liritish
Tommies on lhe shell-swept firing
line.
Day after day they held their own,
knee deep in lhe chilly waters nf a
Flanders trench. Overhead burst the
German shells, carrying death and tor-
ture.
The liritish trenches stretched along
the south bank of a muddy river and
in vain had they struggled to force a
passage over the stream. At night
the foe's searchlight played incessantly on the crossing, and bridge after
bridge was blown to pieces by the
terrific charges of the German guns,
hidden  behind  the  far-lying  slopes.
Then one day lhe British eightecn-
pounders found their target and the
big lights were blotted eiut. The engineers chose a new passage, where
only an occasional shot found ils
mark. When darkness fell they worked like Trojans and quickly the structure reached out towards thc farther
shore. At staff headquarters miles
away,  the   'phone  bells   tinkled.    The
I s
longed-for   menage    from   that   first-
line ditch ley the- iiver -nie- hael at lasl
reached   the   general's  ear.    "11
e-au gi i thc attention of thi ir bi
on  llle-  -eiiuh   ridge  we-'ll   h
thrown  across  before  el lylight."   I I
bearded   man   with    the
-'npe - droppi d thi   receivei   H
e-.l over iln- map on .iee   -.,',!.   ,, e| ,1,,
greellp      eel'      kcill-1  >.   e] Mtmel-
e lose aboul him.
"I Ireh r an attack in forei
The- leader placed hit ':ii^.'e r em .
on lhe ti'.. r. six mill I be low ti,,
bridge "'riie- 21st Royal 11..r-.��� are
��� il Ihe (.'baleen- Farm. They er..-- tin-
bridge ihe minute the last plank i-
laiel and take up position 'eii Hill No
2. In check llie- advance of iln enemy.
Musl hold it till fir.-! elivisje,n j- over. The 18th Light Infantry to supporl the guns."
The orders sped -.ver as man;.
fercnt  wires, and tin- sweating engineers in Ihe river mud learned that their
work  was nol  in vain.    With red mb-
blasl hurled them bail; from 'lie ere-i
Their   numbers   wen    i
bin actually ent it
"Back  I-, ti���   bi Back!
nothing  I i
���
���
���   toll.
-
III.- -
���
battali n  was  fai nd  th,
lay  the  1
I.- dii men   and   horses;   wheezj
Befe re him
. : ink   e, ,
German Dogs Slink and
Snap on 6. C. Soil
While the Hari-McHarg't, the I.ulla's. the Mcrritl's and the
Bell-Irving'* Fall round lhe British Flag
D
1
Shields an.l but , ,-
shrapnel lied- -.
Bul   v, hy   had   tl
why  iv.        - ���:,,.  hjjjy
Jack   rose  painfull}   to
���
German   i iee es  we ���    .-,, tjon,
but    iheir      fire' ���., I
lit.    Theii
e-t     ,\h.  tha it!    Ft
new   p   iitie n  the  Briti
ha.l got  the range
ter the firsl  "brae kel
led efforts they lashed limb..- to l
be-r ami hiirle-il them int.e place.  From   Krupps.     Evert   a-   Batterj   "K"   had
the trenches the mud-bespattered men  '{""'''..*" went the I'm
of  the   18th   scrambled   forth   an,I   laj
down  in  the woods for a  shorl  rest.
lh
e in V.
iii tlle
horses
I'm- many  of the brave  lad
we,uld   he   their   grave-.     Wei
re.ii'.  -en   ihe   Chalons   Farm,
��ere watered, then li,   ked guns
and wagons.    Battery "K" of tii,- Royal  I lorse awaited orders i-1 ad\ .e- - -
These came, with the driving of ihe
la-t spik.- in th.- bridge. Drivers
leaped I-, their saddles, gunners to
their seats. Accompanied by a low
eii' er ilie- battery fi six guns turn,-,I
into the road anil trotted rivcrwards
Tin darkness seemed I" grow deeper, then intense blackness befori tl
dawn, and the air was thick with misi
Over tin- swaying cm-,-way ihe- horses carefully picked their s',.-[,s. On
firm ground again they broke inl" a
gallop. From llu- woods bordering
ihr road, th,- I8th emerged. They fell
into line behind the limber-, with Battalion "(.'" in the lead. Willi Ihem
was Lieutenant Burnham enviously
In- watched lln- men of the Ibe,--,- Artillery clinging  te, ilu- swaying scats.
Battalion "C" was just across ami
"A" was still nn the bridge when a
beam of blinding light frmn the north
pierced the encircling gloom. The
enemy's searchlight was in play a-
gain, and the attacking force stood
revealed to tin- German guns. Well
hael these found the range fnr the first
shell struck fair in the middle of tlle
span. Torn men anil shattered timbers were hurled in all directions.
Shell followed shell until the structure was demolished. No troops
cnuld live in that storm nf lead, and
lhe 18th fell back intn the trenches.
All but Battalion "C"���the river was
behind them, doubling up, ihey followed the way nf the swinging guns.
The baltery galloped on. "Occupy
Hill Xo. 2 and check advance of enemy!" were the oredrs they had received. What took place behind .lid
not alter the command, Orders were
orders���always. So they galloped mi.
Battalion "C" followed, mi the run.
"We've been ordered tn support tlie
guns." the major shouted in Burn-
ham's ear. "If they can't hold tlle
position we fall back nn the bridge
head."
Up tlie last sleep slupe the struggling heerses hauled lhe six I8-poun-
ders, Rear limbers were close behind. They wheeled to the right when
tin- cresl was reached and the he.rses
wen- jerked to a halt. Then it happened. Limber pins were yet nil-
shipped when the first German shell
lit nn the summit, fnr lhe enemy had
their range. Team number six were
still tugging their piece intei place
when the concussion ''irew them to
the ground. The terrified brutes
sprang lo Iheir feet again and bolted
overturning carriage and limber.
Down the steep bank it was hurled
and the crew crushed 'nealh lhe
wreck.
The hail of shrapnel thai fojlowe
fairly blew the battery to pieces. It
cleaned out horses and men. One detachment was slaughtered by a single shell. Gun number three had a
wheel carried off. number four bail
lost its spokes and sank on one side.
lln- fierce artillery duels I
- i the heavii r guns
'. Jack h .,!-.,-,| l,a,k ��� th
river. Hurrah! tin pressure on tin
bridge w as in n   relieved  .nn!  tl
(in   his
oi tin   stream tin- few unwounded
nf lhe 1^'h wei .vhai aid they
could.    "We'll   advance     .n't II '
���  Burnham.
The crack of a im". t on tl
gun -ilie Id brought ���      ion again
to the I     :'
ve r. jusl a- a scattered rille it-,   '���:
mn  and  the  1< ad   splatte red
gnus.    Whai a sigl    ��� -  startled
gaze!    In close forn k e row -
eled   behind   rank,   Germany   infantry
i- ere  pouring  b\ er  tli<     far
��� I ..'.ti  inl,.  the il,-,-p-eiii   road tl
i-.   thc   loiif contesti "K"
tti iv v. as -il, net ,1 and tin-  Kaise r's
les came mi cn ma-.-..' to repel the
attacking force.
"Whal a mark ihey mak-.!" exclaimed Burnham, ami hi- pi ac ised
eye. gauged tin easy range. An idea
started ihr.,ugh hi- throbbing brain.
I le pulled open ihe breach -if thi gun
It was loaded. Grasping iin- traversing near li,- swung tin sights ������������ bear
nu the narrow mad. It to ���',. bul i
-i'e inl P. depri ss ti,.- muzzle ami
train it mi the head ol 'in- .len-, column. I hen he darted "i.r to iln- next
piece. lie sighted it slightly in advance fi his target; number three
-iili fartln r ahead. The bullets of the
on-coming guard flew perilously close
by his ears, bin he heeded them not,
lie was living the life- of ,a Burnham
���at   wnrk   with   the   liritish   gun-.
Gun number four was the cripple
bul he managed tn train il like its
fellows.    He was ready to open  fire.
Back tn the first piece he ran. He
peered along the sights. Splendid!
He reached inr the lever ami. bang!
Number 'ine sent it- message nf death,
Jack cut fnr the second ami fired il;
llie third and fourth the same. Tlle
last, mi mn- wheel, was hurled sideways by the recoil, bin nnt before its
shrieking shell had flung death into
German ranks. He turned his glasses
mi the broken mass. "You've revenged yourself, "hi girl," he saiel. as
with proud satisfaction he noted the
gaps in th,- torn green column, Nu
gunner  cnuld  have  made  better  aim.
lint be must nol stop, Dn pping
lhe glasses lie ran Inr the limber ami
gathered an armful .ef shells. There
were only three guns in reload. A-
gain he sighted them all before firing, ihen mie ai'u-r another the charge- nf lyddite spread death-dealing
shrapnel among the tn iops mi the narrow road. Jack worked like a 'ii nd
There wen- tm mel for "brackets" or
"ranging shots"���the firing wa, all
point blank. Back .mil forth i'i m
limber to gun he stumbled, ladi n w iih
the heavy she-ll-. Ile tripped over the
be.elies of ihe dead gunni rs: .i stricken
horse, m iis death struggle, lashed mil
and shattered Iiis knei No 1" ger
could he keep mi his feel���yel he
foughl "'i a- besl he- could. Tearing
a bell from the m-ari-sl corpse hc tied
the shell- together and, crawling painfully, dragged them over the ground.
He bad checked the advance, he i-i-.w.
but he must keep them there. In eld
them  till  lhe bridge  was  finished.
lie gave no neetice now In the effect e.i his shots���the time could met
be spared. But lhe havoc wrought
was terrible. At intervals, each time
gr.iwn longer, as 11 urn ham's strength
ebbed away, three shells, at point
blank range, tore through the com-
1 masses and exploded in their
midst. A half company was carried
away at a lime. In vain did the officers drive them on. They could not
cross that shrapnel-swept zone and
the heael of the column melted away-
like  snow  before   lhe  Chinook   wind.
At  last  the  troops  eipcned  out  and
a  regiment, in often  order, spread a-
muzzlc   still   pointing   to   the   north.! bout  the  base  eif  the  hill.    The  rifle
1! Pa.c
���   .
cooling
''ii  .em!  carried   him   |
I
the bridge
'    battle
ol  the river thai Jacl
p.     In  a  I..
e , -
'
toppei
���
us at last," In
1 n   tin-   - ing   man.
1..-  lh,   ii--:   -
'"A hai   for?"   asked   J ,
'Fir  pulling  thn ugh tl      fever?"
"Vl1    - Ill's."    He
took   from   the  head
little In-",-, n medal tl   t I
, eve
-    youthful   heir   :
throne Ind  visiti d  the  we um
Th.-   -iit-g, nn   placed   'in     medal     in
Bumham's hai rl.
���   ;
Slowly   i I  it ovei      "For   Va
lor," I:,   read ol "The
V.(.'..' In      hispered.   T
I" speak  more   hi   ttu
questioning .
"\ ��� s."   I nswi n il   tii      . tin r,    "it's
���    I   tu nli   'K'   Ila:
...
II    '   ; I ���' ��� in  indis-
tinctly���the   dear     Id   -u- -.   ami   ihe
ei.vc  mi   tha!   gl
hill.
A -mil,- lii up hi van faci His
.-ui"!'    N-.' and  ::     ��� f  regrel
new   ligl ���     ���    ���    his   ej
'
that  wa-  left was tin
In- um-- return to "I
Tl   ni;-: ������'.:���     ihe lit
tle  bronze  cr..-- in  Ir-  hai d.    Strucl
he knew: pi ;'--.-, ��� fri ni tin
be i.'. ... I i -ie his !.":.- | .-������-.'- I ���
fallen. 'I'h.- surgeon broke in on his
dn eughts, ' I fen '- --.ine thing ��� '-'��� for
ven." |,e said --'i'i., ;,��� ,: n' left il
f r  you yesterday."
Listjesslv Burnham took the paner
and unfolded it. But, with lln first
glance al iin ,-ii-eei!-. ��i,-ni'e his
weaVhess, In- sal upright. "What's
this'" In- cried. "Surely nol a commission   feer   llle?"
"You're Maior Burnham of the
Re yai ! lorse Artillery." . ���-- - n ,1 thi
old surgeon, smiling, and his ham!
went up to the salute. "(',..,1 bless ynu.
boy. no man living deserves it more
than  vein."
With a cry tha! was half a s-.b Tack
fell baek mi the pillows murmuring:
"Mv guns, my very i ivn now." The
excitement hael stolen his'strength and
ius firsl keen joy passed to sweeter
thoughts.
Before his mind rrent th,- tii, mr.
fi a little grev-haired lady Sh,- was
gazing with love and pride on tin
photographs nf three martial-looking
men. "My heroes of the guns," he
seemed to bear her say, ml lay quite
siill with the picture cradled in his
mine!. "Brave little nie'ther." he murmured, "she's due hei -inin- of till
joy." At the thought he beckoned the
surgeon. "Paper and ink," he ri qui -
tee!, "ami please wrap up 'his medal
fur mailing." I le- poisi d tl pen
moment, then  feebly  wrote:
"Mi ibt r.  I'm with iln- guns.1
I de vay Germany will Ireat your John Bul!"
Such were the words of Johan Dierssen as he tore up a
picture cf John Bull and stamped his feet upon it. The incident happened in Henderson's cigar store. North Vancouver. Mr.
Henderson, having a bit of British blood in him, promptly smashed
the Prussian in lhe nose, knocked htm down and handed him over
to the police.
The police held Dierssen for a short time and, according to the
newspaper report, turned him over to the militia. The military authorities later allowed Dierssen his freedom.
If the lacts are as reported, Henderson would have been quite
within his rights had he killed the insolent Prussian on the spot. If
the facts are as reported the authorities, both civil and military, who
allowed Dierssen to escape, should be summarily dealt with by good
Canadians without any regard to the details of the law.
On a Main Street car a certain German engaged in business in
South Vancouver made, it a practice up to a very( few weeks ago of
publicly 1,-iding the Kaiser and of poking fun at British institutions.
Believing it his duty, a resident communicated with the officers
of the Seventy-second Highlanders and urged that the German be
taken in charge.    Nothing was done by the regimental authorities
ind the German continued his insolence.    The civil authorities were
also informed of the man's behaviour but apparently did not deem the
case worth iny attention.    Some little time ago the Prussian spoke
disrespectfully of the British flag in a certain printing office in the
district and did not close his mouth until the printer in charge hurled
a steel galley at his head.
>:. if. *
It is but the other day that a German reservist who had been
arrested by a Provincial policeman, leaped from a train and escaped.
The policeman pursued the fellow and, in endeavoring to capture
him, suffered a broken leg. A line or so was given the incident in the
newspapers and it was forgotten.
* *   ��
In Point Grey a community of fat Germans congregated about
a beer barrel to celebrate an alleged German victory. The authorities smiled softly at this and only after much pressure had been
brought to bear, did they arrest several of the fellows.
* * *
Other such incidents which have occurred right in Vancouver
could be quoted by the hour. In almost every case, the high-cheeked
enemies of King George have received soft treatment at the hands
of the authorities. Ninety Germans in detention or Vancouver Island are fed on the fat of lhe land and allowed to loaf away their
time.
Such as this is sufficient to make the blood of a Britisher boil.
The severest penalties should be visited upon these aliens. Every
German in this Province should be taken in charge. Put them to
work in the asphalt yards of the penetrnti.��ries, make them work in
the coal mines, break stone, cut wood���anything.
Mount a sruard over each half dozen cf these fellows and make
them sweat under the bayonet.
Il the authorities are too soft to deal properly with these eneraie?
of the Crown, it is up to the people to use their own methods���tar,
feathers, stones, fire or buckshot���to rid the community of the brothers, friends and supporters of a nation who, in making war, take
1 their cue from the snakes and the crawling things of the jungle.
With the German battery were machine guns anil Ihey swept the crest
of the British hill with a fire that left
mi life behind. Withoul returning a
single shot "K" Battery was blown
to pieces.
Battle-maddened horses from the
hill met the advancing lSth and plunged through their khaki ranks. The
very top of the ridge was literally
blown into their faces by that hurricane rtf lead. Yet they rushed' it
with a cheer. Only when they topped thc rise did they see the bloody
work that the German guns had done.
Mangled horses and men. alid the
ground all harrowed and plowed.
God! What a sight for young troops!
They scarce had time In look when
an Incessant) terrific shell fire, accompanied by a hail of Maxim bullets, swept them off their feet.      The
fire
rew hotter but Burnham, crawling about on hands and knees, was
less exposed. lie could n.it see thc
advancing Prussians drawing ever
closer. He looked only to see that
a gun bore mi a body of the enemy
on the road, then crawled away to the
next one. His firing grew ever shiw-
er. bul he maintained bis deadly aim.
As long as he could lift shell or pull
lever lhe lone gunner kept up the
fight.
Ha.l he glanced fnr a moment behind him he would have witnessed a
gladsome inspiring sight. Freed from
the destructive fire of the German
batteries the wnrk on the bridge bad
progressed quickly, ami even now
companies of lhe impatient 18th. were
marching across to join their comrades. Behind them were field artillery,   with   British   regulars   at   their
=?)
ALWAYS HAVE
NABOB  JELLY
POWDER
in the house and unexpected company
will be ever welcome - - - it pnly takes a
minute to prepare.
10c   -   3 for 25c
At all good grocers
MADE IN B.C.
j [GHT
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
I    IDAY.  MAV 9, 1915
EDGETT'S
THE STORE OF PLENTY
118 Hastings  Wesl
Provision Department
w
I     .
n f\fk
.i   lies   for iflsW
11 nn      - .-. ,'���       l*rl ".    Cure .1
' le en '     Me	
��i on
Grocery   Departmenl   Specials
Tea   "I                     Ccyl oc...
��nly,   I! *��t
, .,ii, ,-       1 ... ,-'.. "   -.ur   Frc.il      OR/i
Croat, I     S -  ll' *��*
Eoual    . ���''   e -- Ull. I.
Sugar    18  lh        1   Rogrra     * 1  dfj
Granulated  line,     .. k    ��I,W
flour   "Seal ol Alberta,"  No.  I   Hard
Wheal,   i'  lb.   ��� -e k   bettei   value
$2.00
li   Salrao
I  lor   	
25r
10<
Extra Special in Corn, Peas, Tomatoes, ... 3 Tins for 25c |
Fruit Department
.Vi ��� 1.1 ��� -                  ii tl   fruit.
Special,  per  boi	
Orange.,  fresh  juicy  stock,
$1.15
30.;'
Lemons.
pi .   dozen
Extra large,
per   dozen
20c
25^
Special���Large Hard Onions .... 10 lbs. for 25c
Potatoes���Chilliwack,  only  90c  sack
l-e.-i-.   Cucumbers,   Asparagus,   etc..   freah
Strawberries,   Cabbage,   1.,-um-,-,   G
every morning.
Phone 5868
Phone orders delivered promptly.
Store Open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Mall orders shipped day received
Saturdays till  11  p.m,
uithority, as it is taken from the text
lecture delivered by Doctor M. J.
Shields, t" the employees of the Telephone Company in New York city.
>xf^��(l.Wa@(
BIG SIX SS AUTO SERVICE
Cars call for three or more passengers within reasonable distance
of office.
LEAVING
VANCOUVER
726 HASTINGS ST. W.     PHONE SEYMOUR 550
NEW .WESTMINSTER
Every   15  Minute$      15 BEGBIE STREET
6
PHONE  930
��� GET YOUR ���
CAMPING TENTS
Camp Furniture. Canvas Hammocks, and other Camping Supplies from
C. H. JONES & SON Ltd.
Manufacturers
CANVAS GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
PHONE SEY. 740 110 ALEXANDER STREET
Opposite North Vancouver Ferry Landing
HOUSEHOLD GOODS am, OFFICE FURNITURE
y [��� Vi I: L
IN THE  ONLY  REM   PADDED MOVING VANS IN  B.C.
CAMPBELL STORAGE COMPANY^
MOVING - PACKING- STORAGE-SHIPPING
ff PHONE SEYMOUR 7360. OFFICE 857 BEATTY ST. PI
HILLCREST DAIRY
THE   DAIRY   THAT   STANDS   THE   TEST
PURE PASTEURIZED
ilk, Cream, Butter & Buttermilk
DELIVERED DAILY
INSPECTION  INVITED
A TRIAL SOLICITED
131 FIFTEENTH AVENUE WEST
Phone Fairmont 1934
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
MEMBERS VANCOUVER STOCK EXCHANGE
MEMBERS VANCOUVER GRAIN EXCHANGE
MEMBERS OF CALGARY OIL EXCHANGE
DEALERS IN ALL ACTIVE CALGARY STOCKS, BONDS, ETC.
OIL STOCKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
"Stock Department, Seymour 6913
EXCHANGE BUILDING,  142 HASTINGS WEST
Weel freent, I wunner n yae- hae
been peyin' rauclcle attenshun this wee
while.-}- back tae the dams o' they political felliei back iii i tttawa.
I used iae- think that British Columby hael a monopoly ..' a' ilu- grafters
in Canady, but frae whal I ean see
tin- whole bang jing o' them arc a'
taured wi' the- yae stick.
When I hear the kiddies sing-in' the
"Maple-   Leaf,  oor  emblem  dear,"  e.r,
"i Hi.  Canady,"  I   ofteji  said tae  my-'
-el, "Weel, Sanely,  British  Columby's
only a wee bitty o' Canady, an' while I
tlu-rc micht be a hale lot o' grafters
an' parasites, an' shysters as neet- ain
worthy   Eddie  Gold  wml  say.    here,
that's no' tae say it .-hi. cts the Dominion  as   ,i   whole.     I   wis  aye-   firmly,
convinced in my ain min' that as faur
as bum politeeshians, laml pirates, an'
general criminals were concerned British  Columby  wis easy  the  "banner
province" o' Canaely.
Hooever, if yaell maybe be notlcin'
frae the accounts in the papers o' the
investigasbuns bein' held intae the
graft connected wi' the rotten Units
they made for the sodgers, the knock-
kneed cuddles they bocht, an' Ihe big
CommisshuHS (a kin' o' fancy name
fur graft) that hae been hattndeil oot,
a' miner the guise o' pailriotism, a
fellie 11 BUtte neeel tae revise liis estimate o' Canady as a whole.
I can aye min' in the auld country when we wcre speakin' o' Canady
an' the Canadians, oor langwidge t< >'> 1<
��� en quite a sacred sort o' soon'. The
folk at hame had sic a great opeenyin
o' the Canadian's honesty that they
were aye kin' o' scared that they grafters owre in tiie States wud maybe
"slip wan over" on oor virtuous bri-
thcrs.
The average auld country man aye
leiokit ilium Canady as bein' lhe hame
o' men where graft an' shady politics
were   unknown.
Afore I go ony further, I want tae
say that the opeenyin i had o' tlle
folk o' Canady at hame as bein' honest, hard-workin' people basnic altered a partickle, but when 1 come tae
think o' her political life an' her politeeshians���ach, they wud scunner the
deil himsel', ��
I dinnie ken muckle o' Canady's
past political history, an' maybe it's
a guid jpb. My "schulcin'" didnie goi
faur enough for that. I wisnie very
faur past the bit in history whaur
Robert the Bruce killed that big son-
of-a-gun De Ilohun on the field o'
Bannockburn when I wis removed tae
anither sphere o' usefulness, as the
ministers say, an' acquired the art o'
balancin' a grocer's basket on my pow
so that my haun's wud be free tae
baud the "penny blood" 1 wud be
studyin'.
Hooever, that's naither here nor
there, but this talk aboot ha'en a
Dominyin eleckshun at the present
time seems tac me tae be the worst
crime o'  them a'.
While oor brave lads are volunteer-
in' tae go tae the front, while the yins
that are at the front are nobly layin'
doon their lives in defence o' Canady
an' the mither laund, oftentimes sac-
rificin' lucrative posts (a fancy name
for a common, everday job hcrel, no'
tae count on the wives an' bairns semie
o' them are leavin' abint���we fin' oor
politeeshians planum' an' schemin' an'
pleettin' no' as tae hoo they can assist
Canady an' help the auld country, but
solely occupyln their mill's as tae hoo
they can save their skins by bringin'
on an eleckshun at this time. Of
course it's obvious tae onybody that
the flag eeeir lodgers are fechtin' for
on   the   battlefield   '11   be   us.-el   at   Ihis
eleckshun tae cover up a' the misdemeanours o' they dons.
If yae had been readin' the newspapers, yae wud hae noticed that they
spent very near a whole week argyin'
as tae whether the men at the front
wud be entitled tae vote1
Noo, of the- crazy, fat-heided things
I ever heard tell o'. the sodgers votin' at the front is sharely the limit.
1 could haurdly bring mysel tac believe that men, peyed by the nashun
tac look efter its affairs, could mak
themsels  sao  ridiculous.
Hooever, they decided the sodgers
wud be entitled lae vote, an' accord-
in' tae a later despatch, the ballot
boxes wcre a' ready tae be shipped
tac Flanders tac be held in readiness
for the sycological meenit when they
considered it wud be the best time tae
go tae the country.
1 dinnie ken if the sodgers at the
front 'II hae reael o' the graft that bas
been eairried on sin the start o' the
war. If they hae, I can jist imagine
.their fcelin's an' boo they'd be wishin'
they had some o' the rascals in the
trenches  opposite them.
While they wud be shocked at the
wey the country had been robbed wi'
the grafters, their opeenyins. 1 fancy,
on this votin' bizness wud be mare in
the nature o' intense disgust.
It's the maist disgraccfu' thing T
ever heard o' yet comin' frae ony self-
respectin' body o' men as oor politeeshians claim themsels tae be. Fancy askin' men doin' their duty noblv
at the front, never kennin' the meenit
when their number '11 be ca'd, tae go
an' record a vote so tbat some bunch
o' mealy-moothcd politeeshians micht
bc able tae fatten themsels at theirs
an'  their  wives  an'  bairns  expense.
T can jist imagine what a fine job
they fellies wnd hae that wud be goin'
roon wi' the ballot boxes. T can also
imagine f Sep Ceneral French passin'
by at the time, an' tellin' them tae get
Sanely js completely scunnered at the political
jobbery   practeceeee]   in   Canaely
lae-   Ii    ei,e|   ,,'   there,     sentyments
"hich the- Canadian lodgers I'm share
wud cordially e ndot ie.
It's  enieiigh  tae  mak  a  fellie  hang
his he-id in' -hame. Thc while oor
lads arc gien their lives eer their bluid
in defence o1 hearth an' hame an' in
an attempt tae crush tyranny, a bunch
ee' politeeshians are only concerned
as tae hoo thev ean gel (hem lae endorse their candidature so that they
micht be able tae still cairry on the
rotten  state- ..' affairs.
Thre's a time for everything, an'
sharely lae- gudeness this i-. nae time
feer an eleckshun. an' the battlefield
nae place for recordin' a political vote.
1 aye thocht Dicky McBride, Wullie- Bowser an' the vest o1 the miserable' bunch that Compose the liritish
Columby legislature were heid yins
in the artful dodgery bizness, but I
can see while- they're as bad as they're
ca'd, an' maybe wurser as the schule
laddie wud iay, they hae ye-t lome
pints tae pick up as tae hoo lae run
all   eleckshun.
Wullie an' Dick hae made a sorry
mess o' this last venture o' theirs, an'
1 dinnie think onybody hae ony true
doobts as lae the punishment that's
in  store   for  them.
The sutler the honest, self-rcspeetin'
feelk in Canady get roused up tac their
duty tae themsels an' the country, the
suiter will Ihey bring aboot happiness
an' prosperity tae Ihis misguided
launil.
It's time Canady wis riddin' itsel
o'  thc   politeeshians   that
" . . Sum up man's whole duty���
Heaven,  Hell an' Number Tine."
Yours through the heather,
SANDY MACPHERSON.
New Telephone Directory
The May edition of the 1!. C. Telephone Company's official directory,
not yet fully distributed, contains as
an altogether new feature a splendid
article on "Accident Prevention and
First Aid." Special attention is paid
to tlle treatment .to be accorded in
cases of electric shock. One paragraph deals with the use of the pttl-
motor, while in bold face type the
announcement is made that these instruments are to be found in the Vancouver city ambulance and at thc
General   Hospital,
Instruction is also given as to what
should bc done when a fallen aerial
wire is encountered. Several illustrations lend additional value to the
article.
In no more convenient place than
the ubiquitous telephone book could
information of this sort be placed,
and probably the very novelty of its
coming from such an unusual source
will bc the cause of its being read by
more people than any other agency
could have insured.
The B. C. Telephone Company has
performed a great public service, as
even the valuable work of the St.
John's Ambulance Corps has never yet
succeeded in bringing so emphatically
before every individual this most necessary knowledge.
The article itself is brief and to the
point.    Its advice is from the highest
DID EDITOR LIBEL SAM
SHARPE;ACTION AGAINST
UXBKIDGE MAN
Uxbridge,   April   18.    Mr.   Tl
Gowans, the editor and proprietor of
"The Uxbridge Journal," was committed    foi    trial    by    Magistrate    Thollla-
Foster   oi   Canuington   yesterday  on
charges oi publishing defamatory libel, preferred by Major Sam Sharpe,
M P. for North Ontario. Bail was
granted The hearing was hehl in the
market hall, whieh was crowded, His
legal partner. Mr. II. I'. Cooke, represented Major Sharpe, while Mr.
Ceorge \ Sedgwick, of the firm if
Beatty, Blackstock, t'e.wan, Faiken!
& Chadwick, of Toronto, looked after!
Mr.  Gowans' interests.
Ariticles Complained of
A week ago Friday Mr. Gowans
formally admitted thai it was he- who
published the extracts tee whieh Ma-
jeer Sharpe has taken objection. The
hearing, however, was adjourned at
that point until today. The- extracts
in question are:
"The Wall Street Journal prints a
story, evidently supplied that journal,
of six hundred officers flunking after
enlisting in the first contingent.
Wall street is wreing this timi'. There
I was emly em.' officer who flunked ami
ran home, and that was the membci
fe r North Ontario and be got as far
as Hot Springs under the Stars and
Stripes "
This  was published on  April  1. anil
forms  the subject of the  first  charge, i
Again   on   April   8   the   following  appeared  in the Journal, under  the caption. "N'eete's and Comments":
"Why should he run from Valcartier?    My goodness, he had a  pass."
"Majeer   S.   Sharpe.   reputedly   L.   1,.
1!..   says   he   diel   not   run   from   Val
cartier.  only  took   the   fastest  train."
Remembers  Major   Sharpe  was  there
Captain A. C. MacFarlane, an officer in the Canadian Militia, and
manager of the Standard hank at
Canninglon. said that the complainant was senior Major In tbe 34th Regiment. Witness was at Valcartier in
the capacity of Paymaster, and remembered that Major Sharpe was
there in uniform. Valcartier was a
mobilization camp and was em a war
footing. Witness was showm the article in  The Journal of April   1.
"To whom does that refer?
presume it refers to Major
Sharpe."
Under cross-examination by
Sedgewick, Captain Mcl'arlane
ed that Major Sharpe had been attached to one of the brigades mobilized f'ir foreign service at Valcartier.
"Do you know why Maj��r Sharpe
didn't   go   to   the   front?"���"No,   sir."
"Have you heard of Major Sharpe
having any disputes witb senior officers or with the   Minister of Militia?"
Mr. Cooke objected to the question, and in an ensuing legal debate
Mr. Sedgewick declared tbat the complainant had to prove that Major
Sliarne was on April 1 a member of
tiie Expeditionary Force and a member of the House.
Tin- questman wa- diiallow<ed on the
ground that it was a matter "f here-
lay, but when Mr. fee..!., asked whether witness hail e.i his own ktnew-
ledge learned eef any such dispute, the
answer was iu th,- negative.
In asking for commitment eef Mr.
Gowans, Mr. Cooke contended ihat
publication was ill that was necessary to warrant a trial of the
anil that stn h publication was proved by Jobbett's evidence. He referred i" the paragraphs themselves as
a gross ami indecent insult ami to
Mr, Ce.uate.' conduct in publishing
llie in   ,<-  el.-isi .irelh .
Position  of  Defence
Defence alleged thai there had been
no liability tee cause a breach "f the
peace and thus justify criminal pro-
e e e dings, ami that, while the complainant in a libel action bad to be
injured in his calling, it li.nl ne.t been
shown that Mr. Sharpe- was at present either a member of the1 militia
or the- House of Commons, the callings mentioned in the information.
Mr. Gowans saiel In- had nothing t��� >
iay; ami defence offered nee objection
io a commitment <-ti the- second
charge, relating t.e tin- paragraph
published 'en April 8.
'I'he accused was admitted tei bail
��� ei" $I.(khi ,ei, , ach charge, half eef his
own bond in each ease and half oil
the bond -.1   Mr. W.  II.  Kellar.
��� I
Sam
Mr.
stat-
LOOK OVER LAST WINTER'S
GARMENTS
If vni did not hav�� your Rarmpnts
cleaned before you pul tbeffl away for
the summer gel them out now. Every
dress suit or overcoat that '������ nol worn
threadbare you  ihould  Knd  to  us  for
DRY  CLEANING   AND   SAVE
CLOTHING BILLS
Our    perfect    cleaning      ami       repairing
lervlce ii the moil wonderful aaver <>(
"new elothei money" on earth because it
will keep every garment in iti new
beauty until worn <"it.
Pan-Co-Vesta Club
Seymour   2834 547   HOWE   STREET
Blue Funnel
Motor Line
VANCOUVER to
NEW   WESTMINSTER
Cars leave 410 Seymour Street
(Cor. Hastings and Seymour) every 10 minutes, connecting with our
car leaving 744 Columbia Street,
New Westminster, for Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Port Hammond, Port Haney, Langley Prairie, Aldergrove, Abbotsford, Chilliwack and other points on the Yale
Road.
Modern, large roomy cars. Careful and experienced drivers.
Phone Seymour 1615
COAL!    COAL!
OUR POLICY is to supply only fuel of the highest grade. We pay
special attention to screening and weight, and delivery is made by our
own experienced drivers.
WOOD
We also have a small quantity of dry kindling wood for sale.
MacDONALD, MARPOLE CO., LTD.
Phone Seymour 210 427 SEYMOUR ST., City
Is 60
Dollar
Cents on the
worth Saving?
You Can Do It --- Travel on Tango Tickets
32 Rides at
5 cent fare
$1.60
HERE'S HOW!
32 Rides on     Your saving on
Tango Tickets    $1  Investment
$1.00    60 cents
Tango Street Car Tickets ��� Good for Continuous
Ride within City Limits of Vancouver--Non Transfer
���8 for  25 cents, will be placed on sale by B. C.
Electric on Monday, May 10 SUNDAY. MAY 9, 1915
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
THRE
STOVEWOOD
14 inch inside fir
$2 ��P per load $2-��Q
Coast Lumber & Fuel Co., Ltd.
Phone Fair. 2500        Phone High. 226        Phone Fraser 41
The Cost of Operating  Electric
Household Appliances is
Merely Nominal.
The actual cost of current for Electric  Household Appliances is
out of all proportion t'e the comfort  and  convenience  provided,
being especially  true during the summer months.
Look over this tabic of hourly cosl  of operation.
Coffee Percolator Electric Washer
3'/2   certs   per   hour tlectnc   Iron 3   cents   per   hour
Electric Grill 4 �� 5h��^ts Electric Toaster
4 to 514 cents per hour 5  cents  per hour
N.B.���Appliances used for cooking arc operated only a fraction of
an hour per meal. The cost of others depends upon the duration
of their use.
Wc will  lee.' pleased to demonstrate these appliances at our salesrooms.
B. C. ELECTRIC
Carrall and Hastings St.
1138 Granville St.  (near Davie)
The
Telephone
THE ADVANCE AGENT OF
Comfort and Convenience
FORMS  A  CLOSER  UNION  OF  HOME,
BUSINESS AND FRIENDS.
FOR A LIMITED TIME, BUSINESS AND
RESIDENCE TELEPHONES WU,!. BE
INSTALLED UPON PAYMENT OK $5.00
RENTAL IX ADVANCE.
FOR PARTICULARS CALL UP
SEYMOUR ('070.
CONTRACT DEPARTMENT
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH   TICKETS  ISSUED
FROM  VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
[     JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
W
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass. Agent, Vancouver.
"British Columbia Is Hung Up By Seat of the Pants"
Waiting For Ottawa To Take It Off The Hook-
Some Inside Political Information Written
Exclusively for the " Chinook. "
By H. F. GADSBY
''^,^^^^^^^^^^YffififiWJw^w\\\\w
���
���
���
Ottawa, May 6���1 nd  at
B
'|l,,e.
-mli. I   "i 'I"'
"��������� nch   ihat   th,-  mom
they  came iu  on  is  the  month theyl,he
n, thi   ;. :t)  : as sei -
eral  othe rea iring
i mher.     Bj    thai   time   the.   war
will bi   ovei  oi ���  ii ivill be
nd rill le.' caught
the- rebound.    Tl e sei relief will
lee    ���        eat I        i anada   wil!  n I
tin   i       ervativi    G to po
tt e i h   spite 'ei :��� mings. Tl
���
flex  action  of  public  i pinioi, is 1
ing  I iwll;   | ;     ���      pyscho
��� Ilabil ��� ind i part)
al large, The Honorable Bob Rogers,
whe, i- ie,i a psychologist bul a plain
nits an election �� hen he- want- it and "eet threi
month    afterwards, that   :',:-  is
all piffle.    I le- hasn'l much use for an
outfit of ps) is  who can'l  r< -
the   p ij I     moment
��� hey sec it.
All   sorts  e.f  arguments   have  been
mploj      i    persuadi   the  Ministci  i
Public  W'e.rks  that   Scpti mbi r  i-  the
me .ina ol destiny  ''in  to all sui h arts I     had  substantially  ri plied:
"Why  eliel you  n aki   me   Minister of
Public  W'e-rl -  if you didn'l  trusi
lo  know  when  t i  ��ork   lhe  public?"
Which i- a riddle that  lakes a li i ������'���
reading.     Thc   Minister     of     Public
Works, -    lhe Hi mi erabli   Bob at
in rally put there to keep I is - ,,-
li   th,   gn mid     i I ���  iw  ��[len it's time
lo back up and when it'- time I - -���
out and holler.    He may be short o:
ami) -ne] tin grafl taril
worse they ��ill feel againsl  the  Be r-
Govei :       The     Hone
Hob's  political instil
portunit)   by  tin
flow i-r   victory   from   Ihe   m ttie
. 'I  il iwe r. by the
nettle   1
pinion   in  the  country
. aiie-t   him,   not   ie-   mention   the
I ltd     iv I and repre
sents deci i       and  a   numbi r
that.    It is ii
able that  His Royal I lighn ��� . v
erncd \t ith   the  dignil j
Empire     nd tl
of Canada than he is ��ith ll
if either party -
- -ral election be-
[on   the ii-:- ( 'r the un erg
Tin   I inl. e- doi -  i   '
himh] [ing
\- thc lists fe r ���
lee' ready bi fore July, a June
is   said   to   be   oul   of   the   >iu
pcopli   say   Bob migl 1 i       ell
��� :���       ���        I'i ��� ���
Meanwhile   he   has   hired
I ��� tig It U|
,    e
fullll 55   ill   anl
'
rn various wa; Boh
has tried I    ru
their feet.    If they li-i' it lo tin   |
lecetit
.,   da againsl nn election in war time, al
 Hi: .
P_e^^Hl
���
'
I
-    'ele   kd   "
'
I '    :
a   quizzi
.   , ��� ...
I' ���
insidious
h   le, coi rent     daily
- ���      : lai   to taki les    f tin
Idii rs at the from
ticable  :: ,
���  ���'     British
foffi
distractioi might sla
nterfen
-    ������  j.  absurd       thi
I'licrs woul their      ead
long charge -    i   the   Gel mans lo di ��� :���
a ballot for cai didates      I  name
i sues they know nothing about.    The
dul)  of tl
let, gel balle I of t;:'
���    . t (ji rman
I
.
I:  .
boxi     ""t
ballot
���   : -
leae'k
not rii
irrmam      Phi   only
tence. a bal-
i en ��� f-
���     . ears to the
parties  and the
A'hite with
tnd  i 'i'i*   bal
lot    I SUPP    Sed     it     -lie.lllll     le.      Il-l el.
buiil      ���    var coi ditii iris.
Tl ���    ���: ini ground  that  the
it the fr :.!   k ii!  vote���-when
et  1      e.   bul   not   luie ro     If
by   September,   there
may be an el I. If they don't
iiit- b)  Sepli mbi  , the re may l>c
or there may not.    Me v -
while   the   casualty   lis:.-   continue   to
.n and it would bi   an insult to
' e m  ii'  the
e . t-iit.     There    :s
babl)    nobod)   in   I lanada -
.- e':.  ,i  \ ie v
their effect on  the voter-'  list-.
psychology but  he i.s long on human |sn '" I1"' s"'! -mrl11 Y"K'C "' "f1'1"
nature.    He can    Iwa       ell  when thi   "   '    ' :
boys arc hungry and  when it's hard!""1  promised anvthn
imi
In
I"  hold tin-in  in  line any  longer   His
lintance  i-  with  the   workei
flic  party  and  the  workers  natui
inform liim when tin   chain   ��� are besl
lo   turn  another  trick.     A h)   is   lln
Honorable  Bob Minister of  !.'
ex  officio, ii hi- advice is not  taken?
It's a sore touch for  Bob     He saw a
chance gi t ley lasl  fall.    I - lie t i ... e
one go  glimmering?
By virtu,- of liis position a
ing housi  of party pi liti ���-. tl    Minis-1
ie r  eef   Public   Works   faci -  the  f:   I
and  faces  lh - ���   " u'l:, ���    ,--,-   Ri
chard   McBride   visited   I Ittawa    nol
long  ago,  !,'���  hii
homing   pigi on   to   Bi ib   Rogi r's   - f
flee.    AIM: mgh  Iir had business with -
thc other Bob who 1
ment, he saw Bob Iv gers first.    I'I
the tn " Bobs go) , ���   thu - mak- j
pair   of  B.ol       md  th
Sir  Richard thai  il  ��as  g ling
hard sledding and  th il  hc  had '
e '���   :���      foi   amithi :
British Coin
niiel nol do bettct  fi ir thc I'
lives and would
it started s Thit
why   British  C '';'1  iia  :-    una
���
''..e.i. ely 1
the hoi k.
Similarl). been  tl
��������� .    Hoeiorahl     B    ���
tales   of   v
I till
from  Ihe  Roblin  Govi
ivuhblin ;  maj
have   w irn
Bob  Roger's ii
it is that l
���
is in
'
Dr. M
R
iu
it   will   ' a  Royal  (
sion  i"  im' stigati   grafl   in   tin
parliameu    buiidii ���        ��� 11
�� ill last, accordin H
calculations jusl aboul as ' n
, r doi s in ,i i ertain | I
! mentioned on the railwa) timi tables
There was some very coars: work
done up there and Sir Rodmot d R ���:���
Iin would never have price', into ii if
the Lieutenant Governor, who is a
Liberal, hadn't pushed him al it. Rumour has it that tlu' Honorable Bob
is so little sure oi liis popularity in
Winnipeg that he lias offered to take
over Sharpe's seal in Lisgar if Sharpe
should be disposed to retire from public life. The point is that the Winnipeg bunch who claim to have learned their tricks from Bob, are looking
fe.r a goat and Reib may be it. On the
other hand, the Honorable Bob is not
a man wlm waits for punishment.
Like the Germans, he wants to begin
the drive first.
Common sense, as you will observe,
is with the Honorable Bob in desiring
an election befure the Borden government  gets one black  eye  in  Manito-
���
have   not   sei
���
breaks.       The)
bul '
That 1
i  lime limit. The
Mill;-' !    "
.     ��� \1 icawbel
.
turn   up.     1 ns   -
��� :
lection, Imi  if nol  S  ���
Tl   ���
3 nea     s
it.
ni I
the   ' ; "injus-
SMITH MOTOR WHEEL
CAN BE ATTACHED TO ANY BICYCLE,
CANOE OR ROWBOAT
Mosl economical, using only 1 gallon of ga; lini ry 90
miles. Speed frum 4 to 30 miles per hour. V/i h.p. engine.
Automati    i 'iler, intal ��� e, magm I \n;.  om
iperate in ! ride a bicycle.
Ask for Demonstration and Booklet of same
HASKiNS & ELLIOTT
BICYCLE SHOP
y,b HOWE STREET
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HAIL
Cor. 30th Avenue and M-^in Stree-t
Comfortable Hall for nublic meetings,  dances,  etc.,  to  Let
Apply  W   J.  STOLLIDAY
34  32nd  Avenue
nt i I, ]
Poultry  Keepers
i ���. ���
"B&B"
Poultry Spice
Glazed Cement
Sewer Pipe
MADE IN'^
mm
'���: S   ile
city whei      ts
lervice
and has durability.
Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.
I5S  FROM   STREET  WEST Phone  Fairmont   122
And   ECC
ij CEK
teeni.-.   Pi p and
Tried /'.! v
ti
3 lb. sack, <: k, 90c.
100  lb.  sack.  $12.00
Manufactured in Vancouver.    Sold
Everywhere
TERMINAL   CiTY   IRON    WORKS
El :
i
i HON  AN;e   . .NGS
KANTS  AN"
REPAIRS OF ALL  DESCRIPTION'
flttlHK
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General  Agency  Transatlantic  Steamship  Lines
C. E. Jenney, G. A. P. D.
Phone:  Sey. 8134 527 Granville Street
Fireproct Columbarium and -Receivint Viultl
b Day .nd Nitht - '      -,-Ser. 2425
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS
Vancouver���Office  anil  Chapel:   1034 Granville St.      Phone Sey. :>486
North  Vancouver���Office and  Chapel:  122 Sixth St. W.      Phone 134
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can   supply  your   needs   at   right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right  at  Station)
MAPLE LEAF DAIRY
PURE PASTURIZED MILK
We are Milk and Butter Specialists
A. Tommason, Mgr. Phone Bay. 1417
1935-2nd AVE. WEST
A phone call will have prompt attention
Fourth.   New Westminster   Regiment,  now  away at the Iront FOUR
BRITISH COLUMBIA CHINOOK
SUNDAY.  MAV 9, 1915
The Panama Pacific Exposition Excursion Company
HAVE   ARRANGED FOR THE STEEL-BUILT SCREW
STE wn-'.K "CAM! 'SIN" TO MAKE THE
Trip to The World's Fair
and Return
During months of June and July, occupying in all 18 days, with all the
comforts of an hotel, including meals, sleeping accomodation, giving
you 9 days in San Francisco.
$60.00 1 Telephone Seymo^T2818 9440 |   $75.00
BOOK AT ONCE WITH
The Panama Pacific Exposition Excursion Co.
53 HASTINGS STREET WEST. VANCOUVER, B.C.
WOMEN'S EXCHANGE
Cor. DUNSMUIR and HOWE
Light Lunch Served from  12 till 2
I
International Correspondence Schools
W. H. Coulter, Mgr.
H
Room 10, Burns Block
18 Hastings Street West
Keeler's Nursery
Grower and Importer of Plants, Bulbs, Roots and Shrubs
Cut Flowers and Design
Work  a  specialty.
Flowering and Ornamental Shrubs for Spring and
Fall  planting.
One  hundred  varieties of
Roses  of  Choice  Sorts
and  three  hundred varieties   of   Dahlias.
Phone Fairmont 817
I   YOU WILL FIND OUR PRICES MODERATE
Cor. FIFTEENTH AVE. and MAIN ST  ::  MOUNT PLEASANT
VIOLIN EXPERT
Old and valuable violins carefully repaired.
Guitars and mandolins repaired. Bows reliaired.
Violins  bought.
JAMES TAYLOR
531  RICHARDS ST. Phone   Seymour  3415
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   D��AN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
MONDAY AND TUESDAY,
May 24 and 25
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
"A duel's amang > t takin' notes,
An'  faith he'll  prent  it."���Burns.
Whal hai ce,nie' over tbat lauve
knight, Sir Richard McBride, nominal
premier oi British Columbia? Recently he dissolved parliament, announced nn election as pending, then
"Folded his tent like- th.-  ?rabi
And   lilently   sie ele.-   awav."
We   have' vaguely  heard "i him in
New  Veerk. then in the' metropolis I'i
tlle-     Empire,    wlle-He'e'.   1],-    ha*    ~eT.t    11.
modcit reminders thai  be still exists.
Has he gone feer g I?    Is ilu- place
that knew him tee kn<iw   him n<> more?
Tbe  Looker-On  imagines thai  ii be
can  feather a nesl  elsewhere  he has
���haken  tlle- llllst   eei   11.   C.   frum   his   iee!
Perhaps he has sensed the' itorm rising in tiie pie,vine against his policy
thai has passed the cream 'ef our re-
-.���iire.s in land, minerals and timber
into the hands e.f speculators and alienated for ever the pee.pie's heritage. Or may it be that he obtained
an advance copy of the Ministerial
L"nieen's pamphlet just issued, containing ihat tremendous Indictment of the
policy eef himself and colleagues with
respect to the natural resources nf lhe
Province, and found ii such a facer
that he fled? In any case that categorical ami weighty indictment bas
goi tee be faced hy the accused government. The matter can't rest.
Prompt steps must lie taken feer and
by the people of this Province for
the appointment of a non-partisan
commission by the Dominion government tee probe the matter t" ils deepest depths. The Lookcr-On strongly
urges every elector tei possess himself nf a copy of this pamphlet,   It is
entitled "The Crisis in B. C; An Appeal for Investigation." It is isMicel
by tlle Ministerial Union 'if the Lower Mainland nf B, C��� anel ean be obtained from E. C. Appleby, -438 Richards Street. Vanceeiiver. It is an eye-
opener. The matters dealt with in
the pamphlet arc too important and
serious t'i he ignored. The names attached to the Indictment and the documentary evidence produced absed-
utclv forbid this.
It may be that the more acute stage
in our unemployment problem has
now heen passed. The bread line has
ceased and many of the casual workeri
have departed for "pastures new." At
thc same time there are, and will be feir
some time, many eif our own citizens
men with family and home responsibilities, who will continue tn fin:! difficulty in keeping the "grub-pail"
reasonably replenished, Therefore now
i.s the time f'ir every bit of civic work
which has been authorized, and feer
which money bas been appropriated,
tie be set in in,itiein. The Looker-On
kneevvs ni more than one such enterprise which ought tee be set agoing
forthwith, heir example. Last year
plans were adopted by the city council for the construction of a causeway
across Coal Harbor at the' Georgia
entrance tu Stanley I'ark tn replace
the present broken-down bridge. A
In-law was duly passed and the money appr.ipriated, $135,(XW. Why has
this work been hung up? Because thc
money has been spent upon work mher than lhat for which the ratepayers
voted il and the' council is wailing until it can be replaced from some more
eev less uncertain 'seeuree- such as the
sale "I bunds. The Looker-On questions llie legality ni this melheeel .ef
handling iln- public money. In any
case is is an undesirable method.
When the' ratepayers vote money for
a   Specific   purpeise'.   il   should   be   im-
'���!'���   tu   diverl    it   !'���   any   olher
channel, except with their direct sain--
in. Yem mustn't play fast anel lo se
in this fashion wiih llie rate) ave- -
decisions,     Weill   this   work   fi   the
causeway   should   HOW    H"   e.n       |i    ,s
much  needed at  present  in    furniih
w.irk fen- unemployed citizens
In connection witli this t'.eal Harbor causeway scheme, a scandalous
transaction took place which, as it in-
volvei iln- public In me ,r nt' Vancouver,
she.uld be nailed down in the counter     Of     pUbliC     'ipillieell     feel'     (I ellll C 111 II a -
tion by every right-minded citizen  ���."
lhe- end lhat  -neb  thing-  should never
be   repeated,    C petitive   plans   feir
the scheme were called fur at tIti-
linn- frum local anil outside architects. Elaborate plans were prepared
,it  considerable cust and sent  in  by
many architects eef eminence fremi far
and near. It was expected by the
professi n that nne ur Other "i these
plans would be accepted as is the
custom in all honest e-um]ieiiiie us.
Whai was iln surprise anel indignation
of the whe ih- profession when it
learned that all these plans were put
aside and another embodying tin' besl
ideas, it is said, of sume eef these
plans, was put forward by mir own
city engineer, Mr. Fellowes, who,
mark you, was supposed to be the
adjudicator mi the competitive plans,
and  this  scheme  was accepted  by  thc
councill If an author nr a preacher
steals another man's ideas and uses
Ihem it is called plagiarism and bc is
fur ever ruled out of bis profession.
Thc whole transaction seems dishonorable tei Vancouver. Thc Looker-On
understands that it was scathingly
animadverted upun at the time in
several Canadian and American architectural journals f .id that our civic
character stanels Somewhat besmirched  in  architectural  circles.    Crooked
ness  never ultimately pays.
The  presence  in  Burrard  Inlet   this
'    M.  S.  Cruiser,  thc  little
'  with   its  accompanying
���alls   her   plucky     and
the early days
week   rif   II.
"Shearwater,
submarine,   rcc
venturesome voyage in ..
of  the  war,  from  the   Mexican   cuast
to   home   waters   at   Esquitnalt.     The
Lookcr-On   confesses  bis  imagination
..ooker-un confesses ms imagination
fas stirred by that hazardous episode,
.t was known that German cruisers
were sweeping the Pacific for prey.
Each hour of tbe long trip every man
must   have   felt   his   life   hung   on   a
been the custom tee smile when tin
Canadian navy is mentioneel. Its insignificance is treated contemptuously. Hut that is not how the Lookcr-
On  views  it.     Each  of these  diniinu-
On   views   it.     Each
'bull-dogs" is a miniature  Queen
live "bull-does is a miniature Queen
Elizabeth. The same fighting spirit.
devotion to duty, and calm facing of
odds  animates  their  crews  from  cap-
Sea  and th
ada blithe   Ol
same.
"The   spirit   ..(  our   fathers   shall   st
nl tin Dardanelles. Give Can-
it a chance and she will hold up
le!    Flag   mi   the   seas   jusl    the
tie.ni every
For  the-  deck
fail!.',   the  .
pie life in thc lieertb until June when,
immediately before thi elections, he
will return and endeavor tei rally the
"Id guard once more.
Has the Government Any Status
Men   thoroughly   familiar   with   the
liritish   Xeerib   America   Aet  anil  Canadian   law   anil   llriti-h   histeery.   aver
that     tlle     Me liriele-     government     'hees
not exist legally. Tluy point oul that
when tin- Lie ute'iiant-Ceiveriiier signed the order iff dissolution after the
I' .-mel (',. E, fight, the McBride government went automatically nut of
existence.
It is known that upon the Sunday
follAving ihe signing .,f the documcnl
Sir Richard McBride, reconsidering
the- matle-r, caused tin paper, then in
reality the order of Ilis Majesty, in be
turn up.
In thii it i- charged that Sir Richard violated the very foundation! eei
iln constitution, and it i- charged that
the- Lieutenant-Governor, by allowing
this proceeding, made himself a party
tee an act which might be properly
styled as treasonable.
No Election for Months
Meantime there- is every certainty
tbat no election will be held fur Bome
meeiiths to come. Prominent McBride
men do not hesitate tu admit lhat the
case is hopeless fur tin Government,
anel that the unly- tactics which ean
be employed arc tin esc which will
merely have the effect of postponing
a- far as possible the- evil day.
SPORTING  TITBITS
The lovers of .port were1 out iu
great force hist Saturday afternoon
in th.' neighborhood of Carleton Hall
when a baseball game playeel by the
local teams iu Collingwood was on
tap. The- enthusiasm shown by the
cr.ewe] presenl augurs well ior the success of iln Collingwood teams in this
line uf sport. The lacrosse team was
.else, onl  ainl had a strenuous practice,
ami from present indication! it hieiks
as if Collingwood will be beard from
in the lacrOSSi u.erM before lhe siiir.-
mer is  far gone.
* * *
Cricket ii much in favor at Central
Park way and last Saturday afternoon
the yuung nnn in their while flannels were out in gieoel force ami en-
joyed ���! splendid afternoon at the "Id
time popular game, Keep it up Central   I'ark   ami   let   us   hear   freun   you
along  this  iin,   during  rlu-    summer
months.
i
The' things a man forgets are those
he wishes he could re-member.
el> * *
Another reason a married woman
dreads death is that she doesn't want
her children reared by her husband's
people.
��� -��-
The- women say Mrs Gib Childers,
who applied for a divorce three- months
after her marriage t" 'ob. had matri-
ni'iny in   lis  varioloid  form .
* * *
Give a man his "rathers" anel he will
ask. for money. Everyone seems to
realize- thc futility e.f the si-arch for
happiness.
* * *
A good many of you will remember
that there was a time when the oid-
fashioned velocipede was considered
a menace to pedestrians.
* e*    ele
Before giving a man crcelit for refusing tee sell himself, find out whether he bad anything that anybody
wanted to buy
CAN A WORKING GIRL LIVE DECENTLY ON $3.00
A WEEK
(Continued from page I)
wave'.
il   was   their   field   of j
ean  was iheir grave." j
The Mystery of a Cabinet
All  the Latest in Motion Pictures
SOUTH HILL PALACE OF
VARIETIES
(Three blocks  south  of Municipal Hall)
ALL THE LATEST WAR SCENES AND BEST OF
MOTION PICTURES
AMATEUR NIGHTS, WEDNESDAYS AND SATURDAYS
While the average man would like
to be ahead, he is pretty well satisfied if he catches up.
The difference between college graduates is that some have opinions and
others an education.
(Special to the CHINOOK)
Vi.': iria.  May x-    Bt il ih
is   M ithout   a   ;.'"���     I til
Since   Leutcnant-Got ei n
,,  the  .1 icumenl     illin
diss ilution of  Pat lianu nl  .1  ci ndition
has   obtained   hen    n< 1 - r   i.i  hn n   in
.my Canadian proi ince since lhe passing   of   the   British   North   America
Act.
< her the entrance to the office of
the- Premier the spiders have- built a
large cobweb. Thi blinds on ihe' windows of the superb suite are drawn
and within the ehist thickens em the
mahogany desks disturbed only by Ihe
ghosts which haunt the place ��� the
ghosts of lost opportunities and the
ghosts eif shady deals which resulted
in the big bread lines in the cities of
Hritish Columbia.
At tbe Parliamenl buildings there
is only one man eif any standing who
remains at his 1 >ost. That man is
Mr. K. E. Gosnell, the veteran journ-
a'.'st, who during the past few years
has been the brains and thc inspiration
of the Government.
Upon Mr. Gosnell's shoulders falls
the burden of the responsibilities of
which should properly bc borne by
Sir Richard McBride. When the
Premier's former secretary ended bis
life with a bullet. Mr. Gosnell, always
faithful to Richard McBride, in victory or defeat, vvas installed as private
secretary. Mr. Gosnell knows more
ahout the affairs of the Province than
���any Cabinet Minister or all of them
combined. In those trying days he is
indeed being allowed full scope for
his knowledge and his  talents.
Sir Richard is still in London. He
cannot say goodbye to Leicester
Square. What his business bas been
there he and his Maker only knew.
Following bis violent quarrel with
Mr. Bowser. Sir Richard's movements
been   1   mj  I  rj   ti
lish Columbia.
Where is Dr. Young?
Thr honorable I Ir. Young, Ministi t
ni Education, has dis ipi cai 1 d from
thi ' apital. I lis �� I" I. ah,,nt, are 1 1
Mr. Bow - r Btati d
'nie,re In- himself left for a destination nol given, that Dr. Young "had
 ��� i" the country."
It is whispered thai Dr Young is
nol likely tee recover from a severe
nervous trouble which ha* been settling 11 ju ni him for the past two years.
It is known that Dr. Young will never again take his seat in the legislature.
Hon.   Mr.   Ellison   in   Retirement
The Hon. Price Ellison has not
been in the capital since he left her in
disgrace last January when bc wired
from Saline.11 Arm, on bis way home,
his resignation  from the Cabinet.
Hon. Mr. Taylor Gone Too
Thc Hon. Thomas Taylor, Minister
of Public Works, has gone to Revelstoke He is endeavoring to patch
up his political fences in that riding.
His whereabouts are known and he
keeps in touch with his department
whatever his other faults may bc.
This might also bc stated of the Hon.
William  R.  Ross.
Where is Mr. Bowser?
Unable to further stand the scorns
of thc opposition and the slurs from
his own party, the falling of the Government, and the general destruction
brought about by recent developments
at Victoria, the Hon, William J. Bowser has gone off to the north woods.
This week'he spoke at Prince Rupert.
He advised close friends that he would
be gone for a month. Mr. Bowser's
health is said to be breaking down under tbe strain and hc will live the sim-
dollars weekly. Of course a girl can exist on seven dollars a week,
for $5.00 or $5.50 weekly will secure board and room at the Young
Women's Christian Association, but how can she buy clothes, shoes,
pay car fari, and the dozen and one little expenses of daily life?
What about amusement? What can she save to meet emergencies,
such as illness or accidents? Remember, too, that many occupations
are 'seasonal,' that is to say, the work lasts only during the season,
which may be for two or three months in spring and as much in the
fall. Another fact for consideration is that even in the best of times
only a limited number of women wage-earners are steadily employed,
the great majority being hired or discharged to meet the exigencies
of the individual business whatever it may happen to be. Some months
there is a rush of orders and girls are taken on; in a few weeks, perhaps, orders fall off and some, or perhaps all, the girls in that particular factory or workshop are discharged.
�� * *
WHITE LAUNDRIES BIG BLUFF
"The White Laundries of Vancouver" have devoted a good
deal of space lately in the newspapers to extravagant claims regarding
big reductions in prices which, upon close examination, prove to be
almost wholly mythical. Lying advertising is the greatest menace
to morals of the day, and the firms who deliberately mislead the
public with claims that have little or no foundation in fact can hardly
be expected to be honest in their dealings with the public nor liberal
in their treatment of the workers they employ.
'When the high-sounding and pretentious claims of 'The White
Laundries of Vancouver' regarding the great reductions they are
favoring the dear public with are carefully analyzed, they prove to
be nothing more than trivial cuts on a few items of laundry work
which are but little in demand during the summer months. On the
great bulk of goods on the list the price remains the same as ever���
that is to say higher, perhaps, than in any city on the continent for
work of the same grade. For those familiar with wages paid employees in The While Laundries of Vancouver,' the following excerpt from a recent announcement of theirs is not merely humorous
but screamingly funny:
" 'Our present low prices arc as low as will permit us ... to pay
employees wages with which they can live up to the high moral standard which our civilization demands.'
"Generous, self-sacrificing employers! Wilh what complacency must they listen to the pastor's sermon on Sunday morning, mentally patting themselves on the back for the liberality with which they
reward their workers. But do not run away with the idea, gentle
reader, that the employees of the 'White Laundries of Vancouver'
drive to work in their own autos, wear silks and satins, sparkle with
diamonds and spend their spare time conning over their bank books.
Some of them do receive as much as $8 or $9 a week, when they are
working, which, speaking broadly, is only part of the time, and this
for back-breaking toil in the midst of intense heat and volumes of
unwholesome steam, with the constant risk of having their Rands badly scorched between the hot rollers of thc machines they are feeding.
"It was Bret Harte who said that for 'ways that are dark and
tricks that are vain, the heathen Chinee is peculiar,' or words to that
effect, but if the printed effusions of the past week may be taken as
any criterion, it seems more tban probable that the Christian white
laundrymen of Vancouver can give their almond-eyed Oriental competitors lessons in sharp practice. In this connection it must specially
be emphasized t>"��t the tactics they are employing in the attempt to
j.:..- .... ' 1 Chinese laundrymen from a field of employment in
which they have always shone (no pun is here intended) is essentially opposed to the British ideal of fair play which has made the
Union Jack respected a-^ '-- -J in all the countries it waves over.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.gvchinook.1-0315487/manifest

Comment

Related Items