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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Jul 18, 1914

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Array TPa&M* CHINOOK
VOL. Ill, No. 10.
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA,   SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1914.
Price 5 cents
South Vancouver Board of School Trustees Will Only Buy
Coal that is Mined under Decent Conditions���They Do
Not Want the Product of Chinese Labor Nor Do They
Want Coal Saturated in the Blood of Persecuted Workmen
Board in Calling for Tenders for Fuel,
Specifies that Preference Will Be Given that
Colliery on Vancouver Island Which Has
Treated Fairly with the Striking Miners
That South Vancouver stands fast for the working man's
rights, and even officially may go on record as opposed to
the greed of the interests, was indicated at the last meeting
of the Board of School Trustees when the question of purchasing coal supplies for the coming winter for the schools
of the district came^up for discussion.
-In the advertisements which are to appear in the newspapers, the Board of School Trustees state that the product
of the Jingle Pot Mine, on Vancouver Island, in view of the
fairness shown by the owners of that colliery in dealing
with the striking miners, will be given a preference over
all other Vancouver Island coal.
The passing of the resolution, giving the Jingle Pot coal
preference, was preceded by a quiet discussion of conditions on the Island.
The attitude has been taken by the members of the
School Board that the workingmen of South Vancouver
owe some consideration to their brothers on Vancouver
.- milfiland, who -ace at present receiving sustenance from the
treasury of the United Mine Workers of America.
South Vancouver does not want coal mined by Chinese,
nor does South Vancouver wish to support any organization of capitalists who are prepared to furnish the municipality with fuel mined at the risk of the lives of workingmen.
The actions of the local school board has created favorable comment throughout the municipality, and in the
stand the members are taking, every right-thinking ratepayer will endorse the actions of the board.
The resolution touching upon the purchase of coal received the unanimous support of the members of the board:
Messrs. C. M. Whelpton, J. C. Hudson, James Campbell,
William Morris and R. H. Neelands.
One of the Greatest of World's
Rivers is North Arm of Fraser
Commission takes Large Party Over the Length of North Fraser
Harbor and Points out Features Which Will Make it Great
Fresh Water Port
Anyone who lias not had the opportunity of cruising up the North
Arm .ef tlie Fraser, from the Gulf
of Georgia to the N'ew Westminster
line, but has observed the river from
various points on the embankment,
has little idea of the possibilities of
the North Arm as a fresh water harbor.
On Friday of last week, piloted by
thc engineers to thc North Fraser
Mariner Commission, Major Leslie
and Colonel Davis, a party of interested ratepayers were taken over the
length of the river on board the
launch  "Talisman."
During thc trip the officials pointed out features of technical interest,
and declared that the condition of the
channel was very much better than
the surveyors had reported some two
years ago. The constant action of
the waters has had the effect of deepening the stream, and now, save for
a portion at the mouth, the North
Arm of the Fraser might carry very
large sea-going ships.
At the mouth of the stream a great
jetty is under the course of construction, and a large gang of men were
found at work. Along the course
of thc stream the harbor commissioners have surveyors at work, planning
the lines of the new harbor which is
to be evolved.
It is little known that South Vancouver is a fishing centre of considerable magnitude. Along the banks
of the river were noticed several
fishermen's villages with the great
nets drying in the sun. There is one
village in Burnaby which is really-
growing to considerable magnitude,
and there the launch drew up while
the genial  secretary of the commis
sion, Mr Vogel, purchased a great
-11rinn salmon from the fisherman.
Signs eel" industrial awakening may
be noticed along the banks of the
Itream. In llurnaby, just at thc boundary line, lhe foundations are going
In for a great shingle mill, which is
being financed by American capital.
At ane.ther point in the vicinity is a
site which lias been obtained by a
facteery concern, whieh will manufacture boxes.
On the river these days traffic
seems to be very thick���particularly
pleasure traffic. On the way back
from the mouth of the stream the
"Talisman" was held up for some
time by a great boom of logs, which
had g.il into such a position that all
traffic was tied up for a time. Within
ten minutes a flotilla of launches
from up and down the river had
gathered at the obstruction. Many
tugs and fishing boats were noticed
in the stream, and all indications
pointed to an early industrial stir on
both banks of the stream.
The trip is one which men interested in the river can scarcely afford
to miss. No idea of the immense
value of the Fraser River to South
Vancouver can be had unless the
stream is traversed from end to end.
In the party were Major Leslie and
Colonel Davis, engineers; ex-Councillor F. E. Elliott, Mr. D. G. Campbell. Mr. G. M. Murray and Mrs.
Murray and Mr. H. B. A. Vogel.
Local Items of Interest
Service on Bodwell Road, between
Main and Fraser streets, will be dis-
continued for abput two weeks ��� >n
account eef paving operations, commencing Friday, July 17th.
��� * *
Mr. Sam. J. Latta, M.L.A., of Go-
van, Saskatchewan, who has been
visiting at Collingwood East, has
been up the N'eerth Coast for the past
twee weeks and has enjoyed the trip
exceedingly well.
e��   *   *
The Collingwood East Methodist
Church will hold their annual picnic
at Second Beach, on Saturday, July
18th. at which will be provided games
and sports and an enjoyable day will
be spent on the water side. There
will be a special car leave Collingwoeid East interurban station at 9
a.m., and returning leave the beach at
8 p.m.
ele    .    *
The Rev. G. C. F. Pringle of Knox
Presbyterian Church, Collingwood
East, is at Agassiz, attending the
presbytery meeting.
* * ���
Mr. W. Spears, of the 5-10-15 cent,
store, Fraser Street, has sold out his
business and retired. Thc business
will be carried on in future by Mr.
A. Gray.
��� * *
At a very enthusiastic meeting held
in the Liberal Club rooms, at 4362
Main Street, on Monday night last,
a strong committee was formed for
ihe purpose of arranging a plan of
organization of the district. The committee will meet every Monday night
in future and repeirt progress. All
members of the club are expected to
attend these meetings and assist as
far as posible.
* * *
Rev. T. R. Peacock, together with
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Todrick, desire to
express their sincere thanks to the
many friends for their manifest
kindness anil sympathy in the h'ettr
eef their bereavement in the death of
Mrs.  Peacock.
Mrs. Falkins, 4769 Gladstone Road,
reports that her house was broken
Into Tuesday afternoon and a diamond ring and two geild necklaces
were   >teelen.
* * *
Water Superintendent McKay re-
porleel that the new 750,000 gallon
tank at Central Park, which is 75 feet
high, now contains 50 feet of water
and so far has shown no signs of
leaks. Mr. McKay expects lo have
the tank filled by Friday.
The new tank is intended for storing water for the high levels in case
of shortage and to give pressure for
fire-fighting. The tank was built at a
cost of about $30,000 by the British
Columbia  Equipment  Company.
e��   *    *
The fire brigade was called out
about 7.30 o'clock Wednesday morning to a bush fire on Sixtieth Avenue
and Prince Edward Street, which was
burning   fiercely,   fanned   by   a   high
wind.
* * *
The school board decided Tuesday
night to call for tenders for the construction of an annex to the Gordon
High School, Fifty-first avenue and
Knight Road, tenders to be in by
July 20.
* * *
Miss J. Mackenzie has been pro-
nieited to the position of vice-principal of the South Vancouver High
School. Miss Mackenzie has been on
the High School staff since the school
was   first  organized.
* * *
The store of G. Goodwin at Thirty-
seventh Avenue and Victoria Drive
is reported to have been entered late
Monday night and $20 taken from the
cash   drawer.
ef    Sl    *
Preparations are being made for
the laying of the corner-stone of St.
Mary's Anglican Church, South Hill,
next month, when it is hoped that the
Duke and Duchess of Connaught will
be present t.e take part in the ceremony. The foundation work of the
new church is being done by voluntary labor.
Members of the South Hill Presbyterian Church are congratulating
Mr. and Mrs. Conacher of 5216 Fraser Street on the birth of a son, on
Sunday, July 12.
Death of Mrs. Peacock
With the death at Central Park
Friday last of Mrs. T. R. Peacock, a
cloud    "f   sadness   settled   npe>n   the
community, Mrs. Peacock was the
second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.
II. Todrick, highly-respected residents of Central Park, and pioneers
in that portion of Greater Vancouver. Mr-. Peacock was the wife of
the Rev. T. K. Peacock of Chase. B.
C, feir several years a well-known
Seiulli Vancouver clergyman. She-
was  e.ne of nine  children,  and  her
death is the first break in the Tod-
rick  family  circle.
The funeral was held from the residence of the father Monday afternoon to Mountain   View   cemetery.
The large cemcourse of friends who
turned eiut to pay their last respects
testified to the esteem in which thc
young woman  was  held.
Mrs. Peacock is survived by her
husband and a little girl of two years
of age. She was twenty-seven years
of age and was born at Wawanessa,
Manitoba.
The funeral services were in the
hands of the Rev. John Knox Wright
of Vancouver; the Rev. Mr. Pringle
of Collingwood, and Rev. J. Richmond Craig, Central Park Presbyterian  Church.
Referring to the late Mrs. Peacock,
the Rev. John Hughes, Langley
Prairie Presbyterian Church, made
the following reference in his memorial sermon at Central Park last
Sunday:
"As you all know, our congregation meets this morning under the
shadow of a sore bereavement. A
gentle mother, a devoted wife eif a
former esteemed pastor, and a beloved daughter and sister of one of
the most respected and loyal families has, after a long illness, borne
with Christian patience and fortitude.
been called to her reward. Mrs. Peacock was personally known to all in
this neighborhood as a lady of gentle and retiring mind It was here
she grew up; this was her home, and
you all were her friends. Even our
church   had   many   associations   that
were hallowed and dear to her. For
was it not in your midst that she bad
worked s.i faithfully and so unobtrusively for the Master, who has now
called   her  tei  His  high  service.
"Her pure and beautiful life was
she.rt. as years go. And the path
among which she was called to fol-
l"�� was at the end weary and long.
Hut her spirit was ever bright and
cheerful, and  her  steadfast  hope an'l
j restful confidence in life were inspirations to all whose privilege it was
I to wait Upon her.
"The fragrance and sweetness of
her short life will linger long with us.
and will surely quicken us tei more
generous and unselfish service. As
incense il will rise before emr memories, reminding us that the time is
short, and that for many of us the
day may be already far spent and
night even at hand. Therefore, let
us, at this solemn hour, seek com-
feert in the things which neither toil
nor suffering can reach, and which
are obtainable only from our Father
which art in Heaven through Jesus
Christ our Lord.
"Our hearts will assuredly go in
loving Christian sympathy and affection tei the bereaved and sorrowing
family in the hour of their grief and
mourning, let us in the true spirit
of brotherly love commend them to
the competent tenderness and care
of Him who alone can bind up the
broken-hearted and who can give
beauty for ashes, oil of joy for
mourning, and the garment of praise
for the spirit of heaviness.
"They sorrow not as those who
have no hope. Their trust and con-
fielence is in the eternal plans of Him
who has given immortality to the
mortal and gathered to Himself the
treasure eif his heart.
"Her day has come, not gone;
Her sun has risen, not set;
Her life is now- beyond
The reach of death or change.
Not ended, but begun;
Oh, noble soul! Oh. gentle heart!
Hail and  farewell."
Magnificent Stone Arch Adds to
Primeval Beauty of Central Park
Commissioners Have Been Making Changes and Central Park is
Now the Mecca for Great Picnic Parties from all over Province
Central Park, that 240 acres of
woodland and meadow at the boundary line of South Vancouver and
Kingsway, is being wrought into the
most delightful park grounds on the
Pacific Coast.
This season has witnessed many
improvements of the property, outstanding among which is the construction of a massive stone entrance, facing on Kingsway, the
architectural lines of which are of a
character which fits in pleasantly
with the landscape. This arch has
cost in the neighborhood of $3,000,
and the building of it has added materially to the appearance of the park.
During the summer, twelve acres
of land have been cleared by the commissioners, preparing the way for a
great area of tennis courts, bowling
greens, quoiting grounds and a green
upon which all the youngsters of the
community may disport themselves
to  their  heart's  content.
In portions of the grounds, under-
brushing has heen carried out and
throughout the \.-hole park, odds and
ends have been gathered up and
burned, seats have been built, band
stands have been painted, fences
placed in good condition, and Central Park has been placed in a neat
and  well-groomed  condition.
To the park commissioners,
Messrs Stride, Eugene Cleveland, J.
B. Todrick. Thomas Sanderson and
Chairman Sprott, much credit is due
for the good work they are doing.
It is understood that the building of
the entrance arch has been financed
by the commissioners by the disposal
of a narrow strip of land fronting
upon the car tracks to the B. C. E. R.
Company, allowing the company to
improve its grade at that point, and
incidentally refunding off a portion
of the park frontage to the mutual
advantage of the commissioners and
the company. In the transaction,
sufficient "boot" was given the commissioners to permit of financing the
erection of the new arch and the
masonry joining it upon  either  side.
During the summer many thousands of people have taken advantage
of the cool recesses of Central Park.
Picnics are held there every day, and
the place is becoming a really popular picnic grounds. Some of the
picnic parties which will visit Central Park during the remainder of the
season are the Masons, several Vancouver church picnics, and the Conservative picnic, a large annual affair.
It is planned by the commissioners to officially dedicate the new entrance upon the visit to British Columbia in August of the Hon. Sir
Robert Borden, Premier of Canada.
Sir Robert, it is planned, will be the
guest of honor at a great celebration
to be held at the park, which will be
absolutely non-partisan in character,
when the reeves and municipal officials and other dignitarie-s freim ail
peirtions of Greater Vancouver will
be invited to do honor tc the Prime
Minister.
Liberal Picnic at Hastings Park
Will be Gala Event For All
Committees Have Spared No Pains to Make Big Annual Picnic
Attractive to Everyone from Grandpa to the Babies
The Liberals of Greater Vancouver and surrounding districts are
holding a basket picnic at the Exhibition Park on Saturday, July 18,
when B. C. Liberals will gather from
all quarters.
It is the intention of the executive
to make this an annual affair, so that
Liberals can all get together for one
full day eef enjoyment With this in
view. Ihey have placed this picnic in
tin- hands of .-treing committees,
which have- everything in readiness
fe.r   the  big  day.
The platform committee have been
al.h- t.i secure some prominent Liberal speakers, Including; I lien.
Hewitt 11..stock, leader eif the- Canadian Senate: the Hon. C. W. Cross,
Attorney-General of Alberta; Mr.
Sam J. Latta, M 1.. A. m' Saskatchewan.
The refreshment committee are
sparing nu effort to provide the people with tea, coffee, milk, sugar and
all necessary dishes���which will be
free.
The musical committee have pro-
videel a brass band, which will be on
the grounds all afternoon and evening, and in the large transportation
building, with its spacious floors,
which will be converted into a ball
room, thc merry dance will go on
to the music of one of Vancouver's
best orchestras. The dancing will
commence at 6.30.
The baby show, which will be a
special event, will take place in the
north end of the grand stand at 4
o'clock. It is in the hands of a competent committee, who have secured
the services of three lady judges:
Mrs. Ralph Smith of Vancouver.
Mrs. McConkey of South Vancouver
and Dr. John Christie, of McKay Station, Burnaby. As there are two sections and two sets of prizes, there
will undoubtedly be a large number
of contestants; the one section will
he for babies under eme year old, and
the other for babies under two vears
old.
The sports committee have got a
fine programme of sports and games
for young and old, which will start
at 2 o'clock sharp, in front of the
grand stand, if the weather is fine.
In event of rain, the sports will be
held in the horse show building on
the grounds. The sports will be run
off as per schedule, rain or shine.
Following is a list of sports:
iris,
boys,
girls,
boys,
girls,
bovs.
Boys, 5 years and under, 20 yards;
girls, 5 years and under, 20 yards;
boys,  7 years  and  under,  25  yards;
7   years   and   under,  25   yards;
9   years  and   under,  30   yards;
9   years   and  under,   30  yards;
11   years  and  under, 40  yards;
11   years  and  under,  40  yards;
13 years and under, 50 yards;
girls, 13 years and under, 50 yards;
open sprint, 100 yards; 3-legged race,
UKI yards; open sack race, 50 yards;
open fat man's race. 200 lb. anel eever,
50 yards; married ladies' race. 50
yards; nail driving contest; open
sprint. 220 yards; open running long
jUmp,   lleep.   -te;,   .Hid   lvap.
Members' -ems only, 100 yards
sprint; members' daughters, 50 yards
sprint; egg and spoon race, 30 yards;
baseball game, 5 innings, to star* at
6 o'clock; tug-of-war, each ward or
district is to send its own teams.
The committee have secured the
following gentlemen as judges: Mr.
J. II. Scnkler. Vancouver; Mr. Hugh
Fraser, Burnaby; Mr. J. R. Fowler,
North  Vancouver.
James Road Church News.
The Rev. A. O'Donncll of Edmonds will hold communion service
on Sunday evening, July 19th. at St.
Columbia Presbyterian Church,
Forty-fifth Avenue and Victoria
Drive.
On Sunday morning, the pastor,
Mr. E. Crute, will preach on "Studies
from the Life of Christ."
Last Saturday a most successful
Sunday School picnic was held in
Central Park, when about 120 of the
scholars and friends of St. Columbia
Sunday School spent a most enjoyable clay amidst ideal surroundings.
A lengthy programme of sports provided entertainment for the afternoon. The youngsters thoroughly
enjoyed themselves upon the swings
placed beneath the shady trees, and
it was a tired but happy lot of scholars that climbed on to the wagons,
which  were  to  take  them home.
Famous Local Men En Tour.
Mr. J. Francis Bursill of Collingwood East and Mr. Walter Moberley,
pioneer pathfinder of British Columbia, are spending the week at Nelson,
B. C. Before returning to South Van-"
couver. Mr. Bursill and Mr. Moberley will lecture at many of the cities
in the Interior. Tifl^T61*^
^-W CHINOOK
VOL. Ill, No. 10.
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA,   SATURDAY, JULY IS, 1914.
Price 5 cents
South Vancouver Board of School Trustees Will Only Buy
Coal that is Mined under Decent Conditions���They Do
Not Want the Product of Chinese Labor Nor Do They
Want Coal Saturated in the Blood of Persecuted Workmen
Board in Calling for Tenders for Fuel,
Specifies that Preference Will Be Given that
Colliery on Vancouver Island Which Has
Treated Fairly with the Striking Miners
That South Vancouver stands fast for the working man's
rights, and even officially may go on record as opposed to
the greed of the interests, was indicated at the last meeting
of the Board of School Trustees when the question of purchasing coal supplies for the coming winter for the schools
of the district came up for discussion.
In the advertisements which are to appear in the newspapers, the Board of School Trustees state that the product
��jj the Jingle Pot Mine, on Vancouver Island, in view of the
fairness shown by the owners of that colliery in dealing
with the striking miners, will be given a preference over
all other Vancouver Island coal.
The passing of the resolution, giving the Jingle Pot coal
preference, was preceded by a quiet discussion of conditions on the Island.
The attitude has been taken by the members of the
School Board that the workingmen of South Vancouver
owe some consideration to their brothers on Vancouver
Island, who are at present receiving sustenance from the
treasury of the United Mine Workers of America.
South Vancouver does not want coal mined by Chinese,
nor does South Vancouver wish to support any organization of capitalists who are prepared to furnish the municipality with fuel mined at the risk of the lives of workingmen.
The actions of the local school board has created favorable comment throughout the municipality, and in the
stand the members are taking, every right-thinking ratepayer will endorse the actions of the board.
The resolution touching upon the purchase of coal received the unanimous support of the members of the board:
Messrs. C. M. Whelpton, J. C. Hudson, James Campbell,
William Morris and R. H. Neelands.
Local Items of Interest
jj>
Service-   em   Be dwell   Road,  between
Main ami Fraser street-, will In- discontinued for about two weeks een
account e.f paving operations, commencing   Priday, July  17th.
* * *
Mr. Sam. J. I.atta. M.I..A., of Go-
van. Saskatchewan, who has been
visiting at Collingwood ICast, has
been up the N'orth Coast for the past
twee weeks and has enjoyed tbe trip
exceedingly well.
it * *t
The Collingwood East Methodist
Church will hold their annual picnic
at Second Beach, on Saturday, July
18th, at which will be provided games
anel sports and an enjoyable day will
be spent on the water side. There
will be a special car leave Collingwood East interurban station at 9
a.m., and returning leave tbe beach at
8 p.m.
* .  *
The Rev. G. C. F. Pringle of Knox
Presbyterian Church, Collingwood
East, is at Agassiz, attending the
presbytery meeting.
* * ���
Mr. W. Spears, of the S-10-1S cent.
store, Fraser Street, has sold out his
business and retired. The business
will be carried on in future by Mr.
A. Gray.
* * *
At a very enthusiastic meeting held
in the Liberal Club rooms, at 4362
Main Street, on Monday night last,
a strong committee was formed for
the purpose of arranging a plan of
organization of the district. The committee will meet every Monday night
in future and report progress. All
members of the club are expected to
attend these meetings and assist as
far as  posible.
* * *
Rev. T. R. Peacock, teegether with
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Todrick, ilcsire t>j
express their sincere thanks to the
many friends for their manifest
kindness and sympathy in the heuir
of their bereavement in the death of
Mrs.  Peacock.
Mrs. Falkins, 4769 Gladstone Road,
repeirts that her house was broken
Into Tuesday afternoon and a diamond ring ami two gold necklaces
were stolen,
* * *
Water Superintendent McKay rc-
porteel that the new 750.000 gallon
tank at Central Park, which is 75 feet
high, now contains 50 feet of water
Bid sn far has shown no signs of
leaks. Mr. McKay expects to have
the tank filled by Friday.
The new tank is intended feir storing water for the high levels in case
of shortage and to give pressure for
lire-fighting. The tank was built at a
cost of about $30,000 by the British
Columbia   Equipment  Company.
* He   *
The hre brigade was called out
about 7.30 o'clock Wednesday morning to a bush fire on Sixtieth Avenue
and Prince Edward Street, which was
burning fiercely, fanned by a high
wind.
* Sr  *
The school board decided Tuesday
night to call for tenders for the construction of an annex to the Gordon
High School, Fifty-first avenue and
Knight Road, tenders to be in by
July 20.
* *    *
Miss J. Mackenzie has been pro-
nieeteel to the position of vice-principal of the South Vancouver High
School. Miss Mackenzie has been on
the High School staff since the school
was   lirst  organized.
* * *
The store of G. Goodwin at Thirty-
seventh Avenue and Victoria Drive
is reported to have been entered late
Monday night and $20 taken from the
cash   drawer.
* *    efr
Preparations are being made for
the laying of the corner-stone of St.
Mary's Anglican Church, South Hill,
next month, when it is hoped that the
Duke and Duchess of Connaught will
be present to take part in the ceremony. The foundation work of the
new church is being done by voluntary labor.
Magnificent Stone Arch Adds to
Primeval Beauty of Central Park
Commissioners Have Been Making Changes and Central Park is
Now the Mecca for Great Picnic Parties from all over Province
One of the Greatest of World's
Rivers is North Arm of Fraser
Commission takes Large Party Over the Length of North Fraser
Harbor and Points out Features Which Will Make it Great
Fresh Water Port
Anyone who has not hail lhe op-
portunity eif cruising up the North
Arm 'ef the Fraser, freim the Gulf
of Georgia to the New Westminster
line, but has observed the river freem
various points on the embankment,
has little idea of the possibilities of
the North Arm as a fresh waler harbor.
On Friday of last week, piloted by
the engineers to the North Fraser
Harbor Commission, Major Leslie
and Colonel Davis, a party of interested ratepayers were taken over the
length of the river on board the
launch   "Talisman."
During thc trip the officials pointed out features of technical interest,
and declared that the condition of the
channel was very much better than
the surveyors had reported some two
years ago. The constant action of
the waters has had the effect of deepening the stream, and now, save for
a portion at the mouth, the North
Arm of the Fraser might carry very
large sea-going ships.
At the mouth of the stream a great
jetty is under the course of construction, and a large gang of men were
found at work. Along the course
of the stream the harbor commissioners have surveyors at work, planning
the lines of the new harbor which is
to be evolved.
It is little known that South Vancouver is a fishing centre of considerable magnitude. Along the banks
of the river were noticed several
fishermen's villages with the great
nets drying in the sun. There is one
village in Burnaby which is really
growing to considerable magnitude,
and there the launch drew up while
the  genial  secretary  of  the  commis
sion. Mr \ Ogel, purchased a great
-liring   lalmon  from tiie fisherman.
Signs e.f industrial awakening may
be inelie-eel along the banks .if the
stream In llurnahy, just at the boundary line, the foundations are going
In for a great shingle mill, which is
being finance-el by American capital.
At another poinl in the vicinity is a
site which has been obtained by a
factory concern, which will manufacture boxes.
On the river these days traffic
seems to be very thick���particularly
pleasure traffic. On the way back
from the mouth of the stream the
"Talisman" was held up for some
time by a great boom of logs, which
had got into such a position that all
traffic was tied up for a time. Within
ten minutes a flotilla of launches
from up and down the river had
gathered at the obstruction. Many
lugs and fishing boats were noticed
in the stream, and all indications
pointed to an early industrial stir on
both banks of the stream.
The trip is one which men interested in the river ean scarcely afford
to miss. No idea of the immense
value of the Fraser River to South
Vancouver can be had unless the
stream is traversed from end to end.
In the party were Major Leslie and
Colonel Davis, engineers; ex-Councillor F. E. Elliott. Mr. D. G. Campbell. Mr. G. M. Murray and Mrs.
Murray and Mr. H. B. A. Vogel.
Death of Mrs. Peacock
Members of the South Hill Presbyterian Church are congratulating
Mr. and Mrs. Conacher of 5216 Fraser Street on the birth of a son, on
Sunday, July 12.
With the death at Central Park
Friday last of Mrs. T. R. Peacock, a
cloud of sadness settled upon the
community. Mrs, Peacock was the
second daughter ol  Mr. a-.nl  Mr-. .1.
B, Todrick, highly-respected resi-
dents "i Central Park, and pioneers
in that portion of Greater Vancouver, Mr-. Peacock ��:e- llu- wile "I
ihe Rev. T. K   Peacock ol Chase, B.
C. for icveral years ., well-known
S.eiith Vancouver clergyman. She-
was one 'ii nine children, ami her
death is the- lirsl break in the Tod-
rick   family  circle.
The funeral was held from llu   resi-
dence ol the father M..inlay afternoon t'i Mountain View cemetery.
Tlu- large- concourse eif friends who
turned out to pay their last respects
testified t.i tlle esteem in which the
ye.ung woman  was held.
Mrs. Peacock is survived by her
husband and a little girl of two years
of age. She was twenty-seven years
of age and was born at Wawanessa,
Manitoba.
Tbe funeral services were in the
hands of the Rev. John Knox Wright
of Vancouver; the Rev. Mr. Pringle
eef Collingwood, and Rev. J. Richmond Craig, Central Park Presbyterian  Church.
Referring to the late Mrs. Peacock,
the Rev. John Hughes, Langley
Prairie Presbyterian Church, made
the following reference in bis memorial sermon at Central Park last
Sunday:
"As you all know, our congregation meets this morning under the
shadow of a sore bereavement. A
gentle mother, a devoted wife of a
former esteemed pastier, and a beloved daughter and sister of one of
the most respected and loyal families has, after a long illness, borne
with Christian patience anil fortitude,
been called to her reward. Mrs. Peacock was personally known to all in
this neighborhood as a lady of gentle and retiring mind. It was here
she grew up; this was her home, and
you all were her friends. Even our
church   had   many   associations   that
.were hallowed and dear lo her. For
was il not in your mielsl that she had
worked bo faithfully and so unobtrusively for the Master, who has now
called  her  i��� ���   His  high service.
"Her   pure-   and   beautiful   life   was
-Imrt.   a-   years   go.     Anil   tlle   path
among   whieh  Bhe   was   called  to   feel-
low  was  al   the  end   weary and long.
I Hut   her   spirit   was   ever   bright   an.l
' cheerful,  anel  her  steadfast  hope  and
restful confidence in life were inspirations to all whose privilege ii was
I tee wail upon  ber.
"The   fragrance   ami   -.witness   of
: lier short life will linger long with us,
'and will surely quicken us to more
generous ami unselfish service- A��
incense it will rise before our memories, reminding ns that  ihe nine- i-
short, and that for many of us the
day   may   be   already   iar   spent   anil
night even at  band.    Therefore, let
lis. at this solemn hour, seek com-
feert in Ihe things which neither toil
nor suffering can reach, and which
are obtainable only from our Father
which art in Heaven through Jesus
Christ  our Lord.
"Our hearts will assuredly go in
loving Christian sympathy ami affection tei thc bereaved and sorrowing
family in the hieur of their grief and
mourning, let us in the true spirit
of brotherly love commend them to
the competent tenderness and care
of Him who alone can bind up the
broken-hearted and who can give
beauty for ashes, oil of joy feer
mourning, and the garment of praise
for the spirit of heaviness.
"They sorrow not as those who
have no hope. Their trust and confidence is in thc eternal plans of Him
who bas given immortality to the
mortal and gathered to Himself the
treasure ol his heart.
"Her day  has come, not gone;
Her  sun has risen, not set;
Her life is now beyond
The reach of death or change.
Not ended, but begun;
Oh, noble soul'. Oh. gentle heart I
Hail and farewell."
Central    Park,   that   240   acres   of,
woodland  and   meadow   at   the   boundary   line   'ef   South   Vancouver   and j
King-way, is being wrought into the'
most delightful park grounds on the
Pacific Coast.
This   season   has   witnessed   many j
improvements   of   the property, out- j
standing   among   which   is   the   con-;
Btructlon    of   a    massive    stone    entrance,    facing    on     Kingsway,    the
architectural  lines  'if which are of a
character    which    fits    in    pleasantly
with  the  landscape.    This  arch   has
cost  in   the   neighborhood  of  $3,000,
and the building of it has added materially to the appearance of the park.
During the summer, twelve acres
of land have been cleared by the commissioners, preparing tlie way for a
great area of tennis courts, bowling
greens, quoiting grounds and a green
upon which all the youngsters of thc
community may disport themselves
to their heart's content.
In portions of the grounds, under-
brushing has been carried out and
throughout the '..hole park, odds and
ends have been gathered up and
burned, seats have been built, band
stands have been painted, fences
placed in good condition, and Central Park has been placed in a neat
and  well-groomed   condition.
To the park commissioners,
Messrs Stride, Eugene Cleveland, J.
B. Todrick. Thomas Sanderson and
Chairman Sprott, much credit is due
for the good work they are doing.
It is understood that the building eef
tbe entrance arch has been financed
by the commissioners by the disposal
of a narrow strip of land fronting
upon the car tracks to tbe B. C. E. R.
Company, allowing the company to
improve its grade at that point, and
incidentally rounding off a portion
of the park frontage to the mutual
advantage of the commissioners and
the company. In the transaction,
sufficient "boot" was given the commissioners to permit of financing the
erection of the new arch and the
masonry joining it upon  either  side.
During the summer many thousands of people have taken advantage
of the cool recesses of Central Park.
Picnics are held there every day, and
the place is becoming a really popular picnic grounds. Some of the
picnic parties which will visit Central Park during the remainder of the
season are the Masons, several Vancouver church picnics, and the Conservative picnic, a large annual affair.
It is planned by the commissioners to officially dedicate the new entrance upon the visit to British Columbia in August of the Hon. Sir
Robert Borden, Premier of Canada.
Sir Robert, it is planned, will be the
guest of honor at a great celebration
to be held at the park, which will be
absolutely non-partisan in character,
when the reeves and municipal officials and other dignitaries from ail
peirtions of Greater Vancouver will
be invited to do honor to the Prime
Minister.
Liberal Picnic at Hastings Park
Will be Gala Event For All
Committees Have Spared No Pains to Make Big Annual Picnic
Attractive to Everyone from Grandpa to the Babies
The Liberals of Greater Vancouver and surrounding elistricts are
holding a basket picnic at the Exhibition Park .rn Saturday, July 18,
when B. C. Liberals will gather from
all quarters.
It is the intention of the executive
to make this an annual affair, so that
Liberals can all get together ior one
full elay ���������: enjoyment With this in.
view, 'hey have placed this picnic in
the hands "i strong committees,
which have- everything in readiness
fe.r  the  big day.
The platform committee have been
able to secure some prominent Liberal speakers, including; lion.
Hewitt Bostock, leader ol the Canadian Senate; the lion C W Cross,
Attorney-General of Alberta; Mr.
Sam I. Latta, M I.. A oi Saskatchewan.
Tin- refreshment committee are
sparing no effort t" provide ihe people wiih lea. coffee, milk, sugar anil
all necessary dishes���which will be
free,
The musical committee have provided a brass band, which will be on
the grounds all afternoon and evening, and in the large transportation
building, with its spacious floors,
which will be converted into a ball
re,.nn, the merry dance will ge> on
to tiie music of one of Vancouver's
best orchestras. The dancing will
commence at 6.30.
The baby show, whieh will be a
special event, will take place in tbe
north end of the grand stand at 4
o'clock. It is in the hands of a competent committee, who have secured
the services of three lady judges:
Mrs. Ralph Smith of Vancouver.
Mrs. McConkey of South Vancouver
and Dr. John Christie eif McKay Sta-
tiein. Burnaby. As there are two sections and two sets eif prizes, there
will undoubtedly be a large number
of contestants; the one section will
be for babies under one year old, and
the other for babies under two years
old.
The sports committee have got a
fine programme of sports and games
for young and old, which will start
at 2 o'clock sharp, in front of tbe
grand stand, if the weather is fine.
In event of rain, the sports will be
held in the horse show building on
the grounds. The sports will be run
>ff as per schedule, rain or shine.
Following is a list of sports:
Boys, 5 years and under, 20 yards;
girls, 5 years and under, 20 yards;
boys, 7 years and under. 25 yards;
girls, 7 years and under, 25 yards;
boys, 9 years and under, 30 yards;
girls, 9 years and under, 30 yards;
boys, H years and under, 40 yards;
girls. 11 years and under. 40 yards;
boys, 13 years and under, 50 yards;
girls. 13 years and under. 50 yards;
open sprint. 100 yards; 3-legged race,
ion yards; open sack race. 50 yards;
Open ial man's race. 200 lb. and over,
50 yanls; iiiarrieel ladies' race. 80
yards; nail driving conti sl; open
sprint, 22H yanls: open running long
jump, li"p, step and leap
Members' sons only, ion yards
sprint; members' daughters, 50 yarjta
Sprint; egg anel sp.><>ii race. 30 yards;
baseball game, 5 innings, to star' at
d o'clock; tug-of-war, each ward or
district is t'i send its own teams.
The committee have secured the
following gentlemen a- judges: Mr.
J. II. Scnkler. Vancouver; Mr. Hugh
Fraser. Burnaby; Mi. J. R Fowler,
Neirth  Vancouver.
James Road Church News.
The Rev. A. O'Donnell of Edmonds will hold communion service
on Sunday evening. July 19th. at St.
Columbia Presbyterian Church,
Forty-fifth Avenue and Victoria
Drive.
On Sunday morning, the pastor,
Mr. E. Crute, will preach on "Studies
from the Life eif Christ."
Last Saturday a most successful
Sunday School picnic was held in
Central Park, when about 120 of the
scholars and friends of St. Columbia
Sunday School spent a most enjoyable day amidst ideal surroundings.
A lengthy programme of sports provided entertainment for the afternoon. The youngsters thoroughly
enjoyed themselves upon the swings
placed beneath the shady trees, and
it was a tired but happy lot of scholars that climbed on to the wagons
which  were  to  take  them  home.
Famous Local Men En Tour.
Mr. J. Francis Bursill of Collingwood East and Mr. Walter Moberley,
pioneer pathfinder of British Colum-'
bia, are spending the week at Nelson,
B. C. Before returning to South Vancouver. Mr. Bursill and Mr. Moberley will lecture at many of the cities
in  thc  Interior. TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1914.
m~  FREE  *m
With every purchase at our Store of ONE DOLLAR we will give you
an order for one large size Photograph worth $1.25.
The picture of you is strictly high-class work, and no first-class
studio will make one for less than $1.25. Any one can sit for-thii picture and it is given to you absolutely free at the KING STUDIO,
Hastings Street.
Peak, Frean Biscuits, just in, the package l5c
Walker's Grape Juice, the bottle 2��/=
Welch's Grape Juice, the bottle 3*c
Lipton's Jelly Tablets, all flavors, the package loc
Garton's H. P. Pickles, the jar 25c
Heinz Spaghetti, the can ',"n
Plums, Peaches, Cherries, the can 2 for Zoe
Fry's Chocolate Icing, the package 25c
Morton's OX Tongues in Glass, the package 45c
Heinz Olives, Plain and Stuffed, the bottle 25 and 35c
Lipton's Yellow Label Coffee, the can 5Uc
STRAWBERRIES FRESH EVERY MORNING
V 0    M      T 26th Avenue and Main
r raser & MacLean,  Phone Fairmont m
HOUSEHOLD GOODS and OFFICE FURNITURE
BY CHEAPEST   ROUftS   OVER THE   ENTIRE   WORLD
CAMPBELL STORAGE COMPANY^
MOVING-PACKING-STORAGE-SHIPPING
PHONE SEYMOUR 7360. OFFICE 857 BEATTY 5T. afl
���-um.--rnsmiism m ���^���TMn T ��� ~**~���~**������tsssssssmssssmssssmmssst ���
FROM THE HEART OF J^**;
SOUTH VANCOUVER   come?
The Presbyterian Church furnished
the entertainment of last week in a
fenir days' bazaar, which was opened
by Keen- Kerr and Councillor Ste
veils on Tuesday evening. The different societies of the church worked
together  to make Ihis  bazaar one  'ef
ilie moil successful ever held in
Cedar Ceittage. There were attractive  booths  fur luinie conking,  fancy
work,    plain    -.living,    home-mad
baskets and iheir bathing suits. After the business of the meeting was
disposed of, an excellent address was
given by Mrs. Tbompseen on the woman question, after which Miss Jack-
son favored the enmpany with two
charming solos, and Mrs. Mclntyre,
with the assistance of Mrs. W'iggiu.
dispensed lemonade and cake. There
were   four   new   nanus  added   to   the |
membership roll.   The meeting then
ndy, and  refreshments  'if various adjourned, to meet next month st the
kinds, which were all well patronised. ! home   of   Mrs.   Weinds     on     Thirty-
Oil  Thursday  evening  there  was    a   fourth   Avenue
���plendid   sketch   given,   entitled.   "In
Evans,   Coleman   &  Evans,   Ltd.
IF YOU WANT AN ECONOMICAL  FUEL
WHEN  PLACING  YOUR NEXT  ORDER,  ASK  FOR
AUSTRALIAN COAL
EVANS,  COLEMAN & EVANS
Limited
Phone 2988
Foot of Columbia Avenue
MILK
How Satisfactory it is to the Housekeeper to be sure that
the MILK, CREAM and BUTTERMILK she receives is
Pasteurized and Germless.
Delivered in Sealed Bottles, Perfectly Sterilized.
BEACONSFIELD HYGIENIC DAIRY
905 Twenty-fourth Avenue East
Phone Fairmont 2391 L PRICE & GREEN, Proprietors
Is Your Time
Worth $10.00
Per Day!
YOU CAN TALK
Almost two hours over our
Long Distance
Lines
To a distant Town or City at a cost no
greater than a trip to the same place.
If your service is not satisfactory, tell us.
TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT
British Columbia Telephone
COMPANY, LIMITED
Dominion Equipment & Supply Co.
LIMITED
Contractors and Municipal Machinery, Equipment and Supplies
Phone Seymour 7155
1150 Homer Street Vancouver
Pursuit nf the Parson," which proved
ie. be a laughter-provoking comedy,
much enjoyed by the large audience
present. On Friday evening, tlie
ladies served an excellent dinner,
which was partaken e.f by a large
number ol fpiests and highly complimented fe.r the quality and quantity
eef the spread. On Saturday night a
drawing tinik place fe.r the beautiful
prizes   which   hail   been   donated   for
* t *
Mr-. A. (',. Murray anil her daughter
have gone fen a  holiday trip te. visit
at  Hardy  Hay.
* * *
The VV. M. S. nf Ihe Robs.ni Mi-
morial Church held their regular
monthly meeting in the school room
nf the church nn Tuesday last. There
was a good attendance present, and
the ladies arranged for a picnic to be
hehl al Stanley Park tlle first Tucs-
lay  in   August, and  have invited  the
tiie occasion.   Although the returns
are not yet all in. there is reason to ! Ladies' Aid Society to join them.
believe   lhat   the   financial   results   of | * * *
tlle enterprise will lie highly satis-1 Mr. Sampson, a Cornish evangelist.
factory to those who teie.k active part delivered an interesting lecture at
iu the weirk of getting it up. j the Epworth League meeting at Rob-
* * * I sun   Memorial   Church    on    Monday
Mrs.      Parker      of     Thirty-fourth | evening  on   the   subject   of  his   tour
through the West Indies.
lie    lie    *
On Sunday morning, the 19th, Mr.
Savage will preach at thc Robson
Memorial Church. Sunday evening
Rev. Manuel will conduct the services on the church lawn if the
weather is favorable, and there will
he special music by the choir.
* * *
Mr. C. F. Broadhurst went to Chilliwack last week to demonstrate his
ever-ready  stove pipe elbow.
* * *
Mr. Alex. Geirdeen has taken his
family to spend the heated term in
camp at White Rock.
Avenue   is   entertaining   her   nephew,
Mr.  Geo.  Goddard of Kamloops.
* * *
Mrs. Pollard, a former resident of
Cedar Cottage, visited old friends
here last week, and returned to her
home in Langley Prairie on Thursday.
* *   Sr
Miss Margaret Peters is visiting
Miss   Jean   Crawford   at   Gibson's
La n iling.
* * *
Mr. J. C. MeArlhur and family
have gone to Howen Island to spend
the summer months camping.
* * *
Mrs. Geo. Thompson and her little
daughter  have  gone  tei   Victoria   for      A popular topic of conversation in
the summer. Mr. Thompson has
sold their home on Fleming Street,
and will move to Pitt Meadows,
where Ile has invested iu a Kl-acre
tract, and where M's. Thompson will
join him in the fall.
* * *
On July 6th, the regular monthly
meeting of the Political Equality
League of Cedar Cottage was held
at the home of Mrs. Mclntyre on
Thirty-fifth Avenue. There was a
splendid attendance of members and
friends, and among tlle subjects under
discussion was the matter of subscribing for (he ���'Champion," the
equal suffrage organ of the province,
which the ladies feel should be supported. It was decided that the secretary should notify tiie publishers
of this little magazine that the Cedar
Cottage League would he responsible
for 17 annual subscriptions at $1.00
per year. A picnic was arranged for
to take place at Gibson's Landing
at an early date���all members being
expected   to  attend   and .bring  their
Cedar Cottage this week is oil. Those
citizens who at first regarded the
matter as more or less of a joke, are
now showing their faith by organizing companies and slaking claims for
the purpose of prospecting for this
valuable   commodity,   which   would
seem t'e lend support to the belief
that tiie wheels of prosperity will
soon be properly lubricated and set
���nerrily in motion. In the meantime, house-holders would be pleased
lo  see a  litlle  oil  spread around  on
the dusty streets.
St * *
Mrs. Alice Watmorc is spending
the slimmer in Denver, Colo., for the
benefit of her health.
* * *
Mrs. Lorimer returned from Na-
naimo mi Saturday, after having
spent a pleasant   holiday  in  that city.
* * *
Mrs. Miller e.f Fleming Street and
her Iwei small sons have gone to
Quaiicum Beach for a month's outing.
Children's Courts versus Reformatories
SIX   REASONS
WHICH ACCOUNT FOR THE SUPERIORITY OF
CREOSOTED WOOD
BLOCK PAVEMENTS
ITS DURABILITY���Does not crumble or pulverize under the densest traffic; second only to granite
blocks
ITS EASE OF REPAIR���No difficulty being experienced in removing and replacing the blocks; no
expensive plant or skilled workmen required.
ITS SANITARY QUALITIES���Creosote being a
highly antiseptic and waterproofing material instantly destroys all germs, prevents the absorption of
street filth and consequent decay.
ITS NOISELESSNESS���The rattle and bang of
vehicles passing over its smooth surface absorbed
and muffled till the quiet of the dirt road is obtained.
ITS DUSTLESSNESS���Does not pulverize; the
heaviest traffic only pounding down the wood fibres
to offer the greater resistance.
ITS CLEANLINESS���Having a smooth surface and
being waterproof it does not differ in this respect
from asphalt.
We manufacture blocks of the highest possible
standard, the verv best materials only being used and
in the DOMINION WOOD BLOCKS we believe
we produce an article chat has no equal.
DOMINION CREOSOTING
COMPANY LIMITED
Vancouver, B. C.
In considering these  two  methods  it.    Tliey  must be illumined by ce
of  treating juvenile  delinquents,   lhe   tain principles, and work for the ;
methods of children's courts, and the   lication   of   these'
method of reformatories, wc are considering  really  the  rival    claims    of
idealism and materialism, or, in other
words, wc are pitting the new school
of thought against a school  which is
now sh.wly but surely losing ground.
The life of the reformatory addresses itself tei the outer side of a
delinquent child���it changes his circumstances and temporarily, by coercion, reforms his conduct. The
methods employed by tiie Juvenile
Court leave unchanged the circumstances, in great part at least, and
address themselves lo the Strengthening of character,     The  believer  in
reformatory life also expects, of
ceetirsc. to attain liy such treatment
Ihe reformation of character; hut lie
says,  "We   we.rk  through   Conducl   tee
character," ami the believer in children's courts says, rather. "We weirk
through   character   to   conduct."
Ihis   i-   llie   essential   difference   in
the two methods of treatment���the
reformatory  begins  from   the  outer
side, the children's court from lhe
inner. And a very slnerl consideration of lhe .situation will show us
that both methods arc need"d. The
difficulty iu lhe past has been that
I here has been only one method employed indiscriminately with most
varying types of children. The pro-
gross of the future is going to lie in
the wise balancing and blending e,f
tiie two methods.
How necessary this is we see instantly, if we consider the case of
ordinary honest children: There is
the unresponsive, unimpressionable
child, with whom argument and appeal are ineffectual���to such wc give
orders, contenting ourselves with the
formation of good habits, and trusting these may later pass into tastes.
These children find their counterpart
in tlle penal world, and for such, the
hard and unimpressionable cases, the
reformatory is the only method of
treatment.    But we all  know  among
The Terminal Steam Navigation Co.
Limited
HOWE SOUND ROUTE
SS. "BALLENA"
leaves Union Dock
at 9.15 a.m. daily,
Sunday at 10.30 a.m.,
f.er Britannia Mines
and Xewport.
SS. "BOWENA"
leaves Union Dock al
9.15 a.m. daily, Sunday
at 10.30 a.m., for
llowen Island, Britannia Mines, Porteau,
Mill Creek. (Anvil
Island, Mon, - Wed.,
and  Sat.)
""I -
ap-
principles. They
should understand clearly what reformatory treatment and children's
court treatment (generally represented hy probation I stand for���that
roughly, they represent respectively,
coercion and persuasion���and trying,
as far as possible, to keep their minds
clear of fixed ideas, such as "always
we must get children out of bad
homes," or, "always we must preserve the integrity of the family."
Thev must try to deal freshly with
every case as it comes up, deciding
to which type, sensitive or insensitive, the child belongs, and to which
method accordingly, the persuasion
or the coercice, it may with most
likelihood be expected tei respond.
W'e find the need of blending the
two systems, and find that each
weerks best where its administrators
have learnt  io take something from
the .ether. Education is the chief
note in a good children's ceuirt, and
probation work���education taken in
its broadest sense; both judge and
probation officer are alive to the necessity eif comprehending and developing, rather than controlling, the
children     that     pass     through     their
hands.     Eliminating ihe element of
liberty, which is peculiar to probation, we find this idea of education
appearing increasingly in the best reformatories also now.
But whilst both systems arc undoubtedly needed to deal wilh the
many types eif delinquent children,
there is one great advantage attaching to those systems of supervised
liberty, generally employed by children's courts, which docs make them
greatly superior to the life of reformatories, and which should cause
them to be the treatment chosen
wherever possible���this advantage is
that the child left at liberty is supervised and trained under normal conditions. The value of this is so obvious that to expatiate upon it would
bc  superfluous.    The  boy  or girl  in
BEER
the children of our acquaintance that j the reformatory is doing well under
there is another type of child to artificial conditions which cannot be
whom the wise educator never gives continued���when he or she returns to
an order without a reason���the sen- the life of the outer world, what
Sltive chilrl, who is easy to lead, but guarantee is there that the improve-
impossible tei drive. This type also] ment will continue? Tlie child under
finds ils counterpart in the penal i probation, on the contrary, is pursu-
worlel, and for such children as these ing its training under conditions
the reformatory is ruination, and the! which   will   continue���the   conditions
affords, hut a permanent stock in
trade���a itrength which can combat
ihe untoward circumstances "f the
present, anel iln possibly harder circumstances of tiie  future.
All reform '���( conducl which does
neet reach lo character is a building
em -and, and it is well that wc shouhl
recognise it is such. Whilst admitting thai yet this, it is, which makes
reformatory life se. unsatisfactory���
conduct is easily judged of, but character tan only really show itself in
liberty.
Concluding this article, we may say
that whilst repressive methods are
still necessary, and will doubtless always be necessary for the treatment
of a recalcitrant minority, the methods introduced wilh children's courts,
detention liennes and probation are
yet the methods of the future���they
represent tlle new idealism���the increasing faith of humanity in the
power of sympathy, comprehension
and brotherliness, and may thus
safely be trusted to will their way
as humanity may be trusted to pro-
gr< --.
gentler, more friendly methods of the
children's court and the probation officer, assisted by the detention home,
are the only ones through which reform can be attained.
A sympathetic knowledge of child
nature is what the students of this
problem need to brin"r to bear upon
of its often most unhopeful home
life. If. despite the handicaps of this
home life, the probation officer succeeds in inspiring a taste for work
and a healthier outlook on life, he
has given to that child not a temporary, a removable, amelioration of circumstances, such as the reformatory
BUY MADE IN
B. C. GOODS
AND BE AN
EMPIRE BUILDER
SS.    "BRITANNIA"
leaves the Union Dock
at 9.15 a.m. daily for
Gt. Northern Cannery,
Caulfeilds, Eagle Harbor, Fisherman's Bay,
Bindley's, Eagle Cliff,
Iuvercraig. (Horseshoe
Bay,   Tues. and   Fri.)
These trips afford passengers a magnificent view of the scenery
among the islands and glaciers all day. Do not miss these trips.
$1.00 round trip, good for day of issue only. For information phone
Seymour 6330.
BEER
YOU CAN GET ANY AMOUNT FROM THE
International  Importing  Company
303 PENDER STREET WEST
Bottlers of B.C. Export and Bohemian
Free Delivery to Your door in South Vancouver every Thursday
Phone Seymour 19S1
FOR
Sashes, Doors,
Wind*
dws, and
all  k
inds  of
Mill
Work
SEE
i
H. N. WALKER
167 TWENTIETH AVE. W.
We  have the   most up-to-date
machinery.
All Doors, Windows and Sashes
morticed,
We  guarantee   all our work.
PRICES RIGHT
Call and see  us���We put you
wise
Phone Fairmont 836
ESTIMATES GIVEN SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREK
Mill :   Foot of Ontario Street, Fraser River Phone :   Fraser 97
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
CANADIAN   CEDAR
LUMBER CO.
Manufacturers of
BEVEL  SIDING,  BOAT  LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
* Wholesale and Retail
1/ GRIMMETT P. O.. SOUTH VANCOUVER
P. M. HAMILTON F. WILLIS
The Editor does not necessarily Endorse  the   views   expressed   in   this
Col urrn
South Vancouver Builders1 Supply Company
Dealers in Sand, Gravel, Fibre, Cement, Lime, Plaster, Vitrified
Pipe, Tile, Fire-clay, Lath, and Brick of all kinds.
Offices :  Slst Avenue and Fraaer Street.   Phone : Fraser 36.
Main and 29th Avenue.   Phone :  Fairmont 1940.
Fraser Street and North Arm of Fraser River.   Phone : Fraser 84.
Collingwood  East,  Phone :  Collingwood 33.
Coal orders taken at all offices and delivered to all parts of South
Vancouver.
QRAND   fENTRAL   HOTEL
GRAUER  and  GRAUER
The place where they "keep hotel"���
A fully mo'dern hostelry, near at
hand to South Vancouver���it's the
"Grand Central" when you go to
Eburne.
EBURNE   STATION,   B.C.
Milk! Milk! Milk!
Turner's Pasteurized and Germless Milk and Cream is the best
diet for Infants and Invalids.    Superior for tea, coffee and cocoa.
AND GOOD FOR EVERYBODY
Sold at 10 quarts for $100.
Visit our big new modern dairy and we will show you why it
is we can supply you with the best milk and cream and buttermilk
and butter sold in Greater Vancouver.
TURNER'S DAIRY
OFFICE AND DAIRY :   Cor. ONTARIO AND 17th AVENUE.
Phone Fairmont 597
Incorporated
1908
JOINT SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
A Joint Savings Account may be opened at the Bank of Vancouver
in the names of two or more persons. In these accounts cither party
may sign cheques or deposit money. For the different members of
a family or a firm a joint account is often a great convenience. Interest paid on balances.
THE
BANK OF VANCOUVER
B. C. EQUIPMENT CO.
MACHINERY DEALER8
rnvrmtTE MIXERS   STEEL CARS. ROCK CRUSHERS, ELECTRIC, STEAM,
CONCRETE MIXEKS, ��� *�����"       WHEELBARROWS.   TRANSMISSION
MACHINERY,   GASOLINE   ENGINES,  PUMPS,  AND
ROAD MACHINERY
Officei: WS-M7 B��nk of OtUwi Bldg.   Phone Sry. 93 0 (ExiS.ejje lo ill DipiitanlO
HIGH-GRADE
BUILDING MATERIALS
Boultbee-Johnson & Company, Ltd.
Sale of South Vancouver Bonds.
The news lhat came ..ver the wires
last week, re llle sale of the municipality's bonds, was welcomed hy
the  ratepayers  ill  general.
There has been a le.t ..f construction work passed in council during
thc last week or two, and the'sale
of the bonds at this me,ment will' S'j
ease the financial situation that an
immediate start can be made on thc
differed) jobs.
Willi the paving of Main Street,
Bodwell Road anil Victoria Road, j
various permanent works will be undertaken, and while much fault has
been found by the ratepayers in the
past, owing I1' money being spent on
temporary work, no kick should be
coming now, seeing that the money is
being spent oh permanent and much-
needed  improvements.
While these undertakings will only
absorb a percentage of the unemployed, still if the council go in for
more improvements, along the sewerage line, etc., as they promised to
do, they she.uld be able to still further reduce the number of men who
are able and willing, but, owing to
our rotten economic system, denied
the right to work.
* * *
Human Life Is  Cheap!
Damning  evidence   bearing  on   the
| recent disaster at Hillcrest, Alberta,
wherein 200 coal miners were killeil
by an explosion, was given at the inquiry last Wednesday. Mr. Francis
Aspinallj district inspector of coal
mines, with jurisdiction over Hillcrest, was on the witness stand. He
said that the mine was very gassy
and dusty, and that as far back as
July, 1912, he had condemned the
ventilation system used. His examination of tlie mine since thc disaster
had satisfied liim that it was in even
\veir>e condition than befure, apart
from the effects of the explosion.
His evidence practically meant that
the reversing of the fan in Xo. 2 level,
and the we irking of too many men in
lhe sections was a direct violation of
the    Coal    Mines'    Regulation    Act.
I Asked as to his opinion of the fire
bosses' testimony that they could not
say  ho"'  many  miner.;  were  working
Iin   each   section   at   the   time  of   ex-
I plosion, he said they were lying. His
investigation   had   satisfied   him   that
S there was gas present, and poor ventilation in No, 2 level when the mine
| blew up. As to the actual way ill
which the explosion was eventually
caused, he could  not bc certain.
ml
I
of $200,000  to  meet  trade  union  lia-1
bilities.     A   minimum   subscriptieeii   of
two pence  per  week is tei furnish an j
annual  inc. eme  of nearly  two million
dollars,  and  the  establishment  <>f a!
central fighting fund of half a million i
ehellar-   i-   contemplated.     It   is   ex-'
pected  that  within  a  short  time the
-IMi.iKKi membership "ill be doubled,
The  Miners'  Psalm.
The mine owner is my master; I
know   only   wanl.
Ile maketh me- to go down in deep
mine-; he leadeth me beside the rich
ores.
He thinketh met of my soul; he
leadeth mc in paths of danger f.er hi'
profit's lake
Yea,   th.eiigli   I   strike   f'er   more   jjf
the' products "f my labor. I receive
nly  evil:   f.,r  tli'.u art   with  me,  thy
re after
existence on Wednesday, when
a conference of representative! of un-
skill. ���! labor approved ' a icheme
whei. I. j the general laborers' nation.el council and the national trans-.
pe.rt workers' federation amalgamated | gunmen anel thy miliiia they a
int'e a national union. The laborers'
council repreienti eight unions, enrolling general laborer-. Il is urged
that the object is tei lesson the num-
bejr of industrial conflicts. One chief
con-iiliratie.n, however, i- the formation of central funds. Willi tbe commencing membership at four hundred
thousand the proposal is thai a levy
shall   be  converted  into  a   first  fund
Thou prepares! a court-martial be-'
lore me  in tne presence of mine ene-'
mies;   thou   bruisest   my   head   with
clubs; my ble.e.el runneth in the street.
Surely poverty and misery shall
follow mc all the days of my life, if
we allow private ownership of mines
forever.���R. K. Janes, in Appeal to
Reason,
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandy Thinkr, the Cooncils Should get Busy on the Little Mountain
Park Site
Weel freens, I suppose yae wud
a' notice that the Municipality o' the
District n' Sooth Vancoover thoo's
that for a name) came heir tac a
bunch o' money last week.
Maist a body 1 hae met has had
somethin' tae say wi' regaird tac the
���pendin' o' it an' if wc leave oot wan
eer twa confirmed croakers that wud
kick if they were playin' fitba���maist
al.eiely has some wee pet idea o' their
ain wherein they think they could
benefit the municipality if they could
jist get a wee pickle ee' what's owre
an' above the millyun.
Gee, a million. It soonds fine; I
mind aboot the time 1 wis leavin'
hame for the "promised land" I used
tae say tae mysel���Whee, Sandy, hoo
easy it'll be tae keep coont o' yaer
bawbees when tliey rin intae tlle inill-
yins when yaer leavin' yaer pounds,
ihullins an' pence at the back o' yae.
Of course, I ken line thc money's
badly needed der pavin', sewer an'
Ither kiinls o' necessary work, but for
a' that, I'm jist thinkin' a wee bitty
ee' that milly in odd dollars could be
very weel car-marked for a wee pet
scheme o' my ain that I'm share wud
be appreciated by the ratepayers as a
whole.
Vae wud maybe notice that the
C P.R. were afore the City Cooncil
last week wantin' tae ken if thc city
wis iii a iiinod tae pey its share o' the
Park site at Little Mountain.
No6 I'm jist thinkin' that a start
ce.ulil very weel be made now on
gettin' plans prepared for the layin'
��� leet o' that very desirable piece o'
property���as the real estate men used
The third annual report on labor 'af,say afore they took the ile fever.
organization in Canaela, covering the
layin' oot a park that'll be appreciated an' used by the masses as weel as
the classes.
Noo  I  think  the cooncils o' Sooth
Vancoover  an'  Pint  Grey  could  get
thegither wi' the city cooncil an' send
a  deputashon  owre  tae Victoria  tae |
see what ceeiild be dune.
Cairter-Cotton, I've nae doobt, wud j
lie tickled tac dathe tac lend a helpin'|
haund in sic a scheme. He has ever
been ready tae help ony scheme that
wud benefit his constituency. (What
are   you  trying to give us.���F.d.)
Weel at onyrate a general eleck-
shun's due in the "near an' distant
future," as the fellie said when he wis
tryin' tae mak up his mind as tae his I
weddin' day, an' I wis jist thinkin' j
that the teeries could aye get a stray
vote or twa wi' bringin' off a coup
such as that.
At onyrate the stiggestyin's a guid
yin. as a' are that emanate frae Scot-]
tish brains���an' noo I'm gaun tae
tak ma kilt off (metaforically speak-
in' i an' start boostin' for it micht
an' main.
Yours through the heather,
SANDY   MACPHERSON.
Labor  Organization  in  Canada,  1913.
year 1913, has been issued by lhe Department of Labor. At the close of
1913 the numerical strength of organized labor in Canada stood approxi
176,000,   an
Sue .ih Vancoover's share o' the
price o' the land is lyin' in the bank
at the present time accumulatin' interest���that's wan thing at onyrate
we   can   gie   Eddie   Gold   credit    for.
tnately al 176,000, an increase of pmt Grey has her share an it only
nearly 16,1100 over tbe figures at the ! n<H'(ls 'he city tae come through tae
close of  1912.    The  estimateel mem-   square up the deal.    1 he finance com-
Onler your Wines, Liquors or Cigars
By Phone (High. 555)--Free Motor Delivery
To South Vancouver every Friday
Cascade Beer (on Ice)  pt�� ��1 clot, qts $2 doz.
Heidelberg Beer         "   ��1     "        "   ���*   ���
B.O. Export Beer    "   85c  "        "B1.75"
HIGHLAND LIQUOR COMPANY, LIMITED
7S8 POWELL STREET
Johnson's Wharf
Phone : Sey. 914S
se
bership  f.er  each  of  the  three years
! during  which   reports   on   organized
I labor in Canada have been issued has
been as follows:    1911, 133,132; 1912,
i 160,120;  1913, 175,799.
These  figures  show an  increase  in
I membership of over forty thousand
eluring tlie two years 1912 and 1913,
and suggest a quite remarkable development during so brief a period.
The figures indicate that thc growth
of union membership has been fairly
distributed as between international
bodies and those not international in
character. The bulk of Canadian
trade union membership is attached
to international organizations. Of
the total numerical strength of organized labor for 1913, the membership
owing allegiance io international organizations reached the large proportions of 145,577, leaving for all other
organized bodies a membership of
26,222. There were in Canada at the
close of 1913, 2,017 local trade union
branchei ol all classes, 1.792 having
International affiliation, 199 of a non-
International character ami thirty-
fenir independent local bodies. These
figures sinew an increase of 154 in
international local union branches a
decrease ol twenty-six in non-inter-
nationil and an increase of six in independent bodies. International organizations having in Canada at the
end of 1913 one or more local
branches, numbered 101, an increase
of two during the year. There arc
thirteen non-international organizing
bodies in the Dominion, an increase
of three as  compared with  1912.
The total trade union membership
of the world for 1912 stood at 12,-
(,94,490, a slight increase over the
number reported for 1911, which was
11,435,498. Thc union membership
during 1912 increased more rapidly in
Great Britain than in Germany, the
first-named country having an increase of over 800,000 and the latter
slightly over 256,000, giving Great
Britain nearly a half-million more ol
trade union membership than Germany. The United States stands
third, but specially having regard to
its much larger population, considerably below Great Britain and Germany. Australia is the most highly
unionized   country  in   the world.
* * *
Labor Member On Top.
��� Allan Studholme. the Labor member for East Hamilton, in the Ontario Legislature, was re-elected in
the provincial elections held last
Tuesday, by a majority of over a
thousand  votes.
��� # *
Unskilled Laborers Unite in Old
Land.
Advices    from    London,    England.
mittee has lae deal wi' the questyin
yet, but I hae nae fears but that
august body '11 dae their share o' the
undertakin'.
Noo, that 165 acre tract it seems
tae llle wud be a vailnable adjunct tae
the varied beauties o' the Greater
Vancoover that is tae be. In pint o'
si^e it is only surpassed by Stanley
Park. Its elevation an' natural sur-
roondins wud lend itsel tae ony landscape engineer that had an eye for
the beautiful, tae mak oot o' it a park
lhat wiul be a credit tae an' be unsur-
passed on the whole peninsula.
The view that can be had frae the
tap���the city an' the Inlet tae the
neirth; the district as faur east as
Coquitlam ��� >n the east, awa oot intae
ih,- Gulf on the west; an' the beautiful delta wi' the twa airms o' the
Fraser windin' their way doon tae the
sea, iae' the sooth���a panorama nee'
tae be forgotten���pits this park on
the map as wan o' the future scenic
spot-, o   the lower mainland.
Noo my scheme as tae hoo a wee
bit o' that money could be used tac
guid purpose wud bc ill collaboratin'
wi' the city an' Pint Grey In layin'
aside some o' the bawbees tae get
an expert engineer makin' a preliminary survey, wi' the object o' devisin'
a scheme tae lay oot the park tae the
best  possible  advantage.
ll wudna-cost very muckle but it
wud be the means t>' gettin' an idea
as tae boo tae set aboot dcvelopin'
the site.
1 hae in mind, at the same time,
that oor much respected member
could very weel spare a wee while
frae his ither duties in pittin' in a
guid word for us wi' the wee fellie
owre  ill   Victoria.
I wis jist readin' in wan o' the
papers a glowin' accoont o' hoo the
provincial government were spendin'
a' kins ee' money in layin' oot Strath-
ceina Park owre in the Island.
While that micht be a very desirable object that the provincial government has in view, still it seems tae
nie that that park '11 never be o' muckle use tae the average toiler an'
niiiiler o' the cities an surroondin'
districts, There's quite a big chunk o'
ii hasna even been explored yet, an'
wha kens when they do send some o'
Iheir orangemen missionaries they
micht find some self-governing colony e>' liberals or socialists rcsid-
in' there that wud upset their aipple
cairt a bit.
Noo thev had ni engineer workin'
on that job���an' 1 believe he's wan o1
the best that can be had in that line
��e' bizness���for marc than a year, an'
still at it. 1 wis jist thinkin.' if Bowser wudna  think  it  iiiipident,  that he
uibl very weel spare that man owre
state that  the second of Great  Brit-   here for a  month or twa tae gie his
ain's  giant  labor  organizations  came   services   tae   devisin'   a   scheme   for
The Inquest.
The Coroner���You wcre saying,
witness, that you had long been acquainted with the young man who is
dead?
The Witness���I knew him from his
boyhood up.
The Coroner���Just how well did
you  know   him?
The Witness���Very well, indeed. I |
was  with  him,  I  might  say, all  the
tune.
The Coroner���Wcre you ever i
aware that lie was in trouble?
The Witness���Yes; it was I who!
came to his aid at such times.
The Coroner���Tell the jury what j
troubles  he  encountered.
The Witness���Disappointment in :
his work to a large extent. He did I
not get ahead so fast as he wanted I
to.
The Coroner��� 'ml would you say j
that on such occasions he became de-!
spondent���moody ?
The Witness���Yes, he did. More i
than once I had great difficulty in I
rousing him again and making him j
brace up.
The Coroner���Was there anyone
who  helped  you  encourage  him?
The Witness���Yes, his father, at
first; then, for a time, his sweetheart. They gave him up finally.
His  mother  stood  by him  always.
The Coroner���You accompanied I
him to the city when he came here?
The Witness���It was 1 who in-;
duced him to come.
The Coroner���Did he form any
close companionships while here?
Th.'   Witness���I   would   prefer   not
te.   answer���but   he   did.
The Coroner���With whom?
The   Witness���Well���with   an   old
enemy  of  mine,  an   enemy   thai   I���
The Coroner���I'll waive for a moment   the   question   eef   this   companion's  identity.    But   you   knew   him,
did you ?
The Witness���I have known him
for  years.
The Coroner���Were you with the
young man the night of his death?
The Witness���Only a part of the
time. He did not want me to ac-
ceinipany him when he went out. His
companion was with him, however.
The Coroner���What time did thc
young   man   return?
The Witness���I can't tell the hour.
It was late, but 1 was up and waiting
for him te> do what 1 could for him.
Thc Coroner���One question more.
Did any caller come to see the young
man while he was absent that night?
The Witness���Just one. One whom
the young man had been looking for.
But when he saw the boy was not in
he merely left his card and departed
and  I���
The Coroner���Tell thc jury what
happened when the young man
reached  home.
Thc Witness���He did not notice
me. He brushed past quickly. He
did not seem like his real self.
The Coroner���Yes, and what then?
The Witness���He went into the
bath room, 1 heard a shot. I stuck
to him to the last. But I could do
nothing  then.    He  was  dead.
The Coroner���Now, Ambition, you
may tell the jury who the young
man's  companion  was  that  night.
The Witness���Barleycorn is his
name.    John  Barleycorn.
The Coroner���And the caller who
left his card? What was on the
card?
Thc Witness���Only one word, the
name:    "Opportunity."
WE ARE
Liberals
IN THE SENSE OF GIVING
FULL AND
LIBERAL
VALUE FOR MONEY. WE
WORK ON THE SMALLEST
POSSIBLE MARGIN OP
PROFIT ~ BECAUSE WE
KNOW PRICE IS THE
GREAT QUESTION ON
WHICH YOUR FINAL VERDICT WILL REST.
Frank Newton
��� FAMILY =
SHOE   STORE
823   GRANVILLE   ST.
AND AT
CEDAR   COTTAGE
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can  supply  your  needs  at  right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right  at  Station)
JCS. H. BOWMAN
ARCHITECT
910-11    YORKSHIRE    BLDG.
SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER
CAKES       COOKIES
SCONES     BUNS
ROLLS       BREAD
JUST LIKE
MOTHER USED
TO MAKE
The ROSE BAKERY
26th Ave. and Main St.
FOR GOOD
ROAD BUILDING MATERIAL
We claim we have the best.
The largest Plant and a downstream haul.
GILLEY BROS., Limited
Dealers in
Coal, Cement, Plaster, etc.
NEW WESTMINSTER
Phone 15-16
���
a^_i
BH FOUft 	
���    Tib " ~*"*
TS^puvsaCHINOOK
PVBLISHfcD
Ererj  Saturday by the  Greater  Vancouver'PuhlUhere   Limited
Geofee M, Mu.tey.  Editoi
HEAD OFFICE :
Caraer  Thirtieth  Avenue   end   Main   Street   S��th  Van��o��,��er,   B.C.
TELEPHONE : All   departeoenta    Fairmont   187*
MIOHT CALLS Frirmoat 1S46L
tWrtorod .1 th. P..t Offic. D��Mitm<>t. OM.W.. ������ S.co��d CUee Mall
Matter         ^	
SUBSCRIPTION KATES :
To  all  potnte In  Canada.   United   KtnftloiB,  Nnxtouadlnd.  Ne��
faaland, and ether Brlttih Poeweetoni :
One   Y����     tm
Six Month!     l-��J
Three   Montha    "
Poatar. to America. Enropeoa and other Foreig* CeMlriea. Il.su
for poor ultra. _^_���_������^���	
"The truth at all times firmly stands
And  shall  from  ace to age endure."
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY. JULY 18. 19U.
MR. BOWSER TURNS APOLOGIST.
BRITISH COLUMBIA was treated last week to
the spectacle of a cabinet minister apologizing
to the people for his past actions and the policies of
his government.
While at Fort George, the Hon. Mr. Bowser really
admitted that he was ashamed of the fact that the
Provincial Government had spent such a vast amount
of money on the building of automobile highways and
so little upon the roads and trails for the convenience
cf the scattered farmers and settlers of British Columbia.
This admission, however, is the more interesting
because of tlie fact that while on the coast, previous
to starting on his journey into the Interior, Mr. Bowser boasted of the fact that millions had been spent by
the government upon trunk automobile roads during
the past five years.
The policy of the McBride Government, as regards
the building of roads is fairly typical of the many
policies for the spending of the people's money during
its long tenure of office.
The McBride Government has not made any effort
to cover up the fact that it has stood for the welfare
of the special interests, the automobile-owning interests of British Columbia.
The government's road policy has been interlinked
with its railway policy, its land policy and the various
other policies which have been featured during tlie
past ten years.
We have in liritish Columbia many hundreds of
miles of beautifully surfaced highways, over which
may roll the motor cars of the rich, and over which
may walk, or limp, at the peril of their lives, the poor.
We have in British Columbia; or will have soon,
many thousands of miles of expensively built railroads traversing wild lands owned, hut not cultivated,
by the men who in other quarters ride in luxury over
our motor highways.
Over the rails of these great lines will pass trains
of cars. But as a result of many years of the government of Sir Richard McBride and Mr. Bowser, these
trains of cars in this generation will carry very little
of the products of the lands of British Columbia.
Between Prince Rupert and Fort George, it is stated-
by friends of the government, that there arc not fifty
miles of passable road. Nearer home, in the Fraser
Valley, there are farmers living four miles from a
splendid automobile highway, who have not a road
to that highway and are, consequently, held from marketing their products.
In the carrying out of its ridiculous road policy and
in the carrying out of its other policies, the government seems to have proceeded under the very eye of
the people to whom it now apologizes. At a great
labor convention held this week in Vancouver, one
speaker made tlie statement that eighty per cent, of
the people of liritish Columbia were wage earners.
If this be true, then eighty per cent, of the people
of liritish Columbia have been passively watching the
government legislate for the other twenty per eeut,���
the twenty per cent, whei own the motor ears, the rail
roads, the agricultural 'amis, the fisheries and thi'
timber.
Will the people accept Mr. Bowser's apologies, pal
him on the wrist, and tell him to do better next time?
Will the out-of-works stand for it?
���   Will the mothers .-unl children, who are suffering
today because   liritish  Columbia lies dormant in the
hands of the few, allow their men to tolerate indefinitely the works of these hirelings of the big interests?
It is up to the people, the eighty per cent, of the
people, who are today without a voice in the managing
of their affairs.
rect contact with one another, and this praiseworthy
effort should meet with the success it deserves.
The above is from the "Conservationist," the official organ of the Dominion Conservation Commission
Possibly an explanation of why there were not a
greater number of farmers present at the opening da)
of the market may be found in Mr. Bowser's apology
for the abominable condition in which roads and
trails may be found throughout the Interior.
RECREATION FACILITIES.
ONE of the most notable features in the development of municipal enterprise during the past
decade was thc playgrounds movement. Within six
years of the formation of the Playground Association
of America, in 1906, more than 400 American cities
had entered upon the scheme of supervised recreation
centres for children as a municipal undertaking. The
movement has also gained rapidly-increasing favor
throughout the Dominion, and Montreal, Toronto,
Winnipeg and other Canadian cities have undertaken
the carrying on of supervised playgrounds. Its remarkable popularity and growth may be attributed
to universal recognition of its value as a prime preventive measure in the interest of public health and as
the sole available means of securing to the urban
child one of the essentials of his existence. Play is
the prerogative, as it is a necessity, of healthy, normal
childhood.
It takes little persuasion, beyond the silent, convincing proof of living conditions in our industrial
centres, to induce city governments to come to the
aid of children Whose only playground is the pavement or the alley. The standard of future citizenship
depends too vitally upon their proper training to permit neglect of any means whereby that training may
be made to include a full share of wholesome, character-forming games. And, in view of the failure
to secure���one may almost say, the impossibility of
si curing���the necessary facilities through private and
individual initiative, it becomes thc duty of municipalities, as such, to undertake the provision of accessible, spacious, well-equipped and properly supervised
play and recreation centres, it is a form of public
.enterprise to which no valid objection can be offered.
The question of publicly provided recreation facilities, however, is not solved merely through the faction of juvenile needs, ll is one of wider application,
and has just as much importance, although it has received scant consideration, in regard to the adult population of great urban centres. Recreation of mind
and body is as necessary in the well-rounded existence
of the adult human being as is play in that of the
normal child. The common objection to government
action of a paternal nature waives iis validity in the
lace of economic necessity, at least in icspect to children. Under certain circumstances it must do likewise where adults are concerned���where, as in the
case of recreation, collective action must lie invoked
to provide those facilities which modern industrial
organization has made it impossible for the individual
himself to secure.
KAMLOOPS OPENS PUBLIC MARKET.
THE city of Kamloops. Ii. C, has opened a public
market. On the opening day a goodly crowd
of citizens were present early in thc morning, ready
to receive the vendors. But the farmers showed less
earnestness than the citizens; the earliest vehicle was
half an hour late, and only 16 more appeared in the
course of the day. The market conditions were such
that the demand largely exceeded the supply and the
small amount of produce offered was readily disposed
of. This success should encourage more of the surrounding- farmers to take advantage of the market.
���>White farmers will not compete with the Chinese in
peddling their produce from door to door, but might
reasonably be expected to meet their customers at a
central market. Kamloops i.s to be congratulated on
its efforts to bring consumers and producers into di-
M
BY THE WAY
m
COUNCILLOR THOMAS contemplates moving to
a seven-acre farm, recently purchased hy him in the
Fraser Valley, In view of the strenuous puhlic career
the councillor has followed during the past decade or
so, it is no wonder that he now seeks the simple life.
* #   4
WHEN CONGRESSMAN GOLD heard of Councillor Thomas' hack to the land design, he is said to
have remarked: "I love the flowers and the chickens,
but this is the life."
ft    ft    ft
I'lIK NEWS-ADVERTISER suggests that the Honorable Joseph Martin, if he would have new thrills,
should enter municipal politics in South Vancouver.
A bye-election contest for councillor ill Ward Three,
between lhe Mini. Mr. Martin and Mr. Edward Gnld
would give excitement to an otherwise quiet summer,
ft   *   4
Till'. FAILURE OF ihe Vancouver City Council t<���
make good the rather small deficit in lhe accounts of
the pageant committee is a blunder, which will offset
much of the guud rendered Greater Vancouver by the
public-spirited men who made tlle pageant such ;i
notable success.
ft ft ft
FROM Till' RECORDS since the liorden Government came into power, the Chinese conlies have been
rushing into li. C. in greater numbers than ever before. Apparently it's a case of "no ptishee, no pullee,
but comee like helle all the samee."
ft   ft   ft
OIL, SEEPAGES were detected on a Burnaby highway, and an oil company was blighted in the bud
when some of the municipal authorities informed thc
promoters that the seepages were from a contraption
used by the Burnaby authorities for laying the dust
on that particular highway.
* *   *
YOU MAY BREAK, you may shatter the contract if
you will, but the smell of the creosote hangs around
us still.    (Six months' hard labor for this.)
ft ft ft
JUDGING FROM THE DIFFICULTY being mel
with by the paving contractors in preparing Main
Street for permanent paving, the bottomless pit. or an
annex thereto, must be located slightly south of
Thirty-sixth Avenue.
How Public Funds are Being Wasted under Borden
THE PEOPLES   BLACKBOARD
,   , i.v e.     M!j   ucm. '���'   ill    ���
..ill   JUUF.    IOt��. 1914.  TUT   T    P-DT.II . ��� I e. * ; i, ���     WAJ    I       Fl 'Hi
���;vr   :-;"���  ldi.ii   ������ .1 ��� kv.i bt ba.-    ���; i ��t nfif t- V.Alill
ntJT   .'t " .1   .vr.f* I     ��� k -'
j\a~��rt    '���[.".���   i.'     .:;���",". t    * "���
-^
"I A ���    ' '
',   AV     k'   '���������<
:^i��
1   -^ �� zz1 "iie        ���=2,-��tiCy ^������'Hiii'iiiiii
. HE MAN WHO STOLE the editor's dog last week
is hereby notified that the next door neighbor owns a
beautiful large cat.
*   4   4
OX KERR ROAD, on the height of land overlooking the river, may he found the finest residential property in British Columbia. This district is not thickly
settled, and there the Rev. Mr. Merton Smith and Mr.
Eugene Cleveland live side by side in apparent peace
and contentment. These two gentlemen hold very opposite views on the polities of the day, hut to the
passerby they seem to confine their differences of
opinion to vicing with each other in the art of growing
roses.
The Highgraders' Corner
The Pol of Politics A'Bubbling,
Port Arthur Chronicle.
Life powadays seems to he just one election after
another.
��� 4   9
Reno "A Dead City" Now,
Minneapolis Journal.
"A dead city," Reno was called the other day hy
1 California man, who ascribed its dullness during
he past two years to the reformers who have abolished open gambling and divorce-while-you-wait. But
there are worse things for a city than being dead.
* *    *
The Housewife's Burden.
Toronto News.
Life is full of trials. Remembering to buy shoe-
-trings is more than the average man can do, but the
housewife has a worse burden that that. She must
keep a supply of matches in the house, and a spare
safety pin for emergencies, or the whole domestic
realm gets out of joint.
ft   ��   ��
II'Oman's Dress.
London Express.
Men are always running down modem dress and
modern   manners   in   women.     Yet   they  often   find
attractive in other women whal they condemn in the
women-folk of their own house.    Women, of course,
dress largely for the eyes of other women.    But man
is still the main object, and if he frowned upon woman
he   would  change  the guise  in  which  she  presents
herself.
ft   ft    ft
The Good Name of Cities.
Kingston Standard. .
A movement has heen started in the United States
to protect the good names of cities. There is no
doubt that most exaggerated statements are made of
social conditions in many cities. Canada suffered
from sensationalism in this respect quite as much as
the States.
ft   ft   ft
Lots of Untitled Land.
Vancouver Sun.
The census bureau has issued a bulletin giving the
amount of land in each province that could be put
under crop and is not being used.   In Manitoba only
seventeen per cent, is cultivated, in Alberta the proportion is the same, while in Saskatchewan the per-
ntage is thirty, says the Edmonton Journal.    British
Columbia claims that only three per cent, of its avail-
'.ble area has been taken advantage of.   But there is a
big difference between thc quality of what it has still
to offer and that still open to the industrious farmer
in the prairie provinces.
ft   ft   ft
Assistant Street Car Conductors.
Ottawa Evening Journal.
Boys are to be placed on some of the municipal
street cars in London as assistants to the conductors,
i. being considered that on double-deck cars it is im
possible for one person to look after all the business.
As far as possible the youths are to be selected from
families of employees. The result of the experiment
is likely to be the development of a race of expert
street car men in the metropolis.
���ft   ft   *
A Modern St. Francis.
London Advertiser.
Recent attacks in this country on the church give
interest to the case of the English nonconformist minuter, Rev. E. W. Lewis, who after a visit to the Assisi
if St. Francis has given up his work as pastor of the
King's W'eigh-house Church in London, with a salary
if $3,000 a year, and as plain Edward Lewis is to
court poverty, a willing bride, and engage in an irregular kind of "wayside sowing of the seed." Ile
has felt for some time, he says in his letter of resignation, "the incongruity between the position of being
:\ man of God and the position of being a comparatively highly salaried, comfortably conditioned official in organized religion." We are likely to hear of
more such cases as the "social ferment wkrks.
ft ft *
Male and Female Hamlets.
London Times.
Mme. Sarah Bernhardt has had a word to say
about our English male Hamlets. "I have seen English tragedians impersonating 1 lamlet. Their makeup may give them the appearance of romantic heroes,
but their square shoulders and solid limbs are utterly
out of keeping with the anguish expressed on their
faces." Mme. Bernhardt is adding a new severity
to the actor's already severe task. We have all heard
of the conscientious Othello who blacked himself alt
over; and Mr. Arthur Bouehier grew a beard for
King Henry VIII. But more will be demanded in
future for him who would play Hamlet. Sir Johnson
Forbes- Robertson might, perhaps, pass muster; hut
Mr. H. B. Irving must watch his figure carefully;
and think of the course of training to be undergone
by Sir Herbert Tree before he may attain the requisite
fragility of appearance! Mme. Sarah Bernhardt,
being capable of things herself, does not, perhaps,
realize lhat not in all human beings is the spirit so
mightily master of the flesh as in her marvellous and
ex    isite self.
ft    ft    *
Origin of the Argentine Flag.
Westminster Gazette.
Mr. Fraser, in telling of the origin of the Argentine
flag, says: "The emphatic patriotism of the American is tepid alongside the hot-headed nationality of
Argentina. It is daily inculcated in the schools; the
hlue-and-white striped flag is honored on every occasion. When the Argentines were in revolution
against Spain in 1810, and needed a banner to flaunt
against the red and orange of the enemy, they got
pieces of blue and white cloth (intended for garments) from an English warship lying at Monte
Video, and made a flag of it. So the Argentine flag,
like much of Argentine prosperity, is due to Great
Britain." Mr. Fraser holds that, in proportion to the
population, there are as many millionaires in Argentina as in the l'nited States.
ft    ft    ft
Troubles Of a Wealthy Young Man.
St. Paul Pioneer Press.
A useless member of a wealthy    Denver    family
when arrested on a charge of passing a fraudulent
cheque attributed his dishonest and criminal act to the
fact that he had a silver plate in his skull and too
much whiskey in his interior.    Doubtless there are
some gullible persons who will accept the excuse as
lieing a reasonable one.   There are people who believe
that a surgical operation on the skull will turn the
mosl incorrigible crcxik into an earthly saint, so why
not believe  that  a few  cuts with  surgeons'  instruments will make a bad man out of a decent fellow!
\s for whiskey, that is another matter. SATURDAY, JULY 18, 19'4.
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
Hastings
and
Gore Ave.
EMPRESS
Lawrence ft Sandusky, Lessees
Phone
Sey. 3907
Week of July 20
Matinees Wed. and Sat
Reappearance   of   MISS   MAUDE LEONE with
THE DEL. S. LAWRENCE STOCK COMPANY
in
1 The London and New York Success
The Morals of Marcus
Dramatized from W. J. Locke's Famous Novel
Prices 25c and 50c
Matinees 25c Any Seat
FAIRMONT THEATRE
^     18th and Main Street
.��� Coming
ROBIN  HOOD
Monday and Tuesday, July 20 an d 21.
The stirring life of the great adventurer, known to every man,
woman and child, is here shown properly in black and white pictures for the tint time in four parts.
PRICE   OF   ADMISSION   NOT ADVANCED
THEATRJCAL
Empress.
Next week will mark the return of
Mi" Mamie- Leone to the Lawrence
Stuck Cumpany. She will, starting
Monday evening, July 2f)th. take up
again lier duties is leading lady e.f
iliat organization, and that her friends
anel admirers will Le on hand in
goodly    numbers,   neet   only   feir   the
opener,   but   for  every  performance
of llie week is sh.iwn already by the
heavy advance sale.
Miss Leone has much endeared herself to the theatre-goers of this city,
who will remember li<.w bravely she
struggled te> entertain and amuse
them, while suffering from an illness
which proved all but fatal. She now
returns fully recovered and better
able than ever before lei display her
art and undoubted talents.
The play selected for her opening
bill is one which she has already registered a great triumph, although she
has never apepared in it in Vancouver. It is "lhe Morals of Marcus."
and was dramatized from the famous
novel, "The Molars of Marcus Or-
deyne," the finest work of that brilliant  English author, W. J. Locke.
As Carlotla. the Syrian waif, transplanted from a Turkish harem, to a
lovely and refined English home, will
Anecdotes
I feminine beauty anil talent that
j would be hard tv duplicate in tlle
' world Julie King i- appearing wilh
a strong organization in "The Man
She Mel." a clever farce of smart
metropolitan life, which has been universally praised by tlle critics. Miss
King    has   a    personality    that   fairly
reaches onl over the footlights and
grabs her audience-; she sings
Superbly and wears some of the nieest
stunning gowns ever seen on a local
stage.
May & Kilduff will take a verbal
flyer at woman suffrage in their hilarious rural sketch called "Limb of
the Law." Both are very talented
entertainers.
In the nature of acrobatic acts,
Manager Graham will depend upon
the Three Flying Kys. said to be one
in the business. Louise Defeiggie, a
of the meist effective casting troupes
charming singing comedienne, will
introduce a line of new songs and
patter that are sure to please. There
will, as usual, bc a splendid showing
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   DCAN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
ALL THE BEST AND NEWEST   IN   MOVING   PICTURES
MATINEE  SATURDAY AT 2 p.m.
Cedar   Cottage   Theatre
"THE HOUSE THAT PLEASES"
20th  Avenue and Commercial Street
SATURDAY MATINEE. 2 to 5
.  . We show the best, cleanest and most up to date pictures with a
complete change daily.
COME  AND  SEE
CLEANLINESS   IS  NEXT
TO GODLINESS
ESPECIALLY AT THIS TIME OF THE YEAR YOU WILL
APPRECIATE THE SCIENTIFIC MANNER BY WHICH OUR
MILK IS HANDLED.
MILK AND CREAM PASTEURIZED BY THE LATEST
METHODS KNOWN TO SCIENCE.
SOUTH VANCOUVER MILK CO.
29th and FRASER STREET Phone Fairmont 1602 L
Miss Maude Leone at the Empress
Fairview Sand & Gravel Co.
Corner Front and Manitoba Street*
TELEPHONE FAIRMONT   552
BEST PRICES FOR SOUTH VANCOUVER AND
FAIRVIEW DISTRICT
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
MEMBERS VANCOUVER STOCK EXCHANGE
MEMBERS VANCOUVER GRAIN EXCHANGE
MEMBERS OF CALGARY OIL EXCHANGE
DEALERS IN ALL ACTIVE CALGARY STOCKS, BONDS, ETC.
OIL STOCKS
BOUGHT   AND  SOLD
Stock Department, Seymour 6913
EXCHANGE BUILDING,  142 HASTINGS WEST
have eene of lhe very best roles she
ha- evei played in this city. She
succeeded Marie Dune, wlm ereateel
tlle retle, ami many prominent critics
aver thai her delineation nf llie character is superior te> that nf Mi-s Doro,
This fanneii> Locke play has proven
especially interesting t'e women, as
in adeliiiein tn its wonderfully attractive steiry, ii presents unusual opportunities fnr the display of elaborate
gowns by lhe ladies of the company.
The location i- modern England,
and llie action takes place at tin
limiie nf Sir Marcus Ordcync. an aristocratic member nf the upper das-,
and in lhe  telling of the sleerv.  \Y. .1
Locke,  delightful  saiirist  ami    brilliant novelist, has surpassed himself.
Wiih  Miss  Leone as Carlotta  "ill
appeal Mr. Del Lawrence in llie role
.���I Sir Marcus Ordcync. and llu -up
pnrt   will   presenl   all   the   fa. mill-   in
prominent part-.
"Sleep Thief" al lhe Empress Theatre' is still ilu- laughing success of the
ciiy. and the auditorium of that popular playhouse rings nightly with
merriment over ihe escapades of the
clever creeeek ami hi- charming accomplice, the two kleptomaniacs, and the
pretty girll wlm are aline.veil thereby, li is aii Ingenious plot, intensely
funny ami a delightful warm weather
play, and if there is a laugh anywhere' in yuur system, it will net it
eeut. Performance al 8.15 every evening eef ihi- wick and bargain matinee
.ui   Saturday.  July   18th.
of motion pictures, ami the orchestra
programme will he one oi ihe besl in
recent   im tilth-.
"Y'.ur   name?"   asked   the   teacher.
registering a new  pupil
"Arthur."
"Anel  whal'-. ye.ur  first  name?"
"Brown."
"Oh, haven't ynu ge,t them wrong?
1 think Arthur must be your first
name, and Brown yeeiir family name.
Isn't   that  right'���"
Hut   the   small   pupil   was   m.t   per-
���uaded. A day e.r two later he announced!
Teacher, mot her says Hnewn is
my first name. She says I ge.i ihat
name when I was horn and sin didn'l
name nie Arthur till three months
later!"
�� �� ���
One meirning Rosie's teacher noticed her hanging around lhe elesk
with   rather  a   wistful  expression.
"Well, Rosie, what is il?" she fin-!
ally  asked,  drawing the  child  Ut" her.
"Please, teacher, we've got a new
baby t' e.ur boufc
"Oh, have you, Rosie? Isn't that
fine?    What's the baby's name?"
"Ikie."
Several days later the teacher remembered to inquire about the new-
arrival:
"Oh, Rosie. how is Ikie today?"
The child looked bewildered: "Oh,
teacher, wc ain't got no Ikie."
"Yes. You told me you had a
baby."
A gleam e.f intelligence appeared
on Rosie's ...ee "No, teacher, his
name's Mose; his name ain't Ikie.
We found we already  got one  Ikie."
* * *
A   Tennessee  mountaineer, met  in
the "moonshine" belt, went tej towi .
ami among other things he boughl
a jug e,f whisky. Not wanting to
carry it about wit, him. he decided
t'i leave it at a grocery store feir a
wliil..-.
In e.rder that the jug nrght be pr<.-
perly identified, he temk a deck if
cards from his pocket, extracted the
five of hearts, wrote his name upon
it, and attached it t" the handle of
the jug.
Two heeiirs later the mountaineer
returned.    Tlle jug was g.ene!
"Leeeek here. Jim." he cried tn the
proprietor eif the stnre. "iln yi u know
what become of thet jug ������' mine?"
"Sure.'' rejoined tin- proprietor,
"Jake Harwell catne aheng wiih the
six of hearts ami leeeek it."
* *   St
Montague Glass was lunching wiih
two of Iii- '-lecik ami suit merchant
friends recently. The subject had
turned tn real estate, ami "in- of the
cloak ami suit merchants was telling
nf a house In- hail recently bought.
"And the dining-room," he explained, helping himself to nnere
salad, "i- so big it shall seat twenty
people���God  forbidl"
* ��� *
A Sunday School teacher, after
conducting a lesson "ii tin story of
"Jacob's Ladder," concluded by saying: "Now is there any little ��irl nr
boy who would like' in ask a question
aboul ilu- lesson?"
Little Susie looked puzzled fnr a
moment, ami then raiseel Inr hand.
"A question, Susie?" asked the
teacher.
"I would like 1.. knnw." said Susie,
"if the angel- have wings, why eliel
ihey  have tn climb up lhe ladder-"
The teacher thought for some moments, ami then, looking about the
class, askeel: "Is there any litlle boy
win i would like tn answer Su-iv's
question?"
PANTAGES
Unequalled       Vaudeville      Meant       Panrae**.
Vaudeville
I   E.   D.   Graham,   Resident   Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
ALL NEXT WEEK
Miss Jessie Shirley
in
UNDER TWO FLAGS
AND   FIVE  OTHER  BIG  ACTS
Three   shows   daily   2.45,   7.20,   9.15
Admission���Matineer.,      ISc;     nights,
lie and 25c; boxes,  50c.
Cedar Cottage Abating
Cedar Cottage residents are agitating for a permanent paving on Commercial Street, and a committee has
been appointed to interview the B. C.
E. R. Company in regard to an extension of the Grandview carline
along Commercial Street and Agnes
Road to Victoria Drive. The company  promised   to   make   this   exten
sion last year, but owing lo the proposals of the council to pave Main
and Fraser streets and the necessity
fnr permanent tracks on these thoroughfares, the extension was postponed. Cedar Cottage residents consider that a good time to carry out
the wnrk will be when permanent
tracks are laid on Victoria Drive
from Kingsway.
Pantages.
Another record-breaking bill, tupped by twu nf Vancouver's chief
favorites, will he ushered in al Pan*
tages with a matinee Monday afternoon. The show has all tin earmarks of being exceptionally streing
throughout
The hcadliner will he Miss Jessie
Shirley, probably llie most popular
stock leading woman the C'eea-t has
ever known, who will appear with her
splendid company of selected ariist-
in a sumptuous revival oi Ouida's
famous romantic adventure drama.
"Under Two Flags." Miss Shirley
has played in Vane.mver .in a number eel former occasions, and has always been held in tiie highest esteem.
The character of Cigarette in "Under
Tw.e Flags" is nne of the best things
Miss Shirley has ever done, and she
invariably scores successfully with it.
For her present tnur over the Pantages circuit she is using a tabloid
version, but it is presented with all
the care and elaboration 'if scenery
and costume that characterizes the
finest  of  Broadway  productions.
Another star feature will be Miss
Julie Ring, the brilliant and fascinating member of the fanneits family eef
stars, which includes Blanche and
Frances,    making   a    triumvirate    of
BOARD IS ORDERED
TO  RENEW  LICENSE
Mandamus    Issued    by    Mr.    Justice
Clement in Gladstone Inn
Case.
A mandamus issued by Mr. Justice
Clement Wednesday afternoon directed in tin- South Vancouver License Board, ordering them t" renew
the license of ihe Gladstone Inn.
when lhe mailer comes up ior final
disposal. Hi- lordship held Wednesday morning, when the matter
was argued before him in chambers,
that tlle license In aid is in lln- same
position a- a court, and can nol ac;
een its own knowledge, bin only upon
matters ami evidence Drought before
ii In iln- case af ilu- Gladstone Inn.
im complaints had been made against
the house, and no protest lodged with
the board, a majority of whom hail
decided e.n their own initiative iee can
eel the license n the ground thai
ihey did noi think anj public use
could be Ben e ii bj  c mtinuing it.
Tin- Gladstone Inn. tin- license nl
which is lute! b> Henry Georgi
Brown, has been in existence for 30
ye.u-. anel ;- the only licensed Imiise-
in the entire municipality. Recently
a license bylaw was passed ley tlle
municipality ami a license beiard
formed composed nf Reeve Kerr.
Councillors Thomas and Winram.
ami Me-srs. J. C. McArthur and
Robert McBride. A majority nf thc
board composed ni Reeve Kerr and
Messrs. Winram an! McBride gave
notice a month ag - ihat they would
vote fnr the termination nf the license
Mr.W. B. A. Ritchie, K. C, for iln
licenseholder argued that under the
statute and tin Inlaw, sei long^as nn
pvniesi was lodged ami so long as the
license fee was paid, the board had
im authority of its eewn to cancel licenses.
Mr. D. A. Donaghy. solicitor fnr
the municipality, appeared e.n behalf
of the license board. Mr. Justice
Clement held that under his own decision in a recent case at Victoria, he
must hold lhat ihe license board
c.eulel only pass upon matters brought
before it fnr adjudication by interested parties, anil cnuld not initiate
a reduction eir cancellation of the
licenses. In an affidavit it was stated
lhat the Gladstone Inn has thc only
license for the 39,500 population in
South Vancouver.
heated West nf t'eday. where every
convenience nf the w.erld is at our
command���but a tremendous stretch
of mountains and forests���a man's
country. He settled in Vancouver.
How many of the residents of Vancouver teeday realize tlle privations,
the trials, the hardships that beset
tiie sturdy pioneers who hewed this
beautiful city out of an almost impenetrable  forest.
Mr. Stark, in a determined, plucky
manner, started iheing things. He
opened a store ill a modest way, but
the goods he sold were good. From
time to time, as the city grew and
hi- business grew, he took larger
quarters, and the geiod goods went
with him. Five years agee he leased
the building mew occupied, Hastings
Street West, between Abbott and
Carrall streets, and tlle 'lore became
eene of the city's most noted mercantile establishments. The same honest, straightforward methods, sedd
lhe same honest gne.d-. me exaggerating im misrepresentation, and for
every eleellar spent over their counters a good eh'llar's worth was given
in return.
T'i' n  in   May.  like-  a  thunderbolt
freem a clear sky. came tlle announcement that the ��'irm wemld retire from
busim-- al the expiration of their
lease, July 31. Doubting Thomases
laughed; intimated that i; was a
scheme tn gv business; could not sec
how five big fln'ers. a basement and
balcony packed full eef merchandise
could In- cleared oul in so short a
time. I'.ut lhe old time pluck and
miration was -iii! al the helm,
���' ��� -��� me -pirn was infui -el into the
staff and i in- by "in- floors have been
emptied until today all that remains
i.i this once tremendous stock is mi
the   main   'loor.
This balance, a- announced above,
i-   ;..   bi    dispi - d   - i   by   the   well-
known    auctioneers,    Messrs,  A.   M.
| Beattie   ami   Wm.   Atkinson,  and   in
ia  very   few   days    tin-    well-known
-inn  will l.e Int a memory.
Mr. James Stark has been idellli-
fied witli every movement fnr the up-
building i f Vancouver. Ha- a beautiful home in Shaughnessy Heights,
a summer In ain- at Horseshoe Bay
ami large financial interests I" which
he  will  now  iicviie  hi- entire time.
Thousands in Vancouver will re-
grel his retiremenl from the retail
business.
James Stark & Sons have- advised
us that the balance nf their stock i-
tn be sedd at public auction, commencing Tin-day. July 14. al 2 pill.
Undoubtedly everyone in Vancouver
is familiar with tin- history of this
concern���Inn fnr the benefit fi those
who are not we will give a brief
skeich nf their career Twenty-three
vear- ago, Mr James Siark���then in
tin- prime eif life-���heard tin- call fi
lhe Wesl. ll was thc new Wesl thin
���nut    iln-    electric    lighted,    steam-
NOTIQE TO CONTRACTORS.
1 lendera, marked "Tenders," will l.e
received up to ii.e- hour e.f ^ p.m. Monday,
.Inly   JU.    1914,   addressed   lo   U ill am    Kirk-
l.-ni.l.   Secretary   of  the   Scln.e.l   Trustees.  Seeulli
Vancouver, Commercial Street, corner of
Twenty.aecond   Avenue,  fe .r ihe  erection  and
complel   "i  :t  wood frame structure, lo be
used a- an annex i" Gordon High School,
r*erris Koad,
[Mans, specification! arel forms e.f tender
ma) be obtained let Ihe nfficc eef lhe letiekr-
sifmed.
The build -- '- to hi completed ley August
26.   I9l4.
I .    . .        - ' ,    i ��� closed    ee 'tii   :i   mark, if
���   . ���        to   -   pel   cent,   "i  Ihe  amount
of   tee-air.   which    will   lie   forfeited   should
irties   tendering   niii-e    ta   enter   iutu.
contract if called upon te' '1" so
'rin-   Trustees   'I"   "ea   bind   themselves   to
the lowest oi   an)   tendi r.
I.   II    llieWM \N.
Architect.
910-911 Vorkshire Rldg., Seymoui Street,
\ .-., couver,   i'. l
BAS
E  B A L L
Victoria
vs. Vancouver
FRIDAY. 4 p.m.
SATURDAY. 3 p.m.
Spokane
vs. Vancouver
WEEK
ATHLETIC   PARK
South End
Games start week days.
OK JULY  20.   1914
5th and HEMLOCK
Granville St. Bridge
4 p.m.                          Saturdays I p.m.
It Was Not Like This in the Olden
Days.
Policeman  Given  Thousand Dullar
Bill���By   .Mistake���Headline.
CANYON   VIEW   HOTEL
CAPILANO,   NORTH  VANCOUVER,  BC.
II. LARSON, Manager, p. LARSON, Proprietor.
fe
>
1                      ^^J^tk
M*   fH   *          till           .jsT  K*__-i��^jL .aW*���
J'T Jti
**^^MS*��Stey*UB U
���
li
Elevation  625  feet One hour's  trip  from  Vancouver Telephone  146
SCENIC   DELIGHTS,   FISHING.   HUNTING,    MOUNTAIN   CLIMBING,   Etc.
Unequalled  Resort for  Holiday,  long  or  short.       Family  Rooms
en suite with special rate.
Modern  appointments  throughout,   spacious  grounds,   high-class  service  at   moderate
rates.     Easy trail to top of Grouse Mountair, altitude 3,000 feet. SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1914.
SPECIAL
STOVE   WOOD
INSIDE FIR
3 Loads^   $8.00
COAST LUMBER & FUEL
COMPANY  LIMITED
Yard 1.���BODWELL ROAD and ONTARIO ST.
Yard 2.���3612 VICTORIA DRIVE, Cor. 20th Ave.
Phone:   Fraaer 41 Phone: Highland 226
COME IN 0UTJ)FJHE DUST!
Fruits   ���   Pure Ice Cream
ICE   COLD   SOFT  DRINKS,   COOL  FRESH   BUTTERMILK,
CANDIES, CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC.
" The Place with the Gramophone " Open Day and Night
Chinook Ice Cream Parlor
4251  MAIN STREET
CITY  IRON
WORKS
TELEPHONE   HIGH.
TERMINAL
list ALBERT ST.
ENGINEERS, MACHINISTS AND FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND 8PECIA*
REPAIRS OP ALL DESCRIPTIONS 	
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
CORNER 8th AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
Fairmont 189 Always Open
Furnishers of Complete Funerals for $55.00
This includes Burial Case, Hearse, Family Carriage, Removal
Charges and all Personal Services.
We guarantee quality of goods, services and equipment to be first-
class. Wc make no misleading statements, and we have a staff of
competent men who are prepared at any hour to render thc best service possible to be obtained anywhere.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking  Co.
Always Open Use of Modern Chapel to All
CORNER 8th AND MAIN STREET Telephone Fairmont 189
P. H. GROTE���Formerly Center & Hanna's Branch
The Scenic Highway  \cross the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM /ANCOUVER TO
ALL V��iRTS OF THE
WORLD
UJ
The Popular Route t�� the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to date Train Service Between Vancouver and the Eait.
All traint equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hasting St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. Ve/.  BRODIE,  Gen. Pass Agent, Vancouver.
"Esther, Beauteous Queen"
g     By   FRANK   CRANE
There is a class e.f people who read
ilu advertisements of clairve.yants,
palmist*, and fortune-tellers in the
newspapers, or such things would not
continue  tee  lie  printed  and  paid  for.
Mr.. Flora Emmons belonged te) this
clasa, She was a pathetic-eyed, too-
white creature, the kinel e.f personality created to be crushed; and she
had  not  missed  lier  calling.
One morning ibe sal by the window e,f the living-room in her dingy
flat, and by the pale light tli;it
climbed arojjnd the walls and chimneys and down into tlle inner court,
and fell at last exhausted into her
lap, she was reading the .laily paper.
Her eye rajigw) the column of fakers
who offered fortane, lave, ah4 .happiness by the woozy, pat.ll' of mystery,
and alighted upon the following:   .
THE SCHOOL FOR LOVE
Professor  J.   P.   Walmsley
The World-Renowned Savant
and Scientist, offers advice to all
upon the Secrets of Love, how to
cause others to love yeiu, how to
retain the affection of wife or husband, how to woo, and, in short,
how to understand and skilfully
use the delicate and difficult art of
LOVE
Suite 1746, Dobton Building
Hours, 10 to 3. Terms Reasonable
N.   B.���Prof.   Walmsley   is   patronized by the cream de la cream
of society.
I was
cantata
Evans-
Some thing stirred in the pale woman's heart as she read, and at fifteen minutes after ten she was knocking mildly at Professor Walmsley's
office  door.
Inside sat the professor with his
heels cocked up on the table. He
was reading a magazine and smoking
a cigar. He was a sandy-haired man
erf perhaps forty-five. On his chin
flourished a litlle bunch of whiskers
like a patch of alfalfa. His eyes were
blue and shrewd, his figure tended
toward portliness. The whole aspect
of the man, his visage and his clothes,
his manner and his look, would give
one the impression e.f a cross be
tween the faker and a farmer.
When he heard the rapping, he
let down his feet heavily, tossed his
cigar into the cuspidor, put aside
his magazine, brushed the ashes from
his vest, ran his fingers over his hair,
stroked  the  alfalfa, and went  to  the
demr.
No one was there. Mrs. Enimou's
courage had failed her, and she had
passed on around a corner in the cor-
riele.r and was getting a drink at the
water-copier, Her hand trembled,
for she did neit know but she would
hc arrested feir knocking and running
away. ���
Professor Walmsley peered up and
down the hall, and, seeing no one,
said softly, "Well, I'll be switched!"
He walked back to the window, leaving the doeir open. Standing there,
lie gazed out at the office building
across the street. He thrust his
hands in his pockets and whistled
softly. Then he began to sing. It
was not a melodious voice, but it was
a contented one, and reminiscent. He
was singing one of the airs from the
cantata of "Esther," which he had
learned when he was a boy.
"Long live our beauteous queen,
Esther,   beauteous   queen!
Hail, all hail to thee,
Esther, hail  to thee!"
"Oh, yem needn't be scared, lady."
"I went around the corner .if the
hall. Then after a while I came back
by your doeir, and it was open, and���
and I  heard yeiu singing."
���Tm in el llie singer I used to be,"
relumed the professor modestly.
"|l���it was what you sung. Vou
were singing 'Queen Esther.'
"Oh,   yes,   so   I   was!"
"���I nscil tee sing ill that,
the Queen when we gave the
at the Methodist Church in
villc,  Indiana."
Professor Walmsley's face beamed
with genuine interest. "Now you
don't say!" he exclaimed. "Why, I
was Ahasuerus myself, down in lien-
ton, Illinois. Now, ain't that funny!
And you and me both' here in New
York!    Well,  I  jinks!"
"Yes; my sister was the Phrophct-
ess. Oh, she had most beautiful hair.
It came 'way down to her knee. And
she wore it all let down when she
come out on the stage, and everybody thought it was grand."
"Did Professor Barker get up thc
show in your town?"
"Yes.   Was he in Benton?''
"Yes. Well, well, I jinks,
heard o' anybody in years that
knowed 'Queen Esther.'" And the
professor hummed:
"Hainan, Haman!   Long live Haman!
He is the favored one,
He is the favored one,
He is the favored one,
In all the  King's dominion."
"Yes," she responded, eagerly. "Oh,
I know it so well. And then it goes
on, "you know���" and she sang in a
pitifully strained  voice:
I ain't
"Bow down to
Bow down to
Bow down '
Hainan
Haman
nobody has geit acquainted with me
yet; seems like the people are offish
a little. 1 asked tlie minister once
if 1 could go to him, and he told me
to come, but on the day he set I was
sick, and  then  when  1  got  better he
was gone to Europe on his vacation.
11   was���it  was "
She   stopped,   choking.     At   length
she  found  her voice mice  more, and
'Excuse   me!     1
ve   got
They
ince in
a  glass
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
G. Smith, C. P. 4 T. A.
Phone :   Sey.  8134
C. E. Jenney, O. A. P. D.
S27  Grinville  Sireet
WILLOW  HOSPITAL
Corner BROADWAY and WILLOW
PATIENTS  RECEIVED  FROM  $15.00  PER WEEK
Miss HALL and Miss WESTLEY, graduate nurses
Phone Fairmont 2165
Hamilton Bros.
Embalmers and Funeral
Directors
Parlors and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Office Phone:   FRASER 19
Residence Phone:    FRASER 25
(Day or night)
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for public meetings,  dances,  etc., to  Let
Apply W.  J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
Seems Easy      \
Before the passage of the present
strict banking laws in Wisconsin,
starting a bank was a comparatively
simple proposition. Thc surprisingly
small amount of capital needed is
well illustrated by the story a prosperous country town banker told on
himself, when asked how he happened to enter the banking business:
"Well," he said, "I didn't have
much else to do, so I rented an empty store building and painted bank
on the window. The first day I was
open for business a man came in and
deposited a hundred dollars with me;
the second day another man dropped
in and deposited two hundred and
fifty; and so, by George, along about
the third day I got confidence enough
in the bank to put in a hundred myself!"
Hc was thinking, meanwhile, of
how good the watermelons used to
taste down at Benton, Illinois, when
he was- a youngster and sang in the
cantata at the church. And he was
thinking that he would buy a watermelon at a stand down the street
where he had seen some that morning, anil bring it up to the office and
cat it for lunch.
As he stood and sang quietly thus,
Mrs. Emmons walked by the demr.
It being open, she lopked in. No-
be edy passes an open door without
looking in. And she saw the broad
back of the professor, and she heard
his music. Then- was something In
the song that senl a quick rush of
blood to her face and gave her a
smothered feeling. In another minute she  had knocked again.
Professor Walmsley turneil. He
saw the wisp of womanhood halting
at his threshold. She was nervous
and embarrassed, manifestly. Hcr
dress was neat but out of date, and
her bonnet was of the vintage of���
well, if it had been wine it would
have been priceless. As it was, it
was valueless. Her eyes were very
large and brown and, with the red
lips, contrasted strangely with the
chalky face. Once she had been certainly a "pretty girl;'' now she
showed but the timorous and worried
ghost  of  a  past beauty.
Professor Walmsley advanced with
an eye for trade. He set forth a
chair.   "
"Good morning, lady. Come in.
Take  a  scat and  sit  down."
As she faded into the chair he
closed the door. Then he took the
office chair at the desk and gazed at
his caller, ready for business.
"Is this Professor Walmsley?" she
asked iu a high, throaty voice.
"Yes'm."
"Well, I saw your advertisement in
the paper today." Here she paused
and picked at her cotton gloves, looking down as if she were ashamed of
daring   to   exist.
"Yes'm," responded the professor,
encouragingly. "And what can I do
for you?"
I���I knocked at your door a while
ago."
"Did you? Was that you? Now I
wondered   who   that   was."
"I���I didn't have the courage to
come in."
and here shc broke down into a distressing cough that lasted some moments. When she took her handkerchief from her mouth there was a
little fleck of blood upon it.
Professor Walmsley noticed in
himself an unusual sympathetic embarrassment. Hc wanted to help her.
Then it came to him that he was letting sentiment interfere with his profession. He straightened up and
pulled down  his vest.
"What can I del for you this morning,   madam?"   he   inquired.
"Oh. yes," she answered. "Excuse-
nie, please! I got so interested iu
'Esther.' I���I want to consult you.
professor, if���that is, if I can afford
it."
She took out a purse from a
scarred handbag and contemplated it
a little dubiously. "Your advertisement said that you could give advice
about love, and about retaining the
affections, and���and all."
"Yes'm," said thc professor, warming up to his profession. "You've
come tei the right place, mum. It's
a little early in the season now, but
if you had come a month from now
you'd sec 'em standing in line in the
hall, waiting their turn, and some of
the swellest people in the city, ton.
VVhy, you'd he surprised at the number of folks that keep after me. I
just got a telegram from Mister Van-
derbilt and them Goulds and Astors
worry   mc   to   death."
"Oh! Do they?" exclaimed the
woman.
"Yes'm. T just finished a case between a millionaire's daughter and a
crown prince over in Europe. Conducted thc whole business by wireless."
"Isn't that wonderful!" cried the
wide-eyed little woman. "Were they
on a boat?"
"Yes'm. On two boats, going and
coming. I had to sit all afternoon
at the telegraph office, sending orders and receiving reports. It's
lawful hard work that way, a heap
hanler than when you have the parties right before you."
"And how did it come out?"
"Fine. Vine and dandy. Boats
crossed oul ill tiie middle of the
ocean, The crown prince had hisn
Stopped, was transferred in a
breeches-buoy to the other boat,
hem, and they yoked right there on
the deck. He takes a creewn out of
his suit case and slaps il on her
head, and she bands him a bushel of
gilt-edged bonds. They were married hy the ship's chaplain. Thc emperor wired approval. And the Supreme Court of the United States
called a meeting and passed me a
vote of thanks."
"Isn't that wonderful I" she said
softly, her eyes shining as the magnificent moving picture rolled before
her. Then she saddened. "I'm afraid
you wouldn't care to talk to me, sir.
I���I'm a poor person."
"Oh, that's all right, mum. Poor
and rich arc al the same to me."
"How much is it?"
He regarded her shrewdly, and
made a rapid mental estimate of
about the charge she would stand
and replied: "My preliminary fee is
two dollars,  mum."
She opened thc purse and counted
out two dollars on the desk, in nickels, dimes,  and  quarters.
"There!" she said. "I think I have
that much. That will leave me carfare to get home with."
The professor verified the amount
carefully and pushed the money aside
_    t*.ii.1.   ..:t���        e..pi,���,i,.    n1|    rinrlil  "   lie
continued
senile   trouble  wilh  my   tIir.>;it
say  it's  tuberculosis.    Every
a while  I  kind o' choke up."
The   professor   handed   her
of water.
"Thank you!" she said, as she took
twee sips and returned him the glass.
"Thank  you very  much I"
"Well, you speak right out (o me,
lady," said the professor. "Everything is secret and sacred lhat is told
me. Walmsley is just as deep and
dark as thc grave. Why, if I should
breathe even a whisper of what has
been told me it would blow up the
city same as a ton of dynamite. Go
right on!"
"Well, you see. professor, it's this
way. It's Fred, my husband. I want
to know what to do. I'm afraid he
doesn't love me any more." She
gave a dry gulp.
"No? And how's that?"
"Well, we were married in Evans-
villc. I was only eighteen. I am
sure he loved me than. Everybody
Bald'I was a beautiful girl, and I was
awful proud, and wore the nicest
clothes. Mother was a milliner
there, and she always dressed me
fine. And Ercd was so handsome.
All the girls wcre just crazy about
him. We had a perfectly grand wedding���flowers, and carriages, and
men calling out numbers in front of
the church, and���and all. Ered was
clerk in the leading store. He was
musical, too. Hc sang Haman when
we gave 'Esther' at thc church. That
was the first time I met him."
"Oh, it was, was it?"
"Yes. He was so tall and noble
and   grand   looking."
"Mm;" remarked the professor. "I
see.    Looked  the  part,  huh?"
"Yes.    And then Fred got an offer
to  go   lo   New   York.     I   thought   it
would be fine, as I could take veical.
Everybody said I had a grand voice,
and 1  thought it would be a fine opportunity  to cultivate il."
"I  see," observed Ihe professor.
'And after while Fred lost his position.    He got in with careless people,'
and be was always easy led, and all,
and so he lost his place.    lie hunted
everywhere  for  a  new  place,  but  he
couldn't find any; that is, any that at
all   suited   him.      He's  so    sensitive.
There's  lots of work  he  can't do  at
all."
"No?"
"Yes; and the babies had come
then, and I kind o' lost my health.
Hut I got stronger as they grew up.
.Ma sent me money regularly, and
we managed lo live on thai. But she
died���then I tried to get a place' to
sing. I tried for a church twice, but
they were all full. Then I went to
the theatres, but I couldn't get nothing to do. The theatre men laughed
at me. One of them offered me a
job in (he chorus, if I'd wear tights;
but T couldn't do that, you know."
"No," said the professor. "Oh, no."
"Then I gut work with Madame
Jacobson, in millinery. I was always
good at anything in hats. Madame
Jacobson is perfectly lovely. She's
been awful kind to me, professor, just
as kind as could be. She's given me
work often when she didn't really
need me. And last summer she lold
me she thought I ought to go out
into the country and take a vacation,
because my health was poor. Of
course I couldn't go���with Fred and
all���but it was real nice in her to
think of me that way. I feel she is
a true friend, professor; and true
friends, you know, are scarce."
"So they are. So tliey are," assented the professor.
"Things went on pretty well then,
till after while my boy died, and my
girl got kind o' wild, and she went
away from home, and I've never seen
her since. Thai was three years ago.
She- senl ine money for some time,
a lot of it at firsl, and then less ami
less,   and   finally   she   quit."
'I'he professor drew up his whiskers, chewed them meditatively, and
said,  "Mm!"
"I could stand all the trouble if
everything had been all light with
Fred. But I'll tell you, professor.
what I've never told a living soul.
I've kept it to myself until it's killing me.    I  found out he was untrue
"1 see," said the professor. "Is he
���ah���sick, or crippled, or anything
lhat  way?"
"Oh, no! There ain't anything the
matter with him." She le,i,kcd alarmed at the idea. "He's always real
well. And he isn't really bad. It's
just thai he's got a weak will. He
means right. But he's sei easy led. I
try to do all I can to keep him out
of bad company. I know when he's
reading   he's   not   iu   temptation."
"True!" observed the professor.
"True!"
"And then he's so sensitive. He
just simply can'l stand to go out and
knock about and ask for jobs aiid be
refused and all. It jujsX iuakes hjjp
se. blue!"
"Min-lim!" said the professor.     - ���
"Everything was going along all
right until lately; but lie's seemed
to be so cross and peevish iit me. I
don't understand it. Do you think
he is ceasing to love mc any more,
professor? I know I'm not handsome, like I used to be. But I try
tOKeep myself up���I do fry. I'm
always careful about my appearance.
And I always speak lovingly to him.
I   don'l  kneiw, it seems  I  would just
die if he didn'l !
ovc me.
te.
me.
"Yes?'
"Yes.
with  us.
she was
in a little pile. "That's all right," he
observed. "And now what can I do
for you?"
The woman coughed again, holding one transparent hand against her
breast,   and   began:
"You see, professor, I wanted
somebody to go to. That's the trouble in a big city���you don't have anybody to go to. When I was back in
Indiana I used to go to my pastor,
but I've never got acquainted with
any of the pastors here. They seem
so kind of far off. I've been attending church here for some-years, but
It was a lady that roomed
She was a saleslady, and
much younger than me. I
thought I'd die at first. But then I
braced up and concluded to stand it,
if I could just keep my husband. So
I let on I didn't mind his taking her
everywhere and going out with her to
spend the evenings, and all. It went
on from bad to worse. Fred got to
being real ugly to me, and I thought
I just couldn't bear it. And one day
the lady's bneihcr whipped Fred and
took hcr away. Since then lie's been
better."
"Indeed!" said the professor. "And
what is Mr. Fred doing now?"
"Why, he's been reading a considerable lately. I've been going by the
library and getting him hooks. He's
read all of Chamber's books; he's
quite fond of ihose kind of society
novels."
"Is   he?"  asked   the   professor.
"Yes. And he's read McCutch-
eon's works, ami all. I don't get any
time myself, but I've glanced through
the books and read here a.id there- in
them as I was coining home on the
car, anil they must b( grand. Those
pictures of the women in them are
just beautiful, anel such handsome
men! I don't wonder Fred likes
them. Seems as if he can just lay
and smoke and read all day."
"I see!" said the professor.
"I went to Queen Alice, the clairvoyant, and she read the cards, and
she gave me a caul to wear around
my neck. But it didn't do any good.
About that time it was he took up
witb our roomer. And then I've
been to Professor Cheiro, and to a
spiritualist meeting a friend told me
about,-and all; but it hasn't seemed
to help any."
"No?" said the professor.
"And I've prayed���I've prayed, and
that���" Here she was seized with
another spell of coughing which
racked her frame as the hurricane
racks lhe old house on the moor. The
professor sprang up and brought her
a glass of water, but shc could not
take it. At length the storm subsided. Her strangling ceased. She
leaned back for a few moments in
her chair, and closed her eyes. As
thc professor stood looking at her, a
sudden fear gripped him that she
might be dead. But she presently
opened her eyes, smiled a wan smile,
and   said:
"Never mind! It's all right now.
I have these spells often. And I
don't   mind   much."
She rested another moment, and
then went on, with her voice thinner
and  more   smothered  than   ever.
"As I was saying, I've prayed and
prayed, and somehow that doesn't do
any good either. Mother was a great
believer in prayer. But I don't know;
maybe 1 ain't got faith enough to
believe. You know faith can remove
mountains, professor, but I can't
seem to have it."
The professor had sat down and
was working at his collar, as if it
were  too  tight.    "Yes,"  he  said.
"Yes," she continued. "I've thought
some of joining lhe Christian Science. But I went tei one of the readers to ask about it, and she said I'd
have to buy a book. It cost three
dollars and a half. And I haven't
just seen where I could spare the
money   lately."
The professor eyed the little pile of
coin on the desk, and said: "No. I
don'l   suppose you  have."
"I've had our baby's picture���the
first boy, you know; he died when
hc was a baby, and Fred was awful
fond of him���I've had his picture enlarged and colored by an artist that
called one day. He did the picture
for nothing, just as an advertisement,
he said, and I only had to pay for
the frame. That was eight dollars.
I've had it put up in our room, and
thought maybe that would touch
Fred  some."
"I sec. I see," responded the professor.    ,
"I guess that's about all, professor,"
she resumed, folding her hands upon
her umbrella handle. "And now, if
you can tell mc what to do, I shall
be grateful, oh. so grateful." And
she looked up at him as heathen folk
look up at their idols.
The professor did not speak for a
space. Ile appeared tei be struggling
with some feeling that he wished to
suppress. He arose and walked to
the window, and drummed thrice
iipein the pane with his knuckles. He
drummed very hind, for long practise
had made his skilful and powerful as
a finger-drummer. Then he returned
to   his   expectant   client.
"Let mc jusl look at that purse
once," he said. She handed it to him.
Hc opened it and rapidly swept into
it thc pile of coins upon the table.
Then he gave it back to her.
"Madam," he said, "you'll excuse
me, but you've come to the wrong
place. I can't do you any good. I'm
a fraud. That's what I am. I'm a
plum   fake."
"Why���why, professor ���" she
gasped.
"Yes'm," he continued rapidly,
"just one of 'em, one o' the same
kind that's been stringin' you all
your life. I can take it from most
of 'em, but I can't take it from you.
Keep your money."
"But   I���I   thought  you  said  that
you "
"Yes'm, I said a heap o' things.
When I get to lying I do it with a
high hand and a stretched-out arm,
as lhe feller says. But, you forget it,
lady! Forget it! It was all bunk.
Say, when you was a girl you played
Queen Esther, Well, all them times
has been coming back to me. You
was young then, and so was I. The
world was young. I was different.
T was librarian in our Sunday School.
I'm different jiow. I'm hard. I fool
'em all. I ain't had a conscience for
so long I've forgot how it looks. But
you���you've kept something, Queen
Esther, that I've lost. It's in you
yet, something honest and simple
and childlike. You believe in things.
I   elou't  believe  in  nothin'.    Lady,   I
Continued on Page 7. SATL'RDAY, JULY 18, 1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SEVEN
Glazed Cement
Sewer Pipe
Is the choice of property owners in
every city where its value has been
demonstrated. It gives good service
and has durability.
Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.
155 FRONT STREET WEST Phone Fairmont 122
75 per cent, of your Summer Cooking can be
done with Electric Household Appliances
just as well as with a Kitchen Range and
with much greater comfort and convenience
Electric Household Appliances are ready for operation, day or
night, on an instant's attention to connecting the cord with the
household  socket.
ihey can do everything in the line of light cooking, preparing
tea or coffee, making toast, preparing eggs, frying chops, etc. You
don't want heavy meals during the hot weather and thc appliances
just meet this demand and make it unnecessary to have a hot fire
going.
Electric   Household   Appliances cost only a few cents per hour
of  continuous   operation.    To  prepare an ordinary meal takes but a
fraction of an hour.    They are guaranteed   by   the   manufacturers.
See our full line of Electrical Household Appliances
Carrall 8t  Hastings Stn.
1138 Granville St.,  near  Davie
Make Your Gardens Beautiful
Don't procrastinate! Those who have their gardens well cultivated should act quickly in securing what their tastes prompts to
select to make home surroundings beautiful. This obviates a rush
the last weeks of the planting season and consequently confers upon
us a direct favor. Our staff, through generous patronage arc taxed
to thc limit every day, late and early.
Don't delay placing your orders quickly, thereby preventing a
rush and enabling us to give efficient service in meeting your wants.
Our stock of flowering plants (Biennial and Perennial) cannot be
surpassed on this continent.
This is not. to use the slang phrase���hot air���but a fact. When
yon want cabbage, cauliflower and tomato plants order from us.
Catalogues mailed free on application.
ROYAL NURSERIES, LIMITED
Office��� 710 Dominion  Building, 207  Hastings Street West Phone Seymour 5556
Store���2410  Cranville  Street Phone   Bayview   1926
Greenhouses ami   Nurseries  at  Royal on  B.C.   Electric  Railway,   Eburne  Line, about
two miles south of the City limits. Phone  Eburne 43.
GLADSTONE   HOTEL
FIRST CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS H. G. BROWN, Prop.
Hughes Bros1 Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET  EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone : Seymoui 330
We carry everything in Wines, Liquors and Cigars
No order too small, and none too large  for this popular Liquor Store
Store open every evening until 11 p.m.
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
Leaving our Store every Thursday and Friday morning at 9 a.m.
Price List mailed free on application
VANCOUVER CREAMERY
ICE CREAM
Pure and Delicious       Insist on Having It
The Evolution of
COMMISSION Of COHSEBVATIOH
B
usiness
Street
Evil Effects of Lack of Foresight-
How a Municipality May Acquire
Land for Widening at Minimum
Cor.t.
Criticize ilu- congested main sireet
e>i a town as tiling too narn.w. anil
,i resident will probably tell yem:
"Yes, that is all right, we realize thai
BOW,   but.   when   lhe   street   was   laid
eellt.   lie,   eelH-   cut   ill.,light   it   Ha-   luiJul;
ie. he a busy  thoroughfare.    Why. I
i.-tii. iiil.e i   th,   linn- when all lhi~ peer-
li.iii ol ihe- itreet a here we an- standing was lined with private huuses"
We ean all oi u- think of ehezens of
examples oi this se.rt nf thing. The
problem    is    ie,  io plan  residential
roadways that they may be gradually transformed intn business streets
at a minimum e.f expense. One way
in which this may lie done may be
understood by a glance at the ac-
companying illustrations
The upper diagram sinews a street
(50 feel wide anil suitable for a residential section, The roadway is of
moderate width, sufficient tei accommodate ihe light traffic of delivery
waggons, carriages, etc.. that serve
ihe houses on either side. A boulevard and trees give it a pleasant appearance-, anil, also the- he.uses are
sei Ink 20 feet Irom ilu- property
line, wilh gardens eer lawns between
(hem   anel   tin-   side-walk.
If commercial interests should invade this regie ni. property owners
would, under ordinary circumstances,
build forward to the siele walk, partly
te. use the extra space, but chiefly tee
bring sturc windows flush up lo the
causeway. A portion oi the street
in process of transformation presents a very ragged appearance, due
to the lack of a uniform building line.
When llle process is complete, the
once beautiful residential street has
become a congested business thoroughfare   wilh   narrow   walks   and  a
. 44-foot roadway. Tei widen it would
necessitate  the tearing down  eel" valu-
! able buildings anil would be a heavy
expense  to  lhe   taxpayers.
Foresight   would   obviate   this   un-
j desirable   development.     All    that   is
j necessary is tee establish a restriction
prohibiting the use eef land for build-
| ing beyond an established line.
Legally, e.f course, this involves compensating llu- property owners, but
the damages ean be distributed over
a long period in a simple way. Xo
property rights need be acquired by
the  municipality  until  application  i-
| made for a building permit on an
obstructive site, and then the restriction can In- imposed and paid for. In
this wav the public thoroughfare is
gradually widened at exactly the
same rate as llle growing commercial
interests require. Al no time is il
necessary to pull down buildings
When any considerable number of
properly owners require it, the walk
may be moved over tee the building
line and the roadway widened. Tin-
trees shemld be left'as long-as possible, and. unless a street railway is
constructed, should be a permanent
feature.
The lower diagram shows the ultimate    development    of   the   60-foot
jiormous
Waste
of Coal
Ordinary Methods Use Only 5 Fer
Cent, of Energy Locked Up in
Coal Aress���AdvanUges of Byproduct   Coke  Ovens.
street into a 100-foOt thoroughfare.
Safety for pedestrians crossing thc
wide roadway is provided by "islands"
at the base of each pole holding the
electric wires. Motor cars may run
up and down lhe middle unimpeded
by slow-moving waggons and drays,
while the latter have ample room to
pass between the street car tracks
and standing vehicles by tlle sidewalk.���P.  M.  B.
St   *   *
In connection with the above it
is interesting to compare the following extract from a recent address by
COMMISSIOW Or CONSERVATION	
Mr. Raymond Unwin, F.R.I.B A.. In-
fore the Victoria I.e ague Impe-rial
Health Conference in London:
"There  are   certain   requirements   ol
town planning which are fairly obvious and generally applicable, such
ai tin- prevention oi the overcrowding of dwellings, and the fixing of
such a building line on all the main
highways radiating out of the town
into the country, as will prevent
buildings being erected so near to
these n,ails that future widening can
only take- place at excessive cost alter demolition of ihe buildings."
SLOW     .STREIT
TBAFriC     CARS
t *- ��"	
TAST   TRAiriC
 ?4'_	
STREET
CADS    !
T��Amc   vehicles
A   100-FOOT   THOROUGHFARE.
PARIS HOUSING SCHEME
During the next eighteen  months,
' cheap and hygienic dwellings will be
erected in  Paris (a city oi high rents)
> fm- in. fewer than 6(1.1X10 persons who
are at present living iu unsanitary
nouses. The Municipality e.f Paris
has borrowed $4,000,000 freun the
Xaiiemal   Pensions  Office   at  4.2  per
: cent,   and   has   already   purchased   36
'acres of building land for $2,165,000,
an   average   cost   of  $1.35   per   square
! foot. At a cost of $i3.(!(X),(i0(] it will
be  possible  te.  build   11,000  lodgings.
| each capable of accommodating al
least   five  persons.    These  dwellings
| will, it is hoped, be ready  for occu-
j pancy in June.  1915.
This   action   on   the   part   of   the
municipality givis effect to a bill
dealing with the housing problem
passed by the National Assembly lasl
year, which empowered the Paris
Municipality to incur a direct expenditure of $30,000,000 in improving
Housing conditions, and authorized it
to make advances t.. the philanthropic and building societies which are
trying io solve the housing problem.
The council has decided to spend the
remaining half of this authorized expenditure in the construction of
dwellings on the site of the dismantled fortifications of Paris, when
the grand scheme which will give
Paris yet an.ither ring of boulevards
becomes a reality.���The Journal of
State   Medicine.
"Perhaps   (he   mi il   aerioui   waste
��� hich i- tat ie g plai in thi Dominion at the p-e s i : time in connection with its mine al iemun i - is pre-
ii nt. el by the mil i i and utilization
In the Hi st place, in mining
-i deal -earn, ire.m 50 to 'Ml per cenl
��� i iln i ual i- lefl in the workingi ie.r
the purpose I supporting the re..,f.
���if the coal which is taken out and
burned under boilers in the usual
manner, ���.n 1 > aboul !-' per cent of
the total energy i- developed. That
ii t'. lay, we secure i><r useful pur-
pi -e - inly aboul 5 per cenl. e.f ihe
total energy contained in the ce.al
contained in the area. If the coal
i- burned in gas producers and the
gai io obtained used in internal combustion engine-, these, Inning a
higher efficiency, develop about 30
per 'int. of the energy in lhe coal
actually mined, "r about 12 per ctnt
ot (Iii- energy locked up in the cual of
the whole area. Thi- is an improvement, bui -nil repri tents an enormous waste,
"On tin either hand, the coal may
In- mined fur the production 'ef coke
i"r metallurgical purposes. About
three-fourths of the coke produced
i'ir tin- purpose in North America
an.l all tin coke made in Western
Canada i- manufactured in beehive
furnaces, which yield a relatively low
pern-mage fi coke, while lln- olher
- fi lhe coal���gas, tar, ammonia, benzol, etc.���go t'i waste. All
th.-- products may be saved by
making the cki- in by-product ovens,
representing in localities where the
surplus gas can In- -uld at a reason-
al le rate, a gain which is estimated
by Mr. F. E. Lucas, manager of tin
coke "ven- of the Dominion Coal
Company, at S1.9X per ton of coke
made This figure will, of course,
vary "ith tin- locality in which lhe
coke i- produced, but ii emphasizes
the greal -aving which may be effected by the il-. ..t tin modern byproduct oven. The tar and ammonia
obtained by this process, moreover,
el with a ready market The former i- already being used extensively   in   (he   Dominion   feer  a   variety   of
purposi aiming   them   as  a   binding
material in tin manufacture of briquette- from slack coal, ihus enabling
this waste product to be successfully
d���w hile iln- ammonia i.s a fertilizer ui tin- greatest value, f.er whict
��� ;- greal demand abroad and foi
which an ever-increasing demand
t\:\] arise in Canada as the necessity
of employing improved methods of
agriculture i- brought home tn our
farmers."���Dr. I-'. I). \ilam-. before
the Royal Societj   of Canada.
A splendid musical programme is
being prepared feer the evening service at the Wilson Heights Methodist Church next Sunday at 7.30 p.m.
Al! b . Icome.
Mr. Harper was very much better,
so Mrs. Harper allowed the nurse
an evening off. As she herself vvas
to keep a very important engagement, she told lirklget to watch the
sick room and gave her several orders which, she impressed upon the
Irish girl's mind, were very important. Returning later than she intended, she heard Mr. Harper moving restlessly and, after quieting him,
she   sought   Bridget  for   information.
"I wonder what makes Mr. Harper so restless. He was sleeping
very soundly when I went out. Do
you  know,  Bridget?"
"No mum,"  said  the  conscientious
girl, "unless 1 disturbed his moind
when I woke liim up to give liim his
shlecpin'  powder."
A charming girl eif eighteen, the
daughter of a Western ranch owner,
and quite a society queen in her own
city, had been brought by her father
to attend a White  House reception.
As her small hand disappeared
within the hearty grasp of the President, the maiden looked up at him
and, smiling sweetly, said:
���'I'm awfully glad to meet you, Mr.
Roosevelt. I've often heard dad
speak of you."
"Esther,  Beauteous  Queen."
Continued from Page 6.
amt  in your class.    I  ain't lit ten  for
ye.U    t'e    wipe    .Veelir    feet    oil."
"I 111.   prolL-sseer,   I'm   sure   you "
������There, now'. Vou run along home
and lake care o' Freddy, It wont
he i,,ng���cr���1 mean he'll soon come
around all right. Men are curious.
They have spells that way of neglecting Iheir wives, but they get over
it."
-Oh, do you think so?"
"Dead sure of il! V.ut keep right
,,n. You're all right. Keep up that
prayin'. Don't get discouraged. Folks
nave been praym' fe.r some thousands
,,' years, and will be prayin' yet when
me" ami all the resl of the 'con nun
are swept off the earth into the gar-
hage can. where we beleing. And
there is one piece of advice I'll give
ymi, and it won't cost you a cent���
y.eu keep away Irom tin- Queen Alices
ami lhe clairvoyants and all them
bug-house bunch. They don^t want
anything but yur money. 1 hey re
jusi sittin' around like spiders, getting (at e.n such poor little tbe- as
vou. You prayl That's the stunt.
' ������( Hi. professor, do you really think
'so'' I'm s" glad you've told me this.
Ami would ye'll pray ie.r me, too, an.l
| for Fred?"
The profess <t coughed, as ii sunn
one bail struck  him below  the belt.
It was a few seconds before lie could
iconic to himself.   Then he answered
"Well, now. lady, I'll tell you. I've
kind o' got my hand out at prayin,
myself, but I have a friend back in
Benton that's awful familiar with the
throne of grace, and I'll just write
him a line telling him there's a party
_a coiqile of parties���here 1 wish
he'd mention.    Xo names, of course.
"Oh, thank you, so much��� 1���I am
sure you arc a good man. professor,
though you do run ydurself^down bo.
I  must go  now.    Good-by!"
She held out her long blue-and-
white hand, which tlle professor took
In his huge paw tenderly.
"Good-by!" he said. "And if you
ever need'a friend, ma'am���I dont
mean in a professional way, but a
real husky man to help you out-
why, vein telephone me."
"Thank you-!    Good-by!"
When she had closed the doeir behind her. the professor heard her
coughing again violently in the hall.
He went out to see if she needed
assistance. Hut the spasm subsided
as he stood helplessly by. She
leaned a while against a pillar, with
her eyes closed, breathing rapidly. By
and by she recovered her strength.
She smiled and said good-by again
as she entered the elevator.
The professor returned to his room.
He walked the floor. Once or twice
he brushed his eyes with the back of
his hand. Occasionally he would exclaim   under   his   breath:     "Oh,   the
onery     cuss!       Oh,     lhe     low-down
whelp!     <Hi.   L.Tdy!"
The Swede janitor came in t.e bring
back   lhe   waste-basket.
"Nels," said the professor, "will
you lei me kick yuu three times,
hard,   fur   fifty   cents?"
"Sure."   grinned   the   janitor.
"All right! Stand around here!"
..ml the professor administered three
kicks with all his might, accompanying them with. "There! ymi low-down
sun eef a gun! Take thai. Mr. Fred!
You'd sit around, wieiilel you, and���
Oh! geish blame you! lake lhat!
Take   that'"
iln- professor became al! heated up
with his unwonted exertion, and
Stopped, panting, to arrange his dis-
ordered collar and tic
Tlu- janitor laughed as he pocketed
his coin "That was yust fun," he
said. "Sunn linn- you want some
more, you .-inl iur me. I give yuu
five, sevLii kicks al nn- iur a quarter.
When the satisfied Swede bad
gone, tin- professor walked the floor
again, and at length went mer lu tin-
window and drummed sunn' more
with hi- knuckles,
By and by he sang iu a very high
tenor \i i.i. lo himself:
A   gallon ���fifty���cubuts���hiiigh!"
Built  by   Hainan's hands,
"Behold their waiting  stands,
And then in a bass voice thai ran
slowly,   fatefully  down     ilu-    gamut
until it was lust in a hoarse whisper.
because it was below the Walmsley
register:
"Thereon���let���Hay-mun���diiie!"
Anecdotes
Anderson Market
The Family Butcher at
the Sanitary Shop
Try our mild cured Hams and
Bacons,  machine  sliced.
The place to get your Cooked
Hams and Jelly Tongue.
Don't forget we carry the finest
New Zealand Butter and Local
Eggs.
FOR  A   SQUARE   DEAL   AND
QUALITY. TRY
J. E. ANDERSON
Prop.
Tel. Fair 1634
4192 MAIN STREET
i     ".Mi-'   Rogers,"   said   Belle,   wiping
I her hai ,'.-  on  her apron, "yo jisi   ta
git   riel   .''   that   trifling  Jim'  Johnson
or  I  leave yoh,"
"What's the trouble,  Belle?"
"Why.   that   Ce l.-re-.l   trash   i-   steal-
in' from me same as ii I was whitt I"
*  * *r
Little    Mr.   Einstein,    a    travelling
>man, - >n Thai ' I lay Found
himself far away from home, and naturally wry lonesome     I le knew   nol
ul in the hotel al  which he was
staying, and he decided thai he must
attract  somi   attentie n at any cost.
Presently a bell-hop cami  througii
bbj paging a Mr. Murphy. "Mr.
Murphy!     Mr.   Murphy'"   In   shunted,
p :i :  \l-   Einstein jumped up
and hollen d     "Say bi ij. \ al initials;-"
CENTRE & HANNA
LIMITED
Established  1803
Refined Service    New Location
1049 GEORGIA ST.
Opposite new Y. M. C. A.
Fireproof     Columbarium     and
Mausoleum
OPEN   DAY   AND   NICHT
Seymour 2425
                      ������!   HI llllllll ==:1\
jL\fmt)           W\m          A     GOOD     HEATING     SYSTEM       MEANS
H     P^^Bv                fl
COMFORT   AND    SATISFACTION
I       "PEASE
Hcjm' ���    ���
���S3      ,^K-'-'
8     9
^^^^t.^^^^^" -\\mi
ECONOMY"
H      HWi<: A- *       if            * x^V"
HEATERS
BBS    ESfflK                                       ARE   GOOD
^Hgjt_J^BJgpl^��                            "Ask the man who has one"
PEASE PACIFIC FOUNDRY LTD.
1135 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C.                                         Phone Seymour 3230
"           ���= ������ ������ : : EIGHT
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1914.
TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN
SOUTH VANCOUVER SCHOOLS
The South Vancouver Sch h 1 Board
re equipping a building as an annex
o the HIkIi School, which will be
-ed fur a manual training, commer-
ial course and .science department,
Mr. Bowman, tbe architect, has
be plans all drawn and they were
onsidered by the board on Tuesday
ight, when ii ��as decided to call for
endcrs al once.
The new structure "ill be erected
i- fu- pi, -.-ii  I ;/��� Sch-" I grounds,
anel will be equipped with the latest
improved machinery, and is expected
ie.   be   the  best   equipped   school   in
B.C.   of  its  character.
Tlu- laiiu-s will be see arranged as
to make il impossible For any accident  tu happen to the boys,
i Ine combination irood-working
machine, consisting ol a saw-table, a
band saw. a ihaper anel mortice machine will be Installed, which will be
i greal time saver.
Charlotte Islands service. The pres
em -ul siely amounts i" $10,000 and
the C. T. P. Company considers ihis
sum insufficient.
Quite a number i'i settlers are
coming into the north country now.
Last week some half dozen land
seekers from California have come
in ami nunc into tlie interior.   There
were alsii a COUple of .Minn. - -la
ranchers whu went Up the line looking fur grazing country, with the
idea of putting in stock.
All uf the halibut schooners and
iteam crafl that formerly Fished on
ilu wesl coasl "i Vantouver Island
are n.ew on Hecate Straits, having
found thai the fishing banks of the
s.euih have heen temporarily fished
out.
���fuisri   fW   -
jts/st.'tn    i ���**����� .
.-^iSSSBV     ������#!   e^BBaWMWSI*SIBBWWMMBi^BSlj^^M^^^MJ^^M^^^^^^^,^^a^^M^^M^jMa^,^jfjpj^^Maj
Rossland.
Mike Dieniivan of Rossland has
fallen heir to $5(),()IK) hy the death
of an uncle in Ireland, lie quit running the livery Stable al once and il
now in Ireland getting the money.
* *  it
Windermere.
St   John   Harmsworth,   a   brother
eel"   Lord    Xuithcliffe,   and   win,   fiisi
turned   to   profitable   account    thi
mineral springs in France freun which
Terrier water is derived, i.s iu liritish Columbia in connection with the
operations of a syndicate of London
capitalists, which intends developing
the radium springs near Windermere,
and situated un the east side of tlle
Columbia Kiver. (ti) miles suiiih of
Golden, and 13 miles north uf Windermere. The cumpany, called the
Radium Natural Springs Syndicate,
Limited, is capitalized at $125,000,
and proposes to erect a large sanitarium and bottling works, laying mil
grounds and otherwise establishing
a replica of une of the famous springs
in Europe, Some 615 acres eif land,
including mineral rights, have been
secured, comprising the Sinclair radium hot springs. Among the members of the syndicate are 0. R. Stewart, owner of a large part of the holdings at Sinclair springs since 188K,
and fur many years a resident of
liritish Columbia, Hun. Dudley Carl-
tun and Denys Stephenson.
Technical   Exhibit  at  South   Vancouver High School.
Fire Chief's Report.
In his report to the fire, water and
light committee, Fire Chief Lester
states that during the quarter ended
June 30, thirty-one fire alarms were
sent in. The loss on buildings
amounted to $11,270 and on contents,
$6133.65, a total of $17,403.65. The
value of the property involved was
$52,204, and the amount of insurance
paid, $11,313.65.
During the three months 152 permits to burn were issued by the fire
department.
Commenting on the need for new
quarters at South Hill, Chief Lester
remarked: "The greatest possible
economy has been observed in the arrangement of space for the men.
alarm   installation   and  apparatus   at
No. 3 station. For the convenience
of tiie men on their return from a
fire, soaked, cold and dirty, a stove
is set up in the back yard, around
which they dry their clothes, bath,
etc. Our removal to new quarters,
which we expect will bc built before
the wet weather sets in, will mean
quite a radical change from present
conditions, but no doubt we will be
able to adapt ourselves to our new
surroundings. I know your committee have this matter in hand and that
it will be brought to a successful issue."
 ��� ^ i	
Prince Rupert.
The Prince Rupert Board of Trade-
is petitioning for a mail subsidy
amounting to $30,000 for  the  Queen
Summerland.
Alex. Leitch, manager for the Dominion dinners, Ltd., arrived in
Summerland, July 6, and is busy
among the growers making preparations for opening the canning plant
there for the season's operations.
Mr. Leitch hopes to increase the output   considerably   this   year.
*    e,    *
Skidegate.
Rev. Dr. J. C. Spencer of Skidegate has been transferred to Port
Simpson, succeeding Rev. J. H.
Raley. j. H. Young has been named
as teacher of the Indian day school
at Skidegate, in place of A. C. Brown
and R. H. Cairns, formerly of Chilliwack, has been appointed inspector
uf  Indian schools for the province.
/5=
Summer
Race Meeting
AT
MINORU PARK
A BIG SOCIETY FEATURE
::     ::     EVERY DAY     ::     ::
Special Trains leave new Granville Street
Station at   12,  12.30, and   every   fifteen
minutes until 2 o'clock
ADMISSION, $1.25, Including Grandstand and Transportation
Ladies Admitted Free except on Saturdays
Races Rain or Shine
COLUMBIA   BITULITHIC   COM-
PANY COMMENCES WORK
ON BODWELL ROAD
Company Declares That the Splendid
Record on Kingsway Will Be Sustained in the Handling of the
Smaller Contract and Further Sus-
I tained in Event of Victoria Road
Contract Being Awarded Them.
"Bitulithic," said a gentleman who
is interested in the proposed pavement of Victoria Ruad, "is a pavement which, through ils density and
inherent stability, stands out as a signal achievement in the street paving
industry."
In this connection, it might be
said, the Columbia Bitulithic Company have begun work on Bodwell
Road, and promise to handle that
work with the attention and care
which has made thc famous Kings-
way   stretch   of   bitulithic   the   finest
bituminous pavement on the Pacific
Coast
(in Bodwell Road, the company declare!.. South Vancouver labor only
will he employed. In making this
rule, ihe company is going to considerable expense, but believe that as
the interests of South Vancouver are
rapidly becoming the interests oi the
bitulithic people, the employment
solely of local labor will lie to mutual
advantage in the long run. if to some
little  disadvantage  t"  the  company
it   this   lime.
Among bituminous pavements, bitulithic   has   long   held   premier   place.
and in tin event of a bituminous
pavement lieing specified for Victoria
Road, the council will do well to extend the goeeel work whieh has marked tlle opening ihis year's allotment
of  contracts  on   Bodwell   Road.
The Columbia Bitulithic Company
have a permanent staff al we.rk in
Ihe city eef several hundred men.
ameeiig which are many numbers of
Smilli Vancouver residents who have
become expert at the laying eif the
pavement
Hot Cakes
All Possible Damage Has Been
Done.
The suffragettes were righl in
abandoning iheir campaign in thc
Balkans. There's m el Iling left there
to be destroyed except the rulers, and
they are all looking eagerly at the
time tables of mads running out of
the   district.
Of Old  Age,  Probably.
"Before   I   die   half   the   people
Mexico   will   die   with   me."���Huerta.
* * *
He  Simply Doesn't Belong.
Picking a balloonist  for  president
of the aero cluh is a good deal like
picking the propelling power of a jin-
rikshaw as president of the American
Automobile   Association.
* * *
Votes  for  Women���Skirts  for  Men.
In Ohio men are required lo wear
skirts on their bathing suits. Is Ihis
the  beginning  of tlle   finish?
* Si  *
Efficacious Tipple.
Villa's rivals who charge him with
being drunk with ambition might
profit by using the same kind of an
intoxicant.
A Stupendous Invention.
That    wireless   telephone   between
New   England ami  Wales  will  he. indeed, a miracle, if people are able to
talk   Welsh   over   il.
* * *
The Reward of Virtue.
i \s exemplified by the clam i
He leads a  wholly lilamele-s life.
He   gives   himself  no  airs;
With  calm  content   his  thoughts  are
lient
I'pein  his e.wn  affairs.
Of qualities "I  mind and  heart
No  creature  could  he  prouder;
ifel Pate's decree it is that he
Sh'eiilel   finish   in   lhe   chowderl
Untouched hy malice,  hate or greed.
Averse   to   seerdiel   strife;
Among the-  reeds and  sands he leads
Ilis  inoffensive  life
No enmities e.r grudges serve
I'..  make  him  grim  and  hitter
Yet in  the end he's d ned to spend
Ilis future ui a fritter!
* * *
Insulated.
Typewriters to Be Operated by
Win-less   Waves.���Headline.
Not unless they remove those nonconducting tortoise   shell  hairpins.
* + *
Some Good After All.
At   last  we  have    discovered    the
utility   of   investigations.     They   always  develop  lhe  fact  lhat a  lot of
money  is missing.
+ Si t$
Solution of a Long Perplexing
Riddle.
Xow   thai   eggs   are   to  be   sold   hy
weight,   we   understand   llle   purpose
of a   Tuckahoe  farmer  whe.  feeds  his
chickens  gravel  every  few  days.
The  Saving  Word.
l-'utile Attempt to Wreck
I laven   Train.���Headline.
The addition of the we.rel
ni;ike-s this credible.
Xew
The  Limit.
The  tired business  man  was never
so tired in his history as he has been
since  the  present   Congress  went   to
work.
* * *
Rough on  Rye and Bourbon.
Mary   Garden   says   she   owes   her
success to the Scotch  in  her.    Honest  confession  is  good  feir  the  soul,
by why he invidious.
n
OIL
The Pioneer Oil Company
LIMITED
NON-PERSONAL LIABILITY
ALL SHARES FULLY PAID.   NON-ASSESSABLE
CAPITAL
$500,000
Divided into 500,000 shares of $1.00 each, fully paid and noii-assessahle.
The  Company  hereby  offers  for  public  subscription 350,000 shares at such price as thc  Directors ���hay ���
from time to time decide, beginning at 50c per share.      The    whole    purchase    price   being   p&y&hlii   with
application.
DIRECTORS
PERCY F. CURTIS, Retired, 1700 Prospect St. Oak Bay, Victoria, B.C.
DR. D. B. HOLDEN, Physician, 851 Fort Street, Victoria, B. C.
A. C. MITCTELL INNES, Financial Agent, 639 Fort St. Victoria, B.C.
D. O. ROCHFORT, Broker, 103 Pemberton Block, Victoria, B. C.
THOMAS PLIMLEY, Automobile Dealer, 109 Douglas St., Victoria, B.C.
"ONE GOOD INVESTMENT IS WORTH A LIFETIME OF LABOR"
Money is a tool capable of earning 4 per cent or 400 percent, according to the skill and judgment with
which it is used. Every dollar saved represents a possible opportunity to make it breed and multiply with
prodigality.
WAIT FOR YOUR OPPORTUNITY���BUT RECOGNIZE IT WHEN
IT COMES
That's the whole secret of "getting on in lhe world"���the ability to see when a real opportunity presents
itself, and, when you see it, to grasp it.
THE PIONEER OIL COMPANY, LIMITED
Controlling under exceptionally favorable leases, 2HHI acrel of oil bearing land on North render and
Mayne Islands, offers a life-time opportunity for the shrewd Investment of large or small sums under conditions offering immense profit possibilities.
Practical men of high repute and sound oil experience jointly state there is every scientific reason to
believe  lhat  vast oil  deposits exist on this property���sufficient  to pay fabulous dividends for years lo come.
HERE IS AN OPPORTUNITY FOR YOURSELF AND POSTERITY
Capital is rciiuired to adequately test and develop this vast tract and with that purpose the Pioneer Oil
Company, Limited, has ncen chartered under the laws of British Columbia and is placing on the market a
preliminary issue of slock at fifty cents per share, all shares being fully paid and non-assessable.
The  United   Kingdom   imports  six  millions   sterling of petroleum annually.
The  liritish  Navy requires oil bases in its own possessions  for  licet  supplies.
The Ottawa Government pays a bounty on oil taken from Canadian borings sufficient in itself to net
the Company a handsome profit���add to this the commercial profit on large oil production and dividend
possibilities are  simply stupendous.
Invest your money with men you know, with a Company whose property you can personally visit at
any time, under conditions where you are in daily touch with developments.
Help build up British Columbia���Send for prospectus giving full  details.
The Pioneer Oil Company
LIMITED
HEAD OFFICE
-    -    503-4 CAMPBELL BUILDING, VICTORIA, B. C.
SALES AGENCIES :
VANCOUVER, B. C.      -      -      MORAN & CO., 572 GRANVILLE STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.      -      -      1309 DOUGLAS STREET
PIONEER OIL CO., LTD.,
Campbell   Building,  Victoria, B. C.
Dear Sin :
Having received prospectus I request you to allot me  	
shares of the above named company and enclose herewith	
Dollars for which I request you to allot me     shures
at the rate ol 50 cents per share.    All shares being fully paid and nonassessable.
Name	
Address 	
Occupation	
Date  !	
THE PIONEER OIL COMPANY, LTD.,
Campbell  Building,
Victoria, B. C.
Gentlemen :
Please  send,  without cost  or  obligation,
full information and data.
Name    .
Address

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