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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Jan 25, 1913

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Array %������. CHINOOK
f A Half Million in 1917 ^      ^^
Vol. I., Xo. 37
SOUTH VANCOUVER,   B.C., CANADA, SATURDAY,JANUARY25,1913.
J'rice 5 cents
Edward Gold Explains
His Attack on Council
Charges Councillor Thomas with having Roads Put Through
Private Property���A Reply to Correspondents
Tn the editor
PEEvE  FOR   1913
IT he Chineeuk":
Sir.���There- appeared two letters iii
your lasl Saturday'! publication sign-
eel by one Khcnczcr Whyte and John
Black respectively, In which they were
evidently much perturbed and to'ik
umbrage al my pre-election letter in
yours nf the 11th inst. Ihese writers
want t'i know who this Edward Gold
is. thai he darea to refer to Councillor Thomas eif South Vancouver as
an "Antideluvian Fossil," and say that
because he has -een seventy-six years
and has slill ureal vitality, I must have
no veneration for old age to use such
expression, alse, that Councillor
Thomas and the Council thwarted my
plans by neet laying my property with
sidewalks anel all the latest improvements, that yeetir readers are not tei
imagine that I am a "paragon of virtue," that I slu mill remove the "beam"
from my eyes, and they ask if it is
disinterestedness thai makes me seek
the  Municipality's  welfare.
I wish lee point "in to these gentlemen that il  they were to refer lo the
minutes   of   the   past   Councils   they
would   find   resolutions    passed    and
adopted agreeing that if 1 had Lot 638
cleared   and   stumped,   the   Council
would put through    proper   streets,
sidewalks,   water   mains   and   electric
lights.   This  1  had done at a cost of
over  $5,000,   ihen   last   year  in   open
Council meeting, Councillor Thomas
promised that the work that the previous Council began  would be finished early, and he has not carried  ihis
out.    But I repeat that he could and
did  use   the   taxpayers'    money     for
opening   up   streets   through   private
property, viz.;  Lot  ..  of 22 in  D.L.
650, through lilocks 10, 11, 12, D. L.
701, and the Baird properly, and when
Mr. Baird began  suit against  him  be
"whined"  to  the  Council  to  pay  the
costs of defendln" tbe action,    Beish!
Talking about reverence, etc.,   I have
none for that kind of a "Public Man."
and further I say he should be forced
to make good the cost to thc Municipality for putting these streets through
private property  that  show  none  in
the plans of sub-division.   The Municipal Engineer does the bidding of the
Councillors of the respective wards, so
do not try to shift the blame to him.
God knows, he has already enough to
answer  for,  though   his  fat  salary  is
out of all proportion to his worth to
our Municipality, and "Finis" it means
to him as soon as wc arc "annexed"
to the City.
Mr. John Black, you were correct
in insinuating that it was not disinterestedness in South Vancouver's "welfare" that prompted nie to write on
the 11 lh inst. I want to remove the
"mote" from the eyes nf the ratepayers of South Vancouver so that their
"vision"   will   lie   clear   of   how   past
Councils misappropriated iheir money,
and s<, shun veiling for blanket-money
bylaws to enable a set of "incapable,
incompetents" dissipating ihe taxpayers money.
Now, Mr. Whyte and Mr. Black, you
ask who this Edward Gold is? I will
enlighten yen as sheirtly as possibh
Edward Gold does nut set himself up
for a "paragon e,f virtue," nor claim
1" he Ihe man thai pul the "salt in
the' ocean," bul Edward Gold pays
South Vancouver about three thousand
dollars per annum taxes 'en D, l��� 638
which is assessed at aboul three hundred thousand eh'liar- ami which will
surely be worth a million as soon as
"annexation" to the- City passes, .-.,
thai we obtain the costly ami much
needed improvements iu sewerage,
water supply, fire protection, etc., eii-.,
ihat these present "rural" dictators
are unable lei grasp and cope with
intelligently.
Edward Gold is the man lhat had
ex-Councillor Jeelm McDonald step
down and eeut for cutting down his
lots on Fraser Avenue to hi- own
grade at an expense of $3,01*) to lhe
taxpayers.
Edward Gold found that the money
for specific Bylaw Xo. 6 for $1.(15(1,000
was being misappropriated and that
the system of sending out the Municipal money chest to pay off the workmen iu "cash" instead e,f hy paper
vouchers and time cheques was "bad."
It was Edward Gold who examined
the Comptroller's books and pay-
sheets and started the "pot boiling" lo
get this "Government Audit" which
is to be continued shortly and has
shown already to be vitally necessary.
Xow. Mr. Ebcnezcr Whyte and Mr.
John Black, tell thc "Chinook" readers who you are, what interest have
you in the Municipality, what taxes
(if any) do you contribute? Have
you an axe to grind or are you busy
now grinding it? I assume Mr. Whyte
and Mr. Black that you do not belong to that class of "Lecherous Parasites" that hang on and seek the patronage of the "bosses" of the Municipal Wards, and "infest" the Municipal Hall. Mr. Whyte and Mr. Black,
let me further enlighten you, do you
know what that ten to one vote for
"annexation'' to the City really implies? Well, it means that it is the
. outh Vancouver ratepayers' cry from
out the "wilderness" to be saved from
themselves, that they have no confidence in the Municipal Council timber, and wish to abolish all the official "soft-snaps" and high salaries that
we are made lo disgorge for the upkeep of the Municipal Hall which
sheiuld bc converted into a "jail" instead.
EDWARD GOLD
1774 Pendrill Street.
Reeve Kerr is Returned
To Lead Council Again
Results of  the  Municipal Elections held on Saturday last
The Official Figures of Returning Officer Springford
FOR  REEVE
'War.l
War.l
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
J. A.
Kerr
203
.'UK
1,4
682
187
25
32
W.
A. Pound
136
180
33
547
88
10
27
Greenlay
'" 'rge  L.
Municipal Kail   39
25th Ave. 86
Total.
^^^^11,4(11
aje.rily  for K. rr,
1,021
Total..
Majority
Ward
380.
Municipal Hall
25th Ave.
..  125
���er  The.ma
Miller
imes I) vi<]
25
19
-:
The,mas
Gordon  W.
142
62
2(14
���;   Bridi
Robert
9
10
Mr. J. A. Kerr, who was returned   to   Chief   Magistrate's
chair for another term
I desire to express my sincere llianks to all who gave me Iheir support
during the past election, and 1 trust that their confidence in me will not be
misplaced. It will be my best endeavor to see the Government Audit satisfactorily completed and all matters investigated, while all matters undertaken
during the present year will have my must earnest and careful attention.
Naturally I am elated with the vote on the annexation plebiscite. Annexation will be taken up wilh greater vigeer as lhe result of lhat vote, and
I trust that the present Council may bc able to finally and successfully complete this question. I sincerely trust lhat lhe present year may be a successful one for South Vancuuver, in which all ratepayers may share.
J. A. KERR.
Reeve e,f South Vanc.ii
Disastrous Fire at East Collingwood |
In   the  icy  dawn   of   last     Sunday
Interferes   With   Paving
���liver's  unprecedented   fall  "i
...   .......v.   .-     iei,|,i ee ceiciueu     I.Ltl    Ot
morning a lire doing considering dam-1 snow during the past fortnight has in-
age raged in Hast Collingwood. The terfered with the work of laying South
owner nf the Pioneer Dry Goods] Vancouver's first permanent pavement
Store, Mr. J. Brinnen, was aroused on Victoria Road, between Forty-sixth
soon  .tftpr 5 /.','l^.^t- ...  ��-wi   ��� i '     '
soon after 5 o'clock tei find the whole
store was in flames. So rapid was
the work of destruction that before
six o'clock lhe entire premises, including the next door shoe establishment,
also owned by Mr. Brinnen, were completely gulled. The cold was so in-
>ensc that the water used for extinguishing the lire hung in icicles frum
ever>  projecting scrap.    Considerable
 ty-sixth
and fifty-sixth avenues, and on Joyce
Road, Collingvtood.
Of the  many pavements  submitted
lei  the   South   Vancouver  Council  for
these twee contracts, lhe Dolarway ni
terial   handled  by  the  South   VanCO
ver   Builders'  Supply   C
chosen.
Mud
.V
FOR   COUNCILLORS
Robinson
1
25th Ave.
Total...
Majority fi
spencer
15S
33
.   1"!
r Wilbers
Wilbers
John  I"-. |iii
I Si,
165
Total..
Majority
I Ward
for
\2'<
Miller. 85.
351
100.
Ward
2
25th Ave.
Total..
Majority
Warel
3
25th Ave.
Total..
Majority
Ward
4
Total..
I lickinson
William John
217
32
... 249
tier Dickinson,
Stevens
George A.
161
55
44
Roden
 rge
6
28
21
216
33.
I lumphries
Ralph
52
174
.. 226
eer  Humphries.
Third
Jeillll
198
McNeish
Peter
48
48
96
198
130.
Winram
William
152
152
Majority  for  Third, 46.
 I   Campbell
Smart Charle
���	
Municipal   Hall 3''
25th  At :, 7.S
Total   165
Majoritj   for Campbell, Iln.
ELECTED
Reeve���I. A.  Kerr.
Ward  I���Wilbers, John Joseph.
���     2.���Dickinson, William Julin.
.,      3.��� Humphries.  Ralph.
���      4.���Third. John.
5.���Thomas, Geer.le.n  W.
.,      6���Miller. Jas.  David.
,,      7.���Campbell,   C.   Stuart
ANNEXATION
For Against
Ward 1     292 33
���     2     341 19
.,      3       93 4
..      4    1096 71
.,      5      193 63
���      6       26 6
..      7       36 10
Total  3(77 206
SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Ward   Campbell, James   Hilton, Wm. W
impany,  wa.
interest is being taken in lhe
NEW COUNCILLORS
ARE "SWORN IN"
WATER SUPPLY OF
SOUTH VANCOUVER
Joint Meeting of Old and New Coun-   Owing to Running Taps Municipality
cillors���Annexation  Question Faces a Shortage
'in Monday Reeve Kerr and th
newly elected Councillors, Messrs.
Campbell, Dickinson, Humphries,
Miller. Third, Tin'ilia- and Wilbers
wen "sworn in" and at a jiiinl meeting uf the "Id and new Councils payroll! and general accounts amounting
i" $16,126.28 were passed (or payment.
Councillor Spencer Robinson, wliee
was defeated on Saturday, was nol
present, ami Iii- successor, Councillor
J. J. Wilhers. wa- unable iii gel Pi the
Municipal Hall uiiiil iln end e,i the
meeting,
Councillor Klli.'ii took leave e.i his
old colleagues, anil expressed his g 1
wishes for ilu  new Council.
Re4vc Kerr, in w e'le-e uning the new
Councillors, stated thai tlie- firsl business e.f the Council after tin- appointment ..I ihe committees ai a meeting
"I   the   Colllicil   tee   1)C   lll'lll   I'll    Wcillle--
day at 2 o'clqjk, would be to lake up
the annexalieen <111<.'.-;i,��� n anil he referred in the almost unanimous vote
in favor of annexation taken mi Saturday last.
Because    people leave their    water
laps   limning   In   prevent     lhe     pipes
freezing    up    a    serious    shortage of.,      ,
water has been created in South Van- '" CoIImgw
couver, according tee a statement made
by Water Superintendent Mullett.
"I am deling my best in give everyone a supply each day," saiel Mr. Mill
lett, "Imi so long as the severe wea-
ther continues it will he necessary to
cut off lhe water fur a portion tti each
day in sections e,f ih,' Municipality,
and it will he cm ..IT entirely at night,
"Some elistriei- will gel a supply
early in the morning, say 7 n'clnck
and III eiYluck. aiul others will have
il" water turned mi jusi before noon
ami go em iinti 1 ihe whole nf ihe Muni,
cipality has had a  supply.
"Of course," stated Mr. Mullett,
"ii thc severe weather passis away we
shall be able to give a continuous
supply."
damage was done by the beat to the MjJ���* ��< .D��arwa# '"".!' "����� B��ve
store on she opposite side of the road '"7 - mak' S����d ''!' Victoria Road
where several windows were smashed. ; " "' ���">!�� R��a(.. It WiU possibly be ex-
and telephone wires were broken. Howf'"5.1^ used '" S"utth, Vancouver. It
the lire originated remains a mystery.   " s'",! ",' P��SSCSS a"   .hequallties ���,-
The   damage   is   estimated   at   abbut   ��**��* '��'������� 1  >'.l.ade pavemeni.
$K,(l0(). only $3,000 of which is covered "",l,ls ",M '   s�� much lests ' ,:"> 'j1.'
by  insurance.    Mr.   Brinnen's    stock ��'��.n,l'r standard pavements that cvic
unfortunately   included   new   spring t'flicials  declare that  its  introduction
goods,    and  new  cash  register    and  into Canada will revolutionize the pat
showcases valued at some $900 ing business���an industry, by the way
This is the third lire of recenl elate famous as an incubal
id. -'I'.'''
of the
REEVE KERR'S OPPONENT
Total.
Electei
78
86
35
430
146
19
10
.  804
-I. Morris
85
53
40
400
136
12
35
761
Campbell.
Morris
210
179
40
531
84
18
40
1102
Shanks, J   R. Wm.
104
208
42
289
31
2
5
081 :
held
I  hereby certify the above in he a true and
ai South Vancouver this IStli day
correct resuli of the  Poll
GREATER  VANCOUVER
SEWERAGE COMMISSION
Sons of England B. S.. Merrie England
Lodfe   No.  266
The officers of this lodge was in-
"The People's Providers"
Under the name of "Thc  People's
Providers" a  new  business  has  been
opened .by   Messrs.   J.   Armstrong  &
Seen, ai ihe corner of Fraser Streel ami
River Avenue.    Il is a thoroughly up-
to-date  family  grocery Steele,   making
.^^^^^^^^^^/^sssssssssssssssssssssm^sm]''1  new '""' ''ctermincd  cffnrt  to cope
stalled into office for the present Jear [with   that   vexed  question,   the   high
mi   i'riday, January   10.   1913, in   their   cost  of living.
lodge room at  Mount   Pleasant Odd-J     The proprietors are convinced  lhat
fellows'   Hall,  by   Bro.   J.   R.   Waite. | the present high rate of the necessities I
D.D.S.P., assisted  by   Bro.   Marshall |,,f life might  be materially reduced,
ol  Lodge Neptune. |They,   therefore,   propose    to     effect
The following officers was installed: I economy by purchasing in large qtian-
Presidetlt, Bro. DurrantJ Vice-Fres,, I tities. and paying promptly by cash,
Bro. J. Smith; Chaplain, Bro. Hortin;|nnd also by letting a low rental suf-
Jjecturer, Bro. C. Cole; Treasurer
|;ro. W. Attenborough. Guide���1st.,
Bro. Jones; 2nd., Bro. Walpole;
���'rd. Bro. Owen; 4th., Bro. H. Smith;
5th., Bro. Royland. In Guard, Bro.
'��� King. Out Guard, Bro. Stiles.
.After encouraging remarks by the
visiting brethren the lodge adjourned
to indulge in games and carpet ball,
which is this lodge's standard game.
Englishmen would do well to watch
'ne progress of this popular lodge,
sojourning brethem always welcome.
School Board Meeting
..    ,e, initial   meeting   of   the   newly
p'e.c-i      S.cn��o1 Board is being held on
rnaay night of this week,    i he meeting was fixed for Tuesday night, but
�� Postponed owing to thc snowfall.
It is to the interest of all concerned
that Messrs. Armstrong's enterprise
should succeed; if by their mode of
operation business becomes brisk they
intend that their customers shall share
in the benefits, so that economical
purchasing on their part will mean
good value for all who give them a
trial. It rests with the residents of
Piver Avenue and thc neighborhood to
make the People's Providers prove
the  truth of what they assert.
Board of Trade Ball
The third annual ball of the Board
of Trade of South Vancouver will be
held in Kalenberg Hall on Wednesday evening. January 29. There will
be special late cars to accommodate
those in attendance.
Mayor Baxter Confers With Engineer
A.  D.  Creer
With the expectation of urging upon the Provincial Government ilu
advisability oi passing legislation to
give statutory powers to the Burrard
Peninsula John Sewerage Commission, Mayor Baxter conferred with
ungini er \ 11. Cn i r, �� ho, since thi
illness of Consulting engineer R. S
Lea, has hael sole i li irgc of the wmk
'i pi. p.! mil' final data and complel
'     thi  concludin
I January, 1913.    ^^^^^^^^^
AS. li. SPRINGFORD,
Returning < Iffider.
COMMITTEES ARE
NAMED FOR YEAR
Reeve Kerr Announces Bodies at First
Meeting of New Council
Reeve Ke i r, al the lirsl me   ting
the  iieev   Council  on   Wednesday  afternoon, announced thai h,- had named
the followii ttees:
Finance   ���   Councillor     1
chairman; and the full Council.
Board   of   Works- Cotmcilli ���
hers, chairman; am! the full Council,
Fire,  Water and   Light���Councillor
chairman;    anel    Com
"'   prepa  ing   nnai   .l.ia   an.    cmnnej. Tim-,I i         "v 	
ing th. concluding r n on sewering r    , ,', ,, h! """V    ''"!    l ""
Greal                -.    .<���, nna| ... Humphries and Tho,
��'bieh  is    ^   ;,|���,M   ������u,  wi���        i       ,.;"' Councilor    lie.,,,.,.
discuss the ,nailer., apportioning the       11 .' ,    ",'  ',".
'���M-n-.   ��� i  the scheme upon the dis. n; . ,'��� ���     ,   ���            "-      C.  u
nae,- concerned. \, ,' ������,,1|:"n":",: and ' ��ui
Ti i   __....    , .Millar, U ,1 hers   :,,,,!   Tl,;,..,
trie'l- e-'ineerne      ^^^^^^^^
There  are  several   methods
"���*"���   �����<   -i \ e  ii  meinoas  "i  an- ,,,, ,      , ,,        '���
Portionmcnt.   The cosl may either be i, ,    7        :""' ' a,kJ -Councillor Mil
borne  in   accordance  with  the  areas rY,..m,J      ,\r$ Councillors   .
"i the several municipalities or divid- \,"     "      U,n":-
ed .'ii an assessment and population .i,',ill.    atlon���Councillor Humpl      .
basis      Another   method   il   fo   h:o' \ ' ,  """*��� ,T'I',l "'���"��� l!!' - Ca,J
the expense of the intercepting -,.,!_ ���! ''','       P"*lnson.
its,   which   are   of   -rener.il   i,'o,.,-,.si ./I1C Kc-*ve is ex-officio a memh,
Ex-Reeve W. A. Pound, the defeated   candidate   in   the   fight    for    the
Reeveship
I would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who gave me their
support during the election which has just closed, and assure them that
although defeated, I appreciate their efforts on my behalf.
I would aiso like to wish every success to Reeve Kerr and his new
Council, and it is my hope that they may guide the Municipal affairs of South
Vancouver through one of its most successful years.
W. A. POUND
sssssss^m ������'}s\W^ssm
which   are   eei   general   inter, st,
borne by a general raie with the cosl
of ihe various district trunks paid
ley the drainage areas which they
serve, each municipality naturally
collecting the rates for that part of
eael, geographical district within it
which possesses a trunk.
li is expected thai a meeting of the
jeiint  sewerage  commission    will    be
held at an  early dale.  Mr. Creer stated that the final report, in the method
[of  dealing  with   the  drainage    area.
would  insofar as possible keep  away
jthe   question  of  municipal   bound'arj
j lines.
As  was   stateel   some  weeks   age*)  in
I connection with the publication of the
report dealing with the data  secured
y the engineers, the approximate tota|
I cost of the trunk sewers for Greater
'Vancouver will be somewhat over $10.-
1000.000.    Half of that sum will be required within the lirst five years, with
'another $5,000,000 feir the next ten or
fifteen  years.    It  is anticipated  that
the whole  project,  involving a  trunk
sewer for every 400 acres, will be finished     by   1905.     It  is  explained,  of
course, that the matter of service sewers connecting with the trunks will bc
taken  up by  each district  separately,
the sewerage commission not dealing
with   sewers   other   than   the   trunks,
except  insofar as  to make  sure  that
the smaller sewers arc in accord with
the design of the larger mains.
The mayor and Engineer Creer dis-
The Reeve is ex-
!t333,,tt,issssssss^sJttt33^sJt})}3ttM
The   annexation     question   will   be
taken up Immediately, the
meeting a ceimmittee
week.
iee a member of
committee
���f the Citj   this
A bylaw let regulate the procedure
of the Council t"r the year 1913 was
read a first time. According to the
provisions "I" the bylaw, ibe regular
meetings of the Council will be held
on the lirst and third Thursday of each
month, and the various committees
will meet on the preceding Tuesday.
During February the Council will meet
een the 6lh and 20th. and the committees will meet een the 4th and 18th
days of the month.
On     the    motion
Thomas,    seconded      by     Ciiun	
Campbell, it was decided to change the
meeting hour from 2 o'clock in the
afternoon to 7:30 in the evenin
'f    Councillor
ng.
cussed the question at considerable
length and went into all features of
lhe final report. The report published recently will form a portion
of the final one which, as has been
said, will in addition take up the question of statutory powers for the commission under a special aet and will
also make recommendations on the
apportionment of cost.
Engineer R. S. Lea is expected to
return to the city from California
about tbe end of the month. TWU
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   25,   1913
BOUNTEOUS ftURNAQYS
ftONNie Banks~�� Brags
COUNCILLOR  CAMPEELL
Mr. D. C. McGregor, Reeve
The v. suits of iln  elections held e.n
Ss tui day last are ai foil, m -.
I.,. .,,liip- Ii. i' McGregor, 764;
B.   ''.    Walker. 406,
Ward I E. Strid ���, 90; Wm. Bevan,
63.
Ward ii���A V C MacPherson (bj
acclamation I,
Ward HI T D Coldicutt, 95; G
II   Leaf, 93; W .  II. Madill, 46.
Ward IV���F, W. 1 an \'al. 84; Mark
Lumley, 54.
Ward V -A. McDonald, 151; E. A.
Yorston, 7i.
W-,,,1 VI���T. W. Mayne. 12/; .1.
Murray, 44: )���'.. !���'.. Winch. 33.
Sclleeeel    TlllMeV     (tWO)���F,    Telliple
Cliff, 57?; 11. Ross, 447: F. J. Russell,
369; W. J.  Holdom, 356.
By-Laws
For.    Agst.
Road Bylaw, $300,000.. .. 902     76
Waterworks Bylaw, $100-
000    87')     64
School    Bylaw,    No.    1.
$28,000  .800     84
School    Bylaw',    X...    2
$84.000    772      .88
Sewer Agreement Bylaw. 752    116
j .��-l��i
Councillor McGregor, who has been
elected Reeve, has been a member, of
the Council for the pasl four years.
lie has been chairman ni lhe finance
committee, ami em a number nf occasions lias acted as Reeve during lhe
absence   of   the    Reeve.
The only member of the Council
who is new to Municipal honors is
Councillor MacPherson. Councillors
Fau Val. McDonald and Mayne were
re-elected for their respective Wards,
while Councillors Stride anil Coldicutt
have  each   sal   em   ihe  Council  of  Ihe
. Municipality.
Of the' sch.ee,1 trustees elected, Trus.
l.e Cliff wa- a retiring member, and
Trustee Ross had been a trustee prior
1" two years ago, and had also been
chairman of ihe board,
A considerable amount "f interest
wa- cviiKVei iu ihe election, lhe resull
nf which was received wiih enthusiasm by a large number of electors
who attended at the Municipal Hall to
hear the declaration. Cheers greeted
the announcement (>y Returning Officer Moure, and Reeve-elect McGregor, his Councillors and the elect-
eel School Trustees were accorded a
great ovation when they returned
thanks  to the  electors.
The announcement thai .all lhe bylaws had passed was also received
wilh cheers.
Amateur Hockey
. January 29th will see the opening
of the Amateur Hockey League, when
the Moose meet the 1'raser Mills in
the first amateur game of the season. A schedule has been drawn up
and practice games have been arranged. Willi the professionals practically
out of the running for the I'aterson
Cup, interest is turning to the amateur
league and some good games are look.
ed fur. ���
Each team will deposit $25 with
the president of the league to guarantee thc playing out of the schedule.
Til'
I,'II".
Ian
Feb.
I'eb.
Feb.
Feb.
fell.
Feb
Feb
Feb.
-.'lie elide    felt    lllc    g.lllle"    i-    .1-
29    Moose its   Fraser Mill-.
1    Burnaby i \  Beavers.
?    V  11  Burnaby.
8    V M C.A, vs   Sapperton
12���Sapperton vs. rraser M,
15    Beaveri vs. Y.M.C .
I'i���Y. M C.A. vs. Moose.
22   -Sapperton vs,  llurnaby.
2o���Moose vs.  Beavers.
March 1 - Fraser Mill- vt. Y.M C. \
March 5���Sapperton \��.  Moos
March 8���Burnab)  vs   V M.C. V
March 12��� Beavers vs. Frasei  M.
March  15���Burnaby vs.  fraser  M.
March 19   Sapperton \s. Beavers.
The  practice  hours  were arranged
as follows:
Beavers���5-6  Monday   and   Thursday.
V M.C. V    5-6 Tin- day and  Friday.
Sapperton���6-7 Tuesday; 10-11  Friday.
Burnaby    Monday,  6-7;   Thursday,
6-7.
Moose���Monday     and     Thursday
10-11.
Fraser   Mills���Tuesday   10-11;  Saturday, 6-7.
THE WORLD'S PITHY PARS
WALKER   BROTHERS
REALTY   AND  INSURANCE   BROKERS
Have helped sun-kissed llurnaby and Smith Vancouver develop from
virgin fe,resl iule, busy districts <��i heeincs.
They believe Burnaby possesses all the factors necessary i.> make
her ��� ���in- day the hub e,f the peninsula.
VANCOUVER;
lleeiiiinmi Trust   Block,
341 Cambie Streel
EDMONDS;
Edmonds Station,
Burnaby
A. McFEE
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Phone 1038 : Edmonds, B. C.
1 have the exclusive sale of large lots on Salisbury Avenue, close
to stati-i.   $1,000 each; on gejod terms.    See me about them.
Goes back to the Council ss the representative cf Ward VII
COUNCILLOR THIRD
Corporation of the District of South
Vancouver
NOTICE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
All licenses arc now due and payable at the Municipal Hall.
Notice is hereby given that proceedings will be taken against any person
or persuus in default after the 28th
day nf February, 1913.
WM.
JACKSON',
Chief of Police
Corporation of the District of South
Vancouver
DOG TAX~~
Dog Tax will be collected at the
Municipal Hall in future. Dogs found
running at large without having a
license tag will bc impounded.
WM. JACKSON,
Chief of Police
The Post Office Department at
Washington maele a statement concerning the operations of the Sterling
debenture Corporation, whose offices
in New York were raided and half a
do: tn men arrested, Il says: "This
corporation, which has been doing
business unly since l'*06, it is estimated conservatively, has seel.l approximately $33,000,000 of the Btocks eii the
various companies represented. Considerable    nt    the   BtOCk    Se eld    WHS    ill
legitimate companies, but an ehorr
miens amount was eef fake concerns
and absolutely worthless. The investigations sinew thai the Sterling
Debenture Company retained from 50
lo 55 per cent, of the money from the
sale of bogus stocks as ils commission. The business ,,i selling the
stocks "f the legitimate companies
was not nearly so profitable, the commissions only amounting to about 10
per cent. During the last two years
the raids on stock-selling corporations ihrough the mails of the United I
Slates have resulted in no fewer than
1.200   individuals   having  been   canghl
m the net and indicted, It is conservatively estimated that approximately
$150,000,000 has been filched from the
American people by these alleged
fraudulent    operators.    During   this
lime many large institutions have been
put under the ban, such as the United
Wireless, American Redemption Company, and the American Telegraph
and Typewriter Company. The operations nf these concerns, although
large, arc not to be compared with tbe
Sterling  Debenture  Company."
.   *   .
Some startling facts, recently issueel
by the New York Council for Patriotic
Service, has resulted in the formation
in London, England, of the Anti-
Mormon League, the founders of
which hope to put an end to the pernicious activities of the Mormon missionaries within the British Isles.
��   *   *
Canon Ilcnsley llenson, the newly
appointed Dean of Durham, who has
just returned to England from Canada, draws attention to'the low salaries
paid to the clergy in Western Canada.
' Adequate payment of the Christian
clergy." he said, "is needed, not only
in order to provide a career which
shall attract competent men, but also
to make it possible for the clergy to
stand outside the gambling iu real
eslate, which is one of the most unwholesome features in Western Canadian society. The sum of $900 per
annum without a house, is lhe payment which the average minister is
offered; and even this small salary-
is by mi means always given. Remembering that the cost eif living i-
niucli higher in Canada than in England, it is easy to understand that
those underpaid clergy are reduced
tn squalid anxieties, and teio often
are mixed up in business enterprises
more gainful in promise than creditable in character. This serious evil
of low salaries is intimately associated
with the question of Christian unity;
eer, unless the churches combine, there
can be no improvement, for the simple
reason that no church at present possesses an adequate population properly to maintain a clergyman of its own.
If a reasonable arrangement wcre
made, by which one minister could bc
maintained by the combined churches,
he might be adequately paid, and then
required to stand wholly outside the
dubious speculations which have such
a  fascination  for the people."
PATTERSON   &   FISHER
REAL ESTATE AND  INSURANCE
6'/_   acres  in   Edmonds  district,   near   Power   House   and   facing  on   Vancouver
Road.     All   cleared.     Price   $16,000.00.   $5,000.00   cash:   balance   6,   12,   18,   and   24
months.
POST OFFICE BUILDING.  EDMONDS Phone :   No. 664
WARNER, BANGS & CO.
REAL ESTATE AND COMMERCIAL AGENTS LOANS AND INSURANCE
PHONE  1024
COLDICUTT  BLOCK,  EAST BURNABY
SEND US YOUR LISTINGS
H. SWORDER
EDMUNDS   RELIABLE REAL ESTATE MAN
SPECIALIST IN BURNABY PROPERTY INSURANCE
One acre close  lo Cut  Of!   $2000.    Easy  terms
Opposite Power House : Lols 50x120. % cash; 6, 12, 18, 24 inths. $525
Another $450.   $100 cash; $10 per month
HOUSES AND LOTS TO SUIT ALL
BRING ME YOUR LISTINGS
Returned by electors of Ward IV af ter one of the keenest fights of
Municipa 1 Contest
the
Highland   Park   Acreage
We have a number of SMALL ACREAGE PARCELS on and
near the new cut-off line of the B. C. Electric Railway.
1 acre, just off Railway, $2100; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
months.
\i/4 acres, on Railway, $3500; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
month*.
E.   W.   MacLEAN   LTD.
Exchange Building
142 Hastings West
T.    D.   COLDICUTT
REAL   ESTATE.   LOANS   AND   INSURANCE
Coldicutt  Block,  4th  Ave.  and 6th  St.
If It is In East  Burnaby, we can sell it (or you
Telephone 719 East  Burnaby,  B.
SCHOOL TRUSTEE MORRIS
Who headed the Polls for one of the
two vacancies on the Board
of School Trustees
COUNCILLOR  WILBERS
The representative cf Ward I in
Municipal  Council
the
COUNCILLOR THOMAS
APOLOGY TO
THE PUBLIC
Owing to the weather conditions which have existed for
the past few weeks, we regret to state that we have not
been able, as heretofore, to extend to our customers the
prompt deliveries of stovewood, lumber, etc., which their
patronage merits.
In euir effort to satisfy the demand for stovewood we
have spared no expense and in this connection have increased our yard crew and also hired additional teams
to facilitate deliveries. We, however, trust that our patrons will appreciate the fact of our having, under such adverse conditions, done all possible to meet their demands.
We respectively solicit a continuance of their valued
patronage.
Coast Lumber & Fuel Co. Ltd.
Corner Bodwell Road and Ontario Street
GEO. SNIDER & BRETHOUR
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
909   Dominion   Trust   Building,   Vancouver,   B. O.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
Telephones :    Office S497.    Workl 6203.     Works 9328.    Worka  9179   	
The doyen of the Municipal Council who was returned by a substantial
majority in Ward V
20 % off Heaters
Now's your chance to get a
heater cheap.
We want to reduce our stock.
The best place to buy Hardware is
McBRIDE'S
Corner Sixteenth Avenue and
Main Street
Corner 49th Ave. and Fraser Street
McBride's Hardware is the
Hall Mark of   QUALITY.
J SATURDAY,  JANUARY  25,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
Short Lesson in Household
=Economy=
Are you using carbon lamps for lighting ?
Do you know that Tungsten lamps give three times the amount
of light obtained from the carbon lamp with the same consumption
of current?
Would it not be advisable fe,r you to secure this improved form of
lighting ?
Afler you have considered the above queries visit our salesrooms
and ask tlie lamp counter clerk to demonstrate the difference between the Tungsten lamp and the ordinary carbon lamp.
rot convenience of our customers wc carry a full line of Tungsten
lamps, ol an improved type, iu stock.
Carrall &
Hastings
streets
1138 Gran,
ville Street
(Near Davie)
Vancouver
 NOTICE	
The undersigned having severed all connection with the firm of
Simmons & Senecal, at 4140 Main Street, I beg to announce to my
numerous friends and patrons that I have opened Dressmaking
Parlors at Findlay Block, Suite A, Main Street, where I will be
pleased to welcome old and new customers.
MRS. M. C. SENECAL
Findlay Block, Suite A, Main Street, South Vancouver.
South Vancouver
Subdivision of Portion Block 15, D. L. 330 and 331
Fronting on River Road and Sixty-ninth Avenue. Prices
$450 each lot and up. Terms, fifth cash, balance 6, 12 and 18
months.
FRASER RIVER FRONTAGE
River and li. C. Electric Railway frontage, 89.57; Victoria
Drive frontage, 187.84. Price $9,000. Terms, $1,000 cash, balance over three and a half years.
London & British North America Co. Limited
With which is incorporated Mahon, McFarland & Procter Ltd.
Corner Pender and Seymour Streets
Insurance Money to Loan
Agreements For  Sale Purchased
A PRACTICAL SOLUTION FOR THE
High Cost of Living
One step in the right direction is to equip
your home with a Pease "Economy" Furnace. The furnace without a rival. If your
heating plant needs overhauling, ring us up
Hodgson Plumbing & Heating Co.
Limited
1136 HOMER ST. PHONE : SEY. 2412
Flowers for New Year
CHRYSANTHEMUMS,   CARNATIONS,   NARCISSUS,   VIOLETS,   ETC.
Jardinieres, Plants in Pots, Bulbs in Bowls
A large assortment to select from
HOLLY���Extra   Well   Berried���75c   per   lb.
MISTLETOE���Finest English���$1.50 per lb.
RITCHIE BRAND CO.
The Art Florists
723 ROBSON STREET
Phone   Sey.   1892 -:- Vancouver, B. C.
"A South Vancouver Industry"
W. L. GOODWIN
SUCCESSOR TO ROBERT NISBET
LUMBER,     SASH,     DOORS,     MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  LATH,  AND  A COMPLETE
LINE OF BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
Campbell Road Station
On the Eburne-Westminster Tram
(Foot of Inverness Street)
Phone Fraser 109 R P.O. Box 16
���^INsTHe tAOy of ti* HOUSE
Let me figure your bills.
Open Evenings.
Making a New Muff at Home
Y'eii cannot .'ifberd a new let of fur-,
and ye.u wish lOfnething new in a muff.
Tlu- answer is in ihe- exquiiite offering
e>f teparate muffs thai arc combination! eif fur anel fabric and tire de*
liglnful expreifioni of a useful idea.
One muff displayed recently wai of
bandi <,f skunk fur arranged in pain
at thr end, with puffiftgi between.
Old-Gold latin ii wed feer ilu- ihlrred
bands, and the edge! nf lhe muff arc
of satin.    A central slrip of exquisite
>_;< .I'i brocade gives a rich note, A
similar effect is poilible by placing
ecru lace over latin and embroidering
lhe- solid forms in tapestry blue, e.lel
reesc, and dull green silk.
This model is soft and has a gold
lining. Il ce.sis in the little ihop a
fabulous price. There is no reason why
you ihould nol have one at the price
of four strips of narrow fur, a little
satin and lace.
Bandings of coney arc combined on
black chiffon in diagonal lines on another muff for evening wear. Thc
diagonal of the large obleeiig shape is
drawn, anil Ihe lower part of the muff
is made of strips; eef fur alternating
with puffings e.f chiffon. The whole
is made over a satin foundation. On
the upper portion of (he muff, ain eve
the diagonal line, lhe chiffon is placed
smoothly   over   lhe.   satin,   after  being
j Idled   wilh   lines   of  lucked   shirrings.
Tee give- a  l.eiich of color, a cluster
I eef handmade lurries rests em Ihe top.
These are' made eef yellow, blue, and
lavender sill; over balls ��� >f cotton, and
are painted here and there with water-
e'e.leirS    ill    C< 111 t l-a SI i 111.'    te'lle-.
Panne velvet of a soft shade of grey
is trimmed wilh a wide' band eef moleskin on each edge. The- larger por-
lieen eef lhe muff is eef the velvet.
shirred mi the central line in three
line! and caught in at lhe middle mill .-r a cut steel buckle holding a bow
nf velvet. Grey satin form the lining, and silver roses made of metallic
tissue edge the insielc of thc muff,
sinewing iheir French touch at the
sides.
The obi ermine set too small for
this season1! styles can be utilized if
cut into stripes and combined with
black panne velvet and chiffon, after
a model that claimed the attention
of  every  one  who  saw   it.
The foundation was of white satin.
Over Ihis the ermine bands were ceim-
bined with velvet puffings and placed
acre ess the muff on the upper side.
The- under surface was of shirred velvet, thereby requiring a small amount
of fur. The edges of thc muff have
soft flounces of while chiffon, anil on
this at the lop of the muff are clusters of tiny yellow silk berries, to
hint  of  the  yellow  in  the   fur.   I
It is is not difficult to imagine this
muff completed by a smart stock of
fur   In  carry  out   lhe  idea.
Sealskin allied with gold and brown
brocade makes a darker muff that is
suitable for any time of the day. A
broad hand of fur is placed on one
side only of the muff. From this the
brocade extends to the olher edge,
where a narrow band finishes it.
Brown and gold are repeated in the
exquisite rose at the side; and the
brown chiffon which covers cream-
colored satin at the lining gives a
wonderful  richness  to  the  model.
Any fur can be used. The field e.f
fabrics feer combination is so wide lhat
any taste and pocketbook should be
gratified. Separate muffs are here to
stay, and lhe wis. woman is making
line il she cannot buy one.
*      *      A
Moulding  Children's  Ideas
I,el   your  children   alone.     Dee  not
neglect  them.    There is a  difference
between  a   wise  letting alone and a
foolish neglect.
There' have been probably as many
children spoiled by over-management
as by negligence.
Don't forget that the prime right
.if a chilel Is the right tei his own personality. In facl, his chief business
in life is lee develop properly the- expression of that personality. How
can he dee this if he is continually
hedged and thwarted by you?
A child learns by three means���by
experience, by example, and by atmosphere,
It is doubtful if didactic leaching
and preaching ever did much good lo
anybody, child en- grown-up. Only
Inspirational preaching is of any account,
To let thc child touch the sleeve
and get hurt a littl.' is far better than
lee say.    "Yeeu musttl'1 touch it."
He chary of your commands. Every
useless order is a burden that interferes with his growth and tends to
alienate him from you.
Let him run as free as you dare.
One lesson he learns from his own experience is worth a dozen he gets from
you.
How many little lives are rendered utterly wretched by the loving, but
irritating, tyranny of parents. The
little ones are crossed at every turn.
The mother is continually scolding,
the father breaking in by times with
sharp prohibitions
The queer part of all this is that
those parents think they are doing
their high duty by the child. They
propose to give their children some
"bringing up" and not let them "run
wild." So they cramp, thwart, oppose
the growing mind.
Children are sharp. They soon adjust themselves to this, and get their
parents' measure. Then they turn to
become one of two things���"good,"
that is, shrewd little hypocrites, prigs,
and time-servers; or "bad." that is
angrily insistent upon having a life of
their own.
Yet. alas! even among grown people morality is supposed to bc necessarily prohibition of some kind or
other, nagging, heckling, and limiting.
We are beginning nowadays to
study ethics with some kind of intellectual honesty, and are discovering
that there is nothing essentially moral
or religious about any kind of rule,
prohibition, authority, or domination.
The  goodness you  produce  by  mch
negath e '��� iri e n of pe"-r fibre
Real nieeral guidance consists m developing courage, love, freedom, and:
lelf-control.
Study the child, seek te, bring out
what is in him. Don't study your
catechism -er "-vstcm eif education"
anel  try  t'e  make  your  child   measure
up P. that
Then i- no genuine morality with-
eeui freedom.
Anything done from fear is immoral.
Even ih'1 "goodnesi" yeiur child puis
on   because   he   is  afraid   eif     you     is
wicked.
Quit trying to mould your child.
Stand by ami help him. I,el him
mould himself. He Ilis friend. l.el
him  feel you understand  him.
A lot nf our "moral principle" is
mere self-conceit and vanity eef opinion, and we think we are deiine.; God's
service when we iinpeese eeiir egotism
on others, particularly upon helpless
youth.
Study the child, live with him, enter
into 'lis life and point of view, encourage him ill what he wants to ihe.
sympathize with his peculiarities, and
if there is any morality you want him
to adopt LIVE IT YOURSELF, for
real morality comes to the s'eiil by
atmosphere,   not   by   precept.
And when yeeur beey gr.iws up let
him follow the calling he chee.eses. If
he wants p. be a mechanic don't try
tei make him a lawyer. Every life
thai does met pursue its own inborn
be'iit  is a failure.
'lhe rial life problem of yeiur child
is lo find himself; help him de. it.
Last anil most important, any parent that strikes a child for any reason
whatever is ignnranl. stupid, and criminal. There is always si.tne other way
io discipline, and if you will cease
being lazy, negligent, and petulant,
you can find it.
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA  AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass Agent,  Vancouver.
TRUNK
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
H. G. Smith, C. P. 4 T. A. W. E. Dupirow, O. A. P. D
Phone :   Sey.  7100 527  Granville  Street
Paper From Cornstalks
With the decrease eif pulp woe eel and
lhe' Steady increase of the demand for
material for paper, inventors have
turneil to many other possible substitutes. Cornstalks, of which the vast
proportion serves no better purpose
than Dedding for live-stock and s.une
subsequent value as a fertilizer, are
living applied to this purpose under a
plan eef elaborate chemical treatment.
By one successful method the stalks
are first beaten and fanned to get rid
of the dirt, then cut up, steeped in
water, and shredded intii libers in a
special apparatus, 'i nis shredded material is then boiled ill dilute acetic
acid under air pressure, the result uf
which is the extraction uf seventeen
to eighteen per cent, of straw. The
ma.-- is ihen boiled in a strong alkaline
solution and yields a large quantity
of excellent paper liber, while the residue, absorbed by finely "-eeund stalks
is good for fodder. Another process,
developed in South Africa, extracts
from this residue a fair quantity of
cane sugar.
A Happy New Year
TO ALL   OUR MANY
CUSTOMERS    :    :   :
Start thc Xew Year in proper style   by coming and investigating
our prices.
We guarantee all goods.
"FIRST  QUALITY���QUICK  SERVICE"  Satisfaction Guaranteed.
LAING &  FIDDES
GROCERS
28th  AVENUE and  MAIN  STREET
Telephone :  Fairmont 979
BULBS! BULBS! BULBS!
For Flowers in the house, plant the  following
Bulbs now:
Roman Hyacinths, 35c per doz.; $2.65 per 100.
Paper White Narcissus, 25c per doz.; $1.75 per
100.
Freesias, 10c per doz.; 75c per 100.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
FLORISTS AND NURSERYMEN
Phone Sey. 988 and 5727
DOMINION
Creosoted Wood  Block
PAVING
Wood Block Pavements always attract traffic wherever they are in use.
Thc reduction in tlie noise accomplished by the use of Dominion Wood
Blocks greatly improves the value of
stores and offices, facilitates the transaction of business, frequently brings
about higher renting values and higher assessment values. It attracts pedestrian traffic as well as making the
streets a more important thoroughfare for vehicles.
Wood Block Pavement has the extreme advantage of noiselessness and
great durability under heavy traffic.
Competitive tests have repeatedly
shown it to be superior in durability
to granite block, which formerly was
the most durable pavement known. On
streets like Broadway, New York;
Dearborn Street, Chicago; Tremont
Street, Boston, and Market Street,
Philadelphia, it is now demonstrating
the superiority of its resilient resistance to thc hammering of heavy
traffic.
1
Dominion Wood Blocks are Manufactured
in South Vancouver
by the
Dominion  Creosoting   Company,   Limited FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   25,   1913
ti
W^CHINOOK
PUBLISHED
Every  Saturday  by the  Greater  Vancouver  Publisher!  Limittd
HEAD OFFICE :
Corner  Thirtieth   A'/'nue   and   Main   Street.   South   Vancouver,   B. C.
George  M.   Murray.  President  and  Managing  Director.
Herbert  A.  Stein.   Vice-President  and  Managing  Editor.
John   Jackson,   Business   Manager.
TELEPHONE I    All department!   Fairmont 187/
SUBSCRIPTION  RATES :
To all points in  Canada.   United  Kingdom,  Newfoundland,  New
Zealand, anel other British Possessions :
One   Year     12.00
Six  Months       1.00
Three   Months    SO
Postage to American, European and other Foreign Countries, fl.00
yer year esua.
TO CORRESPONDENTS : We will not print anonymous lettesra,
though inviting communication on current events, to be published
over the writer's signature.
leave little room for argument. With a Council which is
practically unanimously in favor of annexation, backed up
by the veele of Saturday last, little time should now be
best in quickly furthering Ihis meivement. It must no) be
forgotten, however, that Ihe last plebiscite showed almost
lhe same feeling, yel the actual annexation of South Vancouver by the City of Vancouver is not any further ad-
vanced than it was a couple of years ago. With a basis
nf agreemeiil upon which to work, the City and Municipality will come together this week and 'cry probably
iieine plan will be brought before the Government at
Victoria at the earliest peissible date.
It is einly fair lee the ratepayers of South Vanceitivcr thai
they sheiuld kneiw ihe exact position of the annexation
ipieslieni. Necessarily there will have to be Considerable'
dealing with the Government before tbe measure is brought
about. The people should know at once what is required
so that they may govern themselves accordingly. If annexalieen is lhe desire of lhe people there should be DO
obstacle in the way.
Tllli FLECTIONS
AS South Vancouver grows in population il is only
natural that there should be a corresponding growth
in the amount of interest taken in the elections feir Municipal office. In the election which was held on Saturday
last, it is safe to say that there was more widespread interest iu the outcome of the balloting than in any other
previous election. Various causes lead up to this interest.
The investigation into the conduct of the business of the
Municipality during the past few years has no doubt had
quite an influence in quickening the public pulse, while
the proposed annexation of South Vancouver by the City
of Vancouver has without question been responsible for
a heavier polling than in  former years.
Be.'st civic government can only bc obtained by a healthy
interest at the polls. Apathy and disinterestedness on the
part of the electorate have been responsible in a greater
measure for waywardness on the part of elected representatives than any other cause. While there have been unusual features to the election which has just been held in
South Vancouver, at the same time it is our belief that, generally speaking, the electorate was nu re alive to its responsibilities than in any other year. This can only bc
construed as one of the most gratifying features of the
election.
Another feature must present itself to the electors and
that is that while the contestants for the office of Reeve
were warm personal friends, neither one forgot himself
so much as to strain that relationship. Naturally the
greatest interest centred in the light for the Reeveship.
While Reeve J. A. Kerr and ex-Reeve W. A. Pound waged
a battle for the chief magistrate's chair, which became
very keen at times, practically no personalities wc...: indulged in. They waged a campaign without regrets. We
believe that Mr. Pound will do all that is in his power to
make the present term of office of Reeve Kerr successful.
Kx-Reeve Pound is too chivalrous to adopt any other
course, and his interests iu South Vancouver are loo great
to permit any other line of action.
Correspondence
REEVE KERR'S appeal to the electors on his record
for the past year and his desire to see to completion the
Government Audit, which was started during the first
term of office, and the Annexation Question were unquestionably the factors which contributed most to his
success at the polls on Saturday last. While in the natural
course of affairs, many matters came before the attention
of the ratepayers, after all, they were only of minor
importance when compared to thc questions of record,
government investigation  and annexation.
The substantial majority accorded to Reeve Kerr should
considerably strengthen his hands in lhe government of
affairs at the Municipal Hall this year. The Reeve, too,
has the advantage of a year's experience at the Council
Board, which should stand him in good stead. Then hc
has the advantage of an augmented Council over tlu.t of
a year ago with just as much experience at the start-off
as the Council of 1912. All things considered, the Reeve
has a strong, active, energetic council at his back, capable
of big things, and the record of the Council of 1913 should
abound with wise and beneficial legislation.
Of the seven Councillors three are returned from the
Council of 1912 in the persons of Councillors Third,
Thomas and Campbell. Ex-Councillor Dickinson returns
to a seat around the board after a year's retirement. The
new members arc Councillors Wilbers, Humphries and
Miller. This Council compares most favorably with any
previous Council, and their record for the year which has
just commenced should be a good one.
The different committees were struck this week and the
member! of the Council will require a few meetings to get
into full working order,   Fortunately, the new Council is
well balanced with tried and experienced men, and il sh'iuld
not require any great length of time before the new Colin-
cillurs gel accustomed t., the methods of deiing business
al Ihe Municipal Hall, and be able to give the very best
assistance to Reeve Kerr in a business-like government of
municipal affairs.
Two of the Council of 1912 retire from the present
Council���Spencer Robinson in Ward 1. and Prank Elliott
in Ward Two. Spencer Robinson was defeated by Councillor Wilbers after the most spirited light of the entire
Municipal campaign, while Mr. j.llintt retired of his own
free will,
THE CLAD HAND
TpHE necessity in some cities for secret society influence
in entering a municipal contest has been  frequently
deplored, and so far as it is a Tactor it narrows the range
eef choice presented  tee (he electorate.
It bars out men who have time and ability to devote to
civic business, but little or none to spare on the many and
varied  efforts  necessary to successful  candidature.
While electors often continue to vote for the good fellow
instead of for the able and public-spirited fellow, some such
influence as that of secret and fraternal societies will
dominate and will be necessary to success.
It is charged against the suffragette proposals that
women would vote for the good-looking candidate.
lie that as it may, the good-looking fellow is quite as
likely to be an able representative as the good fellow, and
i'tie ground for preference is no more foolish than the
other.
Kralcrnal and benefit societies enable candidates to make
wide circles of acquaintances.
They multiply opportunities for extending the all-powerful glad hand.
The hand that clasps with fervor is tbe hand that rules
the world.
Ramified organizations enable a candidate to extend his
reputation for good-fellowship beyond his own circle, for
he can send the word abroad by those who know him to
those who do not.
Condemnation of secret and fraternal societies on this
ground is wide of thc mark.
Party and even religious organizations can bc made to
serve the same purpose in various ways.
So long as electors vote for the good fellow they know
in preference to the able and public-spirited fellow they
do not know, the various agencies for becoming acquainted
will be ruling influences In elections.
At the same time a candidate must not expect the public
to recognize him by intuition.
That hc has been pers inally successful is evidence that
he could manage public affairs well, but is not always accepted as evidence that hc would do so.
The man of ability who makes himself known by coming forward when thc public need his aid, who makes him
S.lf heard always in the public interest and never against
it, who repeatedly stands up for public rights, who light
the fight of the people against open and covert enemies,
will soon again gain a recognition more potent to win
public trust than is the personal familiarity secured through
fraternal societies and other organizations.
Tee the Editor eif "The Chinook":
Sir.���Seeing there is some controversy regardiiv lhe merits of various
kinds of pavement for Kingsway, I
would like In give lhe public lhe benefit eif whal I know regarding block
paving.
W'e end lib eek pavement is lhe besl in
lhe world providing the wood used is
.ils.. the best and hardest kind of wood.
I ipeak wiih a knowledge nf what
lias been done iu London, England.
No cily in lhe world has greater traffic
conditions than London, England, and
all lhe main streets of thai great city,
where the heaviest traffic is lo found,
are paved with wood block paving
laid on a concrete base with creOIOte
nr pitch poured on to bind the blocks
together and waterproof them.
I think the average life of these
pavements is about 5 to 10 years in
London, according to the amount of
Iraffic on the road, but, anyway, the
traffic conditions in London are exceptionally heavy and the authorities
have decided that wood block paving
is the most economical for thc main
streets. However, too much stress
cannot bc laid on the importance of
having the very best kinds of wood for
the purpose.
The wood used in London, England,
is called "Jarrah" wood and comes
from Australia. It is one of the hardest woods of any kind in the world.
1 had thc pleasure some years ago
of watching Whitehall, London, where
ihe chief Government buildings are,
being re-paved with "Jarrah" wood
blocks. The old paving (half worn)
was lorn up and as fast as it was done
another gang laid down tile new blocks
on th,. old concrete base and poured
boiling creosote or pitch on  lo them.
The slick method in which lhe sireet
was re-laid would be a revelation lo
those who have an idea that the "Old
Country" is always slow.
The whole streel, about half-a_milc
long, was torn up and rclaid ready for
Iraffic in about six days.
Hoping this contribution may interest you.���I am, yours truly.
FRfc.DK. 11. NICHOLS,
Edmonds P. 0., Jan. 17, 1913.
ILLEGAL TAX SALE
ONE of the matters which the Council of South Vancouver together with the councils of other municipalities will be face to face with again is the illegal tax
sale question. This is one of the most serious questions
with which any recent Council of South Vancouver has
coped. There is no use denying the fact that its effect
has been keenly felt in the realty market, and with something like four thousand holdings affected the time seems
to have come when some action to bring this matter to a
speedy termination should be sought.
According to the following despatch from Victoria the
Government will take no action to validate the sales. The
despatch says:���
Attorney-General Bowser has decided that remedial
legislation will not be offered during the present session
lo validate lhe carelessly held tax sales of South and North
Vancouver some years ago. Nor is it certain by any means
that such legislation will bc approved by the law officer
eef lhe Crown in any future session, as Hon. Mr. Bowser
slates that he will not recommend such a course until
every means at law has been exhausted hy the legal defendants interested and by the municipalities.
Not Only does tin. slabilily of the Municipality demand
that Ibis question should be ended as quickly as possible,
but it is also well-known that the illegal tax sale has been
a serious obstacle to ih velopnicnt, besides throwing doubt
on a great number of holdings as to thc actual owner of
property. There should bc no delay in having this cloud
removed.
THE SCHOOL BOARD
TWO new members took their places on the School
Board of South Vancouver this week when thc old
board gave way to the new. The new members arc Mr.
Wm. Morris, who beaded the poll, and Mr. J. G. Campbell. Thc members of the board of last year who have
yet a term to serve are Mr. C. M. Whelpton, Mr. J. C.
McArthur, J.P.. and Mr. R. H. Ncelands.
The School Board will enter into work immediately
The estimates for the year will have to be presented to the
Council before the 1st of February, and this will entail a
great deal of work on the part of the board. Several recommendations were made by the old board before resigning office, but naturally the new members will have to
master various intricacies and this will make immediate
demands upon their time.
The board is strongly and well represented. During the
past few years, the school system of South Vancouver has
been most favorably commented upon and there is every
reason to believe that the present board will continue to
carry out tbe work in the same progressive and energetic
spirit which has marked the undertakings of previous
boards. The new board is fortunate in continuing to have
youth and energy on its side.
THE ANNEXATION VOTE,   _ '\
""THERE is no use mincing matters; llii   tJpS^Kylie an-
*     ncxation plebiscite    on    Saturday- last was so overwhelmingly in favor of a measure to bring this Municipality within  the borders of the City of Vancouver as te
PROBLEM OF DOMESTIC SERVICE
ONE problem we have always with us���the problem of
domestic service.
The problem of getting help is rivalled only by the
difficulty of keeping help after it is captured.
The era of onc-night-a-wcek-out girls is gone.
One-night-in-a-week is the popular thing now.
The rest is in proportion.
Thc number of avenues now open to girls to offices,
stores or factories, with sometimes considerable compensation, and often more th. n is offered in domestic service,
together with greater personal freedom, set up a strong
tendency away from service.
It is easy to say that higher wages can secure home
help, but to thc family of moderate means higher wages
are a very serious matter.
Sensible and kindly treatment and good living accommodation can go a good way; but the latter again is a
matter oi means.
Let's all cheer on thc various government efforts to lend
a hand.
The Ontario Government pays to immigration booking
agents a live-dollar bonus for every suitable woman immigrant they secure for Canada.
The Quebec Govcrrment is considering the adoption of
a similiar policy.
It is safe to say that, in the eyes of the hoqs'eholder,
tl're Qnfy.n^a'yWn^cn't's polity isi not extravagance, for
iRc price of a good woman servant is far above rubies.
What does Sir Richard McBride's Government propose
to do about it? '
The Old  Fogey
A man who had been for over forty
years in one position in Toronto,
handling a set of books in a down
town office, resigned his post and decided tee work no more. This occurred twenty years ago. Hc found
the city of the early nineties a wonderful place once he was released from
thc routine daily habits of years. Hc
had known thc city as a boy in tbe
fifties when he began office work, and
during tbe first twenty years he kept
in touch with what was going on, but
during the second twenty years of
his office work he was an old fogey.
Each morning he walked from his
home tei his office, following thc same
course daily. His very feet knew thc
way. Not only did he follow the same
path daily, but his footfalls, morning
after morning, hit pretty much thc
same places in the stone pavements,
so that, if there had not been others
using those walks, he would, in twenty
years, have worn such indentations
that his tracks would have somewhat
resembled yours as you walk in the
morning Ihrough inches of new-fallen
snow.
Of course he did not know at the
time what a creature of habit he was
become. He fancied he was but conserving bis resources, and giving his
mind to his serious concerns. He used
to lunch at noon in a restaurant where
he always sat in the same chair at
lhe same table, and was offended when
a stranger forestalled him. When the
place was remodeled he quit it, and
always sought out a place that needed to but had not yet been remodeled. Each evening he went home by
horse-car on thc stroke of the check,
and always paid his fare to an old
conductor who always expected him
al a certain corner, and held the car
if he was nol  there.
In lhe evening he read newspapers
and books, chatted, smoked, and to
bed at ten. Twice each Sunday he
walked to church, lie owed neehoily
a cent, saved a little, inherited something Ihrough the death of a relative,
and decided lo resign and take it easy
with his books, his pipe, and his
garden.
Released freim the routine of years,
he explored the Toronto of twenty
years ago. He declared that the
growth of the place had been marvellous, astonishing, unbelievable. He
was unable to understand how so
much had been going on around him
without bis knowledge. While he bad
been burying himself in his home and
office for twenty years he might as
well have been in Europe or South
America for all he knew about the
city he was in. So hc walked and
explored and tried to fit the city of
the nineties with the town of the
sixties as he remembered it. Hc had
come home and found his native village beyond recognition.
Are there not men in thc city now
who are wearing paths in thc stone
pavements to and from business, who
work by day so that they may sleep
bv night, and who sleep by night so
that they may work by day, while
they do not explore at all or keep
informed as to the way the city is
expanding fan-shape out over the
country? A man should not be shut
up in his work as if hc were imprisoned in a room. He should resist tbe
drowsy tendency to be an old fogey;
he should pinch himself and keep
awake. When a man passes forty he
should look to himself. He should
not spend this evening as he did last
evening, even if he but varies it by
sitting in a different chair, with, his
feet resting on something else, while
he reads a different book and a different kind of book. Never was there
such a period as this in which to keep
young and interested.
The People's Trust Co.
LIMITED
49th AND FRASER STREET
(South Hill Post Office, South Vancouver, E.C.)
BANKING DEPARTMENT
We conduct a regular Banking Business.   4 per cent, paid on all
deposits
Encourage the children to save their pennies in one of our
Savings Banks.   One Dollar starts them on the way to wealth.
Money Orders Issued and Cashed
Drafts       Collections
Checks on the Corporation of South Vancouver cashed.
Business hours : 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
(the hours that suit the working-man).
REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT
Eraser Street, close to  Forty-ninth Avenue, 33 feet; $2,600 cash.
Cleared Lots, 33 feet, high and dry, $550.   $50 cash, balance easy
payments.
One Cleared Lot, close to Fraser, facing south, 33 feet; $850.   $100
cash, balance easy payments.
Page Road, high location,   facing south; $800.- $100 cash, balance
easy.
INSURANCE DEPARTMENT
Let us insure your buildings, in the strongest Board Companies. We can also insure your Life, your Automobile, Plate
Glass, etc.   All kinds of Indemnity Insurance.
Get one of our Accident, Health, and Sickness Policies, and
draw a revenue while yor are in any way incapacitated.
If you want an Indemnity or Surety Bond, see us.
Bring your Conveyancing to us.
PROMPT ATTENTION QUICK SERVICE
We will make your Will
Estates Managed Money Loaned Rents Collected
South Vancouver Builders' Supply Company
Dealers in Sand, Gravel, Fibre, Cement, Lime, Plaster, Vitrified
Pipe, Tile, Fire-clay, Lath, and Brick of all kinds.
Offices :   51st Avenue and Fraser Street.    Phone : Fraser 36.
Main and 29th Avenue.    Phone :   Fairmont 1940.
Fraser Street and North Arm of Fraser River.   Phone : Fraser 84.
Coal orders taken at all offices and delivered to all parts of South
Vancouver.
Phone 2988
Limited        Ft. of Columbia Ave.
Johnson's Wharf
Phone : Sey. 9145
ROOFING TILE
California  Mission Roll
Spanish Roll Plain Square
In Colors Red and Green
EVANS,C0LEMAN&EVANS
VITRIFIED SEWER  PIPE AND
ALL FITTINGS
C. Gardiner - Johnson & Company
B.C.   EQUIPMENT   CO.
MAOHINERY   DIALERS
CONCRETE MIXERS, STEEL CARS. ROCK CRUSHERS, ELECTRIC. STEAM,
AND    GASOLINE    HOISTS.      WHEELBARROWS,    TRANSMISSION
MACHINERY,   GASOLINE   ENGINES,   PUMP8,   AND
ROAD  MACHINERY
Phone. :  Seymour 7056-7B18 Office. I 606-607  Bank ol Ottawa II!���.������.
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
SOLE AGENTS FOR B. C. SATURDAY,  JANUARY   25,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
HEAD OFFICE, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Authorized Capital      $2,000,000
Subscribed Capital       1,169.900
Paid-up   Capital           840,000
Specia' attention given to savings accounts.
Interest paid at the highest current  rates.
Your account very cordially solicited.
L. W. Shftejoid. General Manager
CEDAR COTTAGE BRANOH
W   E. Jardine. An.   Oneti   Mtnifei
W. H. Ronald. Manuel
Some Views of a Turkish Lady
By LmCn Morgin Sill
HEATERS
The cold weather is coming and you will
require some
Stoves and  Heaters
to keep your home warm.   We have heaters
from
$2.00 up
They are of the best quality, and we will put
them up for you.
Don't forget our line of RANGES.    We
have a few Pioneers left.
FOX'S PIONEER HARDWARE
Fraser and Ferris Roads T. Fox, Prop.
Phone : Fraser 87
LUMBER
Eburne  Saw Mills  Limited
Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of
FIR, CEDAR AND SPRUCE LUMBER
Shingles, Lath. Sash, Doors, Turnings
and House Finishings
PROMPT  DELIVERY   BY TRAM, WAGON OR SCOW
PHONE: EBURNE 14 R
EBURNE, B. C.
.Mini'. Zenoour Noniy de Chateau-
llelll'    i>    the-    eilie_;ill;il    eel    Pierre    Loti'l
"Zeyneb" In Lei Deienchanteei She
is the in-i Turkiih woman ��he. evei
hired i.e leave the Turki-h dominions,
unaccompanied by a man, without
fir it obtaining the But tan-1 permit-
lion.
She   left   Turkey   in  a   tragic   flight
irniii ;i huiband i" whom ihe had
been married without the' least acquaintance with him, laking with hei
the barest necenitiei and accompanied
unly hy her slill younger litter, who
would nut be lefl behind. No Occidental woman can conceive the- luring of this deed f'ir a Turkish woman;
ii was unprecedented in the Ottoman
Empire.
There- could icarecly be found a
more striking type 'ef the new Turkish
woman than Madame de Chateauneuf.
Daughter of His Excellency, Noury
Hey, General Secretary e,f the foreign Office and delegate te. the Hague
Conference; she was reared in the urnst
strict ly conventional Turkish manner,
wearing the veil or yashmak which
she is still obliged reluctantly to assume when ever she returns to her
native country. She knows French,
English, Turkish. Italian, Persian,
Arabic, anel has what she calls a smattering eef German and Russian. Two
books which she has written in French
arc about to be published in Paris:
one a volume of tales of Turkey, thc
��� ether "Lettres sur les Francais ; and
she is correcting proofs of a third
book which compares Turkish and
European life in its more intimate
phases. I asked Madame dc Chateauneuf if there were now many Turkish
women like herself, and she replied
that there arc numbers of them more
eer les- as advanced as she-. Personally she does not favor suffrage,
though whenever she returns tei Turkey she is an out-and-out feminist,
"because the women there need help
se. much"; but in woman's freedom
and right lie self-development she _n-
thusiastically believes.
The ex-Sultan, Abdul llamid. was
against the liberation of women.
Madame de Chateauneuf, because of
hcr advanced views, was regarded by
him as dangerous and an enemy to
the welfare of the empire. But at i ne
time Abdul llamid was see beset with
regard i" the education of women and
so often accused of anti-feminism
that, irritated anel in order to show
these attack- to be unjust, he established in a single year four hundred
public school for girls. "Bul he
thought so much of defending himself," said .Madame dc Chateauneuf,
"that he forgot the buys, and so to
this day there are more schools for
girls than for boys In Turkey." In
one of these schools Madame de Chateauneuf saw a woman of forty-eight
who had gone there tee learn to read,
The present Sultan, Mahomet V., is
meere advanced; that is to say. though
��olarwa
Pavement*
"IT IS PERMANENT BECAUSE IT IS CONCRETE"
���J Dolarway Paving is being laid in South
Vancouver on East Victoria Drive.
4| Dolarway is good enough for .City Streets
and cheap enough for Country Roads.
Gloversville, N. Y.���Street paved with Dolarway showing the adaptability
of this form of construction for paving between and adjoining street car tracks, as
it is unaffected by the vibration due to the action of the heavy cars passing over
the rails.
A Dolarway paved street with car tracks produces a handsome, uniform,
permanent pavement at a great saving in cost.
South Vancouver Builders' Supply
he- never commitl liilusilf on lhe- s,,|,
je e t 1.1 woman, he lets it be known
that he bines tin question to the
women themselves, Itui the cause il
obstructed bj the Sheikh-ul-Islam,
who is the head eif the Moslem world
and wine, though a very clever man,
is   lleel   Iii   any   si use   in   favor   "f   lhe'
liberation ol women.   Tins leriousl}
rci 'iaim ihe- Sultan,
'The Turks," said .Madame de Ch.it-
eauneuf, "are more clever, kind, and
indulgent than they are shrewd or
practical. Their very virtues constantly betray them.   The massacres
which Western people associate always with them are generally done by
foreigners in the Turkish dominions,
nf whom there are so many and whom
I must admit the Turks have failed
really to govern. They have only
been kind. Do you kneiw that ever
since the Turks have had dominion in
Europe the foreigners in my country
have never been asked to pay taxes'-
|Think eif that in the present agel The
Turks arc far more idealists than they
are business men, as you sec. In commerce and in finance they arc far be-
hiii'l the times, Did you know, too,
that until the Conseil de I'Europe thc
Christians and Jews in Turkey were
never admitted to thc army? All
through those previous centuries the
Turks fought feer them and they remained safe at home. The present war
bein;,' the first actual experience eef
these newly admitted Christian and
Jewish soldiers, they have not fought
well���many of them have run away.
And, worse- than lhat, 'here has been
treason among these foreigners���and
thus they have repaid the kindness
of the Turks. Futhermore, when the
Balkan war broke out numbers of our
officers were in Tripoli and arc there
still.
"The Turks have always been generous to foreigners, When Mahomet
II. came as conqueror to Byzantium,
he protected the Christians and gave
them the three patriarchs for iheir
chief pricsis. The Turks have never
forced any one tei change his religion.
They have' never even required foreigners to learn the Turkish language.
In iheir attitude toward the stranger
they have been ill thai you would conceive as Christian. Indeed, a certain
prominent Turk, a political man. when
asked for a comparison between the
Turks and other 'civilized' nations, replied. 'It can all be put ill a few words:
the Christians live in accordance with
the Koran and the Mohammedans in
accordance with the Gospels.'
"Do you know also that there is
no capital punishment feer murder in
Turkey!' Fifteen years at hard labor
is the punishment, and then the murderer is eefteii pardoned by the Sultan after five or six years. They do
nol take 'an eye for an eye. a tooth
for a lee,iib.' Thc Turkish nature is,
above all. indulgent. They are neither
murderers nor thieves; there are
scarcely any of these criminals among
the Turks themselves. And when a
crime is committed tlie feeling is one
eif pily and pardon, and 'he will nut
dn it again.' All these trails, however ideal, are not effective, I admit,
for governing, As yeeu say. slieiuld a
massacre occur in ilu- United States
among any pari of your great mixed
people the government woulil pursue
each murderer with the law. Bul Turkey i- so different, as you see. ami
it. ei a successful governing power,
though she hael been a conquering
one.
"Another fault of my people is this:
'ihen they came from Asia as greal
conquerors they were proud of their
conquests. Tln-y have remained oe'i
since ion much grand seigneurs; they
are al lhe same psychological point
in many respects .is they were then.
Religion, philosophy, I.��� si iita.il v.
beauty, and luxury���these things thej
��� havi always had: il was whal their
civilization required; bul modern
civilization, wiih ii- new commi
iis shrapnel, ii - haute finani ��� -. i1 - v
havi   iie.i  perfectly acquired,
"Yes, if there should be mn
in iw ���and  sonu   think   thei e   n ill   be
veritable    carnage���they will nol    I"
committed  by tin   Turks,    The   Unl
i. irians and S.tv ians, j es, and especially   tin   Armenians.    The    Armcniai -
will disguise themselves as priests ind
soldiers  for this inurdi re >us work, as
they   have  done  several   linns   befori
win ii starting revolutions in Turkcj
Bul not the Turks; they do m>\ mas
sacre.   Good soldiers and fierce fighters they are, bul nol  murderers,
"The Turks are stoical, Their religion, with ii fatalism, makes them s i
and induces in them that laisser faire
which lies at the root of iheir failures
and makes some of their action or in_
Iaction inexplicable iee those who do
[not understand the springs of their
mental inspiration. Speaking of their
stoicism, we were once being entertained by a Turkish gentleman. At
the commencement of the evening a-
telegram was brought to him. He
read and calmly fielded it. saying nothing. We then had music and the evening was passed in joyment. We did
not know until afterward that the
telegram had announced to him the
ilea ill of his only son. He had submitted to this terrible sorrow and the
law of hospitality had to be obeyed.
I ceiuld tell you many other things
of this kind.
"Is the Turkish Red Cross well
equipped? Yes, it is called there thc
Red Crescent, because it would have
.been unacceptable lo (he people to
force them In wear a cross, as if they
had changed Iheir religion, and they
could nol have understood why they
should wear it even though il Is only
[the flag of Switzerland.
"Vou ask mc about polygamy. In
lhe lirst place, there are very few
polygamous households now in Turkey for two reasons. One is that it
is toe. expensive, for living is dearer
in Turkey as it is everywhere else;
and the other is���the most important
reason, of course���that women no
I nger accept it. This change has been
coming slowly. For example, my
grandfather had four wives; the binding of this book",she picked up a copy
nf Loti's "Lei l.e-enehaiitees" b'iund
in an exquisite Oriental -ilk in yellow
and faded gold) "was nude from a
piece "i a ge.vvn -if one oi then, my
grandmother.   But my father had only
��� ne wife, my mother. When he was
asked here in  I'aris why he  hail only
��� an' wile-, he Laughed and said that Ins
wiie- ordered  her gowni ol   Doucet,
ami whal would he dee with several
like  In i -    lint   lhe real  reason   .���,
deeper one. Women die not tolerate
polygamy a- they once did     I asked
al oi my fi iendi �� hen I a I
iu Turkey what they would do if iheir
busbandi  should  take another  wife
fhey eae li -.in!. '( n course I i ould not
prevent   it,   bill   1   ihould   go   away   at
' II"'''*  "
When I bit Madame de' Chateauneuf -he was preparing to return I"
her work feer Iln Reel Cre,.,-, >,r Crescent, to lh,' sad labor 'ef sewing f..r
her countrymen, wounded or dying in
ilieir heroic struggle nol only agan
the enemies surrounding them. Inn
against the terrible enemy t.i ingratitude and treason within their e,vvn
land. Whatever may be our inadequate comprehension, our prejudice,
wc cannot avoid a sense of the deep
pathos of the wreck of this idealistic
and unpractical skip of state stranded
nil   lhe  rocky  shore of modernity.
Your
Best
Chance
Little Molly May was only six, and
on the morning of the story was sobbing her heart "in because she had
lost a penny. .Many looked and sympathized as she- treitted down the
street; but il was an old gentleman
who played the rede of practical Samaritan.
"Well, my little maid." hc asked, as
he patted Molly .May's heaving shoulder,  "what's   the   trouble"'"
"lloo-lioei! I've lost a penny!" came
tin   muffled  answer.
Without a weerd the old gentleman
llirust his hand into his pocket and
handed Molly a penny to replace the
one she  hail  lost, saying:
"Then���there, now everything will
be all right."
Hut lo hi- tiller confusion, the little girl dropped her damp pinafore,
gazing al him with an expression in
which sorrow -trove valiantly with
anger, and  saiel:
"i Mi, you wicked, wicked "Id man,
no   had   il   all   lhe   time."
To get doors cheap. Make your
openings (o suit these doors and
save money. A few odd sizes; like
2 ft. by 6 ft. 8 inches, and 2 ft. by
6 ft. 6 inches. Regular price $2.40.
While They Last $1.25
or we will give one free with every
$20 order.
��   *
McGibbon Hodgson
Lumber Company
20th Avenue
CEDAR COTTAGE, B. C.
Phone :  Fair. 1659
Mrs. Bennett had a clored maid who
had been with hcr for some time. The
girl lefl hcr and got married. A few
months later she came to see' Mrs.
Bennett.
"Well. Mandy," asked the former
mistress, "hnw are you gelling
along:-"
"Oh, line, ma'am, thank ymi." thc
bride answered.
"Yes, 'deed lie am. ma'am." -aid
Mandy. enthusiastically. "Why, jes',
dis las' week, ma'am, lie got me six
new place- to wash al."
Hilton & Webster's
BILLIARD AND
POOL PARLORS
Headquarters    for    thc    South    Hill
Football   Club.
An ideal place to spend a social hour.
Fraser Street, between 46th and 47th.
Toronto  Furniture
Company
Furnish   Houses   at   Very   Moderate
Prices
Call and See
M. H. COWAN, Proprietor
3336 MAIN STREET
Phone :    Fairmont  1660
C. M. WHELPTON
BUILDING CONTRACTOR
ESTIMATES GIVEN
Phone : Fraser 34 - 46th Ave. and Fraser
SOUTH VANCOUVER
PRIVATE HOSPITAL
MEDICAL,    SURGICAL,    MATERNITY
Twenty-eighth   Ave.   and   Main   Street
Misses   Hall   and   West ley,   Graduated   Nursei
Terms Moderate
Phone :  Fairmont 2165
GREENE & MERKLEY
UNDERTAKERS
SOUTH   VANCOUVER   OFFICE
AND CHAPEL.  16th AND  MAIN
STREET
DOWN       TOWN       PARLORS :
305    PENDER    STREET    WEST
Phone :   Sty.  340,   Day  or  Night
Public Notices
IF YOU ARE SICK, CALL ON
Ernest Shaw, D.C.
(Doctor   nf  Chiropratic)
25C   22nd    Avenue   F.ast,    close    to
Main Street
; Hours : 1.30 till 6.    Consultation free
Chiropractic  succeeds  where  medi
ine fails.   For all complaints, whether
acute or chronic, Chiropractic is just
the thing.
Patronize tite
Province Renovatory
South Vancouver's Pioneer
Dry-Cleaning and Dyeing Works
Work  and  Prices  Right
CORPORATION   OF   SOUTH
VANCOUVER
NOT'CE    TO    THE     RATEPAYERS     OR
OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE IN THE
MUNICIPALITY    OF    SOUTH
VANCOUVER
The Government A."(tiling Commissioner ot
ihe above mimed Municipality will have his
office open from 10 lo 11 in the forenoon oi*
tach day (utCSpt elays on which the Public
Inquiry is lieing held) for the purpose of
passing ICCOUBtll and any Ratejeayer or
Owner may he present and may make any
objection tu such accounts as are before the
Auditor.
JAS.  I).  SPRINGFORD.
C. M. C.
DR.   A.   J.   BRETT
DENTIST
S.-E.  Cor. 25th Avenue  and   Main  Street
Phone:     FAIRMONT   2056
4136 Main St.
Cor. of 25th Avenue
SOUTH END CLEANING CO.
First-class    Cleaners,    Prcssers    and
Tailors
A   trial   will     convince  you.     Prices
Reasonable
Open   Evenings
4375 Main Street   -   South Vancouver
TANKS
Wood water-tanks, wire wound wood pipe
and continuous stave pipe made in al! sizes.
Municipal Construction Co. Ltd., 319 Pender
Street,  Vancouver,   1J.  C-
MACK'S
HORSESHOEING AND  GENERAL
BLACKSMITH1NG
SHOEING   A   SPECIALTY
DAVID   S.    McKAY,    MANAGER
South Hill P.O. Box 105
CHARACTER CIRCULATION
There is a difference between
the hastily read street car paper
and the paper that is delivered
into the home; the paper that is
absolutely independent and wholesome; that the men respect and
the women admire���that is the
paper whose advertising columns
carry confidence to the reader���
that is the paper whose advertising
patronage is valuable.
Phrenologyand Palmistry
Mrs. YOUNG
(Formerly of Montreal)
GIVES   PRACTICAL   ADVICE   ON   BUSINESS ADAPTATION,  HEALTH
AND   MARRIAGE
805   Granville   Street,   Corner   Robson
Hours: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. f
is
it SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  JANUARY  25,   19jj
With the Aid of a Mountain
By   K.   W.   licaton,  in "McLean's  .Magazine."
The positieen nf Reibcrt McLaren's
glasses ii'ld that he was unusually
perturbed ibout something. They
rested perilously near the tip oi his
nose, and  tee  be  of any  use  tei  him
be had to throw back his bead until
be presented a broad expanse of neck
mid chin, Jeelm Kenyon slowly removed  hit glass.-*  and  with    them
gently tupped I silver dug that guarded some papers of importance to the
banking house oi McLoreii's & Kenyon.
"What's  the  matter  now,  Robert?
"Matter?" enquired the senior member, wilh a raise of the eyebrows.
"What dei you think, sir, that son of
youri had the impudence to suggest?"
"That we take him in as a member of the firm," ventured Mr. Kenyon, as he turned the silver dog's
head tei face a bronze alligator whose
capacious mouth was filled with
vouchers,
"No, sir. He had the audacity to
come to my office this morning���just
now, sir���and asked to bc allowed to
marry my daughter!" And Mr. McLoreii's glasses clung desperately to
the very extremity of his nose,
"What!" shouted Mr. Kenyon, as
hc jumped to his feet and gazed at
his partner across the desk. "Did thc
young fool make such an ass of himself?"
"Yes, sir, he���" Mr. McLoren paused, lie adjusted his glasses to a safer
position and looked over them at Mr.
Kenyon. "And may I ask, sir, why
a young man is a fool for aspiring to
the hand of my daughter?"
"The young fool," repeated Mr.
Kenyon, partly to himself, as he resumed his seat. Then a thought struck
him, and he rose and enquired in tones
which he tried to make most withering: "May I ask wherein the impudence lies iu my son honorably asking for the hand of any young lady?"
The quarrel was becoming involved.
Both partners appreciated this, and a
truce was tacitly declared. They seated themselves and quietly talked it
over.
Robert McLoren and John Kenyon had been brought up in Montreal.
They had hecome brokers and bankers together as naturally as they got
into mischief together earlier in life.
They grew wealthy and weighty together, Each married rather late, and
Mr. McLorcn's hopes radiated around
his daughter Ethel as did Mr. Ken-
yon's around his son Sterling, who
was just completing his course at Mc-
Gill. This talk of marriage was the
first intimation cither ever had that
he was growing old, and it came as a
shock. They still looked upon the
young couple as children and they
could not thoroughly awaken in an
hour.
They talked it over and decided it
was preposterous,, at least for some
time, a couple of years. That evening
there were two conferences in two
libraries, and two young people were
firmly but kindy informed lhat at their
age they must not think of marrying,
and that each must get out and see
something of the world before choosing a life companion.
Then thc dark plot which had been
that morning hatched in the luxurious
private office nf John Kenyon, of the
banking house of McLoren & Kenyon, was laid bare in all its details.
Ethel was to go to her aunt in London and spend a couple of years.
Sterling was to go out to British Columbia and spend the summer doing
engineering work on some mineral
claims of the linn. He was to finish
his career at McGill, and, after some
experience would be at liberty to go
tee London.
Two weeks later Sterling bade Ethel
a very lugubrious farewell as she embarked on the steamer and, accompanied by an austere maid, set out
her  trip  across   lhe   Atlantic.     A
lirst extensive surveying work, and
ii turned out to he ihe most memorable, Thirteen claims cover considerable ground. Seeme were secured
lor the timber on them, and others
because "leads," partly developed, were
to be found going in Iheir direction.
Kenyon's survey was to adjust the
lines, determine the shape of the
claims, and lee correct the mistakes
iliat   lhe  besl   pnespector  will   make.
The prospector is the pioneer of
all mining camps. He wanders over
the hills with Ilis pack on his back
ami his pick in his hand, knocking
��� ���nt pieces of mineralized rock where
they poke through the moss or show
in the face of the mountain side. When
he finds anything he favors he stakes
ii. lie puts one stake, generally a
chopped-off tree, for trees will grow
where it is difficult to dig post holes,
at the place where he has discovered
the mineral. That is the "discovery"
post. Then he goes, say 750 feet
north and puts in another stake, or
chops off another tree; then, at the
same distance south of the discovery
post he repeats the operation, and
east and west he marks the boundaries of the land he wants. His
name and the date and which post is
which are written on a surface cut
on each stake for the purpose, so that
the next prospector will know what
land is taken up. The "lead" will be
followed up or down or across the
hill and other claims staked, the prospector as before, guessing at his direction and distances, for in his pack
are no engineer's instruments except,
perhaps, a compass. When, after the
claims are recorded and pass from
one owner to another until finally
they are gobbled up by a syndicate or
a company with much money and a
large desire to probe them for riches,
a careful survey is made. Then it
becomes apparent that some prospectors are bad guessers, for claims supposed to bc adjoining prove to be
many feet apart. And when the whole
group is put on paper it is often found
that right in the middle of thc claims
there will be perhaps a tract of land
that was never taken up. This the
surveyor stakes and transfers to the
owner of the group. At least, a surveyor who would take advantage of
the fact that he was the first to discover the vacant land and keep it for
himself would be forever disgraced in
the eyes of the profession. These
inks that unite a solid group of claims,
and which are found only by surveyors, arc called fractions.
Day after day Kenyon tramped the
mountains and at night he pondered
over his notes. At last thc outside
work was done, and one whole day,
all by himself in the superintendent's
office, he drew triangles and rectangles on paper, and worked in the
stables where they belonged, showing
their relative position between the
meal house and thc site for thc compressor, and everything else on the
place that was not alive. The Apex
group was on paper. Tbe paper was
put in a tin  tube and locked up.
"Finished?" asked Boyd, when he
came in for supper, fresh wax drops
on his trousers and boots showing
that he had been poking around underground with a candle.
"Yep," was Kenyon's abrupt reply,
and he became very busy washing up
with a bluster and splashing lhat precluded further conversation. Hc wiped
his face explosively, and before Boyd
could ask any more questions was out
of doors wandering beneath thc great
lir trees.
"This beats the Dutch," he muttered to himself. "I wonder, I wonder "  and   he   wondered   off  into
silence.
After a quarter of an hour's hard
thinking with much more muttering
and sage shaking of the head, Kenyon found himself back at Boyd's
cabin.    He paused  and  took  a  letter
was  whirling  the  youth  across  Can
ada  to the mountains  of  Hritish  Columbia.
lie had received explicit instructions. Ilis destination was the Apex
greuip of claims which sprawled irregularly over the highest mountains
ill the great Kootenay country, lie
was a civil engineer, or al least after
a few months McGill would tell him
so, and he would spend the rest of liis
life in learning tn he one. It was in-
tended thai he should ultimately have
charge eef the many milling properties
in which his father and associates were
interested, and his present summer
was to be spent in thc first practical
work he had done. There was much
work to be completed on the claims
and the services of an engineer would
be constantly required. He thought
himself hc was quite capable of undertaking the work, his father thought
so, and Ethel knew it.
He ruminated about all these things,
and Ethel as he crossed the continent, and wdien he landed from thc
boat at Kaslo���he had left the train
that morning at the foot of Kootenay
Lake���he began to look forward with
pleasure  to  thc  summer's  work.
He was met by Thomas Boyd, wdio
was reported to bc the best mine
superintendent in the country. He
was in charge nf the men working on
the Apex group. That night Sterling
slept seven thousand feet above the
sea level, and next morning be appeared in hob-nailed boots that laced
to his knees, canvas knickerbockers
and a sweater, and was ready for the
campaign. He lit his pipe, and with
Boyd visited some of the scenes of
activity that made the hillside busy.
The latter explained the situation as
it stood.
"Wc have only a short time before
the snow starts in, and we must get
the tunnels well underground before
the bad weather comes. Of course,
the great thing is haste. If your people want this property worked with
a full crew all winter to have something demonstrated by spring, there
is not a day to lose." Before noon,
Kenyon was in command of the details.
Two weeks after he arrived he began to survey the group.    It was his
few days later, the Imperial Limited j from his pocket    It bore the English
stamp and the London post-mark,
"Ethel," he decided, "I'll do il. by
Jove, I will, and I'll name it after
you."
"I'm going down the hill in the
morning, Boyd," he announced lee the
superintendent when pipes were lighted afler supper.
"What's   up   now?"
"Well, I want lee send a couple nf
telegrams and get my hair trimmed
and have a surveyor help me make'
tlie plan heok decent, as I am ashamed to show it lo you as it is now."
Kenyon lied glibly along .ind persuaded   the  unsuspecting   Boyd.
Il was noon next day whin Kin-
yon, wdio had made an early start,
swung himself off his horse in front
Of the government recorder's office in
Kaslo. When he came out he was
the sole nwner of the Ethel fraction,
lying in the very heart of the Apex
group of mineral claims.
Then he found his way to the of.
lice of a firm of lawyers. To one of
them he explained, wilh thc aid of
his plan of the Apex group, that he
was the owner of a long, narrow
fraction, which, starting in a clump
nf timber, ran straight up the hill between the Joker and Derby claims, ft
was very plain on the blue paper,
which also showed that on that strip
of land, 600 feet long by 400 feet wide
at the bottom and tapering to nothing at the top, there were marked
"Tunnel No. 1," "Tunnel No. 2,"
"Tunnel No. 3," one above the other,
and all in thc middle of the long slim
triangle.
"Somewhat extraordinary," said the
lawyer, "but what of it?"
"Well, you see," explained the
client, "I own that property and a
syndicate is drilling three tunnels on
it, and I want the work stopped."
"But, my dear boy," said thc benevolent gentleman, "what better could you
wish than to have other people develop your claim at no expense to
you ?"
"That, sir, is a matter which affects
me only," Kenyon replied. "All I
want you to do is to stop the work."
"Can they show that it is necessary
to   drive   through   property   to   pro-
Corporation of the District of South Vancouver
MUNICIPAL HALL
Corner Fraser Street and 43rd Avenue
Postal Address:
DRAWER 1224, SOUTH HILL P. O., B. C.
TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Corporation of South Vancouver intends as a Local Improvement to pre und with the construcli.
Creosoted Wood Block I'avcmcnt, 42 feet wide, on 6-inch concrete foundation, with concrete and stone curbs, and the necessary drains, inanluele
street gullcys for carrying off the surface water, on Westminster  Road, from the centre of Knight Street to the centre of I'ark Street, in this   '
cipality, and intends to assess a portion of thc final cost thereof upon the real properly described in  the schedule  hereto,  which  property is bene
thereby, and fronts and abtttts upon said Westminster Road.
The estimated cost per foot is $1178, and lhe estimated annual rate per foot on said property is $0,589, the number eef annual payments will I
The estimated cost of said improvements is $579,418.60, of which $70,000 is to be contributed by the Provincial Government, $216,072,60 out
funds to be provided by the Municipality, and $293,346 by the property holders assessed as shown in this schedule.
A Court of Revision will bc held on Eriday, February 21st, at 10 a.m., at thc Municipal Hall, South Vancouver, B. C, for the purpose of li.
complaints against the proposed assessment or  the accuracy of frontage measurements.
S. H. WES'I
January 8th, 1913, Municipal Hall, South Vancouver, B. C. Ass,
ted
20,
1 Ibc
ring
Subdivision
1
(Continued on  Page  12)
22
22
19 & 20
25 & 2C
S. pt. 1 2 & 3
1-5
1-5 A
6-7
6-7
10
11
S. Port.
Name and Address District Lot Block
Tames  McGeer, Hillcrest  P.  0  352 2 & 4
James McGeer, Hillcrest  P. O	
James  McGeer, Hillcrest  P. O	
Chas.   W.   Marrington,   Cedar   Cotlage   	
Narcisse Morine, 410  12th Avenue	
John  II.   Malabar,  Kerrisdale   	
K.  A. Rahy, 254 Hastings Street  ICast  	
R. A. Jackson, care Cancouver Club	
Sam   Angel,   Cedar   Cottage   	
Kdgar John Goddard, 123 I'cndcr Street West 	
J.   Summerskill	
W. II. McKnight, 1025 Granville St	
John  D.  McKinnon, 204  Carrall Street	
Kdgar.  J.   Goddard,   12.1   l'ender  Street   West	
Kdgar.  j.   Goildarel,   123   l'ender  Street  West	
J.   Benson,   Hox  264,   Vancouver  1 Scl
J.   lleiison,   Hox  264,  Vancouver   	
Gertrude M. Robertson, Hox 926, Vancouver 	
Gertrude M. Robertson, Hox 926, Vancouver	
Gertruele M. Robertson, Hox 926, Vancouver 	
C. R. Townley, 630 Hastings Street   	
C. R. Townley, 630 Hastings Sireet   	
C. R. Townley, 630 Hastings Street  	
C. R. Townley, 630 Hastings Street   	
C. R. Townley, 630 Hastings Sireet   	
C. R. Townley, 630 Hastings Street   	
Benjamin   Hlackwood,   3115   Georgia  Street   	
John Tulpul, 508 Richards Street    b
John  W.   rnicume, 45   10th Avenue  West   	
Jas. II. & Ida May Field, Sunnydene I'. 0  352 5
las. II. A Ids May Kielel, Sunnydene I'. O	
S.   flack, 28  Klack  Hldg., Hastings Street  	
S.  Rick, 28 Klack  Hldg., Hastings Street   	
S. Flack, 28 Flack Hldg., Hastings Street  	
S.  Flack, 28 Klack  Hldg., Hastings Street   	
S.  Flack, 28  flack  Hlelg., Hastings Street   	
S.  Flack, 28 Flack Hldg., Hastings Street  	
S.  Flack, 28 Flack  Hldg., Hastings Street   	
Mrs. A. I..  Fowler, 10th 8c iMain Street     J
Mrs.   A.   M.   Whatmore,  Cedar  Cottage	
Mrs.  A.  M. Whatmore,  Cedar Cottage   	
Mrs.   A.   M.  Whatmore,   Cedar  Cottage    ,	
Mrs.   A.   M.   Whatmore,   Cedar  Cottage   	
Mrs.  A.  M.  Whatmore,  Cedar  Cottage..	
II.  C.  J.  Watson,  New  Westminster     7-9-11
Miss  Catherine  I**.   Kirton,  care Mrs.   Warrandcr,  281   18th  Ave.   K...
I.akomatsu Oelda, 433 Alexander Street 	
Hasainc  I.amarche,  Hillcrest  P.  O	
Hasainc  Lamarcbc.  City  Heights  P.  O	
I'.. W. White, 36 Davis Chambers	
K. \V. While, 36 Davis Chambers	
F.  A.  Whittaker,  Cedar Cottaage   	
!���'. A. Whittaker, Cedar Cottaage  	
IC.  A. &  D.  Hester, Aelela  I'.  O	
F. A.   Whittaker,   Cedar  Cottage   	
A. M. Harper, 539 l'ender Street  	
Mrs.   Hamilton   Ilrown,  Carman,  Manitoba   	
Wm.   Hamilton   Ilrown,  Carman,  Manitoba   	
Thos. K, Wilson it ..,ec. Mcintosh, 543 Granville Street   	
Thos.  IC. Wilson & Alec.  Mcintosh, 543 Granville Street   	
Alf.  Steigenberge,   1004  16th Avenue  Keast   	
Alf.  Steigenberge,  1004  16th Avenue ICeast  	
Alex.   Mcintosh,   543   Granville   Street     352 7-9-11
Alex.   Mcintosh,   543   Granville   Street   	
W.  H.  Gallagher, 448  l'ender Street   	
K.   W.  Carroll, 2240  Main  Street   	
S.   R.   Neat,  448   l'ender Street   West   	
S.   R.   Neat, 448   l'ender  Street  West   	
Chong  l.ee  Laundry,   Cedar Cottage    .*	
Allet  &   McCready,  Cedar Cottage	
J.   Russell,  Cedar  Cottage   	
J.   Russell,  Cedar  Cottage   	
J.   Russell,  Cedar  Cottage   	
Fairley 8c Stinson, 308 Loo Building    8
L.  G.  Hrook, Siinnydeene   	
James  Kerr, 218  Winch   Ruileling	
J. W. Harris, care C. L. Moriatt, 410 Homer Street  	
J. W, Harris, care C. L. Moriatt, 410 Homer Street	
National   Finance   Corp.,   Vancouver   	
National   Finance   Corp.,   Vancouver   	
James Kerr, 218 Winch  Building   	
A. N. Dakin, 559 Granville Street  	
Gospel   Hall   	
Gospel   Hall   	
P.  J.   Kechan, 321   Vernon  Street   	
P.  J.  Kechan, 321   Vernon  Street   	
Mrs.  Carrie  Nelson,  2230  Cornwall   St	
Mrs.   Carrie  Nelson,  2230  Cornwall   St	
Mrs.   Kathleen  Joy,   Cedar  Cottage   	
Mrs.   Kathleen  Joy.  Cedar  Cottage   	
J.   Hradnier,  care   Marriott  &   Felleiws   	
J.   Hraelnier,  care   Marriott   8c   Fellows   	
R. C. Anderson, 1057  Melville Street  \2
Benjamin   Blackwood,  3115   Humphries   Streeet   	
II.   MeKenzie,   505   Richard   Street   	
II.   MeKenzie,   505   Richard   Street   	
John  Kgmunelson,  1611   121b  Avenue  ICast     352 12
lolm   Kgmuiidson,  1611   12th  Avenue  ICast   	
II.   MeKenzie,   5()5Richa.els   Sireet   	
G. R.  Simpson,  1100  Salsbury  Drive   	
G.   R.   Simpson,   1100  Salsbury   Drive   	
Elizabeth   Mills,   Cedar   Cottage     13
Elisabeth   Mills.   Cedar   Cottage   	
Clement Mills, Ceelar Cottage  	
Clement Mills. Cedar Cottage  	
M.   Mawhinncy,  Cedar  Cottage   	
M.   Mawhinncy,  Cedar   Cottage   	
The Scotch Investment  Co., care .1. t're, 698 Hastings Street	
The Scotch Investment Co., care J. I'rc, 698 Hastings Street	
Mrs.  Annie Stefanoski, Ceelar Cottage     14 1-2-i
Kalian  Singh,   1866  2nd   Avenue  West   	
L.   Richmond,  Heather   P.   O	
Phillips   Lesser  &   R.   Raphael,   Box   1191   Vancouver	
iames W. Thomson, 619 Haaslings Street West  
ames W. Thomson, 619 liaastiugs Street West  
talpb  G.  Clark, care  Imperiaal   Realty  Co.,  3117   Loo   lluilding     15
Ralph  G.  Clark, care  Imperiaal   Really   Co.,  307  Loo  Building   	
Ralph  G.  Clark, care  Imperiaal   Realty  Co., 307  I.oo  Building   	
Kunialarei   Tatnqucbl,   3711   Powell   Street   	
.1.   We nun, 386  I ttb  Avenue	
I'.   W.   Tvnll.  221   Hastings  Street   ICast   	
Ralph  S   Clark, care  Imp.   Really  Co.,  307   Loo  Bldg  ���
Ralph  S.  Clark, care  Imp.  Really Co.,  307   I.oo  Bldg	
We,  Yny  Soong ct  al,  care Sang  Hang.  22  Canton  Street	
Wo  Voy Soong et  al.  care Sang  Hang.  22  Canton  Street	
Marriott   ix   Fellows.   Cedar  Cottage     16 1-2-3
R.    Bestwitberick,   Janes   Roael    	
i. R. Micbie. Janes Roael  
Irs.  A.  IC. Reibiiison, Cedar Cottaage  	
Mrs.  IC. T. Sterling, Vernon, D. C  393 2        1  & 2 Re. S.
pt.3, 41 to 68
Allan   Bros.,   Pender   Street   West     l'l... A. Bk.l
Allan   Bros,  Lender Street  West     Lots 5, 6, 7
rtn. 3 ei 4, Ilk. 2
F.  J.   Gooelacre, care  Dow   Fraser &  Co	
Jas.   Bateman, care Dow  Fraser & Co.   	
Jas.  Bateman, care Dow Fraser 8c Co ,	
M.   Sbillington,  care  Dow  Fraser  &  Co	
John  C.   Illingsworth,  care  Forbes &  Co	
J. T.  Kirkwood, care Dow  Fraser Co ,	
Mrs.  Heath, care  Dow  F'rascr &-  Co ,	
Chas.   Spooner,   care   Dow   F'raser  8c   Co	
Chas.   Stockwell,  care   Dow   Fraser  Sc   Co.   	
W. W. Manuel, care Dow Fraser & Co	
Agnes  Smith,  Royal  Oak  Rd.,  Central   Park   	
James A.  Wright,  care  Dow  Eraser &  Co	
James  A.  Wright,  care  Dow   Fraser  8c  Co	
Clara L.  McDougal, care Dow  Fraser &  Co	
Clara L.  McDougal, care Dow Eraser Sc  Co	
Ida J.  M.  Bennett,  care Dow  Eraser & Co	
Ida J.   M.   Bennett,  care  Dow   I'raser &  Co	
Mrs.   M.   E.  Caldwell,  La  Mesa,  San  Diego,  Cal	
Allan  B.  McDougall. Hillcrest P.  0	
Wm. Rathie, Cedar Cottage 	
David  P.  McCannon, 981  Hornby  	
David P. McCannon, 981 Hornby  	
Percy Smith, care J.  Lire Bank of Commerce Hldg	
A. Price, care T. E. Ringrose, City Heights 	
Mrs.  S.  Bennett, Cedar Cottage   	
M. A. Muir 8c Mrs. Thompson, care N. Thompson 847 Beatty St.
M. A. Muir 8c Mrs. Thompson, care N. Thompson 847 Beatty St.
M. A. Muir 8c Mrs. Thompson, care N. Thompson 847 Beatty St.
M. A. Muir & Mrs. Thompson, care N. Thompson 847 Beatty St.
L H. Spurr, corner 12th 8c Ontario Street 	
J. A.  Salter, City Heights P.  0  393
Elizabeth   McArthur,   390   10th   Avenue   East   	
Angus   McGillvray,   Cedar   Cottage   	
Angus   McGillvray,   Cedar   Cottage            .
Robert   Curry,   Gladstone   Hotel   	
Joseph  Curry,  Gladstone  Hotel   	
Joseph  Curry,  Gladstone  Hotel   	
Thomas Curry, Gladstone Hotel   	
Mrs.  E.  E.  Barwick 8c  O.  W.  Thomas, 837  Hastings Street   	
Mrs.  E.  E.  Harwick & O.  W. Thomas, 837  Hastings Street   	
Catherine  Johnson,  3248   Quebec  Street   	
Margaret  Goddard,  P.  O.   Box 674 Vancouver  	
Margaret Goddard.  V.  O.  Hox 674 Vancouver  	
Mrs. M. Armstrong, 1904 Westminster Road   	
Mrs.  M.  Armstrong,  1904  Westminster Road   	
Nathan   Sherman,   1019   Robson   Street   	
E.  R.   Buller,  Cedar Cottage   	
E.  R.   Buller.  Cedar  Cottage   	
E.   R.   Buller,  Cedar Cottage   	
E. R. Buller, Cedar Cottage  	
E.  R.   Buller,  Cedlr  Cottage   	
12
3-4-5
6a b c
1   W.   Vs
1  E  i/
2
3
4-5-6-7-8
S. pt
Lot
A
B
C
D
E
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
1
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
1
2
3
4
5
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
2
10
11
12
1
i
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
15
16
17
18
18A
It.
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
I
2
3
4
S
6
7
8
1
2
3
23
24
25
I
2v
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
2
3
13
Frontage Feet Flankage  Feet
Exempt Assessed Exempt Assessed Assc-,ment
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
121A
I
2
3
4
5
��
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
I
2
3
4
1
1
3
4
5
6
7
20
21
22
23
24
25
13.
19.9
63.46
63.46
63.46
111.
1.1.00
36.10
36.10
64.
31.
29.75
29.75
29.75
29.75
29.75
23.85
268.
49.6
49.6
49.6
49.6
49.6
49.6
49.6
49.6
49.6
33.
34.14
34.1<
34.14
34.14
34.14
30.
30.
30.
30.
30.
32.3
32.3
237.
31.
33.
33.
33.
33.
31.8
31.8
31.8
31.8
31.8
3186
31.86
31.86
30.45
J8.65
42.
37.45
37.45
37.45
34.115
34.05
34.05
34.05
34.05
34.05
32.75
32.75
32.75
32.75
32.
31.
31.
37.2
39.7
32.71,
32.76
32.76
32.76
32.76
31.8
31.8
31.8
31.8
41.8
41.5
41.5
41.5
40.45
40.45
40.45
411.43
35.02
35.02
35.02
35.02
36.55
36.55
36.55
J6.55
J6.55
39.8
39.8
39.8
3'l.8
39,8
19.8
39.8
39.8
,"3.(,
36.9
36.9
68.
.li.. 5
3(,.5
31.7
31.7
11.7
31.7
31.7
31.7
31.7
31.7
31.7
31.7
48.3
48.3
48.3
148.8
380.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
70.5
13.
33.
13.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
45.38
45.38
45.38
45.38
45.38
45.38
45.38
45.38
33.
33.
33.
33.2
66.
66.
132.
132.
36.
36.
36.
35.
35.
26.
36.
46.85
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
II
"47.81
.
711.12
425.40
425.44
"54.17
350.57
350.57
350.57
350.57
281.04
3158.11
;K4.1j
584,45
584.41
584.48
584.48
584,41
I II
5H4.4J
584.41
402.10
W2.1tl
4(1.' ,11
403.30
40230
l-!.o
353.52-
.
I
��� ���
��� :
.'7V2.SH
365.30
388.87
388.17
388.87
374.73
I74.M
374.73
.174.7.',
374.71
,175.43
���
.175 43
I  S.4I
.1 1 r
-111.31
441.31
���141,31
41) 1.24
401.24
401.24
401.24
401 24
401.24
385.92
.< ' ���:
1.92
IS ''2
377.08
.1.1= .in
365.30
438 .'������
467.82
JSVII4
386.04
J86.04
386.04
1862-04
174.73
374.73
374.73
.71,73
492.57
6.6.
���
li),7l)
.:.m.70
130.70
19.00
���
1.00
I  ,���! Ill)
.1
i U
I ������
��� 1 31
I
173.55
I73.5S
373.55
50.17
e���i.l7
i,.v. i r
4177 "2
388.87
,!��S<7
.188.87
.188.87
388.87
188.87
188.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
188.87
.188.87
388.87
830.77
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
.188.87
534.75
534.75
534.75
5.U.75
534.75
534.75
534.-5
534.75
388.87
388.87
388.87
391.22 '
777.74
777.74
1555.48
1555.48
424.22
424.22
424.22
412.44
412.44
424.22
424.22
552.08
388.8?
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87 SATURDAY,   JANUARY   25,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SEVEN
6
1-2-3-4
5
1-2-3-4
Name and Address District Lot Blocl
IC  K.  Buller, Cedar Cottage 	
1..   R.   Buller,   Ceelar   Cottage   	
IC.   K.   Buller,   Cedar  Cottage    ,	
IC,  R.   Buller, Cedar Collage  	
Joseph  Curry,  Gladstone   Bote]     '
Me.   M. J,  Hyde, c.eer  (..   1.   Pa ter ion, 32  Inns of Court   HIHelg  8
Mrs. M. J. Hyde, can- G.  P. Patenon, 32 Inns of Court BIBdg	
G, P. Pattenon, Boom 32 Inns of Court Bldg	
A. H.  Hanaome, Re.e.ni 32 hue. t,i Court  Blelg	
W.    Milley,   46   Wain    Sireet    	
S.    <lyaina,    141    Dulleiiii   Street    	
Alex   Chlaholra, 20f, Carroll   Street,   Vancouver   	
Richard   M.  Bpratt,   141   lliilTerin  Street     393 8
II. S.  Murray, 17.15 Westminster Road  	
Gangs  Singh.  141   Dufftrin  Street    ,	
l-'raiikliu   Smith.   Cedlingwooel   ICast    	
B. G.   Wolfe-Merton   	
Mrs.  C.   W.   Lamb.  2218   V���ik  Street   	
Thus,  V.  Leitch,  Box  13'. l-rasrt  Ave.  P. O	
W.   J.   Ryan,   Ceelar   Cottage   	
Robert   VV,   S'eave,   General   Delivery,   Vancouver   	
Ellen   M-   Armstrong,   1286  Ce,me,x   Street   	
Ellen   M.   Armstrong,   1386  Comox  Street   	
Miss iCelgington, 1046 Granville Street  	
Miss  ICelgington,   1046  Granville  Street    ,	
George iMc.Mfee, care C.  I'.  Lumber Co., Winch  Hldg	
George  McAlfee,  care  C,   P.   Lilmbi'r  Co.,  Winch   Blelg.   	
M.   Kallowficlel,   Kensington,   via   Cloverdale   	
Norman   McLeod,   care   Goddard   &   Son   	
Norman   Mcl.eoel,  care  Goddard  e\-   Son   	
11.  C.   WeiHe-Merton,   Box  287,  Vancouver   	
B.   G.   Wolfe-Merton,   Hox  287,   V'anceiuvcr     e
Norman   .Mcl.eoel,   care   Goddard   &   Son   	
Miss  llairc, care  Karris ei-  Montserrat	
Thos. Proat, care F. Dodaon, 531 Richards street  	
Albert   Carlyle.  Ceelar  Cottage   	
Miss   Alice   Whatmore,  Ceelar  Cottage   	
Mrs.   O.   G.   Uawes,   Ceelar  Ceittage   	
Annie   IC.   Millard,   Knight   Inlet   	
Richard C.  Sprakeley,  Box 381  Vancouver  	
J.   S.   Merson,   Cedar   Cottage   	
J.   S.   Merlon,  Cedar  Cottage   	
Chas.   Jeffrey,   Ceelar   Cottage     11
Chas.  Jeffrey, Cedar  Cottage   	
Chas.   Jeffrey,   Ceelar   Cottage   	
Chas.   Jeffrey,   Cedar   Cottage	
Chas   Jeffrey,   Cedar    Cottage      393 11
Chas    leffrey,   Ceelar    Cottage    	
Chas   Jeffrey,   Ceelar   Cotlage	
Mrs.   E.  J.  I.ivesley.  247   17t!i Ave.  West   	
Jas.   Squires,   Collingwood   ICast    	
Jas.   Squires,   Collingwood    ICast    	
Geo.   Mayall,   Cedar   Cottage   	
John   IC-   Magee.   Ceelar   Collage   	
J.  Vernon, 386  1 ith Avenue  Kast   	
Joseph   Pronl,  Ceelar   Cotlage   	
j.  Saul   Pront,  1735   Westminster Road   	
Mrs.   Mary   Carroll,   Britcola   P.   O	
Mrs.   Mary   Carroll,   Britcola   P.   O	
Mrs.   P.   I..   Kbbage,  632   Granville   Street  L
Mrs.   P.   L.   Ebbage,  6.12  Granville  Street   	
Mrs.   P.   L.  Kbbage,  632  Granville  Street   	
Mrs.   1'.   I..   Kbbage,  632  Granville  Street   	
Mrs.   P.   L.   Kbbage,  632  Granville  Street   	
Mrs.   P.   I..   Kbbage,  632  Granville  Street   	
Exors. of late Thomas McCaffney, care Union Bank    52 1-2
ICxors. of late Thomas McCaffney, care Union  Hank   	
Exors. of late Thomas McCaffney, care Union  Bank   	
Angus   McGillivray,   Cedar  Cotlage	
Angus   McGillivray,   ceelar   Cottage    	
Angus   McGillivray,   Ceelar  Cottage	
Angus   McGillivray.   Ceelar  Cottage   	
Angus   McGillivray,   Ceelar   Cottage   	
EUza   Hunter,   care   Maitland   8c   Humber   	
ICliza   Hunter,   care   Maitland   8c   Humber   	
ICeh, in  C.   Robinson.  City   	
A. Chisheelm,  206  Carroll   Street   	
Allen Ayres,  Ilrilcejla  P.  O	
Clem    Mills,   Janes    Roael    	
Thomas   B.   Hamber,   140 Alexander  Street     -2 1-2
John   Houghton,  459  61n  Avenue  ICast   	
W.   C.   f'.eorge .V-   H.   M.  J.   House,   Cedar  Cottage   	
Herbert   Kitchen  et  al,  care Goddard  8c Son   	
Herbert   Kitchen  et  al, care  Goeldard  \-  Son   	
Herbert Kitchen ct al. care Goddard & Son   ....
P.   W.   Land,   1976   Napier  Street     ��
B. Wolfe   Merton,   care  Gnelelarei   et   Son   	
K.   llanaela,   500   Powell   Street   	
J.  A.   Vernon,  386   1 Ith  Avenue   East   	
J.   A.   Slater,   2642   Main   Sireet   	
I.   A.   Slater,  2642   Main   Street   	
Thomas   Harvey,   220   13th   Avenue     4
George Shapland,  Rrltcola  P. 0  5
George   Shapland,   Britcola   P.   O	
A.  P.  Black & W. J.  McDonnell, 60 Hastings Street  ICast   	
IC.   P,   W.   Merton.   119   Pender   Street   	
August  Hoffmeister,  436   Kee-fer Street   	
Leveretle   McKlkineiey,   Cedar   Cottage   	
W.  Kec Kit, care Kwong I.oo Lung,  13  Peiieler Street   	
Thomas   Harris,   Langley,   B.   C	
Mrs.   Alice  Jacks,   Britcola   P.   O >	
Mrs.   Alice   Jacks,   Hiitcola   P.   (1	
Mrs.   L.   Dow,  313   Georgia   Street   	
Mamie   llilliar,   1649   llaro   Street   	
Win.   I.   Brewer,   Cedar   Cottage   	
Chai. G.   L.   Reid.  Central   I'ark   	
('hn.. G.  I,. Reid, Central  I'ark 	
Chas.   G.   L.   Reiel,   Central   I'ark   	
Chas.  G.   L.  Reid,  Central   I'ark   	
Chas.  G.  L.  Reid,  Central  Park   	
South   Vancouver   Pump   Station	
R.  J.  Craig ci  R.   Everett,  72  Water  Street   	
Chas  G.   L.   Reid.   Central   Park   	
A.   Matheson, 3004   St.   Catharines   Street   	
Wm.  V.   Campbell, 275   Prior Street   	
Harry C.oilelnrel, care  Dow  Eraser & Co	
Harry Goddard, care Dow Praier 8c Co	
G. J.  &  R.   I.  Hobl  &  W.  J.   Hughes.   Belliiigham,  Wash	
Tsin Quan, care Man <>n Tong Co., 89 Pender Street   	
A.   J.   Michelmore,   Collingwood   	
Mrs'.   L.   Dow.  313   Georgia   Street   	
Mrs.   M.  A.  Gillespie,  Mission  City   	
Mr.   Slater,   2642   Main   Street    	
Mrs.  M.  McKinnon,  Pender Street West   	
Mrs. Jane A. G. Rae,  1033  Seymour Street   	
Henry   ICarle,  Collingwood   East   	
George   Rae.   llritcola   	
George   Rae,   Britcola	
George   ttitr.   Britcola    	
Geo.  IL llaskins, care Tupper &  Griffin   	
('.cn.   H.' llaskins, care Tupper .V  Griffin   	
George   Rae,   Britcola   	
George   hue,   llritcola	
George  Roden, .lanes  Road  P.  <>	
George  Roden, Janes  Roael   P.  o	
Chin  V'ec Von, care R. C.  Pierce. Colliiigwood  East   	
Chin Yee Von, care R, C. Pierce, Ceillingwood East  	
Chin   Yer  Yon, care  R. C.  Fierce, Collingwood  Kast   	
Chin Yee Yon, care R. C. Fierce, Collingwood East  	
Chin  Yee Yon, care R. C.  Pierce. Collingwoeid  East	
Chin   Yee  Yon, care   R.  C.   Pierce, Collingwood   East   	
Chin  Ycc Yon, earr  R. C.  Fierce, Collingwooel  ICast     S-9-10
Chin Yee Yon, care R. C, Pierce, Collingwood ICast  	
Chin  Yee  Yem. care R. C.  Pierce, Collingwooel Kast   	
('bin   Yea   Y  ran-   R.  C.   Fierce.  Ce.llingwoee.l  Kast   	
Chin Yee Yon, care R. C  Pierce, Collingwood Bait 	
Chin   Yee-   Sim.   Cart   R,   C,   Pier.-e,  Collingwood   Kast   	
Chai Dummerling, Collingwood Bail   J7 "
Chas Dummerling, Collingwood East	
Chas Dum rllng, Ciillmgwii.nl ICast 	
("has Dummerling, Collingwood Kast	
Chai Diimini-ilin" Collingwood Kast 	
Mary Jane  Cameriiii,   16114   Si inline   Drive  1*
Mary   lane  Cameron.   1604   Semline   Drive   	
W.  II.' Wilson, "ii  Pender Streel  ICast   	
[Ohn    Cleave-,   Clrt    Kl.tllklin   Smith.   Collingwooel    ICasI    	
), C   Thorn i  Co., Metropolitan  Building     	
VV.   II.   lames,   1829  4th   Avenue   ICast   	
!obn   Cleave. Janes   Ruad   P. 0  1J
leihn   Cleave, Janes  Road   P.  (I	
lohn   Cleave,   lanes   Road   1'.   II	
lohn   Cleave.  Janes   Road   1'.   II.	
Batata of D. J.  F.  Rolls, care  Bailey   lelfor.l Co	
Estate of D. J,  F. Rolls, care Hailey Telforel Co	
Estate nf D.  I.  F.  Reills, care Bailey Telforel Co	
Estate of D. J. F. Rolls, care Hailey Telford Co	
Fstalc of D. I.  F. Rolls, care Bailey Telford Co	
Estate of D.  I.  F.  Rolls, care Bailey Telford Co	
Estate of D.  1.  F. Re.lls, care Bailey Telford Co	
Estate of D. J.  F. Rolls, care Bailey Telforel Co	
Estate of D. J. F. Rolls, care Bailey Telford Co	
Estate of D. J. F. Rolls, care Bailey Telford Co	
Estate of D. J. F. Rolls, care Bailey Telford Co	
Arthur  Kurne'll.  71   Hastings  Street,  City   	
Arlhur  Hawbolt,  852   Hurran!   Street   	
Kijoje   Suyania,   J18   Main   Street   	
Mary Jane Cameron.   1604  Semline  Drive   	
Mary Jane Cameron.   1604  Semline Drive   	
Spencer   Robinson.   Ceillingwood   Kast    	
Stephen   Hull,   Collingwood   Kast    .... 	
Mrs.   Mary   lane  Cameron,   1604  Semline   Drive   	
Mrs.   Mary Jane Cameron.  1604  Semline  Drive   	
A.  C.  Gray, care Corbold  ft  Grant,  New  Westminster   	
George  Shapland,  Britcola   P.   O	
George Shapland,  Britcola  P.  O	
George  Shapland,   Britcola  P.   O  !���������-{��� V.	
Francis 8c Wm.  Hampson  ft  W.   Bowater,  Edmon,..,  B.  C	
Francis  8c  Wm.  Hampson  ft   W,   Bowater,  Edmonds,  B.   C	
Mrs.   K.  J.  Hamilton,   Granville  Mansions   	
Mrs.   K.   1.   Hamilton,   Granville  Mansions   	
Mrs.   K.  J.   Hamilton,   Granville  Mansions   	
Mrs.   K.  J.   Hamilton,   Granville  Mansions   	
Mrs.   K.   J.   Hamilton,   Granville  Mansions  .
A. C. Gray, care Corbold  & Grant, New \\ estmmster   	
W.   W.   Ford.   Sidney.   Manitoba   	
J.   Slingerlanel.  Cedar  Cottage   	
J.   Slingerland,  Cedar  Cottage   	
Tames  Patcrson,  1327   Granville  Street     J
G, J.  Palmer  	
C.  J.   Palmer	
Dick      .  "  .
Dick    	
Goddard    	
Wallis      .      .
In.  H.  Glanville &  Ralph  Latta, Collingwood  East  	
Sarah W. Ruller, Cedar Cottage 	
Sarah W. Buller, Cedar Cottage 	
Sarah W. Buller, Cellar Cottage 	
Sarah W. Buller, Cedar Cottage 	
Franklin   Smith,   Collingwood   East   	
School   Site,  South  Vancouver  School   Board   	
School   Site,   South   Vancouver  School   Board   	
J. T. Simpson, Central Park    '��
Miss  I.   A.   Simpson,   Box   2166,   North   Vancouver   	
James Patterson, 1327 Granville Street  ���	
Mrs. C.  Scott, Central  Park  	
South   Vancouver   School   Board   	
South  Vancouver  School   Board  ��
Mrs. C.  Scott, Central  Park  	
Subdivision
B. Sc re-
sub, 9-10
1-2
1-2
3-4
Apt.
A
5
6 7
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14
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,      16 W. 1/
37 16 E. ly.
17
18-19-22
20
21
23
24-25
27
28
30
31
32
33
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Flankage  Feet
Lot
Exempt           As.essed
Exempt Aiseieed A*m ,-m. i.i
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. ,                   1573.16
MAN-HUNTING IN THE OLD
DAYS IN NORTHERN ONTARIO
After    'eilr    -upper    ��� ,i    boiled    than.        "Slir..    S ��� l" 1 .. 1 < 11"    s;iii|    111      "'I
t,  -ir  ',i   -'.me-  canned delicacy iln- work     I  lime- to see these men
-en li .i- purl, and i". i i, given up by on   a   little  matter   f"r   the   Govenw
ii   prodigal,   out-bound   camper,    we ment."
would collet i  a  heap ol   lin .������ i��"I  ti
ln-i the evening; and Scfroid, iti i
i��� ij-- In- bony "i'i frame broadside i"
ilu- camp-fire, would nil nu- .1 yarn m
this kind.
These tourists and campers, M ���, 11 -
lieurl 1 hey come up here for a change
from the city. Thej pit e im tin- freedom ami romance of iln- open. Romania���they fish, eat, and snorel My
friend, they do not know thai 'in these
portage trail- of the Georgian Bay
bush, where their pretty, white rub-
ber -lines tread, a man lias died by
bullets. 1 )r that mi these rocks, where
liny lay e,m their jam-pots, sandwiches, and delicacies, a man lias lain
sprawled, dying in starvation, Adventure, monsieur, usee) to be a- common in these tourist-ridden woods as
in that beloved France you tell me
eef. , have seen great adventure with
these eyes.    I have- lived amid it.
A long time ago, wlu-n my moustache was just beginning tee make the
young children laugh al mc. and when
I was home frum my tirst log-driving
winter, I was sitting een tin- golden
beach of Pcnctang, watching away
up the bay lor a raft of timber that
was expected. I was thinking, too, of a
story that some men had brought
into the tow 11. of how lumbermen had
come on a cabin in tlu- Mttskoka bush.
with a trapper, hi-, wile-, anel two
children lying murdered. Tun fur
thieves had been ranging from the
Bay back te, tlie big limber country
you call Algonquin Park, holding up
trappers, ami stealing their -lores of
furs. This time they had killed: probably, a- our priest said, because ihe
dead trapper had recognized them,
ami knew from what pari of the country they came. I was going over this
story, picturing my importance as I
told it to the beevs nil the expected
raft.
1 looked up and found a man iu bush
clothes -landing a little way off. He
had white hair, a fresh face like a
boy's, anel gentle, smiling eye-. He
wa- -.. slight, I could have lifted him
wilh one hand. Ami ile was lame, with
a deformed foot.
"Excuse me." said he. "geienl morning! 1 am a stranger here. I am in a
great hurry to get another man to
come into the bush. I wonder, excuse
me.  if you   can  paddle  and  carryi"
I le was .. ihful, ami liis manner
made nie, twenty-one years old, feel
very superior,
"Well, monsieur," said 1, "I was
expecting a raft, you know. Um I
will arrange I" go. I can paddle
Stem in any water, and can carry,
naturally. How long will we be
j away?"
"Oh, May and Juno, maybe." saiel
the little man. "Just bring your outfit and a paddle. 1 have the provisions and  tent."
I went and told my mother proudly
that I was guiding ,1 man into the
bush, ami after collecting my outfit
and seeing Ilu- priest. I mel the little
man een the beach, ami we sei out at
mice in his canoe. We struck across
lhe fool of lhe Hay I" ilu- Musquash
River, and proceeded quickly, feer the
stranger was a good paddler, into lh'
Muskoka Lakes. We spent two weeks
pushing northward all the time, but
calling al every lumber camp and
stopping every stranger. In this
time I learned something ,iln nit my
1" e>-. His name was Leary. He lived
in the country above Lake Superior,
bin had been in Michigan, in the
L'niieil States, recently, looking for
somebody. Ile hail been .,n l.i- way
back to hi- own country, when our
Government hail askeel him 1 . come
:i ���" Georgian Hay bush to d . a little
work. He was -���' gentle and, ���.,t ak
thai I diilu'i think him fii i..t an;
work, let alone any Governmenl ������
I I secretly thought hc wa- a citj man
mu for fresh air. although thej wire
\ ery rare' in 1 li..-<��� da\ .. I the 1 r���_��� I.t
also, thai he might be- interested in
-mne lumber limits, although lie didn't
Men: interested in trees.
li was iln- murder of ihe trapper's
1 hen  1  laughi el  in  his  face,  mon.
sieur' Thi- hub' limp. 1 elmng cil-
itable wmk' Am! w li.n I flatly re-
fused to hate an) mot - of ihis silly
business, I di thai Leary was
imt lhe man I thought. iii- face
changed 10 thai you would think it
hail never smiled. II.- swore, glared,
and promised t'e kick ine t" a certain
place and back again He' grew iute.
a giant, in his fury. Ile was an Irishman, monsieur, and his language was
lurid. When he had finished, 1 pro-
mised le. go anywhere with him. I
fell as if I had been beaten by ten
men.
Well, monsieur, we started. The
lumbermen of the camp, who are no
cowards, ever, teeld us what they
thoughl e,i" us. Following men in the
winter i- nol so bad. Hut by canoe,
m summer, where death may bc be-
liinel tree- on lhe river bank, or on
portages, such a chase is folly. But
we started. After two days' slow trawling tiipeiigli a chain of small lakes,
and almost impassable streamlets, we
maele eetir camp on a portage that led
eeut of a siele chain of lakes, shown on
the rough map Leary had drawn from
the trapper's description. W'e remained there two day-. I was intensely excited, because I knew for whom we
were waiting, and because 1 did not
know- when to expect them. Leary
limped quietly about, passing the time
in clearing the camp, but always staying close iee the portage. He explained lee me that he would have to see
the men lirst. lie could neet meet
them a- if In- were a traveler for fear
they would hold him up and take his
gun. He would meet them gun in
hand.
Afler supper mi the second day, I
strolled restlessly t" the far end of
the portage. I had been there about
half an heiur. when a red canoe, with
the larger man in lhe bow, turned into
the river-like channel lhat led in to
the portage frmn the lake. They were
about four hundred yards away, and
eliel mu see me a- I turned and tore
down the trail to Leary. I choked eiut
the new- In him where he sal by the
camp-lire, winning tent pegs. He
grabbed his rifle, of the old, single-,
-Imt pattern used in theise day.-, and
limped swiftly up the trail. At the
top, lie told nu- te, gel in beside a
boulder, ami he waited in lhe evening
shadows of the brush until the canoe
came closer to the portage beach.
When il was within fifty yarels. he
stepped nut wiih his rifle across his
wai-i   ami   called:
"Hey, boys! Come in here quietly.
I  want  i" talk to you;"
They were quite close i" the far
bank, and in a flash they hail beached their canoe, grabbed their rilles,
and hail disappeared like rabbits in
the short brush. Leary hopped back
int.e shelter as two bullets clipped
lhe haws ain eve him. 1 saw him
crawl out and lire at tlie opposite
shore of what seemed an entirely
empty clump nf bracken, the smaller
man  lifted  himself ami  stretched  his
arm-  a-  if  he  were  tired-    He  st 1
up, and then decided to lie dow*
again, dropping clumsily at thc cdjie-
of the four-feet river bank. He rolled
over this down to ihe narrow beach,
ami lay witli his head and one arm
in the shallow water. Bul he seemed
te. be ton tired t" bother aboul getting
mu, ami lay very -nil. There was
a strange silence. The trees and all
seemed tee be holding their breath.
Tlnn ihe other man suddenly jumped
from behind a scrub pine anil started
in run madlj over a low rock mound
rds thi -' ' Iter < if iln- dei p bush.
Ju-; as he- reached the- t'i' of the ris .
Leary tired again. The- man stopped
t, ami thn w l.i- gnu aside . a- i;
lie- wen- disgusted with something,
I could hear hi- iti iati nl little curse
from where- I ki . '1. lie started to
walk do�� n iln- -. ��� rds us, un-
' venly ami jerkily, as if some one
wen shoving him from bi hind. Vt
lhe-   feint.    I, ��� wayir      like   a
drunken man. 1 nd fci ling al In- belt
with straj me hands    Then liis kne< s
family  that  interested  him   Ai  every  loosened ami he crumpled  up,
132.39
166.38
133.55
1573.75
camp, and wuh everyoni wc met,
Leary would soon be asking aboul
thai. 11 wa- ihe main topic nf conversation in that part nf the country.
Everyone was saying what they would
do if they could lay hands mi the fur
thieves. Everyone was suspicious of
-nan '.-rs they mel. When we would
approach a canoe on lhe river, we
would find lhe rille lying close In the
how paehller. Leary s interest in the
subject, like an old woman's, made
me angry: but he was a pleasant boss,
and 1 let him fuss about. Due day,
finally, some men told us that ai a
certain lumber camp up near thc Lake
nf Hays there was a trapper who had
been held tip by the thieves, and who
could give ns a description .ef them.
Leary hopped around on his lame foot
and cried:
"Come em. Scfroid!    To the lumber
Leary si I there, blowing through
his gun 'I'lu re w 1, teat - in liis
eyes, I think.
"You know." said he. softly, "I always hale- in do lhat. Bul this was ill
self-defence, wasn't   ii.  Sefroid?"
The suddenness e.f it, monsieur, left
me- dumb for ilu- evening, li was a
tragic scene Moreover, my youthful
admiration wa- stirred by Leary's
shooting. The next morning, wc took
eetir canoe across ami buried the
bodies under stones, ami set up little
cri'-ses nf -tick- tieel together. We
secured some trinkets from the dead
men's canoes for identification, broke
euir camp, and headed down the lakes.
Leary came with me back to Penc-
targ, n here hc caught a sail-boat for
Lake  Superior.
Later 1 learned he was a very famous   peace-maker   from     the     North,
camp. Maybe we'll get a look at ' where he applied his method to the
those   murderers!" fur-thieves and bad men of thc Hud-
. This was going a little too far, I j son Bay Company's region. Hc had
thought, but I would humor him a.<ijust chased a couple of murderers
far as the camp. We were there in into Michigan, and had been asked
two days. Leary spent a long time I ��y I'1,0 Government to get these two
talking with the trapper, who had | men in our country. I suppose, mon-
been roooed quite recently.    Then he  s"-'��r. he considered our expedition a
came limping over to mc.
"Red, wooden canoe." hc exclaimed.
"A big man with a bad arm in the
bow. and dunnage piled near the stem
to balance a smaller man. They are
not more than  three days away."
He was flushed and smiling. Apparently hc was planning to go to
these men.
"Hold on, boss!" said I, at the end
of my patience. "You're not going to
call on these men. I'm not, for instance. You are crazy, boss. You
couldn't find them, for one thing.
They would steal your gun and outfit
if you did. Come on, what is this
job for the Government that you were
telling me?    You  had  better  do it."
I thought this last shot would take
him down.
little  side  trip  to  oblige   the   King.
That, mon ami, is the sort of thing
that happened here not long ago. And
no doubt this very night, encamped
on that very portage, there are some
merry tourists, blathering about the
savage adventure of landing a four-
pound trout.
Arthur: "You don't mean to say
there can be two opinions as to
whether lotteries are moral or immoral?"
Bob: "Certainly. It all depends
whether you win or lose I"
 ��� ^  ���	
Wife���"Don't you think my new
hat  is  a  poem,  dear?"
Husband���"It looks to me more
like  an  illustrated joke." EIGHT
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  JANUARY  25,  1913
^5 THIS IS ANOLO 0N��� BUT-
ll was a fateful day for Pottleby,
the Corn-plaster King. when, having maele his pile, he decided I" settle
down and buy a real estate in Bonnie
Scotland with hi- money.
Bul nol 'eiic warned him. and he in
time became one of the real, old.
fashioned lairdt, and Immensely popular, S'i popular, indeed, that he was
invited to act as judge eef the pipers
at   the   local   sports   gathering.
So he sat away in a small tent,
while the pipers strutted and puffed
at their windy instruments to and fro
in front Every reel and hornpipe in
Scotland had squealed and droned its
way to life, and now there was the
silence  of   the  grave
lint   no  sign   from  the  judge.
One of the officials hurried off to
get  the verdict.
"Wha's won?" came in a chorus of
hoarse whispers, as he reappeared.
"I ,'linna ken wha's won," he answered: "but ane o' ve's kilt th' puir
laird!"
* *    *
The ladies were discussing a wedding which look place in their church
the   previous   evening.
"And do you know," continued the
first and best-informed lady of the
party, "just as Frank and the widow
started <��� the aisle to thc altar every
light in  the church went out."
This startling bit of information was
greeted by a number of "Ob's!"
"What did the couple do then?"
finally inquired one who beat the
others  nut  in  regaining  her  breath.
"Kept on going. The widow knew
the way."
Ill     Sf     A
The chief was in a bad temper when
he arrived at the office in thc morning, and forthwith he proceeded lo
vent his wrath on the head of the
pretty young lady who manipulated
his typewriter.
"Miss Jones," he said, testily, "can't
you keep my desk tidy? Everything
on it is, as usual, in a state of confusion.''
"Well, how can I keep it tidy when
you say you don't want anything disturbed?"
"What's the use of arguing? I said
I didn't want papers disturbed. That's
all. But this rubbish���take it away,
take it away! Also this great sheet
of postage stamps. I don't want it."
"And where shall I put it."
"Oh, don't ask so many questions!
Put it where you like���anywhere!"
"Very well." she cooed, and licking
the sheet of stamps with her dainty
little tongue, she stuck it on her employer's bald and  shining  head,  then
left the office to seek another post.
* *    *
"Maria," said Mr., llillians, "what
ails this meat?"
"Never mind about the meat, dear,"
said Mrs. Billiams, "I'm more concerned te) know what ails you. This is
the first time for twenty-live years
that you haven't been able to tell exactly what ailed the meat and everything else  on  the  table.    Aren't'you
well today, John?"
* *   *
Eleven o'clock was the hour, and
the ladv was both tired and bored.
He was paying his addresses to her,
but she was not very sweet on him,
and yet she did not know how to dispose  of  him  kindly  and   gently.
Half an hour later he was still
rambling on. and then hc turned to
that ever-effervescent subject, his
health.
"Yes, Miss Mnllie," he said; "1 know
' I'm not well. Seldom, indeed, do I feel
myself. It's only my nerve that keeps
me up at all."
She was a nice girl, but she couldn't
resist the temptation li was loo, too
much.
"Oh," she said meekly, "(hat's funny!
Thai's   whal'-   keeping  me   up,   loo!"
Then he departed slowly, sadly,
for ever and a dav.
a    *    *
\ftcr thc Christmas parly they both
felt very pleased with themselves and
things i" general.
They sal together in a cosy little
alcove, ami by-and-byc In- took his
courage in both hand���ami proposed,
There was in. hesitation em the
lady's pail as -he accepted, and a moi.
incut later they occupied but "m-
chair, whilst -In- nestled closely t" his
breast.
1 Tin.mas
Suddenly -he started, frowned, ami  know   you
her husband's violin in a badly broken
slate,   with   a   damaged   bridge.
"II.in-." she called out, "your fiddle
vis broken! How vos you do mit it'"
Hans had really very small conception of what had happened lhe nighl
before, bin returned over sleepily in
bed.
"Vol time did you come home?"
came  again  from  behiw.
"Kalrina���Kalrina." came the reply, "home early, indeed I vies. Heel
disaster to Ihe violin was a real BC
eiile-nt. real and sad, Kalrina, I  stood
on   der   bridge   at   midnight I"
-    *    *    *
"Boots anil shoes repaired neatly
while you wait." So said a notice in
the window. A small boy entered thc
simp, anel dumped a pair of patent
leathers on lhe counter.
"Please, farver wants 'em repaired,"
he ventured timidly.
"What's he want done to them?"
inquired  the tradesman.
"Want's 'em Soled and 'celed," piped
the youngster; "also stretched."
"Stretched as well, ell? And where
do they pinch him?"
"They don't pinch him," replied thc
ingenious son, "he pinched them!"
* *    *
William, aged five, had been reprimanded by his father for interrupting while his father was telling his
mother about the new telephone for
their house. He sulked awhile, then
went over to his mother, and patting
her on the cheeks, said, "Mother,
dear,   I  love you."
"Don't you love me too?" asked his
father.
Without glancing at him, William
said disdainfully, "Thc wire's  busy."
* *       el"
He was really growing tired of paying off his son's bills���the noy was
an undergraduate al one eef big uni-
ersities. However, after much thought
he decided to be indulgent just once
more.
Boys will be boys, he thought. Ac
cording,    as    requested,    he  sent    a
cheque  for $250, but  accompanied  it
with  stern admonitions  to  live  more
wisely and more economically.
"My seen," hc wrote, "you must remember that your studies are costing
me a great deal of money���very much
more than  1  can honestly afford."
"1 know it, father���1 know il." replied his incorrigible hopeful; "and
the tragedy is that I don't study very
hard cither!"
A      A     ���
.V cross-grained old farmer recently
had a difference eef opinion wilh his
neighbor, and ultimately called upon
a solicitor.
"I want you to write him a letter,
and tell him this 'ere foolishness has
got to stop," he said, firmly. "1 know-
just what I want to say, but I ain't
good enough scholard to put it just
right-"
"Well, what do you want mc to
say?"  thc lawyer asked.
"Well, begin by telling him he's the
dardnest, lyingcst, thievingest reptile
on earth���and then work up."
* A     A
To advertise his business, a dentist
recently offered lo lit with false teeth
the twelve aged women in poor circumstances who were the first lo
apply  to  him.
Thc earliest applicant on the appointed day was an old lady in a faded
bonnet, who was politely shown into
the consulting-room. Scarcely had she
seated herself, however, than a red-
faced old man presented himself at
the door, and gruffly announced that
he'd  "come  abart   them   teeth."
"You're making a mistake," thc dentist told him. "I only agreed to fit
twelve ladies with teeth. There's an
old woman inside awaiting treatment
now."
"Aye, an' it's her I'm after," (he old
man grimly replied. "Tell her thai
her husband's wailin' for her. ami
thai she's lo come back home al once,
or there'll be a rumpus. She's goi
an appetite like a horse as il is, and
if ye liis her up wi' a strong sei o'
grimier- she'll eat both hcrscl' and me
into the workus In a fortnltl    Send
her  out   Ihis  itlstant,   1   tells  yer!"
Ami ..ut the crestfallen old lady, slill
toothless, had t ��� > come.
yeiu vc
have,    s
been
i     It's
looked  him   full  in   lhe   face
" Mbi'i'i." she said, "yiui are' unlrtie
to mc!   You are playing a game wilh
me!    You "
"Darling," he lisped, "what "
"You���yon ��� you ��� you're making
f-f-face.s at mc!" she thundered indignantly.
"I can't help it," hc muttered sadly.
"My eyeglasses are falling off gradually,  and  I  don't want  to  let  go  of
your dear little hand!"
+    *    *
Tt was a snowy, windy night, and
Private Raffcrty, on guard, quickly
got chilled.
Ihe snow drifted into his sentry-box
until, in sheer desperation, he moved
that rude shelter to a sloping position
in the lee of the buttress of the wall.
From a locker at the foot of thc
flagstaff he abstracted a large Union
Jack, and, wrapping this round him,
hc crept into the ox and tried to make
himself comfortable. The time seemed
dreadfully long, and presently Raffcrty
dozed off to sleep, to be awakened
later by thc flash of a lantern in his
eyes, and, looking up, he found an
officer and the sergeant eyeing him
.with astonishment.
"What's the meanin" of this?" demanded thc officer, sternly.
��� "Sure," he replied. "1 thought ye'd
left me to freeze to death; so fer convenience I jest laid myself out in this
ould coffin. An, bedad, ye can plase
yerself about callin' out the firing-
party an' going on wid  the funeral."
By persuasion they were Germans.
He being a distinguished member of
a band, had emigrated to London,
bringing with him all his belongings,
including his wife.
One morning Mrs. Strossbosser
came down first and prepared to get
idling!
no   use
breakfast,  but  in  the  hall   she  found   goin' to church,"
deny il!
The solicitor had been away in lhe
country calling upon a client, bin on
his return there wire signs of loafing
ami laziness mi lhe pari of the iuuior
clerk.
"Thomas, thai typewriter has not
been touched today!" snapped Ihe
man of law.
"Oh, sir!" ejaculated thc junior,
"Why. I was using it only an hour
ago!"
"Then." thundered the employer,
"how comes it that there's a spider on
the   machine,  and   that   he's  woven   a
web over the keyboard?"
"Sir," remarked thc lad, "I'll tell the
truth. There was a fly in lhe works
of that machine. Rather than waste
my lime entrapping the i.nsect, sir���I
���er���introduced   the spider, sir!"
"I  sec!"  said  the lawyer  sadly.
*    *    *
It was Sunday morning, and thc
conductor, as his car rattled along,
was perhaps not so wide awake as
usual. At all events, he didn't observe
lhe small boy who dashed out of an
entry, piping, "Hi, ther, stop!" and it
was only when the stout old gent next
lhe door had prodded him in the leg
that thc official became aware of the
pursuing figure.
"Stop thc car for thc boy, conductor," observed  the  prodder.
The conductor looked disparagingly
at the chasing boy; but seeing that hc
was holding up a dime decided he must
be a passenger, and stopped the car.
"Now, then, shaver, hop on," he said,
when the boy panted up.
"Who arc you callin' 'shaver?'" inquired the youth, scornfully. "An'
what d'you mean by running away
from yer customers? 'Ere, mother
wants two nickels for this dime, she's
Name and  A<ieJrcsg
Wt.i.   J.   lohnston,   Collingwooel   Hast   	
Mrs.   It.  M.  Gold-mid,  1129   Pacific  Street   	
Omar   Gielney,   Collingwooel   Kast   	
Waller    Graeldon,    Collingwooel    Kast     	
Kve-lyn   Mielirlnieeic.   Ceellingwooel   Kast   	
A.   K.  Almas, Collingwood   Kast   	
W.   P.   Keeltnonil,   Kgerton,   Alta	
W.   l'\   Keeliiieenil,   Kgerton,   Alta	
Mrs.   Annie   P.    Ilrown,   Cnllingweieed   Kast    	
Caroline   I.    U'liatmougli,   Collingwooel   Kast    	
Me-tlioilisl    Church    	
Ralph  I.atta &- Jno.  II. C.lanville, Collingwood  Kast   	
Ralph  I.atta \- Jno.  II. Glanville. Collingwood  ICast   	
.le.iin  Taylor,  CoUiagwood   Kast   	
A. A.   McRae.  Davis Chambers, 115   Hastings Street   	
Win.   II.   Michclmeire,   Collingwoo.l   ICast   	
Win.   II.   Miclielmore,  CoUlnnrOod  Kast   	
Thos.   IC.  Wright. C.  Newell 8c  IC.  K. Cane, Collingwooel ICast   ..
Frank Gray, Collingwooel  Kast  	
John  II. Thompson, Central  Park   	
John   II.  Thompson,  Central   Park   	
Evelyn   Michelmore,  Collingwoexl   Kast   	
Mrs.   I.ightbody,   Collingwood   Kast   	
II.   Coad,   Kden,   Manitoba _	
Alex   I ... -I.   Collingwooel   ICast   	
]..   II.   Seller,   Regina,   Sask    	
I,,   il.   Seller,   Regina,   Sask	
Ralph  I.atta Sc Jno.  II.  Glanville.  Collingwood   Kast   	
Herbert   C.   Carley.   Collingwooel   ICast   	
Hugh   McDcrmid,  446  Pender Street  West   	
Hugh   McDcrmid, 446  Pender Street  West   	
Alex   Itrown,   Collingwood   ICttt   	
W. A.  McKay, General  Delivery	
A.   L.   Nicholson,   General   Delivery   	
A.   L.   Nicholson,   General   Delivery   	
Dmiel   McKinnon,   Collingwood   ICast    	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwooel   Kast    	
Gar  Way,   101/,   Canton  Street,  Vancouver   	
Gar  Way,   101/,   Canton  Street,  Vancouver   	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwood   Kast    	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwood   Kast    	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwood   ICast    	
Alexaneler McKinnon,   1617  3rd  Avenue  ICast   ������	
Chas  C.   Gow,   I.adysmith,   11.   C	
"   C	
c. W.'.'.'.'."....'.'.'.'.'.'���'.'���'.'���'���'���'���'���'.'.'���'���'���
District Lot Block
���,17 If    35-38
36
37
39
40-41
Subdivision
s. V,
N. pt.
N. pt
Frontage Feet Flankage  Feet
1 xe nip! Assessed  Kxempt Assessed Assessment
l"-.     ..I
37
42
43
44-45
46
47-50-51
Chas C. Gow, Laelysmith, II.
Chas C. Gow, I.adysmith, B.
Chas  C.   Gow,   I.aelysmith.  H.
Annie   Walker.  Central   Park   	
Krnest   Tomelson,   Nanaimo,   II.   C	
Elisabeth   II.   McMahon,   Collingwood   ICast   	
S.   R.   Ono,   Collingwooel   ICast   	
George   Horning,   Central   Park   	
J.   H.   Foster  c.   Sarah   Flack,   Central   Park   	
Vernon   .1.   Nicholson,   Collingwood   ICast    	
Andrew   Black,   Collingwooel   Kast    	
Walker J.  Trott,  Collingwood   ICast   	
Arthur .1.  Miclielmore,  Collingwood  Kast   	
Wm.   J.   Brewer,  Cedar  Cottage   	
Agnes    Nicholl,    Britcola	
Joini   Nicholl,   Britcola	
G.  IS.  Banks, Cedar Cottage   ���	
G.  E,   Banks, Ceelar Cottage   	
G.  IC.   Banks, Ceelar Cottage       	
G.  IC.   Banks, Ceelar Cottage	
G.  IC.  Banks, Cedar Cottage   ���-	
Thos.  R.  Morrow,  care J. J.  Miller .,, ,    ,.
W.  Nicholson,  Britcola           	
S.   VV.   Keith,   2471   Westminster   Roael 	
S.   W.   Keith,   2-171   Westminster   Road	
Franklin   Smith,   Collingwood   ICast  ,	
Mrs.   Mary J.  Cameron,   1604  Semline  Drive	
Dougal    Harris,   Gibson's   Landing    	
.lames  Wright,  4523   Quebec  Street	
Arjobn.   Ceelar   Street,   Beaconsfield	
Maria   Fiedler,   1H.14   5th   Avenue   West   	
A.   Cotton,   1133   Pacific   Street   	
Philip   I Iben,  Central   Park	
J.   II.   Bowman,  Central   Park	
J.   II.   Bowman,  Central   Park   	
.1.   II.   Bowman,   Central   Park   	
J.   H.   Bowman.  Central   Park   	
Jas.   B.  Toelrick,  Central  Park   	
John   M.   Robertson,   Central   I'ark    1.
Wilbers,   Collingwood   ICast   	
Wilbers,   Collingwood   ICast   	
Wilbers,   Collingwood   ICast   	
Wilbers,   Collingwood   ICast   	
F. II.  Dunant, Central   I'ark  P.  O	
J.  J.  Wilbers,  Collingwood   ICast   	
J.  J.  Wilbers.  Collingwood   ICast    ,	
W.   G.  Aleock,  Collingwooel   ICast   	
Aleock,  Collingwooel   ICast   	
Aleock,   Collingwood   ICast   	
Aleock,  Collingwood   Kast	
Aleock,  Collingwood   ICast   	
Frederick T.   Aleock,  Collingwood   Kast   	
L.  R.  Sc  F. T.  Aleock, Collingwood  ICast   	
L.  R.  &-  F. T.  Aleock,  Collingwooel  ICast   	
W.   G.  Aleock,  Collingwood   ICast    ���	
elans   ICspelanel.  Collingwood  Kast    t
Philip   I >ben,   Central   Park   	
Philip   Oben,   Central   I'ark   	
W.  J.   Battison,  Collingwood   ICast	
W. G. Coniinn, care J. D.  Stuart, 320 Seymour Street   	
John McGatty, Collingwood ICast  	
Mrs.   Louisa  Major,  Collingwood   ICast   	
G. H.   Cole,  Collingwood   Kast   	
G.   II.   Cole,   Collingwood   ICast   	
Dr.  .1.   B.   Bingay,  Guadalajara,  Mexico       .....
Dr.  J.   11. ,Bingay,  Guadalajara,  Mexico   	
Dr. J.   B.   Bingay,  Guadalajara,  Mexico	
Chas.  J.  Bell, Collingwooel   ICast	
Chas.  J.   Bell,  Collingwooel   ICast   	
Alex  .McDonald,  Central   Park	
48
49
N.I/
54
5
5
6
A
3. E. pt
W. pt
W. pt
12
13
.4
...
16
11'
1
a
3
4
1
2
3
4
��� I
12
13
14
15
16
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
J. J-
J- J-
J.   J-
W. G.
W. G.
W. G.
W. G.
6
13
A. N.E. pt.
N.W. pt.
3649
9
10
11
12
13
pt.
N. pt.
N. pt.
W. pt.
N.E. Pt.
N. pt. A
22
23
24
25
26
27
9
18
19
20
21
22
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
8
4
5
6
7
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
16
17
18
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
132.99
132.99
132.99
31.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
3J.1-
33 t
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
132.99
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.7
32.8
33.05
33.05
33.05
33.05
132.99
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.25
33.25
33.25
33.25
43.4
43.4
33.3
33.55
.13.35
58.3
250.
216.
211.
47.4
47.3
47.3
47.3
47.3
47.3
440.6
39.2
39.2
53.2
32.11
30.76
36.0."
31.
31.
264.66
204.6 .
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
34.4
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
34.15
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
3.'.
55.
130.1
73.2
74.2
74.2
168.
330.90
330.90
330.90
39.!
39.5
34.06
50.09
33.06
33.06
35.46
298.9
391.22
391.22
391.22
391.22
391.22
391.22
391.22
391.22
1567.15
1567.15
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.OS
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
390.05
1567.15
391.22
391.22
391.22
391.22
397.12
386.51
389.46
389.46
389.46
389.46
1567.15
391.22
391.22
391.22
391.22
391.81
391.81
391.81
391.81
511.42
511.42
392.41
392.99
392.99
687.00
2946.09
2545.34
2486.42
558.56
557.38
557.38
557.38
557.38
557.38
5192.03
461.93
461.93
626.90
178,38
362.47
307.21
365.30
365.30
3118.75
3118.75
388.87
388.87
3HX.K7
388.87
388.87
405.37
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
3R8.87
402.42
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388 87
388 sr
388.87
648.12
153.1."''
862.58
874.37
874.37
1979.71
3899.32
3899.32
3899.32
465.46
465.46
401.36
590.26
389.57
389.57
417.86
3522.24
MONEY
CANT
BUY
BETTER
All Grocers
Kelly, Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Donaldson   &   McDonald
Dealers in
HAY, GRAIN, AND FEED
All Kinds of Chicken Feed
4213 Main Street
Phone : Fairmont 1514
Stove Wood
BUY "AT HOME"
Stove Wood���14 inch Lengths
$3.50 per Load
COAST LUMBER & FUEL
COMPANY   LIMITED
Corner Bodwell Road and Ontario Street
Phone : Fraser No. 41 Mail Address, Box 22,  City Heights
The Robertson-Godson Co. Ltd.
Wholesale Plumbers' Supplies, Water Works
Supplies, Corporation Brass Goods.
572 Beatty Street
Vancouver
Two   Propositions
No. 1. You rent a house at $25 per month. In one year you have
paid out $300, for which you can show no results. 7 per cent, interest
on $300 is $21.   So in the year you practically throw away $321.
No. 2. You bring me in $100, for which I give you a 6-room
Modern House, on Lot 33x125ft. House has fireplace, etc. Balance
is $25 per month.   Total price is $2,600.   No loan.
In one year you have an equity of $400 in your own home.
Compare proposition No. 1 with No. 2, then call at my office and
see this house.
R. J. McLauchlan
4123 Main Street
Phone : Fair. 1607
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
1949 ALBERT ST. PHONE :  HIGHLAND  530R
ENGINEERS,  MACHINISTS AND  FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE  HYDRANTS AND  SPECIALS
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
THE BEER WITHOUT A PEER
CASCADE
THE VANCOUVER BREWERIES Limited
PHONE:   Fairmont 429 SATURDAY,  JANUARY  25,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
NINE
ARENA
Ice
Skating
Band every Evening and Saturday  Afternoon
Three
Sessions
Daily
10  am  25c
3 p.m  35c
8:15 p.m  50c
Children 15c
t^S^TING AR6NA
For Sound Investment Buy Lots in
RIVERDALE
At the corner of Boundary Koad and River Road. There is no
better located property in South Vancouver���at the price���on the
terms���with the wonderful view���the beautiful southern slope���
thc perfect contour���CLEARED���tlie possibilities and assurance
of
DEVELOPMENT  AND   PROFIT
Price $550. Terms $15 cash, $15 per month, or with an increased cash payment wc will make the deferred payments quarterly, half-yearly, or yearly, as desired by the purchaser.
P.    CHATHAM
Room 105, 25 Hastings Street East, opposite Holden Building
Phone : Seymour 2201
Gladstone Hotel
First Class Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
H. G. BROWN, Proprietor
Mr. Diem, General Secretary of the
Olympic Games, which will be held
in  Berlin in  1916, hai been spending
I some time in Stockholm gathering in.
formation from the Swedish committee whieh conducted the- successful
meeting oi 1912. The German games
will be conducted "n the same lin<s
[as were the Swedish, with e,m- central
body   .'mel   different   committees   for
various   111.IIH 111.'-   eef   spurt.
i In- stadium al Berlin, which is
nearing completion, will contain ;i
large running track, surrounded hy a
cycling track, Th? running truck will
be (M> metres long, .'11111 there- will be
plenty 'if room on the green inside
for field spe.ris.   The Berlin stadium
will   COSt   ?W)l),IM)fl.
Ai the nexi Olympic congress Ger.
many will propose that fancy cycling
and   figure  fining  in   itn   ice   rink   lie
added i'e iln- Olympic program and
will strongly oppose the inclusion of
leeexing.
Tlie Germans <l" neit understand
boxing ;il nil, saiel Mr. Diem, und they
consider it a barbarous spurt. Germany probably will lie opposed "ii
this point hy England, United Stale-.
Sweden, ami Denmark, nations which
have favored boxing.
According t'i the present Olympic
rules Germany will have full power
in make up any program it may see
lit. Hut it is believed in athletic circles
in other countries, especially America
France, ami England, thai before the
games are held in Berlin a standard
��� sei oi events will be ilia vn up hy Ihe
International Olympic Committee.
Immediately after the games al
Stockholm last summer, representatives nf a dozen nations met ami resolved i" ask the International Olympic Committee in make up a program
nf events lee he decided at all future
game-.
Since linn ihe athletic authorities
uf nearly all the nations have gone "ii
record as being in favor of a sei pro-
gram. ,
A- fancy eye-ling ami figure skating
are not regarded as standard sports
in m.'si countries, it is likely that they
will be eliminated.
On the other hand, boxing, like
wrestling, is considered a standard
event in a dozen countries, and it is
believed here thai ii will lie among
the sports on the next Olympic program.
SASHES AND DOORS
We have a reputation for supplying Sashes and Doors of the
finest   quality and at tbe shortest notice, at Prices that are right.
We have experienced men who can supply any need in the line
of Sashes and Doors.
It will bc worth your while to get our prices before placing your
order.   It will cost you nothing, and will save you money.
Collingwood Sash and Door Factory
Clements & Tufnah
Dealers in Sashes, Doors, Frames, Sheet Glass, etc.
Collingwood West Station
age,,  told  him    in    itarl    with    th
'cn -ii' li"   In-   told     him   t>.   stop    his
lending.
In a matched race iu Philadelphia in
1HXI Murphy agreed lo allow liis opponent iln n-e- "I ihe- stand-up styli as
against liis use of ilu- "crouch." Tom
Gallagher, the- billiard player, who
u-eil lie he e|iiile- a foeel runner Some
year- ag'e, I. II- oi having mil a runner in Cleveland in 1886 whom he
could beat when tiny started in tbe
usual way���-landing���hut when his
opponent used the "crouch" the latter was away and into liis running
over a yard lo the good a- Gallagher
started.
*       *        el,
The 1913 tournament "f the West-
'iii Bowling Congress, which was
awarded to Vancouver at the Los
Angeles tourney last year, will not
take place- in this city. At a meeting
��� if tlu committee of bowling enthusiasts wlie. hael the matter in hand it
was decided tee call off the tournament ami so senile other city will he
privileged  to  take a chance  with  il.
Five well-known Vancouver business men have been busy for the past
month preparing for ihe tournament
anil canvassing for funds and the
prospects pointed to a most successful tournament being held here. Hut
President Morley "f Los Angeles insisted lhat the Vancouver tournament
shouhl he directed hy A. Jenkins of
Venice, Cal., secretary of the Western
Bowling Congress, who has conducted
a number of tournaments in the pas!
t'.i- thc congress ami has generally
managed to put on a "bloomer." Pre-
siili-ni Morley refused to grant a sanction for the tourney, in fact has refused tee reply tee a number of tele.
grain- and letters despatched to him
hv ihe' Vancouver committee, and so
despairing of ever hearing from him
ihe Vancouver committee concluded
that il was lime to wash ils hands eel
iii-,' whole affair. Morley's sanction
i-   not   really   needed  hy   Vancouver
'. I'M. ih-.' tournament but in the face
of the Los Angeles opposition the
h.eal bowlers refused i'e he connected
with the affair.
often bigs, upon small birds, etc., hut
live! mainly on mice. These it can |
follow into iheir narrowest holes and
runaways, for it is scarcely larger than
a lield-nion-e itself; or, striking the
trail of one. il will trace all il- wan.
ile-ring.s, ami as SOOn as it catches sight
e-f it- prey will spring after it with
amazing ami fatal rapidity, ft is frequently caught hy naturalists in their
mouse traps     \n "hi Indian told Mr
\V. II Osgood, "i tiie Iii-,logical Survey . ��li" ilni- capturi el on,- in southern Alaska, thai it wa- a promise of
ran- good-fortune. Hi- brother, he
related, hail taken ohe when a hoy and
had iii consequence lie-e-om.- ,-, big chiAf,
\ good name for this least of thc carnivore- wouhl he "me.ih< -hunter"; it
is known te, science- a- Putorius
rixoius
I
A Mild Smoke
Modern Uses of Cableways
The use of cableways for I large
variety of purposes is an interesting
development of modern engineering.
Such ways are employed on the
Panama Canal, the steel cablet being
supported by I'jfty movable towers.
The present limit of span is more
than 2,bii\l feet, and the speed of the
conveyers may exceed 1,800 feet per
minute. Mich ways span gorges,
valleys, roads, railways, and obstruction- of many kinds. The system is
used feir building dams by dumping
in a stream beneath; hauling logs
from booms by means of cables
stretched above the river; running
blocks out of quarries up inclined
cableways; dredging channels; piling
lumber, steel plates and beams on
cars, and various kinds of excavating.
SPEND : : : : :
A PLEASANT EVENING AT THE
Fairmont Pool Room
(Bryant  Block)
20th AND MAIN ST.
The best tables in South Vancouver. Everything new. Personal attention by the proprietor, D. D. Den-
man.
Cigars, Tobacco and Candy
Hughes Bros'  Big Liquor Store
10S HASTINGS STREET EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We carry everything in the  Liquor  Line
No order too small, and none too large for this popular Liquor Store
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
leaving our Store every Friday morning at 9 a.m.
himself at  what was
a   peculiar   style   ol
HOTEL EBURNE
A RESTING PLACE ON THE MOST BEAUTIFUL MOTOR ROUTE ON THE PACIFIC
Special attention given public and privite banquets.
Beautifully located, restful surroundings, unexcelled dining-room. We will be honored by South Vancouver patronage.
A. G. Halstead
EBURNE, B. C.
Hotel Headquarters, Vancouver Automobile Club
FOR SALE
Five-room  House, fully modern,  on  Thirty-
sixth Avenue, one block from Victoria Road car.
Price $2,500; balance on monthly terms.
This Snap will not last long!
J. A. KERR & CO.
Real Estate Brokers
3332 MAIN STREET        Phone: Fairmont 822
As the result of an investigation in
regard I" the lirst user of lhe crouch
Start for foot runners made by several full.ewers eel athletics in this
vicinity, it has been rather definitely
settled lhat Jimmy Ryan, a former
! Irish amateur, win. later ran a number eel" professional races in the Wesl.
wa- the first man tu put the now-accepted best style nf starling into use.
M, K. Kitilcmau e.f California, eme
1.1 the fastest sprinters ���>! his time,
stated that Ryan in all e.f hi- contests
west uf the Rockies and prior t" ISlS-t
adopted the "all-fours" style-, anel as
ii had nut heen mastered by any other
"lied." at that time, he was said t"
he iu a class by
then considered
starting.
Acknowledged to be a yard and a
half better han any system eef getting
away from the mark which has ever
been used, the "ciuuch," when properly used, has the advantage over the
stand-up style uf enabling a man to
hold his mark fur a greater period, get
a stronger push-away, ami get inti'
his  running quicker.
Prior lu ils appearance the nearest  depend "ii Mathewson, Tesreau
approach to the "crouch" in the mat-j guard  ami   Cra-ndall;  Chicag
ter of getting into action quickly was
lhat which warranted a man's running
.nit  .ef his "hole" freem the back leg,
1 which    was    simply    the down  start
Standing.     This   style   was   hut   little
[used, most runners affecting the ".lab."
ia pecking action with the forward leg,
'alter whieh the back leg hael tu come
through,   This latter style compelled
[the runner I" make twu movements in
order  i" el"  what  the  man  running
from hi- back leg did in one, with thc
result  that the user eel' lhe latter style
was Into his running a yard or more
[to tile good uf lhe- u-er uf ilu- "dab."
There have heen many claimant- 1"
in ��� distinction e>f inventor t.i the
"crouch," which is thought iee have
been discovered hy some one who had
a penchant fur breaking over his mark
with  Ihe use of tlie  "'lab." falling mi
"all  fours" in an endeavor i"   save
himself,   unly   t"   have   the   starter's
pistol crack, whereupon he found thai
ii was a natural thing te. gel 'iff his
hands and right intei his running, as
is lhe VOgllC now.
In making inquiry as tu the first
user, James E. Sullivan, president uf
thc Metropolitan Association of the
Amateur Athletic Union, asked the
dean of American trainers, Mike
Murphy, what he knew about the matter. The latter asserts that he used it
as far back as 1881. No one can be
Found to substantiate Murphy's contention iu regard to his use uf the
style, as he used the stand-up method
in 1886 in a handicap run at the old
Williamsburg!)  A.  C.  grounds.
In his reply tee Mr. Sullivan. Murphy
stated that when he tried the style
lirst he thought il the fastest method.
bul thai because his brother professionals diel not fancy it he discuntinu
ed   its   use.    Those   who   have   sen The Smallest Beast of Prey
Murphy   run  assert   tbat   hc  used  the      TUt. sm.,n,sl  carnivorous animal  in
weasel.
If more than 50 per cent, of the
efficiency oi a baseball chili depends
ti|e-eii tin pitching, as many players believe, ii might he well lie look over
what ihe twirlers of the various National League clubs eliil last year when
seeking tu dupe nut ihe possibilities
eef this year's race-. Twenty-four
pitchers were officially credited with
winning 5" pei cent, "r more "i their
games, 'if these six wore Mew Y'>rk
uniforms, six were Cubs, four were
Pirates, four pitched fur the Phillies,
Brooklyn hael twu. ami Cincinnati and
Boston une each. Perdue was the
Boston pitcher whee had the highest
official figures, and his average was
.448.
i'lie- Xew Yurk pitchers were: Tesreau, Marquard, Ames, Mathewson,
Crandall. ami Wiltse, and they are still
(in the fold. The six Chicago men were:
Cheney, Richie, Lcilichl. C. Smith,
Reulbach, anil Lavender. The Pitts-
jburg twirlers who won over half nf
theil games were: Hendrix, Camnitz,
Robinson, ami Adams. The Philadelphia men were: Seaton, Brennan,
Alexander, ami Rixey, Stack and Kent
uf Brooklyn, Snugs of Cincinnati, and
Harmon of Stfl Louis all gut over the
.500 mark.
There arc certain twirlers in this
lut whee are almost sure to star again
in the cuming season,   Xew Yurk can
Mar.
upon
Cheney, Ricie, and Lavender; Pittsburg upon 1 lemlrix. Camnitz, Robinson, ami possibly Adams and O'Toolc;
and Philadelphia upon Seateen, Alex-
aneler.  Rixey and possibly Mueere.
Considering these same pitchers in
relation t" iln- runs earned off them
lasl s.-asun. New Yurk makes far the
hesi showing of the l"i < ithet team .
fur instance, averaged but 1% runs
uff Tesreau ami .'.1.' ..IT Mathewson,
tu the regulation game, a- against 2.58
run-   uif   Hendrix   anil   2.S3   run-   "IT
Cheney, Thai tin- support given a
pitcher really counts in a larger degree   than   lhe  hall   player-  appear   t"
imagine is plainly shown by 'in- figures
..11   Xap   Rucker      A-   far  a-   tin-   per.
e'e-lllaKe-   "I   K-lUle-s   Weill   ami   loll    Weill.
Rucker -t 1 28th on  tin- list  of  N'a-
tional League pitchers. Oul e.f 101
total runs,   however,   bul    ".'   were
chargeable directly lu him. anil up.
ponents averaged bul 2 21) run- off him
per name.
Ruekcr is one uf the greatest lef".
handers the game ever produced, ami
the fact that Mathews.m outstrips him
in the ligures shows as well as anything else what a marvelous bnxman
Big Six really is. Mathewson pitched
310 innings. Rucker 298. Matty hit
twu batsmen, Rucker three. Matty
gave 34 bases on balls. Rucker 72. The
Xew York man struck out 134 opponents, the Brooklynite 151. Matty made
three wild pitches. Rucker six: 111"
runs were made off Mathewson, e,f
which 73 wcre chargeable solely to
him; 101 runs were made off Rucker.
uf which 73 were chargeable solely tu
him. Opponents averaged 2.12 runs
uff Matty and 2.20 runs off Rucker
per game.
The Lance
The lance has been ridiculed by
many military experts on th,- ground
that it is out of date ami cumbersome, but the weapon still has ils
advocates who point out its value in
stock tactics and in cavalry charges.
In Germany, fi r instance, tin- lance
in the hands uf the Prussian Uhlan
remains a formidable weapon.
Recently attention has heen called
t.. tin- fact that Ihe lance-point often
makes too deep a wound for the
-halt tu be withdrawn quickly, anel
that therefore tin- lancer run- the
risk of having it wrenched from hi-
grasp in ihe charge. In view of this.
thc cavalry in Germany have been
experimenting with a new kind of
lancehead, It is said that tin- new
arm is jusl as effective in disabling
an enemy anil is free* from main
disadvantages.
Special Rales to Municipal
Hall and other South Vancouver points.
Cambie Street will eventually become thc leading thoroughfare between the No.-th
Arm and Burrard Inlet, and today there is no better investment on the market. A
brief study of the map should convince you that our statement is correct. We have
a few choice lots on  Cambie Street facing  West.
Price $1625 each;   I cash;   balance 6-12-18-24 months
These are between Sixty-sixth Avenue and River Road. We have also a few
choice homesites from  $500  each,  that are worth investigating.
Wm. H. KENT & SON
COLLINGWOOD  EAST
Phone : Coll. 18 Branch : Cor. River Rd. and Ash St.
old  "dab"  style.
They state that if he had found it
such a goml system why didn't he in-
Struct the runners he coached during
tint period in its advantages? Charles
li. Sherill uf Yale, a four-time winner
uf the Inter-Collegiate "hundred."
Mike says, was the tirst une he ever
saw make use of the "crunch." This
was in 1888 at a set of games on the
Ruckaway Hunting Club grounds at
Cedarhurst.   L.l.
While coaching that great runner,
John Owen, jr., of Detroit, the tirst
amateur ill the world to run 100 yanls
at 9 4-5 seconds, Mike never taught
him the "crouch." At any rate. Owen
didn't use it. affecting, tu the contrary, the style then most in use. thc
"dab." Murphy further stated tu Mr.
Sullivan that when George Turner, a
The smallest carniv
thc world is an American
which is numerous in northwest Canada ami Alaska and is occasionally
seen abeiut the Great Lakes. It is a
true weasel, but only six inches long,
with a tail only one inch in length.
All its upper surface is in summer pure
umber brown, but the throat, abdomen, and inside of the legs are pure
white; and, unlike any eether weasel,
it has no black at the end eif the tail.
Hence, although the animal turns
white in the north in winter, it dues
not show the black-tipped tail which
characterizes an ermine pelt and su
it is not sought by trappers and fur-
traders. This, fact, wilh its small size
and secretive life, has made its habits
very little known, hut they seem to be
much like those of other weasels. It
feeds  on  insects, which it finds alive
famous   pistol   firer   of  a   generation  in summer and in winter digs out of
BITULITHIC
PAVE MENT
Cranville   Street   South,   Uefore   Paving
This has the following attributes :
^1 Durability; sure footing for horses; resiliency ; noiselessness; easy drainage; dustless-
ness; economy.
���J Bitulithic approaches more closely than any
other the ideal of a perfect pavement.
?i Its notable durability makes it more economical than any other paving.
fl The Vancouver thoroughfares paved with
bitulithic are an impressive object-lesson in
fine paving.
<][ Bitulithic has been adopted in over 200 cities
in the United States, and 15 cities in Canada.
Granville Street South, After Paving
Columbia Bitulithic Limited
433 Granville Si. Vancouver, B. C. TEN
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY',  JANUARY   25,   1915
16 for 25c
We have purchased a Special Lot of
SUNKIST
ORANGES
and will place them on the Market, while they last,
at the exceptionally low price of   16 for 25c.
SUNKIST ORANGES are known the world over
as the Best, and this is the policy of SLOAN & ALLEN--
to Handle only The Best. (Save the Wrappers).
SLOAN & ALLEN
Handle Only The Best
29th & MAIN STREET
Phone : Seymour 8425-8426
Western Plate Glass &
Importing   Co.   Limited
Regiitered Office:
318 Water Street, Vancouver, B. C.
PLATE GLASS WINDOW GLASS
LEADED ART GLASS
Thorne  Metal   Store  Front  Bars,   Bevelling  and
Silvering, Store Fronts Glazed
ALL KINDS OF GLASS
Fraser Bros. & Co.
We carry Special Lines of the finest
GROCERIES AND FLOUR
e j ��� ,
We also carry Hay and all kinds of Feed
Phone our store (Collingwqod 25), or call.   Our delivery
service is prompt.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
IMPORTANT
To MARKET GARDENERS, POULTRYMEN
FRUIT GROWERS, AND HOMESEEKERS GENERALLY
ew Westminster, in
for market garden-
For sale in any size
advantages of good
school  and   trans-
greatly below pre-
be made to actual
Choice lands near cities of Vancouver and X
British Columbia Electric Railway Belt, suitable
ing, poultry raising and fruit-growing purposes,
lots. Many of these properties possess the great
open roads, accessibility to markets, postoffice,
portation.
We have instructions to offer these lands at
sent market value, and special inducements will
settlers.
For further particulars call at our offices and ask for Mr. Shayer.
Agreements for Sale Purchased and Money to Loan
at Current Rates
The  Yorkshire Guarantee
& Securities Corporation Limited
440 Seymour Street
Phones: 6188 and 6189     R. Kerr Houlgate, Manager
THE WORKERS' PAGE
Kdited by J.  W. Wilkinson, to whom all communications should
be  addressed,   Room  210,   Labor Temple, Vancouver, B. C.
Blasting With Water
A new method of mining is being
practised in German and other coal-
shafts that is said to do away with
dangerous blasting, while also avoiding much of the risk of spontaneous
explosion of coal dust.
Deep holes are bored into the coal
and water is introduced into them
by pipes under heavy presure. The
water finds its way through the coal
fissures and opens them up .until the
mass is loosened, when it is readily
removed while wet without any dust
or the use of any tools other than a
light  pick  and  shovel.
Tin- third annual convention eif tlu-
It. C. Federation <>f Labor opened in
the Forester*' Hall, Victoria, on Monday, January 1.1. With eighty delegates
present, repreienting various branches
of industry freem all pari? eif the Province of Ur it i?-li Columbia, The convention was welcomed to Victoria by
Mr. II. Sheen, tlu- President eif the
Victoria Trades and Labor Council,
on behalf of the organized labor
movement eif that city, the opening
session wm then addressed by Premier McBride, who had been invited
there by the local reception committee. There was also present Mr. J.
II. Wallace, whei is the labeir member
of the Industrial Insurance Commission which administers tbe Workmen's
Compensation e.f the State of Washington, This act is the most up-to-
date piece of legislation of its kind
in the world, and Mr. Wallace gave
a very interesting account of how it
came into existence, and how it has
worked since it became law. Mr.
Prank Farrington, who is an International Board member eef the United
Mine Weirkers of America, was also
attending the convention, and during
the course of the proceedings gave a
masterly address covering the work
of his organization since its inception.
Mr. R. Feister spoke on behalf of the
miners of Vancouver Island who are
out on strike, and in doing so proved
conclusively that the trouble is thc
direct result eef the Colli Mines Regulation Act not being enforced. Mr.
J. McXiven, the fair wages officer of
the Dominion Government, was also
present, and spoke briefly of his work
in  the  Province.
The report of the Secretary-Treasurer of the Federation showed a balance in hand of $600, and hc reported
that since his report was compiled an
additional $600 had come in making a
total in hand of $1,200 at the time of
the convention,
One of the lirst matters taken up
by tlie Federa'tion was the question
f the Labor Commission which commenced its sittings the day after the
convention opened. Keen disappointment was expressed that the Govern.
men had neit given direct representation to the Federation on the Commission, but it was not deemed advisable to ignore the Commission on
that account, and so a special committee of live was elected to go before
the Commission on e.chalf of the
Federation. This committee had a
preliminary interview with the Com-
mlssion and arranged with them to
be received at a special sitting to be
held in Vancouver at a later date.
Mr. R. A. Stoney, who is a member of the Labor Commission, and
who was also delegate to the convention from Xew Westminster, was
nominated for the office of vice-president of the Federation, but did not
succeed in being elected.
The next convention of the Federation will bc held in tbe City of Xew
Westminster. Vancouver and Xelson
wcre also nominated as the place of
the next convention, but were defeat-
eel  by the  Royal  City.
Mr. James Cuthbertson, the new
president of District Association Xo.
6 eif the Western Federation of
Miners, was present at the convention
representing the quartz miners of thc
Province,
The convention voted in favor of
accepting the offer of the Vancouver
Trades and Labeir Council of a half
interest in the "B. C. Federationist,"
which is published weekly by the
Council in the interests of organized
labor iu liritish Columbia.
The election of officers teiok place
on Wednesday, January 15, when the
following were elected: Christian
Sivertz, president; V. R. Midgley,
secretary-treasurer, and A. Watchman,
J. kavanagh, J. Cuthbertson, J. VV,
Gray. J. Ferries. G. Humes, J. J. Tay.
le.r as  vice-presidents  for the coming
year.
Messrs. Parker Williams and J.
Place, the Soclalisl members in the
Provincial Parliament were pre-sent al
lhe session on ilu Tuesday afternoon,
and were both invited to address thc
convention,
The new executive council went into
lealion immediately afler lhe- close oi
the convention to prepare a list of
demands to be presented to the Government on behalf of the Federation.
A resolution was adopted condemning lhe Boy Scouts as an organization
which taught boys to regard war and
killing as desirable things, and calling
on the organized workers to use their
power in favor of universal peace at
such times as war was likely.
J. W. Wilkinson was elected to represent the Federation at the next
convention of thc Trades and Labor
.Congress of Canada to be held in Montreal next September.
The proceedings of the convention
are to be printed in a special number
of the "B. C. Federationist" this week,
when 6.000 copies will be sent out to
the various unions affiliated throughout the  Province.
Mr. W. R. Trotter, the well-known
organizer of the Trades and Labor
Congress of Canada, was appointed by
the executive as assistant editor of the
proceedings.
A very lengthy discussion took place
on the question of the Federation going into politics. Many delegates were
in favor of the forming of a Labor
Party somewhat along the lines of the
Old Country, whilst others wanted to
come out with a definitely Socialist
programme. Others who held Liberal
or Conservative views, opposed this,
and finally it was decided that it was
better for the present to confine the
efforts of the Federation to organizing thc workers of the Province, and
tc leave the question of political
action until a later date.
A resolution was presented calling
for the election of the officers of the
( Federation by a referendum vote of
the unions instead of by the delegates
jwhii attend  tlu- annual  conventions,
but Ibis was defeated as it was fell thai
if the  delegates  were not  sufficiently
intelligent t��� > -elect the officers, they
ought ne.i to be at ilu- conventions.
'ilu- convention adopted a resolution asking the Provincial Parliament
in make ii a criminal    offence    for
Orientals lo employ while- girls iu any
Capacity     whatever.    Similar    legisla-
tion has been passed iii Saskatchewan,
and  the  ceuirts  of  that  province  arc
now trying t*> decide what is a white
girl.
A nieitieui tee invite a representative
of the I. W. W. lei address the convention was defeated by a large
majority.
The following resolution .vas presented in the convention by the Van.
eeeuver Local eef the United Brotherhood  of Carpenters and Joiners:
"Whereas il is desirable in the interests of all concerned, and especially
those who contribute to the material,
moral, and Intellectual welfare of Ihe
people eef this province; and whereas
there is a growing dissatisfaction evident amongst the workers of liritish
Columbia against Ihe existing order
of things: therefore, be it resolved:
that we, the members of Union 617
of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, do hereby strongly
recommend and urge tbe B. C. Federation of Lalieer at its third annual
convention tee take steps toward the
formation of a political party having
for its aim and object the unity of the
workers, social reformers, and those
opposed to tbe present rule of corporate anil sellish interests, monopoly
and special privilege, on a platform
acceptable to all persons favoring
government by the people and for thc
people, and further that we pledge
ur moral and financial support." Tin's
was considered at the time thc question of the Federation going into
politics was before lhe convention,
and was included in the proceedings
for future guidance.
Tbe following resolution was adopt,
ed by the convention, and is interesting in view of the fact that the
local banks have announced that they
will not be eipen for business on Saturday nights after the 22nd of February next:
"Whereas lhe banks doing business
in the City of Vancouver have issued
a notice to thc effect that no business
will be done on Saturday evenings,
and whereas the majority of the workers are paid by cheque which it has
been customary for them to cash on
Saturday evening, that being the only
time at their disposal during banking
hours. Therefore, be it resolved that
steps be taken to make it illegal for
the payment of wages otherwise than
by cash."
The convention endorsed the efforts
of lhe executive board lo organize
the loggers of the province, and voted
the sum of $75 tee Organizer G. Heath-
crton for thc purpose of geiing to the
convention  of the    Shingle    Weavers
nd Loggers, where plans are to be
laid for the purpose of building up a
large   organization   of   the   combined
hingle weavers and loggers of the
entire Pacific Ceiast. At thc last convention "f the American Federation
of Labor assistance was promised
from lhat body also, and if all these
plans succeed the whole of the timber
workers will be put into a position to
improve the conditions under which
they work, and which have been a
scandal for many years.
Messrs. Kavanagh, Watchman and
Sivcilz were elected as the trustees of
tbe shares of the Federation in the
"li. C. Federationist."
A resolution was adopted asking the
Government to supply all children
wilh school beioks, etc., free of cosl.
and also that the age of exemption
from attendance from public schools
be raiaed to fifteen years.
* ���    ��
A committee freun the Vancouver
Trade! and Labor Council appeared
before ilu- Railways and Bridge! C'enn.
mittee at lhe Cily Hall last Tuesday
morning and asked that a clause be
Inserted in lhe agreement between the
Cily and the Canadian Northern Railway Company calling for lhe payment
of a wage of $3.00 per day eef eight
hours lo all laborers employed on the
lilling in of False Creek.
* as   i
The Vancouver Tilelayers' Union
held a very successful smoker in the
Labor Temple on Wednesday evening,
January 15.
A first class programme was carried
out in a first class manner, several of
the numbers being repeatedly encored.
The first number on the programme
was a piano solo by M. T. Edwards,
and Mr. X. Johnston followed with
a recitation, whieh was well received.
The features of the evening were the
part songs by members of the Welsh
Choir; thc singing by Messrs. Williams and Waddell, also the selections
by a six piece orchestra by members
of the Union Band. The committee
take this opportunity of tendering the
sincere thanks of the Tilelayers' Union
to the following gentlemen who assisted in making the concert such a
success: Messrs. J. Wallace, J. Staple-
ton, C. Lamb, O. Summer, T. Gray,
and J. T. Evans for their excellent
singing. To Mr. E. Cox for his excellent rendering of a number of
popular melodies on the euphonium
Refreshments, both liquid and solid,
were served during the evening, to
which the audience paid particular attention.
* *     st
At the last meeting of Painters
Local 138, arrangements were made
with a view to signing up some of
the shops that have for some time
past been employing non-union men
At present indications a number of
these shops have signified their willingness to come to a better understanding with thc Local.
chic:
Authorized Capital
Assets        -
Money Loaned at S per
cent, simple interest.   Ten
ye��r�� iix months to repay
$1,100,000.00
$  350,000.00
or repayment can be made
any month of whole loan
or any part without extra
cost or bonus
PER ANNUM
THE  LARGEST  AND   OLDEST  CONTRACT  LOANING
COMPANY IN CANADA
Business written to date in excess of $12,500,000.00
Officers   and   Directors :
J. R. Seymour, Prcs., A. McKechnic, 1st Viee.-Pres. and Gen. Mgr.
F.  A.   Brodie,  Secretary
Hon. R. E.   McKechnic, 3rd Viee.-Pres.    J. J. Banfield
Canadian Home Investment Co.
LIMITED
Seccnd "loor, Pacific Building,   Vancouver, B. C.
D.C OFFICES:
Victoria,  XewWeslminster,   Xelson,  Kamloops,  Prince   Rupert
jOI-TICi: OPI.N EVENINGS UNTILNINI- O'CLOCK j
"IT  IS  THE  MAN   IN  THE  OVERALLS
WHO   IS   BUILDING  UP   VANCOUVER"
Support Home
Industry
Every Clothier
Sells Them
We Build Overalls
WHALE
BRAND
SIZE���STRENGTH���ENDURANCE
Made in Vancouver in a UNION shop.    Every
working- man in Greater Vancouver should equip himself with Whale Brand garments.   They are built for
wear and tear.
A. WADDINGTON -:- 22 Water Street
F. J. Rolston
G.  H.  Batcheler
Good Old-fashioned Meals (or Hungry Men
Prompt,  courteous service in the cleanest,  daintiest dining-room
you could imagine.
HARD BY THE MUNICIPAL  HALL,   ON   FRASER  STREET
Special  attention  paid  the  palates of civic officials and employees.
UNIQUE CAFE
G.  H.   Batcheler,  Manager
Corner  Forty-Xinth  Avenue and Fraser Street.
MACADAM & COMPANY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
418 Winch Building Vancouver, B. C.
Wood Block
PAVING
SOUTH VANCOUVER'S POPULATION  HAS
INCREASED 35,000 IN SEVEN YEARS
It contains the choicest Residential and Business
Property on the Peninsula
COLLINGWOOD
Is the heart of this thriving Municipality. We have
been established here since 1905, and invite correspondence regarding investments. We can place
money on first mortgage at 8 per cent., and transact
all financial business.
References :    Royal Bank of Canada, Vancouver, B. C.
Bank of Vancouver, Collingwood, B. C.
BAILEY, TELFORD & CO. LTD.
Financial and Estate Agents
317 Pender St. W., Vancouver, B.C.
Fire, Insurance and Loans
Collingwood East, B. C.
At the next session of the Industrial
Commission, it is the intention of thc
Painters' \.nion to present evidence
showing the evils resulting from the
continued rckalciming and re-papering of ceilings and walls in places
which are occupied hy human beings,
with a view to having the Commission
recommend that legislation be enacted,
compelling owners to have all old kal-
cimine and paper removed from such
walls and ceilings before being re-
papered or kalcimined.
Flowers from Cold Storage
The exportation of refrigerated
plants from China to F*rance has met
with much success. The least success has been had with violets and
roses. Other flowers kept in cold
storage now find their way to European markets in a state of perfect
preservation. The Horticultural Society of Paris has recently received
peonies from the Orient in excellent
condition, though they were cut three
months ago. SATURDAY,  JANUARY  25,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
ELEVEN
ARMSTRONG'S
People's Providers
Armstrong's, Corner Fraser Street and
River Avenue
South Vancouver Post Office
For Fine Groceries, Provisions, &c.
DRUGGISTS SUNDRIES
Give us a trial order and see what we can
do towards cutting down the high cost of
living.
Ye'iir- truly,
PEOPLE'S PROVIDERS
J. Armstrong W. H. Armstrong
AVENUE
Geo. B. Howard,     iX   \I  W*   I'M I    I t*      Main  and  Harris
Mgr. ATLllVL  Phone. Sey mz
THEATRE
WEEK  OF JANUARY 27
MATINEES WED, & SAT.
The Dels. Lawrence Stock
Ceimpany
IN
The Greal European Comedy
Success
THE GREAT NAME
PRICES : :5c, 35c, and 50c
MATINEES 25c any scat
PIANOS-GREAT ALTERATION
-SALE-
\\ e positively must got cur floors cleared. The
tradesmen arc in, and carloads are coming in, for
speedy clearance.   No reasonable offer refused. Cash
or terms.
WILLIAM THOMSON
1127   GRANVILLE  STREET
Phone: Seymour 2832. Near Davie.
QUAHTY=SERVICE
These    two words express our highest ideals in the selling   of
groceries.
QUALITY���We offer you only the very best eif every Hue il is
possible to get. Sume places you may get more Quantity, but here
we will have only the best.
SERVICE���Willi our efficient Delivery Service we will be iu the
front rank tn give you prompt deliveries "WHEN you want il."
Stephens' Pickles, all kinds the be.ttle 25c and 35c
(Crinkle  Corn   Flakes  3  packages  for   25c
Oatmeal Toilet  Seeap   8 large cakes   25c
Japanese  Crab  Meals    large  tins    35c
Marshall's   Herrings    tin-  tin    15c
1 lead   Cheese the   bowl    15c
Oliver's  Lemon   Curd    the  jar   40c
Blue Poinl Oyster-   the tin   25c
Special   Blend Tea    3  pounds   $1.00
Coffee, "As You Like It" the pound 40c anil 50c
Oliver's  Bramble Jelly   the jar   35c
Maggi     Soups,  all   kinels    the  package      5c
f fJlSCr    &    IVlaCLCcin, Phone:   Fairmont 784
SNAP, KNIGHT ROAD
Full-sized  Lot,  north of  Home  Road, $1200.    One-third  cash;
balance 6, 12 and 18 months.
$100 cash handles  Building Lots close to Knight Road.
THOS. Y. LEITCH
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
I     Cor. Knight and Westminster Rds. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone : Fairmont 1653
Heaters for the Winter
The cool long nights are nearly here.   We have a complete line
of heaters.
Cartridges
The shooting season is on.   You don't need to go to the City to buy
your ammunition.   See us.
C. B. FEARNEY ^HTr^rrdr"
HARDWARE, PAINTS, OILS, STOVES, RANGES, ETC.
Joyce Street, COLLINGWOOD
EMPRESS
H^MFiAflTVAW(DUVEBS LEAWN6 Progress of B. c.
aH^MA    p^        HOUSES""        Telephone Co.  	
* ���      ��� ��ww���- _~-_ I Haitingi & Gore    Phone Sey. 3907
.���. in o. Vancouver best reserved seats 2Sc, 50c
To-nighl 8.15 M.tinee S.t. 2.! 5
This  Week
The Great Ruby
Kexi Week
The Spoilers
Geo. Brett, "The Versatiles," Imperial
Theatre,  Jan.  27-28 29
CORPORATION OF SOUTH VANCOUVER
PUBLIC NOTICE
To any rate-leaver or owner of real property in tlie District Mtu.iclhb.tty of Soutli
Vancouver.
Take notice- that the commissioner appointed lo enquire Into t he affairs of the
above municipality will resume the enquiry on
tlie 3rd elay e'f February, 1913, at tlie- hour
' <if ten in thc forenoon in the Municipal Hail,,
South Vancouver, corner of Forty-third alert
Fraser, foi- the purpose e>f enquiring into all
municipal matter generally; Imt more particular!]  into ih.   following :
(a) Contracts for public  ue-ir].- oi-  utilities.
(h)  Purchase   Of   real   estate   for   any   pur-
1'eese-.
(cl Purchases of lumber u-cel bv the municipality.
(el) Purchases e.f fire equipment and apparatus.
(e) Water Works generally.
Any person desiring to give any information relating to tlie above matters are requested  to do so.
IAS.   11.  SPRINGFORD,
C, M. C.
The Green Rose
The general verdict upon the green
rose is that it is more curious than
beautiful. To botanists it is particularly interesting, since it is a proof that
all parts nf a plant above the root are
modifications of the same thing, and
in the green ruse every part may lie
called a leaf.
This flower is a variety of the Common China rose brought in England
in thc yrar 1S35. It alsei gives a strong
support to the view held by many
botanists that all flowers were orginal-
ly green ami that tlu' colors in flowers
are analogous In the autumn tints of
leaves. In the green rose the flowers
generally put on a reddish tint when
they  begin   to  fade.
"Versatiles"
Ir commenting upon the performance   eef   tlie-   "Versatile-,"   wipe   appi'lll'-
ti\ iii Calgary the lasl week in October,
ilu- "Calgarj Daily Herald" of October 29, paid them tlu- f.���!!��� ,\\-in>__- e-,.in-
pliment: "Tin- duel from "II Tro-
yatorc," "Miserere," ley Miss Berry-
man and Mr. Conley was immense
We have had grand opera in Calgary
quite recently, hut lasl night's artist-
put tin grand opera -tar- in tin- shade
as far a.- the "Miserere" duet is concerned. Tin- "Versatiles" are a clever
company and their singing will carry
them through any entertainment. In
"In Tin- Camp-Fire's Glow," tin sec
ond part "i tin- entertainment, there
was a greater apparent sequence to thc
occasion, and feer litis reason it was
me ,re- heartily applauded. Certainly
tlu- audience look every advantage oi
its prerogatives and was very insistent
in it- demand for ene-e,re-s. Nol a
single number wa- .-illiewe-ii tn finish
without a repetition. Mi-- Zara Clinton's "Tutu" was a very captivating
piece nf weirk. It was full eif essential
charm thai a song like "Tutu" demands. Tlu- pecularities of the- differ-
enl nations were prettily hii e.t'f. and
tin- picture was strengthened with appropriate gesture."
The "Versatiles" are- billed tn appear a. lhe Imperial 'I hcatre three
days. -till, i .��� Monday, January 27;
matinee Wee,     elay. January _"'.
el: *
"The Confession"
"Tlie Confession" whieh played tee!
a tremendous engagement ten- six
months at the Bijou Theatre. Broadway, Xew York City, will he presented .it the- Imperial for twu nights,
commencing  Friday, January 31, has
Ill-lived   In  lie  One  ni   tile   11]. e-1   SUCCeSS-
fill plays mi the stage in the past ten
years, anil one that will appeal tn the
most cosmopolitan theatre-goer,
The story that is told is a remarkable one and the plot is well developed
ami finds a strong conclusion.    Much ,
interest -In mid lie attached tn the fact j
that this  i-  the  lirst performance of
this  great  play   which   claims    greal
dramatic powers, heart interest, a lesson and a purpose, coupled with thei
announcement of a distinguished cast ;
of exceptional ability,
*        A       A
Avenue  Theatre
The  unusually  inclement    weather.
with the demoralized ear service has !
seemingly nol affected the popularity
of the  .Avenue, anil    uniformly    big
houses   have  attended   ihis   week   to
witness and applaud the efforts of the
Lawrence    Players  In   thai    stirring
Canadian   play  "The   Righl   of  Way"
Eugene I're-lirey. who made theVtdap-
tation for the stage freun Sir Gilbert
Parker's  famous  novel  of the  same
title, has heen markedly successful in
the   wurk,   ami   has   produced   a   play
whieh is even un ere absorbingly interesting and thrilling than the rom.
ance itself. The theme is a mosl unusual eeiie based, as all win, have read
the hnnk  are  aware, e,n   the  well   tin-
deratood phenomena of a lapsed
memory, and the principal character
areiiinil whom the main action 'ef the
story     revolves   is   Charlie   Steele,   a
brilliant Montreal lawyer, talented. Intellectual! but unhappy in his domestic
relations, and a slave tn drink. How
he redeems his manhood is told in
live powerful acts, tilled with sensation and peopled by the divers characters peculiar tee Montreal and its
environs. The rule of Charlie Steele
would tax the efforts of any actor on
the stage today, and to say that Del
Lawrence realized the author's intention is poor praise���his impersonation
was line, indeed, and he has never
done better work here.
Alf. T. Layne played a strong second in the prominent role of Joe Por-
tugais, and Marion Ruckert was all
she should be in the attractive part
of Rosalie. The minor roles were al!
admirably handled, Howard Russell,
Edward Lawrence and Ethel Corley
being especially worthy of mention.
The few remaining opportunities of
seeing this line production should bc
taken advantage of.
For next week Lawrence and Sandusky announce thc great European
comedy success "The Great Name."
Crammed full of intensely funny situations, brilliant and original dialogue,
it has been an enormous success for
several seasons past in the larger cities
uf the East, and it is confidently predicted that Vancouver will laugh over j
it as all other places have done. The
capabilities of the Lawrence Players
as comedians are well understood, and
they will fit into "The Great Name,"
as it was written for them. Go and
see it and have the best laugh you have j
had in years.
lied   at.    that    a    ti i
- -   tin-   play   weekly   can   - i<
impletc  productions    as    this
drama  thai  contains   fourtei 'i   -
and t    mechanical    i ffi 11
i ;. II "en thai ascends anel
i-   sei 'i  ties mid    the       loud
��� i a gi nuine tally lie- coach
with horses that arrives filled with
l���.. ��� ��� rn.' rs to the "Packhorsi Inn.'"
i Crickcl     Gi ounds,    Com
Charkoff's Apartments, Lad) Garnett's
Mi ii-i'in    Piccadilly,  are g  tin-
beautiful tbcll :     Fletcher
distinguishes    herself    as     Countess
. off, and Tilly Armstrong makes
an immense hii as Lady Garnett, Meta
Marskj as Louisa Jupp contributes
-einie- delightful comedy. Charles
Ayres i- very attractive as the Prince,
V. T 111 nderson, I larold \Telson, and
Ashley Cooper are- very inn-, .mel T.
11, I.--fm- as -ir John Garnetl is thi
character to the life, In all respects
"Tin- Great Ruby" i- a tremendous offering.
X'e si week will be offered that fain.
ous play e in- Spoilers," written by
Rex Beach. As a novel the book was
accepted as the niee-i realistic story
of life in Alaska, the fcrozen North,
that had ever been penned. Although
since that time Rex Beach has written many popular novels, none excel
"Tin Spoilers." li tells a story of the
earlj days of the gold rush to Nome,
and deals particularly with the time
when the L'nited State.- Government
tried to establish law and eereh-r in the
territory. The lir-t act opens on the
deck of thc S.S. Santa Maria as it is
.-iIhuii tn sail for Nome. The second
take- place in the law offices of I (unlit in & Struve, Nome, rvlaska, The
third acl shows the Northern Dance
Hall, Nome, and will be- true to life
in every del til. Here the miners make
a stand against their despoilers. The
fourth acl shows two beautiful snow
scenes of the North, the "Sii_:ii of the
Sled," and the entrance to thc Midas
mine. A hosl of typical characters
will be represented, Bill Dextry, Slap
Jack Simms, Mexico Charlie, Skaquay
Remarkable increase of business���Expansion at Fraser and Collingwood
exchanges.
That S null Vai i the
rapidly i expanding districts of the- pro.
in the
number of telepl re i  ning the
that the it   C
Telephone  Company  i-  making pro-
-.ision in inertase tin  fai iliti
.,- possible.
There are- two ��� - ch - . i:: Se-utii
.���:'' .ii Fraser At enui anel
another al Collingwood Ea I 1 hese
' i\ service over the entire South Van-
district, Because of the impor-
tanci - il '!n- section of ti ri itory, the
B, C. Telephone Company pun h
a lot e,n Ferris Road ami plans have;
been approved for the building which
ii will.erect then- a- soon as a;rai
Can     bl'     eielllple-li ���!.        Tlli-     '   - -
change, known as the Fraser, will be
equipped with modern facilities, including what i- known as a X". in
switchboard. Thi- will have an ultimate capacity e.f 1,600 bin-, which indicates tin- growth that i- expected
he-re-. Installation of this will be madt
with a- little delay a- possible so that;
subscribers wanting service may be
;.i-ee.ninie.i|.it' d
Considerable alterations have been
made in the building at Easl Collingwood, which the company owns and
in which the exchange equipment is
located. Thi- has been remodi
and a switchbi iard installed there
which will have a capacity ibout equal
tn that in iln- Fraser exchange. This
u-nrk i- nearly completed anil ii i- ex-
'I' eti 'I  that tin-  "en'   -1\ er"  will  take
place    withil!    iln-    next    three    we-i-ks,
. bi�� district is growing very fast, ami
in view of iln'- extensions of iln- aerial
anil teell lines are in view, plan- fur
which an- about ret. ly. During the
coming summer the- company will bi
active in both sections of the district,
pole line- extensions being proposed
als i  for the Fraser s :ction,
The exchange al Fraser was opened
in February 1912, and there are now
]23 subscribers. The incn use during
the year lias been .-ibenii .,.- pi r cent.
When the new facilities are installed,
unai expansion will be shown in these
ligures
The Collinsrwood exchange was first
operated in January. lf'll. with a very
small beginning, it was foreseen that
many people would settle along thi
interurban line tti railway this side of
Central Park, and the B. C. Telephone
Company was content to start the exchange with only four subscribers, 'lee-
day there are 106 stations connected
with central at thai point, an increase
feir the year of \23 per cent. In this
section also the new equipment will
orovide for the advance that is confidently expected.
PANTAGES
Unequalled       Vauieville      Means       Pantages
Vaudeville
SHOW STARTS---2.45. 7.15. .nd 9.30 p in
Miss  Nellie Schmidt
Tin- only girl to swim from San  l-'an-
cise Oakl ind and around tbe
"Seal   Rocks"
The Four Solis Brothers
rs   of  the   Marimba"
Tom  Kelley
"Jri-it   Minstrel"
Dave  Rafael
In a scenic  Ventriloquial   Production,
"DOWN OX THE FARM"
Valerie   Sisters
Singing  and   Dancing Comediennes
Phil   La  Toska
"The Talkatit i   Juggle r"
Gaumonts    Animated   Weekly
Frank He-ley,   'The Versatiles," Impend  Theatre,  Jan.  27-28-29
Week   i:  ginning January 27
A   Dashing   Rao    Spectacle
THE   SUBURBAN   HANDICAP
With  Gi - irge  I loey and a comet
Bobby  Pandur and  Brother
The most  p< rfectlj   formt -1 strong
en  in the wi irld
I���Other I       .    ..   C. Acts���4
Empress Tho?tr?
That stupendous Dairy Lane
Theatre drama "The Greal Ruby," is
being given a wonderful production
this week at thc Empress Theatre.
While perfect scenic presentations are
looked for as a matter of course at this
playhouse, still it may bc said that
"The Great Ruby" surpasses anything
of the season.    It is something to be
Ike, and Cherry Malotte the girl who
was nol all bad, are among the pronounced characters, Roy Glenister,
the owner oi the Midas mine, is the
picturesque hero, and llellen Chester,
the judge's niece, is the heroine. The
scenery will be- a treat and a host of
people will be utilized to make this the
best presentation of this popular play
that has been attempted outside of the
original production.
* *   *
Orpheum Theatre
"Tii ��� Suburban W inner" will lu- the
headline attraction offered at the Orpheum next ��e. There- are ten pen-
pie in the aei ami three horses, besides a carload of scentry Tlnr,- is
presented one oi the mos exciting
heerse races ever attempted iu v-atiele-
villc. The week will In- known as
"Derby Week" at tin- e Irpheum feu the
teas.ni that "Tbe Suburban Winner'
has been so successful in the Eastern
b.eiises. ('.en, Hoej ��ill be- found in
the featured position em tin- pro-
gramme with a company eef ten picked
players The act has |H-en a tremendous  lilt  all  alniig  the  circuit,
Bobby Pandur and hi- brother, <>r-
pheinn favorites from tin- physical cul.
une   standpoint,  are  returning  fen- an
exhibition eef their wonderful strength
Hobson ami  Mabelle, two   young
women, will nfl'er a neat little specialty
with splendid costumes.
Floyd Mack, a dancing dandy, will
produce some excellent comedy with
his dancing.
Rouble Sims, the cartoonist, will renew his acquaintance with Orpheum
atrons with a laugh a minute.
Havily and Carter will present a
n-iedy talking act. entitled "Neigh-
mrs." said to be brim full of funny
..luff.
* *    *
Pantages Theatre
The  third  of a  quartet  of unusual
���attires i u thc  Pantages bill will be
brought mi as a headline act of the
lew bill opening at thc Pantages next
eek.    The whole show looks like a
vinner of large proportions.    For thc
"D line place on the programme the
lf.'cring    will   be   Nellie  Schmidt,    a
beautiful  young  California  girl  who
has the distinction nf being thc only
"crson   ever   tee   swim   around   Seal
".--ck'S,  one   nf  th.-   m -st   treacherous
���liirlpnols in San Francr'sco Bay. Miss
Schmidt will shi v her aquatic prowess
i a huge tan': i specially constructed
������ the purpoi -.    With   "!iss Schmidt
vill appear Vivian Marshall, who will
do her famous "Fire rive."
The  S. lis   fir -ill. vs.  both  nf  them
"ils. ur,      ling to show what be-
���'ldering     music   may   ne   furnished
'���nm lhat  peculiar    instrument,    the
nirambaphone,
Tom Kelly will bc held responsible
fur a large portion of thc comedy tn
be put over the footlights. Tom is
known as the Fashion plate nf vaudeville.
Dave Rafael is coming along with
his classic ventriloquial production,
"On The Farm," in which he gives a
number of wonderful Imitations. Lu
Toska is regarded as "The Talkative
and  Funny Juggler.
Burns' Anniversary Scottish Concert
A gram! Scottish concert, tn commemorate tin- birth nf Robbie Burns,
Scotland's National Poet, will be held
in the i Iddfellows' Hall. Mount Pleasant, tonight, Saturday evening, Jan
25. at 8.15 p.m. The concert is under
the direction of Mr W, W. Robertson,
[he well-known solo vinlinist, ami he-
will be assisted by the following high
class artists: Mrs. W. W Robertson,
soprano; Mrs. J. 1-'. Paterson, mezzo-
soprano; Miss Mary Isdale, contralto;
Mr. .lames Hall, tenor; Mr. VV, W.
Robertson solo violinisl: Mr. W, W.
Kelly, elocutionist; Mr. R. A. Dunns-
cliffe, comedian; Mi-- Bella Robson
[and Masters Alex, anel Arthur Robson,
Highland dancers; Mrs. J. I-' Paterson,
pianist ami accompanist,
A firsi iln-- Sl-nllis,! programme is
assured to ail wh" attend the
above, al popular prices, ind
tickets can be had at Independent
Drug Store, corner Seventh Avenue
and Main Street, als.i drug stores corner of Twenty-fifth Avenue ami Main
Street, also Eraser  Avenue.
SUCCESS
Business   College
"The School of Certainties"
COURSES IN BOOKKEEPING.
SHORTHAND     AND   TYPEWRITING,
CIVIL   SERVICE   AND   ENGLISH
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded
DAY   AND   FVENING   CLASSES
HARRIS   BUILDING
Corner Main St. & 10th Ave.
Phone :   Fairmont   2075
DENTISTS
Drs. Howie & Hall
Have   opened   up   new   and   up-to-date
Dental  Parlors  in the Williams   Block.
Corner Granville and Hastings
We have installed all the latest and
best appliances, and are prepared to
give you the best there is in the dental
profession.
A share of your patronage is
solicited.
Gas    administered   for    the    painless
extraction   of   teeth.
R. O   Howie, DD.S
Wm. 8. Hall, DD.S.
Phone   Sey    3266   for   appointment
A Machine to Write Music
A German musician has invented a
machine which, lu- states, aul ,m tical
|j :i��� _;i-1e r- ill,- notes emitted by im-
piano. The new machine has tin tame
objeel :i- mil- invented by an Italian
and used by Mascagni in writing his
operas, but it is a larger instrument
and ia operated by electricity, Into
the machine is inserted a roll nf paper,
and thc composer seats himself be-
feere the piano and executes lhe composition that he desires to give to thc
public. 'The machine faithfully registers every note produced, su that
thc musician does not have to depend
upon his memory.
Geo. Jones
HORSE   SHOER
Lame and Interfering horses will
receive ipecial care and attention.
Alt kin 's of hand-made shoes, running shoes, running plates, toe
plates,   etc.
All horses entrusted to me will receive  every   care  and  attention.
GOOD   WORK   GUARANTEED
571  Beatty Street
What Makes the Corn Pop?
A grain of "popcorn," is filled with
tightly packed starch grains. The interior nf the grain is divided intei a
large number of cells, each of which
may be likened to a tiny box, the walls
whereof are sufficiently strong to withstand considerable pressure from
within. Upon the application of heat
the moisture present in each little
box is converted intei steam that finally
escapes by explosion.
To obtain satisfactory "popping"
there is required a very high degree
of heat. This causes the greater part
nf the cells to explode simultaneously. The grain of corn then literally
"turns inside nut" and. is transformed
into a relatively large mass eef snow-
white starch.
If corn be old and dry it will tint
"pop" satisfactorily. A few cell- near
the centre nf the grain may burst, but
the general result will be unsatisfactory. At the base eef the kernels,
where they are attached In the cob,
thc cells appear tn be driest, and it
has been observed that these cells are
seldom broken  in   tbe  "popping."
Practically all the popcorn raised feer
market in this corrutry comes from
Xew England. Great quantities nf it
arc popped, buttered, and packed for
-ale all ove-r thc l'nited States.
HAMILTON BROS.
Embalmers and Funeral
Directors
Parlors and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Phone : Fraser 19
(Day or night)
Ernest D. L. Maxwell
EXPERT PIANO  TUNER
Specialties :   Player    Pianos.    Repairs.    Ton:
Regulating
164 BROADWAY WEST. VANCOUVER
Phone :     Fairmont 1125
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP
The partnership heretofore known hy the
firm name and designation of Sloan & Allen,
grocers and provision merchants, holding forth
on .Main Street, near Twenty-ninth Avenue, in
tlie Municipality of South Vancouver, 1'ro-
vince of British Columbia, is this day dis-
solved hy mutual consent, Thomas W. Allen,
retiring. John Sloan will collect all accounts
and indebtedness to the said firm and assume
all   expenditures   and   pay   all   hills.
In witness whereof the said parties to these
presents have hereunto seC' their hand-; and
Seals this twenty-Sixth day of January, in the
year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred
and thirteen,
JOHN' SLOAN
THOMAS  WILLIAM   ALLEN TWELVE
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  JANUARY  25,   1913"
Successful and Defeated Candidates Thank
Their Friends and Supporters
To the Ratepayers of
South  Vancouver
I WISH to express ray appreciation of the support I
received at last Saturday's election, at which time
I was returned to serve my second term as Reeve. I
enter upon my duties fully aware of the responsibility
that is mine, and will work as in the past for a clear
and progressive administration.
J. A. KERR
Reeve.
I TAKE this opportunity of thanking my friends for
the support they so loyally accorded me in the
recent campaign. I shall continue, as in the past, to
work for the best interests of South Vancouver and
Ward IV in particular.
JOHN THIRD
,,,
}*������%���.,.is*
HP) IK veetc | received this year Ear exceeded tny expectations, I epter upon my second years wink
as a Councillor with the feeling that the ratepayers
nf Ward Yll have confidence in my ability to serve
their interests,, and that confidence 1 will not betray.
1 thank my friends for the overwhelming vote cast lasl
Saturday in favor of my return.
Charles Stuart Campbell
Councillor Ward Yll.
To the Electorate of
South Vancouver
I WISH tn thank you for the support you gave me at
the polls on Saturday last. 1 wish lhe Municipality
every success iu the future. I desire to compliment
Reeve Kerr upon Ilis success and his forgiveness during the late campaign.
W. A. POUND
To the Ratepayers of Ward 2
I WISH to express to you my thanks for the support
I received at the election last Saturday. As the
majority of my supporters voted for me on an annexation platform I will bend every effort to have a
fair agreement made with the City of Vancouver.
W. J. DICKINSON
Councillor Elect for Ward
[rrrrrrrixoxoJ��cr-xcx-xic-_oOTra^" AffiP-oaoocooocpooojjt
I TAKE ihis opportunity of thanking my many friends
who worked so faithfully for my election in the
late municipal campaign, Especially is the "Committee eif Fifty," who managed my campaign; particular worthy of my thanks. I shall give the municipality
the best (here is in me during the vear 1(,13.
J. J. WILBERS
��axxx��noooj.
]g
I WAS very gratified at having received the highest
vote cast for School Trustee, and as a member of
the Hoard for 1913 I will try to serve the best interests
of all the people. I am very grateful for the hearty
support I received.
WM. MORRIS
||ij)c--oo-yxxo(BJ
I AMES GARDINER CAMPBELL takes this op-
<f portunity of thanking the many friends who supported him in his successful contest for School Trustee
at last week's election, and will endeavor to vindicate
the judgment of his supporters by his work in the
next year.
nfooooQC-xcofcn
ie-fr.,<��.,��� (..<:,, ,..,,,���,,,,,;*
���\ftt M><-.,...,^-J.,,..)j.>,.1ii��J
F W ISII to thank the friends who assisted me in the
late campaign both by their personal efforts and
bftllotS,     I  lake |iiv  defeat   with.nit   any  hard   feelings
toward anyone and wish the Municipality every success eluring the next year.
G. L. GREENLAY
5418 Main .Street
With the Aid of a Mountain
(Continued  form  Page 6)
perly develop their claims?" asked
the lawyer. "If they can we have no
case against them."
"I don't think they can," was the
answer. "They could work here, or
here," and he pointed at the map.
"But it makes little difference. We
could appeal. If it comes to a fight,
money is no object. It's time. Time
is everything, so we must move
���quickly."
As Kenyon wrote out a cheque he
felt a little sorry for his father who
had made the young man wealthy on
bis twenty-first birthday.
"The court is sitting onw," the lawyer said, "and I can get out an injunction in the morning, send it up
the hill at once, and by evening no
drill will be chipping on the Ethel
fraction."
It was as the legal gentleman had
said. The injunction restraining Robert Boyd, in whose name all work was
proceeding, from further operations
on the Ethel fractional mineral claim
was secured the next morning, returnable in ten days, and at five
o'clock the same evening the superintendent was served with notice. At
ten minutes after five Robert Boyd
was on  his  way down  the  hill.
Kenyon bad disappeared. No one
in Kaslo, except the lawyer, knew any.
thing about him, and the lawyer was
paid to keep quiet. Boyd showed a
total disregard for telegraph tolls, and
when answers began to come in they
showed that the Montreal end of the
syndicate was as stirred up as the British Columbia end. They were rather
stunned in Montreal. 'Ihey asked the
telegraph company to repeat all the
messages, and they wired Boyd asking him if he really meant what he
said.
"Where is my son?" wired John
Kenyon.
"I don't know where your son is,"
replied Thomas Boyd.
"Get all the lawyers you need to
burst that injunction." wired Robert
McLoren.
"We don't need lawyers. We need
the Ethel fraction," replied Thomas
Boyd.
"How much delay can we stand before the season's work will be seriously interfered with?" wired John Kenyon.
"None,"  replied  Thomas   Boyd.
Five days passed and things had
remained at a standstill. John Kenyon was much alarmed about the
strange disappearance of his son. He
was in his partner's office talking over
the  situation.
Sterling  walked   in   unannounced.
"How do, governor. Good afternoon, uncle,"���he had always called
Mr. McLoren uncle.
It does not matter what occurred
thc next few moments.
"Now, then, the situation is this,"
young Kenyon was saying, with the
calm assurance of a man who has
the trump card and is perfectly aware
of it.
"I own the ground on which you
arc working and I have stopped you.
I am going to see this thing through.
The minute you withdraw your objection to Ethel and me getting married, at once I will transfer the fraction  to you.    I  have left  power of
attorney with my solicitor in Kaslo-
and he can act for me on telegraphic
orders. "I'll let you think it over
for. a while and will expect to have
your answer at dinner, father. I'm
going home now. I have come across-
the continent and need a change."
That night a message went under
the Atlantic.
"Do you wish to return at once
and   marry  Sterling?"
Two hours and twenty minutes
after the cablegram was put in Ethel'*
hands a train left London to connect  with  the boat at  Liverpool.
Ethel, with thc austere maid,
caught it.

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