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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Dec 19, 1914

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Array $CU CHINOOK
v >l. in. x... 32
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, W14
Price 5 cents
CHRISTMAS
USUAL"
" Christmas as usual!"  Yes! be blithe and jolly,
The foe won't invade us in Vancouver South
Hang up the stocking, the mistletoe holly
Let laughter���and pudding���be in every mouth.
" Christmas as usual"���aside put the paper
That tells of grim war���thank our stars���far away ;
" Christmas as usual "���we'll dance and we'll caper,
The times may be hard���let's contrive to feel gay.
" Christmas as usual"���remember some others
Who worse off than we are���the hungry and poor
Help the dear children���Help the poor mother
Who may have a sad Christmas with Dad at the war
-FELIX PENNE
1914
*5
������
^mssst���^mm
_^,^H
_ TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK���CHRISTMAS   NUMBER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER  19, 191*
A (&vmt ��xn
At Kalenberg Hall, Chriitmai Day,
for all the Out-of-Iuck. and all the
Young.ters By ZONA GALE
I never hael felt se. much like Christina-. ' laid Calliope Marsh, "as I ��li<I
that   year.
���"1 wish't,1 I says, when it got
'most time, 'I wish't I knew somebody
to have a Christmai tree with.1
"Will, Calliope Marsh.' saiyi Mis'
Postmaster Sykes, looking surprised-
on-purpose, the way -lie- ileus, 'ain't
then- enough i"��er ami neglected folks
in  this world to please   anybody?1
"'I eii.lift say have a Christmas tree
fm.'   I   >a\> back at   her;   'I  say-  have
one with.'
"'1 el..n't know what you mean hy
that difference,' .-he says, 'I'm snri'.'
"'1 dortno,' I says, 'as I know
either. Hut tluy is a difference, sonie-
where. IM kind of like tej havi- a tree
with  folks  this year.'
"'Why don't ynu help exi your
church tree?' Mis' Sykes a-k's me.
They're going tO'spend quite a little
money   een   theirs   this  year.'
"'I hate tee box Christmas up in a
church.'  I   says.
"'Why, Calliope Marsh!' she says,
shocked,
"I didn't want tee hurt lur feelings
���I ain't never eme of theise that likes
to throw their idees in fe elk's faces and
watch folks jump hack. So I tried to
talk ahejut something else, hut she
went right on, trying hcr hest to help
me out.
" 'The ward schools is each going to \
have a tree this year, I hear,' she
.says. 'Why don't you go in on your
ward. Calliope, and help out there?
They'd be real glad of help, you
know.'
" 'I hate to divide Christmas off into wards,' I says to her.
" 'Well. then, go in with a family,'
she says; 'any of us'll bc real glad tej
have you,' she adds, generous. 'We
would. Come to ours���we're going
tee have a great big tree for the children. I've been stringing thc pop-corn
and cutting the paper for whenever I
got an odd minute. The Holcombs,
they're going to have one too���and
Mis' Uppers and Mis' Merriman and
even the Hubhclthwaits and Abigail
Arnold, for her little nieces. I never
see a year when everybody was going
to celebrate so nice. Come ot with
one of us. why don't you-'
" 'Well,' I says, 'mebbe I will. I'll
see. I don't know yet what I will do,'
I teeld her. And 1 went off down the
street. What I Wanted to say was,
'I hate to box Christmas up in a family,' but I didn't quite dare���yet.
s "Friendship Village ain't ever looked much more like Christmas, to my
notion, than il done that December.
Just the right snow !'..".:'. Come���and no
more; and. just the right cold���and no
more. The moon -was getting along
so's about the night of the twenty-
fifth it was going to loom tip big and
gold and warm over the fields on the
flats, where it always comes up in
winter like it hai just edged around
there to get a sort of a wide front
yard for its big show, where the whole
village ceiuld have a porch seat.
"You know when you live in a village you always know whether the
moon Is new. of to the full or where
it is and when it's going to be; but
when you live in a city you just look
up in the sky some-night and say 'Oh,
that's so, there's .the moon.' and go
right on thinking,. about something
else. Here in the village that December everything was getting ready, deliberate, for a full-moon Christmas,
like long ago. Thc moon and the cold
and the snow, and all them public
things, was doing their best, together,
for our common -Christmas. All but
us. It seemed like all of us humans
���was working for. it separate.
"Tramping along there in thc snow-
that night, I thought over what Mis'
Sykes had said, and about all the
places she'd mentioned over was going to have Christmas trees. And I
looked along to thc houses, most of
'em lying right there on Daphne
Street, where they was geu'ng to have
'em���I could see 'em nil, one tree after another, lighted and streaming
from house to house all up and down
Daphne Street, just the way they was
going  to look.
"And then there was the little back
streets, and the houses down on thc
flats, where they wouldn't be any trees
nor much of any Christmas. Of
ce.tirse, as Mis' Sykes had said, thc
pen.r and the ncglecleel is always with
us���yet; but 1 didn't want tei pounce
down on any of 'em with a bag of
fruit and a box of animal crackers and
set and watch 'cm.
"Tbat wasn't what I meant by having a  Christmas with somebody,
" 'Ther'd ought to bc some place���'
I was beginning to think, when right
along where I was, by the Market
Square. I come on five or six children,
kicking around in tbe snow. It was
';nost'dark, but 1 could just make 'enl
out: Eddie Kewhaven, Arthur Mills,
Lily Dorron, and two-three more.
"'Hello, folks,' I says, 'what you
doing? Having a carnival?' Because
it's on the Market Square that carnivals and some little circuses and
things that belongs to everybody is
usually celebrated.
"Little Arthur Mills spoke up. 'No,'
he says; 'wc was just playing we's
selling a load of Christmas trees.'
" 'Christmas trees.' I says, "Why.
that's so. This is where they always
bring 'em to sell���big load of 'em for
everybody, ain't it?'
"'They're going tee bring an awful
big load here this time.' says Eddie
Newhaven��� 'big enough for everybody in town to have one. Most of
the fellows is going to have 'em���
us and New Backus and the Cart-
wrights and Joe Tyrri! and Lifty���
all of 'em.'
" 'My,' I says, 'what a lot of Christmas trees! Why, if they was set along
by the curbstone here on Daphne
Street.' I says, just to please the
children and make a little talk with
'em, 'why. tbe line of 'em would reach
all up and down the town,' I says
'Wouldn't that be fun?'
"Little Lily claps her hands.
" 'Oh. yes,' she cries, 'wouldn't that
be fun? With pop-corn siring- all going fre.m eeut- tn tlie other-'
"'lt would be a granel sight,' -ays I.
hniking down .-Hrnss the- Market
Square. There, hanging al! gold and
quiet, like it didn'l think it amounted
in much, right lever tin- bi^ cedar*of-
Eebanon-looking tree in tin Square,
was the nieeeen, crooked tee -., horn.
"'Once,' says E.ehlie- Kewhaven,
'when they was selling iln- Christmas
trees hen. they kept right een selling
'em after elark.   Ami they stood 'em
around hire anel put a little light iu
each one. It was awful nice. Vvould-
n't it be nice if they'd elo that all over
llu   Square  some time!'
"It would bc a grand sight,' says
I again, 'but one that the folks in this
town would'never have time for,    .   .'
"While I spoke 1 was looking down
across Market Square again toward
the moon hanging over tin- cedar-of-
l.ebaneiii-1'ei eking tree.
"'There's a pretty good-looking
tree there already,' I says idle. 'What
a grand thing it would be lit up,' says
I. fnr mit much of tiny reason���only
tn keep the talk going with the children. Then something went threiugh
me from bead to my feet. 'Why not
light it senile time?'  I  says.
"Thc children set up a little shout
���part because they liked it. part because they thought such a thing couhl
never be. 1 laughed with 'cm, anil I
went on up thc street���but all the
time something in me kept on saying
something, all hurried and as if it
meant it. And little end of ideas, and
little jagged edges of other ideas, and
plans part raveled out that you
thought you could knit up again, anil
long, sharp notions, a little something
like light, kept going through my head
anil goitlg threiugh it.
"Down to the next corner I met
Ben Cory, that keeps the livery-stable
anil sings bass to nearly everybody's
funeral and to other public occasions.
"'Ben,' says excited, though I
hadn't thought anything about this
till that minute, 'Ben���you getting up
any Christmas Eve Christmas carols
tn  sing  this year?'
"Ile had a new string of sleigh-
bells over his shoulder, and he give
it a shift, I recollect, so's they all
jingled.
" 'Well,' he says, 'I did allow to do
it. But I've spoke to one or two, and
they donno's they can do it. Some
bas gut to sing to churches earlier in
the evening and they donno's they
want to tunc up all night. And thc
most has got to be home for family
Christmas.'
" 'There ain't' I says, 'no manner o'
deiubt about the folks that'll be glad
to listen, is there, provided you had
the singers?'
" 'Oh, sure,' he says. 'Folks shines
up  to  music  considcr'ble,    Christmas
Eve.    It��� sort of���well, it '
��� "'Yes.' 1 says, 'I know. It does,
don't it? Well, Ben Cory, you get
your Christmas-carol singers together and a-careeling. and I'll undertake
that there sha'n't be nothing much
stand in the way of their being out on
Christmas Eve.    Is it a bargain-'
"His face lit us, all jolly anil
hearty.
" 'Why, sure it's a bargain,' be says.
I'll get 'em. I wanted to, only 1
didn't want to carol 'cm any more
than they wanted to.be caroled. I'll
get 'em,' he says, and gives his bells
a hunch that made 'em ring all up
and down Daphne Street���that the
moon was looking down it just as if
it was public property and not all made
up of little private plans with just room
enough for us four and no more, or
figures to that effect.
"I don do if you've ever managed
any  kind of a  revolution?
"They's two kinds of revolutions.
One breaks off of something that's always been. You pick up tbe broke
piece and try to throw it away to make
room feer something that's growing
out of the other part. And 'most
everybody will begin to tell you that
the growing piece ain't any good, but
tbat the other part is the kind you
have always bought and that you'll
better save it and stick it back on.
But then they's the other kind of
revolution tbat backs away from
something that's always been anel
binks at it a little farther off than it
ever see it before, anil says: 'Let's us
move a little way around and pay attention to this thing from a new spot.'
And real often, if you put it that way,
they's enough people willing to do
that, because they know they can go
right back afterward and stand in the
same old place if they want to.
"Well, this last was the kind of a
revolution 1 took charge of that week
before Christinas. I got my plans
and my ideas and my notions all
planned and thought and budded, and
then I presented 'em around, abundant.
"The very next morning after I see
the children I started* out, while I
had a kind of a glow to drape around
the difficulties so's I couldn't see 'em.
I went first to the store-keepers, seeing Christmas always seems to hinge
and bang on what they say and do.
And I went to Epplcby Holcomb, because I knew he'd see it like I done
���and I wanted the brace of being
agreed with,  like  you do.
"Eppleby's store was all decorated
up with green cut paper and tassels
and turkey-red calico poinsettias, and
it looked real nice and tasty. And the
store was full of the country trade.
The little overhead track that took
the bundles had broke down just at
tbe wrong minute, and old rich Mis'
Wiswell's felt soles had got stuck
half-way, and Eppleby himself was up
on top of a counter trying to rescue
'em for her, while she made tart remarks below. When he'd fished 'em
out anil  wrapped 'em up for her.
" 'Eppleby.' I says, 'would you be
villing tee shut up shop on Christmas
Eve, or  wouldn't ymi?'
"He l.e.eked kind of startled. 'It's
i   pretty   good   night   for   trade,   you
now.  Calliope?'  says  he���doubtful.
" 'Why,  yes,'  I   says,  'it    is.      But
FREE DINNER
and
CHRISTMAS
TREE
Kalenberg Hall
Christmas Day
2.30 p.m.
Roast Turkey
Plum Pudding
Candies and
Popcorn
%
Come anyway
Don't Mind Your
Clothes
"NOT CHARITY, JUST A CHRISTMAS BLOW-OUT"
GET A TICKET AT THE MUNICIPAL HALL AT THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT FROM
DR. MURPHY, ADVANCE AGENT FOR SANTA CLAUS
everybody that's going to give presents to people 'II give presents to people. And if the stores ain't open
Christmas Eve, folk's 'II buy 'em when
the stores is open. Is that sense,'or
ain't it?'
"He knew it was. And when I told
him what I'd got hold of, stray places
in my head, he says if the rest would
shut he'd shut, and bc glad of it. Abigail Arnold done the same about her
home bakery, and tbe Gekerjecks, and
two-three more, But Silas Sykes,
that keeps the post-office store, hc
was firm.
'"If that ain'l woman-foolish,' he
says, 'I donno what is. You ain't no
more idee of business than so many
cats. No, sir. I don't betray the public by cutting 'cm off of one evening's
shopping like that.'
"It made a nice little sentence to
quote, and I quoted it considcr'ble.
And the result was, the rest of 'em,
that knew Silas, bead and heart, finally says, all right, he could keep open
if hc wanted to, and enjoy himself,
and they'd all shut up. I honestly
think they kind of appreciated, in a
nice, neighborly way, making Silas
feel mean���when he' ought tie.
"It was a little harder to make t.n
Sunday-school superintendents see
thc thing that I had in my heael. Of
course, when a thing has bein the
way it has been for a good while, you
can't really blame people for feeling
that it's been thc way it ought tn be,
Feelings seems made that way. Our
superintendent has been mir superintendent for 'most forty years���ever
since   the  church   was  built���and    uf
course  his thoughts is kind eif turned
to bone in some places, naturally.
"His names is Jerry Bemus, and he
keeps a little harness shop next door
tei the Town Hall that's across from
Market Square, When I went in that
day he was resting from making harnesses, and he was practising on his
comet. He can make a bugle call
real nice���you can often hear it, going up and down Daphne Street in
the morning, and when I'm down doing my trading I always like to hear
it���it gives mc a kind of a nice, old-
fashioned feeling, like when Abigail
Arnold fries doughnuts in the hack of
the Home Bakery and we can all
smell 'em, out in the road.
" 'Jerry,' I says, 'how much is our
Sunday-school Christmas tree going
to cost us?'
"Jerry's got a wooden leg, and hc
can not remember not to try to cross
it over the other one. He done that
now, and give it up.
'"We calc'latc about twenty-five
dollars,' says he, proud.
"'What we going to do to celebrate?'
"'Well,' he says, 'have speaking
pieces ���we got a program of twenty
numbers already,' says he, pleased.
'And a trimmed tree, and an orange,
and a bag of nuts and candy for every
child,'  hc  says.
" 'All the other churches is going
to do the same,' I says. 'Five trees
and live programs and five sets 'if
stuff all  around.    And all  of  'em  on
(Continued mi page  12)
FREE!   FREE!!   FREE!!!
Sixty Watt Tungsten Lamps
A Sixty Watt Tungsten Lamp of the highest grade (such as is
regularly sold over our counters'at 4f) cents) will be given any lighting customer of the B. C. Electric who purchases at regular sale an
Electric Household Appliance, valued at $3.00 .or over, at any B. C.
Electric  saleroom  during  thc  month  of  December.
This special offer is made to call your attention to electric household appliances as handsome, useful, durable and sensible Christmas
gifts.
Visit our salesrooms. Our line includes gifts suited to every need
and within the reach of every purse.
Carrall and Hastings Streets 1138 Granville Street (near Davie)
Glazed Cement
Sewer Pipe
Is the choice of property owners in
every city where its value has been
demonstrated. It gives good service
and has durability.
Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.
1S5 FRONT STREET WEST
Phone Fairmont 122
SIX   REASONS
WHICH ACCOUNT FOR THE SUPERIORITY OF
CREOSOTED WOOD
BLOCK PAVEMENTS
ITS DURABILITY���Does not crumble or pulverize under the densest traffic; second only to granite
blocks
ITS EASE OF REPAIR���No difficulty being experienced in removing and replacing the blocks; no
expensive plant or skilled workmen required.
ITS SANITARY QUALITIES���Creosote being a
highly antiseptic and waterproofing material instantly destroys all germs, prevents the absorption of
street filth and consequent decay.
ITS NOISELESSNESS���The rattle and bang of
vehicles passing over its smooth surface absorbed
and muffled till the quiet of the dir< load is obtained.
ITS DUSTLESSNESS���Does not pulverize; the
heaviest traffic only pounding down the wood fibres
to offer the greater resistance.
TTS CLEANLINESS���Having a smooth surface and
being waterproof it does not differ in this respect
from asphalt.
We manufacture blocks of the highest possible
standard, the verv best materials only being used and
in the DOMINION WOOD BLOCKS we believe
we produce an article that has no equal.
DOMINION CREOSOTING
 COMPANY   LIMITED	
Vancouver, B. C.
a:4 n llu *'
SAVE 25   BY SHIPPING YOUR HOUSEHOLD GOODS
EAST OR SOUTH IN OUR COMBINATION CARS   GIVE
US YOUR PACKING MOVING STORAGE AND SHIPPING
WE   KNOW  MOW
Campbell Storage Company
OFFICE   857"   BEATTY ST.
PHONE   SEYMOUR 736Q.
���rmrs ��� m m a u u t SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK���CHRISTMAS NUMBER
THREE
i
HOW MAIN STREET WAS PAVED
Notable Achievement in Exclusive Use of British Columbia's Own Products
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.       ���       ���_   , . ��� , .. w���, el,Baeed Ior nearly a year-View near Fortieth Avenue.   3.-As many as fifty teams were kept going.   4.���Concrete slab below car tracks, laid
1     View of part of Main Street when work was started.   2.-Two s\en7ne^��r^0*earred^gfogreground with arm raised.    6.-Block-laying gang-Municipal Inspector John Burns and Foreman Tom Peterson to *e left; Man w.th
-s.   ��7i  ZJnJZ Company    5.-Laying concrete between the tracks-Inspector Howard in        g pavement from Seventeenth Avenue into the heart of the city of Vancouver.   9.-The men who paved Main Street with Bn-
by B.C.E. Ralway Company       ._TVfinished product at Nineteenth Avenue.   ��-L����k>n8 over ^the fruits of thirty years active experience in construction work; Mr. W. H. Harvey, of the Dominion Creosotmg Co., manufac
^rCofumTia^odut;.? bright to left, Mr. J. V. MacAdam  ^^^TKw -Tm"  J  J  StSfivan, foreman fn charge of men and equipment, an expert on permanent pavement construction.
turers; Mr. V. L. MacAdam, superintendent of the work;  Mr. n. n. r|^^^^^^^^^^^il^^^^^^^^^^^^^^l^l^^^^^H ���SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK���CHRISTMAS   NUMBER
FIVE
Hon. W. J. Bowser's Admission of Government's Betrayal
of the People in the Gigantic Dominion Trust Co. Swindle
Official Statement of the Attorney-General oj
British Columbia to the Committee of
Depositors
Hon. W. J. Bowser, Attorney-General of Britir.h Columbia, who, according
to his own statement, knew that t he Dominion Trust Company was
breaking the law many months before its collapse.
William R. Arnold was a Napoleon in his own way.
The Government of the Province of British Columbia and
the Government of the Dominion of Canada bowed for a
time to his will. Six thousand seven hundred persons
trusted Arnold with all their savings and as many more,
directly or indirectly, permitted their fortunes to be tied
up with those of the financial organization which Arnold
had created and dominated.
The Little Corsican rose from the multitude and was
carried upon the shoulders of mob leaders who bawled
"Liberty"; Arnold rose from obscurity and was pushed
forward hy a frenzied mob who cried "'Development." Al!
the Little Corsicans make headway up to that point where
they undertake to use the trusi of the people to finance for
themselves glory, publicity and prestige.
"The Last Phase"
"Tomorrow,"' said William R. Arnold, "tomorrow 1
will take you into the vaults ;ui(l 1 will show vou the securities, bonds and liquid assets of the company. The depositors are fully protected. Every dollar of the trust
funds are available. The affairs of the Dominion Trust
Company are in good order. Wc will go into the vaults
together���tomorrow."
"You have told me that before, Mr. Arnold. I have my
orders and I must examine these securities today. For
days and days you have been putting me off. This work
must be done and we cannot delay longer. Tomorrow will
not do."
Mr. Arnold and Auditor Hodges were in the private
office of the managing director of the Dominion Trust
Company when this conversation took place. It was the
opening of the last act of the tragedy���that part which the
Honourable William llowser, Attorney-General of Hritish
Columbia, grimly referred to at a political meeting a few
nights ago as "The Last Phase."
Always with men who are too ambitious and not too
scrupulous as to the means they employ to satisfy their
lust for self-advancement, there is "The Last Phase."
Mr. Bowser's Own Story
Some insight into the methods of William R. Arnold
and a bare outline of the facts leading up to the crash of
the Dominion Trust Company were given by the Attorney-
General of British Columbia himself to a committee of the
Dominion Trust Company depositors who met Mr. Bowser a fortnight ago in the offices of Messrs. Bowser, Reid
& Wallbridge. This meeting took place in the palatial
suite occupied by the legal advisers of the defunct company on tbe top" floor of the Dominion Trust Building.
These offices have been occupied for some time by the law
firm upon a lease drawn up before Mr. Arnold's death.
Mr. Bowser told the committee that the Government
had known for years that the Dominion Trust Company
was unsound. The Government did not wish to cause a
panic and consecpiently had allowed Arnold to go ahead
with the fleecing of the innocents. Mr. Bowser spoke very
guardedly of the disaster. He did not attack Arnold,
though from his words it might be inferred that Mr. Bowser liad never at any time a high opinion of the brilliant
young plunger.
As Mr. Bowser was the head of the firm of lawyers who
handled ibe affairs of the Dominion Trust Company it was
only natural thai a few months before the collapse, Mr.
Arnold should present himself at the office of the Attorney-
General. At tbat time, Mr. Bowser claims that tbe Gov
eminent had undertaken an investigation of the affairs of
the Dominion Trust Company. Possibly Mr. Arnold suspected this and was in search of information. At all events,
upon this visit, Mr. Arnold stated that a meeting of the
directors vvas to be held within a few days.
"What do you think, Mr. Bowser," said he, "about ibe
company passing a dividend?"
"That." said Mr. Bowser, "would be the craziest thing
you have ever done, Arnold."
Mr. Bowser told the committee of depositors that with
this, Mr. Arnold appeared nervous, took his glasses off.
whipped out a handkerchief and gently wiped the lenses as
he turned the subject.
"I told my partner, R. I,. Reid, immediately after my
interview with Arnold," said Mr. Bowser to the committee.
"to go down to that meeting of Dominion Trust Directors
and stop the passing of a dividend. I told him to stay there
all day and all night if necessary, but not to allow a dividend to be passed. The company was on its last legs and
in a hopeless condition.
"Mr. Reid protested," said Mr. Bowser, "he was of lhe
opinion that everything was alright. 1 gave him the facts
of the case as I knew them.   He attended the meeting."
It is understood that at this meeting, which was a few
days before the collapse, a dividend was passed, though
notices were sent out later saying that the monies would
be withheld for the time being owing to the situation caused by the outbreak of war.
Inspector Runnel's Visit
Mr. Bowser took the committee of depositors back to
March last when, he said, he received the first intimation
that the unstable condition of the Dominion Trust, had
been aggravated by crooked work on the part of some one.
"It was in March that 1 sent Inspector Runnels to investigate the Dominion Trust Company," said Mr. B<,,v"-
ser. The Inspector asked Mr. Arnold at that time t.; show
him the liquid assets for the payment of depositors.
"We haven't the money here." were Mr. Arnold's words
to the Inspector. "It's spread over all our branches. We
have the money, but it would bc impossible to carry it all
ai the Vancouver office."
The C. H. I. C. Cheque
"When Inspector Runnels reported to me," continued
Mr. Bowser, "I asked him how long tlu- thing could be kept
going. 'It can be kept going,' replied Runnels, 'as long
as that Canadian I lome Investment cheque lor $47,000 is
not presented for payment.'
"fn tbe meantime tbe department thought it well to
have an auditor go over thc books. In order to save talk
among tbe employees and to allay suspicions, one of ibe
Company's own auditors were appointed, Mr. I lodges" (of
tbe firm of Kiddcll, Stead. I lodges & Weir, who ior three
years were tbe official auditors ,,\ the Dominion Trusi
Company.) "It did not take 1 lodges long i" find everything
wrong."
Remarkable State of Affairs
Let us leave Mr. Bowser and lhe committee of depositors to consider then the state of affairs in the dying days
of tbe Dominion Trust. We find at the head of the firm of
lawyers who were supposed to advise Arnold and the directors of the Dominion Trust Company, Mr. W. J. Bowser. We find that the man who was directed to audit the
books of the Dominion Trust, a Mr. 1 lodges, the company's
own auditor. We find at the bead of the Government
whose duty it was to enforce the law regarding trust companies, Mr. W. J. Bowser. When Mr. Bowser instructed
Hodges to "go out and get Arnold," Hodges made investigations which plainly showed the concern to be bankrupt
beyond recall. Yet the company's auditors, before this
time, apparently could find no flaw in Dominion Trust affairs. The company, from financial statements published
before the crash, was pictured as being as sound at tbe
Rock of Gibraltar and it was so stated within the past year
in the editorial columns of the daily papers of Vancouver.
History from 1912
Mr. Bowser informed the committee of depositors of
tbe history of tbe Dominion Trust Company from 1912.
"In lhat year," said be, "tbe company was incorporated
under the laws of the Dominion of Canada. The Limited
was dropped and the Dominion Trust Company took over
the assets and liabilities of the Dominion Trust Company
Limited. There was a provision in their charter from the
Dominion Government which prohibited the company from
taking deposits after April 1912. Arnold, to get over this,
applied to the Provincial Government for a special bill
which would make it possible for them to take deposits. The
bill was drawn up and though I, as legal adviser to the Government, declared it was irregular, it was presented to the
finance committee, who unanimously approved of   it.     I
The late William R. Arnold, frenzied financier. His operations brought
ruin to hundreds and were carried on with the full knowledge and
consent of the Provincial Govern ment of the Province of British Columbia.
urgi 1 tbe finance committee of the House not to pass it,
mit my counsels were of no avail. The bill was passed by
the House.    I did not oppose it on the floor eif the House."
Would Government Have Split?
Asked by members of tbe committee why be did nut
oppose it on the floor of ibe blouse. Mr. Bowser said. "I
submitted to tbe passing of the bill. I lad I oppt ised it, there
would have been a split in tbe party and ihe Government
would have been defeated. I did not wish lo risk the defeat of tbe Government.   They were all in favor of it."
Arnold's Fine Hand
Again digressing from tbe interview between the committee of depositors and Mr. Bowser we find tbe Government of British Columbia was right under the thumb of
William R. Arnold. The Dominion Government would
not give Dominion Trust the right tee take deposits, vet the
Provincial Government stepped in tee amend, if you please,
tbe acts of ibe Dominion parliament. Mr. Bowser opposed
ibis. 1 Ir knew tbat the Provincial Government could not,
constitutionally, allow the Dominion Trust to take deposits
when the Federal Government ruled tbat lhe Dominion
Trust should not take deposits. The question arisen as to
what pressure Mr. Arnold brought i<��� bear ifpoti 1'rice Ellison, the Minister of Finance .and his committee to have
this illegal bill passed. Was it tbe wonderful personality
oi Arnold; Possibly     there     were      private     dinners
at tbe Empress Hotel previous to the passing of that bit of
legislation which made it possible for the Dominion Trust
Company to filch money from ihe very pockets of the people whom tbe government is supposed to represent,
Continuing the interview. Mr. llowser stated: "This
bill at all events became law. It was in 1912 lhat we received a wire from the Department of Justice at Ottawa calling-
attention to the fact that it was beyond our power to amend
the acts of the Dominion Government. I expected this and
was prepared to receive such notice.
"Upon receipt of this wire, I sent for Arnold. He came
(ever to Victoria and I showed the telegram to him. Arnold expressed himself as being 'sick of the whole business
ol taking deposits. There was no money to be made in
tbat department anyway.' Afler March, 1914, Arnold told
me. he would discontinue taking deposits. At that time
tbe new Provincial Trust Company legislation would
come into effect. The bill passed the year before giving
the Dominion Trust Company the right to take deposits
was of course repealed."
In answer to a query from one of the committee as to
whether the Dominion Government took any action to enforce the Dominion Trust Company to abide by the law,
Mr. Bowser made an important statement.
"The Dominion Government," said Mr. Bowser, "rather
than cause the Provincial Government any embarassment,
allowed the matter to rest in our hands. We had the verbal promise from Mr. Arnold that the taking of deposits
would be discontinued after March and informed the Department at Ottawa to that effect."
��
(Continued on Page 6) FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK���CHRISTMAS NUMBER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1914
���
Ptf^CHIINOOK
PUBLISHED
Every Saturday by the Greater Vancouver Publishers Limited
Ceorge M. Murray, Editor
HEAD OFFICE:
Corner   Thirtieth   Avenue   and   Main   Street,   South   Vancouver,   B. C.
TELEPHONE:  All department! Fairmont   1874
NICHT   CALLS Fairmont   1946 L
Registered   at  the   Post   Office   Department,   Ottawa,   as   Second   Class
Mail Matter
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
To   all   points  in   Canada,   United   Kingdom,   Newfoundland,   New
Zealand, and other British Possessions:
One   Vear    12.00
Six  Months      1.00
Three   Months SO
Postage to American. European and other Foreign Countries, 11.00
per year extra.
"The truth at all times firmly standi
And shall from age to age endure."
tened a pig is now forced to buy liis milk from the
city dealer and his pork from the butcher.
In times such as the present it is the duty of munici] ial officials to bend every energy towards relieving
tin- pressure upon the taxpayer. In some of the municipalities of liritish Columbia it would lie well to partly suspend these bylaws which hold people from helping themselves.
A Jersey cow with a hell about her neck browsing
in the vacant places on the Fraser -lope would not be
a menace to anyone's peace of mind and hcr pink ttd-
eler^ illicit supply tlle bill of fare for two or three
families of young liritishers. Even a little pitf in a
lack lot squealing before breakfast or grunting contentedly after breakfast could be tolerated if we knew
that bis fattening hams would save a good citizen from
tiie necessity of becoming a common beggar before the
winter is over.
FEDERAL AID FOR PRODUCERS
AT the last meeting of the South Vancouver Board
of Trade the question of food production was
discussed at length and a resolution aolng the lines of
that outlined by the Port Arthur Hoard of Trade was
drawn Up for presentation to the Premier at Ottawa
and the Leader of the Oposition. The resolution urges
that the government assist food production in the urban and rural municipalities by extending loans to
the tillers of the soil.   The resolution follows:
"That, whereas the Dominion of Canada is almost
the size of Europe, having over 2,386,000,000 acres,
of which at least 370,000,000 acres are suitable for cultivation ;
"And whereas in 1911 only 32,404,110 acres were
under field crop, but produced a crop worth over
$550,000,000;
"And whereas it is very essential that the remaining
90 per cent, of our agricultural lands should be developed as expeditiously as possible, to furnish remunerative work for our unemployed; an increased market
tor our industries; greater traffic for our extensive
lines of transportation; food stuffs for Great Britain;
comfortable homes for the brave Belgians, other allies
and British people who may desire to engage in farming and market gardening under the most favorable
circumstances;
"And whereas Canada can render very important
assistance to the Empire in populating Canada with
millions of industrious farmers;
"And whereas to aid the farmer or to secure the
rapid development of agricultural resources, we believe New Zealand has lent $65,000,000; the Commonwealth of Australia over $80,000,000; the Argentine
Republic $50,000,000; and Great Britain to the tenant
farmers of Ireland over $330,000,000;
"Therefore the South Vancouver Board of Trade
would respectfuuly urge that the necessary legislation
be enacted empowering the Dominion of Canada to
lend $50,000,000 to the urban and rural municipalities
in Canada, on their municipal debentures, repayable
in five years, with interest at five per cent, annually,
upon the condition that such municipalities lend such
��TP1
TIIE LAND QUESTION
HERE'S more in the Man than there is in the
Land," is a hoary old maxim which should receive tiie consideration of those who are in favor of
a food production policy for the Province of British
Columbia. There are hundreds of thousands of acres
of wild lands in this Province which might be turned
into productive farm lands. After all thc preliminary
difficulties of bringing this land back into the bands
of the Crown, clearing it and arranging finances for
the people who will work upon it, there will still be
the great problem before British Columbia of securing
men for thc land.
In the cities of the Province there are hundreds of
men today who are idle. From the ranks of these men
there is not a large percentage who would go upon
the land, if it were opened for them. The majority of
the men in the cities are tradesmen or mechanics who
are untutored in the science of agriculture and who
would make dismal failures on any farm.
There are ways of securing men who will intelligently handle the farm lands of the Province. The
easy way is to import yeomen from the British Isles
and from the countries of the Allies. The better plan
is to develop in British Columbia skilled agriculturists by making the study of agriculture of outstanding
importance in the Public Schools. The plan adopted
by the School Board in South Vancouver should be
taken up by every district throughout the Province.
Here at the night school opened by the Board a class
in agriculture is held and is free to all who wish to
attend.
Any policy of land development in British Columbia
will require a partner in the way of an advanced technical educational policy to assure for all time the permanent prosperity of this Province.
Real Coal Economy
The price eef coal per ton is ne.t all that
mist In- considered in buying fuel. Keal
ecqnomy is tee secure tlie greatest amount
oi beat for the smallest  Him of money.
DIETHER
(South Wellington)
COAL
Nut, $5.00     Lump, $6.50
(Full weight without sacks)
Is Bituminous coal, mined on Vancouver
I-land, British Columbia, and the nieest
economical coal em the market. It is
all heat antl no ware.
Washington coal is Lignite which contains up to 25 per cent, water.
When you buy coal in sacks bc sure of
the iull weight without the sacks. A
sack weighs irom 15 to 20 lbs. Vou pay
leer these in nine cases out eef ten.
Water and sacks will give you nee beat.
DIETHER COAL
is sold with a city weigh ticket
guaranteeing net weight in loads
of two tons and up.
Ring for trial load Seymour 552, 553
--.
L. M.
DIETHER
COAL
CO. LTD.
Your hens will lay all
winter if you get your
Poultry Supplies from us
PRATT'S POULTRY REGULATOR
WILL PRODUCE
- - THE EGGS - -
F. T. VERNON'S
MOUNT PLEASANT
FEED STORE
255 Broadway East (cor. Kingsway)
Phone Fairmont 18'i
!
BY THE WAY
"THE CAMPBELLS ARE COMIN', Ayah-ha-ha."
Ex-councillor C. S. Campbell is mentioned as a possible candidate for reeve and the present trustee, J.
money to its ratepayers to be expended in clearing | Gardiner, has already announced himself.
and bringing additional land under cultivation or in
extending the area under market gardening; advances
to be made as the work progresses and not to exceed
$1,000 to any one ratepayer, and to be a first lien on
the land similar to advances made under frontage or
drainage bylaws; or that such money to be loaned for
agricultural development, to be advanced by the government as may be deemed advisable."
Should tbe Government adopt the suggestion contained in the resolution, South Yancouvvr and the
other municipalities of Greater Vancouver would
directly benefit to an enormous extent. The development of our agricultural resources at the present
time is as much a question of Imperial defence as the
outfitting of 30,000 soldiers for the battle line. Should
the suggestions contained in this resolution be considered by the House of Commons, there is little question but that the Government and Opposition would
join in regarding it as such.
HELP THE POOR TO HELP THEMSELVES
WITHIN the past few years cities, towns and municipalities far and near have gone in extensively
for the drawing up of bylaws aimed at protection of
the public health. Every bylaw has created an opening for an inspector of some kind or other. We have
health inspectors, sanitary inspectors, dairy inspectors,
milk inspectors and a whole family of inspectors.
In the thickly congested districts these advanced
health bylaws are necessary for the protection of the
public. There is the fear, however, that in the more
sptarsely populated t rban or semi-urban districts bylaws modelled after those which have been found to
work out successfully in New York or Chicago, are
altogether too drastic.
Certain municipalities have a provision against the
keeping of hogs. It is necessary to have a five-acre
tract before a hog pen may be lawfully kept, the bylaw says. There is also a bylaw governing the sale
of milk. Locally, the dairy premises must be inspected by the health department and a license secured
from the municipality.
As a result of this advanced legislation, the poor
man in the suburbs who formerly kept a cow or fat-
* 4   4
THE HIGHLANDER who held the bridge at Sois-
snos and single-handed repulsed an army corp of
Germans was a cringing coward as compared with
the man who this week started another daily paper
in Vancouver.
* #   *
IT IS TO BE HOPED that the question of the establishment of public markets to be owned by the joint
municipalities will be taken up in earnest at the forthcoming elections. The morgue of False Creek which
at present serves as a market should be turned into a
factory for the manufacture of fertiliser, lots of raw
material being at present available within the ill-
smelling place.
* *   ��
HODGSON SAYS THAT there are no Liberals in
South Vancouver. It would be well if we could keep
Charlie thinking that until about a week before the
next election.
* *   4
WITH TIIE DAVIE CARS now headed for Fifty-
second Avenue, the municipality has entered upon a
new epoch.
��   ��   ��
THAT   WELL-KNOWN    IMPERIALIST,   John
Dickinson, of Cedar  Cottage, is beginning to show
signs of desiring again to have the end seat on the
Municipal Council.
* *    4
THE ENTRIES SO FAR for the grand sweepstakes are: Kerr, Campbell (J. Gardiner), Burgess,
and J. B. Todrick.
* *   ��
TWI'.XTY-FIVE YEARS AGO in Chilliwack potatoes were ten dollars per ton. Today they are $18.00
per ton.
* ������.��.. *
AS THE CHINOOK predicted, the time has come
when thc ratepayers are neglecting the meetings of
the municipal aspirants. They arc turning to other
quarters. Provincial and Federal politics will have
the attention of the South Yancouver citizens henceforth.
J. E. ANDERSON
THE FAMILY BUTCHER
AT THE SANITARY SHOP
4192  MAIN  STREET
has added a complete stock of
GROCERIES
And is now prepared to furnish every family
in South Vancouver with everything in the Grocery line you require at prices that will make you
his regular customer.
WATCH THIS SPACE NEXT WEEK FOR
PRICES
THE AVERAGE South Vancouver ratepayer pay-
$15.00 a year municipal taxes. It has been estimateel
that he pays approximately $700.00 per year for his
food, owing to the high tariff, than his neighbor over
at Illaine, Wash., has to pay.
GOODS DELIVERED FREE
Telephone Fairmont 1634
A GREAT WORK in the interests of humanity would
be the political manslaughter of those brilliant statesmen in the Vancouver city council who have raised
a wall between Vancouver and South Vancouver.
Their brains should bc battered out upon this wall.
*    *    #
NO SOUTH VANCOUVER MAN need apply for a
job on the city, as a result of the cheap methods of
these vote catchers. Yet South Vancouver pays out
enormous sums every month to teachers and employees generally who reside within the city.
Egg
$5.75
Coal
Is as goe��l as any Lump Coal you
have ever burned and the most
economical coal on the market,
being eef eme uniform size, suitable
for furnace, grate or range.
TRY
A Ton on Our Money-Back Guarantee
" Wt have dearer Coal, and as dear as
you want it"
KIRK & CO.
929 Main Street
Phone Seymour 1441
NURSES
CALL BAYVIEW 1097.
MATERNITY AND  SURGICAL  CA8E8
[*]     FAIRVIEW   NURSING   HOME
975   BROADWAV WEST
PRIVATE  NURSES
SENT OUT
Min JONES
myj
The Important Matter of Choosing Your Dentist
Good Teeth
necessary
to health
"Cheap"
dentistry
the  most
expensive
What are
"Nature
teeth"?
Advice
free
The New
Standard Bank
Bldg., Richards
and   Hastings
Second   Floor
Entrance
Room 212
Phone   Sey.
4 6 7 9
"The Last Word
in Dentistry."
j^sHERE is nothing so important to your health and efficiency as the matter with
Vl/ your teeth. Sound, useful, beautiful teeth should bc yours���teeth that enable
you to bite, chew and smile in comfort. Decayed teeth cause, not only continual
inconvenience, but permanent ill-health. It is your duty to yourself to economize
in other ways so that you may secure teeth that look natural, feel natural and perform the functions which Nature allotted to those important members.
CHEREFORE you should choose your dentist with great care. It is poor
economy to buy "bargain teeth." Inferior dentistry���poor materials, little
knowledge and less care���costs but little less than the right kind even at the beginning, and certainly is much more expensive in the long run.
X EMPLOY only the most modern methods, the greatest care and skill and the
best materials. Each individual case is carefully studied. When 1 fit you
with my "Nature teeth" they look, fit and fed like the ones Nature gave you. And
you will find my prices no higher than those of ordinary dentists.
GOME in and allow me to examine your mouth, advise yotl and give you my
estimate of the cost. This will involve no obligation whatever. Make up
your mind now to see to those teeth. Then call, phone or write to me now,
making appointment for examination.
No Gas or Harmful Drugs Used
"You Suffer No Pain"
 GUARANTEE	
I HEREBY Gl'ARANTEE that all dental work performed by me will be absolutely
painless. If the slightest twinge of pain is experienred by the patient no money need be paid
to me, or if any has been paid, it will be instantly ich��nd�� d.
I further guarantee that all crown or bridge work v.r filling will remain in first-class condition for a period of TEN YEARS. If any of my work becomes defective during that time I
will replace it absolutely FREE OF CHARGE.
"TH*  unnin.s ....       * 4\W^^^
OPEN   EVENINGS
"THE MODERN DENTIST SATURDAY. DECEMBER Y),  1<M4
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK���CHRISTMAS  NUMBER
SEVEN
"Business as Usual" on Busy Fraser Street
COAL, WOOD
AND
BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
We tiie pleated te. extend tee emr numerous customer! in S<mth
Vancouver
THE SEASON'S GREETINGS
We  .ne'   Mill  here  selling  the  highest    gr:ulc,  thoroughly
icreened NANAIMO LUMP COAL.
No need te. tell you it is tlu- most satisfactory fuel on tlie
market.    5fou all know it.
One "f emr cuitomeri told us that one scuttle 'ef our coal
was equal in value to three' of WASHINGTON COAL.
Until further neetice we ��ill deliver iii teen Iota "i" over, as
far as 34th Avenue, al city pricei, $7.00 per ton.
All C< > \l. anel W( M >I) ordera promptly delivered and    itis
[action guaranteed.
South Vancouver Builders Supply
COMPANY
51st Avenue and Fraser Street
Phone Fraser 36
Branches: 25th and Main, Joyce St., Coll. East
DO YOU DRINK?
Milk is one of Nature's complete foods, as well
as a healthful drink.
Ymi will drink more milk and purer milk if you
use our Lulu Island Milk.
PIONEER DAIRY
PHONE Fraser 57 and a wagon will call on you
Cor. 62nd Avenue and Fraser Street
Martin's Flour and Feed Store
Cor. 49th Avenue and Fraser Street
A Full Line of
Flour, Feed and Poultry Supplies
at lowest possible prices,
Orders now hooked for
Spring Garden and Flowering Seeds
You can get Nothing Better
than the Best!
And you can depend on getting the very best here. I am the oldest established grocer in South
Vancouver, and carry the largest and best assorted, "up-to-the-minute" stock of Groceries and Provisions.
If you Buy to Try, you will  always Try to  Buy
from South Vancouver's Leading Grocer
JOHN  NORBURY
Corner of 51st  Avenue
Phone Fraser 98
Advertisements appearing on this
page strikingly illustrate the progres-
siveness of the citizens of Fraser
Street. The year 1915 will see the
street paved. Then its predominant
place in the Municipality will be assured for all time.
WE WANT YOU TO SEE OUR LARGE SELECTION OF
Xmas Cards,  Books, Toys  and  Candies
SMOKERS' SUPPLIES GRAMOPHONES AND RECORDS
IHE OLD COUNTRY NEWS STORE   ::   5973 Fraser Street
(RICHARD A. WEBSTER���(Successor to  Charles Hill)
BIG BARGAINS in TOYS
Buy your Toys at Cole's and save money.
Everything in Toys at reduced prices.
TOYS from 2 for Sc. to $2.00
A BIG ASSORTMENT
COLES DRY GOODS STORES
FRASER and 48th AVENUE
Also Victoria and Wilson Roads
Phone up Fairmont 1602 L ear'y, and book your
order for XMAS WHIPPING CREAM.
South Vancouver Milk Co.
Cor. 29th and Fraser Street
We take  this opportunity of wishing   all   our
Customers and Friends A Merry Christmas
and a  Prosperous New Year
'Whether ynu eat tn live
or live to cat,'
You will find my
Groceries hard to beal!
E. 0. GRANT
Family Grocer
5004  FRASER  ST.
Don't wait till all your
Coal and Wood is used
up before Phoneing up
FAIRMONT 2280
South Vancouver
Coal Co.
Cor. 25th and Fraser St.
jFull Weight  Canadian
Coal and Big Loads
of Wood
PLATE GLASS
ACCIDENT
LIFE, FIRE
AUTO
INSURANCE
Exclusive Snuth Vancouver Agent for
LIVERPOOL AND LONDON AND GLOBE
PHOENIX OF LONDON, ENGLAND
CANADIAN NATIONAL FIRE
Real Estate
Conveyancing
Rental Collection
I look after your
Property for you
Phone Fraser 108
Collections
Estates
Managed
Robert S. Lewington
6181 Fraser Street
Thanking' you for your past patronage and hoping for a continuance of same.
Yours for a Prosperous New Year. six
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK���CHRISTMAS NUMBER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1014
Hon. W. J. Bowser's Admission of Government's Betrayal of the People in Gigantic
Dominion Trust Co. Swindle
i Continued from Page 51
It is apparent therefore that both the Pro
vincial Government and the Dominion Government knew
that Arnold was breaking the law and stood silently by
while the Dominion Trust Company accepted monies from
the aged, tlie infirm, die crippled, the widows, tlie orphans,
which monies were used to bolster up the wild get-rich-
quick schemes of Mr. Arnold. Dominion Government was
silent because il sought to shield the Provincial Government. The Provincial Government was silent apparently
because il sought lo shield certain men who had close relations witb tlie Government���possibly the linn of Bowser, Reid and Wallbridge and possibly members of thc
Board of Directors of the Dominion Trust Company.
Questions of Committee
"Why did you not lake steps to stop this thing on March
4 when you saw that Arnold continued taking deposits?"
asked a member of the committee.
Mr; llowser: "We did notify him to stop taking deposits."
Member of committee: "Why did you not put a common policeman at the door and force the Dominion Trust
Company to desist from accepting deposits?"
Mr. Bowser:   "Oh, thai would have caused a panic."
Member of committee: "A panic would have been better than that which has since developed."
Mr. Bowser made no answer to this.
Member of committee: "Considering that the Government has by its apparent silence been a party to this
swindle, considering thai lhe Government knew right along
that the company was in such shape and considering the
-way in which the depositors have been grossly buncoed,
could not the Government take steps to rc-imburse the depositors?"
Mr. Bowser: "There is no precedent by which we could
act. Can you expect me to ask the tax payers in the Interior to come to the rescue of a few people in Yancouver."
Political Expediency
Member of committee: "Why not establish a precedent, Mr. Bowser? Cases may be cited where the Government has come to the rescue of concerns in the Province."
(Committee member here hinted al the cases of the C. N.
R. and P. G. E. where the Government was forced lo save
the companies from bankruptcy.)
Mr. Bowser:   "That might have been a matter of poli
tical expediency." (Laughter.)
Mr. Bowser and Mr. Arnold
Some day lhe story will be written of the career ol the
late William R. Arnold. He was a bold pirate who, as the
"Daily Province" points out, had absolute confidence in
himself, lie was a big financier in the same sense that possibly some of our British Columbia public men are big
statesmen. He had thc run of the Province for a time and
his financial star ascended with the political stars of others
in the Province and was equally luminous as it shot across
the canopy.
Arnold had a great imagination. No small trust company business offered sufficient scope for his talents. He
would be the biggest of financial men or he would bc none
at all. It was this marvelous imagination which led him
into the Vancouver Harbor and Dock Extension Company,
an enterprise capitalized at millions of dollars which, had
it been carried through* might have changed Vancouver
into the portal of North America. This was but one of the
concerns in which he dabbled.
The Vancouver Harbor and Dock Extension Company
had large holdings on Lulu Island and the public is well
aware of the scope of this project for upon the newspapers
of Vancouver thousands of dollars were spent in a great
advertising campaign. This company sent representatives
all over the globe and had made such headway as to receive
promises of subventions from the Dominion Government.
But Mr. P.owser or Sir Richard McRride could see no
good in the Vancouver Harbor and Dock Extension Company. They had assistance to give MacKenzie and Mann,
but none to this dock enterprise. It was probably here that
Mr. Arnold and Mr. Bowser could not see eye to eye and if
the political leader had ever shown any confidence in the
young financier before, when the Provincial Government
had turned down the Pretty project, Mr. Arnold and Mr.
Bowser drifted further and further apart.
Death Stalked on Golf Links
To return to "The Last Phase," as Mr. Bowser refers
to the last few days on earth of William R. Arnold���and
here we will repeat the story in our own words as told quite
frankly by Mr. Bowser to the members of the committee
of depositors who pleaded with him that the Government
come to the rescue of the broken and homeless depositors
gulled by the Dominion Trust Company.
"Tomorrow," said Mr. Arnold, "I will take you into the
vaults." That was about the ���th of October. The auditor Hodges was acting now under instruction from Mr.
Bowser, himself, and when Mr. Bowser passes out orders
they must be obeyed. There is no "tomorrow" in Mr. Bowser's lexicon. Hodges was instructed to see the liquid assets of the Dominion Trust Company and to check over the
securities which were supposed to be in the vaults to guarantee the thousands of depositors who had put their money
in the keeping of the Dominion Trust.
Hodges stuck to Arnold like a leech. Thursday he is
said to have pressed Arnold to deliver up the securities.
Arnold fought it off until Friday. Friday he was clever
enough to have the "day" postponed until Saturday.   Sat
urday he had an excuse and though Hodges pressed him,
again the visit was postponed.
On Saturday Hodges told him lhat there must be a
showdown. His chief was pressing him. The securities
and bonds and ready money musl be delivered up, checked
over and counted.
Arnold, now fighting desperately for time, refused to
do Hodges" bidding on Saturday. When Hodges suggest
ed Sunday, Arnold Said that such a proposition was out of
the question, lie would not work on Sunday. He turned
to Hodges and suggested lhat Hodges and suggested lhat
he be his guest Sunday and lhat ihey have a game of golf.
1 lodges assented to this.
What Arnold did with himself on the Priday and lhe
Saturday, was outlined officially during the following
week. On Sunday he met Hodges and they went lo the
goli links. Never a good golfer, on this occasion Arnold
i> said to have put up a fair game. He chatted with his
companion, it is said, and showed no signs of carrying upon
his young shoulders the greatest burden any financial man
has ever carried possibly in the history of Canada. It is
likely that business was discussed, for according lo the
statement of Mr. Bowser, after the game was over, Mr.
Arnold made an appointment to meet Mr. Hodges the following morning, Thanksgiving Day, at the offices of the
company. The appointment was for 10 o'clock in the
morning.
Mr. Hodges was at the office at 10 o'clock.
At fifteen minutes to ten lhat morning, lhe charge of a
shot gun had, in lhe words of thc report of the medical officer to the coroner's jury, "lorn into ribbons" the heart of
William R. Arnold.
Facts and Fancies
By "Observer"
VICTORIA ROAD MERCHANTS
Extend Christmas Greetings
BE LOYAL  to your  local
business   men. IT   PAYS
Save time and car fare by
spending your money at your
local   Druggist.
A   complete  line  of
DRUGS,
TOILET  ARTICLES,
& CONFECTIONERY
Always in stock
Prompt Delivery
Phone Fraser 113
L. A. MANUEL
5735 Victoria Drive
Mr. L. A. Manuel, Phm. B.
Victoria Drive District's
Popular Pharmacist
Support South Vancouver
By buying your supplies of CHICKEN FEED,
etc., AT  HOME.
Quality High. Prices Reasonable
Every sack guaranteed  100 lbs.
Keep your money circulating in Victoria Drive
by patronising the old established corner grocery
of
BUCK & SON
FIRST-CLASS    STOCK    OF   GROCERIES
At lowest cash prices.   A trial solicited.
Orders delivered same day        Phone Fraser 17
5702 to 4 VICTORIA DRIVE
WHY WASTE TIME
And car fare down town when we have what you
want right here at the SAME PRICES.
Patronize local business if you want Victoria
Drive to prosper. BUY IT NOW
H. J. WILLIAMSON
CONFECTIONER
5079 VICTORIA DRIVE
My prediction e,f .-, plethora of can-
(lielatcs feer the reevetnip seems likely
trj   ceime  true,  if  all   the   men   DOW   in
ihe field idhere t'> present Intention!.
These include   Reeve  Kerr, Councillor
Stevens, ex���Councillor Geild, ex-
Councillor Burgetl and School Trustee Campbell. With to many candidate! in the field it is a toil-up whe,
will   be   elected;   but   the   chancel   are'
that ex-Councillor Gold will reign as
reeve next year, beeatt.se Mr. Gold*!
suppeirters are a unit, though in a
minority, while the majority vote will
be split among the other candidates.
li a ICCond lialleet was necessary, Mr.
Ge eld's chances would be small Indeed;
but with live OT even three candidate! in the field Ilis election as
reeve of South Vancouver is as sure
"as an election can be.
* * ��
While in many respects I shemld
regard the election of Mr. Geild as
a distinct calamity, looking nt the
matter from another aspect, I am inclined to think it may be the best
thing that could happen fur South
Vancouver. There is a certain element in thc municipality which icei
graft and corruption in everything
the council decides tie ele.; anil the'
meere honest and upright Ihe men
comprising the council, the louder is
the cry e,f graft and corruption rais-
e.l. * ��� *
Neiw it seems tn nie, that llle present time is opportune to alow the
noisy element, those who are so loud
in their charges of graft anil corruption, to run the municipality for a
year. They can nol do the municipality much more harm next year than
Ihey have already done; hut there is
just the possibility thai during their
year of office they may surprise
t In esc who have hitlherto listened
with such gusto to their charges. If
lhat happy result should occur, it
would be a God-send to South Vancouver.
* * *
Xo doubt I shall be criticised (or the
foregoing remarks, but let tne explain. Semth Vancouver is suffering
lenlay and will continue to suffer, so
long as the people of the municipality
listen lo the loud mouthed vaporing!
..1 platform politician!. There is only
one satisfactory cure for their complaint���an overdose of their own peculiar brand nf politician. Let Ihcm
learn that those who are loudest in
their denunciation of graft and corruption are usually themselves the
greatest grafters. Grapes do neit greew
cm thorns nor figs on thislles; neither do charges of graft and corruption
come from the mouth! eif honest men.
Evil is he who evil thinks, and you
may bet your bottom dollar that honest men do not think graft and enr-
rupti'iii exists in every public transaction, lieing themselves lmnest
they give others credit for a like characteristic. Hut "set a thief to catch a
thief" is an old saying; and per-
sonally. I suspect men who
ways denouncing graft and
tion���they evidently judge
from Iheir own standpoint.
* * *
Now, as 1 said before, the preaenl
time seems to be an opportune liini'
tee allow lhe element referred to to
run Ihe municipality. F'er Ihis reason: In spite of hopes to tlle COn-
trary, next year's council will be compelled to depend on revenue from
taxes for the year's expenditure.
True, (he Provincial Government has
promised assistance. Rut, promises
are like pic-crusts. At any rale, rate-
pavers may rest assured that the government will tint grant to South Van-
couver assistance which can nol be
offered to all either municipalities in
need. And where lhe money is to
come frmn I'i render assistance to
the different municipalities is a problem which will require some thinking before  the  solution  is  found.
" e��    *    *
Thai being the caie, il seems to
me lhat it wouhl be a wile thing for
thoae wlm have the welfare of Smith
Vancouver at heart to stanel aside for
the time being and allow the loud
mouthed politician! to finance the
municipality during the coming year.
Pul the responsibility on thein. If
they make good, the municipality will
benefit. If Ihey fail to make good,
the municipality will benefit slill more,
because Iheir own supporters will begin to recognize thai all is not gold
thai   glitters.
are  al-
cnrriip-
othen
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for public meeting!,  dancea,  etc.,  to Let
Apply W. J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
Anderson Market
The Family Butcher at
the Sanitary Shop
Try our mild cured Hami and
Bacons, machine sliced.
The place to get your Cooked
Hams and Jelly Tongue.
Don't forget we carry the finest
New Zealand Butter and Local
Eggs.
FOR A SQUARE DEAL AND
QUALITY, TRY
J. E. ANDERSON
Prop.
Tel. Fair 1634
4192 MAIN STREET
EVERY TIME
YOU MAKE
PURCHASES
From these FIRMS
Y
OU WILL BE SATISFIED
DEALER   IN
HAY,   GRAIN   and   FEED
POULTRY SUPPLIES
W. T. HALL
(Successor   to   Donaldson   ft    McDonald)
4285 MAIN STREET
Phone   Fairmont   1514
Terms   Cash
0
RDER Your MEATS
From   The   Family   Butcher
at  the  Sanitary  Shop  today.
Telephone  Fairmont   1634
Anderson's Market
J.  E.  Anderson,  Prop.
4192  MAIN STREET
SHOULD   PATRONIZE
THE CITIZENS
UThat helps protect your home in
war time and not force them out
of buEincss by buying from the
alien.
HONEST PRICES. HONEST WEIGHT
At
Main St. Fish Market
4131 MAIN STREET
S
INGER SEWING
MACHINE
South   Vancouver   Branch
Machines    Rented,    Exchanged    and    Repaired
Needles,   Oils   and   All   Parts
Agent   lor   "CANADA'S   PRIDE"   Malleable
Range,   $1.00   down   and   $1.00   per   week
4095 MAIN STREET, Cor. 25th Ave.
Phone   Fairmont   1548 A.   F.   McDonald
A
TELEPHONE Fair. 720 for
NGUS
PLUMBING   ::   HEATING
ELECTRICAL REPAIRS
A SPECIALTY
No  order too large or too small for
prompt service
V
ERY BEST OF
TAILORING
UP TO  DATE
J. & H. FERGUSON
The  Main Street  Ladies' and Gent.'s
Tailors
3834 MAIN STREET (Nr. 23rd Ave.)
Phone Fairmont 2489
E
XPRESSING
and HAULING
B. R. GRAY
42   TWENTY-FIFTH   AVE.   EAST
Furniture, Piano Movfng and Express Work.
Work promptly attended to and our prices
are   right. Phone:    FAIRMONT   801
[RS. ARMOUR
Ml
Doctor of Electricity
25     years'     experience     Removing
Diseases   and   their   Causes
SPECIAL    TREATMENTS. MASSAGE
Appointments  can  be  made  for   Treatment  in
your own home.
Terms   on   Application
Residence:    3837    MAIN    STREET
(Cor.  22nd  Avenue  West)
0
NLY     THE     BEST     OF
MATERIAL      USED      IN
REPAIRING YOUR
BOOTS AND   SHOES
AT  MY  STORE.
JOHN STEPHEN
3324  MAIN  STREET
Satisfaction Guaranteed.   Prices Right
N
ONE BETTER I     TRY
LIBBY'S GROCERY
6404 MAIN ST. (Cor. 50th)
For FIRST CLASS PROVISIONS
FLOUR AND FEED, Etc.
Give us a trial and be convinced of
quality and quantity. All Orders
promptly delivered. Try our special
Ceylon Tea. Leave your address and
have our solicitor call for your order.
E
VERY Man should patronize
Antiseptic Cleaning
and Pressing Co.
Manager - F.   W.   RIGBY
2900   MAIN   ST.   (Cor.   13th   Ave.)
Guaranteed Best Work only
Reduced Prices. Goods called for and delivered
PHONE   FAIRMONT   812
Open   8   a.m.   to   7   p.m.       Saturday   9   p.m.
'OUR   CHRISTMAS
PURCHASES
Y
M OF   CANDIES,   TOYS,    FRUITS
��� AND GROCERIES should be made
at my Store.
Buy a Box of Chocolates for a Xmas Present
CIGARS A SPECIALTY
Santa  Claus  arrived  at my store on  the  16th
of  November  and   I   have  everything
needed   for   Xmas
Mrs. A. Crossland
4520  MAIN  STREET EIGHT
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK���CHRISTMAS NUMBER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER  19, 19U
frxnuY
ji>Wnu> ��Y Btrtli. \
At    niONIS-HT
that you are so far removed from the
war zone. You are morr comfortable
on that account. You miss some oi
the horrors brought home to us, but
you miss some of the 'thrills.' It has
been quite a common occurrence here
to see spies arrested; many have been
able to prove their innocence, but
guilty ones have been found in places
least suspected. London's hatred of
Germans has its tragic side. One line
young fellow was forced to leave his
berth, he was unfit for the army���and
"arriuing.
his mangled body was found on thc
railway the other day. Poor Fritz���
Teuton though he was all whe> knew
him loved him���and lhat is part of the
tragedy of this war���Englishmen, I
know, with German wives feel the situation  bitterly.
London is full of Belgians. The
refugees were a most pathetic sight
on their arrival; shoeless, ragged.
Jamished they looked like poor hunted
animals, but they soon show the grit
which is a national characteristic and
to  me  the  destruction  of a  beautiful
little   home   by   bombs,   and   when   1
^    0��
England before the Bomnardment of
Scarborough
Letter and Drawings by Mr. Noel Bursill. former South Vancouver Man
Mr. Noel Bursill, se.n oi lit. J-
Francis Bursill, of Ceellingwcod Kast,
is now in London and has sent freem
"thc heart of the Empire" an interesting letter and some characteristic
sketches. There are many old Londoners in South Vancouver, many
who have visited beautiful Antwerp
who will be interested in this letter.
It may be mentioned incidentally that
there are many excellent examplics of
Mr. Noel Bursill's art work in the
Collingwood Library,
Noel Bursill writes :
"You   good  people  of  South   Vancouver   may   congratulate   yourselves Y/W/%/!"<���'("'"'���/>,    /  (i
3elgle\r\
Neuri Ucnrior
pelgian laptrj.
0*7   ffy   R-W.
came to compare notes I found the
home so pathetically spoken of was
in an artistic spot I had visited in
beautiful Louvain. I have made a little sketch illustrating the story so
graphically told me by a poor Belgian
girl, who was a beauty but is now horribly mutilated and disfigured. The
world has heard what politicians have
had tei say abemt this horrible war���
you should hear what is said by the
artists of London who, year after year,
made beautiful Belgium a sketching
ground, and there sought inspiration.
There are many artists lighting for
the old Hag. and their patriotism is
made white hot hy the outraging of
their  artistic instincts.
"With horror I have heard from the
Belgian refugees of the destruction of
many beautiful buildings���buildings
which  sei struck  me when  1  went  te)
Shades of Nelson
Ostend and Antwerp, that I forthwith
got some of their charm into my
sketch book. Beautiful Antwerp
cathedral looked like a piece of lace
as I saw it from the Scheldt and when
1 got out at the quay I found myself
transported to medacval times. Now
many of the grand old places are a
mass of ruins. Britain will see that
Belgium is avenged. She can never
bc compensated. Wc should fear the
same fate for London weere it not for
��� mr tlect. 1 send an old cartoon from
"Punch" worth reproducing. As the
shade of Nelson is made to say Our
ships have changed but thc spirit of
our men is the same as ever!   Yet!
"England     never     did���and     never
shall  lie at  thc  proud  feet  of a con-1
querer."     '
View
ir\ Jloador��
disdaining 'charity' when they can
earn money they are eager for any
job offered them. The 'Standard'
newspaper is now partly a Belgian
paper���there are now Belgians enough
here to make a public for it���1 have
sketched a Belgian "belle." as she
must have been at home, selling papers
in i leet Street. 1 have talked with
many Belgian refugees about the horrors they have gone through���horrors
utterly indescribable and almost past
belief���but thc evidence is too conclusive for doubt.    One girl described
The   Hustlers   of   Mountain
Methodist   Church  arc   giving
cert   in   die   church   next   Thursday
evening. December  17th.
Mr. M. Hamilton, ()f  163 39th
West,  paid Seattle a  visit  last  w<
He found as hard times on the U.S.A.
side as Vancouver  can boast off.
Kyeijh
eek. 1
G. BUSH
Begs to inform the inhabitants of
this locality that hc is opening a
first-class
Meat  Market
at
4553 Main Street
(Between 28th and 29th Ave.)
On    SATURDAY,    DECEMBER
5, with a first-class stock of Meats,
Butter, Hams, Bacon, Eggs, etc.,
at prices to suit the times.
Don't   forget   thc   Address:
4553 MAIN STREET
(Late Street's)
THE HOME OF
For the pasl twenty-one years this beer has been  without  a  peer in all  of  Western  Canada.
When ordering your Xmas Beer, order a ease of Cascade Beer. It contains a little more than
3 per cent, alcohol, and is practically, a strictly Temperance Brew, that no one could object to.
Cascade Beer, is a pure, wholesome and refreshing beverage, proved to be a great aid to digestion,
which goes well with the Christmas Dinner.
Cascade Beer, one of B.C.'s greatest industries.
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES,  LIMITED
CLUBB & STEWART LIMITED
Ready to Execute Your
Christmas Order
See Our List and Note Our Special Christmas Prices
Gifts for Men, Women and Children
Men's Dressing Gowns; regular
from $7.50 to $25.00; sale price
20 Per Cent. Off.
Men's House Coats���A large as
sortment at 20 Per Cent. Off.
Men's Knitted Vests���A special
line; regular price ��3.75 to $5.50;
sale price  $3.25
Men's Sweater Coats; regular $4
to $4.75; to clear $2.95
Men's Sweater Coats���A special
line; regular $5.50 to $6.75; to
clear    $3.65
Men's Evening Dress and Tuxedo Suits���20 Per Cent. Off.
Men's Gold and Ivory Handled
Umbrellas.
Ladies' Umbrellas in gold, ivory
and pearl handles.
Gentlemen's and Ladies' Fitted
Suit Cases and Fitted Bags���20
Per Cent. Reduction.
Purses, Bill Books, Card Cases,
Cigarette. Cases, and. Military
1'rushes, etc.
Ladies' Handbags, etc., at very
special discount.
Men's Gloves in Dent's, Per-
rin's and Fowne's makes, in fur
lined, also  wool and silk   lined.
Dress (doves in kid, suede and
mocha.
Gentlemen's and Ladies' Fine
Linen Handkerchiefs in plain
and initial.
A Very  Special  Line of  Men's
Silk Hosiery
Regular price $4.00; reduced to,
per pair   , $2.50
Men's Pure Silk Hose; regular
$2.75  to $3.00; reduced  to,  per
pair $2.00
Regular $2.00; reduced to, per
pair  $1.50
BOYS' DEPARTMENT
Boys'  Dressing  Gowns���20 Per
Cent. Reduction.
Boys'  Suits and   Overcoats���20
Per Cent. Reduction.
Boys' Mufflers, Suspenders, Kid
('doves, Handkerchiefs in great
variety.
Children's Knitted Suits
Teddy Bear, nice, warm, woolly
suits, for boys or girls.
Knitted   Suits,   with   caps   and
mitts to match; just thc thing to
make the children happy.
The same reductions in Men's Suits and Overcoats as advertised before the Christmas Sale, still prevail.
CLUBB & STEWART LIMITED
309 to 315 Hastings Street West
309 to 315 Hastings Street West
VOTERS' LEAGUE
Committee Meeting
���KALENBERG HALL
MONDAY NIGHT, 21st DECEMBER 1914
Business :    Endorsement of candidates.   All committee members are requested to be present.
James Horton, Pres. J. C. Tommasson, Sec.
MILK
How Satisfactory it is to tht Housekeeper to be sure that
the MILK, CREAM and BUTTERMILK she receives is
Pasteurized and Germless.
Delivered in Sealed Bottle*, Perfectly Sterilized.
BEACONSFIELD HYGIENIC DAIRY
905 Twenty-fourth Avenue East
Phone Fairmont 2391 L PRICE ft GRE EN,  Proprietors SATURDAY,  DECEMBER  19,  1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK���CHRISTMAS  NUMBER
X1XE
Turkeys
Turkeys
Turkeys
MAIN MEAT
MARKET
Cor. 25th Avenue and Main St.
Phone Fairmont 1543
TURKEYS  GIVEN
AWAY
Largest and best selection in South Vancouver
Come in and get a Free Draw Ticket
Take a Look at our Show Windows
The War
HAS HAD NO EFFECT
ON OUR PRICES WHICH ARE LOWER
THAN EVER THIS
XMAS
We take ibis opportunity of wishing our
numerous customers and friends
A Merry Xmas and a Happy Xew Year
J. WALDEN
GROCER
25th Ave. and Main St.
.Mr. Dc Crucliy of 112 41st Ave,
has arrived home from the General
Hospital last Saturday, where, lie hail
Undergone  a   very  serious  operation.
His many friends are pleased lee loieew
he is speedily recovering.
Paving of Main Street Credit
To Whole of British Columbia
Mr. Bennett, Municipal Engineer, Gives a Short Resume of the
Work Done, Which Makes Main Street " Vancouver's Best"
On  Christmas  day  the  services
St.  John's  Church  will he:
I Inly Communion at 8 a.m.
Morning   Prayers   and   Holy   Cm
muninn at  11  a.m.
Special music  will be rendered.
Made in British Columbia, of Bri
t���-ti Columbia cement, and British
Columbia nr. treated with British Columbia creosote, manufactured in a
British Columbia factory by British
Columbia capital, laid by Uriiish C'il-
umlei.i workmen, paid ie.r by British
Columbia cash anel dedicated to thc
use of Hritish Columbiana today and
their children I i comi ���such is tin-
Main Street pavement, twe, miles ol
which have heen completed in the
Municipality of Semth Vancouver,
This i- the largest permanent paving w.irk ever undertaken in British
Columbia.
Two hundred and fifty men were
employed een the work for forty-two
weeks.
Alter deep consideration, it was decided by a majority of the Municipal
Council that it was certainly more
business like to proceed with the paving of Main Street, than to spend
further money in litigation with a
very  doubtful  chance  of  winning out.
In May when Ex-Councillor Gold
was campaigning for Reeve, he then
admitted tbat he had withdrawn his
opposition to the Main Street contract, and was prepared te, how to
the judgment of the other councillors.
Since the weerk has proceeded and
flic rateppjyers have been able to
judge for themselves em the work of
the Dominion Creosoting Company.
Their pavement is pronounced as one
of the finest pieces of workmanship
in  Western   Canada.
Tlie contract specifies a 4-inch crc-
.'Seeled wood block pavement on a
6-inch concrete, with all necessary
curbs, surface drainage manholes and
catch basins. The pavement is Ruar-
anteed by the Company leer 15 years,
that is for this stated time the company are bound tee keep the roadway in good condition for this term
ni years; but on comparing the class
of work and the lifetime of such pavements in either cities, llie quality of
the Main Street work is equal at least
to a lifetime eef twenty-live to forty
years.
After the surface drainage had been
laid, the ground was well rolled and
tamped and a good foundation prepared. 'I'lie greatest difficulty was met
with in the third section, from 34th
.to 451h Avenue, passing through
what is generally accepted as an old
beaver pond, swamp or  muskeg.
Various trial lieeles were put down
in this section anil it was found that
at a depth oi from five to ten feet.
hard pan was met with.
It was absolutely useless thinking
of putting a concrete bed on such a
mass of soft earth, consequently the
wdnele of this bog earth had to be dug
out. To carry out this w.irk, two steam
shovels and forty teams were kept
working steady for several weeks, ou
one occasion the steam shovel ventured too far, and it was with the
greatest difficulty that the giant navvy was extricated.
After the ^.>li<l foundation was obtained, concrete was pe mred "il to a
depth of six inches, the greater pe.r-
tiem 'if which li.is been uneler the supervision eef Inspector Woods, an old
timer both of 'lie   city and of concrete.
After the- concrete was set. a cushion, kneewn as "three-to-one mix" was
placed, and on this thc creosoted
wood blocks  were laid.
'flu- roadway has been built by
what is known as "lath construction."
This leaves ,i space of one-quarter of
an inch which is idled up with hot
gravel, and. while lhe gravel is hot.
a preparation of bitumen, at a temperature of 300 degrees Fahrenheit
is poured over the surface. Afler this
mixture has percolated into the joints,
a further squeegee coat is poured over
the blocks t" fill up the intersticies
Next a thin coating of fine gravel is
thrown over the surface and in a short
time the streel can be opened lor
traffic.
Xot only has Main Street been
paved, but all side streets have been
graded t'i meet Main Street. Buildings have been raised, bulkheads pul
in, sidewalks laid also. Hydrants
have been placed at each intersection, each hydrant is supplied with a
valve, s.' that in case of repair tlie
water ean be -lint off without interfering with the ordinary supply.
Water services have been put in
f..r each vacant lot. anticipating a
bo. .ni in business at an early date
along the whole length ol" Main Street.
The  w-eeod blocks manufactured  for
Main   Street,   during   the   wh.de   pro-
i grc*-   of   the   w.irk.  have   been   care-
I fully inapecte.;. and the tabulate.; r.-
sults will -how that tlie specil
standard has been properlj maintained. Tin- block- have been sawn
from well selected l"g^ ol K'-'-el sue
and in many cases of large dimensions, the whole being i i icci llenl
< 1 u a I i t >-. A quantity were lawn from
material that was cul for tii- for the
Indian  Government.
Treatment
The record attached "ill show exactly the treatment cae-li batch re-
.(Heel, the- time under treatment, the
"C" contents "f charge, the amount
"f e.il absorbed anil the temperature
ami  pressure  maintained,
The cubic capacity of the charges
varies but little, and as the cages are
packed by experienced packers, and
arc similar in sjzei the contents may
be calculated as a "Constant  Factor."
Thc tank ganginga have been kepi
for each batch under observation, anel
by ihis method a correct account of
thc quantity of e.il absorbed has been
obtained, per cubic foot of charge.
Any other method by extraction e,r
weighing can naturally emly he of an
approximate   nature.
Penetration
Willi respect to penetration of oil,
thc adopted Standard can only be re-
garded as an average one ou account
of the wide difference in the density
of its tir. It will be found, however,
on examination of the exhibits, that
individual blocks directly after treatment, showing an average penetration of from 1 inch to 1! _��� inches.
have in a period of sixty flays shown
a thorough penetration and often a
saturated block. Samples from bulk
deliveries  on  the  work   freem  start   to
��� finish taken regularly have- been tabulated, and these bear out the correctness of these remarks and prove
the fallacy of presuming that a block
delivered directly alter treatment,
showing a penetration of even less
than 1 inch, is of necessity a poor
block.
Oil
The  creosote oil used  was  obtained
i 'from various sources, chiefly from
I.England, Taeoma, Seattle, and  some
, from tlle Vancouver Gas C'e. In
all cases, samples have been taken
anil show a S.G. ranging from 1.035
to 1.05. at a temperature of 60 degrees
Fahrenheit, and were particularly free
freim ammoniacal water and no de-
posit was formed when kept at a
temperature eef 60 degrees Fahrenheit
feer four hours. The temperature of
,eil in the retorts was kept at 185 degrees Fahrenheit for 14 hours, treated after 12 Iveiirs and a pressure of 25
libs, maintained during the whole per-
' iod.
Summary
1.���The   fir   used   is   without   doubt
| of the best quality.
2.���The   method   of   treatment,   the
quality and quantity of ����� i 1  used, the
I time under treatment, ami the temperature anil pressure maintained,
have produced a finished product in
every way complying with the specification   of   the   municipality.
SLOAN,     THE     MAIN     STREET
GROCER.  EXTENDS   XMAS
GREETINGS
British  Columbia's  Leading
Marble and Granite Works
ARE LOCATED IN SOUTH VANCOUVER
Patronize Patterson & Chandler and help build up a
local payroll
Works at Main Street and Sixteenth Avenue
Monuments and Cemetery Work of every description
PATTERSON & CHANDLER
Marble and Granite Works
SIXTEENTH AVE. AND MAIN STREET
Phone Fairmont 810
Fraser Ave. and Fortieth Ave. Phone Fraser 10
Stumping Powder, Dynamite, etc.
Promptly delivered
LAND   CLEARING   CONTRACTORS   SPECIALLY   CATERED
FOR
General   Merchandise
GROCERIES HARDWARE DRY GOODS
FLOUR, SUGAR  and  FEED at  wholesale prices
WINNOTT  STORE
AND POST OFFICE
MUNRO & ARNETT, Proprietors
46th Avenue and  Main Street
South Vancouver Phones Fraser 100 and 122
My Work is Equal
To the best in the  City.    With my 20 years' experience  in
watch repairing, I can guarantee all my work.   Prices moderate
R. W. E. PRESTON   ::   3244 Main Street
For live years Mr. John Sloan has
successfully conducted a grocery business "li Main Sun t. Hi- I" Si nt
store near Twenty-ninth Avcmi is
one fi iln- largest am! mosl m- dern-
|y i quipped ii' South Vane -mir anil
is the headquarters for tin- supplying
nf fresh anil rclia'ile- groceries.
Mr. SI.ean stated i - thi CH1NI tOK
that Christmas business ;iii- year was
quite as encouraging a- in former
years anel he looked forward i" 1915
with optimism ami confidence. Since
Mr. Sloan opened his lir<t place on
Main Street, he has observed main
lii-iecers come ami go. His reputation
for h. mosty ami v. ' business principles havi. however, entrenched him
in thc confidence of tlu- peopli "i
South  Vancuuver.
"Progress ami Purity" is the watchword Mr. Shian employs aheeiii the
shop. He is a firm belie ver in South
Vancouver ami is t>-" busy t'i hear ..r
take- pari in tin- sorl of ��"-sip oftimes
hr-arel upon the slreel corners which
has feer its subject bine ruin ami bankruptcy.
Mr. Sloan stated that hc wished t"
avail himself oi the columns "i the
CHINOOK tn wish his many patrons
One of the best Grocers
on Main Street
My st"ck i- new ami very complete, am!  with
pi ici - low are! quality high.
Be sure ami call  in. Don't pass nu-  by.
Elliott's Grocery
3273 Main Street, South Vancouver
Our Motto:
Courtesy,
.   :    Attention
and
Prompl   Delivery
If   you   can't   call
Phcne   Fair.   832
and   the
generally
ople  "t   South   Vancouver
very  Merry  Christmas.
MAIN   MEAT  MARKET
Thc Main Meat Market is thc .illicit established Meat Market in South
Vancouver.
Mr. Chris. Plater, the proprietor, has
been resident here and lias been in
business in the same location now inr
live year-, lie carries emly local meat
and i- deserving of thc support fi
yourself and friends as hy strict attention tei quality nn.it lie has worked up a thriving business.
The Girls' Guild recently organized
in St. John's Church held their first
business meeting on Monday evening.
Amongst other things, planning for
a concert, te- take place in January,
formed a feature of iln- evening.
Following are the officers of the
Guild recently appointed: Hon���president, Mrs. I'. H Clarke; president,
Mis- Constance Draper; vice-president, Mi-s I-'.. Bowman; secretary,
Mis> A. llalpin; treasurer. Miss D.
Bowman; Dorcas-secretary, Miss Ida
Bennett.
MACHINES R8NT8D
EXCHANGED AND REPAIRED
NEEDI.ES, Olt.S
ANIi A I.I, PARTS
Singer Sewing Machine
SOUTH  VANCOUVER  BRANCH
ACKN'T FOR "CANADA'S PRIDE" MALLEABLE RANGE
$1.00 DOWN  AND $1.00 PKR WEEK
4095 MAIN STREET (Cor. 25th Avenue)
a. v. Mcdonald ��� phone pairmont 154s
PHONE   FAIRMONT  720
JAMES ANGUS
Plumbing and Heating
JOBBING A SPECIALTY
36 TWENTY-FIFTH AVE. (Near Main)
GROCERIES
A. ROBERTS
4806  MAIN  STREET
M
CD
p h o x j:
FAIRMONT
5 88
Y Goods aa- not the lowest priced but
they arc tin.- hot em the market, therefore bint>- the cheapest. Goods delivered to
any pari.
Full line of all standard makes of (groceries, including Swift's Premier Hams and
Bacons, Nabob and Malkin's best Coffees,
Teas and Spices. Fruits in season. Candies,
Tobaccos, Chicken Feed, in fact everything
an up-to-date Grocery should carry.
PHONE FAIRMONT 2302
The Main St. Auto Co.
REPAIRS AND
ACCESSORIES
MOTOR  CYCLES  AND  BICYCLES
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
4425 Main Street :: Vancouver
MADE     IN      CANADA
T
H
E
O
X
F
O
R
D
We sell it at a very moderate price and guarantee
its operation
HEATERS
ALL KINDS
$2.00 AND UP
SLOAN BROS.
29th Avenue and Main Street
 I TEN
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK���CHRISTMAS  NUMBER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER  19,  1914
PANTAGES
Unequal! cd
E.
Panttf*
Viudcvlllc       Mtim
Viude��nl��
D.  Graham,  Resident  Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
ALL NEXT WEEK
The Greatest Girl Act of the Season
Eleven American
Whirlwind Beauties
In a Spectacular Singing  Revue with
Acrobatic Dancing
Three   shows   daily   2.45.   7.20.   9.13
Admission���Matinees,     15c;     nights,
15c and 25c; boxes, 50c.
Mr.   Fred.
Mansel,   Labor  Candidate
for Ward 3
I
CHINOOK
JOB  DEPARTMENT
New Phone Number
Fairmont 684
Business and Editorial
FAIRMONT 1874
THEATRICAL
Empress Theatre
There is geiing to be ��� l"t e,f g.md
hearty laugh* ;it the Empress Theatre
next week, where the Lawrence Stock
Company   "ill   present   Philip   li.'irth-
olomae'i funniest farce, "Over Night"
This delicioui fininiaker was the
talk nf N'ew Veerk feir I lull seasem
last year, anil mi lenir it was hailed
everywhere as the cleverest piece of
humorous play writing eif recent years.
Its action takes place em a lluels'en
Kiver   steamer   ami   at   a   picturesque
inn em the shore of the Hudson.
Two  young  couples  start  on  their
honeymoon, but one of the huibandi
anil one of the wives���the either fellow's througii a strange combination
eef circumstances ��� miss the boat,
while the other groom and bride find
themselves in the predicament of being together on the boat while tln-ir
respective  partners  arc  left  behind.
After a hilarious series of incidents
on the boat, the mismateil couple decide to go ashore at the first steep and
try tei locate the stragglers. Tliey do
so and after all efforts to locate the
Others prove vain tliey are compelled
to spend the night at the inn. They
go to their respective rooms hut later
in the night the others arrive at tlu
same place.
Then follows a combination eif circumstances that keep tin- audience
continuously convulsed until they are
finally straightened out at the end of
the last act.
"One Night" also requires very
elaborate stage settings, the scene on
the steamboat and the interior of the
inn being novel and beautiful. As a
laugh producer, pure and simple, it
will provide an ideal Christmas bill
and should induce packed houses for
the entire week of its run.
LOCAL NOTES
PROBABLE CANDIDATE
IN WARD ONE
Many Members of Famous "Committee of Fifty" are Endorsing New
Man for Council from Collingwood
In Collingwood, where municipal
elections are always hotly contested
a new man looms on the horizon of
civic politics in the person of Mr. C.
Stanley, Sixty-seventh Avenue. a
large ratepayer who is at present engaged  in  chicken  ranching.
Mr. Stanley, years ago, was chief of
the Rossland lire department. He has
always devoted great attention to
municipal affairs and his friends believe that in him they have a strong
candidate.
Mr. William Barclay, who ran last
year for the council it Ward One,
called at the CHINOOK office this
week. Mr. Barclay stated that Mr.
Stanley was the man for the job and
if Mr. Stanley refused to run, Mr.
Barclay declared that he himself
would  take the field.
Home-made Christmas Gifts
Be patriotic and select your Christinas gifts from lhat which will
increase Vancouver's payroll. What gives more Christmas cheer than
cut flowers, choice flowering plants in pots and baskets, palms, aspi-
destras, etc? All artistically placed in the house. A gift to he long
remembered would lie a selection from evergreen shrubbery, holly,
shadetrees and rose bushes for garden beautifying.
Ph
one in ye
>ur orders
ROYAL NURSERIES LIMITED
Nurseries and Greenhouses at Royal :
Phone Eburne 43
STORE: 2410 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone Bayview 1926
Mr. Stanley has lived feir years in
tlie City of Vancouver. Last year
property owner* iu tlie city who are
interested In tlle welfare of tlle Collingwood district urged him to run
for the Seeuth Vancouver Council. At
that time he decided that he did not
think that his services were needed in
the municipality. After watching the
situation very closely for one year,
Mr. Stanley has come to the ceniclus-
i.en that il should he his duty to take
a hand in affairs and with that end in
view   In-   is   ce lining   forward.     Many
members of the famous "Committee
nf Fifty" wlm supported Councilleir
Wilhers two years ago as ,-it.aiiist
Spencer Robinson, are in favor of Mr.
Stanley's candidature.
Mr. Stanley is a practical engineer
by profession. It has been rumored
abQUt Collingwoeid that he lias Inlet
an interest in the Dominion Creosoting Company, lie states emphatically that such is not the case, lie- has
hail n i connection whatsoever with
tiie Creosoting concern and believes
that his name has been confused with
that of another.
WARD EIGHT LIBERALS
HOLD RALLY
Messrs. Martin and Smith are given
Good   Reception   in   "301"
Mr. Ralph Smith, in an address t'i a
Liberal meeting held in Ash's Hall,
Thursday night, said that thc "better
terms" secured from the Dominion
government, and eif which Mr. II. II.
Watson, M.P.I'., boasted at a Conservative meeting in Kerrisdale, simply
provided for the transfer of federal
rights in various resources to the Mc-
Bride government with the opportunity of dispensing more patronage lo its
friends. Mr. Smith expressed the opinion that the rights of the people
were in safer hands when the Dominion government controlled them
than when the McBride machine had
this privilege.
Mr. Smith declared further that the
present situation of maladministration was as much the fault of the
people as the goverinment, for tbe
people elected the McBride government, gave it full control, and failed
to provide opposition. However, said
Mr. Smith, when the proper time
comes, the Liberals will be elected and
nothing can now stop their rapid progress.
He attacked the purchase of the Indian reserves by the government, and
asked whether it was right for Hon.
Mr. Bowser to accept a commission
of $80,000 or that Messrs. Helmcken
and Matson should share a commission of $125,000 between them.
Mr. Joseph Martin spoke on Imperialism. Hc did not hold in high
regard the proposition of an imperial
parliament, claiming that such a parliament would jeopardise thc. rights
of the self-governing colonies and that
it would be a most unfortunate thing
if such a  parliament was established..
Mr. M. H. Mclntyre, president of
the Ward 8 Liberal Association, presided in a happy manner. Hc and
Mr. Fred Ogle addressed the meeting.
Mr. Kelly rendered a couple of songs.
Mrs .(Rev.) Davidson is llowly recovering from a serious illness. Her
many friends sincerely hope she will
speedily  recover   her   usual   health.
* * *
We, the ratepayers e.f S'eiilh Vancouver, and particularly Main Street
vicinity, wish lo extend to the firm
of the Creosote Paving Company our
sincercst appreciation ioi the efficient
manner in which they have completed
their contract.    Main  Street  certainly
is a credit to Vancouver now.
�� �� ��
The Municipal Council has settled a claim which has been before
the council each year since 1��11 in
connection with the grading of l-'raser
street, in front of property owned by
the late James McGer.
The council on tiie motion eef Councillors Thomas and Twiddy agreed to
pay the sum of $3000 to the executrix
of the estate of tlle late James McGeer in full settlement "f all claims
arising out e,f the change made in the
grade of l-'raser Streel. and in lieu of
all prior arrangements made between
James McGeer and the council; also
in full settlement for a seven-foot
strip to be conveyed to the municipality fen- widening Fraser Strict, it
being a condition of the agreement
that the sum of at least $2'>,KI he naid
by the estate on account of arrears oi
taxes due tee the municipality. Councillor Millar objected to the settlement.
Municipal  Engineer  Bennett
South Vancouver
The young men of the "Hustlers"
Bible class are giving a concert in the
Mountainview Methodist Church on
Thursday evening, December 17, at
8 o'clock. The programme is furnished by several artists of local talent
and a dialogue entitled "A Troublesome Investment" by the class, the
proceeds go towards the "Hustlers"
part of the building fund. The boys
arc sparing no trouble in preparing
this concert and it is worth the sup-
.port of the South Vancouver public.
The municipal solicitor has been
instructed to prepare a sewer bylaw
for approximately $300,000 on a rental
basis.
BE   PATRIOTIC   and   Patronise   Local   Industry
ORDERS TAKEN FOR
XMAS TOYS, HANDSLEIGHS, ROCKING HORSES,
WHEELBARROWS, etc., etc., etc.
ALL KINDS OF WOODWORKING DONE TO ORDER AT LOW PRICES
A. COURT & COMPANY, Cor. 23rd and Fraser
The Municipal Cenincil has instructed the clerk to request the B.C.
Electric Railway Company lo run
every second Davie Street car south of
Twenty-fifth Avenue, Main Street, in
accordance with the agreement with
thc council, instead of every third car
as  at  present.
* 1e   *
At a joint meeting of organizations
interested in relief work, held at the
Municipal Hall, it was resolved to establish an information bureau to prevent overlapping. Health Inspector
Pleming will have charge of the bureau and will compile information as
to the families receiving relief in
South Vancouver from the several organizations.
* * *
Relief Officers Pleming and Ec-
cleston reported to the relief committee this morning that there are
now some 600 names enrolled of men
in South Vancouver in need of employment. For thc two weeks ended
December 15, about 140 men were
employed for three days each in the
various wards, while eleven men had
been constantly employed on Twenty-
fifth Avenue and thirty-six men for irregular periods on the waterworks.
Grocery orders had been issued during the two weeks to thc amount of
$41.60 to thirteen families, with three
exceptions these orders have been or
will be repaid by work. Four cart
loads of wood had been delivered
where most needed and many permits
to cut wood had been given.
"We have encouraged the co-operation of the various charitable organizations towards meeting the conditions prevailing," the relief officers report, "and there is a distinct desire
that some central officer be authorized to receive and give information."
* * *
A most enjoyable concert was given
at Sexsmith School this week hy the
scholars of the Main Street Sunday
school, corner of Sixty-second Avenue. The programme consisted of
dialogues, recitations and choruses,
rendered in a manner reflecting much
credit on Mr. Warran, the musical
director.       Addresses   wee   delivered
NUT COAL, $6=��� r."
LUMP COAL, $7A��
This is NOT cheap American Koal but the Famous JINGLE POT
COAST LUMBER & FUEL CO., LIMITED
Phone Highland 226
Phone Fairmont 2500
Phone Fraser 41
Hastings
and
Gore Ave.
EMPRESS
Lawrence & Sandusky, Lessees
MA TINEES WEDNESDA Y and SA TURD A Y
Phone
Sey. 3907
Week commencing Monday Evening, December 21, 1914
THE LAWRENCE       j ��� . MISS   MAUDE
STOCK COMPANY '        j LEONE
In BARTHOLOMAE'S funniest farce
OVER NIGHT
One long, lingering laugh
Prices  25c  50c
Matinees 25c any seat
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
Do not fail to see our "MUTUAL GIRL"
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23 and 24
We have  arranged a special  Programme for  Christmas  Matinee
and Evening Only.
ENTIRE CHANGE OF PICTURES FOR SATURDAY
DREAMLAND
H.  H.   D��AN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
All that is New and Up-to-date
MATINEE   SATURDAY AT 2 p.m.
Cedar  Cottage   Theatre
"THE HOUSE THAT PLEASES"
20th Avenue and Commercial Street
SATURDAY MATINEE. 2 to 5
We show the best, cleanest, and most up to date pictures with a
complete change daily.
COME AND SEE
AMOS YOUNG
Proprietor
EDUCATION
PARENTS SHOULD HAVE THEIR
DAUGHTERS
ATTEND THE
Burrard School for Girls
850 BURRARD STREET
Miss B. H. CARTMILL, Principal.
FOR TERMS, Telephone  Seymour  1847, or ^all in person.
by   Rev.   Mr.   Freeman,   Reeve   Kerr,
Councillor Millar and others.
* * #
The Ladies' Aid Society of Westminster Presbyterian Church, South
Vancouver, will have a sale of handkerchiefs and home baking on the afternoon and evening of Thursday,
December 17, in the basement of the
church.
* * *
The annual meeting of the Central
Park Agricultural Association was
held at the hall on Friday, December
11.
New officers elected were: Capt.
Fisher, president: Thos. Anderson,
vice-president; W. Kirkham, secretary-treasurer. The following directors were appointed. Messrs. Walker,
Sinclair, Shaw, Coulter, Ross, Nimo,
Harbottle, Somerville, Prentice, Win-
ste.nlcy. Wishart, Thurstan. Reed.
Holland and Mrs. Kirkham. W. W.
Burke and T. A. Prentice were reappointed auditors. Mrs. Kirkham is
the first lady director of the organization.
One  cent  per  Fowl,  per  Week
Poultry  Keepers
will got best results from constant
Osc of
"B&B"
Poultry Spice
And   EGG   PROBUCfiS
A Hen tonic, Pick-me-up and
Drop-em-down
Once Tried Always Used I
Guaranteed   to  produce  results,   if
fed   according   to   directions   (in
every sack)
3 lb. sack, 45c.    6"4 lb. sack, 90c.
100 lb. sack, $12.00
Manufactured in Vancouver.    Sold
Everywhere p
SATl'RDAY, DECEMBER  19,  1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK���CHRISTMAS  NUMBER
ELEVEN
A Residence
Telephone
Makes a nice CHRISTMAS PRESENT. Until
January 1st, 1915, at all Exchangee, we will
install Telephones
RESIDENCE or
BUSINESS
Upon payment of $5.00 rental
in advance
For Particulars Call Seymour 6070
Contract Department
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH   TICKETS  ISSUED
FROM  VANCOUVER  TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA  AND
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^1    JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
w
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass. Agent, Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
H. 0. Smith, C. P. &T. A.
Phone:   Sey. C134
C. E. Jenney, G. A. P. D.
527  Granville  Street
E.onomy consists of spending  money so
that you will have more to spend
MORAL   Eat at the PENDER CAFE
727 Pender St. West
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandy gets awa back thinkin' on his  auld  Sunday  Schule  Days���An'
incidentally o' Dicky an' Wullie
��.
thi
ihat
\\ ,-e 1  freens, ��� e're gettin'
( liel     e,'      ej;,        .,,-,,      ;[M;|jn a||
year it h;es lee - n.
Hogmanay in another twa  weeks���
it'll tai mony "V\ ee di nch an'
doi is"*"  tae mak ui  forgi t  the terri-
bli   timi    '.���. e Iii c in    ne this  yeai   ���
1914.
Me.n\ i 'II remembi i   19H
Kan  pittin'  iije  "scraper* ���>i   c eursc,
�� i' ither folk's me ni y
\  ce itnpany  wud !������   fom
lawyer's   clerks   wud
ioi iashun,
conn r lot unel lie- acquire d.
aril   ' asy.      \   mortg
���
iln  bildin'  ���> ud   i idmir-
Vai
Tlle'   IllOl I
|     istraai
- niuk.s think   nai^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^,^^^
bad ristmas trees wi   used | makin  ns pro��perou��-*BUT, *e fit*
,     in  cunneckshun   �� i'  th
Sundaj   Schul
t in return.
ihi
Mornin'   Sei
Mi I
THE MARSTON SHOWCASE CO.
JOINERS AND CABINET MAKERS
3764   COMMERCIAL  STREET
Phone Fairmont 989 P.O. Box 574, Cedar Cottage
(J Where do we South Vancouver People
EA T when we are Down Town ?
THE    PENDER    CAFE    Pender St. West
Can *, no' min' o' the opi nin1
hymn   wi'   which   the    tuperii ti ndent
llle-   trelil.
Herald \ngel Sing"���
eh nn.ii' it wit graund���wud -.veil
��1 ��� frae a hunm i nr twa lust). young
vie i - an' he i nti miasm pit intae thc
singin' made ns feel better bairn
et e ii though ��!��� micht indulge in a
garni ��� ���' fitba <������.,' a tin can on thi road
hame an' (ecnisti ii|> ni' pittin' it
through lome puir auld wife's windae,
I'e  ll'  e      ��� ���! 1    fill'. ', 1.    g 1    Will     tieUlilll.
all men," Can we im' min o' the
long crimson streamer wi' the ab.w
inscripshun woven e.n it iu pure
white?
Can we- no1 min 'e' the' "surree" Imu
an'  ��� anxiousness as tae its contents Generally speakin', we young-
sti i - mai e or less size el up the merits
ll'     eeeet      rC-pCCtivc     Stltnlly      SchuleS     b>
the l>ikr'ie's^ .,' the famous bug.
In passin', I've often thocht that
wis sort ..' bred in ui bairns���hoo
often is it no' the case men an' wee-
nun e,' the.' community are jidged by
iln' size o' their money bags,
Christmai l'Jl-1���It'i a long, long
time sin I wis at a Christmas tree,
but methinks we were nearer "Peace
nu  Earth" then than we are the noo,
Winn u fellie lifts the paper al
nicht an' nails o1 the daens o' the
lodgers at the front e.r the navy on
the high seas���one often lias tin u-k
himsel ii it really can be true.
Men who were followin' iheir usual employment���or lookin' for it���
a few months ago are now marchin'
an' dreetin* an' learnin1 he>e, tae shemt
an' hoo tae use the bayonet, see that
,t?hey micht be able tae elae Iheir'
"eltity" when they meet the enemy I
Christmas l'M4���an' the ministers
.���' releegin are drawin' doon bigger
an' fatter salaries than tliey ever did.
Whal :i mockery o' "Peace on Karth.
(', Iwill towards all men."
An' ine think that His holiness, the
Pope, In his position as heid ee' u
powerful Christian church, ihould ad-
veee'ati- u cessashun ee' hostilities ilnr-
in'  Chcistmastide.
Weel. we'll. I elinna eeitell siele wi'
Andry Carnegy, but I maun say that
for yince I wis heartily in sympathy
wi' bis denunciashun o' the unchristian  like  idea.
While i   herts  ��;ti'   oot   tae   oor
kinsmen wine are fechtin' sue bravely
ill tlle cause 61 < >, >r freedom, nor
wishes for their success are saicond
eeiiK tac the ��isli that the "like o't
we'll never see again.'
*    *    ef
Tae Come nearer hame. I'm jist
thinkin' the year 1914 '11 be remembered in Vancoover for years an'
years tae come.
I wis readin' u speech the Attorney-
General delivered the ither nicht it
which In' referred tae the fact that
his opponents, the liberals, had brok
en the truce thai had been in forct
in rcgaird tae maitters political, an'
had commenced tae criticise HTM!
The fact ee' the mother land bein'
at war, he thocht, wis sufficient reas.
mi for u cessashun o' a' pairty talk.
I've yet tn. learn that Kitchener e>r
Asnuith 'ir Llvod George or Jellicoe
wiul he leriouslv embarrassed bv eeny
criticism the folk ee' British Columby
micht level at the the heids ���>' that
couple ei' fifth-rate lawyers that
''euiile'" (cheese iii the destinies o'
this province o' Canady. Raither
wml it be the ither wey aboot, T wis
thinkin'. I've nne doobt if Miere were
ony German spies in H.C. afon the
war. an' thev saw the1 wiv things
were managed here ��� couhl they be
blamed i"r wiriti' hame that the Briti-h Empire, frae what they seen o't,
wis  gaun  tae the dugs.
Why. if this place had been pro
perly managed���shame though it is
tae sav it���the war wud hae been a
blessiii'. frae thc pint n' view.o' general   commercial  prosperity.
A' the same, why should we criticize they twa fellies that are .-o bowed
down wi' their cares n' nffieJe. The
fact ee' the maitter is. they're rnare tae
be poelicd than blamed ��� though
they're a darned sicht wi ersje than
they're   ca'd.
Durin' their term o' office file pen--
nle o' British Cnluniby hae been busy-
in cairrvin' eeut the brigamtisTi' precept: "Dn itliers. or they'll dn VOU."
The province, as Dicky wild say.
"wis passin' through an era of extraordinary commercial TI expansion,''
and their huge naitural resources were
the magnet which drew the wealth
frae  the  auld  cotirttry  financiers.
"Easy come, easv go." is an auld
sayin'. an' while the bawbees were
cumin' in. we were a' prosperous an
the demand for fat ceegaurs an' dia-
ni.mil rings an' motor caurs grew tae
gieantic proporshuns,
Sf eres doon  the  city  that  used  tae
li ie peanut staunds were gutted oot
an' furnished wi' mahogany counters
an' swell leather chairs.
l'ani'v pamflels were printed in colors as lttriil as the letterpress, tellin'
hoo they were anxious tae mak yae
share in the general prosperity that
had   struck   the   pr.evince.
Tn a short time, the whole popttla-
shuii. frae the highest tac the lowest,
were in a state1 o' feverish excitement,
bttvin' an' sellin' an' sellin' an' btiyin'.
a' imbued wi' the ielea o' gettin' rich
quick���but wi' somebody else's money.
As "bizness" progressed, mare office
room wis required, an'  then  they bc-
Goodyear Shoe Repairing Co.
625 PENDER STREET, VANCOUVER
Geo. H. Morris, Prop.
ious Hate li a'most scem-
��� li.  were
���endin'   n-   iln    money   ���
patl >��� for bein' an' tae'
com 'le' n- I ������.' hai n sic
rtilin' ui
I       time  this   wis  gaun   on   Dicky
an' Wiilliv wen hu-    haul
���i.i"   .    .'   -       countr)   lide
Tain. Dick 'T Harry that  had ���' ���   gall
tae come an' ask ieer it. an' ��li
lit  intae a  pairt  o' the machine thai
: - a' iae prospi rous.
We.!, in I'��14 the bubble burst an'
it wml seem as if it wis gaun tae
le-iiie a in sty -mil! efter it.
'Tm think we should criticise Ihey
twa fellies owre in Victoria the timi
the Empire is at war. It's scandalous.
I wudna criticise them. I wud penalize   them,   an1   send   them   tae   keep
company ��i' - e o' the "prosperity"
thei hae ""t at the new cemetery lite,
where honest workin' nnn arc compelled, in this country where "there
are no poorhouies," to wnrk  fur their
bed an' board
W liy thc paupers at hame were
princes compared tae the lot "' they
men who are bein' swindled ""1 "'
their life by a pair o' politicians that
hinna even an elementary knowledge
o' government.
It's a  funny thing--!  sat doon  taeI
write resolved tae refrain  frae makin'
eeny menshun <���' they twa characters,
but ye i it wud be a funny Christmai |
if   I didna gie them ma respecks.
Oh   what   a   merry   Christmas   we I
could hae if the' bogle man happened,
lae tak Dicky all   W'u'ly awa an' hand
them  for ransom.
\ Merry Christmas an' a Guid Xew
Year tae yae a', freens. i- the wish ee'
SANDY   MACPHERSON.
WE  DO WORK  CHEAP, BUT  NOT  CHEAP  WORK
High-grade  Shoe  Repairing done by modern methods.    Our  Bicycle
Messengers call for and deliver goods
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
MEMBERS VANCOUVER STOCK EXCHANGE
MEMBERS VANCOUVER GRAIN EXCHANGE
MEMBERS OF CALGARY OIL EXCHANGE
COLLINGWOOD NOTES
Christmas services of exceotional
interest wiii bc held ill !<..��� >s Presbyterian Church, Collingwood, "ii Sunday. December 27th. The choir will ,
give Handel's Oratorio of The Mi--
siah and Rev. 'Win. Menzies will
preach a Christmas sermon. Th*
evening service will -tart at 7 instead I
,d 7.30 o'clock.
it  St  it
A large attendance is expected (
Monday, December 21st. al the lecture' tee be given in Knox Church by
Mr. I. S. McKay, a Klondike "sourdough," een "The Story of the Edmonton 'Trail." There' is ine charge fori
admission, A collection will be taken.
te     *     *'
Several   enterprising   boys   of   K.tst
Collingwood, whu have built a "coaster,"    have  been  praying    for snow.
Their  prayer-  seemed  in  a   fair  way
tee  be   answered   on   Monday     night.
'Vhi-n  I Hei  Sol appeared  so brilliantly
���l  tfie  heavens on   .uesdav  morning
heir faith  suffered.    Bob sleds made
ly  thei*  uwn  handiwork  in  the  sash
ind door factory were' found and sup-l
������'irte'il o plank sixteen feet in length. |
\heitit twenty boys waited eagerly fori
mow.   'The enterprise was headed by
Masters   Shantz,   England   and   Eng-J
land.
DEALERS IN ALL ACTIVE CALGARY STOCKS, BONDS, ETC.
OIL STOCKS
BOUGHT   AND   SOLD
Stock Department, Seymour 69 J 3
EXCHANGE BUILDING,  142 HASTINGS WEST
Hughes Bros' Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET   EAST, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone : Seymour .330
We carry everything in Wines, Liquors and Cigars
No order too small, and none too large  for this popular Liquor Store
Store open every evening until 11 p.m.
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
Leaving our Store every Thursday and Friday morning at 9 a.m.
Price List mailed free on application
At Kitsilano Presbyterian Presby-'
terian Church Local Editor Up-I
holds   Woodrow   Wilson
At   Kitsilano   Presbyterian   Church
last  week  an  interesting  debate  was
held  when   the  question   of  the-  fldvis-
btlity erf--MtA'iiT.n  IntBtTCtltlon  By   ���"''
United States was she- subject of dis-j
e'tissiiin.     Messrs,   Tree   and   Gill  ar���j
gueel  in   favor  of intervention,  while]
Messrs.   Suttieii   and   Johnson   placed
themselves   upun   record   as    against
such   a   policv.
Excellent points were made by lhe
debater) onAboth sides, and it was
emly afler'mijoh consideration that
the judge, Mr. O. M. Murray, editor
of the OH1KQQK, awarded- theide-l
eisiou to the lever's of peace and Sup��� 1
porters, of thc .plan oi "watchful
waiting."
Mr.   R.   H.   Ce.elk.  president  of  thc I
Yeiung   People's   Literary   and   Deb
ting Society, presided;
GLADSTONE    HOTEL
FIRST CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS
R. CURRY, Prop.
WATER NOTICE
(DIVERSION   AND   USE)
TAKIC NOTICE' that F."J. Lancaster, whose
address is 259 30th Avenue East, Vancouver,
B. C.'-will apply for a licence to take and
use 1500 gallons per hour of water out of
An n ore Creek, which flows southeast and
southwest, ami drains into Lake Buntzcn
about the southeast corner of the lake. The
water will he diverted from the stream at a
point about 225 feet south and cast of the
northwest corner' post of Lot 16 and will be
used for domestic and irrigation purposes upon
the land described as Lot No. 16, Plan of
Subdivision of Parts of Sec, ions 16. 20 and
21, Township 39. This notice was posted o:i
tbe ground on thc 11th day of November,
1914. A copy of this notice and an application pursuant thereto and to the "Water
Act, 1914," will be filed In the office of the
Water Recorder at New Court House, Vancouver, R. C. Objections to the application
may be filed with the said Water Recorder
or with the Comptroller of Water Rights,
Parliament Ruildings. Victoria, R. C, within
thirty days after the first appearance of this
notice in a local newspaper. The date of the
first publication of this notice is November
14th,   1914.
V, J. LANCASTER. Applicant.
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
1941 ALBERT ST. TELEPHONE   HIGH.   ISt
ENGINEERS, MACHINISTS  AND   FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS  AND  SPECIALS
REPAIRS OP ALL DESCRIPTION
JOINT SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
Incorporated
1908
A Joint Savings Account may be opened at the Bank of Vancouver
in the names of two or more persons. In these accounts cither party
may sign cheques or deposit money. For the different members of
a family or a firm a joint account is often a great convenience. Interest paid on balances.
THE
BANK OF VANCOUVER
WILLOW HOSPITAL
Miss HALL and Miss WESTLEY, graduate nurses
CORNER OF
BROADWAY and WILLOW
Patients Received from $15.00 Per Week
Phone  Fairmont  2165
/ TWELVE
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK���CHRISTMAS NUMBER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER  19,  1914
I"
;'
i|i
I
$     A (&tmt ��tw     %
(Ceintintieel  from  page 2l
Christinas live, when you'd think
we'd ill iort nf draw together instead
i���:' setting apart, in cliquei. Land.' 1
igyi out, 'that first Christmas Eve
wouldn't the angels have Stopped
sr'ging and wept in the sky if they
cottld of seen   what  we'd  do  to it!'
"'Hush, Calliope,' lay I Jerry Bc-
mu��, sheecked. 'They ain't nee need to
be-  sacrilegiems.  is  they-'
""Not a bit,' layl I; 'we've been it
Se. long a'ready worshiping around in
tectioni like Hotentota. Well, aow,'
1 says, 'do you honestly think we've
all chose the best way to go at Christinas Eve for the Children, filling them
up with colored stuff and getting
their stiimmicks all  upset?'
"We had quite a little talk about
it. back and forth, Jerry and me. And
all of a sudden, while I was trying my
best to make him see what I saw, I
happened tee neetice his bugle again.
" 'There ain't no thrill in none of
it.' 1 was saying to him. 'Not half
se, much.' I says, 'as there is in your
bugle. When I hear that go floating
up and down the street. I always kind
of feel like it was announcing something. To my notion,' I says, 'it
Could announce Christmas to this
teewn far better than forty-'leven little separate trimmed-up trees. . . .
Why, Jerry,' I says out sudden, 'listen tn what  I've thought of.    .    .   .'
"A little something had come in my
head that minute, unexpected, that
fitted itself inte) the rest of my plan.
And it made Jerry say, pretty soon,
that he was willing to go with me to
see the other superintendents; and wc
d'eiic so that very day. Ain't it funny
lieew big things work out by homely
means���by homely means? Sole because the choir-leader in one choir
had resigned because the bass in that
choir was the bass in that choir, and
so they elidn't have anybody there to
train their Christmas music, and sole
because another congregation was
hard up and was having to borrow its
Christmas celebration money out of
the foreign missionary fund���we got
'em to see sense. And then the other
two joined in.
"The scheeiils was all right from the
lirst, bein' built, like they are. on a
basis of belonging to everybody, same
as breathing and one-twee either public utilities, and nothing dividing anybody freem anybody. And I begun to
feel like life and the world was just
one great bud, hinging tie open, so be
it  could  get   enough  care.
"The worst ones to get weaned
away from a perfectly selfish way of
observing Christ's birthday was the
private families. Land, land, I kept
saying to myself them days, we all of
us  act  like  we  was  studying  kinder
garten mathematics. We count up
them that'-, closest tn us. and we
can't none of us seem tee count much
above  ten.
"Not all of 'em was that way,
tlteeugh. Well���if it just happens that
you live in any town whatever in the
civilized w.erld. I think you'll know
about  what   I  had said to nie.
"On the other hand it went abeiut
like this, from Mis' Timothy Teiplady
and the Holcombi and the lltibbleth-
waits and a lot meire.
"'Well, land kneews, it'd save us hits
of backaching work���but ��� will the
children like it?'
"'Like it?' 1 says. 'Try 'em. Trust
em witlnmt tryin' 'em if yeiu want tee
I would. Remember.' 1 couldn't help
adding, 'you like to be with the children a whole lot nflener than they
like to be with yem. What they like
is tee be together.'
"And 'Well, do you honestly think
it'll work- I don't see how it can���
anything sei differ'ut.'
"And. 'Well, they ain't any harm
trying it one year, as I can see. That
can't break up the holidays, as I know
of.'
"Hut the (ether side had figured it
out just like tlle other side of everything always figures.
"'Calliope,' says Mis' Postmaster
Sykes, 'are you crazy-headed? What's
your idea? Ain't tiling alright the
way  they've always  be  done?'
" 'Well,' says I, conservative, 'not
all eif 'em. Not wholesale, I wouldn't
say.'
" 'But you can't go changing things
like this,' she t"ld me. 'What'll be-
ceeme of Christmas?'
''Christinas,' 1 says, 'don't need you
mr me, Mis' Sykes. to be its guardians.
All Christmas needs is for us to get
out of its way. and leave it to express
what it means.'
"'But the home Christmas,' she
says, 'most like a wail. 'Would you
do away wilh  that?'
"Then I sort turned on her. I
couldn't  help  it.
''Whose home?' I says stern. 'If
it's your home you mean, or any of
the thousand) of others like it where
Christmas is kept, then you know, and
they all know, that nothing on earth
can take away the Christmas feeling
and the Christmas joy as long as you
want it tei be there. But if it's the
homes yeiu mean���and there's thousands of 'em���where no Christmas ever
conies, you surely ain't arguing to
keep them the way they've been kent.'
"But she continued to shake her
head.
" 'You can do as you like of course,'
she said, 'and so can everybody else.
It's   their  privilege.     But  as   for  me,
I -hall trim my little tree here by our
own fireside. And here we shall celebrate Christmas���Jeddie and N'>ra
and father and me.'
" 'Why can't you do both-' I says.
1 wouldn't have you give up your fireside end of things for anything on
earth.    Bul  why can't yotl do both?'
Mis' Sykes didn't rightly seem to
know���at least she didn't say. But
she gave nie to understand that her
mind run right along in tiie self-same
groove  it  had  had  made  for  it,  cozy.
"Somehow, the hmger 1 live, the
less sense I seem to have. There's
some things I've learned from twenty-
five to thirty times in my life, and yet
I can't seem to remember them no
more than 1 can remember whether
it's sulphite or sulphate of soda that
I lake for my quinsy. And one of
these is about taking things casual.
"That night, feir Instance, when I
come round the corner em to Daphne
Street at half-past seven ou Christmas Eve, 1 thought 1 was going lo
have to waste a minute or two standing just where the bill-board makes a
shadow for the arc-light, trying to get
used to the idea eif what we was doing���used to it in my throat. But
there wasnt' much time to spend that
way, being there was things to do between then an eight o'clock, when
we'd told 'em all to bc there. So I
ran along and tried not to think a-
bout it���except the work part. 'Most
always, the work part of anythiug'il
steady you.
"The great cedar-of-Lebanon-leeok.
ing tree, standing down there on tlle
edge of the Market Square and looking as if it had been left from some
long-ago forest, em purpose, had been
hung round with lines and lines of
strung pop-corn ��� the kind that no
Christmai tree weiuld be a Christmas
tree without, because so many, many
folks has set up stringing it nights
��� if Christmas week, after the children
was in bed, and has kept it, careful, in
a beex, so's it'd do for next year. We
had all that from the churches���Methodist and Presbyterian and Episcopal
and Baptist and Catholic pop-corn,
and you couldn't tell 'em apart at all
when you got 'em on a tree. The fes-
teeons showed ghostly-white in the
elark and the folks showed ghostly-
black, hurrying back and forth doing
the last things.
"And the folks was coming���you
could hear 'em all along Daphne
Street, tripping on the bad place that
hadn't been mended because it was
right under the arc-light, and coming
over the hollow-SOtinding place by
Graham's drug store and coming from
from the little side streets down on
the flats. Some of 'em had Christmas trees waiting at home,���the load
had been there on the Market Square,
just like we had let it be there for
years without seeing that the Market
Square had any other Christmas uses
���and a good many had bought trees.
But a good many meere had decided
not to have any���only just to hang up
stockings;   and   to  let   the  great  big.
common Christmas tree stand for
what it stood for, gathering most of
that little garland of Daphne Street
trees up into its living heart
"Over by the band-stand I ceeme on
them I'd been looking for ��� Eddie
N'cwhaven and Arthur Mills and Lily
Deirron and Sarah and Mullie anel the
Cartwrights and Lifty and six-eight
more.
"'Hello, folks,' I says. 'What you
down here for? Why ain't you hemic?'
"They   answered  all   together:
" 'For the big tree!'
"Are you now-' I says���just to
keep on a-talking tei 'em. Whose
tree?'
"I love to remember lhe way they
answered. It was Eddie New haven
that said it.
"'Why, all of us's!' he said.
"All of us's! I like to say it over
when Ihey get lo saying 'mine' and
'theirs' too hard where I am.
"When it was eight o'clock and
there was enough gathered on the
Square, they done tlle thing that W8I
goin to be done, only nobody had
known lieew well they was going to do
it. They touched the button, and from
the bottom branch tei the tip-top little
cone, the big old tree come alight just
like it knew what it was all about and
like it had come out of the ground
long ago for this reason���only we'd
never known. Two hundred'little elc-
tric lights there was there, colored,
and paid feir private, though I done
my town to get the town to pay for
'em, like it ought to for its own tree;
but Ihey was paid for private���yet.
"It made a little oh! come in the
creiwd and run around] it was so big
and beautiful, standing there against
the stars like it knew well enough
that it was one of 'em, whether we
knew it or not. And coming up a-
cross the flats, big and gold and low,
was the moon, most full, like it belonged, too.
" 'And glory shone around,' I says
to myself���and 1 stood there feeling
the glory, outside and in. Not my little celebration, and your little celebration, and their little celebration,
private, that was costing each of us
more than it ought to���but our celebration, paying attention to the message that Christ paid attention to.
"I was so full of it that I didn't half
see Ben Cory and his carolers come
racing out of the dark. They was all
fixed up in funny pointed hoods and
in cloaks and carrying long staves
with everybody's barn-yard lanterns
tied on the end of 'em, and they run
out in a line down to the tree, and
they took hold of hands and danced
around it, singing te> their voices top
a funny old tune, one of them tunes
that, whether you've ever heard it
before or not. kind of makes things
in you that's older than you are yourself wake up and remember, real
plain.
"And Jerry Bemus shouted out at
'em: 'Sing it again���sing it again!'
and pounded his wooden leg with bis
cane.    'Sing  it  again.   I   teli   you.     I
ain't heard anybody sirfg that fiir goin'
on forty years.' And everybody iaug-
hed, and they sung it again for him,
and some more songs that had come
out of the old country that a little
bit of it was living inside everybody
that was there. And while they was
singing, it come tei me al! of a sudden
about another night, 'most three hundred years before when em American
soil that lonesome English heart, up
there in Boston, had dreamed ahead
to a time when Christinas weiuhl come
here . . .
But faith unrolls the future scrolls;
Christmas shall not die.
Nor men of English blood and speech
Eorget   their   ancestry���
or any other blood, or any other
speech that has iu it the spirit of what
Christ come to teach. And that's all
of 'em. And it felt to mc as if now
we was only just beginning to take
out our little single, lonely tapers and
carry them to light a great tree.
"Then, just after the carols had
died down, the thing happened that
we'd planned t'e happen: Over on one
side the choirs of all the churches,
that I guess had never sung together
in their lives before, though they'd
been singing steadily about the selfsame things since they was born
choirs, began  to sing���
Silent night, holy night.
"Think of it, deiwn there on the
Market Square that had never had
anything sung em it before except
carnival tunes and circus tunes. All
up and down Daphne Street it must of
sounded, only there was hardly anybody far off to hear it, the most of
'em being right there with all of us.
They sung it without anybody playing
it for 'em and they sung it from first
to last.
"And then they slipped into another
song that ain't a Christmas carol exactly, nor nol any semg that conies in
the book under 'Christmas,' but something that comes in just as natural
as if it was another name feir what
Christmas was���'Nearer my find, lo
thee,' and 'Lead, kindly Light,' and
some more. And after a bar nr two
of the lirst one, the voices all around
begun kind of mumbling and humming and carrying lhe tunes along in
their throats without anybody in particular starting 'em there, and then
they all just naturally burst oul and
sung too.
"And so 1 deinno who done it���
whether the choirs had planned it that
way, or whether they just thought of
it ten. or whether somebody in the
crowd struck it up unbeknownst to
himself, or wdiether the song begun
tei sing itself; but it come from somewhere, strong and clear and real���a
song that the children has been learn
ing in school and has been teaching
the town for a year or two now. sung
to the tune of 'Wacht am Rhein':���
The crest and crowning of all good���
Life's   common   goal���is  brotherhood.
"And then everybody sung. Because that's a piece yeeu can't sing
aleme. You can neet sing it aleme. All
over the Market Square they took it
up, and folks that couldn't sing, and
me that can't sing a note except when
there's nobody around fliat would recognize mc if they ever saw nie a-
gain���we all sung together, there in
the dark, with the tree in e,ur midst.
"And we seemed long and long a-
way freun the time when the leader
in one of them singing choirs had left
the other choir because the bass iu
the other choir was the bass in the
other choir. And it was like tlle Wav
Things Are had suddenly spoke for
a minute, there in them singing ch'eirs
('emu- eiut uf their separate lofts ami
in all tiie singing folks. And in all
of us���all of us.
"Then up hopped Eppleby Holcomb
em tee a box in front of the Iree, anil
he calls nut:
"'Merry Christmas I Merry Christmas���on the firsl annual outdoor
Christmas-tree celebration of Friendship  Village!'
"When he said that I felt���well, it
don'l make any difference tei anybody
how I felt; but what I (bene was to
turn and make for the edge of tin-
crowd just as fast as I could. And
just then there come what Eppleby's
words was the signal feir. And .,in
nil the litjle flagstaff balcony of the
Town Hall Jerry Bemus stepped with
his bugle, and he sounded all over the
town, once, twice, three times, a bugle-
call tei say it was Christmas. W'e
couldn't wait till twelve o'clock���we
are all iu bed long before that time-
in friendship Village, holiday or not.
"I'.ut the bugle-call said it was
Christmas just the same. Think of
it . . . the bugle that sounded used
to sav it was war. And the same minute the big tree went out. all still ami
quiet, but to be lit again next year
ami lie stay a living thing in between
"When I stepped on to Daphne
Sireet. who should I come fare t'i
face with but Mis' Postmaster Sykes.
I was feeling so glorified over, that I
never thought of its being strange-
that she was there, lint she spoke
up. Jtlsf the same as if I'd said" 'Win.
I thought you wasn't  coming near.''
'The children was bound tei conn-,'
she says, 'so  I  had  to bring 'em.'
"'Yes.' 1 thought tn myself, 'the
children know.    They know.'
"And I even couldn't feel bad when
I passed the post-office store and see
Silas sitting in there all sole alone���
the only lit store in the street. I
knew he'd be em thc Market Square-
the next  year.
"They went singing all through the
streets that night, Ben Ceiry and his
carolers. 'Silent night, holy nighl'
come from my front gate when I was
'must asleep. It was like the whole-
town was being sung to by something
that didn't show. And when the time
comes that this something speaks
clear all the time���well, it ain't a very
far-off  time,  vou kneiw."
Who Exposed
the Graft ?
THE B.C. INDEPENDENT
UNDERTAKERS LIMITED
(Formerly Sill & Miller)
652-654 BROADWAY WEST   ::   Phone Fairmont 738
The same Phone Number, FAIRMONT 738,
that has for the past SEVENTEEN MONTHS
saved so many heart-broken relatives THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS wil! connect you with
the above firm, which POSITIVELY GUARANTEES prompt and courteous treatment at ONE
HALF the expense charged by the COMBINE.
INVESTIGATE AND BE CONVINCED.
Modern Chapel and all our first-class services
ABSOLUTELY FREE. Automobile equipment
in connection.
Mill: Foot of Ontario Street, Fraser River
Phone: Fraser 97
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
CANADIAN CEDAR
LUMBER CO.
Manufacturers of
BEVEL SIDING, BOAT LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
Wholesale and Retail
GRIMMETT P.  O., SOUTH VANCOUVER
P. M. HAMILTON F. WILLIS
BX. Independent Undertakers Ltd.
652-654 Broadway West
������ -
Phone Fairmont 738
Keeler��s Nursery
Grower sad Importer of Plants, Bulbs, Roots and Shrubs
Cut Flowers and Design
Work a specialty.
Flowering and Ornamental Shrubs for Spring and
Fall  planting.
One  hundred varieties  of
Roses  of  Choice  Sorts
and  three hundred varieties  of  Dahlias.
Phone Fairmont 817
YOU WILL FIND OUR PRICES MODERATE
Cor. FIFTEENTH AVE. and MAIN ST :: MOUNT PLEASANT
Hi
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can  supply  your  needs  at  right
pricei.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right at Station)
FOR GOOD
ROAD BUILDING MATERIAL
We claim we have the best.
The largest Plant and a downstream haul.
G1LLEY BROS., Limited
Dealers in
Coal, Cement, Plaster, etc.
NEW WESTMINSTER
Phone 15-16
THBO. J. HUTTON, L.A.B., L. Mus. McGill
Principal
SESSION 1914-15
British
Columbia
Conservatory
of Music
591 HOWE ST.
(Cor. Dunsmuir)
VANCOUVER
Tuition is provided in the following subjects:
PIANO VIOLIN or SINGING ELOCUTION
ORGAN VIOLA HARMONY STAGE
Band Instruments���Teacher, Mr. E. W. Hunt, City Bandmaster.
Guitar, Mandolin, etc.���Teacher, Prof. G. H. Ozburn, late of Toronto
College of Music.
Pupils trained for all examinations.   Highest successes have been gained
by students in previous years.
SUCCESS
Awaits those who are prepared to accept their business opportunity
when it presents itself.    Hundreds of
OPPORTUNITIES
Will present themselves in the great revival of business following the
war. If you are wise, you will get your training now and be ready
for your opportunity. ~~~
Our Winter Term Opens Monday, Jan. 4
See us about it NOW.     The Information ceists you in.thing.
Success Business College
Limited
E. Scott Eaton,  B.A., Principal
CORNER TENTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
Fairmont 2075 VANCOUVER, B.C.
CENTER & HANNA
LIMITED
Established 1893
Refined Service    New Location
1049 GEORGIA ST.
Opposite new Y. M. C. A.
Fireproof     Columbarium     and
Mausoleum
OPEN  DAY  AND  NIGHT
Seymour 2425
Order now your Wedding Cakes,
Christmas Cakes and Real Scotch
Shortbread, from
A.   BLYTH
Baker and  Confectioner
Cor.  of JOHN  and 28TH  AVE.
Phone Seymour 1946
ENGLISH COLLEGIATE SCHOOL
1150 ROBSON STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Mil* HILDA A. POMEROY, Principal
Certificated at the Board of Education, England.
Trained at Hishop Otter College, Sussex.
Associate of Arts at Oxford University.
Certificated at Trinity College of Music���Piano and Harmony.
English Literature and Science Distinctions at Examination.
SUBJECTS TAUGHT.
ALL ELEMENTARY STUDIES (Preparatory and otherwise).
and
NEEDLEWORK (Plain and Fancy).
DRAWING AND PAINTING (All branches).
MATHEMATICS.    Matriculation Syllabus, London University.
??^Y^D NATURE STUDY.   With Microscopy if desired.
LANGUAGES (By arrangement).
,J,A,lLR?,xPJ<ESS/CU'mNG AND  MAKING  (London Academy).
SWIMMING, PHYSICAL CULTURE, ATHLETICS, ETC
ENGLISH LITERATURE (Poetry and Prose).
Pupils of any age prepared in any of the above subjects   bv arrangement, DAY or EVENING. '
TERMS
Parents are requested to call in person and interview Miss Hilda A.
Pomeroy,  Principal English Collegiate School
30,000 Price Tickets
Signs and Window Notices in stock
Price from 15c. per doz.
Every kind of Sign or Letter made
to order
T. WEST
JANES ROAD P.O. So. Van.
Mr. W. W. Robertson
TEACHER OF VIOLIN
Open for few more pupils
Terms  Moderate
4223   WINDSOR   STREET
South Vancouver   Phone Sey. 4284
CHIMNEY SWEEPING CITY
Phone Seymour 5293 FLAG  POLE8  PAINTED
We have the most up-to-date and
best equipment in Vancouver
409 Dunsmuir Street
I

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