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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Feb 6, 1915

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Array Wp�� CHINOOK
\ Ol.   III.    \'<
.V)
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1915
Price 5 cents
"There Is Enough Truth In It To Be Damnable"
The Retort Classic Was Given the
CHINOOK by Mr. Bowser in the House
On Thursday    ::    Need for Famous B.C.
University Demonstrated Now    r.   Attorney-
General Spends Three Hours Attempting to
Answer Critics
Voters League of South Vancouver I Lively Interest Taken in the
Hold Meeting at Municipal Hall Doings of Municipal Fathers
i Prom tlu1 "Chinook's" special correspondent)
Victoria, B.C., Feb. 4, 1915���The long-looked for day had come at
last. Since October of last year the depositors of that defunct institution, the Dominion Trust, have waited, patiently striving to keep a
brave heart, hoping that all will be well yet, and that the government
would help tn relieve them in their distress,
That they were justified in looking for government assistance was
borne out in the columns of the CHINCH )K of Dei ember 19, 1914, when
in interview the depositors' committee had with the Attorney-General
was repeated in full.
Since then delegations of depositors from Vancouver, Victoria and
Xanainio had waited on the I'rime .Minister and the Attorney-General
when they urged the government to come to tlie assistance of the people
who had been swindled out of their hard-earned money.
Sir Richard McBride told the delegation a reply would be given at
an early date and later it was announced that Mr. Bowser would reply
in detail and This was the Day.
The day that thousands of old and decrepit men and women, yburig
men and we mien with heavy responsibilities would know what: the government intended doing���the day that they have long looked forward
to through their tears and anguish. "Will they have built their hopes
in vain ?"   Wc shall soon see.
Air. llowser came into tiie house at 2.50 and uppermost among his
sheaf of papers bearing on Dominion Trust matters were two copies
of the CHINOOK of dates December 19, and January 30, which reported in full the committee of depositors' interview with the Attorney-
General.
The public galleries were crowded to their fullest capacity when the
Speaker took the chair at five minutes past 3.
The question standing opposite Mr. Parker Williams' name, calling
ior all papers, documents anil correspondence . re Dominion Trust matters to be laid before the House was immediately taken up, and the
question being put Mr. llowser at once rose to his feet. The Attorney-
General plunged into the question and said that from all accounts it
would seem the Liberal party were claiming a monopoly of sympathy
for the poor depositors in that defunct institution.
Lifting a copy of the CHINOOK of December 19, he read the headline of the article which appeared in that issue touching on the interview the depositors' committee had with him and in which appeared
his photograph along with that of the late Mr. Arnold. Then picking up
the issue of January 30, he drew attention to the same article with the
addition that besides the photograph of Arnold and himself he regretted
yj see the picture of Sir Richard McBride. The Victoria "Times."
he went on to say, had copied the article verbatim from the CHINOOK
but to their credit thep had omitted the photographs. The fact of printing the prime ministers' picture a��ong with the article made Mr. llowser exceedingly sorry. "There is enough truth in it to lie damnable."
was the crude way in which the Attorney-General referred to the
CHIXOOK'S story.
Mr. llowser endeavored to make out that the report would do harm
among financial men in the < >1<I Country. There is enough truth in it
to show that until this government of muddlers are turned out tbe
province will remain in a very damnable position,
Mr. llowser at tins stage spoke very heatedly and said it was a distinct attempt to put Arnold and himself in tlie same category as being
the wreckers of the Dominion Trust.
i "I hold my head just as high today as before the Dominion Trust
-caudal," he said, at which the thirty odd little mannikins thumped their
���desks in glee.
Mr. Bowser then plunged into the history of the Dominion Tuist Co.
from the time they obtained their Federal charter which fully substantiated what wc have published in these previous issues.
On the principle of two blacks making a white the A irney - General
then dealt at length witli other Attorney-Generals in Canada who had
made mistakes also, he claimed. "1 was perhaps wrong with my law
in 1913, but why lay all the blame on the Attorney-General. Perhaps we
are all to blame."
The reasons hc gave for the depositors putting their money in thc
Dominion Trust were he said: The esteem in which Mr. Arnold was
held; thc higher rate of interest: thc splendid advertisement the magnificent building gave it: the fact of having such reputable citizens as
directors: and the reputation the company had built up.
The Liberal party are like hungry wolves after a victim, he said, but
he would be content to leave his case to the independent voters in the
province.
Mr. Bowser went into great detail in an attempt to show that the Provincial government had done their very utmost to put the Trust Company chi a proper basis in the province but he never explained how it
conies about that the depositors are in the shameful position of outranking after the shareholders in the assets of the company.
That the government evidently relied on Mr. Bowser to do his best
to make attempt to retrieve the fortunes of the government could be
seen from the fact that even when a member required a glass of water
Resolutions Passed Dealing With Municipal and School Matters
and the Unemployed Problem
Tin' Municipal Hall, Monday nighflcism and a resolution moved by A. II.
last, was filled to capacity ami over! Lewis calling upon tin; council t" dis-
flowing inte, tin- lobby by a meeting pense with iln- Clerk's services was
called for ilie purpe.se nf reorganizing moved ami carried ain! a committee
iln- Smith Vancouver Voters' League] appointed to wait on tin; council.
Mr. James M>,rt..n. president of thei Another delegation vnt appointed
league, temjL tIkj chair and called upofl.to wait on lhe manager 'ef tin- Daily
Councillor Russell, Cedar Cottage, to "Province" tee ask him to retract the
address ilu- meeting. statements  in  his   paper  which   were
Tin- representative from Cellar C')t- alleged iee Ik- false.
tage gave a short resume nf what the      The    chairman    intimated    that the
new council hail done m iln- interest!  notice  ������!   iln-  meeting  hail   been   ra-
eef  economy  ami  efficiency  since  ac- ther  misleading  in  that  it had  men-
ceptillg office, lie refuted lln- state--''""e'l it Was f'er lln- purpose of re-
ments made in ihe "Province" anent organizing the league, lie said the
the C.P.R, springs and saiil it was m^ league was alright in organization any
fair criticism. He made- an attack of more than they could be el.,ing with
:ln- School Be.anl .ever a certain iterh[an augmentation eef membership.
of extraordinary expenditure which [ Another resolution was passed cal-
appeared on their books, stating thatji'pw for a mass meeting of the unem-
uld met give his consent  t'e th
passing of their estimates until that
matter  hail been  cleared up.
School Trustee Hudson, who was a
member .if the audience, made reply
tu Councillor Russell, and a verbal
battle was waged between tlie tun representatives fnr a she.rt time anel
which Ended up with honors about
even.
Councillor Campbell also wenl into
municipal matters and said that he.
since taking his seat in llle ceetincil
chamber, hail been simply staggered
with tiie lack nf efficiency and waste-
in municipal matters. As an ex-School
Trustee, however, he entirely disagreed with Councillor Russell in his
remarks anent that budy. He said
the school board was suffering from
the apathy shown in their work by
tin- ratepayers and a lot of criticism
of that body was founded on ignorance of the true state of affairs. During tile two years he hail been in oWice
he had counted about fifty people who
hail taken the trouble t'e attend
School Hoard meetings. The rate-
leavers slinuld not ge, on mere rumor
lull sheeiild found their criticism on
facts. He explained the item of extraordinary expenditure showing that
though the bylaw fnr the High Schneel
hail been turned down they wcre compelled le. lind accommodation fe.r their
pupils and had obtained the sanction
..f   tiie   governmenl   before   lining   SO.
Touching Upon the reports appearing in the Daily "Province" anent
South Vancouver municipal ailairs,
Councillor Campbell said they were
entirely misleading, giving thc ratepayers an entirely wr.nig impression
of what the council were doing and
wound up bv declaring them a tissue
of falsehoods. He deprecated very
much the wrong reports which were
not in the best interests of the municipality.
Councillor Welsh also spoke along
tbe same lines and was heckled by
eme e,r twei members of the audience
on his attitude re the cut in firemen's
wages. Ile stated he was nol a party
te. that, and he would take his stand
against it when it came before lhe regular   council   meeting.
During the evening Municipal Clerk
Springford   came   in   for   strong   critl-
ployed ne be held immediately at
which the preeblem would be thor-
��� Highly thrashed nut.
Mr. Seyme mr moved that a committee be appointed to wait upon the
Scheiol Board at it- next meeting with
the view nf getting that body to conic
down in their estimates. The motion
was passed and a committee appointed.
Various either speakers took part
in the proceedings and the meeting
adjourned about  eleven o'clock.
Local Notes
The Se.uth Vanceeiiver branch nf the
""���' rian Order of Nurses met at the
home of Mrs.Harvey, River Road;
for the lirst. meeting of the new -ear
on Tuesday afternoon. General busi-
iie-s.- was taken up. A very good attendance was there and after the routine of affairs was dispensed with the
ladies enjoyed a cup ..f tea and delicious refreshments from-their charming   hostess.
Laurier Liberal Club will open the
club rooms at the foot of River Road
and Main Streel with a smoker on
Tuesday night of next week. Several
prominent speakers will attend among
whom are M. A. Macdonald, Ralph
Smith, anil 1'. R. McD. Russell. A
most   welcome  invitation  is  extended
to all.
Tin- Main Street Liberal Club lielel
the regular monthly meeting Thursday night. A humorous debate was
the feature- of the social side of the
nieeling in which Mr. Fred I >gle anil
A. !���'.. Chamberlain took part. "Jitney
Buss vs. I'.. C, Klcctric" was Ibe subject of discussion, Mr. Ogle for and
Mr. Chamberlain against. A vote ol"
the audience
jitney.
School  Board  Came  in   for   Severe  Criticism   and   Deputation
Ask for Dismissal of Clerk Springford
decided  in   favor  of  tin
Mrs.   \V.   II.   Harvey and   children
have lefl for the South. They expect
to spcnel llle balance of the  winter  in
California.
They were all required there to
but  be  saiel  the  time  was
it was brought in by one ol the pag
make the big noise at the proper times.
Some people had advocated prosecution
premature vet and he would nol attempt anything along that line until
after he had received a report from the permanent liquidators.
Air. Bowser's whole defence, summed up, was tbat be. like Others,
had been grossly deceived by the late  Mr. Arnold.
During the critical months just before the collapse he had been
greatly handicapped by the absence of Sir Richard in England ami could
not give the matter the time it warranted.
Mr. Bowser had been speaking for two hours and a quarter in an attempt to justify his actions in connection with the giant fiasco and when
aVlast he came to the point where he was going to declare tlie government's stand and what they intended to do. some of the "faithful" on
the floor of the house were yawning in their seats.
WHAT 'PHI'. GOVERNMENT INTEND TO DO
With regard to their ranking as creditors on the estate, he announced
that the government had appointed Mr. E. I'. Davis, K.C.. to act for tlie
crown and go lo the Privy Council if necessary so that the depositors
would he enabled to rank as ordinary creditors in thc liquidation.
With regard to the bond of $250,000 for the benefit of the creditors
and the payment of which had been disputed hy thc insurance company,
they intended putting a quarter of a million in the estimates this year
and pay it out to the parties it was intended for.
It was one huge political speech from beginning to end in an attempt
to justify the actions of the government over this regrettable and mis-
chevious business. That Mr. Bowser fully realized the importance of
the occasion was evident from thc amount of energy he put into his utterances. He spoke for two and a half hours and what he lacked in
brilliance he made up for in length.
After the Attorney-General sat down Mr. Parker Williams immediately moved the adjournment.
Tin- S.R.O. sign was up outside the
Council chamber, Tuesday afternoon,
when a special meeting of the council
was tn lake place.
The- Reese anel Council have been
at it practically every day since inking iffice, but previous tee this their
meetings havi been in committee ami
iln- censorship had been exercised to a
great extent as to what had transpired behind  the  scenes.
Thc meeting was called i'.r three
o'clock but long bei..re that hour every seat in lhe Council chamber was
occupied and the passages were uncomfortably  crowded.
There hail been a meeting of the
Ve iters' League the previous evening
at which some lively criticism had
been indulged in anent various municipal and school board matters ami
it was with the object of foil..wing
up that criticism anil hearing anything new that the crowd were assembled.
The Reeve called ihe meeting t.. ..r-
der and the lirst item mi the agenda
was the Sell...el Trustees' estimates
for the year.
Reeve Gold in opening ihe discussion said he hoped the Council felt
the ,aim' as he did on the subject, for
if they did. they would unhesitatingly
turn lhe estimates down. The items
coming under extraordinary expenditure, he held, were entirely illegal,
and it was like as if the School Board
were asking absolution for their -ins
.ef the past. He asked Municipal Solicitor Donaghy to state the legal side
of the question as it affected the act
re the Ordinary and Extraordinary
estimates.
Mr. Donaghy informed the council
that so far as the ordinary expenditure was concerned, and which he understood the Council t""k some exception to so'far as some eif the
items coming under maintenance
were concerned, they had no option
in the matter���according te. the law
thev were bound io pa>s it. Hut if
they chose they could turn down the
extraordinary estimates and thus compel tin Scln.nl Board tn come before
them again when they could probably
make terms on the ordinary estimates.
It was a weapon they hehl t" use as
thev saw tit.
Reeve Gold sai.l the extraordinary-
estimates were illegal and lhat he for
one would n..t be- a party to passing
them.
Councillor Campbell took tin- floor
in defence of the items which were
found under extraordinary expenditure. He admitted they were illegal
but stated it was not through any
fault of the Scln.e.i Board of the past
twu years, of which he was a member, that these items were appearing.
He went on to show that il had been
thc result of the mismanagement and
chaos the board had been in eluring
the Spencer Robinson regime- ol
years gone bye and stated that instead of being in the "hole," last
year's council had a surplus on hand
as  hae!  been   shown in  their accounts.
Councillor Streel said '.hat after lis-
! telling tee the Solicitor, In- was ..I the
opinion that they should pass tin account. Tln-y ha.l I" make- a clean
start seeme time, and it would help
tin- presenl board by wiping this sum
,.ut and thereby freeing their hati Is
Councillor Russell was againsl passing tin- estimates an.l stated thai I i
for mn- we.nlel stand pat ami refuse
:,, sanction the estimates.
Councillor Stanley wa- entirely a-
gainst anv reduction in lhe ���caching
staff's salaries. He wanted ihe highest efficiency possible to prevail in
the sell....Is. ami he did met think that
would In brought about ly making
any   cuts  in  teachers'  wages.
Reeve Gold pointed out that Spencer Robinson would sneen be a free
man ami if they should pass these extraordinary estimates, they might tie
their hands in any action thc Council
mighl  deem necessary  to take.
Councillor Campbell in reply said
he thought in would not be in the best
interest- of South Vancouver should
any action along that line bc taken;
it would be better, he thought, to let
that  matter   drop.
After seime discussion, it was decided, on the motion of Messrs. Campbell and Stanley, that the extraordinary estimates be turneil down. This
would give the School Board an opportunity to appear before them a-
gain. when they would perhaps be
able to arrive at some compromise.
A deputation from the Voters'
League meeting of the previous night
were then given a hearing.
Mr. Lewis was the first spokesman
and introduced a resolution, the wording of which was as follows: "We
humbly request the Council to dispense with the services of Mr. Springford. the municipal clerk." Mr. Lewis,
speaking to the resolution, made a
series of charges against the clerk,
tlle main ones being, inefficiency and
lack of legal training.    He also cited
a cast wherein he had given wrong
advice '.-. Mr. Gold during his term
as councillor in the previous year. He
alsn referred to an instance in which
the Clerk ha.l advised the past year's
Council to purchase a certain piece
of land for municipal purposes, he
then knowing there was no money to
pay for it, but "they would scratch it
ii). somehow." Again the clerk had
wrongfully stated the water works
to be a revenue-producing undertaking when  that   was not tlle case.
Mr. Seymour cited a few cases of
inefficiency and stated that what he
had heard frmn Councillor Russell
the previous night was sufficient iu
in- opinion to make the Council take
action���quick action. If you as a
Council do nm take steps to discharge
him, wc as ratepayers will take action
against   you.   was   the   way   he   put  it.
Councillor Russell laid a direct
charge against Clerk Springford in
that he had charged the cost of new-
tires, gasoline ami other things in
connection with his private automobile against the council, This caused
quite a sensation,
Councillor Street at this moment
rose to point out that in justice to
Mr. Springford. it ought to be stated
that some arrangement had .-existed
betw en the Clerk and the previous
year's Council with regard to the use
of the car. Mr. Springford had been
requested to put his machine at the
disposal of the Council when not in
use, and the ceist of upkeep had been
a quid pro quo. lie had not known
Mr. Springford up till a few weeks
ago, and it was only fair to state
what he did know.
Councillor Stanley rising said lie
stated at his election meetings that so
far as he was concerned, politics
would not enter int.. the discharge of
his duties as a member of the Council. Efficiency would he the only thing
that would work with him. and whether an official had worked for or a-
gainst him at election time would not
be taken into consideration if he possessed real merit.
Councillors Welsh and Allen spoke
along somewhat similar lines, asking
the ratepayers who had facts to submit to do so ami they would be very
pleased to go inte-. them and deal with
them.
Reeve Gold asked the deputation
if they wished the Council to take
instant action without holding any investigation. Cries of "Yes" and "Xo"
greeted  his   query.
It was tiie feeling of the Council
that no steps be taken until after an
investigation had been held, when Mr.
Springford would have an opportunity
of being present and defending himself.
It was decided that Monday fir-t
at two o'clock the Council would meet
to go i'lto this matter.
Councillor Campbell then reese lo
bring before the attention of the
Reeve ami Council articles which hail
been appearing in the Daily "Province." which he said were entirely
misleading and were a bundle i i falsehoods from start to finish. lie felt
very keenly on the subject ami said
the paper should I e severely condemned for its unwarranted attacks
mi the present Reeve- anl Council.
While criticism was alright and was
a good thing, he thought iu thi- iu-
stance tin liberty of the pres- hail
been grossly exceeded. These reports,
he contended, would el.- a great a-
mount  fi harm  to ihe municipality.
Tin- minutes of '.he committee meetings of January 29 and 3ii were then
read. Items appearing therein bearing
on tin- dismissal of Dr. Murphy, Miss
Dench, Messrs ('.. R. Bell, J. Rutledge, A. C. Hunter, C. II. Lardlcs. .1.
X. M.uai and YV Robson led t" some
discussion. Councillor Rowlings said
In- understood ihat only officials who
cnuld be done without would be dis-
missed. Councillor Welsh said he
took it ihat officials discharged wouhl
bc able to make application for tin
posts. Reev Gold said so far as applying again was concerned, he was
not in favor. Councillor Campbell admitted that thc storekeeper would
have to be replaced. On a vote being
taken there voted iu favor of tlle re-
solutiem: Councillors Campbell Russell am! Welsh: against, Councillors
Rowlings, Stanley. Street and Allen.
The motion was thus lost.
Thc Reeve asked the Municipal
Solicitor how the law stood on the
question of voting. The Solicitor said
the Council was composed of eight
members, including the Reeve. The
Reeve had a vote but no casting vote.
The officers and members of Queen
Mary Hive, XTo. 22, Ladies of the
Maccanees, will hold a social dance
in Kalenberg Hall on Friday night.
- ebruary 12, from 9 to 12 p.m. and
extend a hearty invitation to all their
friends.
Admission 25  cents. TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY.   I-'KI'.RCARV   6,   I<>!5'
W^CHINOOK
PUBLISHED
Every Saturday by the Greater Vancouver Publishers Limited
George M. Murray, Editor 	
HEAD OFFICE:
Corner Thirtieth  Avenue  and  Main  Street,  South  Vancouver,   B. C.
TELEPHONE:   All department! Fairmont  1874
NIGHT CALLS Fairmont  1946 L
Refiatered at the Poat Office  Department, Ottawa,  aa  Second Claaa
Mail Matter ' ___
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per year extra.	
"The truth at all times firmly stands
And shall from age to age endure."
THE "CHINOOK" AND TIIE "EVENING
JOURNAL"
EVERYBODY knows by this time that the Vancouver "Daily Times" has entered upun another
incarnation, ami will appear about the beginning of
next month as the Vancouver "Evening Journal." The
" l imes" is now in the past tense. The Evening "Journal" will be launched with Mr. George M. Murray as
manager. The management of the "Times" follow
other paths. The "Journal" will be tinder the personal editorial guidance of Mr. Joseph Martin, K.C.. M.P,,
as has already been announced. The newspaper will
stoutly take the middle ground of progressive and independent Liberalism. Mr. Martin thinks that public
feeling in liritish Columbia is ripe for a free newspaper of independent shade. Mr. Martin is a forceful and able man and his strong personality will give
stimulation to his editorial articles.
Although Mr. George M. Murray has widened his
field the "Chinook" will continue to appear as usual.
The "Chinook" will lose nothing by the "Evening Journal." The two papers will in every sense be kept
separate. The "Chinook" will continue to freely discuss public affairs from an independent point of view.
It will be published in this office as usual.. It will
stay at home. Though the "Chinook" ami the "Evening Journal" may be united by family ties there will
be no affinity between them.
B
THE  GOVERNMENi   AND  THE  DOMINION
TRUST
RITISH COLUMBIA people will not be satisfied with Mr. Bowser's denial of the Dominion
Trust charges. It was apparent that some larger motive than to benefit the Dominion Trust was lurking
behind the bill of which H. If. Watson, M.L.A., was
the parent. Mr. Bowser always pretended to be the
conscience of the government. He has always made a
pretense of being sensitive. But he has never taken
an attack very seriously before. Now he stands at
hay and will be forced to defend himself on every occasion.
| of the same make and model filled with nickel passenger-.    It has also kindled aspirations to own his uwn
J car in the breast of many a man who never rode in
an automobile before except on election day. It has
hul a stimulative effect on the accident insurance
business. It has added another word to the English
language: jitney, merely meaning a nickel, could hardly have sneaked into the dictionary, but jitney, meaning a kind of omnibus, has walked into Mr. Webster's
exclusive volume by the front dour. It will be in the
new edition, enshrined un India paper. The jitney
has furnished a large and important part of the people with a new interest in life; a trip down town in a
mere sireet car is dull and uneventful, but skidding
and sidestepping and bumping in a jitney furnishes
the jaded with some excitement. Jitneys are multiplying very rapidly in Vancouver and the amount of bodily agility needed by the citizen in crossing the sireet
is increasing daily. Jitneys have done both good and
harm. They have both helped and hindered. It is
hard to say what will happen, in the march of events,
but we predict that the nickel bus will stay with us,
and shake down into something durable and good in
the way of transportation. The drivers of jitneys can
hasten this by driving more cautiously, and at lower
speeds, and hy preventing the overcrowding of their
cars. The jitney has provided work for many men
who were jobless and furnishes employment for hundreds of idle machines. Many automobiles are now
earning an honest living for the first time. We would
suggest that the South Yancouver Municipal automobiles could justify their existence and pick up an honest nickel on the jitney routes. The jitney has given
all municipal automobiles a chance to make good and
become self-respecting cars. Let us send the South
Vancouver cars out to ply for nickels. The cars
would of course be bewildered at first by the idea of
doing useful work, but after a day or two they would
What is
"a Diether ton?"
How It Is Made���
The patent apparatus used in weighing
Diether South Wellington Coal insures
generous weight der all leeails ill sacks.
The cily weigh clerk guarantees all hulk
le.ails uf 2 tons and up hy issuing a city
weigh ticket with such loads.
Weighed Before Sacking
Diether Coal is sacked by an automatic
scale and ICOop���fl new and interesting
device. The coai tips the scale at lflll
poundi and so releases the scoop, which
deposits it in the sack. Tlle full 100 lbs.
must he ill the scoop before it goes into
the sack.
"A Diether ton" is more than merely accurate full
weight. It is a generous ton. Notice how it fills
your bin!
Delivered Promptly Same Day As Ordered
Pea Nut Lump
$4.25 $5.00 $6.50
"DIETHER
COAL
CO. LTD.
any financial distress in the province, though it is apparent enough in the very corridors of the legislative
buildin
those who cannot be fooled by smooth talk it will be
plain that the cut in expenditures will fall in the wrong
places. We shall still have our full quota of road inspectors, road agents they should he called, though
road-making will undoubtedly diminish. But our inspectors will continue to perform their heavy duties
face the music. This scheme might be the prelude to'.from the soft seats of automobiles. Officials so useful
great results.    It might rasie the prevailing low tone  as these in keeping the vote right for the government
121
Your hens will lay all
winter if you get your
Poultry Supplies from ui
PRATT'S POULTRY REGULATOR
WILL PRODUCE
- - THE EGGS - -
F. T. VERNON'S
MOUNT PLEASANT
FEED STORE
255 Broadway East (cor. Kingsway)
Phone Fairmont 18'i
of South Vancouver municipal politics and be the beginning of enlightened municipal government. You
never know what is waiting around the corner. The
example of honest intentions and thrift set by the
municipal jitneys gumshoeing around after real business might perform wonders.
THE "SOB STORY" IN THE TIMES
JUST before it disappeared from public view for
good, the Daily "Times" gave on its front page
a sad description of the experiences of Miss Towns-
end, the laundress, in South Yancouver. The "Chinook" regrets that this article appeared in the "Times."
lhe article furnished a good illustration of the maxim
which says that "One story is good until the other is
told." The information supplied to the Daily "Times"
was incorrect. The "Chinook" regrets that discredit
was thrown by the article on Mr. W. F. McClintock
and others whom South Yancouver people know as
excellent citizens. In most of its statements the article strayed away from the paths of truth. We are not
responsible of course for anything published in the
. .eiies." but we think it unfortunate that the article
should have appeared. The affair which was dealt
with in the "story" was not a thing to be handled in
a newspaper article without treading mi the tender
toes of many citizens whose only fault was that they i their maladministration
had taken sides in a dispute over a rather trifling mat- thai nothing short of disaster al the polls would bring
ter. Miss Townsend tried to build up in a residential the government to their senses. While the question
disirict a business which was unwelcome there and on, is being asked from mouth to mouth throughout I'rit-
Wednesday it was decided in the council that she ish Columbia win tin- development of ilie province
would have to move it elsewhere. The "Times" had I has been neglected while its great revenues were email imperfect understanding of the circumstances ployed in rewarding party favorites, keeping up a
which surrounded the case and should have investi- costly and corrupt party machine, and in other ways
gated the matter more carefully before publishing the which brought neither profit or honor to liritish Col-
story.   It was one of those cases which appear, to any- umbia, the premier and hi- associates, or accomplices,
THE "ROAD AGENTS" WILL HOLD  THEIR
JOBS
MANY events have happened lately calculated to
disturb the government. I^ast week the member for Columbia rocked the boat. The wave of hostile criticism which has been sweeping over the government is getting stronger. In the present mood of
the liritish Columbia people, these things are causing
the administration real worry, llowser never defended himself against attacks so earnestly as recently. The
wolf never tried so hard to acquit himself. His voice
has developed the falsetto note of an offender showered with accusations.
That the Government of Hritish Columbia not only
has no intention of substituting a sane economical and
honest administration of provincial affairs for the
orgy of waste and extravagance which has been the
distinguishing feature of their administration in the
past, but that they entirely fail to realize the conditions of stress and business decline which make necessary a revolutionary change from the old order of
things, seems clearly indicated by their attitude toward criticism from supporters and opponents alike.
Xo body of public men in Canada ever had such cause
to feel humble and chastened in spirit as Sir Richard
McBride and Hon. W. J. Bowser and their colleagues
in office have. They have played the spendthrift to
perfection with the income and resources of the province. There remains so little to show for the millions
of public funds that have passed through their hands
that one can only wonder that the people of liritish
Columbia were so long blind to their wanton -11111
ruinous prodigality. It required the rough touch of
hard times to waken in the public a proper sense of
It  would  seem,    however, I
Contributions of $500,000 each have been made to
the Pensions Fund and tbe Workmen's Holiday Pund,
Economize they must, of course, hut to and $750,000 to the Christmas Fund.   The number of
employees was increased to 80.000.
'Phis unusual activity in the Krupps' works was
very prophetic. It is difficult, however, io foresee
future events, and few of those who read this news in
December, 1913, guessed the true bearings and direction of events in Europe. The increase in the Krupps'
dividend could only mean that larger armament orders
than ever before were being tilled. There are few people in this country who possess the gift of prophecy.
All knew that the German people, from prince to
pauper, had made a cult of force, and that war was
their ambition, but the conflict seemed far away. The
liritish were keeping their powder dry. but the bombardment of tbe English coast in less than a year, by
German ships, would have seemed a wild nightmare
if any one had even dreamed it. Nobody did. Tin*
world talked much of peace a year ago. The won!
peace must have had an ironic ring to the German
militants who were planning a war of conquest ami'
intended to start it when the day was ripe.
must not be interfered with, nor must the army of
employees in other walks who form so important a
portion of the political machine. There are other expenditures too which must he kept up. All that long
array of items grouped under the head of "miscellaneous" which has so long and so vainly roused the
curiosity of Mr. Parker Williams and which has not
escaped suspicion among well informed people outside the legislature, that will be pruned with the gentlest hand, if it be pruned at all. Meanwhile there is
no money for the extension ami improvement of agriculture, none for the development of mining, none
for the completions of the university and the advancement of education, All that makes for the material
and intellectual good of the province must remain at
a standstill but money must be found to satisfy the |
needs and wants of the horde of party managers, j
on whose efforts the hopes of the government for another term in office depend.
It is a misfortune that at this juncture there is not
a powerful opposition in the House, having among
them at least one competent financial critic who could
compel the administration to divulge the true inwardness of the public accounts and give to tbe public that
information regarding its own affairs which is their
right and privilege to receive.
A SINISTER FINANCIAL REPORT
NE of the truest maxims is that "coming event;
o
V-/   cas
t their shadows before."
About   Christmas.   1013.   the  daily
this "special cable" from  lierlin:
papers   carried
HELMUTS
WO or three of the spiked helmets which characterize German soldiers have arrived in Vancouver from France and it is noted with interest that
their wearers must have had singularly small heads.
Many men have tried them on. and have found them
too small. A surprising thing is that the men who
wore ancient European armor were generally not of
heroic hut of small size. The average size of knightly
harness is small, even when it is taken into account
that parts of the armor can be lengthened or shorten-
'ed. Of twenty suits of armor in a certain collection,
only one is large enough to have fitted a man of fivt-
feet ten. who weighed two hundred pounds. Especially small were the heads.    There arc in this collec-
Ition ten casernes dating from the fifteenth century.
They are so little that they will hardly go over a head
of average size. Their wearers must, therefore have
bad remarkably small crania, for between casque and
The Krupps' dividend, issued a month earlier than' head heavy padding was worn as a protection frum
usual, amounts to 14 per cent, on the paid up capital of shock. It is difficult to believe that these ten casques
$43,000,000, the largest in the firm's history. are  exceptions  in  size, ami  they  could  hardly  have-
Tbe net profit for the year is $,),000,000 an increase been prepared for children, for such juvenile pieces
of $2,500,000 over 1912. are extremely rare.
one at a distance, to be of quite different hue from
their true color. Very lew people 'living outside of
South Vancouver really understood all the circumstances of the case, which after all, was not of enough
importance to take up as much space in a daily newspaper as that given it hy the "Times."
T
are only too evidently doing business iu the same old i
way. Whether they believe that their hold on the
province is too strong to be broken, or whether they
have concluded that they are in such desperate straits
that nothing can either improve their situation or make
it worse, is neither here nor there. The fact remains
that they have not diminished one jot the autocratic
methods which passed without question when times
were easy, money plentiful, and the electorate too busy
with their private affairs to inquire very fully into the
lib: jitney bus is the offspring of hard times and |n,anner in which the public money was being hand-
too many automobiles to the square mile.    It basjic(j.    Instead of frankly taking the people into their
MUNICIPAL JITNEYS
done more to lower the standards of automobile riding
than anything else. It is hard for people who ride
in their own motor cars to have emotions of pride and
exclusiveness when they are passed by a jitney car
confidence, acknowledging thc errors of the past and
promising amendment for the future, they are at their
old juggling game. It is true that they promise economy, but in thc same breath they deny tbat there is
NURSES   a
CALL BAYVIEW 1097
MATERNITY  AND SURGICAL CASES
FAIRVIEW   NURSING   HOME   pb,^ct^UUT8E8
S75 BROADWAV WEST Mlna JONES
mVt
The Important Matter of Choosing Your Dentist
Good Teeth
necessary
to health
"Cheap"
dentistry
the   most
expensive
What are
"Nature
teeth"?
Advice
free
"The Last Word
in Dentistry."
i^OlERE is nothing sn important to your health anel efficiency as the matter with
\^J yeenr u-iili. Bound, useful, beautiful teeth should be yours���teeth that enable
ynu In bite, chew and smile in comfort. Decayed teeth cause, not only continual
inconvenience, bul permanent ill-health. It is your duly to yourself to economize
in other ways see lhat yuu may secure teeth that look natural, feel natural and perform the functions which Nature allotted to those important members.
j^SHEREFORE you should choeisc your dentist with great care. It is poor
^^ economy to buy "bargain teeth." Inferior dentistrv���poor materials, little
knowledge and less care���costs but little less than Ihe right kind even at the beginning, and certainly is much more expensive in the long run.
X EM PLOY only the most modern methods, the greatest care and skill and the
best materials. Each individual case is carefully studied. When I lit yotl
with my "Nature teeth" they look, fit and feel like the ones N'aturc gave you And
you will find my prices no higher than those of ordinary dentists.
GOME in an.
estimate o
d allow me to exar
amine your mouth, advise vou and give vou my
A the cost. This will involve no obligation whatever. Make un
your mind now to see to those teeth. Then call, phone or write to me now-
making appointment for examination.
The New
Standard Bank
Bldg., Richards
and   Hastings
Second   Floor
Entrance
Room 212
Phone  Sey.
4 6 7 9
No Gas or Harmful Drugs Used
"You Suffer No Pain"
GUARANTEE
LJ,1'^'l!J.,^^^I^^iJ'l^,i.^!(J'c':t"m'',.1'V   n��   will   b,   absolutely
patient no money need be paid
painless.    If the slightest twinge of pain is experienced hy tht
to mc, or if any has been paid, it will be instantly tcfv*HJed.
I further ��*���^g**&����*B'Of bridge work * filling will remain in first-class condition for a period o ?EN YEARS. If any of my work becomes defective during that time I
will replace it absolutely FRfcE OF CHAROE. l
"THE   Aftftrtrnv,   ~  ^^^
OPEN   EVENINGS
THE MODERN DENTIST SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 6, 1915
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
The
Telephone
THE ADVANCE AGENT OF
Comfort and Convenience
FORMS   A   CLOSER   UNION   OF   HOME,
BUSINESS AND FRIENDS.
FOR A LIMITED TIME, BUSINESS AND
RESIDENCE TELEPHONES WILL BE
INSTALLED UPON PAYMENT OF $5.00
RENTAL IX ADVANCE.
FOR PARTICULARS CALL UP
SEYMOUR 6070,
CONTRACT DEPARTMENT
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
THROUGH   TICKETS  ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
W
J. MOE, C P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass. Agent, Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic  Steamship  Lines
C. E. Jenney, G. A. P. D.
Phone:  Sey.  8134 52T  Granville  Street
Economy consists of spending  money so
that you will have more to spend
MORAL   Eat at the PENDER CAFE
727 Pender St. West
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandy congratulates wan  or twa  fellie toonrmen on their appintment
tae various poseeshuns o' trust
yai   thai  f��l-
II   hae   jele nt)
vVeel  freens,  these
l-e��   the  dailj   papers
tai    ibsorb   yaer   attenshun   th,
wi' maitters at hame    n' abroad
I !.'   oval  news, ol     etirse, is v. e t  -
firsl   tae   occupj ���  nshun,   a-i'
eftei   u. iiin'   tin    ��� is   dint-Hied,
wi    maybe   -pin.I   ,:    ��� i  ' - -Im .,
I tryin   lae  think  noi   foi   nor sell  ��he-
ther 'lee- fecht'i wenl  ��i' ..��� r ride or
j wi' il ���  e i,,-ui>  durin' the last t��   nl ���
fower I r��.     It's only  when  h
new - e,   .1 naval  victor)  like  thai  yin
j m hen  h e-  lank  she    Hleuch. i   ihat   ��,
I i-.-ni   throw   up   oor   h.-et-   .ii.    gii    ;i  Ine
I hooch!
i e in.   wi'   the
i.r  midsl   tin
nai   nne  diHihti it ui- responsible ie.r!
���   'itn.l.eiini'  ..'  political  life  in    \ul'l
Reekie  an'  Scotlan'  generally   ;it   that
linn .
l.e
i iie  Shaw ������' the- lleirdei  Burghi
 ���   I."iii  Cham rlloi i   waa   the   lirsl
in.ii. president, an' .1   \\. Gullaud wit
presidi nt,
I'i rhaps ilu- new  Chief \\ hip '11 Iw
hem   remembered,   hooever,  ss     hem'
 ' iln- late Baillii   Gulland o'
llruchton  Ward
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
^ Where do we South Vancouver People
. EAT when we are Down Town ?
THE    PENDER     CAFE    Pender St. West
Anderson Meat Market
and Groceries
4152 MAIN STREET Phone Fair. 16S4
MEATS   AND   GROCERIES
We    specialize    in    our    home-cured    HAMS,
BACON, an.l AYRSHIRE ROLL
NEW LAID EGGS ��� ��� -40c per doz.
l'( rTATOES  :������������ 90c a sack
SWIFT'S SILVER LEAF LARD, 31b. pail, 35c
ORDERS PROMPTLY DELIVERED
Curieiui   as   ii   may
: amounl   e.'  .,,idgeri  in  u
I i  the war fever has subsided quite
I   .1    bil    'ee|    llllC    ill    till'    lil-I    IIH.tllli    nl'    sai
i back���an' it's no' tae he wunnered al
I when yae consider the- condeeshun we
i ii' oorscl in here.    Polks in general
I ae   in.nie  up  their  mill'  lhat   i''-  gaun
tae tak seeme time yel afore it's ended
j an' wi' the Parliament sittin' owre at
Victoria, they  hae K"t  somethin' else
j iae- absorb their attenshun
I   hope yae a' read  thai   speech  o'
j Parker Williams owre at Victoria
last week. I think that gentleman deserves the thanks o' every resident o'
the province for the wey in which he
, showed iit> Ihe rotten ilea! thc government hail gien the depositors in
ihat   defunct   institushun.
I've happened ' u come in ti iich w i'
wan or twa o' thc puir folk who hue
lost their a' in that concern an' I ean
assure Wnlly if he disna mak amends
for ilu- wrongdoin' "ii thc pair! o' the
government, there'-, gaun tac be
���omcthin' daen.
At the- present time, when the depositors committee are daen tln-ir best
iae wet iln- government tac retrieve
iln money which has been stolen fra
them, it wud In- wrong for me tae
say onything that wud jeopardise
their interests.
li yae- wiul ii-.tiii in Parker Williams' speech he referred tae thc
"spiked" government [ires- ������' the province, li I hadna happened tac pe i a
copy "' iln- "Sim" wi' the speech in
it, cxtendin' tae abool live cul.inn.s ������
print, I wudna hue read a word about
it for een consultin' my "Province" nt
nicht the only notice ii taen �� - that
"Parker Williams al this --lav;-, touched briefly on maitters conccrnin' ths
Dominion Trust "
Xe,,, this is no' as it should be;
When I think o' the dally preSa at
hame where wan could gel all almost
verbatim report ������' the daj'-  iv elm's in Parliament, whether it wis the
paper's ain side that ��-i- in ir thi oppisishun, an' compare it vi' the wey
they serve il Up iur.- a' that wan ean
say is "there's sometlr.n' :i -un in the
stale ee'   Denmark."
Frae what I hae rend o' last wei 1. -
proceedin's, hooever, wha wi' I atker
Williams an' that independent Conservative member (Foster), the sinus
are that tlu- Heavenly Twins are .ni
their last legs rn' that B.C '11 sune
be ahle tae tak her place among ither
nashuna an' be able tac saj that she
has a government that represents the
citizens, insteed o' ham a bunch a
neer-dae-weels in pooer that nae sclf-
respectin' indeevidual wud entrust wi
the management o' a peanut staund.
*  s,  *
My hcrty congratulations, Maister
Forrester. ' Perhaps yae wud notice,
freens, that in connecshun ��, that
ither gigantic swindle, the Lit. A ������
that Maister Forrester, the president
,,��� the Edinburgh an Midlothian Associashun, wis appinted permanent U-
nuidator. ,      ,.
In passin', I micht say that line n
bi2ne��� has often appealed tae me mysel The fact ..' bein' a permanent liquidator man,, let a iellie in on ...is o
fancy kin' ���>' drinks.
Hooever, I'm quite shave that tne
creditors ������' that defunct institushun
���11 hae nae cause iae regret the appintment e.' nor Iellie Set-man an native
,,��� guid auld  Edinburgh toon.
l" convcrsashun wi Maister Forrester wan i.me. he took me awatack
in ,ome reminiscences o a quarter in
Auld Reekie tinu I *i�� 77 ���*"*"
w"when1 wis a laddie. A lawyer bj
profession, he wis connected w a
firm in Thistle Coort (famous ae the
legal  fraternity  o'  Auld   Keeku-i   a
a plaee  1   wis very  w ,-el .'u-i,���an,le,   w,
,,, ,,���,,,, my occupashun as i printers
;Uvl, ,1, ha, travelled aur an wide
������ he lefl Auld Reekie but his Scot-
,,'sh tongue an' his pawky humour
are there as o' yore, wi the- love--
justie,- an' honesty which maks Scot-
������,' nrood ���.' her sons whereer thej
maybe found. Yin or twa Scott.es
owre at Victoria wud sune mak thej
beggars tak .1 thocht an  men.
By the wey, Andry Stewart, the re-
,,,���ly appinted permanent Hqnhtetor
,,- the Dominion rrust, 1- anither
auld Edinburgh laddie.
It- jisl what 1 say-.ae yae hear
mC) pelix-wherever British folks gel
Zae   a   tieht   comer   or   a   bad   mess,
hev pit a Scotsman  in.,   a Scotchman) in tae ri-,1 things up.    It wud
'eem as it Hue couldna trust ony 0
their iiin nashunallty.
,,- the Scotties abroad arc keepin;
up  their  end  an   incidentally   ftddin
ae auld    Scotlan's    rcp.itasli.tn
same  thing  can  truly  be  said o   th,
chiels that are left in the auld land
Yae WUd notice in the papers that
1 \v Gulland. the member for Dumfriesshire, had been appmted chut
"hip u.e Hu- liberal government, wan
,,��� the maist rcs,...ns,hle poseeshuns
in tlu- pairty. , .
It wis immediately elter thc Khak.
Election" that Gulland came intae
prominence, Edinburgh at that time
returned fower conservative members Ue Parliament an' lhe young
bl,,...Is o' the liberal pairty stirred
themsels up tae wipe oot sic a disgrace. They immediately set tae an
formed ihe "Young Scots' Society."
Though 1 didna see a'thegither eye
tae   eve   wi'   that   institushon,   there's
Incidentally I micht meiuhun the
editor ..'  the "Chinook"  tai.-  muckle
I'I I'le  tae   hilllsi 1   .iw re   llle   fact   '���'  hem'
a -"ii ������' a wortbj Scotsman. V\ ink-
I-- ha- liis fauts like ither men. yel
has lu- that yin rcdeemin' feature ���-'
which In- feels unco pre,,,,{  whiles.
lly ihe bye. tin- sons ������' Scotland
look a very prominent pain in the
eleck ihun up in Sooth Vancoover this
i eat
Eddie Gold's richl haund man. who
played a very prominent pain in elec-
tin'  tin-  reeve   tae  his  present   pose- I
Bhun, is a native .,' the laund ������' cakes, j
In facl I wudna lie surprised tac hear'
ii   l-.ihlie  himsel  lays claim  tae  bein'
a native, lie hasna been in Aiberdeen.
Xe.ee. Felix, I think yaell admit wi'
ii". thai wee country up Xe.rth which
some ..' yaer Cockney freens feign
tae mak believe is only a province o'
England has been able tae lead the
world in mare things than whuskj
an' bible manufacturin'. She has led
in a' things thai mak for guid government an' lu-r sons hae worthilj upheld their upbringin' in .my country���
ceevelized or unceevclized���wherein
thej   hae made their hames.
Get busy, you Scotties oot here.
Tak a pain in llu.- politics ,,' the
country yaer livin' in an' we'll >hii> sei
I'. C, tak lu-r proper place amon ��� the
ither provinces "' ilu- I)..mini..11.
Yours througii thc heather,
SANDY   MACPHERSON
One  cent  per  Fowl,  per   Week
Poultry   Keepers
will get best results from constant
" B & B "
Poultry Spice
And   EGG   PRODUCER
A   Hen  tonic,   I'ick-me-up and
Drop-em-down
Once  Tried Always  Used!
Guaranteed to produce results, if
fed  according  to  directions   (in
every s.tckl
3 lb. sack, 45c' tiy2 lb. sack, 90c.
100  lb.  sack.  $12.00
Manufactured in Vancouver.    Sold
Everywhere
G. BUSH
Begs tei inform the inhabitants of
this locality that hc is opening a
first-class
Meat  Market
at
4556 Main Street
(Between 29th and 30th  Ave.)
On SATURDAY, DECEMBER
5, with a first-class slock of Meats,
liuttcr. Hams. Bacon, Eggs, etc.,
at prices to suit the times.
Don't   forget   the   Address:
4556 MAIN STREET
(I.atc Street's)
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for oublic meetings,   dances,  etc.,  to  Let
Apply W. J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
30,000 Price Tickets
Signs and Window Notices in stock
Price from 15c. per doz.
Every kind of Sign or Letter made
to order
T. WEST
JANES ROAD P.O. So. Van.
Mr. W. W. Robertson
TEACHER OF VIOLIN
Open  for few more pupils
Terms   Moderate
4223   WINDSOR   STREET
South Vancouver   Phone Sey. 4284
SUCCESS
Awaits those who art prepa ed I heir busim        pportunity
when ii presents itself.   Hundreds of
OPPORTUNITIES
Will pn senl then il of business folle wing tin.
war.    li ye,n an   wise, yoo  will    et j       training now and be reaely
for ye��nr opportuoitj
Our Winter Term Opens Monday, Jan. 4
See- ii- aboul ii SOW,     The- information costs you nol
Success Business College
Limited
E Scott Eaton, B.A., Pritt
CORNER TENTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
Fairmont 2075 VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone Seymour 1946
ENGLISH COLLEGIATE SCHOOL
1150 ROBSON  STREET,  VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Miss HILDA A. POMEROY, Principal
Certificated at the Board of Education, England.
Trained at Bishop Otter College, Sussex.
Associate of Arts at Oxford I niversi )
Certificated at Trinity College of Music���Piano and Harmony,
English Literature and Science Distinctions at Examination.
SUBJECTS TAUGHT.
ALL ELEMENTARY STUDIES (Preparatory and otherwise).
and
NEEDLEWORK (Plain and Fancy).
DRAWING AXD PAINTING (All branches).
MATHEMATICS.    Matriculation Syllabus, London University.
BOTANY AXD NATURE STUDY.    With Microscopy if desired.
LANGUAGES (By arrangement).
TAILOR  DRESS-CUTTING  AXD  MAKING  (London  Academy).
SWIMMING, PHYSICAL CULTURE, ATHLETICS, ETC
ENGLISH LITERATURE I Poetry and Prose).
Pupils of anv age prepared in any of the above subjects, by ar-
rangement, DAY or l-'.\ ENING.
TERMS
Parents are requested to call in person and interview Miss Hilda A.
Pomeroy,  Principal  English Collegiate School
Tlll-'.O. J. HUTTON, L.A P... L. Mus. McGill
Principal
SESSION 1914-15
British
Columbia
Conservatory
of Music
591 HOWE ST.
(Cor. Dunsmuir)
VANCOUVER
Miss B. II. CAKTM1I.L, Principal.
FOR TERMS,  Telephone  Seymour  1847, or call  in  person.
CENTER & HANNA
LIMITED
Established  1893
Refined Service    New Location
1049 GEORGIA ST.
Opposite new Y. M. C. A.
Fireproof     Columbarium     and
Mausoleum
OPEN  DAY  AND  NIGHT
Seymour 2425
Tuition is provided in the following subjects:
PIANO VIOLIN or SINGING ELOCUTION
ORGAN VIOLA HARMONY STAGE
Band Instruments���Teacher, Mr. E. W. Hunt, City Bandmaster.
Guitar. Mandolin, etc.���Teacher, Prof. G. H. Ozburn, late of Toronto
College of Music.
Pupils trained for all examinations.   Highest successes have been gained
by students in previous years.
EDUCATION
PARENTS SHOULD HAVE THEIR
DAUGHTERS
ATTEND THE
Burrard School for Girls
850 BURRARD STREET
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can   supply   your   needs   at   right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right at  Station)
WILLOW HOSPITAL
Miss HALL and Miss  WESTLEY, graduate nurses
CORNER OF
BROADWAY and WILLOW
Patients Received from $15.00 Per Week
Phone  Fairmont  2IBS FOUR
GREATER   VANCOUVER   CHINOOK
SATl'RDW.   FEBRUARY   6,   1915
.;
���
1
K
;;
Phone Fair 2302.
4429 Main Street.
MAIN ST. AUTO CO.
for
AUTO  REPAIRS  AND  ACCESSORIES.
Tin- Best Grade e.f nils an.l Grease* kepi in stock.
Auto Filling Station on Premises.    Shell Gasoline 20 cents a gallon.
When the German Raiders Came
By  Thomas  Bertram
Mill: Foot of Ontario Street, Fraser River
Phone: Fraser 97
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
C ANADIAN CEDAR
LUMBER CO.
Manufacturers of
BEVEL SIDING, BOAT LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
Wholesale and Retail
GRIMMETT  P.  0., SOUTH VANCOUVER
P. M. HAMILTON
F. WILLIS
Hughes Bros' Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We carry everything in Wines, Liquors and Cigars
No order too small, and none too large for this popular Liquor Store
Store open every evening until 11 p.m.
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
Leaving our Store every Thursday and Friday morning at 9 a.m.
Price List mailed free on application
GLADSTONE   HOTEL
FIRST CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS
R. CURRY, Prop.
JOINT SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
Incorporated
1908
A Joint Savings Account may be opened at the Bank of Vancouver
in the names of two or more persons. In these accounts either party
may sign cheques or deposit money. For the different members of
a family or a firm a joint account is of'en a great convenience. Interest paid on balances.
THE
BANK OF VANCOUVER
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
MEMBERS VANCOUVER STOCK EXCHANGE
MEMBERS VANCOUVER GRAIN EXCHANGE
MEMBERS OF CALGARY OIL EXCHANGE
DEALERS IN ALL ACTIVE CALGARY STOCKS, BONDS, ETC.
OIL STOCKS
BOUGHT  AND  SOLD
Stock Department, Seymour 6913
EXCHANGE BUILDING, 142 HASTINGS WEST
The lirst step toward tbe Greit
Project was taken in 1913. Meetings
bad been held ill half a hundred American cities and towns to bear the
celebrated strategist and tuthor,
Bernhardt, explain how the conquest
..i   Europe   would be   accomplished;
ami while- listening tee Ve.n llariihardt.
the Great Project firsl suggested itself tee tin- fertile mind ol one, Professor Burgmaster, incumbent e.f the
chair of modern history at the University of Milwaukee Professor
Burgmaster had no difficulty in enthusing others with the magnitude ol
the idea. Active support was enlisted
in every corner of the United States,
and inside ot a month, men met in
Secret conclave and discussed the detail uf the Great Project with intense
earnestness, fired t'i unwonted enthusiasm by its boundless possibilities.
It was characteristic of the race from
which these men had sprung that, al-
though fully two million people in all
were aware of the secret plans, tuet a
hint, not even a whisper, of tlle Great
Project reached the general public.
The lirst tangible eveidence of the
plan  underfill it   was a  gradual   exodus
e.i German-American    families    frmn
l'nited States to Canada. Many thousand* threw up jobs eer closed their
stores   and   migrated   acre ess   the   line.
locating themselves in Toronto, Hamilton, London, and oilier Ontario cities. They sought employment, sometimes successfully, more often not���
for limes were none too good in the
Dominion���but whether employed or
idle, the new coiners invariably seem-
I ed to have ample funds at their disposal to live comfortably. Pretty soon
the cities of Ontario were honey-
Combed with German-American families, who. as they volubly explained,
had left the United States to avoid
the industrial depression settling
down  there.
Feer the benefit of economists and
theorists generally, it may be pointed
out that this influx was one of the
real causes of the inexplicable increase in unemployment which became so marked during llie fall of 191.1
anil fnr which no entirely satisfactory
reason  could  be  found.
Although lhe quiet but steady transfer of population was tbe onl outward evidence of the movement which
had begun when the germ of an idea
took root behind the corrugated brow
of a German professor, the plans for
the Great Project were pushed in
countless other directions with true
Germanic thoroughness.
As Professor Burgmaster walked
out from a meeting, where final arrangements bad been ratified a special
edition of an afternoon paper was
thrust into his hands. It announced
the handing of the belligerent Austrian ultimatum to Servia. Tiie pro-
fesseir smiled and threw nut his chest.
"On scheduled time!" he declaimed.
"Nothing can in the way of a great
natiun stand when matters of international magnitude are years in advance planned out. International
diplomacy? Balance of power? Pali!
mere idle terms! ! Tbe Kaiser decides, and we with stop watch, follow
llie   plans   out."
Nevertheless the war in Europe
broke and was carried alnug with
ruthless  determination    fnr    months
witliieut any definite move being made
bv tiie Professor and his fellow conspirators, Everything was ready
from the careful packing of the last
rifle into the upholstery of a couch
billed for Canada, to the final survey
of maps and charts. The final word
was  patiently   awaited.
One day early iu January, a tall
man with a reddish beard, a heavy
booked nose, and a lofty forehead
that eietokened intensive study, walked into the rotunda of the King Edward Hotel at Toronto, and signed the
register '^v'ith an academic flourish.
"Olio llansalt, of Xew York," was
the name tbe clerk made out and,
consulting his books, he found that
rooms liail been reserved for Mr.
llansalt ,f.ir this very date, four
months previously���the best suite in
the house. It was rather a coincidence, he remarked to himself, that
ill the rooms in the house should have
been reserved for this day by individuals bailing from the other side, Mr.
llansalt being the last to arrive. Had
the clerk known il. the same coincidence was being remarked upon in
nearly every hotel in Ontario that
day.
The distinguished1* looking Mr,
llansalt   was  shown   Immediately   to
his room. As he,crossed the rotunda
toward the elevator, a yening man
who had been lounging all the morning on one of tiie seats commanding
a view of the desk, rose slowly and
sauntered toward the main entrance,
llansalt watched him out of thc corner of his eyes, and as they drew
close together, slowly inclined his
head forward. The young man quickened his step, and vanished through
the revolving doors.
Next morning citizens of Toronto
poured out of their homes at the usual hours, and individually met the
surprise of their lives. At each corner stood a man with, a rifle, a most
officious person, who ordered them
back into their houses with guttural
brusqucness. As the rifle was there
to enforce the command, they obeyed.
During the two hours that elapsed between six o'clock and eight, probably
fifty thousand citizens of Toronto
rushed indignantly to phones with thc
purpose of calling up the nearest police station. And in no instance did
they get an answering "hello" from
Central   to   their   vociferous   demands.
The programme for the next couple
of hours was pretty much the same
all over the city. Infuriated but very
much puzzled citizens made attempt
after attempt to beard the mysterious
guardians of tbe street corners, only
to  bc  chased  back,  sometimes     with
zi)
CHIMNEY SWEEPING CITY
Phone Seymour 5293 FLAG POLE8  PAINTED
We have the most up-to-date and
best equipment in Vancouver
409 Dunsmuir Street
shots viciously cutting the air behind
and around thein. lu cases where
sorties in force were attempted, the
prompt blowing of ��� whistle brought
up more mysterious men armed with]
very business-like rifies.  Neet knowing
thai  the  same  thing was  happening
in  all   parls  of  the city,  the  residents
e i each locality came to tlu- conclusion thai thev were being held up by
escaped lunatics ot daring robbers
operating on  a  colossal   scale;    and
meere   frenzied   but     fruitless     eii.,its
were   made   lo   get   a   response   from
teli iilieeue  headquarters.
Toronto continued in a state of siege
until  noon.     Tlie  telephone  exchange,
the police station, ibe armories, the
file   stations,   ihe  armories,   tin-   tire
Stations, and telegraph offices, had all
been quietly taken possession i'i eluring lhe night. The attacking party
had in each instance descended on the
guardians of the public safety wilh
a suddenness and force that made Opposition impossible, and quite short
lived.
Xo   blood   had   been   shed   ill    the
stealthy    midnight   operations   which
pul a city of nearly half a million
people at lhe mercy of a hostile force
thai hail descended upon it from an
unknown source. It seemed almost
as though some modern Jason had
sown a plentiful creep of dragon's
teeth during tlle night and armed men
had sprung up with daylight at every'
crossing,
At noon the first trains to put ill
an appearance pulled ill at the Union
Station. Pour specials from Buffalo
arrived, tilled to lhe platforms with
noisy strangers who produced weapons as they poured out through the
Station exits. Trains from all other
directions had been held up outside
the city and the crews and passengers
marched off at the point of the revolver.
During tbe rest of thc day trains
plied oack and forth from tlle frontier, carrying in thousands of I'an-
Geriuanic     enthusiasts     who     roared
"Deutschland uber .-dies." interminably, and fired shots through the windows of the coaches to frighten tbe
bewildered residents of the country
districts through which tluy were
whirled. The trains were sent here,
there and everywhere, depositing their
passengers according lee a set schedule which provided for see many men
to be left at each city and town.
In a crowded room, in the King
Edward Hotel, Professor Burgmaster,
alias Otto llansalt, sat at a table and
perused the multitudinous reports
which wcre handed to him. A watch
lay at his right hand. Early iu the
evening be shoved back his chair and
stood up. A smile of inexpressible
triumph  lighted up bis face.
"Gentlemen," he announced, "the
last report is in. confirming tbe successful issue of all our plans. Every
city and town iu the populated section
of Ontario has our forces been pal-
rolled by. i.vcry weapon has been
seized. Every telegraph wire ill our
possession is. everywhere are militia
and   home   guards���but   powerless   to
stop us.   Tlu-ir rifles ami ammunition
we have. Gentlemen, one minute of
eight it lacks. We are a minute a-
head of schedule. Thus are tbe affairs
eef llle   Fatherland carried  out!"
The nexl day the foreign garrisons
of the Ontario towns converged een
bases previously determined upon
which enabled them to command tlle
railroads and guard against advances
from other sections ol tlle Dominion.
Bach town as it was abandoned, was
cut off from the outside world by the
effectual wrecking oi telegraph and
telephone systems, and. so far at least
as the invaders could tell, not a weapon of any kind was left in tlle hands
of the towns people.
"Canada had nod troobs to diss-
lenlge us der tree month," chuckled
llellinutli Schmidt, who as a result of
early training as an officer of the
German army, had been put in charge
of field operations. "And pebore dot
comes, Chemiany will smash dose Allies, like dot! Then comes eiut Cher-
nian troobs and Canada is ours!"
"It   cannot   fail,  our  plan,"  assented
Professor Burgmaster, with cool confidence. 'Word of the conquest of
Canada tee all parts of the United
Stales   I   am wiring."
The next morning tlle citizens of
Toronto were allowed out alter nine
o'clock. Placards were found on every corner announcing the official occupation of the city preparatory to
the annexation of the Dominion in
the name of the Kaiser. Unlil further
notice citizens would bc allowed on
the streets only between the hours of
nine and live. In no case would more
than three men be allowed together.
Places of business wcre to be kept
closed and under no circumstances
would   visiting   from   heetise   tei   house
be permitted. Numerous other re���
frictions of a like nature were listed
and a warning was given that any one
violating the regulations would be
immediately shot. The main streets
were patrolled regularly to sec that
orders  were  carried out.
It was decidely the most exciting
day that Ontario had ever known.
The programme followed ill each city and town throughout the occupied
section, was identical with what transpired in the capital city; so that ;
description of the events of that momentous day in Toronto will serve as
an indication of what was happening
the whole province over. Early in
the morning the officials and branch
managers of the banks were called
upieii and escorted by armed squads
to their respective offices. No time
had been lost in securing proper addresses. All such information, in
fact, had been very carefully compiled in advance. At the point of the
bayonet, the managers were instructed to open up tlle vaults and produce
all the gold in hand. As the blow
had fallen like a bolt from the blue,
the banks were caught totally unprepared and, as a result, the haul proved  enormous.
(Continued on page 6)
SIX   REASONS
WHICH ACCOUNT FOR THE SUPERIORITY OF
CREOSOTED WOOD
BLOCK PAVEMENTS
ITS DURABILITY���Does not crumble or pulverize under the densest traffic; second only to granite
blocks
ITS EASE OF REPAIR- No difficulty being experienced in removing and replacing the blocks; no
expensive plant or skilled workmen required.
ITS SANITARY QUALITIES���Creosote being a
highly antiseptic and waterproofing material instantly destroys all germs, prevents the absorption of
street filth and consequent decay.
ITS NOISELESSNESS���The rattle and bang of
vehicles passing over its smooth surface absorbed
and muffled till the quiet of the dirt load is obtained.
ITS DUSTLESSNESS���Does not pulverize; the
heaviest traffic only pounding down the wood fibres
to offer the greater resistance.
TTS CLEANLINESS���Having a smooth surface and
being waterprool it does not differ in this respect
from asphalt.
We manufacture blocks of the highest possible
standard, the verv best materials only being used and
in the DOMINION WOOD BLOCKS we believe
we produce an article that has no equal.
DOMINION CREOSOTING
���COMPANY   LIMITED-
Vancouver, B. C.
HOUSEHOLD GOODS and OFFICE FURNITURE
: WiKb
IN THE  ONLY  REAL  PADDED MOVING VANS IN  B.C.
CAMPBELL STORAGE COMPANY^
MOVING - PACKING- STORAGE-SHIPPING
Ui
PHONE SEYMOUR 7360.
OFFICE 857 BEATTY ST.
511
Glazed Cement
Sewer Pipe
-'MADE IN V
Is tlle choice of property owners in
every city wlicre its value has been
demonstrated. It gives good service
and has durability.
Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.
1S5 FRONT STREET WEST
Phone Fairmont 122
Keeler's Nursery
Grower and Importer of Plants, Bulb*, Roots and Shrubs
Cut   Flowers  and   Design
Work  a  specialty.
One hundred1 varieties  of
Roses  of  Choice  Sorts
and  three   hundred  varieties   of   Dahlias.
Flowering and Ornamental Shrubs for Spring and
Fall  planting. ����-U/ Phone Fairmont 817
YOU WILL FIND OUR PRICES MODERATE
Cor. FIFTEENTH AVE. and MAIN  ST  ::  MOUNT  PLEASANT
VIOLIN EXPERT
Old and valuable violins carefully repaired.
Gti'.itars and mandolins repaired. Hows rehaired.
Violins  bought.
JAMES TAYLOR
Phone  Seymour  3415
531 RICHARDS ST.
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORK8
1941 ALBERT ST. TELEPHONE   HIGH.   131
ENGINEERS. MACHINISTS AND  FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS  AND  SPECIALS
REPAIRS OP ALL DESCRIPTION' SATl'RDAV.    1-KHKl'ARV   U.   1915
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
AVENUE
MAIN     AND     HARRIS
Phone���Seymour   4634
Matinees   Wed.   and   Sat.
THE    AVENUE
PLAYERS
with
MISS   MAUDE
LEONE
Prices 25c 50c   Matinees 25c Any Seat
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
Do Not fail to see "ZUDORA," Thanhouser's Greatest Photo Play
3000 Scenes. Caste of 1000
FRIDAY and SATURDAY.   Read the Story in the Monday "Sun" by
Harold McGrath
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   DEAN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
GOOD LITTLE BUSINESS
W FOR SALE *�����
RENT CHEAP
Cor. 25th Ave. and Main
FACTS AND FANCIES
liy "Obser
th
For sheer childish foolishness commend me tee the actions of the Seeittli
Vanouver council under Reeve Gold.
This, f'T instance.-: Moved by Councilleir Welsh, seconded by Councillor
Stanley: "That Mr. (',. Coghill be recommended for the peesilieeii as representative of Seeuth Vancouver
municipality on the- Greater Vancouver Sewerage Hoard, as in the opinion
of the present council the present representative, C. Stuart Campbell, being interested in large sales ol material to this corporation, is detrimental
to tlle interests of tlie municipality
and againsl ils nie eral principles."
Poor dear! Ii would be a pity tn cer-
rttpt its moral principles would it neit.'
lint did il neet occur t.e the wiseacres
who drafted llie resolution that the
simplest way out of tlle difficulty was
to cease purchasing materials freem
the firm in which Commissioner
Campbell is supposed to be Interested? Is neit tbat the answer to be expected from the Provincial Government? But, any stick seems good
epough with which to get in a blow
at an ex-councillor.
He     *     *
Apropos of moral principles. I
wonder on what moral principle it
was proposed by Reeve Gold anel
Councillors Campbell, W elsh anel
Russell to dismiss Dr. Murphy, Miss
Dench. G. R.  Bell, J.  Rutledge, A. C.
inner, C. II. Undies, J. X. Mouat
Kiid W. Robson, against whom, -" fat
as ean be ascertained, there were no
complaints and whose positions will
have to be tilled by others? To my
mind the proposal was either very
foolish eer there was a desire, as last
year, to create vacancies to lee filled
by    political    friends. Councillor
Campbell admitted that the -ion-
keeper weiuhl have to be replaced, and
it is certain that Hunter and Landles
would, if ne,t all the persons named.
Then why in the name of common-
sense anel decency dismiss them? As
1 intimated last week, ii j- only necessary te> spend a short time al the
Municipal Hall t��> recognize the men
ready to till vacant places. In regard
to Miss Dench she is said to have
pulled a nail eiut of the wall of the
stenographers' room on which a certain hat and coat used to hang. Hence
the proposed dismissal? As a stenographer doing weerk requiring expert
skill and accuracy she Rave entire
satisfaction. But, the nail came eiut
and "off with  her heael" demands  the
ree\e.
* st st
I notice Councillor Campbell| was
very indignant at the "Province" '.eir
suggesting that a system of espionage
had been established at the Municipal
Hall; yet, we are te.ld by Or. Murphy
that his office desk was opened anel
the contents noted* by someone seeking inform:.then after the manner of
llie' Russian secret service police or
a German spy. And the curious thing
is that when an effort was being made
to mist Mr. Colin Clarke from the office   of   municipal   solicitor last   year
he alsei complained that his office had
been entered and his desk "gone
threiugh." If that is not espionage
what is it? But perhaps Councillor
Campbell approves of office-breaking
and desk opening;' Or possibly Councillor Campbell prefers the meire open
ami above board detectaphone method
of obtaining information required?
* * *
Another piece of fatuous feilly is
the proposal of the council to close
down the C.P.R. springs, friend Lewis has announced, with all the weight
of his great name behind the announcement, that the cost of the water freim the springs is 17 cents per
lt;tl cubic feet. All records at the
Municipal Hall show that the actual
cost is about 21' cents. If the pumping records are doubted, there' is a
very simple way of ascertaining the
amount of water obtained from the
wells. Close down for a week and
supply ihe district, which now receive.-, water from the springs with
Vancouver water and note the difference in the Vancouver records. To
my mind the ligures quoted in the
"Province" Ihis week, from the official annual reports, as to the amount
paid t'i Vancouver for water before
the wells were nut int" operation ami
afterwa    proved  conclusively    the
i value- of ihe- municipal w, 1!-. I f ii is
true thai in l'Ml South Vancouver
paiel lo Vancouver $32,764 feer water
'to supply 4760 services, befori tht
mils were operated, ami that in 1913
'wiih the wells in full flow 8822 ser-
vices   were'   supplied   anel    -nly   -SI /".41S
wa- paiel io Vancouver ami Burnaby
for water, ami if il is true that in l'Ml
S.i4.51<�� was collected in water rales
and in 1913 $80,085, it should be plain
enough feer a School boy t'i grasp that
I water to tin- value .if $o2.5sr was obtained   !>��� >m  the  municipal   wells  in
1913. I'.ut. apparently lhe reeve ami
council are see prejudiced againsl previous councils that when facts such as
those ligures are placed leefe.re them,
like lhe priest ami the l.evite. they
turn aside ami pass by���unbelieving.
Reminds eme of the olel proverb:
"Convince a mall against his will, he'll
be of the same opinion  still."
Just a word aboul salary reductions. When by carelessness eir ne-
glcci of duty employees can involve
the municipality in endless law suits
and claims feir damages, and when by
a little extra exertion employees may
save ratepayers thousands of dollars,
is it good policy by unnecessary
cheese-paring tee create a discontented, dis-satislii'il staff Is it good business even' I tre.w not! Hut this i- exactly what the council is el..ing by cutting   salaries.
Misses Eva and Mabel Kay entertained seuuc elozeii friends :il their
home em Tuesday evenihg With an informal dance.
THEATRICAL
Pantages Theatre
The headline act for Pantages foi
next week ii , startling. beautifuHy
acted dramatic playlet called "My
Friend,' written bj Willard Mack and
presented l>> Landers Stevens���Georgie Cooper and their companj of ar-
"���'-��� ll is ,i dramatic drama dealing
with a wayward wife ami teaches ;i
powerful lesson How the husband,
played b) Stevi ni in thi l capable ac
lor's In || ityU, deali wilh a man who
would bre-ak up his home, providei a
novel and effective ending
The  aehleel aitra.-ti.in  f.ir  the-  bill  is
furnished by Allen'- Cheyenne Minstrels, a pretty ami picturesque musical ami comedy offering in which
three- nun ami a woman, all with excellent voie-e-, show a fascinating bit
of cowboy life ai twilight.
It..li  Knapp ami Chris  Comalli iu
a  potpourri  ol  vaudeville
ble am! elance   well above 'h.t  average
and an- alwaj of  tin-  hits  on
an>    preegrami ii   whieh   they   appear
Vnother capital act is supplied ley
Gilmour &��� Raminoff, a dainty maid
anel a man in an exposition of the
newest  ami  most  eccentric  dancing.
Leona Guerney, the Sit>.r::ni Songbird, returns  in  a  new   repi rtoin
some stunning new  gown-.
The- Corr-Thomas Tri.. i- one of the
be-t acrobatic acts which hai ever
visiieel   Vancouver.
How They Waste The Money
(Special to the CHINOOK from our own press gallery representative)
Victoria, Feb 4. -The Hon   Price Ellison and some of his colleagues have
expended very recentlj  ie $20,000 iu "promoting immigration."   Parliament
\eiti-el in  I'H-t $60,000 "f'er immigration." So unless the money is  wasted for
other purposes anil in  ihese  nines it  is met difficult  to divert it. there is still
y4n,iem oi ihat vote to be spent "em immigration,"
How is the Hon. Price Ellison spending it? Well here are a few ligures:
Salvation Army grants, $4,166.17. There are senile who would not grudge that
17 cents, bul would hardly give those dollars to the Salvation Army just now,
considering what lhe Army gets by persistent begging. To the "Colonist"
Printing and Publishing Company���that is the same liim as the "News-Advertiser." otherwise Mr. Matson of "Songhees Reserve" fame���has been paid
lor is still owing for McBride and Company can owe motley as well as other
people) the sum of $3,246.50. This is for "cuts." etc. As the "Colonist"
comes out with a portrait of silver-headed Dick McBride about every other
day it. is not unfair to assume that many of the "cms" have represented his
benevolent countenance. Tiie "Colonist" and "Xew���>-Advertiser" have not
produced many "cuts" of Parker Williams���they indeed ignore his speeches���
because they cannol answer them I Heatons Agency. London, England, has
been paid e.r Is tei be paid $1,371.55 for "Booklets���Opportunities in British
Columbia." Does this mean that the sum named has been paid for printing
in London which might have been very well done in B.C.? W'e do met grudge
London a share of business���it is all in the Empire���but here was an opportunity to give the printers of Vancouver a bit eef weirk which they need even meere
lhan they do in Old London, where there is mit such a lack eif employment as
we are feeling here.
Then again, Price Ellison has paid, or will pay, $460.75 for "Painting���in
oils���Various Views of liritish Columbia." What will tlle "li.C. Society of
Artists" say to this? A printing firm in London given the job, to be "given
out" to some poor devil of an artist���at Heaven only knows what Price, when
here in Vancouver we have clever artists who can paint British Columbian
scenes from nature and would be, oh! so glad of the work. Shame that with
clever artists like Mrs. Alice lilair Thomas, Mr. McKay Fripp and others,
whose native talent needs encouragement, artistic work should be "jobbed
out" in this way.
Hut what do the government care or know about artistic nr literary work?
W'e see that a certain gentleman got salary for January $e80.33, and if we are
not much mistaken, this was for "literary work'' in boosting B.C. Well, perhaps it is only worth $80 a nueiith to "boost" B.C. jusl now���with tlle present
government  there  cannot  be  many  inspired  moments.
so iar aencienl mat we seem to ha\e
no hop, . e ,. full enjoyment fi the
ample repast ihat is spread before us.
In the house- i the humble a little
library, in my opinion, is a most pre-
eioii-  possession."
('I ������ li.   , uuinued).
LOCALN*OTES
On Sunday hrsi the services in S:
David's Presbyterian Church, Heed-
well Road ami Windsor Street, "ii!
i" ��� inducted by ihe- Rev R. ('��� Mc-
��� i ol the Rev. Mr.
Robertson, who is in Victoria this
week Mi. M.l'.iih i- known all e.eer
the- Dominion as one of th���- ablest men
in the Presbyterian Church of Can-
nd ii is aniie ipated that crowded
congregations   will   hear   him   a:   thi
ni' -n ng  and  e\ ei.my   sen tct s,
��� ��� *
Lasl Monday evening was passed
very pleasantly b) a pari) of young
people al 'In. home- of Mr. anil Mrs
Rnshbury, 4760 Fraser Avenue, the
occasion being a birthday party for
their daughter, Miss Pansy Rushbury.
The time wa- spent v.ry happy wilh
music, -e.nys md games, and afterwards a birthday cake was ������iu liy Miss
Pansy ami refreshments were served
by the host anel hostess Everybody
was happy am', all wished Mi-- Pans)
many happy return- of lln- dav.
��� * it
The Main Streel Liberal Club wil!
hold a social entertainment on Wednesday, February 10. at the Club
reioms. 4.162 Main Street, commencing
j at eight o'clock, when an enjoyable
evening is promised to their friend-.
There will In- a short musical programme, contributed to bv Messrs.
W. Nichols. W. II McKelvie, Magnus Irvin and Miss Denman, after
which progressive whisl will be on
lh.- lapis, for which suitable prizes
will be awarded to the successful
players.    Refreshments  will  be  serv-
! ed in the Club's usual abundant  style.
Livingstone Centenary Presbyterian
Church
The annual congregational meeting
of tin Livingstone Centenary Presbyterian Church, situated at the coiner
of 56th Ave. ami Kerr Road, was held
Friday, January 23. 1915, the Rev,
Jeihn I). Gillam, M.A.. presiding over
a gooel attendance. A brief repeirt of
the past year's work from lhe chairman wa- followed by tin- financial
statement freim the treasurer, sinewing
a small balance on the right side-. The
superintendent of tin Sunday School
gave an encouraging address and a
report eif lhe wurk of the Ladies' Aid
by Miss Smith showed what a strong
branch   eif   lhe   church   thi-   organiza-
PANTAGES
Unequalled       Vaudeville      Means       PaatafM
Vaudeville
E.   D.   Graham.   Resident   Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
LANDERS  STEVENS���
GEORGIE COOPER &  CO.
in
MY FRIEND
And Other  Great Acts
Three   shows   daily    2.45.   7.20.   9.1S
Admission���Matinees.     15c;     nights,
15c and 25c; boxes,  50c.
Ao
u-r.
U   xJ
Order now your Wedding Cakes,
Christmas Cakes and Real Scotch
Shortbread,  from
A.   BLYTH
Baker  and   Confectioner
Cor.  of JOHN  and  28TH  AVE.
tion is. Me-sr-. G. M. Smart, l;..
Nixon, C. II. Stanley, A. Hunt. \V.
Han-lay. Jr.. and W. E. Jack were
appointed managers ami ilu- officers
��� ef the Sunday School were re-elected.
Mr. I'ateui congratulated the members
of the Laelies' Aiel on tile invaluable
assistance rendered the church during
the past twelve months and Rev. G.
Wilson eif tin- Home Mis-ions addressed  the  gathering.
Refreshments wer.- served under
the superintendence of Mrs. Barclay
and other ladies and a pleasant gathering was shortly afterwards brought
to a  close.
Famous Men and their Praise of Books
Al Ihe McGill University last week
Mr. J.  frauds Bursill (Felix  Penne),
of Collingwood I'.ast. accepted an invitation which hael been extended t'i
him and addressed a large body of
students, ladies and gentlemen, in thc
college hall. Mr. Gordon Scott presided and in introducing thc lecturer
remarked that it was well known that
"helix Penne" exercised a beneficial
influence in the intellectual life of
Vancouver,
Mr. J .Francis at once plunged into
his subject and said in pan:
For many years 1 was engaged in
journalistic and literary wurk in Lon-
don. My duties as well as my inclinations often led me into tlu dim religious light under the great dome of
Si. Paul's. I have sat under the
beautiful fretted roof e.f Westminster
Abbey. I have seen glorious sunlight
turned into rainbow hues as it stole
threiugh tlle painted windows eef Antwerp and Louvain���those cathedrals
laid in ruins by lhe Huns. I have
spent many days too uneler the circular roeef in lhe greal library eif ihe
Hritish Museum���and I am inclined to
agree with Thackeray that "[here is
no dome comparable t" the dome of
the British Museum Library at
Bloomsbury."
I hope I -hall not be deemed sacti-
ligioiis if I regarded thai dome as a
sacred dome and considered thai my
literary wurk was ., -on of religious
exercise.
"There is me dome comparable to
that at  Bloomsbury," saiel Thackeray,
ami   he   added.   "I    have     "lieu      said
grace   at   ihe  table  and  thanked   Heaven  for ilie plentiful supply of hook-
i   which   I   e-eeiihl   freely   pan.ike ,"
1   hope  tee  -how   you  in   lhe  course
ol   Ihe  brief  lune   I   speak  lo  you  lhat
many   other   famous   men   have   fell
and acknowledge���a  devout  gratitude
feer the benefits conferred uy nooks.
It is true ih.it some of the famous
men whose weerks are familiar tei us
as household words, some of tin- great
creator- of eeiir literature���useel books
very sparsely. Tluy studied human
nature direct, drew iheir inspiration
from life itself. Dante. Chaucer,
Shakespeare, Dickens���studied nun
more than books. Ihey found life
greater than literature, men ami women meere interesting than volumes.
But even those giants eii originality
owed something���owed much���tei ilu
written as well a- ihe spoken word.
In lhe early romances patiently engrossed by the Monkish scribes ���
Shakespeare found the kernels ol
some of his st.,ri> s. Charles Reade
was a great debtor to b.eoks and to
periodical literature. I have seen him
un to his elbows in old books, magazines  and  newspaper  cuttings.
Matthew Arnold called a library
"a happy island." Yc-! an island on
which you can have a literary pic-nic.
Sometimes such an hour, it is often
lhe case with a pic-nic. will colour
the whole subsequent life eif men ami
wumen. You have heard of "the way
nf a man wilh a maid"���let us mark
iln- attitude eif some men towards
their   loves���lleeelks.
Southey was a une specimen of the
bookman, he was a bibliophile tei his
linger tips. At his home at Greta
Hall. Keswick, he gathered a library
which was not only a continuous i��� >y
to all who hael ihe privilege eif entering   il. but  was  useful  in  helping him
to earn that bread and butter which
even a poet needs. Read Sara Coleridge's descriptive letters and yem can
fancy you see Southey in the little
winged study where he pored over
books for hours teegether. This little
study became a drawing room when
visitors arrived. Tea drinking guests
who were always welcome���though
ihey did interrupt literary labor. Tne
room was lined with books, there
were books on bracket- and beautiful
vellum bound books lying on their
side- in heaps on the floor. Ah! I
am afraid tlu- librarian who loves his
books all iu a row neat ami well ordered woulil have rebuked the 'li- r-
dered i-'mliti-eu of Southey's library.
The besl literary work, however, has
not always come from ihe mat. well-
ordered library. The man who spends
his lime arranging anil labelling and
dusting his boeeks may not find time
to do much else. Some very literary
men would define chaos as a library
which a woman has made 'so neat
and tidy."
Southey   spoke  i'i   his  hooks   thus���
"My  elays among  tlle deail  are  past:
\rouud tne   I   behold
Where'er thesi  casual eyes are cast,
The mighty minds of old:
My never failing  friend- arc  they,
With whom I converse 'lay by day."
Southey was a book lover who n
only    Collected    but    knew    his    1 -
Ile hail a  wonderful knack  of getting
rapidly   all  he  required or was  li
tee require fin ol anj work. IK- lo iked
forward eagerlj   to the arrival  ol  Ius
parcel-   of   fresh   volumes.     "Bj
day   month,"   he   w mie   eif   a   cons -
ment coming from abroad, "the}  will
probably lu- here; tin n I shall In- happier than  if In-   Man siy   King  Gcorgi
lhe   I e ,iu I ll  were   I"  givi   ��� -r.ie.-l -   I I
should be clothed in purple. and sl i .-
upon geild. ami have a chain upon my
iH'ck. ami sil nexl him because "f my
wisdom, ami lie called hi- cousin.
Next Io lhe peace "i liul. Southey
-aiel hi- happiness, humanly -pi,iking, was due i.e literature. It was
food for boily and mind, ten., in his
e i.r. i -our,, of "continual emploj -
ment, ami therefore continual pleasure." Th thought occurred to him
one elay thai he might have had to
��� e content with twenty, nay. twelve
beeoks. In that case, which should
they he? lie knew at once Shakespeare. Chaucer. Spenser, and Milton:
Jeremy Taylor, Isaak Walton, Sidney's Arcadia; and, of course, Sir
Thomas   Browne.
Speaking of such books. Southey
said:
"They bring me joy, but with it the
mingled feeling tha! life will not be
long enough to make use of al! this
material. Ah. how little knowledge
can be acquired in the most laborious
life of men." That thought, 1 think,
enters lhe mind tti every industrious
reader.
John Brighl said: 'Aon have in the
house costly pictures .md costly ornaments, and a great variety of decoration; yet so far as my judgment goes.
I wouhl prefer to have one comfortable room well stocked with be.oks to
all yeeu can give nu- in tlle way of
decoration. The only subject ot lamentation is (one feels that always.
I think, in the presence of a library}
lhat life i- loo short, and 1 am afraid
I   must   say  also   lhat  our  industry  is
What Does the
B.C. Electric Mean
To British Columbia
In The Field of Labor
At the present time, despite the conditions now existing, the B.C. Electric is
carrying on its payroll
2408 Employees
The majority being married  men  with
families
Should not the above fact
be remembered by every
workingman ?
Go to
ANGUS
FOR
TUNGSTEN LAMPS
And Electrical Repairs
36  Twenty-fifth Ave. East
PHONE FAIRMONT 720 FOUR
GREATER   VANCOUVER   CHINOOK
SATURDAY.   1'F.BRUARY   6,   1915
Phone Fair 2302.
4429 Main Street.
CO Tt i Tin-:
MAIN ST. AUTO CO.
for
Al To   REPAIRS AND  ACCESSORIES.
Tin  Best Grade of Oils and Creases kept in stock,
Auto Filling Station on Premises.    Shell  Gasoline 20 cents a gallon.
Mill: Foot of Ontario Street, Fraser River Phone: Fraser 97
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
C ANADIAN CEDAR
LUMBER CO.
Manufacturers of
BEVEL SIDING, BOAT LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
Wholesale and Retail
GRIMMETT  P.  O., SOUTH VANCOUVER
P. M. HAMILTON F. WILLIS
Hughes Bros' Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET  EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We carry everything in Wines, Liquors and Cigars
No order too small, and none too large for this popular Liquor Store
Store open every evening until 11 p.m.
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
Leaving our Store every Thursday and Friday morning at 9 a.m.
Price List mailed free on application
GLADSTONE   HOTEL
FIRST CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS
R. CURRY, Prop.
JOINT SAVINGS ACCOUNTS   i '-Tsar1-
e
A Joint Savings Account may be opened at the Bank of Vancouver
in the names of two or more persons. In these accounts either party
may sign cheques or deposit money. For the different members of
a family or a firm a joint account is often a great convenience. In-
(     terest paid on balances.
THE
BANK OF VANCOUVER
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
MEMBERS VANCOUVER STOCK EXCHANGE
MEMBERS VANCOUVER GRAIN EXCHANGE
MEMBERS OF CALGARY OIL EXCHANGE
DEALERS IN ALL ACTIVE CALGARY STOCKS, BONDS, ETC.
OIL STOCKS
BOUGHT  AND  SOLD
Stock Department, Seymour 6913
EXCHANGE BUILDING, 142 HASTINGS WEST
When the German Raiders Came
By Thomas Bertram
The   first   step   toward   the     ("ireat
Project  "as taken in  \9\3.    Meetings
1 had heen held in half a hundred American   cities   and   towns   to     hear     the
celebrated strategist and author,
; Bernhardt, explain how the conquest
of F.nreipe woulil be accomplished;
and while listening i" Von Bernhardt,
the (ireat Project tirst suggested itself  to  the   fertile   mind  of  eene,   I'm-
fessor  Burgmatter, incumbent of the
chair of modem history at the University of Milwaukee. Professor
Burgmaster had no difficulty in enthusing others with the magnitude of
the idea.   Active support was enlisted
ill every curlier of the L'nited States,
and inside of a month, men met iu
secret Conclave ami discussed the detail of the  Great  Project with  intense
earnestness, fired to unwonted enthusiasm   by   its  boundless   possibilities,
It was characteristic of the race from
which these men had sprung that, although fully twei million people in atl
were aware of the secret plans, not a
hint, neit even a whisper, uf the (ireat
Project   reached   the  general   public.
The lirst tangible eveidence uf the
plan underfoot was a gradual exodus
of German-American families from
United Slates to Canada. Many thousands threw up jobs or closed their
stores   and   migrated   across   the   line,
locating themselves in Toronto, Hamilton, London, and Other Ontario cities. They sought employment, sometimes successfully, more often  mei���
for times were none teen good in the
Dominion���but whether employed e>r
idle, the new coiners invariably seemed tei have ample funds at their disposal to live comfortably. Pretty soon
the cities of Ontario were honeycombed with German-American families, who, as they volubly explained,
had left the United States to avoid
the industrial depression settling
down   there.
For the benefit of economists and
theorists generally, it may be pointed
out that this influx was one eef the
real causes of tin- inexplicable increase iu unemployment which became su marked during the fall of 1913
and for whieh no entirely satisfactory
reason  cnuld  be  found.
Although the quiet but steady transfer of population yvas the onl outward evidence of the movement which
had begun when the germ of an idea
took root behind the corrugated brow
of a German professor, the plans for
the Great Project were pushed in
countless other directions wilh true
Germanic thoroughness.
As Professor Burgmaster walked
out from a meeting, where final arrangements had been ratified a special
edition of an afternoon paper yvas
thrust into his hands. It announced
the handing of the belligerent Austrian ultimatum to Servia. Thc professor smiled and threw nut his chest.
"On scheduled time!" he declaimed.
"Nothing can in the way of a great
nation stand when matters of international magnitude are years in advance planned out. International
diplomacy? Balance of power? Pah!
mere idle terms! I The Kaiser decides, and we with stop watch, follow
the   plans   out."
Nevertheless the war in Europe
broke and was carried along with
ruthless determination for months
without any definite move being made
bv lhe Professor and his fellow coil-
snirators. Everything was ready
from the careful packing of the last
rifle into the upholstery of a couch
hilled for Canada, to the final survey
of maps and charts. The final word
was  patiently  awaited.
One day early iu January, a tall
man with a reddish beard, a heavy
hoolcetl neise. and a lofty forehead
that uetokened intensive study, walked into the rotunda of the King Kdward Hotel at Toronto, and signed the
register jw'ith an academic flourish
"Otto llansalt. of Xew York." was
the   name   the   clerk   made   out   and,
consulting his books,  he  found that
rooms had been reserved for Mr.
llansalt for this very date, f.eur
months previously���the best suite in
the house. It was rather a coincidence, he remarked to himself, that
all the rooms in the house should have
been reserved for this day by individuals hailing from thc other side, Mr
llansalt lieing the last to arrive. Had
the clerk known it, the same coincidence was being remarked upon in
nearly every hotel in Ontario that
day.
The distinguished^ looking Mr.
llansalt was shown immediately io
his r.eom. As he cr.issed the rotunda
toward the elevator, a young man
who had been lounging all thc morning on one of the scats commanding
a view eif thc desk, rose slowly and
sauntered toward the main entrance,
llansalt watched him nut nf the corner nf his eyes, and as ihey drew
doae together, slowly inclined his
head forward, The yeiung man quickened his step, and vanished through
the revolving doors.
Xext morning citizens of Toronto
poured out of their homes at the usual hours, and individually met the
surprise of their lives. At each corner- stood a man witb a rifle, a most
officious person, who ordered them
back into their houses with guttural
brusqucness. As the rifle was there
to enforce the command, they obeyed.
During Ihe two hours that elapsed between six o'clock and eight, probably
fifty thousand citizens of Toronto
rushed indignantly to phones with thc
purpose of calling up the nearest police station. And in no instance did
they get an answering "hello" from
Central   to   their  vociferous  demands.
The programme for the next couple
of hours was pretty much the same
all over the city. Infuriated but very
much puzzled citizens made attempt
after attempt to beard the mysterious
guardians of the street corners, only
to  be  chased  back,  sometimes     with
ry
CHIMNEY SWEEPING CITY wehave*-��"*"''������'
Phone Seymour 5293
FLAQ  POLE8   PAINTED
best equipment in Vancouver
409 Dunsmuir Street
shots viciously cutting the air behind
and around them. In cases where
sorties in force were attempted, the
prompt bl,,wing of a whistle- brought
up   nie.re  mysterious  men  armed  with
very business-like rifles. Not knowing
that the same thing was happening
In all parts of the city, tlle residents
of each locality came to the conclusion that they were being held up by
escaped lunatics or daring robbers
operating on a colossal scale; and
more frenzied hut fruitless efforts
were   made   to   get   a   response   Irom
telephone headquarters.
Toronto continued in a state uf siege
until  noon.     The   telephone  exchange
the police statieen, the armories,  tin
live stations, lhe armories, the lire
-tali.ms. and telegraph offices, had all
been quietly taken possession nf during the night, 'flu- attacking party-
had iu each instance descended on the
guardians of the public safety will
a suddenness and force that made up.
position impossible, and quite short
lived.
No   blond   had   been    shed   iu    th
stealthy      midnight   operations   which
put   a   city   uf   nearly   half   a   million
people at the mercy nf a hostile force
that   had   descended  upun   it   frum   an
unknown source. It seemed almost
as though sume modern Jason had
sown a plentiful crop    nf   dragon's
teeth during the night and armed men
had sprung up  with daylight at  eve
crossing.
At   n i   lhe   lirsl   trains   t.i   put   in
an appearance pulled in at the Union
Stati.en. Pour specials from Buffalo
arrived, tilled tu the platforms with
noisy strangers whu preeduccd weapons as they puured nut through the
station exits. Trains from all other
directions had been held up outside
the city and the crews and passengers
marched uff at the point of tin
volver.
During the rest of thc day tran
plied nack and forth from thc frun-
tier, carrying in thousands of Pan-
Germanic enthusiasts whu roared
"Dcutsehland uber alles," interminably, and fired shuts through the windows nf the coaches tn frighten the
bewildered  residents  nf  the  country
districts through which they wcre
whirled. i'he trains were sent here,
there and everywhere, depositing their
passengers according Pi a set schedule whieh provided fur su many men
tu he left at each city and town.
In a crowded room, in the King
Edward Hotel, Professor Burgmaster,
alias Otto llansalt, sat at a table and
perused the multitudinous reports
which were handed to him. A watch
lay at his right hand. Early in the
evening he shoved back his chair and
Stood up. A smile uf inexpressible
triumph  lighted up his  face.
"Gentlemen," he announced, "the
last report is in. confirming the successful issue iif all our plans. Every
cily and town in the populated section
uf Ontario has mir forces been patrolled by. i.very weapon has been
seized.     Every   telegraph   wire   iu   our
possession is. everywhere are militia
and home guards���but powerless tu
Stop us. Their rifles and ammunition
we have. Gentlemen, une minute of
eight it lacks. We are a minute a-
hcad uf schedule. Thus are the affairs
of the Fatherland carried nut!"
The next day the foreign garrisoi
��� if the Ontario towns converged
liases previously determined upon
which enabled them tu command the
railroads and guard against advances
Hum either sections oi the Dominion.
Each town as it was abanduued. yvas
cul eeff frum the outside yvurld by th
effectual wrecking nf telegraph and
telephone systems, and. su far at least
as the invaders ceiuld tell, nut a weapon nf any kind was left in the hands
uf the towns people,
"Canada had nod troobs tee di
lodge us f.er tree month," chuckled
Hcllmuth Schmidt, who as a result uf
early training as an officer uf the
German army, had been put in charge
eif Held operations,   "And pebore dm
eeimes, Cherniany will smash de.se Allies, like deet!    Then comes nut Cher-
man  troobs and  Canada  i.s ours!"
"It   cannot   fail,  uur  plan,"  assented
Professor Burgmaster, with cool confidence,    "Word uf the  conquest  of
Canada lei all parts uf the United
States   I   am wiring."
Thc next morning the citizens of
Toronto were allowed nut after nine
o'clock. Placards yvere found on every comer announcing the official occupation of the city preparatory to
tlle annexation of the Dominion in
lhe name of the Kaiser. Until further
notice citizens Would bc allowed on
the streets unly between tlle huurs of
nine and live, lu no ease would more
than three men be allowed together.
Places of business were tn be kept
clnsed and under nu circumstances
would visiting from house tn honse
be permitted, Numerous other restrictions nf a like nature wcre listed
anil a yearning was given that any one
violating the regulations would be
immediately shot. The main streets
were patrolled regularly to see that
orders  were  carried out.
It was decidely the most exciting
day that Ontario had ever known.
Thc programme followed in each city and town throughout the occupied
section.yvas identical with what transpired in the capital city; so that a
description uf the events of that momentous day in Toronto will serve as
an indication uf what was happening
the whole province over. Early in
the morning the officials and branch
managers uf the banks yvere called
upun and escorted by armed squads
tn their respective offices. No time
had been lust in securing proper addresses. All such Information, in
fact, had been very carefully compiled in advance. At the point of the
bayonet, the managers were instructed tn open up thc vaults and produce
all the gold in hand. As the blow
had fallen like a holt from the blue,
the banks were caught totally unprepared and, as a result, the haul prov-
ed enormous.
(Continued un page 6)
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WHICH ACCOUNT FOR THE SUPERIORITY OF
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ITS EASE OF REPAIR���No difficulty being experienced in removing and replacing the blocks; no
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street filth and consequent decay.
ITS NOISELESSNESS���The rattle and bang of
vehicles passing over its smooth surface absorbed
and muffled till the quiet of the diit toad is obtained.
ITS DUSTLESSNESS���Does not pulverize; the
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TTS CLEANLINESS���Having a smooth surface and
being waterproot it does not differ in this respect
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We manufacture blocks of the highest possible
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in the DOMINION WOOD BLOCKS we believe
we produce an article that has no equal.
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Vancouver, B. C.
HOUSEHOLD GOODS and OFFICE FURNITURE
m [��� vj I: [
IN THE  ONLY  REAL  PADDED MOVING VANS IN  B.C.
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Glazed Cement
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and has durability.
Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.
155 FRONT STREET WEST
Phone Fairmont 122
Keeler's Nursery
Grower and Importer of Plants, Bulbs, Roots and Shrubs
Cut Flowers and Design
Work  a  specialty.
Flowering and Ornamental Shrubs for Spring and
Fall   planting.
One  hundred' varieties of
Roses  of  Choice  Sorts
and  three  hundred  varieties   of   Dahlias.
Phone Fairmont 817
YOU WILL FIND OUR PRICES MODERATE
Cor. FIFTEENTH AVE. and MAIN ST  :: MOUNT PLEASANT
VIOLIN EXPERT
Old and valuable violins carefully repaired.
Gulitars and mandolins repaired. Hows rehaired.
Violins  bought.
JAMES TAYLOR
531 RICHARDS ST. Phone  Seymour  3415
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORK8
IMS ALBERT ST. TELEPHONE   HIGH.   ISI
ENGINEERS. MACHINISTS  AND  FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND SPECIALS
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\ SATL'RDAY.   FEBRUARY   6,   1915
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
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A   \ / WT* TWT �� T .T MAIN AND HARRIS
��\      \f     ��*      PM    1     J    H       Phone���Seymour  4634
is   M      ���      M^   I ^    V^    1���<    Matinees   Wed.   and   Sat
THE    AVENUE
PLAYERS
with
MISS   MAUDE
LEONE
Prices 25c 50c  	
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
Do Not fail to see "ZUDORA," Thanhouser"s Greatest Photo Play
3000 Scenes. Caste of 1000
FRIDAY and SATURDAY.    Read the Story in the Monday "Sun" by
Harold McGrath
THEATRJCAL
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   D��AN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
oming  Wednesday,  January     27,   THE   MASTER   KEY
GOOD LITTLE BUSINESS
���W FOR SALE "�����
RENT CHEAP
Cor. 25th Ave. and Main
FACTS AND FANCIES
By "Observer"
For sheer childish foolishness commend me to the actions of tlle South
Vancouver council tinder Reeve tie eld.
This, for instance: Moved by Councilleir Welsh, seconded by Councillor
Stanley: "That Mr. C. Coghill be recommended for the peesiiieeii as representative of Smith Vancouver
municipality on the Greater Vancouver Sewerage Board, as in the opinion
of the present council the present representative. C. Stuart Campbell, being interested In large sales of material to this corporation, is detrimental
to the interests of the municipality
and against iis moral principles."
Poor dear! It would be a pity to corrupt its nieeral principles would il not?
Hut did it mit Occur to the wiseacres
who drafted the resolution that the
simplest way out of the difficulty was
t'i cease purchasing materials from
ilie firm in which Commissioner
Campbell is supposed to be interested? Is not thai the answer t" be expected from the Provincial Government? Hui. any slick seems good
enough with which to get in a blow
at   an   ex-councillor.
en    *    *
Apropos eef moral principles. I
wonder mi what moral principle it
was proposed by Reeve Gold and
Councillors Campbell, Welsh ami
Russell t" disnii-s Dr. Murphy, Miss
Dench. G. R. Hell. .1. Rutledge, A. C.
I\ ttnter, C. II. Undies, J V Mouat
'��� .\nd \V. R.ebse.n. against whom, so far
as can be ascertained, there were no
complaints and whose position- will
have to be tilled by others? T" my
mind the proposal was either very
foolish eir there was a desire, a- lasl
year, to create vacancies to lie filled
by     political     friends. Councillor
Campbell admitted that the storekeeper wemld have to be replaced, am!
it is certain that Hunter and I.andli-s
would, if not all the persons named.
Then why in the name of common-
sense and decency dismiss them? As
I intimated lasl week, il j- emly necessary lo spend a shorl time al the
Municipal Hall to recognize the men
ready lo till vacant places. In regard
to Miss Dench shc is said to have
pulled a nail eiut of the wall of the
stenographers' room em which a certain hat and coat used to bang. Hence
the proposed dismissal? A- a stenographer deiing work requiring expert
skill and accuracy she gave entire
satisfaction. Hut. the nail came out
and "off with her head" demands the
reeve.
* * *
1 notice Councillor Campbell was
very indignant at the "Province" tor
suggesting that a system of espionage
had been established at thc Municipal
Hall; yet. we are told by Dr. Murphy
that bis eetiicc desk was opened ami
the contents noted.-by Bomeone seeking information after the manner of
tin- Russian secret service police or
a German spy And the curious thing
is that when an efforl was being made
to eiust Mr. Colin Clarke freim the office   of   municipal   solicitor   last   year
be also complained tbat his office had
been   entered   and     bis     desk     "gone
through."    If  that  is not  espionage
what   is   il?     Hut   perhaps   Councillor
Campbell   approves   of  office-breaking
and desk  opening? Or possibly  Councillor Campbell prefers the more open
and above board detectaphone method
eef   obtaining   information   required?
* * *
Another   piece   of   fatuous   folly   is
tlle   proposal   of   the   council   to   cleise
down the C.P.R. springs.     Friend Lewis has announced, with all the weight
of   his   great   name   behind   the     announcement,  lhat  t'le  cost  of tlle  water from  ilu- springs i-  17  cents per
100   cubic   feel.     All   records   at   the
Municipal   Hall   show   that   the  actual
cost is about _"-���  cents.     If lhe pumping   records   are-   doubted,   there   is   a
very   simple   way   eef  ascertaining   the
amount   of  water  obtained  from  the
wells.     Close   down   for   a   week   and
supply   tlie   district,   which   now    receive.-   water   from   the   -prings   with
Vancouver water ami noli- the difference   in   the   Vancouver   record-.     T>
my   mind   the   ligures   quoted   in   lhe
"t'e-ovince"   this   week,   freem   the   official annual reports, as i" ilie amount
pud  io  Vancouver  for  water  before
lhe wells were put  inl" operation and
aficrw.a......   proved   conclusively    the
value of the municipal well-. If ii is
true thai in l'Ml South Vancouver
p.nel ���..  Vancouver $32,764  for water
���te. supply 4/7,11 services, befon tin-
wells were operated, anel lhat in 1913
with ihe well, in full flow 8822 services  were   supplied  anil   emly   $17,498
Was paid to Vancouver ami  Burnaby
tor waler. and if il is true lhat in  l'Ml
$34,519  was  collected  in   water  rates
'and in 1913 $8l).tK5. ii should be plain
enough feer a schoeil boy to grasp that
waier to iln- value of $62,587 was obtained from the municipal wells in
1913. Hut. apparently ihe reeve and
council are so prejudiced againsl previous councils that when facts such as
those ligure- are placed before them.
like the priest and the l.evite. they
turn aside and pass by���unbelieving.
Reminds one e.f the old proverb:
"Convince a man againsl his will, he'll
be eef the same opinion  still."
Just a word about salary reductions. When by carelessness or neglect of duty employee- can involve
tlle municipality in endless law suits
and claims for damages, and when by
a little extra exertion employees may
-ave ratepayers thousands of dollars,
is it geioel policy by unnecessary
cheese-paring tee create a discontented, dis-satislicel staff' Is it good business even? I trow not! Hut this i- exactly what the council is doing by cutting   salaries.
��� Eva ami Mabel Kay enter-
niiieil -eme dozen friends at their
borne -ii Tuesday evening wiih an informal dance.
AWJICAL
Pantages Theatre
The headline aet for Pantages fm
next week is :, startling, beautifully
acted dramatic playlet called "My
Friend." written by \\ illard Mack and
presented by Landers Su-ie-n-���Georgie Cooper am! their company eef ar-
ti-t-. It i- a dramatic drama dealing
with a wayward wife anel tefti he's a
powerful   Ie---e.n      Ibew-   ihe   husband.
played by- Stevens iu ihat capable actors I"-I style-, deals with a man who
woulil break up Ins home, provides a
novel and effective ending,
The added attraction for Ibe bill is
furnished by Allen'- Cheyenne Min-
strels, a pretty and picturesque musical and comedy "tiering iu which
three men and a woman, all with excellent voices, h"W a fascinating bit
of cowboy life ai twilight
Bob   Kn.-ipp  ami  Chris   Ceernalls  in
a potpourri fi vaudei ilie. si ig, I um-
ble and dance well above 'he average
aii'! are always one of the hits on
any programme on which they appear.
Another capital act i- supplied by
Gilmour e\- Raminoff, a dainty maid
and a man in an exposition of the
newest  ami  mosl  eccentric  dancing.
I.euna t'eiii-rney. tlie Siberian Songbird, returns in a new repertoire ami
se.tne  -tunning  new   gown-.
Tin- Corr-Thomas Tri" i- mie of the
besl acrobatic acts which has ever
visited  Vancouver.
How They Waste The Money
(Special to the CHINOOK from our own press gallery representative)
Victoria, Feb. 4.���The Hon, Price Ellison and some of his colleagues have
expended very recently some $20,000 in "promoting immigration." Parliament
voted in 1914 $60,OCO "for immigration." So unless the money is wasted for
other purposes and in these times it is neet difficult to divert it, there is still
$40,000 e,f that vote to be spent "ou immigration."
How i>. the Hon. Price Klliseen spending it'' Well here are a few ligures:
Salvation Army grams. $4,166,17. There are sejmc wlm wuuiel not grudge that
17 cents, bin wouhl liarelly give llieese dollars to the Salvation Army just now,
considering what lhe Army gets by persistent begging. To the "Colonist"
Printing and Publishing Ceempany���that is the same firm as the "News-Advertiser," otherwise Mr. Matson of "Songhees Reserve" fame���has been paid
her is slill e,wing for McBride and Company can owe money as well as other
people) the stun of jt3.246.5tl. This is for "cuts." ete. As the "Colonist"
comes nut with a portrait of silver-beaded Dick McBride about every .-ther
day it.is not unfair to assume that many eif the "cuts" have represented his
benevolent countenance. The "Colonist" and "News-Advertiser" have not
produced many "cuts" of Parker Williams���they indeed ignore his speeches���
because they cannot answer them! Heatons Agency, London. England, has
been paid or is to be paid $1,371.55 fe.r "Booklets���Opportunities in British
Columbia." Deies this mean that the sum named ha.- been paid for printing
in London which might have been very well done in B.C.? We do not grudge
London a share of business���it is al! in the Empire���but here was an opportunity to give the printers of Vancouver a bit of work which they need even more
lhan they do in Old London, where there is not such a lack of employment as
wc arc feeling here.
Then again. Price Ellison bas paid, or will pay, $460.75 for "Painting���in
oils���Various View- e.f Hritish Columbia." What will the "B.C. Society of
Artists" say to this? A printing firm in London given the job, to be "given
out" to some poor devil of an artist���at Heaven only knows what Price, when
here in Vancouver we have clever artists who can paint British Columbian
scenes from nature and would be, oh! so glad of the weirk. Shame that with
clever artists like Mrs. Alice Blair Thomas. Mr. McKay Tripp and others,
whose native talent needs encouragement, artistic work should be "jobbed
out" in this way.
Hut what do the government care or know about artistic or literary weerk?
We see that a certain gentleman got salary for January $80.33, and if we are
not much mistaken, this was for "literary work" in boosting B.C. Well, perhaps it is emly worth $80 a month to "boost" B.C. just now���with the present
government  there cannot be many inspired moments.
so far deficient that we seem tee have
no hope tti ������ full enjoyment eif the
ample repast that is spread before us.
In the houses of the humble a little
library, in my opinion, is a mi
ci,ni-, possession."
t T'i be  continued;.
~locaITnotes-
On Sunday lirst the services in St.
David's Presbyterian Church, Bodwell Road and Windsor Street, will
1" ci nducted by the- Rev R. c, Mc-
Heth. in the ab-e nee of the Rev. Mr.
Robertson, who i- in Victoria this
week Mr. McBeth ii known all over
the Dominion a- one of the ablesl men
in the Presbyterian Church e,f Canaela. am! it is anticipated that crowded
congri gi lions will hear him at the
morning ami evening servici -.
* ��� *
Last Monday evening was passed
very pleasantly by a party of young
pee,pie   at   [he   il nne   of   Mr.   and    Mrs
Rushbury, 47mi Fraser Avenue, the
occasion being a birthday party for
their daughter. Miss Pansy Rushbury
Tlie lime was -pent very happy with
music, -eenus anel games, and afterwards a birthday cake was cm by Mi-s
Pansy ami refreshments were served
by tiie host and hostess. Everybody
was happy and all wished Mi-- Pansy
j many happy return- oi the elay.
PANTAGES
Uctqualted       Vaudeville       Mean.       Parnate*
Vaudeville
E.   D.   Graham.   Resident   Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
LANDERS  STEVENS���
GEORGIE COOPER & CO.
in
MY  FRIEND
And Other Great Acts
Three   shows   daily    2.45.   7.20.   9.L5
Admission���Matinees,     15c;     nights,
15c and 25c; boxes, 50c.
.{\AA/1
* * *
The   Main   Street   Liberal   Club   will
hold  a   social   entertainment   on   Wednesday,   February   1".   at     ibe     Club
'rooms. 4362  Main  Street, commencing
at   eight   o'clock,   when   an   enjoyabll
evening   ii   promised   lo   their   friends.
There  will lie  a  she .rt    musical    programme,   contributed   t"   bv    Messrs.
W.   Nichols,  W.   II    McKelvie,  Magnus   Irvin   anil   Miss   Denman.     after
which   progressive   whist   will   be   mi
i the   lapis,   for   which   suitable   prizes
j will   be   awarded   to     ihe     successful
, players.     Refreshments   will   be   serv-
I ed in the Chili's usual abundant  style.
I
Livingstone Centenary Presbyterian
Church
The annual congregational meeting
'ef iln- Livingstone Centenary Presbyterian Church, situated at the turner
of 56th Ave. and Kerr Reiad. was hehl
Friday, January 23. 1915, the Rev.
John D. Gillam, M.A.. presiding over
a g ! attendance.    A brief report of
the past year's weerk freim the chairman was followed by ihe financial
Statement from the treasurer, showing
a small balance mi the right side. Tlle
superintendent of the- Sunday Scheie,!
gave an encouraging address and a
report oi the weerk of the Laelies' Aiel
by. Miss Smith showed what a streeiig
branch  of  the  church  thi-  organiza-
Order now your Wedding Cakes,
Christmas Cakes and Real Scotch
Shortbread,  from
A.   BLYTH
Baker   and   Confectioner
Cor.  of  JOHN   and  28TH   AVE.
tion i.s. Messrs, G. M. Smart, K.
Nixon, C. II. Stanley, A Hunt. VV.
Barclay. Jr.. am'. \\ . E. Jack were
appointed managers and the officers
eef the Sunday School were re-elected.
Mr. I'aton congratulated the'members
of the Ladies' Aiel on tin invaluable
assistance rendered the church during
the past twelve months and Rev. G.
Wilson of the Home Missions ad-
dressed  the gathering.
Refreshments wee- served under
the superintendence of Mrs. Barclay
and other ladies am! a pleasant gathering was shortly afterwards brought
t"  a  close.
Famous Men and their Praise of Books
Ai tin McGill University last week
Mr. J. l-ranci- Bursill (Felix Penne),
of Collingwood East, accepted an iu-
vitation which had been extended to
him and addressed a large body of
students, ladies and gentlemen, in the
college hall. Mr. Gordon See nt presided and in introducing the lecturer
remarked thai it was well known that
"Felix Penne" exercised a beneficial
influence in the intellectual life of
Vancouver.
Mr. J .Francis at once plunged into
his subject ami said iu part:
For many years 1 was engaged in
journalistic and literary w.irk in London. My duties as 'Veil as my inclinations often led me into the dim reli-
gi'ius light under the great dome of
St. Paul's. I have sat under the
beautiful fretted roof of Westminster
Abbey. I have seen glorious sunlight
turned into rainbow hues as it stole
through ihe painted windows e.f Antwerp and Louvatn���theese- cathedral-
laid ill ruins by the I Inns. I have
spent many days too uneler the circular roof in tlie great library of lhe
British Museum���anil I am inclined to
agree witli Thackeray that "there is
im dome comparable to tlie dome ol
the British Mus. um Library at
Bloomsbury."
I hope I shall not he deemed Sacri-
ligimis if I regarded thai ele eme as a
Bacred dome ami considered that niv
literary weerk was a sort of religious
exercise.
"There is no dome comparable t<-
thai at Bloomsbury," saiel Thackeray,
ami he added. 'I have often said
grace at the table and thanked Heaven leer llle plentiful supply of books
of which  I  coulel freely partake."
I   hope   lo   -how   yuu  in   lhe   course
oi  the brief nine-  I  -peak  i.e you that
many   other   famous   men   have   felt ���
nd  acknowledge���a  devout   gratitude
for ihe benefits conferred uy neuk-.
It is true that some of ihe famous
men whose works are familiar lo ns
as household words, some of the great
creators of mir literature���used books
very sparsely. They studied human
nature direct, drew their inspiration
from life itself. Dante, Chaucer.
Shakespeare. Dickens���studied men
more than books. Ihey found life
greaier than literature, men and women more interesting than volumes.
Bui even those giants of originality
oweil something���owed much���to the
written as well as the spoken word.
In the early romances patiently engrossed by the Monkish scribes ���
Shakespeare found the kernels of
some of Iiis steeries. Charles Keade
was a great debtor tee be.oks and lo
periodical literature. I have seen him
tin tei his elbows in .eld books, magazines   .mil   newspaper  cuttings.
Matthew Arnold called a library
"a happy island." Yes] an island on
which you can have a literary pic-nic.
Sometimes such an hour, it is often
ihe vise with a pic-nic, will colour
the whole subsequent life eef men and
women. You have heard eef "the way
of a man with a maid"���let us mark
the attitude of seeme men towards
their   loves���books
Soul hey was a line specimen of the
bookman, lie wa- a bibliophile to bis
linger tips. At lii- home at Greta
Hall. Keswick, he gathered a library
which was not only a continuous joy
lo all who hul ihe privilege of entering  ii. Imt   was useful  in  helping  him
to  earn  that  bread  and  butter  which I
even  a  p.eel   needs.     Read  Sara  Coleridge's descriptive letters and yeeu can
fancy   you   see   Southey   in   the   little
'winged   study   where   lie   pored   over
boeeks  feir hours  together.     This little
study   became   a   drawing   room   when \
visitors arrived.    Tea drinking guests i
who    were    always   welcome���though
i ihey did interrupt literary  labor.   Tlie!
room   was   lined   with     books,     there
were books on brackets and beautiful
vellum   bound   books   lying   on   their,
I sides  in   heaps  on   the  floor.     Ah!   I
jam afraid the librarian who loves  his
books all in a new neat and well ordered woulil  have rebuked iln  disor-
dered  condition  of Southey's  library.'
[The best literary work, however, has |
not always come  from tlie neat, well-|
ordered library. The man who spends
his   time  arranging  and   labelling   and
dusting   his  books   may  not   timi   time
[to dee much else.    Some very literary
i men   would  define   chaos   as  a   library
[which   a   woman   has   made   "so   neat
and  tidy."
Southey spoke eef his books thus���
"My days among the elcael are past;
Around me I behold
Where'er these casual eyes are cast,
'I'he mighty  minds of old:
My never failing friends are i' ey,
With whom I converse elay I.v day."
Southey was a book lover who noi
only    Collected   but    knew    Ins    li""\s.
He hail a wonderful knack of getting
rapidly   all   he   required  e.r   was   likely
';o require oul of any   wurk. lie lo .Red
forward eagerly t" ihe arrival "i  Ius
parcel-, of fresh  volumes.    "Bj     this
1 day month,"  he  ee rote of a  - msigi ���
menl  coming  freem abroad, "thej   will
!probably he here; then  I  shall lee- happier than if hi- Majesty   King George
the Iourth were t.i give i rders that I
' -In.uld be clothed in purple', and -' i
upon gold, and have a chain upon my
neck, ami sii  next  linn because "i my
wisdom,   ami   lie   called   his   cousin.
Next   lei   ihe   peace   of   God,   Southey
said   In-   happiness,   humanly     speaking,   was   elue   iee   literature.     li   was
1 foeid   for  body   anil   mind,   too,   in   his
ease,  a   source  oi '-continual   employment,  and   therefore   continual   pleasure.''    Th   thought   occurred   te'   him
eme   day   that   he   mighl   have   had   lo
��� e  content  with   twenty,  nay.  twelve
hooks.     In   that   case,   which   should
they   lie?     Ile   knew   at  onc<   Shakespeare,  Chaucer.  Spenser, and   Milton;
Jeremy    Taylor.    Isaak    Walton,    Sidney'*   Arcadia;   and.   of   course,     Sir
Thomas   Browne.
Speaking   of   such   books,   Southey
said;
"Tliey bring me joy. but wilh it the
mingled feeling that life will not be
long enough to make use fi all this
I material. Ah, how little knowledge
jean be acquired iu tbe uuest laborious
i life of men." That thought. 1 think,
i enters ihe mind of every industrious
\ reader.
John Bright saiel; "You have in the
j house costly pictures and costly ornaments, ami a great variety oi decoration; yet i,ei far as my judgment goes.
I would prefer io have one comfortable i ""in well -tucked with bmeks to
all you can give me in the way of
decoration. The emly subject of lamentation is (one feels that always.
I think, in the presence of a library)
that life is too short, and I am afraid
1   musl   say   also   that   our  industry   i-
i*M
What Does the
B.C. Electric Mean
To British Columbia
In The Field of Labor
At the present time, despite the conditions now existing, the B.C. Electric is
carrying on its payroll
2408 Employees
The majority being married  men  with
families
Should not the above fact
be remembered by every
workingman ?
Go to
ANGUS
FOR
TUNGSTEN LAMPS
And Electrical Repairs
36  Twenty-fifth Ave. East
PHONE FAIRMONT 720 SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   FEBRUARY
1915
CORRESPONDENCE
Editor Chinook :
I hope that the residents of South
Vancuuver ��'ll have corhrhon senai
enough to discourage the jitney leu>
business which is bow developing in
thi- section by withholding their patronage from the live cenl auto. I
ei<<n't always agree witl) what the B.
I.'. Electric -ays .1 u��� I docs lent in tht
presenl instance, I think that South
\ ancouver residents whee patronize the
busses i'i preference to rIn- itreel cars
are doing a direct injury t" thc interests of the municipality a^ a whole ..inl
piling up trouble ieer themselves in
days that are- to come.
The B. C. Electric employs, I am
told, over 2000 men in connection with
i:- work on the southern mainland.
About ItKMt employees are connected
with the operation of tin- Vancouver
city tram lines and a considerable
number of these reside in South Vancouver, the majority of thein are
married men with families, wh
homes  and  sole
crippling the It C. .le-c'.ric are we n ll
putting eiff the day when it would be
possible feer the company t'i comply
with the requests of emr municipal
council and extend it- lines according to the demands of municipal
growth?
I thank you for your space. Mr. Kili-
i.er, and irn-t that South Vancouver
residents will remain loyal t'e the interest-, of the' municipality as a whole
and met leek to cripple the powers
..f a company which ha- already done
 re than ;m\ ��� .tliir power t'e develop
the' municipality and is. if given proper support, ready t.e advance .>- settlement advances throughout the district.
RATFPAYER
Fine Books for Collingwood  Library
Mr.  I. Francis  liursill ha- received
from  the   King'-   Printer  at   Victoria
two large and handsomely bound vol-
I umei   ior   tin-   Collingwood   Library.
interests are located [The volumes include beautifully illns-
I;   i-  absolutely  cer-|trated   papers   on   Hritish   Columbi
this district.               	
tain  that  if the jitney  bus  makes  sev- e Fisheries. Timber  hinds,  archives  etc
ions inroads upon  the  traffic of the There ii being built up in the Colling-
It.   (.'.   Electric  the company    will    be j w I   Library a   line  historical   collec-
compelled   tee   reduce   its   service   audition and this  fact ought  to  stimulate
lay eiff a considerable number of the]
'plan a bold stroke which would place
the country in our hands wa- my
work. I devised the means to secure
complete possession of Ontario only.
as it woUId be impossible tee occupy
tlle whole coun' v without a million
men. My plan sii'cecded without the
le.-- of a single life. It i- '.he role
eif the strategist to plan possession
ll devolves on the lighter to hold pees
-is-iein once gained. I am a strati
gi-i You, gentlemen, represent the.
lighting end of the organization."
���When   we   look     l'aris     in     1871.
; France was beaten." put  iii another
"Why   couldn't   Canada   see   that   wi
j had won when we captured Ontario?''
"Scientific   warfare   is   not   by     the
Canadians understood," -aiel Burgmaster, perplexedly. "They do not
country. Eighty thousand men were recognize when tluy have been -trate-
enrolled in Montreal on thc day that gCtically beaten. Win. knows, foi
followed the receipt of the astounding years they may keep on  lighting?"
news from Ontario.   The trains could     Then a  voice  speike  up  from  the
not begin t.e hold tlle volunteers whee j'ither  end   of  the   board,   a   brisk  and
poured into the'  western cities.    Re- business-like voice with mure of the
volvers,  muskets,  ihol    guns,    wereIYankee twang than the guttural Ger-
brought   '.ut   tee   help  arm   Ihe  rapidly'111'"1 burr about it.  Herman  Von liar-
forming citizens' armies.    In a week's !<lcn was a wealthy German-American
declaration 'ef war. An outbreak of
hostilities in Europe at any time, but
to conceive of a band of civilians
-weeping across a peaceful border
line, ami effectually -eizing so large
a section of country as Ontario was
unbelievable, a cataclysmic iiverthreiw
of Impossibilities. The names of Pro-
feasor Burgmaster and Hellmuth
|Schmid) were on two hundred mil-
liein lips during the days that followed
the daring coup.
The people en the Dominion awoke
with a start that literally rent the
-oul of the nation. The sloth that
a sense of false security had imposed,
fell away. Business everywhere stopped, and every man with the strength
t'i earry a gun clamored l"r a chance
te.   help   drive   the   raiders   from   the
men now working e.n llle cars. Such
a movement would hit Seeuth Vancouver rather hard aril 1 dee met think
that at the pre-eitt tinu we ran afford
to take such action as will result in a
large number of residents of our section being thrown out of wnrk.
Then, looking at the question fremi
another standpoint. I would ce insider
the relations between the company
and the municipality. A few years
agee the Ii. C. Electric made an agree*
ment covering the construction and
operation of a tram system in South
Vancouver. The ceempany has already
maele' a large iuve-lment in this district in accordance with the terms of
this agreement, ami. as new sections
arc becoming settled, the residents are
crying out for extensions nf the lines.
If we dee. that which deprives the company of business mi existing tram
lines, how can we expect that the
present service on these lines shall be
maintained up to the present standard
and how much less can we expect that
the :Company will make extensions to
other sections  of the municipality.
Tlie coming of the B. C. Electric
into South Vancouver was the beginning of a new era in the life of the
district. The Company is here and
operating under an agreement which
is to- r-un for over 30 years to come.
What we want in ."south Vancouver
is a well connected system of tram
lines, connecting every part of the
municipality witli every other part. By
patronizing the jitney misses and thus
libs. Tuitions   tee   lhe   Library    Fund'!
The "Chinook" will gladly receive subscriptions.
Mrs. Dagliesch. who has been the
housekeeper feer Nurse Paye, Victorian
Order, is leaving feer Australia today.
She has very kindly donated her services to the Order and she will be
very much missed, 'llu ladies gave
her a surprise party on Friday evening and presented her with a purse of
gold.
ele        *        *
The council granted fifteen hundred
dollars Io the South Vancouver Branch
of the Victorian Order when a delegation waited on them Friday morning. This is somewhat smaller than
last year, but the officers of the branch
did not use all of the grant made last
year. The grant is subject to tbe Estimates Committee, however.
*    *    *
The uanimous call from the Westminster Church. 26th and Sophia St..
for the Rev. J. Craig from Central
I'ark Church, was granted by the
Presbytery and Mr. Craig will be inducted into the church, February 25.
+    *    *
St. Andrews Parish Hall, 49th Avenue, was the place wdierc some thirty
couples made merry last Thursday
evening in the form of a dance and
social evening. Tiie proceeds were
in aid of the church debt. These
dances arc becoming <|uite popular,
excellent music and good floor being
some  of the  attractions.
WHEN THE GERMAN RAIDERS
CAME
(Continued from Page 4)
The next step in thc campaign was
the summoning of prominent cilizens
in parties of twenty or more to the
headquarters of the general staff.
Half a dozen skilful appraisers were
kept busy dealing with each individual
case. The conversations ran something like this:
"Edward D. Bland. Il'm, Mr.
Bland, you are estimated to bc worth
one hundred and seventy-fie thousand
dollars. We have reason to believe
that quite a large share of this is so
placed that you can get your hands
on it. We are also informed that
you are too public-spirited to see
your fair city suffer as the result of
failure to raise the levy we have unfortunately been compelled to place
upon it. Mr. Bland, wc have estimated your share at twenty thousand."
"I won't pay you a cent!"
"Sir, do not lose your temper. Observe that we arc maintaining a courteous attitude toward the people of
this conquered country when we might
adopt an entirely different tone. Remember that Canada henceforth belongs to Germany. Keep tbat fact
in mind and you will look at this matter of a little contribution in an entirely different light."
"You miserable thieves! I'll sec
you damned before !"
"Mr. Bland, another word and you
will be transferred into the hands of
another department whose work is
to bring recalcitrants to a reasonable
frame of mind. The methods employed in that department arc somewhat sterner. For your own good,
let us advise you to produce the contribution  without  further dispute."
business concerns with tangible
were  levied  upon   in  the  same
time, tw.e forces of fifty thousand
men each, we-re being mobilized within striking distance of the lections
acquired by the audacious Germans.
Th.' plan- laid by Professor Burgmaster and his band of strategists for
the seizure of Toronto and thc settled
pans of Ontario had been perfect.
Every detail had been settled ahead
of   time',   every   contingency   thought
out ami provided for.   The'strategical I
features   had   been   quite   as   complete
as   the   plan-   of   the   German   general,
-tuff   for   the   capture   of   Paris;   and
much more successful.    Hut they pos-|
who bad helped to finance the project anel whose word carried'considerable  weight.
"Not with us." he saiel. emphatically, "It -cents to me we underestimated! this right from the start. If
I remember right, professor, your
view before the war was lhat these
Canadians we're lukewarm to Britain
anyway and wouldn't put up much of
of a fight, especially if we paralyzed
them by the suddenness of our attack
and the completeness of our organization.    Then, after the war started and
they showed up as frisky as any "ther
libly resembled the on-to-PariS pro-1 part of the Empire, you figured it out
gramme also in that they did not 1 that all the able lighting men had
provide for what was to follow the gone with the contingents and only
successful culmination of the coup ; cripples and old men were left. You
with any degree of certainty. guessed wrong both ways. And you've
Inside  of  a   week,   the   complexion \ ��ot-"s into a mess, that any  amounl
f   things   had    materially    changed! |��* fishting !����'��� going to get us o.
worn ^^^^^^H
ut
ssets
^^_^^^_^_^_^^^_^^^ way.
the outstanding feature of this work
was the almost incredible extent and
accuracy of the information in the
hands of the invading force. Only
by a wholesale system of espionage
carried on for many months could
such a formidable array of statistics
have been obtained.
And so it went. Professor Burgmaster located himself in thc Rose-
dale mansion of a real estate magnate and requisitioned all the cars in
the neighborhood for the use of his
personal staff. Hellmuth Schmidt
took a fancy to a large house on the
hill. The other leaders quartered
themselves as their fancies dictated
or to lit in with the scheme of rigid
street  patrol  that  was  followed out.
One of the first steps bad been to
secure the control of the food supply.
Butcher shops and grocery stores were
rapidly depleted of all fresh food
stuffs and central distribution depots
wcre established. The heads of families were permitted to call at the
nearest depot once a day. A set list
of questions were asked in every case
before  supplies  were  handed out.
"Name?"	
"Address?"	
"Number in family?"	
"Six. Let's see." consulting list
under counter. "Our information is
to the effect that there are only four
people in your bouse. You arc entitled to rations for four only but
since you have tried to deceive us'!lla11.
you shall receive for four and pay
for six."
A  levy was  placed  on
who was deemed to have the where
Attempts at organized opposition
were made at various places but So
watchful were lhe raiders that all uprisings were snuffed out almost before they wcre begun. Ontario, like
Gulliver, had been caught unawares
every man ] and securely manacled by a pigmy
band.
withal to meet it and in three days'
'.ime the amounts collected reached a
staggering  total.    Manufacturing  and
The news of the well planned raid
and its successful issue took thc world
even more by  surprise  than  the  lirst
Twee -treeng Canadian forces were
closing in on the occupied sections
of Ontario, one from the West, by
way eef Xorth Bay, and the other from
Montreal and the east. Tbe noisy enthusiasts who had crossed the line on
thc special trains had for the most
part been showing evidences of a
cooling ardor. The prospect of severe
fighting did not appeal to many of|Pr,va ,
the raiders and every day saw a larger number of deserters skulking
back over the border. By the end
of tell 'days, practically the onlv
forces left at the disposal of the leaders were the men who had come to
Canada with their families before the
outbreak of the war; and they couldn't
get back.'
A hard blow was struck wdien the
corps detailed to block the advance
of the Canadian volunteers from North
Bay decided that resistance would be
futile, and hastily embarked in such
boats as could bc secured in thc Georgian Bay ports. They had not been
beard from since, and it was expected
that they had drifted on tiie Michigan
coast or they were still cruising on
Lake Huron, looking for a safe spot
to land.
The carefully planned raid looked
to be on the point of a complete col:
lapse. Strangely enough, the whole
course of events had not as yet been
marked by the loss of a single life.
The most disquieting feature of all
for the men embarked on the Grand
Project wos the attitude which the
United States Government had adopted. The sincere desire of Uncle Sain
to maintain complete neutrality was
clearly indicated in the way that the
Federal authorities handled the question of tbe attempted seizure of Canada. Naturalized citizens of the United States had crossed with warlike
intentions the border of a country
with which the United States was at
peace. That it devolved on the American people to assist in suppressing the
raid, if possible, and in any case to
punish the offenders, was the almost
unanimous view of thc American public. Feeling ran high and the Government was strongly advised to send
tbe United States army to assist in
quashing the invasion. Thc authorities did not go to this length, but regiments wcre despatched to watch all
points on thc border line. Any efort
to send more volunteers across the line
to help the instigators of the Grand
Project were thus effectually blocked; and a warm reception was promised the raiders on their return home.
Orders were issued to seize every
who attempted to rccross the
border. J
Tint- things were looking very dark
feu- the guiding rpirits of the invasion
lugubrious faces showed arounel th
council board when he general i:f
met tee talk the situaliin ir. At
the   head   of   the   '.able   sat   Professor
Burgmaster, listening with a saturine
frown to the panicky suggestion of
his lieutenants. He did not readily
respond to the rather urgent requests
of the rest that he outline plans for
the future handling of the expedition
"My part is finished." he said.   "To
"F.vcn thc most farseeing guess inaccurately at times. Consider Italy
and Belgium," said Burgmaster. "Of
course, he added, "wc can always
throw the project up and go back
home."
"And be arrested and tried for piracy!" said Von Harden. "I've got
advices that the Government
back home means business. We're
just as safe on this side of thc line
as we would be back in tlu U.S.A.
now. And Lord knows things look
powerful  scaly,  here."
A rumble of dissatisfaction followed
his remarks. Dismay was written'
large on every face.
"Whert the men know this, they'll
probably make short work of us," svt'j
Von Harden. "They went into thc
scheme to help the Fatherland beat
England���and for the other considerations we were able to hold,put. But
there isn't 'a man with us who didn't
expect to go back home when it was
all over." ���    ���
"Do I understand 'fill to slate,"
asked the professor,' "tjiltt if we had
captured this country and held it for
the Fatherland, it was not your intention to stay here and the fruits of
your victory enjoy under German
rule?"
"It was not." said Von Harden, emphatically. "Listen, professor, I was
born in Germany and didn't leave the
old land until I got old enough to go
into the army. Then I came to America. Before I left I was earning the
grand sum of ten cents a day. My
parents lived in poverty. My father
hadn't a vote and couldn't open his
mouth for fear of going to jail. He
had to get off the sidewalk when an
officer came along. The taxes ate up
nearly everything he made. Well,
I've made a fortune in America, I've
got a voice in the Government. I can
say what I damn well please to anyone and about anything. I'm a free
man."
"Don't think that I don't love the
Fatherland still.    I do and so does
every German-American in the United States of America. We wanted
to see her win this war. Not to the
extent of going back to enlist, of
course; but it didn't seem right for
us to lose all the glory���and spoils
of victory when it looked so blamed
easy to come over here and grab Canada. Wc weren't adverse to copping
out some choice sections of land or
talcing over a couple of banks or a
railroad or two as compensation for
thc risk we were running. But do
you think we aimed to stay here after
Germany got Canada���and he taxed
to a line platinum finish and have no
votes and be rule! over by the military aristocracy and see our sons
forced to serve in the army? Nol "it
your life, we didn't! After doing
what we could to help Germany bv
keeping England busy, and making
sure of our own little slice, we aimed
to make tracks back t that dear .ild
U.S.A.���and continue to be free mei:''
This was a new viewpoint for
Professor Burgmaster. He apparently had been too busy working out
We"are the exclusive  South Vancouver Agents for JL
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COAST LUMBER & FUEL  CO., LIMITED
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Phene Fairmont 2500
Phone Fraser 41
the details of thc Grand Project to
get close enough to his confreres to
understand  them   fully.
"But the Great Plan!" he exclaimed. "This war, the capture of Canada, are but details in the immense
train   of   events   that   shall   make   the
world one grand German Empire I
France beaten. Russia thrown back,
Britain crushed, then Canada would
be taken and���Germanized, Armies
would be trained here and se>mc day
. . . the United States would be
persuaded to join the German Empire!"
A gmwl of dissent rose from all
corners oi the room. Von Harden
���prang I" his feet and shook his fist
menacingly at the preacher of Pan-
Germanic   domination.
"If you had lold us all you had in
tli.it dome "I yours in the lirst place,"
he declared, "you wouldn't have got a
-ingle recruit for this crack-brained
scheme. 1 used to think 1 was a German lirsl and a citizen of America
afterward. I'.ut now that we're plum
up against this situation, face to face,
I begin to see where I stand. I love
freedom and democracy more than I
do this idea of German domination.
I'm a Yankee lirst with the German
in nie a poor sec-end. The Kai-er
rule the United States! If he ever
tries it, he'll find every German of
us fighting him tooth and nail!"
"Wc can't gel back there soon e-
ROUgh to please mc." said another,
a ponderous citizen eif Buffalo with a
prosperous boot and shoe store.
"W'e were convinced." declared the
professor nervously, "that the Government would with a lenient eye our
enterprise look upon. Apparently in
this we were misinformed. But if
we cannot go back, to slay and light
is thc only alternative."
"Dot wouldn't be an alternative,"
growled Hellmuth Schmidt. "Dot
wemld be suicide!"
"We haven't ten thousand nun
left," said Von Harden. "We would-
neit last a week now. A snowball in
hell 'tl look a good fire insurance risk
compared to our chance of winning
now."
"By process of elimination, then,
but one course is open," pursued the
professor. "As prisoners of war, wc
must  give  ourselves up."
"Don.'} fool yourself, professor,"
said Voii Harden. "If wc give ourselves up, it won't be as prisoners of
war.' We would be considered    just
plain pirates and they'd probably
either  hang or  shoot  us."
"We cannot fight, we cannot retreat, we cannot surrender!" exclaimed Burgmaster. "We have indeed
ourselves in a predicament placed.
This project 1 begin to sec should
have been thought out more carefully."
"Dot's right!" affirmed Schmidt,
with fervent emphasis. "If back we
���go home, we get tried as pirates. If
we surrender, dey shoot or hang Us.
If we fight wc get killed anyhow.
What then do we dor"
"Now listen to me, thc leit of you,"
said Von Harden. "It's time for a
business man to step in and take thi-
out of the hands of you strategists
and ex-soldiers. I'm a business man.
And I sec that there's one common
sense way out of this. With public
opinion in the state it is now- back
home, we're more likely lo get off
easy here than we are there. Besides,
nearly all the men we've got left have
their families here. They can't go
back. So it's up to us to stay here
and  face thc music."
"I think we could fix it up now
without any of us facing a firing
squad," he went on. "We haven't
killed anybody yet. We can offer financial compensation for any damage
we've done. I have an idea the Canucks would let us off lhat way rather
than kill off thousands of their men
in capturing us. I propose we put
it up to them as a straight business
proposition."
"Dot'6 talking." said Schmidt. "A
business  probisition."
"Hold on. I'm not througii," pursued Von Harden. "I'm not at all
sure that after we had fixed it up
with our neighbors here, we could go
back home���not for a while, anyway.
Uncle Sam's been pestered a lot lately, what with the Mexican greasers
and war taxes and contraband and so
on, and he's just laying lo spank
some one. We're still citizens of the
United States and open to punishment, Besides, I know about one million people back there and every one
of them will be ready to give mc the
laugh. No sir, life back home weiuld
be too warm and uncomfortable tee
suit me for a while and if I can fix it
that way, I'm going to stay here.
1 might even settle down here and be
a Canadian. The place looks goeed ;.i
me."
"liul," put in another, "if Germany
wins the war, Canada goes lo Germany as the prize. Where would we
come in?"
"You beat mc to that, Hans," said
Von Harden. "If wc become Canadians���and 1 don't sec anything else
for us to become���and tbe Kaiser gets
Canada, wc might bc regarded as deserters. Anyway, we would bc taxed
and conscripted and our votes wouldn't be any better than a Republican's
down in Alabama. Before we offer
t.i become Canadians, we've got to be
sure  we'll  remain   Canadians."
"I infer from your line of reasoning, Herr���er, Mister Von Harden,"
said thc professor, "that should we,
from considerations which you have
lucidly advanced, decide to throw in
our lot here, il would bc in our best
interests to make sure that the cause
Canada has espoused be triumphant."
"That's what," said Von Harden.
"I hate to change sides but from, what
you've said today about the future.
I can see that whether we stay in
Canada or get back home, it's mighty
important we all do what wc can to
keep the Kaiser out of America.
That's where I stand."
* * *
A delegation from the invading
coming Canadian army, with a white
force was sent out to meet the oncoming Canadian army, with a white
flag  prominently  displayed.
"Do you come to surrender?" demanded an officer, advancing to meet
them.
"Neinl" declared Schmidt. "We
come to enlist."
EVERY TIME
YOU MAKE
PURCHASES
From these FIRMS
Y
OU WILL BE SATISFIED
DEALER   IN
HAY,   GRAIN   and   FEED \
POULTRY SUPPLIES
W. T. HALL
(Successor   to   Donaldson   &    McDonald)
4285 MAIN STREET
Phone   Fairmont   1514 Terms   Cash
kRDER Your MEATS
Anderson's Market
From   The   Family   Butcher
iry  Shop  today.
Telephone   Fairmont  1634
at  the  Sanitary  Shop  today.
J. E. Anderson, Prop.
4192 MAIN  STREET
u
SHOULD   PATRONIZE
THE CITIZENS
That helps protect your home in
war time and z^* force them out
of business ���y buying from the
alien.
1 HONEST PRICES. HONEST WEIGHT
At
j Main St. Fish Market
4131 MAIN STREET
S
INGER SEWING
MACHINE
South  Vancouver  Branch
Machines   Rented,   Exchanged    and    Repaired
Needles.  Oils  and  All   Parts
Agent   lor   "CANADA'S   PRIDE"   Malleable
Range,   11.00   down   and   $1.00   per   week
4095 MAIN STREET, Cor. 25th Ave.
Phone   Fairmont   1548 A.   F.   McDonald
A TELEPHONE Fair. 720 for
NGUS
PLUMBING   ::    HEATING
electricJal repairs
a specialty
No order too large or too small for
prompt service
V
ERY BEST OF
TAILORING
UP TO  DATE
J. & H. FERGUSON
The Main Street Ladies' and Gent.'s
Tailors
3834 MAIN STREET (Nr. 23rd Ave.)
Phone Fairmont 2489
E
XPRESSING
and HAULING
B. R. GRAY
42   TWENTY-FIFTH   AVE.  EAST
Furniture, Piano Moving and Express Work.
Work promptly attended to and our prices
are  right. Phone:   FAIRMONT   801
M
RS. ARMOUR
Doctor of Electricity
25     years'     experience    Removing
Diseases  and  their Cauaea
SPECIAL    TREATMENTS. MASSAGE
Appointments can  be  made  for  Treatment  In
your own home.
Terms  on   Application
Residence:    3837    MAIN    STREET
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0
NLY     THE     BEST     OF   .
MATERIAL      USED      IN   !
REPAIRING YOUR
BOOTS AND  SHOES
AT MY  STORE.
JOHN STEPHEN
3324 MAIN STREET *
Satisfaction Guaranteed.   Prices Ki..'f
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ONE BETTER I     TRY
LIBBY'S GROCERY
6404 MAIN ST. (Cor. 50th)
For FIRST CLASS PROVISIONS
FLOUR AND FEED, Etc.
Give us a trial and be convinced of
quality and quantity. All Order
promptly delivered. Try our special
Ceylon Tea. Leave your address and
have our solicitor call for your order.
EVERY Man should patronize
Antiseptic Cleaning
and Pressing Co.
Manager - F.   W.   RIGBY
2900   MAIN   ST.   (Cor.   13th   Ave.)
Guaranteed Best Work only
Reduced Prices. Goods called for and delivered
PHONE   FAIRMONT   812
Open   fl   a.m.   to   7   p.m.       Saturday   9   p.m-
OU WILL GET VALUE
AND SATISFACTION BY
PATRONIZING
Y
Grassland's Store
4520 MAIN  STREET
A nice clean stock of Groceries,
Candya and Tobacco. SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   FEBRUARY   tt.   1915
CORRESPONDENCE
Fine  Books for  Collingwood  Library
Editor Chinook :
I hope that thc residents of Se.uth
Vancouver'will havi- common tense
enough to discourage lhe jitney lens
business which is bow developing in
this lection liy withholding their patronage from tin five cenl auto. I
elein't always agree ��itli whal the B.
C. Electric says and il' n -. but in the
present instance, I think that Se.ntli
Vancouver residents ��li" patronize the
busses in preference t'e 111��- itreel carl
doing a direct injury tee the interests of the municipality a^ a \\ h��� .It- and
piling up trouble for thcmielves in
the day- thai are tn come.
The II. C. Electric employs, I am
told, over 2000 men in connection with
ii- we.rk mi thr southern mainland.
About WW) employees are connected
with thc operation of the Vancouver
city tram lines and a considerable] Mr. J. Francis Bursill has received
number of these reside in Seeuth Van- from the King's Printer al Victoria
couver,  the  majority  of    them    are itwo large and handsomely bound vol-
married  men   with    families,    whose umes   for   the   Collingw 1   Library.
homes and sole interests are- located The volumes include beautifully illus-
in this district. It is absolutely eer- trated papers en British Columbia's
tain thai if tlu- jitney bus makes' ser- Fisheries, Timber lands, archives ete.
ious inroads upon tin- traffic e.f thelThere is being built up in tin Colling-
P. (.'. Electric the company will be]wood Library a line' historical collec-
compelled tn reduce its service andi tion ami this fact oughl t" stimulate
lav "IT a considerable number e.r the subscriptions i" the Library Fund'!
men mew working e,n tin- cars. Such ' The "Chinook" will gladly receive Bub-
a movement would hit South Vancou- scriptions.
wr rather hard ami 1 do ii"l think
that at the pre-eift tunc we~can afTeird
tn take such action as will result iu a
large number of resilient- of emr section being thrown r.ut of wnrk.
Then, looking at the question from
another standpoint, I would consider
the relations between  the    company
and  the  municipality.     A   few     years
ago the B. C. F.lectric made an atrree-  gold,
ment  covering the  construction  nnd
operation of a tram system in Snuth
Vancouver. The' company has already
made a larnc investment in ihis district in accordance with the terms of
this agreement, and. as new section!
are becoming settled, the residents are
crying mit for extensions of tlie lines.
If we do, that which deprives the company of business on existing tram
lines, how can we expect that lhe
present service on these lines shall be
maintained up to the present standard
and how much le-s can we expect that
the :Company will make extensions to
other sections of the municipality,
The coming of the B. C. Electric
into South Vancouver was the beginning of a new era in the life of the
district. The Company is here and
operating under an agreement which
is to' pun feer eever 30 years to come.
What wc want in south Vancouver
is a well connected system of tram
lines, connecting every part of the
municipality with every other part. By
patronizing the jitney misses and thus
crippling the B. C. .leclric are we not
putting eeff the day when it weiuhl be
possible feir the ceimpany to comply
with the requests of our municipal ij.Vn'l'i'ps during t
council and extend it- line- according tei the demands eef municipal
growth?
I thank you for yenir space'. Mr Editor, anel tru-t that Se null Vancouver
residents will remain loyal i.e the interests of ilu municipality a- a whole
and not se-ck t" cripple lhe powers
nf a ceempany which ha- already done
more than any oiher power t" develop
the municipality ami is. if given proper supporl. ready to advance a- settlement advances throughout tin district.
RATEPAYER.
declaration of war. An outbreak of
hostilities in Europe at any time, but
p. conceive of a band of civilians
-weeping across a peaceful border
line, ami effectually seizing so large
u section of country as Ontario was
unbelievable, a cataclysmic "overthrow
e.f impossibilities. The names of Prole-seer Burgmaster and Hellmuth
Schmidt were on two hundred mil-
days that followed
the daring coup,
The people of the Dominion awoke
with a starl that literally rent the
soul of the nation. The sleith that
a -eii-.- oi false security had imposed,
fell away. Business everywhere stop-
peel, and every man with the strength
Pi cany a gun clamored leer a chance
Pe help drive the raiders from the
country. Eighty thousand men were
enrolled in Montreal "il the day that
followed the receipt eel the astounding
tie-us freem  Ontario.    Tbe trains could
imt begin te. hold the volunteers who
poured into the western cities. Revolvers, muskets, shot guns, were
brought  mil  to  help  arm  the  rapidly
plan a bold stroke which would place
the country in our hands was my
w.erk. I devised the means tee secure
complete possession of Ontario only,
as it wemld bc impossible t" occupy
the whole coun'ry without a million
men. My plan succeeded without the
loss of a single life. It i- the pile
of the strategist to plan possession
Ii devolves on the fighter i" hold pos
session once gained. I am a (irate
gist. You, gentlemen, represent the.
lighting end of the organization,"
���When we loeik Paris in 1K7I,
France was beaten." put in another
"Why COUtdn'l Canada see thai wi
had won when we captured Ontari"?"
"Scientific warfare is nut by the
Canadians understood/' said Burg-
nia-ler. perplexedly. "They do nni
recognize when they have been -trale-
gtlically   beaten. Whee   kneeiis.   fen
years they may keep on  lighting?"
Then a voice spoke up from llle
other  end   of  the   board,  a   bri-k   and
business-like voice with more eif the
Yankee twang than the guttural German burr about it.  Herman  Von  Il.'ir-
forming citizens' armies. In a week's] den was a wealthy German-American
time, two forces of fifty thousand I "ho had helped to finance the pro-
men each, were lieing mobilized with- jeel and whose word carried consider-
in   striking   distance   of   the   sections I able   weight
"Not  with  us."   lie  said,
Mrs. Daglicsch, who has been thc
housekeeper for Xur-e I'aye. Victorian
Order, is leaving for Australia today.
She bas very kindly donated her services t'i the Order and she will be
very much missed. The ladies gave
her a surprise party on Friday evening and presented her with a purse of
Tlle council granted fifteen hundred
dollars to the South Vancouver Branch
of the Victorian Order when a delegation waited on them Friday morning. This is somewhat smaller than
hist year, but the officers of the branch
did not Use all of the grant made last
year. The grant is subject to the Estimates Committee, however.
* *    *
The uanimoua call from the Westminster Church. 26th and Sophia St..
for the Rev. J. Craig from Central
Park Church, was granted by the
Presbytery and Mr. Craig will be inducted  into  the  church,  February  25.
* *   *
St. Andrews Parish Hall. 49th Avenue, was the place where some thirty
couples made merry last Thursday
evening in the form of a dance and
social evening. The proceeds were
in aid of the church debt. These
dances are becoming quite popular,
excellent music and good floor being
some  of  the  attractions.
WHEN THE GERMAN RAIDERS
CAME
(Continued from Page 4)
Tlie next step in the campaign was
the summoning of prominent citizens
in parties of twenty or more to the
headquarters of ��� the general staff.
Half a dozen skilful appraisers were
kept busy dealing with each individual
case. The conversations ran something like this:
"Edward D. Bland. H'm, Mr.
Bland, you are estimated to be worth
one hundred and seventy-lie thousand
dollars. We have reason to believe
that quite a large share of this is so
placed that you can get your bauds
on it. We are also informed that
you are too public-spirited to see
your fair city suffer as the result of
failure to raise the levy we have unfortunately been compelled to place
upon it. Mr. Bland, we have estimated your share at twenty thous
and."
"I won't pay you a cent!"
"Sir, do not lose your temper. Observe that we are maintaining a courteous attitude toward the people of
this conquered country when we might
adopt an entirely different lone. Remember that Canada henceforth belongs to Germany. Keep that fact
in mind and you will hiok at this matter of a little contribution in an entirely different  light."
"You miserable thieves! I'll see
you damned before !"
"Mr. Bland, another word and you
will bc transferred into tbe hands of
another department whose work is
to bring recalcitrants to a reasonable
i'rame of mind. The methods employed in that department are somewhat sterner. For your own good,
let us advise you to produce the contribution  without  further  dispute."
A levy was placed on every man
who was deemed to have the wherewithal to meet it and in three days'
time the amounts collected reached a
staggering  total.    Manufacturing  and
emphati-
illy. "It seems tn me we underestimated this right from the start If
I remember right, professor, your
view before the war was that these
Canadians we're lukewarm tee Britain
anyway and wouldn't put up much of
of a fight, especially if wc paralyzed
them by the suddenness of our attack
f the German general Iand the completeness of our organiza-
capture   of   Paris;   and | tion.    Then, after the war started and
acquired by  the  audacious  German-.
The plan- laid by Professor Burg-
masle-r and his band of strategists for
the seizure of Toronto and the settled
parts of Ontario had been perfect.
Every detail had been settled ahead
of time, every enntingency thought
mit and provided fnr. The strategical
features had been quite as complete
as the plans
staff   for   lhe
much meere successful. But they pos- they showed up as frisky as any other
sibly resembled lhe on-to-Paris pro-j part of the Empire, you figured it out
gramme also in that they did not! that all the able fighting men had
provide fur what was to follow the BO*1* with the contingents and only
successful culmination of the coup cripples and old men were left. You
with any degree of certainty. i guessed wrong both ways. And you've
Inside   "f  a   week,   tiie   complexion! ��?'.."?  jnto a mess that any amount
eef   things   had     materially     changed.
Two   strong   Canadian   forces     were.
closing   in   mi   the   occupied   sections i
of  Ontario,  one   from   the   West,  by I
way of N'orth Bay. and the other from
I of  fighting isn't  going  to  get 'us  out
| of."
"Even the most farseeing guess inaccurately at times. Consider Italy
and Belgium," said Burgmaster "Of
course, he added, "we can always
throw the project up and go back
home."
"And be arrested and tried for pir-
lacyl"   said   Von   Harden.     "I've   got
lighting  did   not   appeal   to   many: "of I private  advices   that  the   Government
the  raiders and  every day  saw a lar-  ?ack   home   means   business.     We're
gcr   number   of     deserters     skulking  J"st  M  s;lfc,  n"  ,llls  s,c|e  of  the  line
as  we  would  be  back  m  the   U.S.A.
Montreal and'the east. The noisy en- j
thusiasts who had crossed the line onl
the special trains had for the most j
part been showing evidences of
cooling ardor. Tlle prospect of severe]
not  appeal  to
business concerns with tangible assets
were levied upon in the same way.
'the outstanding feature of this work
was the almost incredible extent and
accuracy of the Information in the
hands of the invading force. Only
by a wholesale system of espionage
carried on for many months could
such a formidable array of statistics
have been obtained.
And so it went. ��� Professor Burgmaster located himself in the Rose-
dale mansion of a real estate mag
nate and requisitioned all the cars in
the neighborhood for the use of his
personal staff. Hellmuth Schmidt
took a fancy to a large house on the
hill. Thc other leaders quartered
themselves as their fancies dictated
or to fit in with the scheme of rigid
street  patrol  that  was  followed out.
One eef the first steps had been to
secure thc control of the food supply.
Butcher shops and grocery stores were
rapidly depleted of all fresh food
stuffs and central distribution depots
were established. The heads of families were permitted to call at the
nearest depot once a day. A set list
of questions were asked in every case
before  supplies  were  handed out.
"Name?"	
"Address?"	
"Number In family?"	
"Six. Let's see," consulting list
under counter. "Our information is
to the effect that there are only four
people in your house. You are en
titled to rations for four only but
since you have tried to deceive us
you shall receive for four and pay
for six."
Attempts    at  organized opposition
were made at various places but so
watchful were the raiders that all uprisings were snuffed out almost before they were begun. Ontari", like
Gulliver, bad been caught unawares
and securely manacled by a pigmy
band.
The news of the well planned niiel
and its successful issue took the weirld
even  more by  surprise  than  the  lirst
back over the border. By the end
of ten "days, practically the only
feirces left at the disposal of the leaders were the men wdio had come to
Canada with their families before the
outbreak of the war;
get back;'
A hard blow was struck when the
corps detailed to block the advance
of the Canadian volunteers from North
Bav decided that resistance would be
futile, and hastily embarked in such
boats as could be secured in the Georgian Bay ports. They had not been
heard from since, and it was expected
that they had drifted on the Michigan
coast or they were still cruising on
Lake Huron, looking for a safe spot
to land.
The carefully planned raid looked
to bc on the point of a complete collapse. Strangely enough, the whole
course of events had not as yet been
marked by the loss of a single life.
The most disquieting feature of all
for the men embarked on the Grand
Project wos thc attitude which the
United States Government had adopted. The sincere desire of Uncle Sam
to maintain complete neutrality was
lcarly indicated in the way that the
Federal authorities handled the question of the attempted seizure of Canada. Naturalized citizens of the United States had crossed with warlike
intentions the border of a country
with which the United States was at
peace. That it devolved on the Amer
ican people to assist in suppressing the
raid, if possible, and in any case to
punish the offenders, was the almost
unanimous view of the American public. Feeling ran high and the Government was strongly advised to send
the L'nited States army to assist in
quashing the invasion. The authorities did not go to this length, but regiments were despatched to watch all
points on the beerder line. Any efort
to send more volunteers across the line
to help the instigators of thc Grand
Project were thus effectually blocked; and a warm reception was promised the raiders on their return home.
Orders were issued to seize every
man who attempted to rccross the
beerder.
Thus things were looking very dark
for the guiding spirit! of the invasion
lugubrious face- thowed around the
council board when he general irf
met to talk the situation < r. At
the head of the '.able sat Professor
Burgmaster, listening with a sat urine
frown to the pamcky suggestion of
his lieutenants. He did not readily
respond to the rather urgent requests
of the rest that he outline plans for
the future handling of the expedition.
"My part is finished," he said.   "To
thin
RS
lei
ol'owed
written
now.     And   Lord   knows
powerful  scaly, here."
A rumble of dissatisfaction
his   remarks.       Dismay   was
i ii.-x- .   iiMn't JlarWe on  every face.
"Whert the men know this, they'll
probably make short work of us." svd
Von Harden. "They went into the
scheme to help the Fatherland beat
England���and for the other considerations we were able to hqjd^ut. But
there isn't'ri man with us who didn''
expect to go back home when it was
al! over." .   ���
"Do T understand ' e-,u to Elate/'
asked the professor,'"'hut If we had
captured this country and held it for
the Fatherland, it was not your intention to stay here and the fruits of
your victory enjoy under German
rule?"
"It was not," said Von Harden, emphatically. "Listen, professor. I was
bom in Germany and didn't leave the
old land until I got old enough to go
into the army. Then I came to America. Before I left I was earning the
grand sum of ten cents a day. My
parents lived in poverty. My father
hadn't a vote and couldn't open his
mouth for fear of going to jail. He
had to get off the sidewalk when an
officer came along. The taxes ate up
nearly everything he made. Well,
I've made a fortune in America. I've
got a voice in the Government. I can
say what I damn well please to anyone and about anything. I'm a free
man."
"Don't think  that  I  don't love the
Fatherland still.    I do and so does
every German-American in the United States of America. We wanted
to see her win this war. Not to the
extent of going back to enlist, of
course; but it didn't seem right for
us to lose all the glory���and spoils
of victory when it looked so blamed
easy to come over here and grab Canada. Wc weren't adverse to copping
out some choice sections of land or
taking over a couple of banks or a
railroad or two as compensation for
the risk we wcre running. But do
you think we aimed to stay here after
Germany got Canada���and bc taxed
to a fine platinum finish and have no
votes and be ruled over by the military aristocracy and see our son-i
forced to serve in the army? Not on
your life, we didn't! After doing
what we could to help Germany bv
keeping England busy, and making
sure of our own little slice, wc aimed
to make tracks back t that dear .ild
U.S.A.���and continue to be free men!''
This was a new viewpoint for
Professor Burgmaster. He apparently had been too busy working out
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the details of the Grand Project to
get close enough to his confreres to
understand  them  fully.
But the Great Plan!" he exclaimed. "This war. the capture of Canaela. are but details in the immense
train of events that shall make the
world eene grand German Empire!
France beaten, Russia thrown back,
Britain crushed, then Canada would
be taken and���Germanized. Armies
would be trained here and some day
. . . the United States would bc
persuaded t'i join the German Empire!"
A growl of dissent reise from all
corners <.f the room. Von Harden
sprang tee hi- feet and shook his list
menacingly at the preacher e.f I'an-
(ieruianic domination.
"If you had told Ul all yeiu bad in
that dome of yours in the lir-t place,"
he declared, "you wouldn't have got a
.-ingle recruit for this crack-brained
scheme. I used t" think I was a German first and a citizen of America
afterward. But now thai we're pl.im
up against this situation) face tn face,
I begin to see where I stand. 1 love
freedom and democracy more than I !
do this idea of German domination.
I'm  a   Yankee   lirst   with  the  German
In  me a poor second.     The  Kaiser
rule   the   United   States!     If   he   ever
tries   it,   he'll   find   every   German   of'
us lighting him tooth and nail!"
"We   can't   get   back   there   soon   e- '
neiugli   tei   please   inc."   said   another,!
a ponderous citizen of  Buffalo with a
prosperous boot and shoe store.
"We were convinced," declared the
professor nervously, "that the Government would witb a lenient eye our
enterprise look upon. Apparently in
this wc were misinformed. But if
we cannot go back, to stay and light
is   the   eenly  alternative."
"Dot wouldn't be an alternative,"
growled Hellmuth Schmidt. "Dot
would be suicide!"
"We haven't ten thousand nun
left," said Von Harden. "We would-
not last a week now. A snowball in
hell 'd heeik a good fire insurance risk
compared to our chance of winning
now."
"By process of elimination, then,
but one course is open," pursued the
professor. "As prisoners of war, we
must  give ourselves up."
"Don't   fool     yourself,     professor,"
said   Vori   Harden,     "li we   give   our-j
selves up, it won't be as prisoners of
war."   We  Would  be  considered    just t
plain   pirates   and     they'd      probably j
either  hang or  shoot us."
"We cannot light, we cannot re-
tre'at. we cannot surrender!" exclaimed Burgmaster. "We have indeed \
ourselves in a predicament placed.
This preiject I begin to see should
have been thought out more carefully."
"Dot's right!" affirmed Schmidt.
with fervent emphasis. "If back we
go home, wc get tried as pirates. If
we surrender, dey shoot or hang us.
If we fight we get killcel anyhow.
What then do we do?"
"Now listen to me, the lot of you,"
said Von Harden. "It's time for a
business man to step in and take this
out of the hands of you strategists
and ex-soldiers. I'm a business man.
And I see that there's one common
sense way out of this. With public
opinion in the state it is now back
home, we're more likely to get off
easy here than wc are there. Besides,
nearly all the men we've geet left have
their families here. They can't go
back. So it's up to us to stay here
and  face  the music."
"I think we could fix it up now
without any of us facing a firing
squad," he went on. "We haven't
killed anybody yet. We can offer financial compensation for any damage
we've done. I have an idea the Canucks would let us off that way rather
than kill off thousands of their men
in capturing us. 1 propose we put
it up to them as a straight business
proposition."
"Dot's talking," said Schmidt. "A
business  probisition."
"Hold on, I'm not through," pursued Von Harden. "I'm not at all
sure that after we had fixed it up
with our neighbors here, wc could go
back home���not for a while, anyway.
Uncle Sam's been pestered a lot lately, what with the Mexican greasers
and war taxes and contraband and so
on. and he's just laying to spank
���Ome one. We're still citizens ot the
Unitcel States and Open to punishment. Besides, I kneiw about one million people back there and every one
eif them will be ready to give me the
laugh. No sir, life back home wemld
be too warm and uncomfortable to
suit me for a while and if I can fix it
that way, I'm going to slay here.
I might, even settle down here and be
a Canadian. The place looks good to
me."
"Bul," pul in another, "if Germany
wins the war, Canada goes to Germany as the prize. Where would we
come' in?"
"You beat me to that, Hans," said
Von Harden. "If we become Canadians���and I don't see anything else
for us to become���and the Kaiser gets
Canada, wc might hc regarded as deserters. Anyway, we would bc taxed
and conscripted and our votes wouldn't be any better than a Republican's
down in Alabama. Before we offer
to become Canadians, we've got to be
sure  we'll  remain   Canadians."
"I infer from your line of reasoning, Herr���er, Mister Von Harden."
said the professor, "that should wc,
from considerations which you have
lucidly advanced, decide to throw in
our lot here, it would be in our best
interests to make sure that the can
Canada has espoused be triumphant."
"That's what," said Von Harden
"I hate to change sides but from, what
you've said today about the future.
I can see that whether we stay in
Canada or get back home, it's mighty
important wc all do what we can to
keep the Kaiser out of America.
That's where I stand."
* ��� *
A delegation from the invading
coining Canadian army, with a white
force was sent out to meet the on
coming Canadian army, with a white
flag  prominently  displayed.
"Do you come to surrender?" demanded an officer, advancing to meet
them.
"Nein!" declared Schmidt. "We
come  to  enlist."
EVERY TIME
YOU MAKE
PURCHASES
From these FIRMS
Y
OU WILL BE SATISFIED
DEALER   IN .
HAY,   GRAIN   and   FEED \
POULTRY  SUPPLIES
W. T. HALL
fSuccesior   to   Donaldson   &   McDonald)
4285 MAIN STREET
Phone   Fairmont   1514 Terms   Cash
0
RDER Your MEATS
From   The   Family   Butcher
at  the  Sanitary  Shop  today.
Telephone  Fairmont  1634
Anderson's Market
J. E. Anderson, Prop.
4192 MAIN STREET
U
SHOULD   PATRONIZE
THE CITIZENS
That helps protect your home in
war time and -?���. force them out
of business y buying from the
alien.
HONEST PRICES. HONEST WEIGHT
At
Main St. Fish Market
4131 MAIN STREET
S
INGER SEWING
MACHINE
South   Vancouver   Branch
Machines   Rented.    Exchanfed   and    Repaired
Needles.   Oils   and   All   Parts
Agent   lor   "CANADA'S   PRIDE"   Malleable
Range.   $1.00   down   and   $1.00   per   week
4095 MAIN STREET, Cor. 25th Ave.
Phone   Fairmont   1S48 A.   F.   McDonald
A TELEPHONE Fair. 720 for
NGUS
PLUMBING   ::   HEATING
ELECTRICjAL REPAIRS
A SPECIALTY
No order too large or too small for
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VERY BEST OF
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UP TO DATE
J. & H. FERGUSON
The  Main Street Ladies' and  Gent.'s
Tailors
3834 MAIN STREET (Nr. 23rd Ave.)
Phone Fairmont 2489
EXPRESSING
and HAULING
B. R. GRAY
42  TWENTY-FIFTH   AVE.   EAST
Furniture, Piano Moving and Express Work.
Work promptly attended to and our prices
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3324  MAIN  STREET
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6404 MAIN ST. (Cor. 50th)
For FIRST CLASS PROVISIONS
FLOUR AND FEED, Etc.
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Manager - F.   vV.   RIGBY
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PHONE   FAIRMONT   812
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A nice clean stock of Groceries,
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