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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Dec 20, 1913

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Array V
PCUa CHINOOK.
INDUSTRIAL   NUMBER
CHRISTMAS   1913
\m "*-l
SECTIOX ONE
INDUSTRIAL
NUMBER
THE CHINOOK
SOUTH   VANCOUVER
CHRISTMAS
1913
Vol II, No. 32
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1913
Price 10 cents
Greater Vancouver and Our
Industrial Future
^fttjE are all proud antl rightly so, of thc progress made in the past
HI few years by what is known as Greater Vancouver, and in considering this subject we .must consider it not only from an industrial standpoint, but also from a commercial standpoint. There is
no one doubts the progress made by Greater Vancouver from a commercial standpoint, but we often hear such remarks as these: "Greater
\ ancouver should encourage industries." "We must have more industries."
It requiries no great stretch of the imagination to picture what
Greater Vancouver will be in a few years. The progress already made
would indicate what it will be. Greater Vancouver in its geographical
petition holds a unique position. Xature has given her advantages that
few other seaports possess. The great natural harbor in Burrard Inlet,
her seaboard from Kitsilano to the North Arm of the Fraser kiver,
combined with the fresh water harbors of the North and South Arms of
the Fraser River, truly places her in an enviable position from a harborage point of view. But as we well know, these harbors, more especially
her fresh water harbors, are in an undeveloped state at thc present time.
It is true that the government has appointed commissions on the different harbors, namely, Burrard Inlet, the Xorth as well as the South Ann.
The government has already commenced development work on these
different harbors, but in order to secure the best possible from these
different commissions, they must be supported by the citizens of Greater
Vancouver. W'e must take a broad-minded view of the whole situation.
We must also take an optimistic view. Already we see other cities of
the Pacific Coast awakening to their possibilities, They are putting
forth strenuous efforts to secure the trade that will How from east to
west, and from west to east. Miiliejus of dollars are being spent by our
rivals in making preparations to secure the How of trade that will come
with thc opening of the Panama Canal and unless we of Greater Vancouver awake to the necessity of immediate action in preparing for this
enormous trade, 1 fear that other cities will outrival Vancouver and we
���.veil know that it is more difficult for her to take the place she should
hold after she has lo4 it,' titan it would be to secure it at the present
time.
By Reeve James A. Kerr
REEVE JAMES A. KERR
GREAT FUTURE
When we consider the expansion of the trade of China and Japan���
these people are now getting away from the "1-1 customs; rice, which
used to be the staple food is being replaced by wheat���Dees not this
mean that the produce of thc prairies will pour through Greater Vancouver? We can readily understand what this will mean to our shipping.
Then consider the number of railways that are rushing construction
to the Coast. We can rest assured that this rivalry amongst the Railway Companies will bring to Greater Vancouver a tremendous amount
of business. It is only natural that it will become a great commercial
centre. Banks, Insurance Companies and Financial Corporations
'will make their headquarters in Greater Vancouver and there is no
doubt as to the future of our city from a commercial standpoint. But
what about her industries? As I said in the beginning, if she is to become (fin industrial centre her people must work to that end.
SECURE 1XDUSTRIAL SITES
I would suggest that the different municipalities, more particularly
those along the Fraser River, secure industrial sites to be leased at a
nominal rental.   Power plants should be secured for the selling of power
at the cheapest possible price.   In fact every encouragement should be
given by the different Councils of these municipalities for the encouragement of industries within the boundaries of Greater Vancouver. Let
\ me mention a few of the industries that we should endeavor to secure:
'��� shipbuilding and ship repairing docks, foundries,forges, boiler shops, en-
| gine shops, rubber factories as well as saw mills and shingle mills, in
| fact almost every kind of manufacturing plant could be encouraged to
j locate on our different industrial locations, thus making for Greater Van-
; couver that most enviable of all things a large payroll; that our work-
1 ing people may not be dependent ou municipal and other uncertain
i
1 work for their daily bread, but when we can point to Greater Vancouver
! as the home of the working man, because he can readily obtain work.
But this cannot be accomplished in one year nor in a short time.
CO-OPERATION IS WAX TED
If we don't take a narrow-minded, selfish view of the situation, but
if each district joining hands with the other, works for the common good
of all, we shall be surprised to see how soon many of our different district-, will become hives of industry.
We have in Hritish Columbia untold wealth in minerals which is at
the presenl lime practically untouched.    We can scarcely imagine what
| this will mean to us.
Greater Vancouver will always be the centre of attraction to the
tourist.   Her mild climate, both winter and summer, will lure the tourist
to our Coast.   This coupled with our commercial and industrial possi-
; bilities is bound to make Greater Vancouver what we sometimes dream
| of, the greatest city of the Pacific Coast.   This can only be done as al-
] ready stated by the cd-operation of our citizens.    We must lay aside
petty jealousy and selfishness and work with one end in view, namely,
the establishment on our Pacific Coast of a Greater Vancouver.
Greater Vancouver's Only
Cheap Industrial  Sites
Lie In South Vancouver
On North Fraser
Harbor   Which  is
Administered   by   the
Federal Government
South Vancouver's Board
of Trade Will Advise
Manufacturers
Regarding Industrial Sites
Shown in Accompanying
Views of North
Fraser Harbor THE MOST COMPLETE YARD IN SOUTH VANCOUVER
The W. L. Goodwin Lumber Co.
WISHES YOU A
MERRY   CHRISTMAS
THE   BIG   CORRUGATED   IRON   WAREHOUSE
FOOT  OF  INVERNESS  STREET
EVERYTHING
FROM FOUNDATION
TO GARRET
CALL AND INSPECT OUR STOCK���GET FAIR PRICES,
COURTEOUS TREATMENT AND QUICK DELIVERY
BOX   16   SOUTH   VANCOUVER   P.O.
OPEN   EVENINGS
PHONE   FRASER   108 R
LUMBER
FINISH
MOULDINGS
SASH AND
DOORS
COAL
WEIGHTS
CORD
PAPERS
NAILS
BEAVER BOARD
SAND
GRAVEL
CEMENT
LIME
BRICK
PLASTER
LATH
SHINGLES
EVERYTHING
C. T. McPHALEN
W. A. McPHALEN
McPHALEN   BROS
NOW
Hodgson, King & McPhalen Bros.
General Contractors
Phone Sey. 1536        319 Pender Street West, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Were the General Contractors for the
South Vancouver School Board on the
Secord, McBride, Norquay, Gordon, Sexsmith
Also additions to Lord Selkirk== II
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
SATURDAY  DECEMBER 20,  19!J
Progressive Fraser Street, Where the Saw and Hammer Never Cease
Possibly on Fraser Street there
are more ratepayers in favour of the
Incorporation eef South Vancouver
than in any other lection e,f the municipality. The reason for this lies
in tin' tact tbat een this street, 'at
S'eiith Hill, a diitrict has sprung up
which  is  rapidl)   developing  into  ���
city e,i  itll If,
South Hill people do not like to
be called suburbanite* Bnd a journey
thr.nigh tlie district will quickly impress upon one :i]c reason. They
hav,'  a  branch  of  the  Royal   Bank
there, anil a branch ol 11"' Canadian
Bank of Commerce, Substantial permanent buildings have been erected
for many ble.cks and there are
se.ires of busy stores in South Hill
which do a big business. The
Trailer's Trust Company have their
office on South Hill and the district has several drug stores, doctor's ofices. Tributary to South
Hill is thc most progressive and
well-to-do community of small property owners and workmen in Greater
Vancouver.
Therefore, should South Vancouver be erected into a city the section which will doubtless benefit the
most will be South Hill and Fraser
Street. It is centrally located. Already the Municipal Hall is located
at the corner of Fraser and Wilson
Road, and the plans would doubtless
Some of the substantial Business Blocks on Fraser Street at the intersection of Forty-eigth and Forty-ninth Aves.
This section is rapidly forging to the front
The  cutting  down  of  the big hii1. ,ei
Rosenberg   Road   has   been   of  gi   u
assistance  to  the  street  and  has  led
up to a settlement of the flats along
what   may   now   be   termed    North
Fraser  Harbor.    Hire are ideal  lil
feer industries and thc owners in  I
district   of   sufficient   public  spirit   I
hold the  value of their land to luch
a  point   that  industrial  development
may   be   encouraged.     Only   two   or
three    new    industries    have     bei n
hie night tn the river at that point  -
far, but the proipectl for the fir ���
are very  bright and a  whole-he.
efforl ii being made by both the
zcns  of   Fraser  and   Main  Street
line.
Among   the   gentlemen   in   Sou
Hill  who  have  been  most  ehergel
in   pushing   forward   the   interest-
lhat   district   is   Mr.   J.   B.   MacD
aid,   once   a   member   of   the    Si
Vancouver   council,   a   business   man
who  has  pinned  hii  faith on  Sen.
Vancouver.    Mr.  R.  S.  Lewington  ii
another  progressive  property  holder
in    the    community.       Others    whei
pioneered in the district and are Still
doing    splendid    work    are     Messrs.
George    Greenslade,    J.    B.    Baird,
Thomas     Houston,     Thomas     Fo.\,
Ji ih ti   Xorbury,  E.  A.  Barker, J.   B.
Martin,    John    Armstrong,    C.    M.
Whelpton,   Fred  Way,   Donald   Burgess.
British Columbia's Leading
Marble and Granite Works
ARE LOCATED IN SOUTH VANCOUVER
Patronize Patterson & Chandler and help build up a
local payroll
Works at Main Street and Sixteenth Avenue
Quotations will be carefully given on all designs
submitted.
Scotch, Canadian and American Granite.
Italian, Canadian and American Marbles.
We also specialize in cemetery curbing���granite,
stone, cement.
PATTERSON & CHANDLER
Marble and Granite Works
WORKS :
SIXTEENTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
Phone Fairmont 810
FRASER STREET AND FORTIETH AVENUE
Phone Fraser 107
be to etect a substantial municipal
building should the municipality be
iiKide into a city.
One fact that is vastly in favor of
South Hill is that the trunk road
out to Lulu Island and Ladner passes
through the district. Stage lines already operate from the carline terminus at the foot of Fraser to the
rich Delta. The Board of Trade
have in hand a project to establish
somewhere near the foot of Fraser,
on the North Arm, a big public market where the consumer and producer may meet of a morning and
do a cash trade to their mutual benefit.
Plans are under way for the paving of Fraser Street through South
Hill, and this will undoubtedly he a
boon to the locality.     South Hill is
favored at present with the best
car service In South Vancouver, a
splendid location, splendid, progressive residents and property owners
and from a scenic point of view has
been blessed marvelously.
Down Wilson Road, from Kerrisdale in Point Grey a new carline is
being pushed by the B. C. E. R. Company, This line has already been
completed to Main Street. The
plans of the company are to continue it to Fraser Street and Victoria Road. This will have the effect of making South Hill almost the
pivotal point on the whole peninsula.
Hundreds nf thousands of dollars
have already been expended upon
the   improvement   of   Fraser   Street.
E. E. Thurenon
E. E. Thuresson, Chief Plumbing
Inspector for the Municipality of
South Vancouver, B. C, was born in
Toronto, of Canadian parents, and
served his apprenticeship in his own
home town with Messrs. A. Welch &
Co., a popular and well established
firm of plumbers and heaters, later
being employed by local city firms
until coming west in 1902, where he
was employed in various cities in the
prairie provinces, coming to Vancouver in 1908, and was employed by
Messrs. Heaslip and MacPherson
prior tei receiving his present appointment in 1910, on which date the
department  was  created.
Mr. Thuresson has inaugurated a
system under which all Inspections
and records arc up to date daily, the
efficiency of which and of the staff of
I the  department  Mr.  Thuresson  cannot speak too highly.
The activeness of this department
in the last three years has resulted
in a decided and marked improvement in the installation of plumbing
and the maintenance of sanitary conditions in the municipality, which
jpeaks for its.'U.
Mr. Thuresson is also much
/.leased with the new plumbing bylaw which will come into effect on
January 1, 1914.
 ������ smss ���	
ALERT   REALTY   AND   BUILDING    COMPANY.
Here is a firm that prospective
purchasers of real estate will find it
a pleasure to do busines with, and
one that is thoroughly acquainted
with all the little ins and outs of
this difficult and complicated business. Those who have deeds made
out here may rest assured that they
are all that is represented, and may
save themselves all the worry and
'expense usually attended by incom-
I petcnt brokers attempting to enter
a business of which they know
not the first thing about. Besides
real estate, Mr. G. L. Greenlay has
architectural and building lines.
Nothing is too small or large for
which he is not prepared to furnish a
plan and estimates. Call and see
him before you build or buy.
This firm is prepared to write fire
insurance and negotiate loans for all
who desire, both branches of
which business they do an enormous
business in, many of their old clients
leaving their affairs in their hands
year after year. In private as well
as business life the members of this
well and favorably known firm enjoy
the confidence and esteem of a large
circle of friends, due no doubt, to
their willingness to boost and help
along all things that have as their
ultimate end thc advancement of the
district wherein they are domiciled.
All who wish to communicate with
these gentlemen may do so at 5418
Main Street.
The Beilrim M.e.blr eind Granite Worki. Fmri and 14lh Ave,., Souhl Vancouvti, B.C.
As we uuderstand the marble and monument business in a practical way, we know when we
are getting the
BEST SELECTED STOCK
and the best workmen that can be obtained. We give the most reasonable prices, at the best terms
possible. We can do this as we employ no agents. All orders by mail receive 'careful and prompt
attention, and we are always pleased to quote prices by mail.
THE BERTRAM MARBLE AND GRANITE WORKS
WORKS:   FRASER and 34th AVE., SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C.
EGGS!
EGGS!
EGGS!
Are your hens laying? If not, there is
something wrong. Your egg supply will be
well maintained if you feed your poultry
right.
To produce eggs while the price is high,
we recommend our Special Chop and Pratt's
Egg Producer.
For quality and moderate prices try the
old stand.
F. T. VERNON
POULTRY FOOD SPECIALISTS
CORNER BROADWAY and KINGSWAY
Phone Fairmont 186
Ask for Poultry Book and List of Supplies
Phone Fraser 87 T. FOX, Prop.
Our Motto " Prompt Delivery"
PIONEER HARDWARE and
FURNITURE STORES
PAINTS,  OILS,  VARNISH,  BUILDERS' AND
GENERAL HARDWARE
FRASER AND 51st AVENUE
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C.
Wish our friends a Merry Christmas and Happy
Happy New Year 1ATURDAY DECEMBER 20, 1913
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
ri=-
Main Street Marks Middle of Greater Vancouver and Cuts From Salt to Fresh Water
MAIN   STREET     accurately     bi-
secti Gr< ati i    Vancouver   anel
N'irili Prater Harbor with Uur-
rard Inlet.    It is a  wide, practically
level r'eail.     Men eel j ml ���> nu-ii I  belie ,'i
that the time will corns when  Main
t will  be thc big retail  le rale-
of the city.
There is a project in band at the
nt moment to pave that portion
���    Main   Street   which     lie^     within
,- nth Vancouver with i rei toted wood
blocks manufactured in South Vancouver at a colt of nearly half a
million dollars. This shows the im-
portance of Main Street to the muni-:
ipality. Just at the present moment
there are many who believe that thej
time is inopportune for the permanent
paving of South Vancouver's end of
���   -treet.    All are agreed, however,
that the work is necessary and warranted by the expansion and development   in   thc   locality     Main     Street |
traverses.
It is only a few years since the
cars began to run on Main Street,
and today they run, two abreast from
the Inlet to the River Reiad, a distance
of some six miles. The H. C. E. R.
Compahy recognizes the splendid
-irategic value of Main Street, and it
lias been learned that tlie plans of
that company is to make the thoroug-
fare a sort of base for all thc myriads
of lines which spread over the greater city and the municipalities adjoining.
This policy was first indicated when
the Westminster Rejad, Victoria Road
and Frasar Street branches of thc
electric car service were projected
from Main Street, south from Mount
Pleasant, Later the line to Commercial Drive was driven from Broadway
at the Main Street corner. Later
years have seen a line running into
Shaughnessy Heights sent from
Main Street, up Wilson , Road, into
Point Grey and Kerrisdale. It may
lee seen therefore that the location of
Main Street in its relation to the rest
eef the peninsula is vastly to its favor. It is even now one of the big
trunk thoroughfares of the city���and
six or seven years ago it was bush
right from False Creek on to the
Southern slope of the Fraser.
As the development of North Fraser Harbor proceeds Main Street will
lee vastly benefitted. Over its surface will be found the route to the
new manufacturing district that is
-('ringing up along the North Fra-
ser's banks.
Down at False Creek, the Canadian Northern Railway has millions
of dollars worth of improvements
under way. Their great transcontinental terminal will face upon Main
Street, as will al*n thc big passenger  terminals  of  the  James  J.   Hill
Busy section of Main Street, looking north from Twenty-eighth Avenue
ROSS & McKAY A
PROGRESSIVE  FIRM
Have Been Established Three Years
at 51st and Main Street���Attention
to Business Their Secret
.��� j e .,i - age i,     bi d there was
greal w ildi mess .et the i or-
uer of 51.it anel  Main  Street, two eii-
ii   ye ung no n, i      nl Ij     If irom
hardware
butim   -     I hi ..   .'ere- Mr. J. S. McKay
and  W. J    Ross.    Tbey  are -.till '.here
toda)   doing   bu d   evidently
1 f |        ha .   ci mm and
gone but thii linn will undoubtedly
be with us when this thoroughfare
;- Mi.   centre of Greater Vancouver.
B iii gentlemen were- experienced
in the whole,ah' business before leaving the (del Country and their vast
year- ol experience they have been
able to give tei their many customers
in handling only the best lines of
goods __	
Why Baby Cried
Mamma���"What is liamy crying
for,  Maggie?"
Maggie���"I don't know."
Mamma���"And what are you looking  so  indignant  about?"
Maggie���"That nasty, greedy dog's
been and took and eaten my 'punge-
cakel"
Mamma���"Why, I saw you eating
a iponge*cake a minute Sgo!"
Maggie���"O���that was Baby's."
Tipping Them All
An American traveller, about to
leave his Loneton hotel to make connections by train with a New York
hound steamer, had just given a servant a liberal tip. "1 'ope, sir," the
servant said, "that you 'ave seen the
Abbey."
"No." replied the American, "but
I shall. I suppose I must tip him,
too."
lines which find their terminal in
Vancouver.
At thc Burrard Inlet end of Main
Street arc the docks of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway, and here tens
of millions of dollars will be spent
within thc next few years on wharfs,
jetties and the like necessary for the
caring for thc terminal business of
a great system of railroads.
The Dominion Government in its
wisdom   has   seen   fit   to   dot   Main
J. Walden
25th and Main Street
Street with substantial post office
buildings. Plans are out for a $200,-
0O0 structure at thc corner of Fifteenth Avenue and Main Street, just the
other side of the South Vancouver
line. At the corner of Wilson and
Main Street a similar building is about
to be constructed and thc Government
has already secured the necessary
site.
Along  the   whole   length   of   Main
Street   substantial   buildings   are   be
ing erected, many millions of dollars having been spent during the
past year between False Creek and
Sixteenth Avenue.
And in addition to thc many benefits given Main Street by Nature, it
has so happened that the men who
arc interested on the street are for
thc most part men of great progres-
siveness. This helps a great deal and
Main Street forges ahead.
Chasing the Treasurer
He put every cent he had into an
"Uncle Tom's Cabin" show, and at
the end of four weeks his treasurer,
with $400 to the good, skipped out
during thc night. So he said to himself, "I'll catch the cus," and set the
bloodhounds they had in the show
on his trail. "Catch him?" he said, in
speaking of it later. Sure they did.
They caught up with him and he put
chains around their necks and started another  show."
Tal^es this opportunity
of wishing his numerous
Customers  and Friends
A   MERRY   CHRISTMAS
AND
HAPPY   NEW   YEAR
Phones: Fraser 100 and 122   46th and Main
WINNOTT STORE
AND POST OFFICE
REEVE & HARDING, Props.
Dye From Moss
Beautiful shades of brown may be
had by the dyer whose home is in
the country, from the use of easily
acquired materials. The brown moss
and lichens that grow plentifully in
some sections, on rocks, fallen trees,
and fences, make a delightful dye,
giving a fast color, and one that will
not fade as do so many brown dyes
Boil the moss in enough water to
rather more than cover it. Strain it,
and put in the goods. For light
brown only a short time is required.
For darker shades leave longer in
the dye. If left in a very long time,
the color will deepen until it is almost
black.
���..-   ft   it.   ft.-
1 lealefs' in
" ;   is
Groceries, Dry Goods, Hardware,
Boots and Shoes, Oils, etc.
Flour,   Feed   and   Stumping   powder   our
specialties
ft  ft,  ft  ft
Satisfaction Guaranteed
Winnott P. O., South Vancouver
Little Mountain Realty
COMPANY
REAL   ESTATE   AND   COMMISSION    BROKERS
Corner Main and 29th Avenue
MR. H. N. HALLBERG. Manager, has
good faith in the future of the municipality
and wishes his many South Vancouver
friends A Very Merry Christmas.
"BOOST SOUTH VANCOUVER"
We wish to thank the general public for
their increasing patrpnage during the past
year and wish to take this opportunity of
wishing one and all a very Merry Christmas
and a Happy and Prosperous New Year.    .
The Toronto Furniture Store
M.  11.   COWAN,  Proprietor
Household   Furniture,   Carpets
Linoleums, Window Shades, etc.
Wishes their many customers and the
Good people of South Vancouver
a very
MERRY   CHRISTMAS   and
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
Phone Fair. 1660
3338 Main Street fURDAY  DECEMBER 20,  1913
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
What Incorporation Means for South Vancouver
Bj> Councillor C. Stuart Campbell
ainst the Incorporation of South' It-tic grounds, ttc, etc, all of which
Vancouver as a city municipality. The I are a n ~--.it> fur the maintenance-
issue 1b clear, for or against Incorpor- land well-belD( of mir population    OnrH
On January 7, 1914, the ratepayers i business centres which are surely .that we are rinht in the pathway of
I South Vancouver will have the op- coming; the acquisition of park slteB; I Vancouver's expansion that our bonds
<.itunity of voting either for or j acquisition anil maintenances of ath-jhave appealed to him. As an Incorporate:] city with a population of
85 000 to 40,000 we would stand much
hinher in the estimation of the inves
tor This would tend to make our
bonds more saleable at a higher price.
Ab the third largest city in British
Columbia we would receive a goodly
amount of advertising which we miss
entirely as a municipality; vie would
be included In ail statistics relative
ie, the cities of British Columbia,
Issued by the Provincial (Joverument
anel sent broadcast; we would be an
object of Interest to the' transient and
tourist; in fact we would be on the
j map for  the  lirst   time  from  a  busi-
eiii.n.    It  requires a  three-fifths  majority of the voles cast to pass the by-1
la...   Having introduced the by-law It
is probably  mete that  1 should give
some of my reasons for doing bo.   But'
rsl I should like to state that the Importance of this question made a new
rs' list Imperative in order to give
ratepayers a chance to record their
vote for or against.   The new Voters'
list is not returnable until January 6,,
otherwise  the  vote  would  have  been i
liken late  In  November or early  inl
li.. ember of this year.
In giving my reasons for bringing
In eerporation to the fore I am free to
admit that I have been an ardent an-
i.-xatlonist In the past, but voted for:
the Incorporation Bylaw when it was
before the electorate in 1910. I have
always held that either Incorporation
,ir Annexation would be a step in ad
vance of our present municipal status,
furthermore, I fail to see where In-
corporation will interfere with the
formation of Greater Vancouver when
tbe groundwork for the accomplish-
me-nt of that object has heen well and
truly laid. And my experience in connection with annexation has taught
in.- that South Vancouver will gain
nothing by throwing herself at Van-
. i,uver's head or by assuming a pas
sive position with folded arms awaiting the eventful day. That day, considering the fact tnat there are four
municipalities concerned, is not nearer
than the year of our Lord 1917.
Incorporation should be undertaken
bj South Vancouver for the advantages It has to offer in connection
with Provincial and Federal representation if for no other reason. It is
understood that very shortly redls-
tributlon measures will be Introduced
in both houses of Parliament. We
should be ready to make a bid for a
proper share of representation for our
present large population and not have
our strength in this particular do duty
iur several municipalities with a frac-
lion of our population. South Vancouver will require the assistance of
both Federal and Provincial governments In connection with matters vital
to her interests In the immediate future. If we would ensure the protection of our interests In this regard
there Is only one way to accomplish
it���send South Vancouver citizens to
represent us at Ottawa and Victoria,
and see to It that they are elected to
represent one city���the City of South
Vancouver. As our population Is the
third largest In the province this
should not be difficult of accomplishment. I think It must be self-evident
to all that from a redistribution standpoint Incorporation will place us in a
much more advantageous position than
-hould we remain a nebulous nonenity
-a municipality.
Nature has been exceeding kind to
Burrard Peninsula. Take the tour municipalities of Vancouver City, Burnaby, South Vancouver and Point Grey
and you f nd each and all have within
their bounaaries the natural elements
in the, rought for the formation of
large and prosperous cities. The task
of suprer.ie import to the citizens of
South Vancouver Is the intelligent development of her natural resources.
In other words, the creation of a har-
lartteiy a working population and
'iny public measure lhat will tend to
supply employment for that population
within our own boundaries and within
a reasonable radius Ol their homes iH
hound to react beneficially to the mu
naclpality ub a whole mid make for
ihe prosperity of her citizens, both
collectively and Individually, This being the case 1b it not good business to
place ourselves In the moBt advantageous position for the development!
of these resources and when thc
greater city comes thev will be valu
able assets and as such will tend to
secure for South Vancouver more favorable terms than we could otherwise hope for. Some of the first (essentials that call for careful attention if
we would attract industries within
our boundaries are cheap power,
water, light, transportation, better
main roads, etc. With the securing
of these essentials as a necessity of
the immediate future, is it not rea
tollable to suppose that as an incorporated    city   South    Vancouver   can
by all large corporations where a
large amount of cash is taken in
daily, so that we are now able to
���leal with tlie public with promptness
md in an efficient manner, and I believe the system in use in this department will compare favorably
with those used in any city or municipality in British Columbia. The
Following will give ye,u an idea of
-.lie rate ai which the work has increased. The number e,f hojdings
m the tax roll in l'JOl was 10,164;
thii year  we  have 39,219.
MR.   HARRY    NEELANDS
School Trustee, Who  Seeks Re-election   for   Another  Term
ret who
at   the
school
class on such a body as the school
board.
Mr. Neelands has been identified
with the labor movement for a long
number of years, always taking a
very prominent part in the affairs of
his own  craft���the  printing industry.
lie- has sat for a period of two
years on thc School Board, and during that time has given of his beat
in striving to get the maximum of
good for the rising generation. The
fair wage clause on all contracts of
every description has found an able
sdl icate, anil it can truthfully be
aid that his untiring efforts in this
direction have had the utmost suc-
ceit s't far as the South Vancouver
ichool  trustees  are  concerned.
Of a retiring and modest disposition, yet be il extremely well-liked
by the- rank and file and to instance
his   popularity   be   was   last    month
Though it il mt known
are lei be- the candidate!
forthcoming    election     for
trustees, Mr. Neelands hai already unanimously elected iecr< ary ol his
made up his mind to stand for an- organization for the fifth consecutive
other term. time.
you   will   go   iar   before  you   will      He ii the only workin groan repre-
find  a  more:   painstaking,   conscien-  sentativi    in   South   Vancouver,   and
iiihb point of view.
Much could be said of the advan-
tagei of being a city from the point |
of view of citizenship.   It would tend'.
>t> awaken our citizens to the pottenti-
allty of our gepgraphlcal position and
resources from a business standpoint.
Our  citizens  would  find  It  profitable
and more convenient to patronize our I
own   merchants,   thus   enhancing  our I
main  business  thoroughfares  Instead
of   Hastings   and   Granville   streets.
The Increase of values on our main
streets thus brought about would react
beneficially to the whole municipality
in the shape of increased assessment
from our business centres.    In other
words,   Incorporation   would   have
tendency   to   hasten   our
velopment along sane lines
Leonard Janes, Tax Collector
'ions worker in the interests of the
workers and their children than the
lubject  of  this  short  article.
A workingman himself, he is peculiarly fitted to represent  the working
C. STUART CAMPBELL
Father of the Incorporation Bylaw
Leonard J mcs, Tax Collected,
���erved three years as articled pupil
to F. \V. J. Palmer, Esq., C. E., Municipal Engineer to licrnc Bay, Urban District Council, Heme Bay,
Rent. England, and afterwards
served for two years as assistant surveyor and thc same Council. Came to
S'litth Vancouver in 1908. Appointed Assistant Clerk of South Vancouver in June, 1908; appointed Collector and Assessor in 1909. In 1911
when the two departments were separated hc retained the office of Col-
a! lector. He has been employed here
natural de-' i,)riger t|lan any man on the office
taff.
We need transcontinental railway; In 1901 the staff consisted of the
terminal freight rates. At the present, Municipal Clerk, two policemen and
time we are handicapped to the ex- myself. Owing to the phenomenal
tent of from $12 to $14 per carload In growth of South Vancouver, it has
the handling of freight.   With the de-1 always  been   a  hard  matter   to  keep
make much more rapid progress along
these lines than if merged with the
City of Vancouver, whose population
are so busy solving their own problems that they know little or nothing
about ours. Also, 1b it not a fact patent to every one that the successful
establishment of a munlclpally-owned
electric light plant in South Vancouver would at once force a reduction
In the cost of electricity in the City
of Vancouver? In this way South
Vancouver can materially aid Vancouver city; if merged with the city the
chanceB look extremely slim for anything municipally-owned for some considerable time.
In considering Incorporation the
question of finances and how a city
would appeal to the financial world,
ut compared with a municipality, occurs at once. To any one who has
been in touch with fiscal agents the
answer to this question is not far to
s.ek. The financial agent is puzzled
to find a reason why we are not an
incorporated  city.    The  Old  Country
bur on the North Fraser, thus inducing 11 Investor, who has supplied us with
shipping; the establishment of Indus- money in the past, considers a nut-
tries the improvement of our main niclpality a negligible quantity, and it
���horoughfares In  preparation  for the | has only been by virtue of the fact
velopment of the Fraser River this
burden will become acute. While
many railways are heading towards
Vancouver it would be the part of wisdom to secure one or more for South
Vancouver. As a city, fully alive to
the possibilities of the future, we
would more readily appeal to railway
corporations.
If South Vancouver were merely a
residential suburb of Vancouver it
would be quite useless to incorporate,
but on the contrary we have the means
at hand to develop business within
our own area. And every Industry we
can secure for South Vancouver will
help to furnish what we stand most
in need of���employment for our residents within a reasonable distance of
their homes. By retaining the management of our own business affairs
surely we can hope to secure these desirable things much earlier than by
placing our affairs in other hands.
In conclusion, I think the voters of
South Vancouver will surely enhance
their own material interests as well I
as those of the municipality by voting
in favor of Incorporation, and as the I
third largest city In B. C. we will make
more rapid progress than we can hope
to make as we are.   The opportunity
is here,  and  it is  clearly up to you,
Mr. Ratepayer, to see that it doesn't
slip by you.   You will hear plenty of |
exaggerated   statements,   much   mis-1
representation, but it is your duty in j
your  own   Interests  to  separate   the i
wheat from the chaff.    Boiled <jown,
the question is simply, "Are you ca-1
liable of running your own  affairs?"
If you are then go about it energetical-1
ly and place your municipality in the
most  advantageous  position   possible
for the solving of the problems of the
Immediate future by carrying the Incorporation By-law by a thumping majority.
pace with the work in this department. The bookkeeping system has
been thoroughly revised and all new
forms adopted, and the department
equipped with all the modern time-
saving devices, including electric receipting  machines,  such  as  are  used
if he i- I elite lion of what wc may
expect from labor legislators, then
.' , join in the chorus: "Let 'em all
comi
Our wish is to see Mr. Neelands
get a bumper vote at the forthcoming election. Than him wc could
wish  for  no better.
Harry Neelands
Macaroni Soup.
This is an inexpensive and nourishing soup, and can be prepared at
the shortest notice. Boil some macaroni in salted water for twenty minutes, strain it, and add three pints of
stock nicely flavored with vegetables. Season with pepper and salt,
and serve. If you have it, a little
grated cheese sprinkled on the top
of each plateful is an improvement.
 ioi ���
A CORRECTION
In the interview with Mr. J. B.
Springford, C.M.C, which appears
elsewhere in this issue, Mr. Springford is made to say that the unsold
bonds of South Vancouver had been
disposed of. This is an error. Certain portions of the bonds have been
sold of late but not all. At the time
of the interview everything pointed
to the early sale of all the remaining
unsold bonds.
���THE  EDITOR.
4 MERRY CHRISTMAS
AND A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
T
SPECIAL SALE
Off Men's  and  Boys'  Overcoats,
Ladies'  Rain  and Overcoats.
Off all Men's and Boys' Suits, all kinds, no
reserve; all Hats and Caps, Odd Pants and
Fancy Vests, Dressing Gowns and Housecoats
1
3
1
4
CLUBB & STEWART
LIMITED
From the Foreman, the Comps,
the Ptessmen, the Salesmen, the
::   Lino-men and the "Devil"   ::
CHINOOK PRINT
4601-3-5 MAIN STREET
Phone Fairmont 1874
Tel. Sey. 702.
309 to 315 Hastings St. W.
Special Ratea to Municipal Hall
and other South Vancouver
points.
CASCADE  BEER
Beats them all-It will certainly pay you to get wiae and
have a talk with ua about it.
International  Importing Company
303 PENDER WEST
Bottlers of Cascade, B. C. Export  and   Bohemian
FREE DELIVERY TO YOUR DOOR IN SOUTH VANCOUVER
EVERY THURSDAY
PHONE SEYMOUR 1951
Hamilton Bros.
Embalmers and Funeral
Director*
Parlors and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Office Phone:   FRASER 19
Residence Phone:    FRASER 25
(Day or night)
Hastings
and
Gore Ave.
EMPRESS
Lawrence & Sandusky, Lessees
Phone
Sey. 390'
Week of December 22
Matinees Wed. and Sat.
NUNN, THOMPSON & CLEGG
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS   AND
EMBALMERS
Day and Night Phone, Sey 7653
518 Richards St., Vancouver, B. C.
The   Del.   S.  Lawrence
Stock  Company
WITH
Miss
Maude   Leone
THE THREE TWINS
Prices 25c and 50c
Matinees 25c Any Seat
TERMINAL   CITY  IRON   WORKS
1949 ALBERT ST. PHONB : HIGHLAND 530R
ENGINEERS. MACHINISTS AND FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND SPECIALS
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 	
Why Go With
the Bunch
Down  town to play  Billiards and
Pool, when wc have a more up-to-
date and sanitary billiard and poolroom in South Vancouver ?
Latest and most improved tables at
W. J. STOLLIDAY
4209 Main  Street
Near 26lh Avenue
JOS. H. BOWMAN
116
ARCHITECT
CROWN     BUILDING
PENDER STREET
VANCOUVER
PIANOS $300 rich toned up-
IinaiVO right mahogany
grand (quite new), -uaranteed, only $175. $350 beautiful walnut case,
steel plate, rich full tone, warranted (quite new), only $200. $450 upright overstrung by Mason &
Risch, only $250.
nBrAlUQ By all the best
UIXUAlW and leading makers, largest stock in town, lowest
prices.
THOMSON, 1127 GRANVILLE ST.
Phone  Sey.  2832. Lists  Free IV
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
SATI'RIUY DECEMBER 20, 191
Permanent  Road Building in  South Vancouver
BY ENGINEER W. A. CLEMENT
When incorporated, during the year
1892, the Municipality of South Vancouver included the district west of
Bridge Street, which seceded in 1907,
and is now known as the Municipality
of Point Grey. South Vancouver is
bounded on the north by the City of
Vancouver, on thc east by the Municipality of Burnaby, on the west hy
the Municipality of Point Grey, and
on the south by the North Arm of
the Fraser River, and thc area within
these boundaries is fourteen and a
half square miles.
Until 1909 very little street improvement work was undertaken, the
bylaws to raise money for the purpose only amounting to $185,000 up
to that time, but the district was practically a virgin forest, thc population
sparse, and the needs of the community did not warrant larger expenditures, so for sixteen years the
total expended on thc streets, over
and above the small annual grant
contributed by the Provincial Government for maintaining and improving the trunk roads, was $185,000.   By
1909 the population had increased to
10,000, and it was found necessary
to borrow $150,000 for roads, anil
$45,000   for   plank   sidewalks,   and   in
1910 $200,000 ami $.10,000 for roads
anil   sidewalks   respectively.
During the year 1910, the population of Vancouver increased from
78,000 to 93,000, and the filling up of
the city caused a rapid overflow into
the munlcipalityi which increased from
10,000 inhabitants in 1909 to 30,000
in 1911, and rendered the expending
of larger sums on public improvements an  urgent necessity.
In order to cope with the conditions
arising througii the rapid increase in
population, it was deemed advisable
to undertake the clearing and rough
grading of streets, and the construction of macadam roads and plank
sidewalks on an extensive scale, so
bylaws were submitted to, and received thc endorsation of thc ratepayers
to raise by way of debentures $1,165,-
677.90 for roads and $55,000.00 for
sidewalks. In 1912 $1,000,000.00 was
raised to still further continue the
work.
To give some idea of what has been
accomplished in thc way of street
improvements, and what still remains
to be done, it may be of interest to
mention that there are 244 miles of
streets in the municipality, 44 miles
of which are uncleared, 165 miles have
been cleared and rough graded and
some of them planked, and 35 miles
have been macadamized. Of the 35
miles of macadam, 8 miles were constructed during 1911, and 17 miles in
1912. Of the clearing and rough
grading  47  and  50  miles  were  done
| in 1911 and 1912 respectively. As to
plank walks, 55 miles wcre laid in
1911, and 53 miles in  1912.
One of the great needs in developing the district is street railway transportation facilities. At present we
have tracks on the following streets :
Main Street, from 16th Avenue to
Eburne  track.
Fraser Street from 25th Avenue to
River  Avenue.
Westminster Road from Knight
Street  to  Park  Street.
Victoria Drive from Westminster
Road to 56th Avenue.
16th Avenue from Main Street to
Bridge Street.
34th Avenue from Ontario Street
to Fraser Street.
Besides thc lines mentioned in the
above list, there are two interurban
lines passing through the municipality, but what is urgently required for
thc comfort and convenience of the
citizens is one or two lines running
east and west. Last year the question of constructing permanent pavements was seriously considered by
the council, with the result that Westminster Road is paved with bitulithic
and granitoid, entailing an expenditure of over a quarter of a million
dullars. Quite recently the paving
of Main street and Fraser street from
the city boundary to River Avenue
with creosoted wood blocks, was
recommended by the council, and it is
altogether likely that the work will
bc undertaken in the near future. The
cost in this case will bc in the neighborhood of three quarters of a million dollars. Dollarway paving has
been laid on Victoria Road from
46th to 56th Avenue on Joyce Road
from   Westminster  to   Wellington.
Perhaps the most pressing necessity
of the hour, having in view the health
and welfare of the community, is the
providing of an adequate sewerage
system. F.nginccrs have been at work
for the past two years preparing a report and comprehensive scheme for
sewering the whole peninsula, and it
is expected that the work will soon
be under way.
At present there are few industries
in South Vancouver, and the district,
although it has a population of 40,-
000 is practically a residential suburb
of Vancouver, but it is only awaiting
harbor improvements along the North
Arm of the Fraser River when many
industries will undoubtedly blossom
out along the waterfront, and South
Vancouver will quickly become a
thriving busy industrial community.
BITULITHIC
PAVEMENT
Has the following attributes:
Durability; sure footing for horses; resiliency; noiselessness ; easy drainage; dustlessness; economy.
Bitulithic approaches more closely than any other the
ideal of a perfect pavement.
Its notable durability makes it more economical than any
other paving.
The thoroughfares paved with bitulithic are an impressive
object lesson in fine paving.
Bitulithic has been adopted in over two hundred cities in
the United States and fifteen cities in Canada.
See Granville Street, Fourth Street, Heather Street, Marine Drive and Magee Road in Point Grey; Georgia, Burrard
to Stanley Park; Tenth Avenue, Laurel to Granville Street;
Twelfth Avenue, Seventh Avenue, and Venables Street, in
Vancouver City.
Columbia Bitulithic Limited
Phone :   Seymour 7130
417 Dominion Trust Bldg. Vancouver, B. C.
JAMES WALDEN
W. A. Clement, who has been Chief Engineer of this Municipality of South Vancouver for the past two years, graduated in civil engineering from the University of Toronto in 1889, and was first employed after graduating, as instrument man on the Welland Canal.
Early in 1890 he received an appointment on the Toronto city engineer's staff, and remained in the city's service until 1905, when he resigned his position as Assistant City Eengineer to accept the City
Engincership of Vancouver. During his six years of office in Vancouver, the city increased in population from 40,000 to 100,000, and
this rapid increase necessitated greal activity in the engineering department. A few months after being appointed hc reported on, and
recommended the improving of the Capilano water system, and the
constructing of a reservoir on "Little Mountain," which has since
been carried to completion. Op his recommendation in 1908, and
after thorough consideration and investigation Vancouver abandoned
the "septic tank" treatment of sewerage and thc "separate system,"
adopting the "combined system," which is being carried out today.
Leading   South   Vancouver   Business
Man
A splendid exemplification of thc
spirit of progress which has actuated
the retail merchants of South Vancouver is seen in the concern which
is operated under the above style.
This gentleman located at 4112 Main
Street, and has been doing business
in this district long before there were
any streets graded. Starting in a
most unpretentious way, and the extent to which the business has grown
my bc seen in the fact that he is now
one of thc leading grocers in the
community. Just four years ago thc
increase of business necessitated the
building of the first handsome brick
block here. A complete stock of canned goods, staple and fancy groceries
is carried in this modern emporium.
Incidentally it would be well to remember that here is to bc procured
the finest confectionery in the locality. Mr. Walden is one of South
Vancouver's leading citizens, honest,
straightforward and upright in all
transactions.
H. P. McCOOL,
REAL ESTATE
If any of our Readers should ever
think of purchasing a nice piece of
real estate, H. P. McCool is the gentleman in this firm that you should
do business with. A keen financier
and thoroughly progressive, this gentleman has, by paying strict attention
to the many little fluctuations of the
realty market, placed himself in an
enviable position to serve those who
desire to appoint him as their representative. In the matter of fire insurance, this firm stands pre-eminent
in thc drafting of a policy, writing
only such as give to the client thc
fullest measure of protection. Occupying centrally located offices at
4405 Main Street, this firm transacts
a goodly share of thc business of thc
district, due no doubt to thc keen interest they take in all things appertaining to their client's welfare.
Phone Fairmont  1565.
THE WINNOTT STORES
Thc value of a business can invariably be judged by the volume . |
trade it transacts during a given period. Unless its turnover is large ar.'!
rapid its returns to its investors ar
small. Not only that, but a health;,
turnover is thc best evidence of sati-
lied customers, which is the keynote,
to success in business.
A couple of years ago the Winn,'!
Stores, at the corner of Main Street
and 46th Avenue were taken over bv
Mr. Walter C. Reeve and Mr. H. G
Harding, two enterprising grocery
men. Since their advent into the pre -
prictorship the ameeunt of business
transacted at these steircs has increased by leaps and bounds. Last year
thc turnover of the business was over
$60,000, which compares favorably
with many of the larger stores in the
City of Vancouver ai el is the best t ���-
ken of the popularly nd progressive
business   principles   of   .'��� s   firm.
Located in a well-populattd .'.'.
and with a field which is not restricted
on any side, this firm has been able
by capable management, splcml; ;
service and the most modern facilities for handling business to build u|
a substantial and lasting business
The slock which is carried is lar:;
and lends itself to selection of every
taste. Mr. J. F. Newman is the outside man, and he has shown that hc
can more than take care of himself
with any travellers in the grocery
tine.
Slam I
The old car horse had been entered in a horse race and he wouldn't
start.
"Why don't you get up to the
mark?" shouted the starter to the
jockey.
"Can't do it. He won't ever start
until hc hears the door shut, and I
haven't any door."
An Odorous Spirit
A woman who attended a spiritualistic seance was invited by the medium to go up to the cabinet and r ���
ceive a message from "one who ha!
departed to the other side of life
When she came back a friend as'ie.
her if she had received a message.
"Yes," she replied, "a voice whispered in  my ear."
"Was it a real spirit message?" her
friend   persisted.
"Well, I don't know," answered
the woman; "but if it was, the spiri;
had been eating onions."
Dangerous Topic
"Do you care for Browning?" asked thc poetical man with the long
hair of thc conspiciously-drcssed lady
at his right.
"Not so loud, please," whispereei
the woman, "my husband has an awfully   jealous   disposition."
Telephone:  Fairmont 317
Home Phone, Fair. 1911L,
E.W.
PEACH
Pioneer of
South Vancouver
PLUMBER
��
Jobbing a specialty
All work guaranteed
53 29th Avenue West
VANCOUVER, B, C.
Main Street Paving
Watch us make the dirt fly in the
paving of Main Street with Wood
Blocks Manufactured in South
Vancouver H
Dominion  Creosoting
COMPANY   LIMITED VI
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
SATURDAY DECEMBER 20, 1913
Remarkable Gain in School Attendance in Last^Five Years
By Secretary William Kirkland
d-
LARGE   GROWTH   IN
SCHOOL   ATTENDANCE
y car-
1908
1909
1910
1912
1913
Pupils.
163
237
352
.    1561
.    3564
.   4352
I have thc pleasure in subscribing
to your Christmas number a short
review of school work in South Vancouver. The first school was opened
in 1902 at the corner of Eraser
Street and North Arm Road, a public-spirited citizen gave an acre as a
school site, this school has two class
rooms, though only one room was
opened at that time. I am informed
that when this school was opened it
was under thc supervision e,f thc
Richmond Hoard of School Trustees,
of which Mr. Sexsmith was chairman, and his daughter was the first
teacher. At a later date the Board
of School Trustees of South Vancouver as an addition to the grounds
bought an acre on the east of the
original site for the sum of $2000,
and built a four-roomed School cost-
AugusJ,  1911.
The next school built was a single
room at the corner of Joyce and
Westminster Roads in  1906, followed
by a tWO-rooatcd scheeul in 1908.
This was followed in 1909 by the
erection o( the first half of what
was to be according to the plans
an eighl-roomed school, the second
half being built in 1910, and is now
an annex to Carleton School. Next
in order was a two-roomed sehoeel
built at Cedar Cottage in 1907, followed in 1908 by the erection of the
lirst half of what was tn be an eight-
Ireie.nieel seheieil, which was completed
in 1909. and is now known as the
Annex tn Lord Selkirk School. Next
in order comes the building oi a two-
reeenned school in 1907. on the ce,r-
ner <ef Thirty-secnnil Avenue and
Main Street, followed in 1908 by the
erection of the first half of what was
tee    he    when    completed    an    eight-i
roomed school, now known as Gen-
eral Brock School.    In  1909 thc first
half    of    Sir    Alexander    Mackenzie
School,   on   Eraser  Street,  was  built
and completed in 1910. in addition to
the   eight-roomed   schoeil   there   are |
I now two temporary schools, one with
femr rooms and one with two rooms.
In  1910 the contracts  were let for
building our first brick  schools, viz.:
Tecumseh,  General  Wolfe  and  Lord,
Selkirk   School,   schools   with   eight \
rooms each, all of which were opened
in August,  1911.    The school population began to grow so rapidly at this .
period that Lord Selkirk School was i
filled   to   its   utmost    capacity,   ten-1
ders   were   called   for   and   contracts
WILLIAM KIRKLAND. Secretary Scull, V.ncoum School Board
let for the building eef two wings te,
this school, alse, for the erection eef
viz.: Walter Mobcrly. Sir William.
Van Home, Richard McBride and
Carleton schools. The new Schools
just enumerated and thc additions to
Lord Selkirk School were completed
and opened in August, 1912. During thc year 1912 there were also
two temporary two-roomed schools
opened, viz.: Champlain, corner of
Sixty-first Avenue and Kerr Road,
and Connaught Schoeil. corner of
Rupert Street and Wellington Ave.
It was now found necessary owing
te; tlle congested condition of some
of our schools to call for tenders fe,r
the erection of four new schools,
and contracts wcre l.t for the building oi Norquay, Secord, Gordon and
Sexsmith schools, also two wings to
Wolfe schools. All these contracts
were completed and the schools occupied in August of the present
year. As a proof of the phenomenal
growth of the population I submit
feer the consideration of your readers
a statement of the school attendance
for thc last six years, viz.: 1907,
162; 1908, 237; 1909. 352; 1910, 1561;
1911, 2543; 1912, 3564; 1913, 4352. Thc
total cost of our school sites amounts
to $362,534.00. and Iheir present estimated value is $566,650.00. The cost
nf our school buildings amounts to
$785,000.00. There arc 128 teachers
on the public school staff, six on the
high school staff, five manual training teachers and two domestic
science teachers, making a total ef
141.
MISSES EVA AND  MABEL KAY
DELIGHT    ST.    PATRICK'S
AUDIENCE.
Two     Well-known     Local     Young
Ladies Take  Part  in  Successful Concert.
At the monthly concert at St. Patrick's Church Tuesday night, smong
those who assisted iu the program
were the Misses Eva and Mabel Kay,
talented   Senith   Vancouver   soloists.
Miss Eva Kay sang soprano in a
mixed quartette with Miss Mabel
Kay; Mr. Joe Kelly and Mr. Bertram. This number was exceptionally
well rendered anel credit is due Mr.
Bertram for having arranged the
number,
Miss Mabel fairly brought the
house down with her rendition of
the "Persian Seranade," accompanied
een the piano by her sister. As an
encore she gave Ihe "Dutch Idyll."
Miss Collins also sang with much
sweetness.    Father Connely and Mr.
McCarthy sang a duet which was
well received. Mr. Bob Arthur gave
a recitation on "Sentenced to Death."
All the numbers were very well received and the evening was of a
most  enjoyable  character.
il
South Vancouver May Well Feel Proud of these Magnificent Modern Institutions       si
CORDON SCHOOL
WALTER MOBERLEY
LORD SELKIRK
SIR WILLIAM VAN HORNE
SECORD SCHOOL
SEXSMITH SCHOOL
1 c
r
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:""*��"S��i*                    -          " ' ���      ,            '            ��� - i
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HtaSMb-                          ��� *MMCtiS.aL!L.     ij^i^^lS
'.       ��*   -           ���
GENERAL WOLFE
RICHARD McBRIDE
NORQUAY SCHOOL SATURDAY  DECEMBER 20,  1913
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
VII
New School Houses Are of a Most Modern Type
By Joseph H. Bowman, Architect
%
THE four new schools erected in
Seeuth Vancouver this year,
namely, Gordon, Sexsmith, Secord
and Norquay arc what is known as
slow burning construction. Thc
.���liter walls, which are of brick with
sandstone trimmings, are supported
an a substructure of concrete fejrm-
ing a basement, in which arc located
lhe playrooms, lavatories and furnace
r.tom.
The two floors containing the class
and other rooms arc built solid and
supported on very heavy tir beams,
thc outer ends of which are carried
by means of strong steel hangers,
embedded into concrete, supported
��� m brick piers laid up in cement and
s.ind-mortar, the inner ends resting
on steel caps, supported on heavy
pusts going through thc full height
of the building and supporting the
centre of roof. The inside partitions
forming the class rooms, cloak rooms
and teachers' offices, are also of solid
construction.
In no case have permanent load
carrying beams been allowed to run
into brick-work, thereby eliminating
thc possibility of dry rot or injury
from decay by dampness from the
outside. Great care was also exercised so as to have all supporting
members arranged in such manner
as to avoid thc possibility of settlement taking place in the fleeeers. which
is sometimes caused by placing supporting members on horizontal hearings, that are liable to shrink.
The lintels above all windows outside arc of concrete reinforced with
mild steel bars, running the full
length of the building in each case,
thereby ensuring a very streing and
rigid  construction.
Class rooms have been designed to
accommodate from forty to fifty pupils, and are exceptionally well lighted and have been provided at each
end and side with natural slate black -
boards and chalk rails with map and
picture  rails above.
Ample cle,ak rooms have also been
provided at the end of each class
room.
Corridors running the full length
of each floor gives access to these
classrooms. Principals' and teachers'
rooms are located on each floor.
Stairs leading from main entrance
te, each floor are of very ample proportion and easy rise.
Fire escape stairs are located at
each end of the corridors and exit
double deiors opening out are equipped with panic bolts for ready exit
I in case of tire. With regard to open-
' ing out thc same idea has been carried out in reference to all other doors
throughout the building.
Good school plumbing fixtures
have heen installed and everything
done te) ensure good sanitatiein in this
regard.
Drinking fountains are located in
I each floor and lavatory basins in each
I toilet.
TECUMSEH SCHOOL
As it is the intention of the tm--
tees to enlarge these buildings to that
of sixteen roomed schools, as future
time and conditions may warrant, the
planning anel general layout has been
designed with this end in view and i
preparations made sn that thc wings
of the complete structure may be
added at any time without in any way
interfering with the weirk e.f the present  schools.
As far as possible hecal labeir and
material were used and employed in
the work of construction, and the
wishes of the trustees in this regard
were carried  out.
Lumber was supplied by a S'-uth
Vancouver mill, brick from Clayburn,
and sand and gravel from Eburne.
Slates which, unfortunately are not
quarried in B. C, were impeirted from
Wales and Shank's school plumbing
fixtures from Scotland.
Thc contractors for the work were
Messrs. Mcl'haler Rros., to whom
the contract was a ucd in the u-ual
way by public tender and who carried out the work in a very satisfactory manner.
In reference to danger from tire
or panic, lighting, heating, vcnlilatt.n
and sanitation, no effort has been
spared in planning and building these
Schools tei create ideal conditions
both   for   pupils   and   teachers.
THE  LADNERWOODWARD
SERVICE.
The recent inauguration of the new
Ladner ferry service to Woodward's
Landing with ihe motor bus connect
tion through South Vancouver is of
mole than ordinary importance to the
municipality. For one thing, by bringing over the produce of the Delta to
South Vancouver it should eventually
tend to lower the cost of living, as the-
new route Is not only shorter but
transportation of produce Is cheaper
than hy ejther the N'ew Westminster
or Steveeton routes from l-adll"l' It
should, moreover, help along the
speedy realization of a distributing
market in South Vancouver, a project
which now lies in abeyance.
The new service will also help to
make the municipality better known to
the numerous people travelling between Vancouver and the Delta. The
Fraser road district, will of course, be
more particularly affected, but there
ran he no reasonable doubt that the
whole of the municipality will benefit
hy an increased knowledge, thus promoted, of its residential and industrial
advantage**.
As yet the motor bus Bervice Is In
it- Infancy, but so far the patronage
has heen of the most encouraging
kind, and a large increase In both passengers and freight is confidently ex-
pected in ih'' early spring. There are
at present three motor buses in commission and the times of service will
lie  found  in  our advertising columns.
J. H. BOWMAN, Architect Ioi South Vancouvei Schooli
The wiring for electric lighting,
fire alarms and bells are in conduit
and the electric energy brought into
the buildings by means eif underground cables, thus preventing the
danger to children from wires blowing down.
The buildings are warmed with hot
air automatically controlled from each
Separate fan and furnace rooms arc
located in thc basement and are surrounded with brick walls, and entirely ceiled with reinforced concrete
over head. This method of isolating
the heating plants has been done with
a view to avoid thc danger freim fire
his point and also prevent sound
1    .i U e e   i i .t i    -    kiJUL, uiieii   11 e ,,,,   cavil     . ,    . e.'       _ ,:���.    , ���
, -. ... .. ,   at this point an
lass room, and ventilation is  cared i .
.or  by  means  of  electrically  driven 1 "r vibration from
multivane fans
for   by   means   of  electrically   driven;
| turbing  the  work  of  the  school
^ssisSS^
"SE^a0"*0
II BQ IS
, null ii A il liiiii
��SEErr     m"
GENERAL BROCK SCHOOL
THE W. S. HOLLAND AGENCY
AND
A. E TREGENT & CO. LTD.
GENERAL AGENTS FOR
Independent Insurance Companies
We make our own rates, our companies not being controlled by any combine
FIRE INSURANCE EMPLOYER'S LIABILITY INSURANCE RENT INSURANCE
PLATE-GLASS INSURANCE ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE
 AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE SURETY BONDS	
South Vancouver School Insurance      Let Us Save You Money
A very large proportion of this Insurance is carried in companies operated by us,
and the ratepayers are thereby saved a large sum in premiums, as our rates are lower
than those quoted by competing companies.
Our companies have complied with all the requirements
of British Columbia Insurance Department and will bear the
strictest investigation.
OUR  MOTTO
"INSURANCE AT JUST RATES"
OUR  MOTTO
27 Imperial Building, Pender Street West
VANCOUVER, B.C. SATURDAY  DECEMBER 20,  1913
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
A Municipally Owned Electric Light and Power Plant
BY L. F. RAWDEN, A.I.E.E
IN asking me to give your readers
an article on our proposed muni-
i ipal light and power plant, while not
lieing a jeuirnalist, I must apologise
ii 1 do not write on journalistic
lines, but 1 will endeavor to give
you/ readers a few simple facts why
we should have our own light and
power   plant   in     Seeuth     Vancouver.
With the system that I have recommended to thc reeve and council, op-
e rated and owned by thc municipality, and the rate oi 7c per killowatt
hour, would not only bc self sustaining, but revenue producing, no charge
lor connections, and no meter rents
, - at present time, and a charge of
per killowatt hour and a small
meter rent feir day load, with a most
u| -to-date street lighting system.
This is no new thing. There arc il'iz-
(iis of municipal owned steam plants
ihrough the world.
'I here arc only two hydro electric
municipal owned plants in Great
l'.ritain. Thc majority are steam
elriven, and nearly in every instance
'how a good prolit. London, Liverpool, Derby, Conway, IX vonport,
I astbourne, Glasgow, Loughborough,
Norwich, Perth, Tynemouth, Wolverhampton, and dozens of other niiini-
, i|e,'ilities throughout Great Britain
ami Ireland, are showing a good pro-
lit on their installations. In almost
every instance, big extension! are
leeing made to their present plant.
Thc rates are from 2c to 8c per kil-
lowatt hour. At Liverpool the output in this city for eight months was
���hree million units. Since the plant
vas installed, out of the profits $.!,-
556,650 has been set aside towards
repayment of capital and $1,500,000
tee reserve against depreciation and
other contingencies. In addition to
this $1,175,000 has been alleted to
thc relief of rates Atl'tri lis, Tasmania, Germany. Belgium, Bulgaria,
France, Russia, South Africa, and in
a great many other countries and
lilies all over the world are all steam
elriven and owned by the state or
municipal government. The City of
London 'England) has just let a big
contract for steam turbiti'-. in substitution of '.heir existing reciprocating
engines. Halifax (England) charge
from 4c to 6c per killowatt. Harlstcn
municipality, which is a very small
plant, the gross income was $7,995
and expenditure $5,830, leaving a
prolit of $2,165 or equal to 6 per cent,
on thc outlay, which shows that even
a small plant, properly worked, will
derive a good profit, China, Shanghai,
lhe town council own their steam
plant anc gel profits.
Elv.ahcth, South Africa, the steam
plant is municipally owned, and the
rates arc from 6c to 8c per killowatt
hour,  although   fuel   is   expensive   in
COLES HAVE TWO
LARGE STORES
By   Close   Attention   ta  Business   E.
Cole and Sons enlarge their Scope
of   Business
Mr !���'.. C'eele, the drygoods man, is
in bil line, lhe leading merchant in
South Vancouver. Mil success has
been the result eef years of bard effort,
close attention i'e details, ami abio-
lute faith in the future, honesty in
all things ;e!iel good-will towards all
men.
Mr Cole bai two large stores in
Seeuth Vancouver. Tie older estab-
liihmenl i- located "" fraser Street,
and in that neighborhood Mr. Cole
Im- built up a strong business and
has, in lhe years hc has pioneered it
.it Se.uth Hill, made many close
frii'tnK
At the corner e.f Wilson Road and
Victoria Road, Mr. Cole'- V'.unejcr
Move II located, i" a 1arc,c. well liglit-
| ed building. The Victoria Road district appreciate! thc progressiveness
; of the dry good I bouse, and though
this branch has been open for a brief
period, already a large clientele lias
been worked up among the good people 'ei Victoria l< >ad.
Twenty-five yean ago, Mr. Cole
tirst broke int-��� the dry g 1- business. He claims thai daily a little
ii being added to his knowledge of
hii business, bul it may be taken tor
granted thai he is by this time very
familiar with the rudiments of the
I dry good- trade, lie has associated
with liim in the South Vancouver enterprises, two ions, Messrs A. and C.
Cole. two yi ung mi n ��ho have been
hreeiight up in their father's line of
effeert. and who have already developed a high efficiency in their chosen
trade.
Before locating in South Vancouver, Mr Cole had been f'er nearly
ten year- with thc greal T. Eaton
Company Limited, whose -tores are
located at Toronto and Winnipeg.
Mr. C'e.le wa- a buyer i I dresi goods
ami -ilk- for thi- concern���a responsible position which enabled Mr.
Cob to I iok into the very innM workings of the dry goods business and
secure knowledge which he lias
ent advantage in the
South Vancouver en-
Above is a view of Burrard Inlet at foot of Main Street
that locality, and they have to import everything that they use. Edinburgh, Scotland, rates arc 4 to 4-Kic
per  killowatt.
Yours for the Industrial
Development of
South Vancouver
Mr^M
Edward Clough
Real Estate, Insurance and Loans
441 HOMER STREET
PHONE SEYMOUR 2882
Vancouver, B. C.
Hundreds of such examples could
be given if space would permit. South
Vancouver's capacity for almost unlimited development is established
beyond the shadow of doubt, and
manufacturers could be assured of a
cheap power factor. Domestic lighting of a few of the principle cities
throughout Canada arc Winnipeg, 3c;
Regina, 7c; Saskatoon, 6c; Stratford,
4j/jc; Berlin, 4c; Edmonton, 7c;
Dundas, i',ie; Woodstock, 4c Fort
William, 5c; Port Arthur, 5c; Gait,
4c; Hamilton, 3c; Ottawa, 3j4c; Toronto,  3c;  and   Vancouver,   lie
New York, Chicago, Boston are all
steam  plants  and  dozens    of    other
I cities and  municipalities.
1 have placed before you the estimated income and expenditure for
one year, which is only half the capacity of the proposed installation.
With the full load the profits would
be much greater at practically no
more expense.
Estimated Expenditure
Staff-
Electrical Engineer  $   3.6(H)
Chief Engineer       2,41)0
Assistant   Engineer,   3   shifts,
$1,200, each         3,600
Boiler Men. 3 shifts. $900 each     2.700
Oiler     900
Switchboard  Men,    3    shifts,
$1,201)  each          3,600
i Four Outside Men $1,200 ....     4,800
Ground   Man          1,200
Trouble Men, $1,200 each  ...      2,400
-     Office  Staff-
Chief Clerk         I.**!
Four  Assistant  Clerks, $1,020     4,080
I Printing.   Stationery   and   Office  Furniture   	
Fuel,   estimated   at     half-cent
per killowatt 	
Debentures and    interest,    20
years ;������������
Loss in transmission, estimated 5 per cent	
Depreciation on line and machinery   	
Revenues to 10 per cent, bills
paid before  time limit   ..
have our plant  in  as  g 1  condition
as when lirst installed. Our lighting and power will increase year by-
year as the district becomes more
thickly populated, and unless we do
install an electric plant, il will only
be a matter of a few years when our
bills for street lighting and power
will amount practically to the cost
of building our own plant and we
should have nothing to show for the
outlay except receipted bills.
In conclusion. I weiuld like to say
that I have asked the Reeve and
Council to give me thc benefit "f a
disinterested consulting electric engineer, one that is not interested in
any  firm  or  manufacturer,  but    the
besl that it is possible tej bc had, to
le,ok over my plans and layout, and
supervise the work, not only ber my
own protection, but for the protection
of all the ratepayers of the municipality. 1 would suggest an engineer
wine i- above reproach, and one whose
decision cannot bc questioned, a man
who is an expert in the designing of
power plants and equipment!. He
should be a well known electrical
man, or the work would not be of thc
best; an ordinary consulting engineer
j does not know thc electrical part,
therefore  my  wurk  would    not    be
I checked up ami the very best would
bc thc cheapest in the end.
cNCe'l
eel     Ilis
to
USe'll     tl
conduct
tcrprises.
Mr. Cole's large utock of drygoods
i- constantly changing,   He buys from
llie factory direct The benefit of this
is reaped by the working men and
substantial middle-class of the district, i
All Animals
"It's funny, ain't il. that everybody
in emr family's some kind eif an animal:" "Some kind of an animal, Bob-
by? What do you mean?" "Why
nn ether's a dear, you know." "Yes,
certainly." "And my baby sister's
mother's little lamb, and I'm the kid,
and dad's  the  goat."
in
Where the Skeleton Was
"Ila-   his   family  got  a   skclet
lhe   closet?"
"1 eh..n't kneew about what they've
got in the closet. Inn they've got one
in a hobble skirt."
$204,840
.    21.240
Estimated   net   prolit   for
year    ���	
$226,080
Revenue  Estimated
2,000 killowatts at 7c, 3 hours
a day for 30 days   $ 12,600
1,500 killowatt at 2c, 8 hours
a day for 26 days        6,240
Estimated   income     for     one
ve;ir    $225,080
At the present time we have to
help to keep up long transmission
lines from Lake Buntzeii to Vancouver. Point Grey, Burnaby, New Westminster, P.Iain. Sumas, Washington,
therefore the ceempany. must secure
more feer their output in order to obtain a revenue. But in a municipal
plant for South Vancouver, wc shall
not require these long transmission
lines, and so save a big expense for
their up-kcep. All the lines in the
municipality would bc revenue pro-
duclng from the start. At the present rate eef growth the municipality
should pay for this plant in very little time freim the revenue received
from   lighting   and   power,   anil   still
MERRY  CHRISTMAS IS NOT  COMPLETE
IN ANY HOUSE   WITHOUT A   CASE  OF
6^
1$eer
IJ For 20 years the leading bottled beer of Western Canada,   -f Do  you
keep a case in YOUR HOME?    If not, start 1914 right,   and  order it
regularly from your dealer.    Pints $1 Dozen    ---    Quarts $2 Dozen
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER   BREWERIES   LIMITED VIII
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
SATURDAY  DECEMBER 20,  1913
^^CHINOOK
PVBLISHED
Every Saturday by the Greater Vancouver  Publithen  Limited
HEAD  OFFICE :
Corner  Thirtieth   Avenue   and   Main   Street.   South   Vanoouvtr.   B. C.
���3'orge   M.   Murray.   Presielent  and   Managing   Director.
Herbert A.  Stein.  Vice-President  and  Managing  Editor.
John Jackson,   Business  Manager,
TELEPHONE : All   ejepartmenti    Fairmont   1874
NIGHT  CALLS    Fairmont   1M6L
COLLINGWOOD   OFFICE Collingwood   SSL
SUBSCRIPTION RATES I
To  all  pointB  in   Carada,   United   Kingdom,   Newfoundland,   New
Zealand, and other  British Possession! :
One    Year     $2����
Si*   Months       100
Three   Months    50
Postage to American, Europeon and other Foreign Countries, II.00
ter year extra.
"The  truth  at all  times  firmly  stands
And   shall   from   age to age endure."
THREE DAYS'
Christmas Specials
Monday, Tuesday and  Wednesday
Christmas Candy 25c per lb.
Mixed Candy 2 lbs., 25c
California Walnuts 25c per lb.
Almonds and Filberts 20c per lb.
New Dates, per pkge 10c
Eggo Baking Powder.... 20c per tin
Regular Specials
Cranberries,  per lb. ! 10c
Large Box Jap Oranges 50c
3 lbs. Butter 1.00
3 lb. pail of Pure Lard 45c
3 tins of B.C. Milk 35c
Pur^ Maple Syrup, per tin 50c
Peas, per tin 10c
No. ��� 1 Ashcroft Potatoes, guaran.
teed 100 lbs.
10-lb. sack Pastry Flour, reg. price
45c       35c
New  season  Lemon  and Orange
Peei, 2 lbs 25c
New season's Citron Peel, per lb.,
 20c
Lard, 2 lbs. for 25c
2 tans Molasses 25c
3 lbs.  Currants 25c
Sultana Raisins, per lb 10c
16 oz. pkge of Raisins 10c
2 large tins Quaker Tomatoes.. 25c
Coal Oil, per gal 25c
4 tins of Sardines 25c
2 bottles Holbrook's Sauce 35c
Totem Catsup, reg. 30c, now 20c
6 LOAVES OF 5c BREAD.. 25c
C.B. Hutton & Co.
Cor. TYNE & WESTMINSTER
ROADS
Telephone Collingwood 2
COLLINGWOOD EAST
=For Your:
Christmas TURKEY
Geese, Chickens and
Ducks
GO TO
Anderson
Meat Market
RETAIL BUTCHERS
4152 Main Street
South Vancouver
Phone    -    Fairmont 1634
*
BRANCH:
43rd Avenue & Victoria Road
(G. N. DALSTED. Manager)
Butter, Eggs, Live or
Dressed Poultry
A Square Deal and Quality
Guaranteed
YOUR^BUSINESS:
1. Is your business paying?
2. Arc you worried over the state of your books ?
3. Is all your capital tied up in customers' accounts?
4. Is your system of accounts all you could desire?
5. Arc your collections properly looked after ?
MY BUSINESS:
To show you whether your business is paying or not.
To put your books in proper shape.
To reduce your outstanding accounts.
To suggest a system that is best for your business.
To personally look after yuur collections.
G. WM. PATERSON
Office���620  Bidwell
Residence���3715 Du
Street.
:k Street
ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Pli.enc Seymour 9138
rin me Fairmont 2020L
Consolidation Makes New
Firm One of Largest in City
-*
The important amalgamation has
recently taken place of the two contracting Hi ms of Hodfr'Bon & King and
McPkalen Brothem, the new Htyle of
firm being Hodgson, King, McPhulen
Bros. The combined firm has already
in hand some extensive contracts, and
the following among others are now
under construction: The substructure
and superstructure of steel bridge
over Kootenay River at Tagburn, near
Nelson, for the provincial povern-
menti a gate lodge for Mr. B. I. Rogers; a wharf at Gillies Bay, Shelter
Point, Texada Island, for the Dominion government, and a contract for
laying about ten milos of sidewalks.
McFhalen Bros., the members of
Whioh are Clies. T. Mt-Phalen and Wm.
A. McPhalcn are well-known In Vancouver and the province, the former
member having been in the contracting businoss in that city for a number
of years.
During the past year of so the firm
of MePhalen Bros, has constructed
quite a number of schools in South
Vancouver, including "Norquay." 'Second." Sexsmith, Gordon, "Richard McBride," as well as 8-room additions to
the Lord Selkirk School.
Messrs. Hodgson and King, while
not so well known in Vancouver as
the other members of the new firm,
have a large and varied experience in
various parts of the world. Prior to
settling in Vancouver both these gentlemen were employed by the contracting firm of Haworth Erskine,
Limited, whose field of operations extended from Rangom, Burma, to
Shanghai. China. Mr. Hodgson was
in charge of the construction of the
new Kavanagh Bridge, over the Singapore River. A few of the contracts
successfully carried out by Messrs.
Hodgson and King include Sule Par
goda wharf, Rangom, for the Rangom
Port Commissioners; steel framed
transit sheds, police buildings In
brick work and steel lattice pantoon
bridges for the Rangom Port Trust;
the steelwork and roofing cf platform
of new main station, Rangom; foot-
ovetbiidge acroB3 the new Random
station; bridge at Pejer for the I!;.:
ma Railway Company; large muniei
pal market for Rangom municipality,
wharfs and pontons at Akyob; bridge
over Nygyan River, Upper lln mm.
Baptist College for the American
Baptist Mission, Rangom, costing In
the neighborhood of $200,000; a number of large steel framed buildings
for private residents in Rangom, besides numerous framed bungalows.
These constitute only a smail pro-
poition of the numerous contracts
carried out under the direction of
Messrs. J. P. Hodgson and F. T. King
while in the Far East.
It may be mentioned here that both
Mr. Hodgson and Mr. King are from
the Old Country. , Mr. Hodgson is an
AM.I.C.E., and before going to the
East was with MesBrs. H. Arnold &
Son, contractors, Doneaster, as well
hb with Mr. John J. Webster, M.I.C.E.,
of Westminster. While in England
Mr. Hodgson acted as engineer and
manager for Beveral important engineering works, including the construction of reservoirs for the water
supplies of Bradford and Carlisle and
the erection of bridges for the Great
Northern Railway. While in Mr.
Webster's service, Mr. Hodgson was
engaged in preparing various engineering schemes for the construction of bridges, piers, harbor and other
work. Among these may be mentioned a scheme for connecting the
towns of Widnes and Runcorn on opposite Bites of the river Mersey, by
means of a transporter bridge which
had the longest single span of any
bridge in England.
It may be readily seen, therefore,
from the enumeration of these successful undertakings, that the amalgamation of these contracting firms is
an important event in the business
world not only of Greater Vancouver
but also of the province.
WELL-KNOWN FIRM
INVEST CAPITAL HERE
South Vancouver is but in its infancy as an industrial centre. The
progressive policies being formed by
the present council will no doubt
hasten the industrial growth of the
municipality. In the meantime, new
industries and new capital are coming in.
On the banks of North Fraser
Harbor, near Campbell Road Station, the Leading City Lumber Company had developed a large lumber
manufacturing plant, employing 20
or 30 hands. This concern recently
passed into the hands of a large, substantial lumber corporation���the
Federal  Cedar   Mill   Company    Lim-
W. H. CROWE
ited���and it will be the policy of this
concern tei develop the industry
along modern,  progress  lines.
Situated at Campbell Road, between the B. C. E. R. Company*!
lines and the waterfront, the mills
occupy a strategic position in relation to Greater Vancouver. Thc
plant has several hundred feet of
waterfrontage,    and     machinery     at
present" installed represents an investment of many thousands of dollars.
Mr.|PW, H< Crowe, a man with long
experience in thc lumber business,
is the manager of the Federal Cedar
Mills Company Limited. It is his
plan to have the mills opened at an
early date with a full complement of
white labor. Cedar and fir lumber,
lath and shingles will be manufactured for the present. Special attention will be paid to the wants of
local residents and to the wants of
the corporation of South Vancouver,
while it is the hope of the concern
to build up a large outside trade.
It might be mentioned that the
directors of the company regard
South Vancouver so favorably, as a
site for an industry, that they are investing their capital without, so far,
asking any concessions from thc municipality in tlle way of exemption
from taxation, or bonus of any description.
With Mr. Crowe, the following
well-known business men are directors of the Federal Cedar Mill
Company Limited: Mr. E. B. Day,
president; Mr. Paul Day, vice-president and treasurer; Mr. j. M. Allen,
secretary.
 1 ^ ���
VICTORIAN    ORDER    OF    NURSES.
One of the, organizations which,
especially at this time of the year,
deserves the whole-hearted Bupport
of people in South Vancouver is the
Victorian Order of Nurses. It Is a
society of ladles who devote themselves to looking after eases of sickness and distress, administering
wherever possible the help so much
needed in various parts of the municipality, especially during the, winter
months. In some cases of sicknesB
fully qualified nurses are sent to the
homes, while deserving people who
may have fallen on evil days are relieved or assisted by gifts of food and
clothing.
It is the earnest desire, of the ladies
associated with the local branch of the
order to help brighten those who may
be In want during Christmas week and
the New Year. They therefore make
a special appeal for donations towards
the objects of the organization, and
contributions of all kinds, such us
food, provisions or clothing will be
thankfully received and placed to the
best advantage In relieving want and
sickness throughout the municipality.
Thei following are the names of the
ladles to whom donations of money or
goods may be sent:
Mtb. Thomas Dickie, president of
the South Vancouver Branch, 226 Nineteenth avenue west; Mrs. J. Mullett,
4520 Quebec street, or Mrs. A. E.
Young. 62 Forty-eighth avenue west.
South Vancouver.
WILSON'S DRUG STORE
Main and Sixteenth
Phone Fair. 805
EVERYDAYPRICE LIST:
Read below a partial list. These prices are not for Fr'day and
Saturday, but arc good seven days a week and delicvrcd to yuur
door. Send us your Prescription Work and save money. Wc do
not pay big rent and do not require the profit that some do, These
arc cash prices:
Pink ham't       Vegetable      Compound,   Sl     75
Mention's  Talcum,  rog.  35... 15
Carter's   Pills,   reg-   25 15
llcrpicidc,   reg.   $1.00 75
Formamint Tablets, reg. 75.50
Caitoria,  reg.  35 25
Cuticura   Soap,   reg.  35 25
Hospital Absorbent Cotton, reg
50    35
Lavonna de Compoia Hair Tonic, reg. $1.25 $1.00
Fcrrol Emulsion, reg. $1.00..75
Aver's   Sarsaparilla,   reg.  $1.00.
 75
F.no's Salts, reg. $1.00 85
Gin Pills, reg. 50 35
Dodd's  Pills,  reg.  SO 35
Abbey's Salts, reg. 60c and 25c
for 50c and 20c
Allenb'ry's Foods, reg. $1, 65,
50, 35  80, 50, 40, 25c
Ilorlick's Food, reg. $3.75, $1.00
50 $3.50,85,45
Ncstle's Food, reg. 50 45
Benger's  Food, reg. $1.00. 50c
 90, 45
Reindeer brand Milk, reg. 20.15
Miniard's Liniment, reg. 25..20
Elliman'a Embrocation, reg. 35
 25c
Scott's Emulsion, reg. $1.00, 50
 75,40
Perttna.   reg.   $1.00 75
Burdock    Blood    Bitters,    reg.
$1.00          75c
WILSON'S  DRUG STORE
MAIN AND SIXTEENTH
F.  A.   WILSON
FORMERLY   AT   MAIN
AND     BRO A D W A Y
HORSE SHOEING
General Blacksmith and Carriage Builder
harry McAllister
SPECIALIZES IN
ALL KINDS OF REPAIRS
ADDRESS:
(New Westminster Road)
NOTICE
Ladner
Ferry Service
Auto Passenger and Freight Stage
Leaves Fraser St. Carline Terminus
7 a.m.    10 a.m.    1 p.m.    6 p.m.
Leaves Woodward's Landing
8 a.m.    11 a.m.    2 p.m.    7 p.m.
Fare    -   -    35c
Have You a Boy.or Girl Who
Would Like to Learn Typewriting?
F'or a limited period we shall offera number of Rebuilt No. 7 Remington Typewriters, conceded to be the best Remington ever built, at
$25* Cash
We suggest this to the careful parent as an Ideal Xmas gift for a
boy-or girl who has commercial inclinations.
Come early for lirst choice.
United Typewriter Company Ltd.
UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITERS
579 RICHARDS STREET VANCOUVER, B.C.
Wessex Street, KINGSWAY
COLLINGWOOD EAST
\
, ��c ~-4eW>
I
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r-
���
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'&* ��� .   ���           -             ^: .
$3
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If ~ THIT5'68
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tMfii2^,^Bte*
Carleton School
Mackenzie School
Connaught School SATURDAY DECEMBER 20, 1913
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
XI
Main Street Marks Middle of Greater Vancouver and Cuts From Salt to Fresh Water
THE BROKEN MEDALS
A Story of the War ol  1812
By FELIX PENNE
The approaching celebration of
���line Hundred Yean  of Peace" bc-
- II Britain anel the United States
hai sent the students of history to
ecordi of the War of 1812, and the
Declaration '��f I'eacc anel caused
many old archives to be examined,
The main facts of the war have
often been told. We arc all familiar
with records of the heroism and self-
- icriflce displayed on every side, but
iliere yet remains many interesting
stories to be told���stories of human
interest and historical value, which
have escaped the historians, or been
deemed too trivial for the official
record*.
Turkeys!
Turkeys!
Turkeys!
MAIN   MEAT
MARKET
Cor. 25th and Main Street
Phone Fairmont 1543
Largest Stock of XMAS
TURKEYS and MEATS
in South Vancouver.
TURKEYS
GIVEN AWAY
SEE WINDOWS
FOR PARTICULARS
_ Dr. Clarke, I.E. I), of the Toronto
Qenpral   hospital,   has  just   brought
lie ni such st'eries to light. From
the infereftfrig history oi the Toronto General Hospital which '���>���
published, I am able t'i gather - 'ine'
material, which, amplified from other
sources, can be woven int.. a most
interesting story of the peace, which
followed the War of 1812.
Upper Canada was startled and
shocked, when, in 1812, the United
States of America declared war
against the United Kingdom of
Croat Britain ami its Dependencies.
The Canadians wore quite unprepared for war; they hail a militia, but
without arms or suitable clothing,
Canada was invaded, and, as a writer
of the period very tersely says, "This
provided tbe Canadians with arms at
the expense of their enemy." Winter was aproaching, but thanks to
the energetic labors of Canadian
patriotic women, the mon doing duty
in the lines between Niagara and
Eort Erie were clad in good, thick
flannel undergarments. Still, much
distress prevailed, especially among
the  families  of the  men���the  bread-
"Felix Penne"���J. Francis Bursill
towards a permanent hospital in
Vork, a In spital which grow nut of
or succeeded the small hospital
which the war had necessitated. That
was the origin of that now splendid
institution���the Toronto General
lie spital. Still money poured in and
in 1817, long after the war had
Ceased, the Loyal ami Patriotic So-
ciety    found     that    its    benevolent
In a oirole. formed by
laurel the we.nl-:
wreath of
FOR    MERIT.
PRESENTED   BY A   GR VlT.ru.
COUNTRY.
t 'n the- ret e r-e ,
A Mr,iit between two laki i (��� tl
the nierth tide a beaver (Emblem e,i
Peaceful Industry), ilu- ancient arm-
orial bearing of Canaela. In tbe
background an I-'11e_-1 i-1 i lion slumbering. < m the south -ielo of the
strait ih, American Eagle, circling
in liie air as if checked from -> i/.iug
the Beaver le'.' the presence eef the
Lion.
Scycnd     Upper     Canada     Preserve.
Sinn- patriotic Canadians will met
fail iee observe how in those days it
.'; - admitted the Heaver looked ti
the   Lion   for   protection,   if   needed.
For these beautiful meda-'s, made
b) Leonard C. Wyon, eef .London,
the Loyal and Patriotic Society paiel
(of money generously subscribed),
in English geehl, a sum of e.ver five
thousand el /lars.. And now the
roaelor will imagine that in many a
heeiiio in Upper Canada there is
proudly displayed the medal won by
great gramlsircs, or the arlcestral
heroes of the War e,f 1812. No! not
a single medal is known to exist, but
thanks lee Mr. Allan G. Wyon ( a descendant of the original medallist 1.
a bronze duplicate of one of the original medals can bc seen in Toronto.
haps  met  all),  remained ur.nl   1820,
when ai a public meeting Chief Ju--
tice Sir William Campbell referred io
the bitter feuds the medals had
caused. He expressed the opinion
tha: the gold anel silver medals could
m.t, after such a lapse of time, be
distributee! to answer the original
purpose feer which they were designed, ami that they hail better be
solel for their value a- metal, anel
iln- money devi ted i" the hospital
Um nothing was then eione\ S'MI
years r  !! d by ami tl ���   mi dal
loelgllt    I,Ver.    Ileil     ,   1.1V    ill    oil!    T     '
(.ir York i. but iii ihe Legislal
lembly, the "medal  war" hai inj
come a  public  scandal.
AfU r twenty years of bid
Paul Bishop, a l.l.ul smith, ai
two apprentices, took a :���: i iron
anvil out into a back yard ami 'inn
all the moelals wore brought ear nn
trays for the "throe merry s:imi:s
with  a  ding,  ding,  dong,"  to  sm     i
them 'en  the anvil all u pieces. Tbe
rings  by  which wen    lo
pm the medals i 'i thi ir i i ei ��� - at 'i
e bipi ui guid and nlvei il< * about
among the garden vegetables ami
were continually turning up for
years af,er.
All   the   moelals   were   smashed,   I
have-    saiel.       It    l-    doubtful     if    ihat
st:.lenient   is   correct.      A   box
mining     forty-eighl      medals     was
found   among   the   effects   'ef   (
Justice  Scott   when  he died,  lee:
on,-  knew   h''.v   the     '111:'   inl
Paul  Bishop, the  I
smith, and his tn ��� 1 appi entl
hammers   specially   shaped    foi
; purpose,    "smashed    up"    sixt;
and some
���ei dred ites, at     ell   B
Id   1 r   silver!:   which  had
sly   founel   their   way    into
Just! itt's   1" e'.r- om.     For   tl 1 ���
splendid   service   oi   destruction
(Continued on  Pago  12.1
Home of the Success Business College and one of the many substantial business blocks of Main Street. The Succesi
School is Vancouver's 1 eading Business College
winners���on military duty. In York
(as Toronto was then called), the
Loyal Patriotic Society of Upper
Canada was formed to help the distressed people, and money was subscribed with that generosity _ which
has ever distinguished the Toronto
citizens. Money poured in from all
parts. Nova Scotia, indignant at the
barbarous burning of Newark, gave
liberal help. Subscriptions were
sent from England, and even from
distant Jamaica, where the people
gave not only many golden doubloons but coffee and "fifty puncheons of rum." So generous were
the people at home and elsewhere
that not only was pressing distress
relieved but the sum of over two hundred and fifty pounds tit was English currency in those days)  was left
Phone Fairmont 1514
D. A. McDonald, Pres. and Manager
ft   ft   ft   ft
Donaldson, McDonald
Company, Ltd.
HA Y GRAIN FEED
Poultry Supplies
it   ir   ir   ir
4285 Main St., Vancouver, B.C.
Quick Service and Satisfaction guaranteed
labors were at an end anil there yet
remained a large sum of money.
What better could be done wiih
some of this than purchase medals
for the heroic militiamen, whe) hael
so gallantly defended their country?
At first one hundred peuim'.s was
appropriated feer this purpose. Hut
the number of heroes grew larger;
the, medals ("made in England"!
were not good enough, so one thousand pounds was voted for more
medals " of a better  quality."
Those medals arrived in Canada.
They were two and a half inches in
diameter. They were thus officially
described by Wyon, the medallist,
the name is still honorable associated
with medals and coins today.
The   medals   are    inscribed    thus:
The gallant militiamen .>i 1812 did
ti'it get the medals "presented by a
grateful country." When the Loyal
and Patriotic Society started to dis-
tribute these rewards of "merit" they
found so many jealousies arise over
the distribution that they weiuld not
award a single medal. The heroes
v. ire like tiio dog in "Mother Ilub-
barel," they "had none." The "regulars" wouhl m.t allow that there
were any hc.ocs outside their own
ranks; the militiamen insisted on
recognition, and so a "medal war"
was waged���a war more fierce than
the struggle, medals were designed to
commemorate. The medals were all
placed in lhe Bank of Upper Canada until jealous rivalry should simmer down.
In   thc   hank   the   medals   (or   per-
RENTING
INSURANCE
J.  W.  Goostrey
BROKER
South  Vancouver Agency Commercial  Union  Fire
Insurance Company
i   *   ft   ft
"MAIN STREET MUST MAKE PROGRESS"
t 4 4 *
Phone Fraser 64
5604 Main St., South Vancouver
Ladies' and Gent's
TAILORING
3834 MAIN STREET
Near 23rd Avenue
it    ft
W'e have  successfully  conducted a    first-class
Tailoring business at the above address.
All garments made on tbe premises.    Best possible cut. make and finish guaranteed .
J. & H. FERGUSON
PRACTICAL TAILORS
Phone Fairmont 2489
l'hone Fairmont 2468
W. J. McCUAlG
4288 Main Street
tt
Sheet Metal Contractor
CORNICE, ROOFING and SKYLIGHTS
WARM AIR HEATING A SPECIALTY
ft   is   ft   ft
WE WISH OUR MANY FRIENDS AND
CUSTOMERS
A MERRY XMAS AND PROSPEROUS NEW
YEAR
WISHING YOU A MERRY XMAS AND A
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR     L   k
HARRISON & LOVE
AUCTIONEERS AND FURNITURE DEALERS
Have removed to more commodious premises
No.   4241   Main  Street
(Between 26th and 27th Avenues)
Furniture Bought for Cash
or Auction  Sale Arranged
Prompt  Settlements
Furniture Warehoused CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
SATURDAY   DECKMIiER 20,   1913
/^=
Progressive Fraser Street, Where the Saw and Hammer Never Cease
Conserving the Public Health in South Vancouver
By Dr. Giles B. Mutphy, Health Officer
PERHAPS no branch of immici-
* pal activity in any district should
lu nearer in the end to the hearts of
tlie people at large, than that e.i'
"public health." With everything
working smoothly, however, wo think
little of our health conservation, but
lot an epidemic strike our midst, and
all attention is turned to ils stamping oul in the shortest possible time.
The old rhyme,
"When   the  devil   was  well,   the  devil
a saint was he,
When  tlle  Devil  was  ill,  the  devil  a
saint would bc"
Seems in many cases applicable to
lhe apathy and enthusiasm in turn
exhibited in matters of public health.
Conservation of any public asset we
believe is better than waste, and with
this iu view, we ihould like to point
out a few obstacles, and a few requisites that we believe necessary to
the host management of this vital
subject.
\Ve in South Vancouver have many
obstacles to encounter in the conservation of our public health. The lack
of a thoroughly comprehensive sewerage scheme, and an up-to-date infectious hospital seem to be two of
tli'j most pressing. That thc former
may be overcome, we believe probable in thc not too distant future, for
the installation of a sewerage system
will tend to a far more sanitary and
consequently    healthy    municipality,
l'ndcr present circumstances we can
never   reach   llie   ideal   situation,   but
when the sewerage plans become an
established fact, wo shall he far on
our way to thc cleanliness in our
midst  that  is sei much  desired.
The lack of suitable accommodation for tlie treatment and segrega-
lieeu of our reported infectious and
communicable diseases is deplorable,
Our present methods may do all right
for a small village, but with our
vast population they are entirely Inadequate. To quarantine communicable disease cases in their own
homes, where in many instances
there are many other children, is little short of gross neglect, but no
other alternative under present conditions exists, and until such time as
we are in possession of an up-to-date
infectious hospital, we cannot hope
to be even reasonably free of those
infections. Were the experience
brought home to more of our people,
that of being detained for weeks or
months in their own houses, under
quarantine, we believe that greater
interest would be more quickly aroused. The exposure of healthy children to infectious diseases under conditions such as these, is anything but
excusable. Given therefore, proper
accommodation for the handling of
infectious cases, the number of these
will  drop,  and  we  shall  have  a  far
if
:ildr
THIS PAPER IS PRINTED FROM METAL
MANUFACTURED BY THE
Great Western Smelting &
Refining Company
971 MAIN STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Robert S. Lewington
Successor to Traders Trust Co., Ltd.
6181 FRASER STREET
Phone Fraser 108
INSURANCE
PLATE GLASS
ACCIDENT
LIABILITY
LIFE
AUTO
FIRE
AGENT
LIVERPOOL AND LONDON AND GLOBE.
PHOENIX OF LONDON, ENGLAND.
CANADIAN NATIONAL FIRE.
Real Estate    Rentals     Collections
Conveyancing       Estates Managed
Thanking you for your patronage in the past and
trusting for a continuance of same.
healthier population
result.
An'ether obstacle we as health of-
, fu'ors moot is the disposal "f our garbage re-fuse. About two years neiw
in existence, this system has more
I than demonstrated its worth, but the
| collection of offensive material from
our houses and hack lams, to be deposited in a disgusting heap in some
leuit of the way ravine, is a case of
robbing I'eter to pay Paul. The system is growing and the requisite in
this regard is an adequate destructor
for our garbage, neit only now, bul
for the future. If as proposed the
garbage department is paid from
revenue, in time not far distant, our
collection; will more than double,
and tbat some means be established
for its ultimate and satisfactory disposal is a prime necessity.
On the whole, however, and with
thc means at present supplied for the
work of puhlic health conservation,
our conditions are not too bad. Not
ideal by any means, but then wc believe that this young and growing
municipality is tending towaid an
ideal, and if the proper attention be
paid to health conservation, and sanitary regulations, we shall have at a
future date, a community and settlement to which no one may point the
finger of scorn, in this most vital regard, that cf the health of our people.
'PEOPLE'S PROVIDERS"
A GROWING BUSINESS
Mr. John Armstrong & Son are Enthusiastic Boosters for North Arm
South Vancouver covers an area of
some fourteen square miles, but one
does not reach South Vancouver
proper until arriving at the corner of
Fraser and  River  Road.
At that point is located South Vancouver Pest Office. At that point is
also located Mr. John Armstrong &
Son, member of the South Vancouver Board of Trade, chairman of the
committee on that board which has
worked So hard for the development
of the N'orth Fraser Harbor; a 27-
year resident in Greater Vancouver,
and a most valued citizen.
Mr. Armstrong is thc postmaster
of official South Vancouver, and an
ex-councillor of our municipality. In
passing, it might bc mentioned that
Mr. John Armstrong owns a splendid
store at South Vancouver Post Office, where there is kept on sale groceries, flour and feed, general provisions and druggists sundries. In the
conduct of the establishment, Mr
Armstrong's personality applies as it
docs in the other interests with which
he has been associated. As a result
"The People's Providers" arc building
tip a.splendid reputation. Their patrons are many. Prompt service, fresh,
high class goods, and courteous attention to the wants of their customers, are a few of the factors which
contribute to weekly increases in cash
sales.
The Royal Bank of Canada
INCORPORATED 1869
Capital Authorized $25,000,000
Capital Paid up   11,560,000
Reserve Funds   13,000,000
Twelve Branches in Vancouver City
Over 350 Branches throughout Canada and the West Indies
This Bank possesses every facility for transacting all kinds
of Banking Business with promptness and economy.
Accounts of Business men, Kimrs and Corporations handled
on favorahle terms.
Accounts of Farmers, Stock-raisers, Graziers, etc., are invited.
SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
An Account may he opened with a deposit of
ONE DOLLAR
Interest paid, or credited at highest current rates.
BANK BY MAIL    I out-of-towna<?cws
\    given special attention
Hillcrest Branch
Cor. Main and 17th Ave.
Vancouver B.C.
A. A. STEEVES,
Manager.
South Hill Branch
6295 Fraser St., Cor 49th
Avenue
South Vancouver
N. RIEL,  Manager.
Wise Child
The pastor always told his charges
to choose the lesser of two evils.
Meeting one of his boys running home
as fast as he could, he stopped him
and asked the reason of his haste.
"I am following your advice," said
the youngster. "Maw is going to
beat me, and if I don't get home lirst,
Taw will do it."
Greater Vancouver is noted for its Beautiful Homes. Above
are a few of the Many
CAN ANY GOOD THING COME OUT OF
SOUTH
VANCOUVER ?
PEOPLES PROVIDERS say YES! It is our ambition to apply the Golden Rule to all our patrons.
OUR RULE IS GOOD
OUR GOODS ARE GOOD
OUR SERVICE IS GOOD
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
Then why not help build up our splendid Municipality, soon to be the Third City in B.C. by patronising
your local business men.
We are doing our best. Come over and help us.
YOURS FOR A HAPPY CHRISTMAS
Peopled Providers
Corner Fraser and River Avenue
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C. Tic^T6
SECTION TWO
W^m, CHINOOK
Vol. II, Xo. 32
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA,  SATURDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1913
Price 10 cents
Dominion Government Appoints
Commission to Develop on the North Arm of the
Fraser a Fresh Water Harbor of World Importance
���/���OCATION' of a greater portion of South Vancouver along the
iyy, banks of thc North Arm of the Fraser River represents millions
of dollars to this Municipality. It is the great national asset on
which South Vancouver will make a bid for prominence in the coining
development incidental to the opening of tlie l'anal Canal. What benefits Vancouver and Westminster and other ports will secure as a direct result of the opening of this big ditch, will be gained by South
Vancouver just in proportion as the North Arm harbor is developed and
made ready to reach out for thc commerce of the world.
Years ago there were men in South Vancouver who dreamed of
wonderful possibilities for the Xorth Arm of the Fraser River. They
were called dreamers because the possibilities to which they looked forward were not generally accepted as feasible. Today these "dreams"
are coming true. It is generally conceded that the future of South Vancouver is bound up to a major extent in the development of the North
Harbor as a world port, a port into which will flow ocean carriers from
all parts of the globe, which will bring and exchange cargoes with the
great transcontinental lines completed and near completed into Greater
Vancouver.
Several years ago the development of the North Arm of the Fraser
Kiver was advocated by the South Vancouver Hoard of Trade. It was
immediately accepted as a good idea, and that body of progressive business men of South Vancouver used all the energy and pressure they
could muster to impress its weight upon the proper authorities. But
South Vancouver was a small place at that time���a small place in the
matter of population���and Burrard Inlet had probably first call on the
Government for assistance.
But South Vancouver has grown and the requirements along the
North Arm became more apparent. The Board of Trade grew, too,
and their demands for recognition became more insistent and more impressive. This year they pressed for the creation of a Harbor Commission for the North Arm. A bill was introduced into Parliament at Ottawa by Mr. H. H. Stevens, M.I'., and Mr. J. D. Taylor, M.P., authorizing the creation of the North Harbor Board, giving recognition
to the claims of this water to assistance from the Dominion Government. Almost immediately followed an appropriation of $200,000 towards a start in making the North Ann a harbor.
Robert Abcrnethy, R. C. Hodgson and F. N. Trites were thc men
chosen to act on the Harbor Board, a trio of happy selections on the
part of the Government and thc different municipalities interested.
Later the board chose Mr. Abernethy as chairman. This board now has
in hand the important work of mapping out the preliminary steps in
the creation of the North Harbor, which is destined to take its place
amongst the few really great fresh water harbors of the world.
All the members are admirably qualified to sit on the board. Mr.
Abernethy injects into the board a strong personality, coupled with a
wealth of experience and knowledge of conditions on the North Ann.
He is one of the pioneer industrial kings of the North Arm, in fact no
one is in a better position to authoritatively discuss the lower reaches
of thc Fraser River than he.
In Mr. Hodgson and Mr. Trites he has associates who will give
him inestimable assistance on the board. Mr. Hodgson has been one of
the most active workers in South Vancouver lor the development of
the North Arm. As president of the South Vancouver Board of Trade
he has prcsistently kept this matter before the members and has given
every encouragement to all suggestions which had as their motive the
development of this stretch of water. Fully alive to the necessities of
thc occasion and equipped to bring his views forcibly before the board.
Mr. Hodgson's influence will be felt al all the deliberations   of   that
Mr.  ROBERT  ABERNETHY,    Chairman of the North Fraser
Harbor  Commission
body. Mr. Trites adds the fruits nf lung experience together with
capacity to the board. For many years a resident of Richmond Municipality, the development of thc North Arm has been his hope by day anil
night. Bringing t����� the board a keen business knowledge, with an unbounded enthusiasm. Mr. Trites is a link iu a very formidable combination. Recently Mr. II. 1'.. A. Vogel was appointed secretary of tin
board, another acknowledgement of what South Vancouver has done
Uncut ami lhat the p'irliein west of that line can be served more cheaply
from the Pacific than irenn the Atlantic.
< Ither phases of tin- new era will have an important bearing on the
future commerce of every Pacific port, of first importance i- the
question regarding industries.
I'p i i the present time the only industries on this ce,a-t have been
those of a local nature, arising from the lumber and salmon packing,
and similar products nf tlie ceiast portions eif the province, There have
been some other small,industries, but comparatively unimportant in re-
lation tn the total oi manufactured goods imported into Western Canaela.
Many manufactures will be established here which will depend on
bringing in raw materials cheaply via the canal fnr manufacture here,
and to be shipped by rail inland a-- far as the freight rate- will allow,
in competition with similar manufactures shipped from the Atlantic
coast when the 1'anama Canal open-. Here again i- the dividing line,
here the boundary of the territory in which, the influence of the new
trade conditions will be felt.
Manuafactories on the Atlantic seaboard in the past have shipped
right across the continent because the ocean freights prevented raw materials being delivered at Pacific coast points on a parity with thc
Fastein rates. The change will have the effect nf bringing about a
revolution in this regard. There will be a hundred different manufactures spring up which can under new conditions nut only ship to advantage from the Pacific coast but -hut out the shipment of goods from
tlie Atlantic coast into the territory west nf the new north and south
line, which will be deliminited a- soon as the new conditions get into
working order.
If the opening nf ibe western halt nf the continent to the cities of
the Pacific coast for trade will result in the establishment nf many
manufactories tn supply that territory, another industry which will bo
estal li-hcel through the same agency will be that ni flour milling. Tbe
millions nf bushels of Western Canadian wheat which arc bound tc
come tn the seaboard of British Columbia will be a compelling force ir,
the building nf large export flour mill- here. Where great terminal
elevators are located, and there i- no question of their being bound to
be erected here on a scale equalling or exceeding the.' great terminal
elevators nf Montreal, Fort William, Port Arthur ami other points 'if
transhipmenl on the Eastern seaboard, thc establishment of large flour
milling plants is a natural sequence. What applies to the shipment of
wheat is true to a large measure of all the products of Western Canada. The exportation nf cattle fnr many years will be a leading industry. With the growth of the cold storage industry and the demand for
chilled beef, it will not be long until no live cattle shipments to the markets of the Old Country will be allowed. When that transpire- there
will bc established on this coast great cold storage plants for the handling of fresh meats.   Similarly the killing of beef here for export will
in its effort to make the Xorth Arm one nf the great centres of shipping j [eave t|lc hides an.l other by-products to be disposed of.    The natural
Commissioner R. C. HODGSON
Of the North  Fraser Harbor
Commission
and commerce.
Tenders are now lieing called fnr the construction of a breakwater
near the mouth of the Fraser Kiver. This will more than absorb the
first appropriation made by the Dominion Government. It will acl as
a barrier to the formation of sandbar- in the channel and will, therefore, make effective the dredging of thc stream.
The opening of the Panama Canal will mark an entirely new situation in the handling of the commerce, not only of the Pacific but of the
Atlantic. Trade, even ocean traffic, is compelled to follow certain
lines of travel. Every well-defined Hade route crossing both Atlantic
and Pacific���and that virtually means every important trade route on
the waters of the globe- is radically affected by the changes coming
with the opening of the 1'anama Canal. Thc changes with respeel ti
traffic between the Orient ami both side- of the Atlantic will ainnunt toI
a revolution.
Through this big ditch will rush the merchandise for both South
and Xorth America from Europe anel frum tlie Atlantic seaboard ol
America. Inimigratiem. tem. which has been in large measure dependent on long rail journeys at high cost to reach the western portions of
Canada ami the l'nited Stale-, will be diverted and even increased very
materially by the opportunity to make the trip in a continuous sea voyage, even if the time required may be a few days longer than by crossing the continent by rail���an immigrant is much more likely to consider the low rate by all water than the few extra day-' time that thc
water route demands. Time is of all things whal the immigrant has
most of. while money is likely to be a very scarce commodity, and even
if not. the needs of a new established in a new country will find ways
for every dollar.
Thc attraction of the west coast of America to many thousands of
European settlers is very great, and only money considerations have
prevented a much larger influx of population to these sparsely settled
portions of the continent. With tlle changed conditions following the
opening of the Panama Canal, not only will commerce flow in this direction in a way unthought of and impossible heretofore, but the tide
of immigration ivWf* ������������'" Hfltce on the Pacific coast in an ever rising
flood will astonish those who have not been thinking of the possibilities
in this direction. British Columbia will add many thousands to her
permanent population by this means ere another census is taken.
Then it is apparent that the traffic arising from thc movement of
all the products of the western half of the continent to the Pacific coast
is another phase. Associated with, and supplementing that inevitable
movement, will come the shipment inland by rail from Pacific ports of
all the merchandise and manufactured goods imported for consumption
in the western half of the American continent. It is clear that there will
be a dividing line drawn in a general way down the centre of the con-
rcult of that will be thc establishment of tanneries and other manufactories, adding to the list of industries which will centre on the Pacific
coast. Today a tannery is being built on tbe North Arm in South
Vancouver, and arrangements are now under way for thc erection of a
cold storage plant and a large rubber factory.
Then metal manufacturing industries will bc developed a- the
mining industry of the province continues to expand. Then in thc iror.
and steel industry there is local demand which would warrant development nu a large scale. There arc well-known and proved deposits nf
iron of large extent and good quality in several pari- of the coast district with an unlimited supply of coal.
H. B. A. VOGEL, Secretary cf the Commission XII
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
SATURDAY DECEMBER 20, 1913
tr=
Piloting the Municipal Ship Through Stormy Seas of Finance
BY JAS. B. SPRINGFORD, C.M.C.
JAS. B. SPRINGFORD, C.M.C.
During the years 1912 and 1913
S nth Vancouver like all uf our Canadian municipalities, lias been confronted with most diificult problems in connection with financial
natters. In 1912 it was found im-
p ssible I') dispose of the current
(authorized bonds and upon advice
from our financial friends, temporary financing was recommended', in
lie issuance 'nf treasury bills to the
extent uf 80 per cent, of the total
bonds for sale. If the council of that
year hail taken the stand that this
was bad business, criticism to an
unlimited extent would have been tendered, in the feerm of non-progrcs-
siveness and being: inactive to the
best interests eif the municipality.
However, the action would have
been most economical, but the lessen had tee be taught tei all western
public and private corporations before retrenchment was adoptee!. Ot
course at that time there was not
the slightest doubt but that the
bond market would be lively again
by the end of that year (western
optimism). Instead, it gradually
took ilie downward trend until rock
bottom vvas reached. It was not
until June, 1913, that  lhe real string
ency affected South Vancouver, i em-
porary financing was then impossible, resulting in a shutdown of
public works and a general cut in
thc office staff.
For a month or so wc faced most
trying times, daily visits to the bank,
etc. However, I am more than
pleased to state that we have successfully overcome these difficulties,
ind are in excellent position financially inasmuch as all our bonds has
heen disposed of at prices very favorable, and our standing on the financial market is A-l, retained only
by very careful management in the
handling of our security. Speaking
for myself I wentld not care to face
another year similar le, tlle past.
However, the experience has put me
in a better position to more ftbly assist in the financing of our rapid-
growing municipality.
curloui  plant.    Mistletoe is a para-
-iii,- growth, appearing most frequently on apple trees, although it is
founel em evergreens ami on poplar,
hawthorn, pear and oak trees, but
very rarely em the last named. It is
an evergreen bush, about four feet
in length, thickly crowded with
other plants, its leaves extend down
as well as up. The plant flowers
every year, but does not bear the
little white berries until it is four
years old. The mistletoe proper is
a native nf Europe. In olden tunes
it was considered a sacred plant, because its berries grow in clusters of
three���emblematic of the Trinity.
The ancient Celts used t'e bang
mistletoe aneiind their necks as a
safeguard from witches. The maid
that was not caught and kissed under
the mistletoe at Christmas would not
he married within the year, so the
old rules the ceremony was not
properly performed unless a berry
was pulled off after each kiss and
presented to the maiden. When all
the berries were gone the privilege
ceased.
THE BROKEN MEDALS
(Continued  I'mm  Page  11.1
ALL   ABOUT THE   MISTLETOE
Popular Christmas Plant in Olden
Times Was Considered Sacred.
Although, in the ma.iority of Canadian anil English lieimcs mistletoe is
displayed at Christmas time, it is remarkable how  little is known of this
three blacksmiths were paid five
dollars.
As tlle medals cost $5,500 and the
metal only realized $1,575 it is im-
posihle to avoid the suspicion that
some; of tbe medals got mysteriously
intei other hands I nan those of Chief
Justice Scott. Any medal which has
escaped tbe ���uelting pot would command a high price (and no questions
asked), from some of the antiguarian
collectors of Toronto and other Can-,
adian cities. Parliament took the
matter up. "Why were not the
medals distributed?" was asked. The
answer was: "No proper means bad
been taken to ascertain who were the
persons entitled to receive them.
There was so much jealousy and discontent that no distribution was
made."
That explanation was by no means
Satisfactory, as could easily be
shown, but lhe affair is best forgotten except fur the lesson it teaches.
Such lessons arc necessary as the
fate of the  ship "Egeria" shows.
There is one comfort in this story
of the Toronto medals. The money
the medals fetched was devoted to
the Toronto General Hospital, a
splendid monument to the patriotism,
courage and generosity of the Canadians who shared the perils of 1812
and lejolctd in the I euce winch succeeded.
(Note.���The above is one of a
series of copyright articles by Felix
Penne, which will appear from time
to time In connection with the celebration of the 'Hundred Vears of
Peace.")
Success Business College
The School of Certainties
(Affiliated with the Business Education Association of Canada)
WE OFFER YOU
The best Business School premises in the city. They are bright, well ventilated and sanitary.
Modern equipment in all departments and new throughout Over sixty typewriters of the best makes.
A staff, every member of which is normal-trained and has bad at least six years
of actual teaching experience. We have secured the best obtainable. We will
not employ inexperienced teachers.
Courses that are up-to-date in every respect.
In a word���Everything that should form a part of a good school.
SHORTHAND AND
TYPEWRITING
COURSE
Shorthand
Typewriting
Business English
Spelling
Rapid Calculation
Penmanship
Office Practice
Course in Architectural
Drawing (Night School)
COMMERCIAL
COURSE
Book Keeping
Business Arithmetic
* ���
Rapid Calculation
.Spelling
Penmanship
Business English
Office Practice.
Commercial Law
English Course
(Nigbt School)
E. SCOTT EATON, B.A, Principal
Winter Term Opens Monday, Jan. 5, 1914
Get full information today
Corner Main and 10th Avenue
Phone Fairmont 2025
Vancouver, B. C.
A MOST PROGRESSIVE FIRM OF GROCERS
An Up-to-date Lumber Yard
Optimism is the word with Mr. \V.
L. Goodwin, the well-known lumberman, whose extensive yards are located at Ihe foot of Inverness Avenue on the River Road. Despite re-
ports of money stringency Mr. Goodwin has had a fine year's business,
and is looking forward to 1914 for
even a better one.
Since   coming   to   Ihe    North   Arm
with   his   industry   Mr.   Goodwin   has
made   hundreds   of   friends   over   the
municipality, and is rapidly making a
reputation   for   himself   by    bis    fair
.dealing    wilh    his    many    customers
I that  will   long  stand.     In   regard   to
I  lhe   business   outlook   in   the   lumber
I industry. Mr. Goodwin  recently  said:
"On lhe whole tbe past year lias
bein a good one' for t.'.e W'e wcre
just getting well established at thc
ele.i,e of 1912 and were getting in
ge.i.el   shape   when   1913   was  ushered
. Business has been better than I
expected, but wc have been able to
meet thc demands that wcre malleoli us for lumber and all building
materials,, and I am glad to say
through fair treatment we are building up a fine business.
"1 am looking forward with mucl
interest to the development of the
North Arm and believe it will in thi
near  future  be  a  hive  of industries
South Vancouver has a great future
and particular is this true of lh,
part located on the river road."
D.   S.  ROBINSON,  BARBER.
South  Vancouver boasts  of man.
esteemed cltiiens, but none more s
than   Mr.    Robinson.       This   genih
man    has    been    a    resilient   of   this
country   for   four    vears,   "U'l    ha
served  his district  well  by  taking an
active Interest in all movements thai
lend iii boost ihis district,   None ai
more ready to "heiller their head eii;
to  help  a  movement  alung  that  will
aid  the  residents.  A  first-class  work
man   in   every   respect,  the   circle  of
Mr. Robinson's clientelle is growing
every  day.    A  good judge of  cigars.
this  business   man   stocks  a  full   line
of the best.    In case you smoke, 417"
Main is tbe address.   The same does
for thc tonsorial parlor.
It was said long ago t lat ''cleanliness is next to Godlines v" In the
grocery and provision business,
is more���"cleanliness is Gc illness."
Step inside the store o Messrs.
Cochrane & Elliott, at the Junction,
South Vancouver, and the first impression one will get will be that of
the absolute cleanliness and orderliness of the surroundings. This establishment is a Twentieth Century
proposition throughout. On the
shelves are displayed vast quantities
of new, attractive, standardized,stock.
One finds glass show cases in the
Cochrane & Elliott store���show.cases
that fairly glitter with cleanliness.
Throughout the, house are/modern
fixtures and appurtenances. 'There
is air and there is light in Cochrane &
Elliott's and the clerks wear immaculate  aprons  of  white  linen.
Cochrane & Elliott have flourished
and progressed even :n the face of
recent  hard  times  that  have  thrown
into the bauds , of recovers many
nesscs in British Columbia of longer standing. They arc building up.
Tliey are "getting along," so to speak.
This is so because the business has
been founded on the right lines and
is being conducted along the same
standards.
Pass along Kingsway any day and
you will be attracted by the window
exhibit, at Cochrane & Elliott's, i This
store is not in the heart of the iity
by any means���rather more dryness
towards the outskirts. Yet Cqpirane
& Elliott take as much pride Ul dressing up the front of the place as though
they were up ou Granville or Hastings Street.
Mr. R. J. Elliott and Mr. Thomas
Cochrane are the members of the
firm. Both are young men well trained in their line of trade, good business men and progressive citizens.
They started into business some four
years ago at the  corner  of Carolina
Street and Westminster Road. They
made a humble start and their growth
has been slow but sure. Their business outgrew the first premises and
so over one year ago they moved into
the bright new store at the junction
of Kingsway, Eraser Street and Fifteenth  Avenue.
Cochrane & Elliott have several
wagons goiug every day delivering
goods throughout Greater Vancouver. And their delivery is always
prompt. They employ several men.
It is said that in 1912 they turned
over more than $50,000 worth of
goods.
Business is always good with this
optimistic firm and it is likely that
1913 will, break all previous records
with them. Messrs Cochrane & Elliott are performing a great duty to
the community by conducting as high
class a provision store as can be
found in Western Canada.
Plant of W. L. Goodwin Lumber Company, at foot of Inv erneSs Street
'     ��������� SATURDAY   DECEMBER  20,   1913
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
THREE
ASLEEP    AMONG    HIS    TOYS. I Or if we should chance to bi  fighting
  I >n opposite sidi - "i  .1   ...
, ,   , , ,      And  I  u.i- a --e.   with lhe mi iting
I   found  my  babe asleep among  his      wbjch   ,���     },f ,d   L. .
for
A qoartcr-hout Id m.sscd his joci i       ,,.  mjgh|   e        c  m     ,m|  |](,(,   ,e|
11' llSC
i'e" iiee and ii"i e,t i tin  reward;
Vncl   ihen.   when   nobody   could   i-'ei
He'd  inn   himself lh:e,n>;li   with  Ilii
el       on the |
I
I !e ������  conn Id give nu
���    ���
ind  nonderid  what   - i  i| deli'i  ihe1
led.
��ing:   "lie'- nevei  -iili unl n
bail.'
i.ni     �� h. n     I     liptoi',    in- i. i ' ���
stealth)   -���'���.
\    touching    pie 1.He-   llie l    in:     .1
eye:
.   hanel  la)   un  ih    ' n
..,   othi I ;" d ���'  Iin?
p n   liii    ���   i    i   i orld I "      '
1 . Am       icr  I  ate it  witl
Mankind in  miniature  la)   i "'  .     '",'     *ilh   his   v"i    :
there! brM,n'
And  lay  himsell   down  full  ul   glad
I  lifted him and hugged liim  i-   n n ���
breast, To  save  me���and
.i him, and laid him gcntl) down death.
tei   re -I
Upon a conch,   The wary limbs re-	
lux. il:
The puckered brow, with  w mdering
orertaxi d
i.,. ,i    its    troubled    frown;   and
with   a   sigh
Of deep relief he slumbered on
While  I,
Wiih murmured words of chocking
tenderness,
Smoothed bis warm cheek, bis hands,
his   wrinkled   dress���
Did all the things we love-mad parents   do���
Old, old Caresses  that  are   ever  new.
Sometime   the  great,  kind   bather   of
ns all.
Noting   we   make   no   answer   fei   HIS
call.
Tiptoeing  in  t"  "here  we've been  at
play
Through all the hours of our allot.
ted  day.
Will find us 'mid mir playthings, fast
asleep.
Our toys abemt us in a tumbled heap.
Each   weary    band    upon     a    trinket
laid���
Senile   phantom   hope   burn    in    the
marts e,f trade.
Then,   in    Hi>   anus,   the   cares   our
hearts  possessed
Will   yield   their   place   t.e   sweet   anil
dreamless  rest.
��� Ilv  Strickland  Gillilan.
And   if   I   \e ;:-   w< Hindi  '     I I    Iti
\ne! "in  when   gn ai dai
I ..
He'd come
rattb
Of gu
I le'd carr)  nu   i ul   full
'." mi n
Ami   thi n ".  all
WHERE   IT   IS   ALWAYS
CHRISTM\ST1ME.
With
and  would  di-���but
i     ������
���   . nn ought I
���
111
fellows   n
And (riei
- 'i .ne:
'
I ler
Tis tim<   ���
lhe i
-',,    .'  . ���
pal I
III   r.iu-in.   '    |     In   ll
I fane)  ���
Ilis   liml -   an i  i yei
'   '
lb   dm     noi   fear   the   d
eak  and  p<�� ���    i   i
i ���    i those   win
i
.���' rs il
Twere   l
j eat through.
B)   S   E   Kisei
The  London of Charles  Dickens.
1 i     Monday  nighl    Mr.  J.   rrancii
MUVVER    DEAR.
[ know a b",
you have go and      To cheat  the
plays
For   help   all   Ihe   lime    that's   hi
IBM a boy  I    - one 1       !,      in  go in    mn ,���. ., .
-By I. W. Foi
i; ;:  ::;    le i tun d    on    "Thi     London
Charl       Dickei   "   al   St.    Viden's
Church.     N'e��     W�� stminster        'I I i-
Rev.   Mr.   I'e tiie-   presided
audience.  Mr.   Bursill's  '_���"-
���  Ik,     well     illustr; ted,     was
enjoyed.
lint always willingly obeys.
THE EMPRESS OF ASIA
A   BOY   AND   HIS   CHUM.
Ii   we   sheeiild   be   shipwrecked   together
\nd only had watei  [ r one
And it was the liotti
Righl   out   in   thc  boilii | I ol   - in,
He'd tell me-   no matter how bad he
Might   wani   it���to   take    a    drmk
fir-:;
And   then   he   would    smile    oh,    S i
glad  he
Hail  saved  me!���and  perish   from
thirst!
The   handsome   new   liner   which   has been added to the Pacific fleet of the C. P. R.
). ar  thi j   wa     i  any  Chris'ruiu
I,, .,,
Foi     :    ' I led an'
ii led
.  r    Cln i-'"
'l 'pun    mi .
I ii jest cried an'
h -i man lhat i-.
li nt -nil lie  couldn i lake I le i plat e
���in i  in ar
I      i im an' presinks���I  ���
'Ci pt    Mu
���
' out my list
' ' 1015 O t
But    iluvvi     dear, didn'l   'joy it
mm
Shi    had dachi    .'.hen
'twa:   '    ni
S'exl an1 talked
an'  ial
An'  made  her   sm  ' i   a 'tn     eter,
an'  in n
lie ti"���!-: her 'way in hi!  machine
To   v.! en    fi IV -   live   till   thi y   get
well  ...
X  Fai ver, hi   ji -��� '  \ ed me bard an'
tight
An' said  we'd  stick  togethe r." An'
each week
vVe    wen:    to    see    Her,   but    tbey
wouldn't let
Me stjueeze-a-hug hcr, but jest pat
lu-r  cheek.
An'   Aunty   Bess,   she   come   to   live
wiv   us
For   iirl'ul   long���till    winter   went
away
An' summer come; but  Muvver dear
was -iili
L'p i" th'  11"- Tb' house where
sick   fe elks   sta)
Bul   "ii   Thanksgivin'   Fawer  smiled
an' smiled,
An' pinch my ear an' say, "Good
new-, my  lad;
In   one   month   more   we'll   have   ber
back  again
All  wel an'  happy.     Mv!   won't  we
be glad-!"
I    dupno   why    I      -ried.   but     Aunty
Besn.
She   did   it,   t"".   an'   biff,    an'    say
"Dear, dear!"
They    ain't    a    thing    I    want    this
Chris'mustime
EsceptW   Muvver   dear���an'   she'll
be here!
Useless   Presents.
Ainu���Yes, Johnny, Santa Claus
brought you a baby brother.
Johnny- -Gn at Scot! .' nother
present that ain't any use!
R. B, LINZEY
JEWELLER
4132    MAIN    STREET
CHRISTMAS CHEER
IS BEST EXPRESSED
BY A CHOICE BOX OF
Cut Flowers
KEELER'S
NURSERY
For your Christmas Cut-
Elowers; also Pot-plants
all in first-class condition.
Prices   Moderate
KEELER'S NURSERY   1 ^prists
15th Ave. and Main St. "The Home of Choice Flowers" Phone Fairmont 817
REMOVAL NOTICE
Vancouver, B.C.
On and after October 25th,   1913,   thc  offices and warehouse of this
Company will be located at I 136 HOMER   STREET, where we will have
larger  premises  with  better   facilities   for   handling our  increasing   business.
NEW TELEPHONE,  SEYMOUR 3230
Private Exchange ti all Department.
Pease Pacific Foundry, Limited
CENTRAL PARK BAKERY
"WON QUALITY" BREAD & CAKES
LOOK GOOD
NUTRITIOUS
TASTE GOOD
DIGESTIBLE
DO YOU GOOD
PALATABLE
OF ALL LOCAL STORES
Our Bread and Cakes are carefully prepared by experienced bakers according to scientific formulae and the MAXIMUM of NUTRITIVE qualities
secured.
UP-TO-DATE MACHINERY
SANITARY BAKEHOUSES
"WON QUALITY" has secured DIPLOMAS at COMPETITIVE EXHIBITIONS at   VANCOUVER   and NEW WESTMINSTER.
To insure timely delivery Orders for Christmas   and   New   Year   Cakes
should be placed now���With your grocer or to
Phone 13 L Coll.
KINGSWAY
ROBERTSON
Corner Westminster Road and Park Ave.
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
1949  ALBERT  ST.
PHONE :   HIGHLAND   5308
ENGINEERS.  MACHINISTS  AND  FOUNDERS
IRON  AND  GRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND SPECIALS
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
HARRY KAY
PAINTER   AND   DECORATOR
Phone: Fair. 326       4518 Main St.
MM TWO
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
SATURDAY DECEMBER 20, 1913
THE BONNIE PURPLE HEATHER
Sandy te! s yae aboot some folk that thocht they had him for a soft mark
Hastings
and
Core Ave.
EMPRESS
Lawrence & Sandusky, Lessees
Phone
Sey. 3907
Week of December 22
Matinees Wed. and Sat.
lie,.,',  a'  wi'  yai-.  ire-e'ii-.
I guess jra�� wud be thinkin' Sandy
had ne,t intae some kin' o' trouble tae
accoont i'er no' baen hii weekly filo-
��� fie article, Hooever, elimVi believe
a' the itoriei yae here���an' believe me,
there'a some gey queer yin- gaun a-
le.e.et the noo.
i ii coorse, the season o' the year's
n iponsible for a lot ee' them, what wi'
Chsytmai an' Neerday i 3" upon ns
aii' the heated atmosphere peculyar
tae elec! -111111 time.
Noo I telt the edytur tae bc share
a.l'   pit   .1   COUpU   ,>'   SCOtch   thistles   at
the held ee' this article���jist for auld
timet *ake. I ken fine there's noth-
ing cheers a Scotsman's hert mare'
than V.ie see liis ain native flooer,
even though it's only a picter o1 it.
Bj the wey there wis w.-m fellie actually had the impidence iae- challenge me tac a debate as tae whether
it wis really a flooer nr an animal.
They're Bae Bmert they fellies that
they're aye in danger ee' fa'in an' cut-
tin' themsels.
Jist as the rose betokens the delicate, sensitive, tender nature (gee
whiz) 'e' the average cock-shure Englishman, so dis the sturdy, jaggy
thistle betoken the hardy, "second-
tae-nane" demeanour o1 the man frae
the laund O1 cakes.
Nop, I intend tae he very brief in
this, my last article 0' the year���an'
I'll gie yae wan nr twa reasons fur it.
In the first place I've been askit
tae staund fnr elecksluin as Reeve o'
Seieeth Vancoover by a "very influential body 0' ratepayer*," ai they generally  say. although  they  micht  only
be a wheen real estate men.
They put it richt up tae me an' for
a wee while 1 wis sare tempted .1-
tween gaun em leailin' a Christian life
an' gaun tae the deil.
Weel. at ony rate the propiiishun
didna appeal tae me. I'm li^e the man
that came frae that place in Aniciiky.
������|   wis  wantin'  tac be  shown," an'
there dielna seem tae he onything BUb-
Stanshial at the lack o' it except thc
share thing ee' bein' ca'd a grafter���
an' I hie mare respeck feir my tnmli-
Stane than hae it tellin' lees e.n nie.
\Ye-   neet   talkin'   elll   the   Subject   feer   .1
v. ee- while an' I wisna long in lindin'
oot they were unly gaun tac use mc
as a tool tae further their ain (interests, But 1 wisna in wi' a cairt o'
hey.
The idea wis that if I wud staund
1 wud he share tac tak awa a lot o'
votes frae anither candidate an' by
that means thc man they wcre wantin'
lae be Reevfc wud hae a chance o'
scramblln' in.
Xaw, freens. I'm for nane o' they
! tricks. Ile.eiever. if ever I should
honour Sooth Vancoover by cond.s-
cendin' tac staund for the reeveship
an' they dae me the doobtful honor o'
clecktin me ���weel, believe mc, I'll
mak  things  hum.
Hooever, dismiss a' they serious
subjects frae yaer mind in the meantime,  freens.    Xeerday's  a'most  here
|an' why should wc worry, as I beard
la lassie wi' wee sbi rt [ruckles say i'i
! the theatre the ither nicht,
In the saicond place the wife's near
g"t nu- eiut ,,' up jidgmenl the noo.
I've no' been worried eueeiigh owre
the ither questyin, she thinl -. but -he
comes in ui' ither things tai- mak a
man feci as if he wished Christinas
an'  Xew  Year wis a' passed.
The time the negoshiashuni wire
gaun on ancnt the reeveship the only
thing she wis concerned aboot wis
what color the motor cam' wud bc
that tin- municeepality wud provide.
(Vs if it niaittercel a bug's c'e tai' me
aboot  a  thing  like   that.
llarkin' back, hooever, the cookery
book taks the place ������' the i'aimily bible in the meantime���an' it's sometimes jist as haurd tae try an' tinner-
staund.
"Iloei wud yae dae, Sandy, if vac
wis makin' a cake an' it telt yae tic
pit a dizen eggs in an' the Ileus no'
layin' yet."
Did yae ever hear o' sic nonsense.
I   wisna long in  tellin' her.
"Look here. Mistress MacPherson,
if I read a cookery beie,k an' it telt
me tae pit a dizen eggs iu a cake at
this time o' the year 1 wnd come tae
the natural conclushun that the edytur had been drinkin' leetnonade or
sonic ither intoxicatin' liquor on a
Sunday when a' they shops should
hae been closed.
"Forget it, lassie," I says, "insteed
o'  makin' a  cake  for yaer freens tae
eai. wi' ninety cents worth ee' eggs in
it���ji-t you set tac an' mak a Scotch
hagie.1-
" 11 - a long time ��� i:t I law yae at
it an' beeauie yaer, iu Canada noo,
dinna think we're owe polite tac lil
doe >n an' mak a falsi that a king wud
relish.
"Wis il no' lhe Scutch haggis that
won   the   Battle   o'   llaniioikbiirn   an'
wis  it  no'  lhe  Scotch  haggis  that  iu-
-;eireel   Burns  tae  write���
"Ve   powers   wha   111:1k   mankind  your
care,
Ami eli-h  them "lit their bill ee' fare,
Auld Scotland wants nae skiuking
ware
'lhat jaups in  biggies;
But if ye wish her gratefu' prayer,
Gie hcr a haggis!
I canna thole the wife when she
askl me sic questyini���an' especially
at a lime like this when a fellie should
be practicin' singiu' an' jiggin' for
that nicht o' a' nichts in a Scotsman's
year���guid auld Hogmanay.
Xoo freens, I wish yae a' a very
merry Christmas���jist tae be in the
faushun, yae ken���but for the New
Year I couldna wish yae onything
better than yae should hae jist e-
nougli fun an' frolic as '11 keep yae
in guid luck an' guid humor a' the
year roon.
Long may yaer lum reek!
A guid New Year tae ane an' a' an'
mony may yae see, is the wish ee'
SANDY MACPHBRSON.
The  Del.  S.  Lawrence
Stock   Company
WITH
Miss
Maude   Leone>
In The Musit nl Comedy
The Timejhe Place & The Girl
Prices 25c and 50c
Matinees 25c Any Seat
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
SATURDAY'S MATINEE, 2 till 5
"The  House ol  I'"catures"
PROGRAM MONDAY AND TUESDAY, DECEMBER IS AND 16
"THE GLOW WORM."
A three-reel Reliance masterpiece, showing Prairie scenes, then to
the heart eef Xew York's underworld, and again to lhe Spanish Isle
de Ora. of South America. Many stimulating scenes follow, in
highly picturesque settings, full of action and excitement, Also good
Western drama and a famous Keystone comedy.
FRASER   &   MACLEAN
Grocers  Who   Have   Steadily   Progressed
Qycr two years ago Mr. II. E.
Fraser and Mr. E. D. MacLean opened their now well-known grocery
stqre at thc corner of Twenty-sixth
Avenue and Main Street. Coming
originally to South Vancouver from
Stongbton, Saskatchewan. Messrs.
Eraser and MacLean had considerable experience in both farming and
trading which has served them in excellent stead in the extensive business which they have built up in the
short period mentioned.
Some idea of the growth in
Messrs. Fraser and MacLean's trading may be gathered from the fact
that tbe extent and variety of the
stock of provisloni carried has more
than doubled in iwo years and there
has been a steady increase in each
department. Their great aim has
been the highest quality of goods
with the best and quickest service.
It should be added that Messrs.
Frater and MacLean have taken the
keenest interest in municipal developments since they settled here, and
have an abiding faith in the continued prosperity of South Vancouver. Their own success has justified them in being boosters <>f the
municipality, "first, last and all the
time."
R.    HORRELL,    LADIES'    AND
GENTS'   TAILOR.
Our district was indeed fortunate
when this gentleman packed his
traps and hied himself to the only
place worth living ill, South Vancouver. For quite a few years, the
number escape us at the present
moment, this gentleman has been
one eif our most progressive merchants. Ever ready to take part in
all movements that tend to better
the district, this gentleman is fast
forging his business into the front
rank.     He  has  supplied   every   cloth-
VITRIFIED SEWER  PIPE AND
ALL FITTINGS
C. Gardiner - Johnson & Company
Johnson's Wharf
Phone : Sey. 9145
ing lhat fits every individual case,
rounding out here and filling in here
as the occasion demands. He uses
only the very best of fabrics, and
when the work is turned out there is
an indescribable something about it
that places it at once in a class of its
own. This is, after all, is where the
joy of tailor-made garments come
in, added to which is shapliness and
durability. Little need be said of
the renovatory department, suffice to
say that once a customer, always a
customer. You cannot miss the
place it you look���4135 Main Street.
Mr. Horrell was cutter with thc
Hudson's Bay Company, Winnipeg,
for eleven years.
ANDERSON,     THE     BUTCHER.
"By right dealing J wil merit your
continued and valued patronage," is
the statement issued to the general
public by tlu aboye gentleman. Mr.
Andurs'Oh has been in the butcher
business   for   twenty    years,   five    of
which lie has pent in this glorious
district. He was one of the first to
ipen up this particular line here, and
expects to still continue to live here
and boost the district along as he
has been doing in the past. Already
a fine trade has been built up. and
the adding of but little more will
necessitate the enlarging of already
extensive premises. This shop carries a line of fresh and cured meats,
poultry, etc., and it is a specialist
for the best ever. As they say, right
dealing is his standby. It is by right
dealing and fair methods that he has
substantiated a meat business that is
the best the market affords, and at a
price no higher than you would have
to pay for inferior goods in Vancouver, note thc address���418.S Main
Street. The store is also headquarters for strictly fresh eggs. Mr.
Anderson has a branch store, the
Avenue Market, corner of Wilson
and Victoria  Reiaels.
VAUDEVILLE
ALL
WEEK
Prices 15c 25c, 35c, and 50c
Two Shows Nightly, 7:30 and 9.15
Matinee  daily  3  p.m.
PANTAGES
Unequalled      Vaudeville      Meana      Pantagef
Vaudeville
E. D. GRAHAM, Resident Man.
l'hone Seymour 3046
Three times daily, 2.45, 7.20 and 9.1?
VAUDEVILLE
ALL
YVF.EK
And Four Other  Feature Acts
Prices,  Matinees,  15c;  Night,  15 and
25c.    Box Seats, 50 cents
South Vancouver Builders' Supply Company
Dealers in Sand, Gravel, Fibre, Cement, Lime, Plaster, Vitrified
Pipe, Tile, Fire-clay, Lath, and Brick of all kinds.
Offices:   51st Avenue and Fraser Street.    Phone: Fraser 36.
Main and 29th Avenue.   Phone :   Fairmont 1940.
Fraser Street and North Arm of Fraser River.   Phone : Fraser 84.
Collingwood   East,   Phone :   Collingwood 33.
Coal orders taken at all offices and delivered to all parts of South
Vancouver.
!~
TEACHER
OF THE
Mr. JIM TAIT
VIOLIN and PIANOFORTE
You Can Save Money Buying
Your Xmas Goods at Cole's
Is prepared to receive a limited number of pupils
and impart instruction al their homes  or  at  his
STUDIO 1
COLLINGWOOD EAST,  At B. C. Electric  Station
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   DEAN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
We change daily with a fresh feature each day. We have installed a New Powers 6 A, the most perfect motion picture machine
made.
Come any night and see a NEW FEATURE on our NEW 1>:T.R-
ROROIDE curtain just imported.
MATINEE SATURDAYS AT 2p.m.
Cedar   Cottage   Theatre
"THE HOUSE THAT PLEASES"
20th Avenue and Commercial Street
SATURDAY MATINEE, 2 to 5
SPECIAL FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
"THE RE-INCARNATION OF KARMA"
Strong Oriental picture full of the spices of the Indies
... We show the best, cleanest and most up to date pictures with a
complete change daily.
COME AND SEE
Beaver Transfer Co.
LIMITED
112 WATER'STREET
Furniture. Piano Moving and
all sorts ot teaming done.
Calls from any part of Vancouver or. South Vancouver
will receive our closest attention.
All orders promptly attended
to.
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can  supply  your  needs  at  right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right  at  Station)
VERY  NEWEST IX XOVELTY COLLARS AM) FANCY TIES
FOR LADIES
LADIES' TIES, usually E0c; newest colors 35c
LAD I KS' COLLARS, usually 50c; our price 35c
LADIES' COLLARS, regular $1.00; special 50 and 65c
Collars are neatly boxed suitable for gifts
FANCY HEADED HAIR BANDS, regular 50c; .iur price 35c
FANCY HANDKERCHIEFS  10c to 75c each
LADIES' TEA APRONS,    A big assortment at 25c each.
FANCY  LINEN COVERS, SILK embroidered 50c  to $1.25
TOYS OF ALL KINDS AT LOWER PRICES
Our "BIG BEAUTY" DOLL at $1.75 is the best doll value in
Vancouver
MEN'S WEAR SPECIALLY  BOXED FOR XMAS TRADE
TIES and ARMLETS  ,.25c and 50c box
SUSPENDER SETS  35c box
THESE ARE A FEW OF THE MANY GOOD VALUES AT
COLE'S DRY GOODS STORES
Fraser and 48th
BUTTERICK PATTERNS
Also Victoria and Wilson Roads
P. C. CORSETS BUCKLEY HATS SATURDAY   DECEMBER 20,  1913
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
FIVE
The Christmas Tree at Wide Plain
(By W. D. NESBIT.)
Wide Plain  is  in the   Middle  West. | her  way  te.  bf   his.     George   h.ul   nol
It wu se, named because it li see. It
wide. The town does neet cover
entire plain. Fat bc it from ne
(., convey inch an Impression, inasmuch as the plain extends east, west,
i .r111 and seeuih ostensibly as far as
there is anything.
No doubt  somewhere   In  the dis-
tance   there   are   treel   and   hills,   or
methlng   to   Stop   tbe   plain   from
cadlng any   further.      And  some
daj it is tlie intention 'ef the Greater
Wide Plain Association tee have real
irees growing in their thriving little
city. But just at present they are
sn busy getting the town established
that  the trees  must  wait.
1'.verge   Freeman   was   one   of  the
most  energetic   yeiung  men   in   Wide
Plain.   He was one of the pioneers,
lie  was  almost   the   oldest   inhabitant, although  he was  was 25 years
I ;ige.    You  see, George  located  ill
Wiele  Plain   when  it   was   practically
nothing but width and plain, He fore-
the future for the town, and heme   its   leading   dealer   in   agricultural implements   and  groceries   and
hardware   and   see   on.       lie   became
the   leading   dealer,   because   he   was
the only one.
In a few months Wide Plain had a
population of 2.500. Ami so social
life became a feature of existence
ihere.
Social   life   requires    two    factors.
< ine of them is women. The other
is men. You may have thought that
. ne feature would be sociability and
tlie other would be life, but that
wi uld be drawing it a bit fine.
Lucy Cleveland was the belle of
Wide Plain. She was not the belle
because she was the only young
woman there,  for  there  wcre others.
< IthefS���young and beautiful, hut
while some of the others were as
young none of them were as beautiful as Lucy.
Consequently Lucy had suitors a-
plenty, In fact, she had eight suitors, that being the available unmarried portion oi the population that
-li- would consider. And she managed to give the eight the impression that she was not considering
them very much.
George Freeman endeavored to induce her to consider hiiii. George's
P"lie.y in life was to get what hc
wanted by one nr two methods. One
was to go where it was and take
possession, the other was to ask for
it. Inasmuch as Lucy was not a
building site nor a quarter section
In could not claim her by right of
discovery. So he bad tei ask her.
And she assured him that while shi
esteemed him highly she did not set
skeel her ii there wai v.m,. one el
to whom she hael pledged her affection or plighted her treith. He diel
met care. Ile Went '.u idling agricultural Implements and striped overkill and brootni and naili and putty I a   Christina
and  canned  g I-   and   other  groc- Umiles,    i   peciall
erica,   whistling   little   melodiei   tojrivali
himself   and   w,������b ring   how   Lucy ;    .. N  Chriatma
w.'idei   want    their   house   painted
when they got married.
Every now and then he would pro
poae again  tei Lucy.    By every  now
and then  I  mean that hewould pr
DOle, say
lie   proposed   twice.      He'   saw   lhat
"We must have a Christmas tree
for the  children," Lucy  laid.
Lucy was teacher in the Wide
Plain Sunday School. Her pupils
iehilize-el her. George anel ihe .ether
-���.en suitors had tried to jeiin her
class, Inn   -be had insisted  that  they
nm-i attend the Bible class (or older
students,   which   wa-   presided   over
le\ Mr- Hear) Gillup. a me,si capable marrieel holy, win, had brought
"in- husband and -ix children i" help
upbuilt    Wide   I'I;.;::
'llie- (act  thai  Lucy bad demanded
ccasioned   many
especially     ire em    George l
tree!" laughed William Shillin..re "There isn't a tree'
(eir a hundred miles in any direction "
"Let'-    gel    i nil'    ihipped    in    by
once a week.    Someweeks ' ���''������ighl.   then,"   lUggested   Luke   M.ir-
ed twice     He saw ihat '��  '
pleated Lucy t'e be proposed to an.l "No time
George wai a gentleman whee be-, peeinle'd out
lieved   in   making   himself  agreeable.  Cnristmai
when   he  was   fond     , TJ>��   "v��n   rj.vall   wer�� n0J  ���� ,"ar-
1 lictilar abniit the tree.    Each of them
now,"   Wesley   Perkins
"It's only twee dayi to
eve
to a  veiling  lady   w In
��'  'ler- | knew   that    Lucy   would    be    disap
So  it  came  along   toward  Christ-  pointed a  bit, but each of them felt
mas. ' thai tlu  gift he had selected for her
would   help   to   overcome   her   disap-i     Mrs.   Gillup   had   spent   some   time
peeintment.    For, in  any event, there  in   conference   with   him   that   day.
The   seven   rivals   had   attempted   to
wai  to be a  Christmas  Eve  party  at
the church.
' In the evening of December 23
George called e,n Lucy. Shc was
still unhappy because the dear chil-
dren   could   not   have  a   tree.
"Xow, Lucy," be said. "I've arranged il all i'er you. There'll be a
Chrutmai  tree."
"Oh, have you g'et it!    Where- is it'"
I   elieln't  know yeiu ce,uld get eme."
h   isn't   here   yel,   but   there'll   be
��� iuiz her, but she would not gratify
their curi"sity further than to say
that there weiuld be a tree. They
hael asked her���separately���if she
would hang their presents for Lucy
een tin- tree, anel lhe agreed to do se,.
She  anel George, behind the drawn
curtains   of  the   church,  labored   l"iig
with curtain pubs and siring- and a
profusion   of   green   paper,   to   say
nothing   of   several   bundles   of   arti-
one Christmai Eve Now, don't ask ficial palmi and the like, which
questions Mrs Gillup and I will I Georgi had unearthed among Inns   il   up  all   light " [Ol '���
''ll"< I '����*< tr"11 il ��P" When the audience wai assembled
"No. Mrs. Gillup ami I have ar- for the- Christmai Eve exerciaei Mrs
ranged ior it all. You are ne.t to Gillup ilowly drew ba.k a curtain
worry yourself about anything. Ju-t winch concealed one corner of the
you gather your class together and room, and there with candlei glow-
be at the church at M 0 clock that I ing ;ind green paper and green palm
im ning, and the tree will be there." i branches rustling, ste.eed a Christ-
S'i Lin;,. Scenting mystery, and mas tree. It wai nol a genuine fir
too     diplomatic     t"     ask     anything   or  cedar,   but   it   looked   like   a   tree.
more,  wai  compelled te, content  herself with that much  information.
Towardi dusk of the day before
Christmai George was seen carry-
inn several bulky bundlei into the
church.
And the candles and the strings of
popcorn and glittering ornaments
hid many of its faults.
To   the   surprise   of   Lucy,   George-
was   not   in   sight.      She   looked   all
I about  for  him,  in  her  delight,  wish
ing t" thank him for his ingenious
way  eif providing this  make-believe
tree for the little ones.
Mrs. Gillup went blithely on, taking present! !mm the tree and distributing them. After passing out
the. gifts for the children she picked
e.n package- and bundles for the
older folk.
It was noted that the tree sort of
-hee.ek every time she took off one
of the gifts which had been provided
by the seven rivals for Lucy. Hut
;o tail the final package had been
dilposed of. Mr. Gillup drew the
curtain In front of the tree again
and thc audience filed nut. laughing
and  'hatting over  the    '      I if the
entertainment. Lucy ,1 i<l neit hurry
away with the rest. She stepped
back e,f the curtain with Mrs. Gillup
"It   was   just   lovely,   Mrs    Gillup!"
the exclaimed.   "Bul why wasn't Mr.
Preeman here?    After his bard work
land   cleverneai   in   helping   yem.   I
ihould have thought he would have
j wanted  to see how   the  tree looked."
"I   expect  he  was pretty busy."
"And���of   course,    I    haven't    any
j right tee expect such a thing���but  he
was such a good friend nf mine, Mrs.
Gillup���1   really   thought   it    a   little
; odd   that   he   didn't   make   me    some
kind   of  a    present���just   a    remem-
, brance,  or���"
"I didn't forget you, Lucy." said
i the tree.    "Y'oti can have  mc."
And Mrs. Gillup says that Lucy
[knew all about it all the time, be-
1 cause she had sharp eyes, and no
���tree  that wore  boots  could  fool her.
A view of the waterfrcnt   along   Burrard   Inlet.    With the development of the North Arm  of  the  Fraser  River, similar
scenes will be commonplace in South Vancouver.
DAD.
Dad ambles home at close of day,
and. though he's tired and lore, he
joins he children in their play upon
thc cottage floor. He sems to share
in full glee that stirs their hopeful hearts A elad adjustable is he. a
dad of many parts. Now he is slain
in mimic wars and proves a lively
corpse: and now he is a train of cars,
again he is a horse. He is a rooster
or a mouse, a monarch nr a game���
it's always Christmas In the house
when good old Dad comes home!
And when he's tired of being all
the creatures in the zoo he leans his
chair against the wall and talks an
hour or two. Who ever heard such
wondrous labs as Dad knows how to
tell? Of palaces in fur-off vales,
where mighty giants dwell: of
maiden stolen from her bower, of
knight in brave array, who dares the
maid way. And so he talks until
each lot is nodding in his chair; it's
always Christmas in the cot when
good "hi Dad is there!
December's final week departs
adown the dead year's tracks, but
Christmas lives in human hearts and
not In almanacs!
DOMINION
HOME   BREAD   MADE
Dominion Bread is handled by the following representative traders
in Collingwood and Cedar Cottage districts:
COLLINGWOOD
Burcet,   Westminster   Road.
Wight, cor. of Errols Road.
Adams,  cor.  of  Errols   &  Westminster
Rupert   St.   Grocery   Store,   Rupert  St.
Wall   Work,   Government   Road.
Hill, Rogers Street.
Shearer, Joyce Road.
BitHngham,   48th  Ave.,   the   Busy   Bee
Store.
Kobertson. 56th and Carr.
Edmonds,  56th and  Nanaimo.
CEDAR  COTTAGE
Provincial   Grocery,   Westminster   Rd.
Page,  cor.  24th and  Knight Road.
Nicklin,  Westminster   Road.
Williamson.   Commercial   Street.
Fletcher,   Commercial   Street.    .
Benett,   Commercial   Street.
Salisbury.   Commercial  Street.
Marfew   Cafe.   Commercial   Street.
Edmonson,   Commercial   Street.
Cashion  Bros.,   Commercial Street.
��iicox.   Victoria   Road.
Govan,  Victoria  Rsad.
Woods,   Westminster   Road.
Donald,  Westminster   Road.
Morrow, Gladstone Road,
Williams, Nanaimo Rd. and 22nd.
Engilkey.   Slocan   Road.
BAKERY, Cor. 24th Ave. and Thomas
Phone Fairmont 872
SCOTCH  CLOTHING  HOUSE LIMITED
TWO STORES
30 to 34 Cordova W., Between Abbott and Carrall
77 Haitingi Street E., Corner Columbia Avenue
See Our Special $12.50, $18.50 and $22.50
Suits and Overcoats
We cater to the man who wants the best, for the least money
T. BAMBER
Begs to announce to the Residents of WALES and EARLS ROADS
DISTRICT that he has opened a
HARDWARE STORE
AT 2074 KINGSWAY (Cor. V/ALES)
General and Domestic Hardware. Builders Supplies. Paints and Stains,
etc.. will be handled at strictly city prices.
Your patronage will be esteemed and all orders will receive prompt
and personal attention.
PLUMBER   and    HEATING   ENGINEER
ESTIMATES FREE
2074 WESTMINSTER ROAD
IT WILL PAY YOU TO SEE OUR SHOWING FOR FALL
PRICES THAT CANNOT BE BEATEN
OR REPEATED IN THE CITY
SHOES
Family Shoe Store
(No. 2)
CEDAR COTTAGE
Grandview Cur Terminui
VANNESS AVENUE
Store No. 1
at   823 GRANVILLE STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
FRANK NEWTON
BEST   FOR   CHILDREN
Chambers 40 per cent.
Emulsion Cod Liver Oil
Soothes, Heals and Builds
up the Lungs and System
We guarantee it
Second to None
SPECIAL PRICE 85c and 40c
CHAMBERS
DRUG   CO.
Collingwood East
Make South Vancouver
Beautiful
By   planting   such   varieties   of
ROSES,   SHRUBS   AND
ORNAMENTALS
as are furnished by the
British Columbia
Nurseries Co. Ltd.
They are THE BEST, and are
GUARANTEED TO SATISFY   THE  MOST  CRITICAL.
Write for our 80-page descriptive   Catalogue,   IT   IS   FREE
We also grow and sell the
choicest fruit trees and small
fruit plants, in great variety.
Nothing but the best grade supplied and delivered fresh from
the  nurseries.
H. H. HOWARD, of (3425
Inverness Street, South Vancuuver, is our representative,
see him, eer write to 1493 7th
Avenue West
P ENGLISH BILLIARDS P
0
0
L
A BURROUGHS & WATTS table���the only
CEDAR COTTAGE���ia nov, initalled at the MARFEW
pi i.il. RO< iM.
\ n,����� extension of premises, inst completed, makes
this resort both COMFORTABLE and COMMi iDH H S
���the i'i.-    i ' -i'^'"'! s pleasant bout ot two
City      ���        BARBER SHl IP Prices
3594   Commercial   Street,   Cedar  Cottage
0
0
L
Collingwood Pure Milk Co.
PURITY CLEANLINESS
REGULAR DAILY DELIVERIES
All our Milk and Cream is treated in the HOLDING
PASTEURIZING PLANT, in accordance with the
new PROVINCIAL ACT'S REQUIREMENT.
G. W. HAWKINS C. F. HAWKINS
EARLS ROAD, South Vancouver
Hughes Bros' Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET  EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone : Seymout 330
We carry everything in the Liquor Line
No order too small, and none too large for this popular Liquor Store
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
leaving our Store every Friday morning at 9 a.m.
TABLE VINEGAR
Now that thc time of salads and green stuffs is here you will want
vinegar that is pure and wholes, me. We have this week put in a
stock of thc finest vinegar procurable. It comes in strong glass jugs
With a handle, in half gallons and gallons.
Blue Grass Bell Cedar Vinegar, half-gallon jugs   50c
Blue Grass Belle, White Pickling, half gallon jug  50c
Pacific Belle Codfish Tablets, the package 20c
Fisher's Home Made Peanut Butter, the jar 15 to 45c
Pioneer Minced Clams, the can    20c
Clark's Pork and Beans in Chili Sauce   two cans for  25c
French 1'eas, two cans for  25c
Swift's Borax Soap, the cake   5c
Old Dutch Hand Soap, the bar  5c
Sheriff's Jelly Powder, all flavors, three for  25c
Deuerr's Jams, two pound pots  40c
Strawberries, Cherries, Plums, Peaches
Fraser & MacLean,
26th Avenue and Main
Phone :   Fairmont 784
EARLS   ROAD   PHARMACY
Corner Earls Read - KINGSWAY - 2197 Westminster Road
NA-DRU-CO. REMEDIES
50c���Tasteless   Cod   Liver Oil���$1.00
25c���Linseed Licorice and Chlorodyne���50c
SPECIALTY���PRESCRIPTIONS
WAKELIN BROTHERS
PROPRIETORS
Arena
HOCKEY
At Westminster
Vancouvei
DECEMBE
Entire  Gallery,  50  cents.
B
��� v, Westminster
R 19, at 8.30 p.m.
Reserve  seats,  $1.00.    Promenade,  $1.25
ox Seats, $1.50
-__n FOUR
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
SATURDAY DECEMBER 20, 1913
"I have been following the mistletoe rule- faithfully," said a pretty
girl. "Veni must do so ii yeeu want
to he effective when under the mistletoe "ii Christmas
"The mistletoe girl Mas a very fine
skin. It is see nice ili.it she doesn't
have to powder and rouge it. In
fact, the girl whe, rouges Is impossible frum ��� mistletoe standpoint. Most
��� ei my mistletoe hangs under lhe' side
lights.     1   don't  believe in  hanging  it
from the chandelier in the centre of
the room. Top lights are unbecoming.
"They east a strange set of shadows upon the fact and they make the
eyes look as though they were great
bars under them. If ynu want to
h.eek Well under the mistletoe be sure
tn have your room lighted frum the
side. Vou can hang yuur mistletoe
fn.in the lights just the same and
you ean sit on a chair under the
lights, even if you can't stand under
them.
"So I've set down these two rules
for my guidance. Don't use too
much rouge and powder if you expect to stand under the mistletoe;
and be sure to lighten your room
from  the side.
"I have various other under the
mistletoe rules. One of them is to
wear something becoming to the
complexion.
"If the spots in your eyes are ::
delicate green be sure to wear a
delicate green gown with a white
setting. But if yeiur eyes are blue,
choose a light blue something like
the color of your eyes when the sun
strikes  them,  a  soft  pastel  blue.
"The black-eyed girl and the
brown-eyed one can take more liberties with their eyes. They will
stand any color.
"The under the mistletoe girl always wears a gown of pale tone.
There is omething forbidding about
lhe  more pronounced colors.
"I knew a girl who had an imported gown. It came from Paris where
they know how to serve up the pale
tints  to customers.
"This Rirl a- -he stood under the
mistletoe ween- a very pale turquoise
linen, an almost impossible thing; it
was so sheer, and it was so delicately
trimmed with embroidery, It was
in, e-t effective.
"The girl in black may be so alluring in the pathos of her mourning
that she tempts the eye under tlle
mistletoe. Hut neet so the girl in
navy blue, in garnet or in purple.
These culurs have a depressing look
when  seen  beneath   the  mistletoe.
"I have already pointed out the
importance of a nice skin. There
ihould be me freckles.
"Freckles are all very well in the
summer time, when they accompany
a sail boat and a tennis racquet; but
in tin- winter time they are wholly
oat of place and particularly inappropriate to the mistletoe.
"I have found from experience,
added t" some study of the subject
at home and abroad, that for taking
away freckles and keeping them
away s.uir milk is best. And tbat is
why 1 have a jar of it brought to me
regularly   every  day.
"I pour a full cup of it in a washing basin and 1 daub my face freely,
letting the seuir milk dry e.n. It feels
rather  sticky  for a  few  minutes, but
it deees my face and neck, hands and
arms  a  world  e,f  good.
"The girl under the mistletoe must
have pretty eyes, and very few of us
have those They don't seem tei be-
as numerous as they used to he.
"In the days of the old-time lo-e
stories and in the time of the mi' i
lure lhe heroines all bad great, soft
dreamy eyes. They were dove-
shaped and the gazelle hail no ili-epe-
depths in its hazel or! s than had th
novel  girl.    That   wa-   |,,ng ago.
"The girl of today looks at yotl
through eyelids that have very
scanty lashes while above her eyes
there is only the tiniest shadow of
an eyebrow. She doesn't have the
beautiful, sharply defined eyebrows
of a few years ago.
"Why? The reason isn't so very
far e,ff. She is too busy to take care
eef her looks. That is about the way
it  is
"If the girl of today would read
les- and study her looks more she
weeiild be happier and better. If she
would -t'el) trying to be somebody
else and would be ju-i her own self
made prettier by the beauty arts, shc
Wi "Id enjoy standing under the mistletoe   more.
"'lhe  under-the-mistletoe girl isn't
fat.     Nolle.ily likes a  pudgy girl.   She
Is too cushiony t,> be roinantie and
she is teen flabby to be poetic.    There
isn't any grace or charm in her.
"The unilei-tlie-niistletoe girl, if
she a southern girl, is busy banting
just  now.    She  bants  upon  oranges.
if''     ;���   >���#��,
Kitsilano  Beach, one of the beauty spots of  Greater Vancouver.
���H
':v,..��Sa> ���' _���* ������>
"For breakfast she has a tray oi
them with thc outer skin removed
and a hole cut in the top of each
eirange. The orange in its thick,
white skin is set in a cold place over
night and the next morning the fruit
is all juice. If freest touched it, lo
much the better. Eat a breakfast of
oranges eer a luncheon or orange-
and not much else. That is a gone!
way   to get   thin.
"Thc under-the-mistletoe girl ha-
other things to look out feir. She
must watch her expression, for tin-
li a generation when girls are judged
less   by   their   chethes   than   by   theii
looks.
"The    popular    girl���the   Useable
girl���will have a nice, smiling face
Her teeth will be very while and the
ceirners of her nieiuth will turn up.
"The under-the-mistletoe girl has
other things to look out for. Bhe
must have a sweet breath. Shc mu-'
be able to show a very pretty hand
Men are fascinated by the hand and
so are weemen, of course tlle mistle-
the girl aims at all-around popularity
"The mistletoe girl has a prety
figure. Just now it is the tight-fitting figure, the day of thc blouse
girl  is  past.
"Shc i.s little in the waist, broad in
the shoulders, and she has a wiele
hipline, none too broad for beauty,
and none too narrow for good form
She is exquisitely shaped and for thi-
she thanks her physical culture'
teacher.
"The mistletoe girl is sweet 'ef
voice and  she  has  the  low note  cul
tivated.   Shc speaks as the English
woman speaks, upon a low note, and
she knows how to make use of the
sweeter notes. Il inclined tee be
shrill of tone she modifies her note'-
imtil she can speak low and inu-i
cally."
Mr.    William    Stewart    Recovering.
Mr. William Stewart. Twenty-see
e mil Avenue, Inspector for the Fed
eral Life Insurance Company, ami
eme of the best known men in Uriiish Columbia, was stricken luddenh
some days ago with appendicitis. He-
was removed to the General 11"-
pital where an operation was performed upon him anil where he lingered for seeme time between life
and death. Latest news is to the effect that lie is recovering, and it will
ihe welcomed by the many friends "i
I the  Stewart  family  locally.
B.  C.   ELECTRIC   IRONS
THE CHEAPEST
IRON OF ITS
STANDARD ON
THE MARKET
THE BEST IRON
OFFERED  ON
THE   MARKET
AT ANY PRICE
-PRICE  $3.50-
Every Iron is guaranteed by the B. C. Electric for 10 years
CARRALL   AND
HASTINGS STS.
PHONE
SEYMOUR 5000
1138 GRANVILLE ST.
(Near Davie)
What Book is More Used Than The
Telephone Directory?
Macdonald,  Marpole Company
THE OLD RELIABLE COAL DEALERS
HAVE NOW ON HAND AN AMPLE SUPPLY OF
THE GENUINE
Wellington  and Comox Coal
ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED���PHONE SEY. 210
TRY OUR NUT COAL FOR COOKING PURPOSES
NO INCREASE IN PRICES i^fl
"Snow is Coming"���Buy Your
STOVE WOOD
$3.00 Per Load
WE SELL VANCOUVER ISLAND COAL
COAST LUMBER & FUEL
COMPANY   LIMITED
4905 Ontario Street, Cor. Bodwell (34th Avenue)
Phone:   Fraser 41 Phone: Highland 226
Advertising space is valuable, because the book is in use
by everybody, on duty constantly, every day in the year.
It is the only medium that cannot be read at one sitting
and then laid aside and forgotten.
The Telephone and the Directory never part company.
Side by side with the means of advertising, it is the means
of making the sale.
Do you not think it should have your careful consideration?
For Rates and Information Telephone
ADVERTISING  DEPARTMENT
Seymour 6070
British Columbia Telephone
COMPANY, LIMITED
Hi Your OWN Home is HOME in every :==;
i==S Sense of the Word |^|;
���       -': It is attractive and cosy.    You made it so with the '���        -
j     ��� ���: knowledge that you would get big returns in comfort :        ?
EEEEf:: and enjoyment for the time and trouble spent.    Uncer- :        ^
|==- tainty of conditions docs not warrant such expenditures ==== =
= ==== in this direction with the rented home. -^==
= ==== For   $1500,   small   payment   down,   balance   in   easy 11=1
��;#���;�� monthly instalments, we will build a four-room bunga- 3E��j=I
=.=== low   with   full   basement,   concrete   foundation,   living ��.===;=.
= ==== room, dining room, bedroom, kitchen, bathroom, plumb- ==== =
= == = ing with  up-to-date  enamelled  fixtures, beautiful  elec- =====
= ==== trie   fixtures,   hot   air   heating   apparatus,   large   front =====
= ==== verandah  and  back  porch.    For  $2000 we  will  build, === =
= === = embodying your own ideas as far as practicable, a live =====
= == = room bungalow, similarly finished as above. 5=3=
jSSJ No obligation incurred if you talk "house" with us. SS���
llbnndalowFmance&Buildinif,MlI
l=g416.Howe Street Ve>nco-uver,BC!Ili
liiOtaifln Eveniri&tf^Sfiik |L ,
=====       *|)pifirjiXiEaaa*- ����J^i-��ei-ac-is3bn<=Mfi,l�� o^s-ii
MOTOR  TRANSFER
We do all kinds of Transfer.     Special attention paid to
EXPRESS AND BAGGAGE
All Kinds of Repairing Autos For Hire Antoi Stored
Fraser Street Garage & Motor Transfer
6184 FRASER STREET (Opposite 48th Avenue)    TEL. FRASER 251
C.RAND   fENTRAL   HOTEL
Fully Modern and Up-to-date
EBURNE STATION, B. C.
CORNER OF FOURTH STREET AND RIVER ROAD
THE LEADING HOTEL
EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN PLAN
GRAUER & DUMARESQ, Proprietors
AUTO PARTIES CATERED TO
PHONE EBURNE 136
B. C. Fruit Captures Gold Medals���Get
Your Fruit Tree Stock From Us
It is very gratifying for the fruit growers of British Columbia to know that B.C. apples, in competition with the world,
capture the gold medals.
It has been our object to produce fruit tree stock best suited
for the climatic conditions of the different districts of our province.
Any one planning to set out fruit trees will be studying their
best interest by writing us for a list of our fruit tree stock,
which we are selling at eight to twelve dollars per 100, for year-
old apple trees, such as Jonathan, Spitzberg, Baldwin, Mcintosh
Red.Wincsap and  twenty other different varieties.
The prices of our two-year-old stock, as well as our stock
of plums, cherries, pears and all kinds of small fruit, you will
find equally cheap, according to grade and variety.
Don't forget. We can supply you with privet and holly for
hedges, cheaper and better than you can get anywhere else.
Also shade trees, shrubbery of all kinds, roses and herbaceous plants (choicest flowering varieties), Alpine plants of
rarest kinds, wall flowers, and in short, anything desirable to
make your home surroundings beautiful, is comprised in our
stock of over $100,000.
All orders for floral design work receive expert and prompt
attention.
Our bulb stock is home grown as well as foreign.
ROYAL NURSERIES LIMITED
Head Office, 710 Dominion Building, 207 Hastings Street West.
Phone Seymour 5556
STORE, 2410 GRANVILLE ST.       PHONE BAYVIEW 1926
Greenhouses and Nurseries at Royal, on B.C. Electric Railway,
Eburne Branch, about two miles south of City Limits.
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
SOLE AGENTS FOR B. C. SATURDAY  DECEMBER 21), 1913
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
1 I'll ''   I
SEVEN
i tne "i  the   leading  th ughfarei
Se.uth Vancouver (a Victoria Koad
extending   fre.m   Kingsway    t"   the
r  Kiver.     In   lome  reipcctl  thii
nl hai, made more remarkable prolixin  any   Other  in  the  limine i
ility,     It   i^   one   of  tin-   lute >t   tlner-
ighfarei to bi   opened up, and al-
dy traffic  on   the  It. C.  Electric
Railway i*. perhaps, greater than on
, other section of the line, taking
i  consideration   the  district  cov-
,!.   Especially where Wilaon Road
, rsects Victoria  Road, ai well a<
leljacent points, then- hai been n
���.ly quite a remarkable increaie in
ifie.    A1 <>11k   the   whole    of   this
:i.ni of the  B. C. E.  K. there is an
optionally  goi d  ear  lervice.
The    recent    paving    of    Victoria
! has also leen an important fac-
in attracting lettleri tee the resi-
iitial   parts   of   the    district.     This
paving    being    of    the    well-known
I...larway     pavement     system     has
ived a substantial success, both as
-arils permanency and appearance,
tin   work   having   been    nuest    effici-
ntly executed by the South Vancouver Builders' Supply Company.   The
permanency of this paving is insured
by  there  being   five  or  six  inches  of
the   best   Portland   cement   concrete,
surface   being   Coated   with   bitumen,  over   which   is    spread    coarse
sand, fine gravel or screenings.
Among the principle firms on Vic-
toria Road are Mr. l'\ K. Elliott, a
liieiiiecr real estate man: I,. A. Manuel's DniK Steere, J. W. Buck, gro-
-. and Anderson's Meat Market.
The South Vancouver Wire Works
have also established a growing hiisi-
ness in this progressive locality. One
.ii the peiints whieh especially mark
the growth of this fast-developing
district is the lar^e number of Fraser
Street tradesmen who are now opening up branches in Victoria Road
and adjacent  streets.
SOUTH VANCOUVER WIRE
ANR IRON WORKS
A   Local   Industry   Which   Thrives
Without  Bonus
Fraser Kiver. anel plant are being
hud fe.r the bonusing of industrial
concern! locating in the municipality
there is at  least "in- u I  tubsti
factory e.n Victoria Road, mar Wilton  Road, thriving even In  --,>11c e.i
1       I! II     ��� lle;y.
"That   work   time."   said   Mr.   licrt
Pearl en, proprietor .ef ilie- South Vance.mer   Wire   ami   lr"ii   W'eerks.   fe   a
I reporter   who  called,  "goei  t-.  Ver>
ll'ell,    li.   C.,"   -el  e|   |||-   |,    i   ,1,-el   I   ,   ,,   ^TCat
heap e.f ineii building mai rial "Then
iron window guards here are for thc
Vam ou\ei   School  Board."
, Mr. Pearson manufacture! man)
lines of wire fence.    His work along
.this line brought the Seiuth Vancouver Wire and Iron Works te, the attention eef the South Vancouver
School 1'eearel with the result that the
board practically insists upon the product 'el the South Vancouver concern
for the many beautiful se-hoeil premises   throughout   the  municipality
Mr. Pearson has met with considerable success in South Vancouver.
Ile is a thorough mechanic and personally attends te. all orderi placed
with his factory. The field of the
concern is extending beyond the confines of Smith Vancouver, and the
business is growing on gei.nl, substantial ground*.
The Se.uth Vancouver Wire and
I re en Works is a concern that shnuhl
receive the patronage e,f every pat-
rieitie- ratepayer in the district. The
Hoard eef School Trustees, in patron-
izing the factory, have displayed commendable judgment. Mr. Pearson's
investment in machinery and plant
and building is very heavy. It is by
wlmle-heartedly assisting such institutions that the growth and development of South Vancouver as an industrial base can be successfully accomplished.
Mr. Pearson was for some years,
before establishing the South Vancouver Wire and Iron Works, assei-
ciated with the B. C. Anchor Fence
Company. He is an expert in the
wire   and   iron   business.     The   Vic-
Vict iia Road i- the better because
if the presence e.f the wire anel iron
li   lie', III
YOUNGEST   DRUGGIST   IN
BRITISH    COLuMrllA    HERE
Mr. L. A.  Manuel,  Popular  Phaima-
cist  cf  Victoria   Road  District,
Holds the Title.
Ii i- trulj ;e j i lung man's age   \\ e
ha\ e- thii  ii ti ated in no better
manner   than   right    here   in    S'eutii
While the good civic fathers are
planning the purchase of large industrial tracts on the North Arm of the
Road   at   ihe   intersection    of I
I  irt> third,    a',el    the    business    is
Mr.  Manuel came lo the district a
year ago after looking over the vari
��� n- in B. i'. and he li en
tirely   satisfied    with   bis   selection,
��� i    -.��� 'y   drug   store   In   the i
district.    !''���'   young man ipent 'ever
-���������.��� w yean in  the busineii in   Brit
i -'    i' ilumbia   befi ire   -��� iit g   i ast   to j
gr;i In.-,i..   which  III-  eliel  ill   1912,   ire,Ml
tin- Ontario College am! the Univer-
itj  ol Toronto.
M Manucl'i -ion- i- well stocked
anil '-'.-aii. i.iul upon entering one ii
immediately impressed with i'e
idea that the business is conducted
'e.i strictly business lines. As a
young man pioneering, so t" speak,
in hi- particular line in the Victoria
K.. i.1 elisirie-i. Mr. Manuel i- entitled
to the hearty support eif the residents e,f the district.
CHRISTMAS AT THE CENTRAL
PARK BAKERY.
fortuity of firing is only one e.i many
.ether feature- oi tlii- laicst triumph
in iln weerbl if bread-making machinery
The- dispe -ni'iii e,i iii, i oe u- departments hai been carefully Mud-
i''l. e -;,., i illy in relation to hygiene
ami onsen ance of il"- latest scientific principle si applied tee the hand-
food -mn- in proci ii of
manufacture.
\- befits a native of tin- I.ami o'
Take -. Mr. Robertson ipecializei in ;
these daity furnishing! of the table
(eir which, with the "Won" Quality
bread In- hai been awarded three
diplomas at ilu- Westminster and
Vancouver   Exhibits ms.
The fact that tht ie ����� re secured
under ihe "hi order of things indicated that now lu- will soon eclipse
his own very excellent rre-.,rel. both
here and in llie- Obi Country, where
he we,n at Glasgi w Technical College   a   fint-elass   certificate   f"r   his
bread anel cakes. And Mi. Robert-
ion i- justly proud of iln- facts   re-
above. A special feature- .1
..-"if- trade al tlle bakery is
ornamental Christmai cake, and
Scotch ihortbread Th,- proof of the
pudding i- iln- eating and iln- best
compliment 'hai - en be paid Mr.
I<. .!.��� i --..n i- t" put hi- goods to the
t, it
FRANK LAVERDURE, BARBER.
Tin very next lime you feel that
you weiild like a nice smooth shave
���the kind where the whiskers are
removed without pain���rem.-inker
tlie abovi gentleman, whose address
i- 44J7 Main Street. Here you
resl ;e--urc(l that the towels uscl in
tin- establishment have been the.r-
oughl) sterilized, likewise the razors,
anil that the haircut yell receive will
heighten yeiur appearance, thus making y.iu one of the best-groomed
men in lhe cfrcle of your associate!
Are yeeu geeing to become one "f uis
many satisfied clients? We feel sure
you will.
Mr.  L.  A.  Manuel,  Phm.  B.
Vancouver where many of the
youngest of our citizens may be -een
running their own establishments.
The subject 'ef this article is Mr.
I.. A. Manuel. Phm. Ik. win, is the
youngest man owning his own phar-
[macy in British Columbia. ili^
place of business is located on  Vie-
When the times ,-:,]| f,,r retrenchment in many directions, we must
-till have bread. Economies in the
more expensive items of the family
larder increase the importance 'ef
that stapie. It must be pure, and
carry  lhe  maximum of nutriment.
Ail Collingwood knows the "Won"
quality bread, but few, even e,i those
I who use it at every meal are aware
that it is the product of one of the
most Up-to-date baking plants in
Vancouver, and in some respects.
unique perhaps em the Pacific Slope.
"Good gear goes into small bulk."
This applies to the Central Park
Bakery, which though small, in-
cludes in its bread and cake mixers
the Read three-speed cake mixer.
1913 models, the latest machinery
feir securing perfect results in this
important detail.
Especially noteworthy are the
Duhrkop Bake Ovens of the latest
design, with steam bath attachment
which completely counteracts dry-
heat and resultant impairment of the
flavor, in those new ovens this is retained  to   the   full.      Al solute   uni-
SOUTH   VANCOUVER
WIRE & IRON WORKS
VICTORIA DRIVE and 45th AVENUE
Janes Road Post Office, South Vancouver
BRASS, COPPER, BRONZE
THE MARSTON SHOWCASE COMPANY
WE SPECIALIZE IN SOUTH VANCOUVER PROPERTIES
F. E. ELLIOTT
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE
AND LOANS
PHONE FRASER 65
Office: Victoria Rd. and 43rd Ave., South Vancouver, B.C.
BANK, STORE, OFFICE AND HOTEL FIXTURES
REPAIRS and POLISHING
3764 Commercial St., Cedar Cottage, South Vancouver   Phone F. 899
A Double Drive Gate
Wire
FENCES
GATES
GARDEN ARCHES
WINDOW SCREENS
GRAVEL SCREENS
COAL SCREENS
BANK CAGES
COUNTER GUARDS
SIGNS
SPARK ARRESTERS
VENT AND DOWN PIPE
COVERS
BASKETS
MACHINE GUARDS
Wrought Iron
GATES
FENCES
BALCONY RAILINGS
STAIR RAILINGS
AREA   ENCLOSURES
GRILLS
GRATINGS
PIPE FITTING
TELLERS' CAGES
CIGAR STAND
ENCLOSURES
Etc.       Etc.
GEO. SNIDER & BRETHOUR
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
909   Dominion  Trust   Building,  Vancouver,   B.C.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
Teleph.ntt :    Office 6497.    Work. o20S.      Works  9321.    Worki  8179	
CHRISTMAS
SUGGESTION
What Christmas  present could   be more  acceptable to the
family than
An Extension Telephone
In that Sewing Room, Library and Den ?   What steps it will
save during 1914.
AND IT COSTS A LITTLE OVER 3 CENTS A DAY
ONE-FIFTH THE COST OF A GOOD CIGAR
CALL CONTRACT DEPARTMENT
SEYMOUR 6070
British Columbia Telephone
COMPANY, LIMITED
1   ���^ "
i',;,giBJK^^i5��iE
BUCK'S CASH GROCERY
5659-2 Victoria Drive -:- South Vancouver
Finest assotted sto.'k ol Gtoceries, Jams and Pickles
Boned Ham, Bacon, Lard. etc.
Apples, Oranges, Nuts    Christmas goods in great variety; viz: Raisins
Currants, Candy-Peel. Chocolates, etc.. etc.
Tobacco   and   Cigars
Phone : Seymour 8425-8426
Western Plate Glass &
Importing   Co. Limited
Registered Office:
318 Water Street, Vancouver, B. C.
PLATE GLASS WINDOW GLASS
LEADED ART GLASS
Thorne   Metal   Store   Front   Bars,   Bevelling   and
Silvering, Store Fronts Glazed
ALL KINDS OF GLASS SIX
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
SATURDAY   DECEMBER 20,  191
The First Christmas Tree
In ih,- winter of 724. Winifred, ���
Christian missionary, wanderini
through the forests erf Northern Europe, came upon a large assembly <��i
poor pagan people iust a- they wen
about i" ncrifici tbe boy Bernhard
to  their   war   god   al   the   fool   e.i   llie'
laered oak, Tin- boy'i mother had
imt lir.n able i" hear the lacrifirc,
and hail rushed forward i", sav< thi
child at the lame lime with W ini-
fred.
'I'lii- priest! "i Thor were aflfry at
the Interruption* but Winifred told
them of the Christ who had died for
all.
Dr. Van Dyke's beautiful story
tell* what followed:
Out of the stillness of the winter
inula a mighty rushing noise sninid-
eel overhead.
Was it tlie ancient ,��"eN ofl theii
white battle steeds, with their black
hQUndt eif wrath and their arrows of
lightning, sweeping through Ihe air
to destroy their foes?
A strong, whirling wind passed
over the tree tops. It gripped thc
oak hy its branches and tore it from
the roots. Backward it fell like a
ruined tower, groaning and crashing as it split asunder in four great
pieces.
Winifred let his axe dr.ep, and
bowed his head feir a moment in the
presence eif Almighty Power.
Then he turned to the people.
"Here is the timber." he cried, "already felled and split for your own
building. On this spot shall rise a
chapel to the true God and His servant St. Peter. And here," said he
as his eyes fell on a young fir tree,
standing straight and green, with its
top pointing towards the stars, amid
the divided ruins of the fallen oak,
"here is the living tree, with no stain
of blood upon it, that shall bc the
sign of your worship. See how it
points to the sky. Call it tbe tree of
Christchild. Take it up and carry it
to Chieftain's hall. You shall go no
more into the  shadow of the  forests
tn keep y.iir feasts with secret rite*
of ihame Vou shall keep them at
home, with laughter an.l songi aiel
ii, . of love There thunder oak has
i illen, and  1  think  lhe el-,,,   i-  e'enning
ie lien 111, r<   ihall nol  I1   a  home In
all Cirmany  when ildren ate
i ol   gathered   i ound   the  green   fir
bravely,   a-   if   the   new   Imrele-n    hail1     But   the   boy   Bernhard,   on   Irma's
made it lighter, 1 nee, folded in  her soft arm-, grew
When they came to the house nf {restless as the itory lengthened, and
Gundhar, he bade them throw cpen began to prattle softly at his mother's
the doors of the hall and ie( '���!���' tree car.
in the midst of it      They kindled      ',XI"'V'"    wt,iM>��rfd    lIhe,, cn."d'
,. , ,     ,       , .,   .  rveliy did you cry ou;  ->��� loud when
,,ghts  among   the   branches   until   it   ,,���   ]llU,,  u;:. going ,,, ,end  ������.  ,..
[���teemed   (���.   be   tangled   full   "f   fire-   Valhalla?"
��� i Hi hush, my eliibl." answered the
,,,;,   and   we -��. el   him   closer   i"
balsam filled tlie house he-:  tide.
Then   Winifred   si i   beside   tin-     "Mother," whispered the boy again,
chair  "f  Ciinelhar   on  the dais at   the   laying  h!l  finger- ..n  the   -lain- upon
ilie-     'I'he  children  encircled  it   wondering,   anil   the   sweel   odor   'el   the
last words e.f Winifred as hc spoke
eef the angelic niesseiigei-. flying
over lite hi!D .,f Judea and singinc as
I'll!     ill W.       'I'll,-    child    B'lilie.. ,,.'   ��� ���.,
dreamed and listened.    Suddenly  hii
face    Lire l\     lll'i 4111 He    ;  111    hi-    e'b'se
tie I riua> face ag tin, "' >h. mother."
he whispered very low. "do not -peak.
I i.e yon bear them? Those angels
have come hack again. They arc
singing   now  behind   the   tree."
And -euiic -ay that it was true; but
otheri -ay that it was only Gregory
and I'i- companions at tin  lower end
PASSING     OF     THE     CHRIST
MAS    STOCKING.
ST. PETER'S CHURCH, SOUTH VANCOUVER
Burnt October 20 and being rebuilt. The  Christmas spirit  cannot be better shown than in a donation to the   rebuilding of this church.
tree  to  rejoice
Christ."
So they took the little fir from its
place and carried it in joyous procession to thc edge of the glade and
laid it on tlie sledge, the horses tossed   their   heads  and  drew   their  load
the birth-night of | end of the hall, and told the story of
I Bethlehem; of the babe in the manger, of the shepherds on the hills, of
the host of angels and their midnight
I song. All the people listened,
I charmed into stillness.
her breast, "see, your dress is red!
What are these stains? Did someone hurt you?"
The mother closed his mouth with
a kiss, "Dear, be still and listen!"
The boy obeyed. His eyes were
heavy   with   sleep   but   he   heard   thc
Bulbs-Bulbs-Bulbs
Wc have just received three car loads of Bulbs. Now
is your time to buy your Bulbs for fall planting or
Christmas bloom. The best selection in town to choose
from.    Prices the lowest.
BROWN BROS. & CO. LTD.
FLORISTS, NURSERYMEN AND SEEDSMEN
THREE STORES:
48 Hastings Street E., Phone Seymour 988
401 Granville Street, Phone Seymour 5727
782 Granville Street, Phone Seymour 9513
GEO. SNIDER & BRETHOUR
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
009   Dominion   Trust   Building,   Vancouver,   B. C.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
THcphonm :     Office S497.    Work* o203.       Works  9328.     Worki  9179
LOT NEAR CAR
$550���Easy Terms
This let is situated on 56th Avenue,
close; to Victoria Road, which now
has a 10-minute car service. This is
the best buy in this district. Let us
show you it at your convenience. We
can arrange very  easy  terms.
The Yorkshire Guarantee
&  Securities Corporation  Limited
440 Seymour Street
Phones: 6188 and 6189   R. Kerr Iloulgale, Manager
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA  AND
JAPAN
W
Up to date Train Service  Between Vancouver and the Eaat.
All train! equipped with Standard and Tourist Sltepera.
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hasting St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H.  W.  BRODIE,  Gen.  Paaa  Agent,  Vancouver.
Gladstone Hotel
First Class Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
H. G. BROWN, Proprietor
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Linei
H. G. Smith. C. P. * T. A.
Phore :   Sty.  8134
W. E. Duperow, G. A. P. D
S27 Granville  Street
Phone Colangwood 24
P. O. Box 32
W. H. BRETT & CO.
Successors to Fletcher & Brett
REAL ESTATE
LOANS,  INSURANCE, ETC.
Notary Public
Dominion Express Money  Orders Issued
JOYCE ROAD, COLLINGWOOD EAST
MACADAM & COMPANY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
418 Winch Building Vancouver, B.C.
Wood Block
PAVING
Dominion Equipment & Supply Co.
LIMITED
Contractors and Municipal Machinery, Equipment and Supplies
Phone Seymour 71S5
839 Beatty Street Vancouver
B. C. EQUIPMENT CO.
MACHINERY DEALER8
CONCRETE MIXERS. STEEL CARS.  ROCK CRUSHERS, ELECTRIC. STEAM,
AND    GASOLINE   HOISTS.        WHEELBARROWS.    TRANSMISSION
MACHINERY,   GASOLINE   ENGINES,   PUMPS,   AND
ROAD MACHINERY
Offices: 606-607  Bank of Ottawa Bldg.
Phone Sey. 9040 (Exchange to all Department,)
hul
chanting their Christmas
of tin
hymn
"All glory be to God on high,
Antl on  lhe earth he peace!
Good-will,  henceforth,  from   heaven
tn men
Begin  anil  never cease."
I-'e.r   the  passing   e,(  tin-  ('hristnv ���
stacking  tbe  ���'' am In-.en d house h ���
heen   Unduly   blamed.    True,  lhe  la
ul   chimney    facilities   incr<ea*ed   i
difficulties   ol   Santa's   weerk,  bul   -
le.ny as a stocking hung there in I
filled he' generally managed SOT
heiw. even lliemgh he hael le, ^neak
disguised ai father, with the preset
under hi- coat The fact is, ihe' itoc
ing, feer Christmas purposes, has 1
come inadequate. Only a Tn it i
trouser-leg would hold what f
im .il, in family expects ie, receive.
Pink-striped    stick    candy,    nut��
'.ranges, a  tin  horn, "r a  very you
doll-baby   could   he  slipped   into
Stocking without straining it.    But, if
f'ereiel tn swallow the pony-skin coat
whieh   daughter  wants,   sun's   nn.t<
boat,  ot  mother's  grand  piano,  ���
lies!    guaranteed   stocking   is   apt   ;���
Spring  a   leak.
When stockings were made
woolen eer cotton, even mother four
delving in the slim, elark lengths fa--
cinating. Each package was fingcree.
and speculated over before Be ins
lire,nght te, the light. Alas, thecal! he no surprise concealed in .
cobweb stocking; it was never intended tei conceal anything.
In    the    stocking-hanging    age
mother   had   leisure-   te.   indulge   i:
such  light and  frivolous accompli-1.
ments as darning and mending. Now
she-   may   have,   say.   a   Greek   drai,
club,  a   Mothers'   CongresB,   a   suffragette parade, and the writing of ,
paper  on   "The   Effect    uf    Schopenhauer   Upon   the   Mind   uf  the    Ign.e-
rant," all  in  one  week.     With  every
week equally full of vital important
w.irk,   can   she   be   blamed   feir   tucking Tommy's  heelless,  toeless stockings    under    his    crib    where    Santa
Clans can't see them?
The time-honored custom of hanging up the Christmas stocking will
eventually cease to be observed for
lack nf a stocking to hang up���
days.���Lippincott's.
ICWaFT I CDV   IS EASILY THE
J H, VV H.JLLI1. I\ I      BEST FORM OF
Christmas and New Year Gifts
For personal wear or adornment it is a constant
reminder of the good wishes of the donor.
In choosing your Christmas Gifts make your selection where PERSONAL ATTENTION and PRACTICAL ADVICE is at your disposal.
You can get these at your LOCAL STORE. Do
you hope for them from casual help at Christmas
Sales in down town department stores?
The ARTISTIC MERIT of our selection of JEW-
ELLRY and FANCY GOODS suitable for presents,
at prices REALLY moderate, is the result of long experience and a due consideration of local requirements
WELLMAN
COMMERCIAL   STREET
CEDAR   COTTAGE
��� BEST CANADIAN
MANUFACTURE
J. T. BROWN
THE  BEST GOOD   SHOE
INVICTUS
IN   GRAND  VIEW &
CEDAR COTTAGE by
EXCLUSIVELY
Thc INVICTUS is the product of the premier shoe factory o
CANADA���G. A. SLATER LTD., of Montreal.
Why pass by reputable brands bandied in your own neighborhood
for dtiliieitis bargains advertised in hysterics by department stores,
whose enormous rental charges arc of lirst importance?
More, mir clerks are practical craftsmen and can interpret individual requirements, thus assuring complete satisfaction.
We stock "LECKIB6" and other proved makes.
if
BRANCHES
DOWN TOWN
1061 Granville Street
GRANDVIEW
1721 Commercial Drive
And at CEDAR COTTAGE
SOUTH VANCOUVER W00DYARD
Wood
Coal
PHONE 2381 FAIRMONT
DELIVERY TO ALL PARTS
UT We Specialize in CORDWOOD
CEDAR COTTAGE TERMINUS, COMMERCIAL STREE1
FURNITURE and PIANO MOVING
BAGGAGE. EXPRESS and GENERAL TEAMING
ALBERTA STABLES
HC.   ,ir^i   0, QA���     ALBERTA STABLES
.   OieWari  Oi OOIl Cor. 16th Ave. and Victoria Rd.
Phone Highland 1255 :-: Cedar Cottage
BUY YOUR
BUILDING LUMBER
FROM
South Vancouver Lumber Co.
(Manufacturers)
ALL KINDS OF KILN DRIED LUMBER, MOULDINGS AND
FINISH.
Mill and Office : Foot of Ontario Street, on Fraser River
Phone Fraser 94 W. R. Dick, Proprietor
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for nublic meetings, dances, etc., to  Let
Apply W   J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
C. M. WHELPTON
BUILDING CONTRACTOR
ESTIMATES GIVEN
Phone : Fn,.e 34 - 46th Ar*. and Fraier ���I
Coal, Stovewood, Lumber,
Shingles and Lath
WE OPERATE TWO YARDS
YARD No. 1 YARD No. 2
Corner Bodwell Road and Ontario St.       B1       Victoria Drive, Opposite 20th Avenue
PHONE FRASER 41 PHONE HIGHLAND 226
m
" HELP BUILD A CITY OF SMOKE STACKS ON THE BANKS OF NORTH FRASER HARBOR"
FEDERAL CEDAR MILL
COMPANY LIMITED =
A South Vancouver Mill, With a South Vancouver Pay Roll-
Manufacturers of Cedar and Fir Lumber, Lath and Shingles
IN LUMBER BUYING ^XS" QUALITY and SERVICE
E. B. Day, President       -       -       -       J. M. Allen, Secretary
Paul Day, Vice-President      -       -     W. H. Crowe, Manager
MILL: CAMPBELL ROAD STATION, B.C.E.R.,  South Vancouver
Telephone: Fraser 127 Registered Office, 920 Rogers Building, Vancouver, Telephone Seymour 2065
m EIGHT
CHINOOK CHRISTMAS EDITION
SATURDAY   DECEMBER 20,   I'd
ONE OF THE MANY PLAN TS IN SOUTH VANCOUVER WITH A LARGE PAYROLL
..ii '  Lid
^J^g
*
^���liU  ��.'.*��>
1               e^WPS^-,
r F f M               .MP
.
��-1*igfi""     "*��yM|
MUM ���
^^y-
mkL':^,    I
IL  vit, .
: >. ������ ��� a -,
The Coast Lumber & Fuel Company Limited is one of the industries
of South Vancouver whose record of
trade is a highly satisfactory index of
the progress of the municipality. Although established less than two years
ago this young industry has increased its output very considerably in
each department. As an instance, the
company has sold more than twice
as much coal and wood during 1913
as in 1912, a point which indicates
at least a satisfactory increase in set
tlers in South Vancouver. In fact the
evidence of this company's trading
during the past thrre months especially appears to show that there is
an increasing number of Vancouver
residents making their homes in
South Vancouver.
Some significant facts may be mentioned which will show not only the
progress made by the company as a
business, but also its importance to
the prosperity of South Vancouver.
Its plant, including offices, wood
pile yards, horse barns, covers three
and a half acres. Besides the central depot at Ontario and Bodwell,
there has recently been a second yard
established at the corner of Victoria
road and 20th Avenue, another instance of increasing trade.
The company's payroll now
amounts to $22,600, and as practically
only South Vancouver residents are
employed, this amount is a most val
uable addition to the prosperity of
thc  district.
At present the company is operating 26 head of horses in their business, and on the completion of thc
proposed Main Street paving it anticipates employing motor trucks for
the deliver of coal and wood to their
customers.
The lumber business of the company has also shown most gratifying increase during the  past  twelve
months. While a large percentage
of lumber has been sold to contractors, it is a noteworthy fact that there
has also been a considerable increase
in lumber sold to local home builders,
In this connection it is rather a satisfactory feature that much of this
lumber is required for additions to
homes already  built.
It should be mentiorted, to the
credit of this firm, that its aim, from
the first has been to cmpl,.y South
Vancouver men in preference to out
side help, and it may bc added th
all coal and wood is supplied to ei
ployecs at cost price. The COtnpai
is consequently strongly in favor
the support of local labor and a
preciates the expressed determinati.
of the Municipal Council to buy goo
in South Vancouver in preference
elsewhere.
Much of the credit for the progri
of the Coast Lumber & Fuel Cm
pany is undoubtedly due to the ca
able management of Mr. C. Bruce
SWEATER Dept
Ladies', Men'
Children's
The Cheapest
in the City
f Get Busy Before It's Too Late
REMEMBER
SHOE DEPT.
Rubbers, Shoes,
House Slippers
for Men, Women
and Children
The  popular  lines  of  Christmas Novelties are fast melting away under  the  strain  of  the  season's  late
rush.
This week and next we will clear all lines of Novelty Goods at prices not duplicated in the city.
FOR   MEN.
Boxed Four - in - Hand
Ties   for  men  with   season's   greetings.
35c   EACH.
FOR   LADIES.        | FOR   MEN.
Beautiful Jabots and Col-1 Mufflers, fancy and plain,
lars. | a swell line.
50c, 75c and to $1.75.
25 c  and  50c.
1
FOR   LADIES.
Cashmere    Gloves,   black
and brown.
ONLY  35c.
Excelda    Silk    Handker-1 Embroidered  Fine   Swiss I Negligee    Shirts,   a   spe- I Jabots  and   Collars,
chiefs. I Lawn. 1 cial, 85c. I '
3  for  25c. 1       2 fer 25c and up.       I SEE    OURS   AT   $1.25. I 2Sc  and   50c-
Lace Collars and Cuff Sets 50c and up.
THESE   ARE   EXTRA   SPECIAL.
Silk Blouses for the ladies.   These  are  samples  that  have  never been  used;  in  sizes  34, 36, 38 .and  40.
$3.75 up to $6.00, worth regularly $7.00 and $8.00.
Suits, Working Clothes and Overcoats���Buy Them NOW AND AT
LANCASTER & FOX CO.
25th and Main
The Value Givers   ���  25th and Main
STREET'S    CASH    MARKET.
You never run up against a tough
proposition   if   you    purchase    your
meat   at   the  above  market.      There
are   few   better   places   in   which   to
make a purchase  of a  nice  roast or
, tenderloin than at 4556 Main  Street.
j Few  who sell  more good  meat year
| after year  than  Mr.  C.  Street.    Few
who  understand   the  carving  process
I better.    Few  who  are  satisfied  with
i such  small  profits.    These  facts have
i made  this market  extremely  popular.
I We are positive that Mr.  Street can
; satisfy    the    most    fastidious.       Mr.
Street   buys   fur   cash   and   sells   for
| the same, so has no loss, and the customers  gets  the  benefit.    If you  are
! not a customer, look him up.
 o aasa, i
0    *    m
]A  POPULAR  GROCERY  STORE
Among  the  most  enterprising  tra-
I destnen   of   East   Collinwood   is   Mr.
| J.   E.   Shearer   who   runs   the   wcll-
' known   grocery   store   and   provision
store at 283 Joyce Street.    Mr. Shearer  has made it his consistent aim to
provide only the best of goods at the
most  moderate  of prices, with  quick
and   efficient   service.     At   Christmas
time  particularly there will be  found
a large stock of the most varied kind
of goods for domestic and festive re-
quiremtnts at  this popular store.
Mr. Joieph Mullett, Water Worki Superintendent
As a token of the high regard in
which Mr. Joseph Mullett, superintendent of South Vancouver Water
V.'ciks, and Mrs. Mullett are held by
employees of the waterworks as well
as by his many friends, an interesting presentation took place last Friday evening at their home on Quebec
street. Former Reeve Pound acted as
chairman and there was a large gathering of waterworks' employees and
friends, including: Reeve Kerr, Councillor Third, chairman of the waterworks department, Councillor Dickinson and ex-Councillor J. B. MacDonald. The presentation took the form
of a handsome smoking cabinet to
Mr. Mullett and a bouquet of flowers
to Mrs. Mullett.
Speeches were made by Mr. Pound
and   Councillor  Third  bearing   testi
mony lo the able manner in which the
waterworks department had been administered by Mr. Mullett during the
past twelve months, while other speakers, including Reeve Kerr, referred
to the great esteem in which both
Mr. and Mrs. Mullett were held by
their numerous friends throughout
South Vancouver.
CHRISTMAS    ROMANCE
Me a preparing for Christmas���
me. Goodness knows I wish I was,
but Christmas doings ain't me no
more. And just because I was baking something to eat tomorrow,
which happens to be Christmas, she
thought I was preparing for that
day a special."
Betty Green sighed as shc placed
the pie in thc oven, and pulled a
kitchen chair up beside thc stove.
The new neighbor, who had but recently moved into town, and who
knew nothing of Hetty's history, had
just left. With the Christmas spirit
everywhere she had thought of
course that Hetty was preparing a
feast  for  the day.
"Now, if Jim hadn't never sailed
away on that water-logged old Mary
Ann, as he did a-going on four year
ago, I guess I could have bein preparing for Christmas like other
bilks 11" there hadn't been nobody
else, Jini and me could of enjoyed
Christmas, and then maybe there'll
a     been     seiineboily    cist���sumebody
what jusi  about now would a been
liking dulls or tin cars, and if so
Jim and me would a been having a
Christmas tree for that somebody.
and we'd be a having the best Christ-
mas  in   all   South  Cove.
"My, how 1 did try to keep Jim
from sailing in that Mary Ann. Anybody what knew about ships knew
she wasn't fit to go to sea in, but
Jim says it's the only berth he's
likely to get, and taking it would
mean our marrying just that much
sooner and the Mary Ann or Jim
ain't, never been heard of since she
left that South America place to go
round the Horn on her way to
China."
The bright eyes of Betty Green
were wet with tears as she opened
the oven door to raise the pie to a
higher shelf. Ever since Jim Busby
failed to return in time for the wedding which Betty had so carefully
prepared for four years ago���a wedding which was to bc the big event
of the Christmas season at South
Cove���she had had a lonesome life.
Two months after the Christmas
that was to have been Betty's wedding day her aged father had been
carried to the village cemetery, leaving her all alone in the world. With
no other relatives, and with no
friends except those at South Cove
Betty remained in the little fishing
town in which she had been born
nearly  twenty-seven years  ago.
With the baking finished, Betty
left the kitchen and went into her
bedroom. She wanted nothing so
much as to be alone in that room
that had been her father's���in that
room where she kept carefully preserved the wedding cloths she had
lavished   so   much   care    upon    four
years ago. These clothes and thc
faded photograph of Jim Busby on
her bureau wcre all that wcre left
her of her romance. With these shc
would spend hcr Christmas Eve,
would live over again the courting
days. And Jim should be there
with her. That would be her Christmas.
With care shc took each garment
from its wrappings in the bureau
drawer and spread them on thc bed.
The pretty wedding dress which
Sarah Glover had helped her make
���yes, she would put it on tonight
just as she planned to four years
ago. Jim would like to her to do
that; hc had always liked to sec her
prettily dressed, anil maybe Jim
might see her from the spirit world
tonight.
As she fastened the gown she almost forgot tIi;it Jim could ii"l be
there, lhat it was all a make believe.
As she Stood before the mirror the
smile of four years age, came bach
again. She noted lhe color ir. her
cheeks;   il   was  like  a   bridal   blush.
A rap al llie door dispelled lhe illusion she hail permitted herself for
a few moments. She could nut go to
the door in that dress. The caller
would have to wait, but he did not
wait. She heard the door swing, a
heavy step on the floor, and a voice
���oh, such a familiar voice���calling
Betty.
"Jim! My Jim!" shc answered to
Jim's tale of shipwreck on the Pata-
gonian coast, of the months and
years of practical captivity before
he could get back to a seaport.
"And now." he said. "I am home to
claim   my   Christmas  bride."
"And I have our Christmas baking
done," said Betty.
Help for Collingwood Library.
The Collingwood Library needs
funds. That splendid collection of
books ofl "Political Economy" is not
yet paid for. To help a gentleman
has given a double-barrelled gun,
made hy Manton of London, to be
drawn for. Send 25 cents in postage
stamps to J. F. Bursill, the library,
East Collingwood, and you will help,
and may win a gun worth $25.
Form Labor Bureau.
The Collingwood and District
Business Men's Association have
formed a Labor Bureau office in thc
store of Mr. Burness, tailor, Joyce
Road. Do you want to give a man
work? Call in an register. Do you
want employment? Do so and make
this register useful during the winter.
D. J. Froser
Wm. Thompson
A. B. Cornish
When Mr. William Thompson,
succeeded Mr. A. E. West as Assessor of the Municipality last fall,
hc entered upon his duties with the
one word, "Efficiency," in his mind.
As yet his work is only in the beginning, but much has been done by
the new assessor to put the business
of the office on a proper working
system. In this Mr. Thompson has
been very ably assisted by Mr. D. J.
Fraser and Mr. A. B. Cornish.
Among the new departures adopted in the office is thc Skeleton assessment roll, which is already
proving its worth, being very satisfactory   and   accurate,   eliminating   a
llot of needless work and simplifying
the   immense   amount   of   work   that
I has to be carried on. The idea ul
the new mil being to keep ail
changes entered and up to date, so-
that in future years the department
will be relieved of a lot of extra
work and expense. The new plan
sheets for field work, containing only
registered plans, is another new idea
of the office.
Mr.   Thompson  is  ably  assisted  in
his  work  by  D.  J.   Fraser  and   Mr
A.   B.   Cornish,   whose    picture    ap
pears    above,    and     other     efficient
members of the staff.
the Municipality. He has witness. ���
its wonderful growth, as one of the
best scholastic centres in Create
Vancouver. Mr. Whelpton believe
indeed, that thc system as well a
lhe facilities for education in Soutl
Vancouver arc nut equalled by an
olher    Municipality    in    British    C
lumbia.
As a close student of trade an
civic affairs in South Vancouver. M
Whelpton retains the highest faith i
its still greater progress as one i
the besi municipalities in th<" pro>
ince, whether feir residential pui
poses or for industrial potentialitie
Horn iu Brussels, Ontario. 1X7-1
Mr. Whelpton is still a young mai
with lung years of active publi'
j work still before him. As t.i tii
coming elections,  Mr.  Whelpton
being   strongly   urged   to    become
candidate   for   both   Municipal   an-!
Scheie el Board honors, but has not y
definitely decided upon  his course of
action,     It   is   understood,   however,
that   hc  will   be  a   candidate   for  at
least one of these  public offices.
Mr. Whelpton married the only
daughter of Mr. John Forsyth, mem
ber of the  Manitoba  Legislature.
C.   M.   WHELPTON
Mr. C. M. Whelpton who has been
for four years a member of the
South Vancouver School Board, and
during two years chairman, is a man
of varied interests. He has been,
for instance, a member of the Council of South Vancouver Board of
Trade since its inception, as well as
chairman of the Postal and Telephone committee of that board,
treasurer of the South Vancouver
Conservative Association, and treasurer of Ward Five Committee. Besides these public and political affiliations. Mr. Whelpton is a member  of  the   Oddfellows.
Coming to South Vancouver six
years ago and settling on Fraser
Street, Mr. Whelpton was one of the
first contractors to open business in
the Municipality. When he first arrived upon the scene of his present
activities there were only thirteen
houses on Fraser Avenue, so that it
can be seen what marvellous building developments have taken place
since.
During his connection with South
Vancouver School Board, Mr.
Whelpton has taken the most active
part   in   the   educational   progress   of
Phrenology **A Palmistry
Mrs. YOUNG
(Formerly ol Montreal)
GIVES  PRACTICAL  ADVICE  ON   BUSINESS ADAPTATION,  HEAI-TH
AND  MARRIAGE
SOS   Granville   Street.   Coma."   Robson
Hours: 10 a.m. to ��� p.m
���ft What Has
South Vancouver
To Offer?
CJ Five and one half miles of Fresh Water Harbor
Frontage
Cfl Industrial Sites at Reasonable Cost���not at   the
price the speculator demands
fl Nominal Rents for Factory Sites
South Vancouver Holds the Industrial Lever, Which, When
Thrown Forward, Will Make Greater Vancouver One of
the   First  among   the  Manufacturing Cities   of   the   World
DEEP SEA HARBOR
DEEP SEA SHIPPING
This Will be Developed on the North Arm of The Fraser River���
North Fraser Harbor���It is The Policy of The Business Men of South
Vancouver and the Men Directly Behind Harbor Development To
Procure Industrial Sites to be Leased Out to Industries at Nominal Rents
Shippers of the World Are Requested to Consider That North Fraser Harbor
Will Offer Lower Charges Than Any Other Deep Water Port on the North Pacific
All Enquiries re Shipping, Industries, Industrial Sites, etc., may be addressed to
KENNETH LAMOND
Secretary South Vancouver Board of Trade
MUNICIPAL HALL SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C
 "Tl

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