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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Sep 12, 1914

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Array WqZi^ CHINOOK
Vol. Ill,   No. 18
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1914
Price 5 cents
Tons of Rotting Potatoes and Scores of Boxes of Decayed
Tomatoes found in Vancouver City Market, An Institution
Which Has Become a Pest Spot and Menace to Health
While Out-of-works receive Charity, City
Officials see Tons of Food Stuffs Waste and
Rot       ::
*' There Were Millions of Flies," says Inspector
Hynes, " And the Juice from Decayed
Tomatoes Oozed over the Floor "
Investigation should be made in the Interests
Of the Health of the Community
IN these times, while the high cost of livin"; and the war
are the two main subjects of interest, a turn to the
efforts being put forth by the City of Vancouver to
make it easier for the consumer, may be of benefit.
At great expense, the City several years ago, built a
public market at False Creek, on Mam Street. Since the
doors of the buildings were lirst opened, the city has spent
thousands of dollars in the maintenance of the public market every year.
Here is an institution which might have been of great
benefit to the citizens. At this market, it was planned,
producer from the Fraser Valley and the suburbs of the
city, might meet the consumer from Yancouver, South
Vancouver and the vicinity, to trade to their mutual advantage.
Here was an institution then built with a view of lessening the load on the consumer and cutting in on the
^raft of the wholesaler of fruit and garden produce and the
graft of the middlemen generally.
Such centres as the Vancouver Public Market would
go far towards driving the Oriental garden pedlar from the
streets, if properly managed���would go far towards encouraging the industry of farromg and gardening in Vancouver's hinterland.
Unfortunately, the Vancouver public market has been
allowed to fall into a centre for the breeding of disease.
The Vancouver public market has been allowed to degenerate into a receptacle for tons of rotting potatoes and
rotting tomatoes.
The Vancouver public market has been allowed to become, instead of the cleanest spot in Greater Vancouver,
one of the filthiest spots where the odor of decaying vegetable matter is only relieved by the dry, poisonous atmosphere of dozens of hens packed in narrow enclosures.
It is charged that food products, after being allowed
to rot within the walls of the market building, are dumped
recklessly into False Creek, there to continue a poisonous
function. As to the truth of this, however, it is up to the
Harbor Commissioners of Vancouver to investigate.
"I found in one shed which was locked, from six to
eight tons of rotten potatoes," writes Health Inspector J.
A. Hyne.
THE  GLADSTONE   LICENSE       ON   HIS  MAJESTY'S  SERVICE
The quarterly meeting of the lic-
onse commissioners was held when
the license of the Gladstone Inn.
Kingsway, was transferred to Mr.
Robert Curry from Mr. H. G. Brown.
The license will continue till January
15 next unless decided otherwise by
the commissioners. When the license
is up for renewal it will be opposed
l>y 'Commissioner McBride, who gave
notice of his intention to do so.
The Athletic Association for children of Westminster Church is proving
to be a very desirable one. The
membership is growing and the
children  are   taking  a  great   interest
in  it.
* ��   ��
The Westminster Church Ladies'
Aid will meet at the home of Mrs.
Esselmont on next Thursday afternoon. The ladies are all invited. Considerable business will be taken up as
this is the first meeting since the
summer vacation.
* *   *
It was decided by the School Board
t3 put on display thc exhibit of work
done by school pupils of the municipality, and which was intended for
the Dominion exhibition, which was
to have been held at Victoria. The
exhibit will be placed in the board
offices at Cedar Cottage.
Vancouver Health Department,
September 5, 1914
Dr. F. T. Underhill,
Medical Health Inspector.
Dear Sir,���
RE COMPLAINT AGAINST CITY MARKET
Having received a complaint from Mr. William
Hood, colonization agent for the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway that a grave nuisance existed at the
City Market, in company with Mr. Hood, I immediately went and inspected the whole of the market.
In the rear I found in one shed (which was locked) from six to eight tons of rotten potatoes. Maggots were crawling out through the boards onto
the wharf, also liquids and millions of flies covered
the windows.
Another shed, also in the rear contained a large
quantity of rotten fruit, but this shed was also
locked and I could not see properly, but the stench
was abominable. I asked Mr. McMillan to open
the sheds and he told me distinctly that he would
not for me or anyone else.
Aid. Kirkpatrick and Aid. Hoskins were at the
market at the time and inspected it with me. Inside the market, in the southwest corner there were
170 boxes of tomatoes absolutely rotten, and liquids were flooding the floor. In fact the whole of
the market, from the health point of view, was in
a frightfully unsanitary state.
I have the honor to be, Sir,
JOS. A. HYNE,
Chief Inside Inspector.
Local Notes In and Around the
Municipality of South Vancouver
The ladies of Central Park had a
j magnificent exhibit of preierved
| fruits, fancy wnrk anel baking at the
l Vancuver Exhibition and the greitt
i volume   e.i   lirsi   prizes    distributed
among them indicate! that in the
: science of household economy the
i ladies of Central Park take a leading
place.
Mr. Russell, of Cedar Cottage, had
the council badly excited when he
objected t" the releasing of the paving company on ihe Kingsway guarantee.
It is said that Mr. Robert McBride
and J. A. Russell have cn-eiperated in
the -.vork nf sinking a well in search
ol "il on the McBride property near
the N'orth Ann of the Fraser.
*     ��     ��
The  candidates  mentioned   for  the
��� hip s,e  far  are :    Reeve    Kerr,
Donald   Burgess,   Edward   Gold   and
Councillor   Bob  Rutledge,  tbe  popular ambassador  from  Collingwood
The Dominion Creosoting Company
| have ISO men .-et work at the mills
I em the N'orth Ann loading creosoted
wood ties feer India. The tie' will be
Indications are that the Victoria shipped on the Queen Helena, now in
R.ead paving contract should not be [Burrard Inlet. The company under-
proceeded with feer the present. The stand that the boat may leave at any
concensus of opinion among the more | time as the route i're,m here to Cal-
rcspunsible residents and property
owners on the street show that the
tearing up of the street fe.r starting
the preliminary we erk at this time is
neither necessary or advisable.
Think of it!
The City of Vancouver allowing eight tons of potatoes to rot, while the demands for charity from the city-
coffers increase every clay.
Eight tons of potatoes allowed to rot in the Public
Market while the puhlic is forced to pay exorbitant, prices
for pecks of potatoes from Vancouver's retailers!
In another part of the market, Inspector Hynes found
a great mass of tomatoes decaying.
Food stuffs being shovelled into False Creek from the
City Market, while wives and dependents of Vancouver's
contribution to the British Army, are subsisting on War
Fund contributions!
However, thc waste of food is next in importance to
the fact that the market has been allowed to degenerate
into a plague spot.
Surely this is a matter which the City Council should
investigate and remedy. South Vancouver and Point Grey-
have been planning the construction of public markets with
a view of relieving the load on tbe consumers' shoulders.
The example of Yancouver cannot be a very great incentive
to these municipalities in such a work.
It has been charged that the wholesalers of Water
Street do not wish to.see the Vancouver City Market flourish. Possibly these gentlemen have some influence upon
the City Council in allowing the institution to deteriorate.
It is to be hoped, however, that such is not the case and
that these deplorable conditions are merely the result of
a careless organization.
The Rosenberg Trinity paving contract has been  indefinitely  postponed.
Nothing is likely  t'i  be heard  of  it
until next election  when nee doubt  it
will   be   discussed   fully. Hock   derj
Kiser!
+    ���    ���
Monday night, at the Old School
House, tin- men of Main Street audi
vicinity are requested to attend teer
the purpose of organizing a company in tlii- district feir the Home
Guard. All loyal male citizens over
fifteen years of age are invited to attend.
* * *
The paving of Main Street is going ahead with system and dispatch.
Fifty-lirst Avenue has now been
reached with the concrete and this
week will see most of the concrete
work completed to that intersection.
The blocks are down as far as
Twenty-eighth Avenue. Automobile
traffic on tiie street is already very
great and the completion of the paving will no doubt see the great bulk
of the north and south traffic through
Greater  Vancouver  diverted   to   Main
Street.
* #    *
Three buildings are being erected
in 800 block, Main Street, at a cost
of  $6,0110.
* *    *
A small army of men are engaged
on the new postoffice building at Sixteenth Avenue and work will start
soon on the structure to be erected
at  Forty-third and  Main.
One
e-|ll|
lie
hundred   and   fifty   men    are
eel   on   Main   Street   today.
"Green anel Gold." the daily paper
published by the Exhibition Association during the week was handled
by the Greater Vancouver Publishers Limited and has made a hit. being the lirst paper of its kind ever
issued  west of Toronto.
cutta is absolutely free from the enemies' cruisers.
+   *   *
The upsetting of a scow of oil at
N'ew Westminster is held responsible
ifT the oil menace at the Kitsilano
Beach.
* *      *
Tiie ceimmittee organizing the
South Hill section of the Home
Guard is made up of. Me-srs. H. Baker. R   R. Speers and P. C. Wales.
* *    *
Collingwood and Cedar Cottage each
have their organizations of the Home
Guard.
ete       ele        *
Colonel Worsnop states that the
rifle range where the Seeuth Vancouver sections of the Home Guard will
shoot i.s near at hand to South Vance .mer. The range will likely he
fitted Up just over the boundary line
in  Burnaby.
* *   *
The South Vancouver Tanning
Ceempany. the tanning concern located, "ii the Robson property at the
foot of Main Street is being re-organised and will be known hereafter
as the'I',. C. Tanning Ceimpany. Limited. Mr. Crowther, recently out from
England, is acting manager. The
company had an excellent exhibit at
the Vancouver Exhibition of the
Double Diamond brand of lacing
leather
* *    *
Monday has been set for the day
for finally deciding upon the Victoria
Road paving contract. This subject
will likely be the piece de resistance
of the next election, as the Main
Street  contract was  last  year.
* *    *
Mr. Williamson, representative from
the International Sunday School, vis-
lited Mountain View Methodist Church
I last   Sunday   afternoon,   and   gave   a
\ery   interesting  talk  to  the    pupils.
The children always look forward to
Mr. Williamson's visits with pleasure.
* *    *
Mrs. (Rev.l Caffin entertained a
number of ladies from their church
on  Wednesday afternoon.  September
ON   HIS  MAJESTY'S  SERVICE
ST. PETER'S CHURCH
South Vancouver will be represent-,, ,  j   Duff Stnart Commander 23rd
ed at the annual convention of school        J      "      *        ��� ,    ,
trustees to be held in Nelson,. Infantry Brigade
Albert Martain Ladouceur and
Sarah McNally were married on July
16, and have bought a home. No. 345
46th Avenue East. Mr. Ladouceur
is a carpenter on the Roman Catholic
Church  being  built  on  48th   Avenue
East.
��   *   ��
Mr. and Mrs. Gartley. of Grandview
visited Mr. and Mrs. Boden, 136 39th
Avenue West, Tuesday evening last.
st   *   *
The Alert Realty at 5418 Main St..
is doing a lot of insurance business
these days. Everybody should see
that their homes and contents are
well protected from loss by fire.
Mr. Archibald Alexander, engineer
on the C. P. R. steamer. Princess
Sophia, and Miss Maggie Thomson
Macgregor, who recently arrived from
Scotland, were married on Monday
night, September 7. at the residence
of Mr. and Mrs. J. Williamson. 1073
28th Avenue East. Mr. Andrew Alexander, brother of thc groom was present as best man. while Miss Margaret
Williamson made a charming little|
bridesmaid. Thc marriage was per
formed by Rev. J. R. Robertson. of|
St. David's Church. After the cere
mony bridal lunch was served by the
host and hostess. Mr. and Mrs. Williamson. The young couple will take
up residence in the City of Victoria.
Very active steps arc being taken
or the rebuilding of St. Peter's'
Church. Meetings held have been
lighiy successful. Thc new building
vill be on the corner of Thirtieth
\vcnue. Meanwhile the congrega-
:ion meets at the corner of Main and
Bodwell.
The medal won by the High School
entrance pupils will be presented by
Dr. Westbrook, president of the B.
C. University, at an entertainment to
be given shortly at the opening of the
new  annex  to  the  High  School.
Mrs.   Chas.     Allen,
daughter eif Mr. R. H.
:enering  very   rapidly
cent   illness.
of Spokane,
Horrell is re-
from   her   re-
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Cathcart. of
Saskatoon, Sask., have spent the last
month visiting Vancouver and sur-
rounding parts. Tliey were also look-
���ng after some property here belonging to Mrs. Cathcart's father's estate.
*   *   *
Mrs. Boden. of No. 136 39th Avenue West, has hcr little girl Margaret
at the baby show today, Wednesday.
���.       uc.    �����.!_���      .,-, j   ,  i Mr. Harlock, our mail carrier from
Major   H.   S.   Tobin.   23rd   Infantry Mth Avenue  to 4gth  Avenue  is en-
Brigade jewing a three-weeks holiday.
��� I
' SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
Glazed Cement
Sewer Pipe
Is tlle choice of property owners in
every city where its value has been
demonstrated. It gives good service
and  has durability.
Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.
155 FRONT STREET WEST
Phone Fairmonl 122
Make Your Gardens Beautiful
Don't procrastinate! Those whe have their gardens well cultivated should act quickly in seciring what their tastes prompts to
select to make home surroundings beautiful. This obviates a rush
the last weeks of the planting season and consequently confers upon
us a direct favor. Our staff, through generous patronage arc taxed
to the limit every day, late and early.
Don't delay placing your orders quickly, thereby preventing a
rush and enabling us to give efficient service in meeting your wants.
Our stock of (lowering plants (Biennial and Perennial) cannot be
surpassed on this continent.
This is not, to use the slang phrase���hot air���but a fact. When
you want cabbage, cauliflower and tomato plants order from us.
Catalogues  mailed  free on  application.
ROYAL NURSERIES, LIMITED
Office���710 Dominion  Building, 207 Hastings Street West. Phone Seymour 5556
Store���2410  Granville  Street Phone  Bayview   1926
Greenhouses  ami   Nurseries  at   Koyal   on   B.C.   Klcctric   Railway,   Klmrne   Line,  about
two miles south of the City limit*. l'hone  Kburne 43.
Hughes Bros' Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET  EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We carry everything in Wines, Liquors and Cigars
No order too small, and none too large  for this popular Liquor Store
Store open every evening until 11 p.m.
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
Leaving our Store every Thursday and Friday morning at 9 a.m.
Price List mailed free on application
Dominion
Equipment & Supply Co.
LIMITED
Contractors and Municipal Machinery
Equipment and Supplies
Phone Seymour
7155
11 SO Homer Street
Vancouver
Fairview Sand & Gravel Co.
Corner Front and Manitoba Streets
TELEPHONE FAIRMONT   552
BEST PRICES FOR SOUTH VANCOUVER AND
FAIRVIEW DISTRICT
WILLOW  HOSPITAL
Corner BROADWAY and WILLOW
PATIENTS  RECEIVED  FROM $15.00  PER WEEK
Miss HALL and Miss WESTLEY, graduate nurses
Phone Fairmont 2165
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
CORNER 8th AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
Fairmont 189 Always Open
Furnishers of Complete Funerals for $55.00
This includes Burial Case, Hearse, Family Carriage, Removal
Charges and all Personal Services.
We guarantee quality of goods, services and equipment to be first-
class. We make no misleading statements, and we have a staff of
competent men who are prepared at any hour to render the best service possible to bc obtained anywhere.
Mount Pleasant  Undertaking  Co.
Always Open Use of Modern Chapel to All
CORNER 8th AND MAIN STREET Telephone Fairmont 189
P. H. GROTE���Formerly Center & Hanna's Branch
75 per cent, of your Summer Cooking can be
done with Electric Household Appliances
just as well as with a Kitchen Range and
with much greater comfort and convenience
Electric Household Appliances are ready for operation, day or
ni��ht, on an instant's attention to connecting the cord with the
huuse'.iold socket.
ihey can do everything in the line of light cooking, preparing
tea or coffee, making toast, preparing eggs, frying chops, etc. You
don't want heavy meals during the hot weather and tbe appliances
just meet this demand and make it unnecessary to have a hot fire
going.
Electric   Household   Appliances cost only a few cents per hour
of  continuous  operation.    To  prepare an ordinary meal takes but a
fraction of an hour.   They are guaranteed  by  the  manufacturers.
See our full line of Electrical Household  Appliances
Carrall ft Hastings Sts.
113s Granville St., near Davie
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON   WORKS
1*4* ALBERT ST. TELEPHONE   HIGH.   131
ENGINEERS. MACHINISTS LUD FOUNDERS
IKON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND SPECIALS
REPAIRS OP ALL DESCRIPTION'
RING QUIRK'S BELL
liy  Archibald  Sable
Charley Woolson sauntered int��� >
the   reading   room   ol    In-   club   and
ed up tlie- "Herald "    As hit
fell e,n  the   first  page  I.,   . :. laimed;
"Ah. thi^  i-> teeee much."
The- >.iii ��� , ul In- exclamation was
tlu- following among the personal
notices
A   V will call ..ii  II. !���'.. R.,
..  W'e ..i   Fifty-seventh  Street,
leai ii   something   i"   his   ae!-
Ring  Quirk's  In 11."
position   of  tiii-.   notice   in  tbe
eltinni   ol   llu-   firsl    ]f.ti2e   was
"II M
So 2:' 1
he    Will
vantage
Th
lirst ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
such that it was likely t.e catch tir
eye eet a person Hiking up the papi
It had appeared there for three elay-
in succession anil though in the old
palmy elay-. of ilie- "Herald" Personals it would hardly have attracted liis
attention, it was sufficiently out (,f
tlu- common mew te, excite his interest. Add t'> that, that today W'e.ol-
seen bail indulged i" me,re champagne
than usual and was in a devil-may-
care mood. He seemed ti, think that
the words "King Quirk'* Bell" were
a direct challengi to him. Tluy b����ili
annoyed anel interested him. The-
!ir-t time- In- read tin notice contemplatively, tin- second time he- nail it
through wilh a sneer ami a smile; mi
the third reading he studied it with
awakening interest. His experience
with it was like' that which Pope says
we have with  vice-  which
We  Iir-t  endure, then  pity, then embrace.
W'eiiilsnii hail apparently reached
ihe embracing stage, fur after read
ing tbe- "personal" through several
times. Ik- exclaimed :
"By all the gods, I'll ring Quirk's
bell myselfl If she-'s see anxious to
have-  it  rung   I'll  oblige  her."
With that Woolson clapped his hat
on bis head and sallied forth from
his club. He hailed a taxi, informed
the driver where lie wanted to go.
and was soon on his way uptown,
In justice tee Woolson, it should be
said that he had no definite idea as
to what he- wanted to do except that
he wanted tee ring Quirk's bell, lie
had formed me plan of action tn be
followed after ringing thc bell. He
had nol calculated any possible result 'if that operation. The "advantage" to be gained thereby he bad
nut considered, He simply bad a
dim notion tbat Quirk's bell must be
rung and that he was going t,, ring
it.
Tiie machine stopped before a
large-, old fashioned apartment heeiise.
Woolson descended, entered the vestibule of tiie building ami looked for
Quirk's bell. When he found it there
was a gleam of satisfaction in bis
eyes. Ile felt that his mission was
about tee be accomplished. Ho pressed tiie electric button. It was done.
Presently the sound of a soft,
flute-like voice came to his ear. It
came from the tube over the electric
button.
"Who's  there?"  said   tlle  voice.
"I." replied Woolson, avoiding
mentioning his name. "I came to
ring   Quirk's  bell."
"(lh, come right up," saiil the flutelike voice.
The dour latch clicked ami the
door swung invitingly open. Wool-
son felt that, after ringing the bell,
common politeness required him to
accept the invitation. Besides, the
voice was very soft ami flute-like, lie
dismissed   the   taxi  and   went  up.
When he reached the second landing he saw a young woman standing
in the doorway of a hall leading into   a   flat.
"This way." she said, as shc retreated.
Woolson mechanically followed
her. lie had barely put his foot
across tiie threshold of a il'ior opening into a prettily furnished parher.
When a furienis barking assailed bis
ears, and a little yellow pug dog,
having an ugly black muzzle ami
wearing his tail twisted lei the left
like all well-bred pugs, rushed at him
as though about  to devour  him.
"Why, Daelee' I'm ashamed eef you!"
exclaimed the young woman, picking
up   thc   dog  ami   imprisoning   him   in
her arm-;     Would yeeu  bite   Mr. ?
Hut I don'l know your name." she
added, turning toward Woolson with
a smile.
"Charles Maxson," replied Wen 1-
seiu without hestating,
"He still. Dado! We still!" said the
mistress of the; Hat to the pug. that
was  still barking.
"What a charming dog!" exclaimed Woolson. "Why ibe vou call him
Dado?"
"Because be hieiks like tlle dado of
this room, which, you see, is yellow.
1 named liim Dado the day my husband brought him  home.
"Ah! there is a Mr. Quirk then,
and this i.s Mrs. Quirk." said Wool-
son to himself as he took the seat to
which   he   was   invited.
A few glances sufficed to show
Woolson tbat yellow was Mrs.
Quirk's favorite ceilor. It cropped
out in the decorations in all parts of
thc room. Tbe curtains were tied
with yellow ribbons, and a great yellow chrysanthemum ornamented Mrs.
Quirk's bust. Even the yellow pug
wore a yellow DOW on bis collar. The
establishment was what followers of
the Whistler school would call a
symphony in yellow, all designed to
set e.ff the charms of tbe beautiful
brunette who presided over it. Wool-
son bad decided by this time that
Mrs. Quirk was beautiful. Her beauty was enhanced in his eyes by ber
evident embarrassment.
"I suppose, Mr. Maxson, 1 owe
the pleasure of your visit to my personal in thc 'Herald''?" she said, hesitating.
The psctido Mr. Maxson admitted
that the beautiful Mrs. Quirk's inference was correct, and be led hcr
also to infer that he thought ber contribution to the "Herald" the most
interesting item in it.
In  the course of the  ensuing con-
tion Woolson learned From Mr-
Quirk -....I ii-i husband ��as a travelling   salesman,     lie m   al
. she said, i Mad bei i
in New Vork but a little while, h iv-
ing be. ii only re cently marrii d, she
knew aim  -��� no om  in ihe i it). ��� eiv
-e e.il. nti)     -I'e-    1 e , , j, . ,;    |1'
��� aa desperate!)   lonely.    I '
pr. -e-in   trip   her   husband,    hi    .aid,
had I  - than usual, and
in -in ��� i  di sperat el ad pul the
mai" in the "I lerald," di ti rmin-
lind  ioi i"   with  whom  she
Oelllel   lalU   S.iltle-   "lie-   wl,"    ,\e,|lle!   |y|||.
patl i/'   �� ith  In i.
"I know it ��at a strange thing f.er
nn t-< do," she continui '1. "an I I di
li- pe, \h Ma ��� - ��� that ) ou will nol
think  in      ���. i rbold."
As        - ihe    Inriie.'!    her
great black eye* e,n VVoolion, who
leemed about i" disintegrate under
their soft, magnetic light. Hc man-
agi -I. however, to say that he 'li'l not
think lu-r bold, bul on the contrary
regarded her ai tlie- mosl modest and
circumspect woman in Xew Vi.rk.
I and Ik- assured her thai he was the
| most  sj mpathetic  of  men,
A startled look '.nne into the eyes
;  ii   Mrs.  Quirk   aa  the   grating  of  a
key in a luck was heard.    A step in
i i he  hall, and���
"My   God!  there-  i-  my  husband!"
I she   exclaimed,   springing   ir..in     her
seat.    "Remember yotl are  my cousin,  Hen  Stanton, from Chicago."
"Hen Stanton, Ben Stanton," said
Woolson tee himself, repeating the
���i.inn��� to Impress it on his memory.
iii- aliases were changing bo f;t-1 he
was afraid that at somi critical nie>-
"ii-nt he migh forget who he wa* al
thai particular time.
The step approached, The door
was opened, and a rather good-looking, light complexioned, full-bodied
man. having a grip in one hand and
an umbrella in the other, entered the
room. Mrs. Quirk ran tee him.
Dropping the bag and the umbrella,
he folded her in hi> arms and kis,,-.]
her, then turned an inquiring glance
mi Woolson, wlm had risen.
"Oh, this is cousin lien Stanton of
whom yeeti have heard me speak see
often.'' said Mrs. Quirk with a becoming  blush.
"I am very glad 1" meet you, Cousin Hen." said Quirk, advancing and
-baking Woolson'* hand with great
heartiness. " I think my little wife
has spoken of ynu every day since
we were marrieel. so you see I feel
as though 1 were well acquainted
with ye ut."
Quirk proceeded tee ask Woolson
a thousand questions. He askeel when
he arrived, bow heiig he intended t'
stay, where In- was stopping, etc.
When Woolson, lying gracefully, saiel
that he was Stopping at a certain
hotel, tjttirk declared that be musl
leave it ami come ami steep with himself and his wife in their Hal. Woolson
saiel that he could not possibly ibe se.
He gladly compromised by agreeing
i.i stay and dine with the Quirks that
evening.
The dinner passed with gay talk.
invented anecdote* ami unconscionable lies told by Woolson ami Mrs.
Quirk in maintaining their assumed
characters as cousins. By thc time
thc coffee was served Woolson began to plume himself on his powers
as an acteir and t��� > admire his suddenly acquired facility in lying. When
an hour after dinner had been passed in meere romancing ami in "push-
ing" their ceeffee with several glasses
of brandy. Woolson made an excuse
to depart. Though both Mr. and Mrs.
Quirk urged him te. stay longer, he
insisted e.n ge'ing. Quirk saiel he
would walk eeut with him. and Mrs.
Quirk suggested that lu-v husband
sheeiild take Dado for an airing. Wool-
son bade his "cousin" good-bye, and
soon the two men and the dog were-
in   the   street
They turned into Broadway, where
they sen ni met a political procession
headed by a band. A crowd of men
and boys on tin sidewalk accompanied the procession, timing their steps
t" the musii Quirk hael expressed
the intention of seeing Cousin Ben t-
bis hotel When tin- crowd earn, up
iz.e.l the opportunity of
oi Quirk. He declared
eeia. e.e .....-' g" u.i further, and having promised t.. call again tin nexl
day. be bade him good-bye and left
him. Woolson, wh" hurrieel away
amid the crowd, was nut ,,f Quirk's
sight in a moment.
(in  reaching the outer edge of tin
crowd  Woolson,  wh"  was  congratu-
himself   em   his   successful   es-
^^Hsud'len
W.e.'lse.n s
ge-tting riel
that  lie 11111-1
lating    ^^^^^
cape  freun  Quirk, came t 	
halt and stared before him in astonishment. There, directly in front of
him was Dade., prancing "ti his hind
legs and grinning diabolically, Tin-
dog, becoming confused in tbe crowd
and losing sight eef his master, bad
naturally followed Woolson. . For
fully a minute Woolson, who felt the
effect of bis numerous potations, steie.e!
still anil gazed at the pug as though
he were trying to stare him eeut of
Cottntehance. Then for another minute be apostrophized the dog in
terms more forcible than elegant.
Presently, perceiving that this strange
Conduct was attracting the attention
of passers-by, Woolson straightened
himself, squared his shoulders and
threw back bis head in an effort to
regain his dignity, then moved on ap-
narently unperturbed. But it was in
appearance only, for hc was silentlv
anathematizing the dog that followed
at  his heels.
Wnetlson's first impulse was tei take
a car or dive into the subway ami
give the doff the slip. Then be
thought of Mrs. Ouirk's fondness fe.r
Dadd. and decided 'hat such a course
would be cruel. Ile finallv made up
bis mind to take the deig home with
liim. and to return him to his mistress
tbe next day by messenger.
By   the   time  Woolson   reached   tlle
bouse   in   which   he   bad   a   bachelor
apartment   he     was     decidedly     the
(Continued on page 4)
(]RAND   CENTRAL   JJOTEL
GRAUER  and  GRAUER
The place where they "keep hotel"���
A fully modern hostelry, near at
band to South Vancouver���it's the
"Grand Central" when you go to
Eburne,
EBURNE   STATION,   B.C.
Milk! Milk! Milk!
Turner's Pasteurized and Germless Milk and Cream is the be��t
diet  for  Infants and Invalids.    Superior for tea, coffee and cocoa.
AXD GOOD FOR EVERYBODY
Sold at 10 quarts for $1.00.
Visit our big new modern dairy and we will show you why it
is we can supply you with the best milk and cream and buttermilk
and butter sold in  Greater  Vancouver.
TURNER'S DAIRY
OFFICE AND DAIRY :    Cor. ONTARIO AND 17th AVENUE.
Phone Fairmont 597
JOINT SAVINGS ACCOUNTS      lncr*0rd
A Joint Savings Account may be opened at the Bank of Vancouver
in the names of two or more persons. In these accounts either party
may sign cheques or deposit money. For the different members of
a family or a firm a joint account is often a great convenience. Interest paid on balances.
THE
BANK OF VANCOUVER
Order your Wines, Liquors or Cigars
By Phone (High. 555)-Free Motor Delivery
To South Vancouver every Friday
Cascade Beer (on Ice) ._.__ pts $1 doz., qts S2 doz.
Heidelberg Beer     "    $1     "        "   *2   ���
B. C. Export  Beer   _           "    85c   " "SI.75"
HIGHLAND LIQUOR COMPANY, LIMITED
758 POWELL STREET
BEER
BEER
YOU CAN GET ANY AMOUNT FROM THE
International  Importing  Company
303 PENDER STREET WEST
Bottlers of B.C. Export and Bohemian
Free Delivery to Your door in South Vancouver every Thursday
Phone Seymour 19S1
COME IN OUT OF THE DUST!
Fruits
Pure Ice Cream
ICE   COLD   SOFT   DRINKS,   COOL   FRESH   BUTTERMILK,
CANDIES, CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC.
" The Plare with the Gramophone " Open Day and Night
Chinook Ice  Cream Parlor
4251   MAIN STREET
CANYON   VIEW  HOTEL
CAPILANO,   NORTH   VANCOUVER,  R C
U.  I.ARSON,  Manager. 1*.  LARSON,  Proprietor.
Elevation  625  feet. One hour's trip from  Vancouver Telephone 146
SCENIC    DELIGHTS.   FISHING,   HUNTING.   MOUNTAIN   CLIMBING,   Ktc.
Unequalled  Resort  for  Holiday,  long  or  short      Family  Rooms
en suite with special rate.
Modern  appointments  throughout,   spacious  grounds,  high-class service  at  moderate
rates.    Easy trail to top of Grouse  Mountain, altitude 3,000 feet. TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER. 12 191#
Ui^pvEaCHINOCX
PUBLISHED
Every Saturday by the Greiter Vancouver Publisher! Limited
George M. Murray, Editor
HEAD OFFICE:
Corner   Thirtieth   A��enoe   and   Main   Street,   South   Vancouver,   B. C.
TELEPHONE:   All departments Fairmont   1874
NIGHT   CALLS Fairmont   1946 L
Itigitured  at   the  Poit   Office   Department.  Ottawa,   ����   Second   Clan
Mail  Matttr
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
To  all   pointej  in   Canaela.   United   Kinudom,   Newfoundland,   New
Zealand, and other British Posueiiiona:
One   Year     *2 ����
Six   Montha       1 ����
Three   Months     s0
Poataje to American. European and other Foreign Countries $1.00
per year extra. 	
"The truth ��t all timea firmly standi
And shall from age lo ate endure."
TIIE CITY MARKET
Wanton Waste of Pood and a Menace to Publn
Health Alleged
INFORMATION has reached the CHINOOK, from
a reliable source, in connection with the City Market which has made us sit up and take notice.
The statement is made that a reliable man���a city
official in fact���having had a complaint about the unsanitary condition of the city market���inspected that
place and found���
Tons and tons of rotten potatoes.
Tons of rotten tomatoes.
Filthy liquid oozing from heaps of rotten offal.
Maggots galore and millions of flies.
This is a pretty state of things to exist, and the evidence is that it does exist in a public market.
Not only is there the menace to health���that danger
anybody can appreciate���but the question arises, Wh)
this wanton waste of food?
Common sense suggests tbat it is absurd to think
growers would send and pay freight on rotten goods.
If prevailing conditions prevented the ready distribution of this food among consumers, if want of facilities for distribution, a desire to keep up prices or anything else prevented this food���while food���reaching
the stomachs of hungry people then not only are the
potatoes rotten, but "there is something rotten in the
State of Denmark"���or, rather Vancouver. We want
a market for South Vancouver, a market where food
will be distributed before it rots. Meanwhile the j
CHINOOK may be relied on to investigate the mat
ter under notice to the last detail.
pean conflicts that I was prepared to give R. L. Bor-
den, Premier of Canada, a clear title deed to one of
inv blocks on Granville Street to complete the transact!! m."
Such were tiie words of Mr. T. F. Fee made to Mr.
Rounsefell when the two were discussing contribu-
lii.ii tee a IIriti-li patriotic fund.
But fur the liritish gunboats at present patrolling
the oe.-txi nf British Columbia! long ere this German
shells would likely have riddled the petty buildings on
Granville  Street owned by  .Mr.   Fee.
Hut lor Hritish money, the real estate business of
tbe man Fee might never have prospered.
lint for liritish justice and'liberty, this mctn might
today have been walking the earth with a copper collar on his neck, marking liim as but a serf.
And he claims that he is a Canadian born!
"If such there be. go mark him well.
For him no raptured minstrels swell.
Proud though his title, high his name,
lloimdless  his  wealth as  wish  can  claim���
Despite  those titles, power and  pelf,
The wretch concentred all in self,
Doubly dying shall go down
To the vile earth from whence be sprung,
Unwept, unhonored, unsung."
SOUTH   VANCOUVER   WINNERS   AT   THE
EXHIBITION
IT is gratifying to see that South Yancouver has
won many honors and prizes at the Exhibition.
The Surprise Poultry yards of Collingwood East has
taken so many prizes in so many classes that it will
take us until next week to reckon them up. Let tis
get thc work and worry of the Exhibition paper,
"Green and Gold," over antl the CHINOOK shall have
all our energies. Let us here pay a tribute to other
South Vancouver prizewinners. Here are a few of
them : IT. \V. Stones, River Avenue; J. Ilatterham,
Central I'ark ; Alex. Morgan, Collingwood East; Thos.
Porter, Beatrice St.; Frank Purding, Moscrop Rd.;
11. liracewill, George St.; Alex Mogar, Hoy St., and
others we will refer to next week.
"I
THE CASE OP MR. PEE
STATED that John Hull bad done no more for
me than l'ncle Sam. I said that I would like
to see Canada a part of the United States and that I
felt so certain it would be a great financial aid to
Canada and prevent her being drawn into any Euro-
.(.V ECHO OP LOUVA1NE
I HAVE received from a lady, a resident in South
Vancouver, a charming letter, which I here reproduce because it throws some light on present European affairs.
After some pretty compliments my correspondent
proceeds :
I call upon your pen for a plea for justice. I was
educated at thc magnificent convent of the L'rsulines
at Thildouex, Lez Louvaine, and passed many years in
the lovely old city.
Nobody seems to remember the magnificence of the
Other churches and buildings. One day \ took a walk
witb the two great sculptors, T. F. Lambeaux and
Constantin Menmuir, who lived there. At every step
they pointed out a fresh gem. Unfortunately Louvaine possessed many distilleries and breweries.    So
NEW STREET CAR
EXTENSION
Fulfilling the Agreement between the Canadian
Pacific Railway Co. and the B.C. Electric Railway
Co., the latter will construct early next spring a line
on South Cambie Street as far south as King Edward
Avenue, and from there to Main and Oak Streets to
connect with existing lines.
This will be a great boon to property owners in this
district and should have the effect of stimulating the
erection of houses in this first class residential locality.
the Prussians got mad drunk and destroyed the place.
Prussia and not Germany is responsible.
Afler going into some technical political details my
correspondent says, Germany's sin consist in allowing
herself to be shot into submission by the Prussian freebooters���for the Germans as a rule are a kindly
people.
This charming letter concludes with a plea for justice for the Germans who are in our midst and who
are not at enmity with Britons.
1 wish everybody who deplores the horrible war
took my correspondent's sensible view of it.
FELIX PENNE.
COLLINGWOOD HOME GUARD
THERE is every prospect of thc Collingwood unit
of the Home Guard turning out a thorough success. At the meeting held last week Mr. W. H. Knit
presided. Capital patriotic speeches were delivered
by Mr. Williamson, Mr. Smith and others.
DOING THE RIGHT THING
THE Hastings I'ark Exhibition prize list bids even
the groucher anil the pessimist take "heart o'
grace." Humble Owners of small lots���not "ranchers"
with large acreage���have carried eiff prizes for nearly every variety of "the kindly fruits of the earth" and
for poultry, honey and other food. South Vancouver
has secured a splendid reputation and many awards.
This is as it should be with war on���prices going
ti]), mouths to feed and the breadwinner on the firing
line. W'e ought io go back to ilu good old times
"when every rood of ground" maintained a man.
This is not the time io sit with folded hands and
wail for the "unearned increments" ui an advance in lhe
price of land. "What we haw we'll hold," ���unl if we
want lo hold our lionies. our liberties, we must not
only shoulder ihe rifle but the spade. Work is the
best medicine lor trouble���the best consoler for sorrow. So what thy hand findest to do, dn it with all
thv might ami in good time the cry will be "All's well."
Manufacturing in British Columbia-
Past, Present and Future Progress
One often hears it said that British
Columbia is nut a "manufacturing"
province; even that it "never will be,"
but these remarks come from those
who have never looked into the present facts and the future possibilities.
We hear a great deal about the
natural resources of the province���
ils lumber, its mineral wealth, its
agricultural future and its great fisheries, but many have given very little consideration to the question of
another great form of productive
wealth���manufacturing. The manufacturer is the oue who converts raw
material into finished product available for use; who employs workmen
to carry out his processes; who creates a market for raw material. The
manufacturer creates wealth in thc
same way as the miner or the agriculturist, for he increases the value
of raw material by putting into it the
value of the labor.
The wages paid by a manufacturer
circulate among the ��� community
where they arc paid and the value of
the work done remains in the manufactured product. It is therefore always an aim among civilised, progressive communities to induce and foster industries in their midst to create wealth for the community by converting its raw material into finished
products, at the same time providing
work for its citizens. We find that
among uncivilised or partially civilised communities that almost every
necessity of life and comfort, apart
from the product of the.field, has to
be obtained from outkidc sources.
even though the raw 'material for
their manufaclure be a$l(idaliJyCon-
versely wc find thai mailtit^J^ii^lj; ,i$
brought to its highest jJeffection
among the educated natfons,' who are
able not only to supply 'their own
needs, but also to malmttacture flbr
the needs of others and tir export
their wares, even though they havt
sometimes to import the raw 'tnattr-
ials..   ���, . t
The factors necessary for the successful conduct of manufacturing industries aire supply. of raw materials,
labor,- capital,,.Rower,, and accessibility to, market. British Columbia is
fortunately placed in many respects
and  hcr  future  destiny  should  place
among the manufacturing
rnj/ffttics. Within her borders are
abuiirtttt supplies of raw material of
varie>'(isTHmls. Powei is available in
piactivtfSi unlimited quantity and
""developed cheaply when the
iuanjl Warrants it. There is a market right at home for the general product? ofc our factories���a market
which wjll grow naturally as the province develops and which could today
be mlRh larger than it is if better
support evfte given to local manufacturers by lhe people of the province���a question to which we will revert later. Up to the present it has
been iBifficuh fpr our manufacturers
to reach beyOTitj.tfie Rockies into the
valuable Praise market, which would
e��nap to be a natural
���as't manufactures, but
erto' been shut off on
;fc , freight rate, too
lriajority of coast
' with  the  east.
appear 9j
market ft
,i*Wch ha*';
account
hJ8&:' to!
faeitories,*
Therf'aTe; howevejv factors at work
which ^Ul^enJualPpreduce the1 disparity  fn   frejgtit   rates  until  we  are
^W^^^V^K gff'll;t5 almo-sf as far
iiilaud'TrWfh th* ft***tt coast for our
dollar than can at present be done
from the Atlantic coast. Furthermore, the geographical position of the
coast gives us access to the cheapest
of all  freight  routes���the ocean, and
with her other advantages, British
���Columbia cannot fail in time to build
up a large overseas trade in many
products of her industry, although
they may at present be counted almost on the fingers.
The labor problem is one which
history shows is capable of solving
itself as the industries develop. In
general where the demand exists for
any particular class of labor, it i' is
forthcoming.
What then is the past and present
position of the manufacturer in this
province? The history of the manufacturer in British Columbia is the
history of a courageous man. for
manufacturing industries have had to
labor in the face of. many difficulties
in the cast, sume of them the outcome of circumstance! and others the
result of indifference on the part of
tiie authorities and the people. The
many instances of unfair discrimination against the production of local
industries, both in matters of purchase and of freight, led to the formation of the Manufacturers' Association of British Columbia, and this
body, comprising at present more than
two hundred large and small firms,
manufacturing �� widely diverging
range of products, has done good
work in bringing before the Government,   the   municipal   authorities   and
tin; public the sheer necessity of giving adequate support to local industries.
What arc the reasons why local
products should be bought wherever
possible? What is the meaning behind the cry eef "support -home industries?" Is il a selfish cry of the
manufacturer who wants to sell his
wares? Xo! It is the cry of lhe man
in the street, of thc farmer, the landlord, the city councillor, e.f every
man-who has the desire to see the
province develop and progress, and
who wishes to see our cities populous and prosperous.
Our cities require the population
and the payrolls to support them, and
the success of our industrial undertakings will attract further population, further capital and further industries to develop our natural resources and commerce and stimulate
the opening up of the whole of the
province. The period of depression
through whlcjl wc have been passing
has brought home forcibly the fact
that the manufacturing industry is
the mainstay of our cities and this
has stimulated interest in the whole
question. jsR;
Thc question was never of nxaWe
vital interest to Vancouver. Victcffrl,
New Westminster and our other cities
than at the present time, when ltlfi
disturbed financial and commercial
conditions throughout the world,
arising from the great oonflict in fify,
rope, are acting as a drag on "tljjjf
wheels, of progress, .which must. pf
necessity be keenly felt in a crfuntry
"in the making" as in British Columbia. Commerce is bound to hfltom-
pered, and many industries^ -cWe experience a reduced demand, ftlrihcir
products���and as a'result many*l5'rk-
ers must go hungry���unless. Cnle'ss
we. the people of British Columbia
realize that we have among -W factories turning out a host of products
which we require in oi(r'daily-meeds,
and which up to now vi( hatfe' not
cared where they came from.<*��>; .  ���
Who made those shoes-'.you bave
on? Did the wages paid, for making
them go towards the upkeep of*'
Vancouver home? Where. w;as "that"
cigar made that you. are smoking?
Did you sleep last night on a bedstead made in B. C. with a Vancouver-
made mattress? Do you ever giwe
any thought to the matter at all?
At ihis critical period we are al!
asking ourselves how we may "help."
Some eei us can go to the firing line.-,
others can help only in other ways;
but all of lis who are It'll at home
can lulp t" maintain the integrity >ef
our own cities and provinces, so tbat
the Empire shall see, when the clash
of arms is over, that we have dune
"iir share in upholding eiur portion
anil ihat wc have been true lei the
trust .imposed upon us by those wh"
have invested funds in tlle development of our cities and province.
ll wc .lie lo avoid disaster to many
eel" our industries, we must give the
utmost   support   possible   to   'eur   lo
cal products thereby keeping in employment the thousands "i men ami
women who arc employed, whose
wages, circulating among our retail
stores ami oilier channels of commerce, keep our cities g ling and provide a market for "in- dairy and farm
pre educe.
The Manufacturers' Association of
Uriiish Columbia bate a trade-mark
label. Goods bearing ihis label arc
made locally. Make a hobby, from
neiw On, of asking for British Columbia-made goods at your grocer anil
everywhere, antl yeeu will thus bc loyally helping lo keep things gnod in
this  province.
R. j. MORRISON, new president 4^JJ��iuiscturers' Association FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 12. 1914
MILK
How Satisfactory it is to tht Housekeeper   to   be   sure   that
the MILK, CREAM and BUTTERMILK    she    receives    is
Pasteurized and Germless.
Delivered in Sealed Bottle', Perfectly Sterilized.
BEACONSFIELD HYGIENIC DAIRY
905 Twenty-fourth Avenue East
Phone Fairmont 2391 L PRICE & GREEN,  Proprietors
GLADSTONE   HOTEL
FIRST CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS H. G. BROWN, Prop
MOVING - PACKING- STORAGE-SHIPPING
fj PHONE SEYMOUR 7360. OFFICE 857 BEATTY ST. f\
B. C. EQUIPMENT CO.
MACHINERY DEALER8
CONCRETE MIXERS, STEEL CARS, ROCK CRUSHERS, ELECTRIC, STEAM,
AND    GASOLINE   HOISTS.       WHEELBARROWS,   TRANSMISSION
MACHINERY,   GASOLINE   ENGINES,   PUMPS,   AND
ROAD MACHINERY
Officei: 60S-607 Bank of Ottawa Bldg.   Phone Seje. 9343 (KieAiniMo all D.-piilinenti)
Special
Night Rates
OVER OUR
Long Distance
Lines
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
BETWEEN 7 P.M. AND 8 A.M.
Three times the regular day period
for the regular day rate
Make Appointments any time during the day
FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS CALL
LONG DISTANCE
British Columbia Telephone
COMPANY, LIMITED
VANCOUVER CREAMERY
ICE CREAM
Pure and Delicious       Insist on Having It
Studying Butterflies is Scientific
Woman's Job
^21
Une million butterflies is the curious cargo that has cume to the
studio of Mrs. J. C. Crawford in tht
last   seven  years.
Mrs. Crawford is the wife of the
assistant curator of the National Museum in Washington. She's the "butterfly expert" of the  l'nited States.
Amateurs with the net, and scientific collectors of lepidoptera send her
daily freem all quarters of the world
the fruits of iheir adventures.
Dnc morning hcr mail may bring
100 specimens of tiny butterflies nn
bigger than a pin head from some
explorer in Brazil, the noon mail may
bring gorgeous specimens big as a
dinner plate from a traveler in Panama.
From India, Norway, China and
Alaska the butterflies flutter into her
stui'.Oi, sometimes crumpled up in
little pi" boxes, but usually in the
tri-ceirncred paper packet used by experts.
The collection of butterflies at
Washington, second only to that In
the Uriiish museum, is more carefully catalogued than a library of books.
Scientists come from all parts of the
world to study thc trays of mounted
butterflies.
Mrs Crawford proclaims herself a
feminist at least t., the extent of believing that married women are better e.ff if they have an occupation eeiit-
lide the home. "I sincetely believe,"
she says, "that married women Increase their own happiness, and their
husband's, too, if they have se.me big,
outside interest, some daily 'job' to
round  out   their  lives."
Of ceuirse contentment may be
wealth, but nephews anel nieces do
in >t ele-ire- their bachelor uncle to be
rich  that   wav
* *    *
"Opportunity really knocks at
many a door."
"Then why don't meere of us succeed   better?"
"The trouble is that opportunity
wants us tee gee to work."
* *    *
'.'Why el., you speak of a gathered
dress?'
"It's an (del term handed down the
ages, live wore llle lirst one, gathered from a tree."
* *       e|<
A woman's crowning glory���somebody's hair.
RING QUIRK'S BELL
(Continued from page 3)
worse for the wine and liquor he had
imbibed. Instead of turning the dog.
over to the care of the janitor, as he
would have done in his sober senses,
hc look the animal with him to his
rooms. Throwing off his clothes,
Woolson turned out thc gas and
tumbled into bed. He had been in
bed but a moment when hc felt something damp against his check. Dado
was licking his face. With an emphatic admonition to keep away he
pushed thc dog off the bed and turned over to go to sleep. Hut Dado
did not let him. The pug was soon
on the bed again, licking his hand.
Woolson knocked him off and swore
at him. Then he pulled the clothes
over his head and once more tried
to ge to sleep. Presently he felt Dado crawling over his feet. The persevering dog was on the bed again.
Woolson arose and lighted the gas
Dado, in full possession of the bed.
sat in thc middle of it, grinning at
him.
"You ugly little beast!" exclaimed
Woolson, "I'll teach you better manners."
He looked for a cord with which
to tie Dado, but found none. Seeing
his suspenders be unfastened them
from his trousers, then tied one end
of them to the leg of a table in the
centre of the room and the other
end about the dog's neck.
"Now get on the bed if you can."
said Woolson. as he put out the light
and returned to his couch.
He was soon asleep, for Dado
'troubled him no more that night.
However, toward morning he had a
strange dream about the dog. In his
dream he went through his experience of lhe previous night. lie
dreamed that Dado annoyed him by
following him in the street, that he
took him home where the dog continued to annov him until he lost all
patience, and killed the brute bv hanging him. Thereupon Dado defied him
even in death, grinning at him with
a ghastly grin. This grin, or the
morning light streaming in through
the windows awoke Woolson, who
sat up in bed and rubbed his eyes in
astonishment; there, over the foot-
'board of his bed hung Dado, dead and
grinning at him wtih a ghastly grin.
The dog, in a last desperate effort
to get on the bed, had dragged the
table toward it. jumped over the footboard���and hanged himself with
Woolson's   suspenders.
When hc had recovered from his
astonishment, Woolson leaped nut of
bed. put Dado on thc floor, and threw
water in his face in the hope eef reviving him, but he was past reviving.
Dado was a dead dog.
As he turned thc carcass over with
his foot Woolson wondered what disposition  he  l,ad  better  make  of it.
"Poor Mrs. Quirk! how she idolized the little beasl!" he said aloud as
he gazed al the lifeless form of her
pet.
Then a bright idea came to him. lie
would send- the carcass to a taxidermist, have it set up. and return Dado,
artistically preserved, lo the mistress
who so adored him. At the same
time he would write a letter in the
name of Cousin Ren. which he would
have posted in Chicago, and in which
he would relate thc misfortune that
had befallen Daclee and state that he
was afraid to call on Mrs. Quirk
again after having caused thc death
of the dog. but that he had done
what hc could to restore her pet tei
her in as good a condition as possible. Accordingly the dead Dadei
was conveyed to the shop of a taxidermist  in   Sixth  Avenue.
One day, while laughing over the
prospective fun. he was seized with
a desire tei sec how Dado looked, so
he turned his steps toward the shop
of the taxidermist, who, he thought,
had had time to set the dog up. As
he approached the shop he heard a
woman scream. He saw Mrs. Quirk
with one hand grasping her husband
by thc arm and with the other pointing to the window where the taxidermist, proud of his work, had displayed Dado to- the admiring gaze of the
public. Mr. and Mrs. Quirk went into the shop. Woolson turned on his
heel  and  beat a  hasty  retreat.
The next morning while Woolson
was at breakfast two cards were laid
on the table. One bore the name of
Mr. Alexander Quirk, the other lhat
of James Johnson, attorney and
counselor-at-law. i he visitors were
admitted. Woolson expected to see
Quirk enraged. Hc was mistaken.
Quirk was dignified and polite. He
said that he had obtained Woolson's
address from the taxidermist.    Wool-
seen in confusion, explained how Dado
met his death and offered to pay for
the loss of tbe dog whatever value
Quirk might place upon him. Quirk,
with a meaning smile, replied that the
loss of the dog was nothing in comparison wilh other damages which
Woolson had done him. He said
lhat his lawyer would explain, adding
that his own mission was accomplished in obtaining the evidence of his
eyes that Ben Stanton and Charles
Woolson were one. Thereupon he
withdrew.
The lawyer explained that Quirk
meant lhat hc would institute divorce
proceedings in which Mrs. Quirk and
Woolson would figure respectively
as respondent and co-respondent.
The lawyer added that for the sake
of Mrs. Quirk, who took the matter
very hard, he himself was inclined to
counsel a compromise. Woolson
did not take thc hint, and the lawyer,
smiling blandly, departed.
That day Woolson received thc
bill of the taxidermist for setting Dado up. He ordered the pug's remains
to  bc  sent  to  Mrs.  Quirk.
When Woolson opened his paper
on the following morning he found
under a display heading, a sensational account of the institution of divorce proceedings by Alexander
Quirk against his wife, Krminie Quirk,
in which, it was stated, Mr. Charles
Woolson would appear as the corespondent. While Woolson was
contemplating, in imagination, Ihe
emotions of Miss Marion DeC.raw
when she also should read1 the account of the divorce proceedings, he
was served with the papers in the
case. He had hardly digested them
when Mrs.  Quirk's card was sent up.
���Mrs. Quirk entered, carrying in one
hand a large square package. Shc
opened the interview with tears. Be
tween her sobs the lovely woman implored Woolson lo compromise the
matler in senile way with her husband,
for she declared that if he obtained
a divorce she would be ruined for
life. Her family were very strict, she
said, and would surely cast her off.
Woolson was naturally sympathetic. He was moved by Mrs. Quirk's
sobs and tears. He believed that his
thoughtless conduct had placed her
in this unfortunate predicament. He
likewise thought of Miss Marion De
Graw. He promised that he would
do all in his power lo stop thc divorce   proceedings.
Thereupon Mrs. Quirk dried her
eyes, and, opening the package, took
from a paper box the remains of her
precious Dado. Fondling lhe ugly
head of the stuffed brute, she informed Woolson that the sight of Dado
so exasperated her husband lhat she
could not keep even this poor remnant of him in the house. As. she
said, the deeg loved Woolson, and
she knew that he admired the dog,
she begged thai he would keep her
dear,  dead   Dado  for  her.
Later in thc day Woolson railed
on Quirk's lawyer, and it was arranged that the action for divorce
shemld be withdrawn in consideration
of five thousand dollars, which Wool-
son  paid.
When he returned'to his rooms
Woolson found a note from Miss Dc
Craw, in which she informed him
that their engagement was at an end.
Before calling nn her he waited till
the evening eif the next day in order
lo give hcr wrath lime to cool. Then
he presented himself and tried to explain matters, but she asked him, in
the words of Byron, to "explain his
explanation,"   and   he   couldn't.
As Woolson sat before his fire that
evening and contemplated the harm
he had done himself Iw ringing
Quirk's bell, his thoughts were
gloomy. If he had drawn a complete bill of damages it would have
been   something  like  this :
Settling divorce suit   $5,(100.00
Setting  up  pug dog          12.00
Suspenders   ruined      2.50
Miss De draw's broken heart ?
Total      ?
Dado, grinning at Woolson from
a stand in the corner, seemed to say:
"Don't you wish you could mend
Marion's broken heart as easily as
you   mended   me?"
Trying to turn the current of his
thoughts. Woolson picked up the
"Herald" which lay unopened on his
writing table. There, in the first column, his eyes fell on a "personal"
similar to that which had' brought
all this trouble upon him. It ended
with the same aggravating words that
had challenged and tempted him���
"Ring  Quirk's  bell."
And Dadei. apparently enjoying
Woolson's discomfiture, looked at
him with his everlasting grin.
SIX   REASONS
WHICH ACCOUNT FOR THE SUPERIORITY OF
CREOSOTED WOOD
BLOCK PAVEMENTS
ITS DURABILITY���Docs not crumble or pulverize under the densest traffic; second only to granite
blocks
ITS EASE OF REPAIR-No difficulty being experienced in removing and replacing the blocks; no
expensive plane or skilled workmen required.
ITS SANITARY QUALITIES���Creosote being a
high'y antiseptic and waterproofing material instantly destroys all germs, prevents the absorption of
street filth and consequent decay.
ITS NOISELESSNESS���The rattle and hang of
vehicles passing over its smuoWi surface absorbed
and muffled till the quiet of the. din load is oLtam d.
ITS DUSTLESSNESS���Does not pulverize; the
heaviest traffic only pounding down the wood fibres
to offer the greater resistance.
ITS CLEANLINESS���Having a smooth surface and
being waterprool it does not differ in this respect
from asphalt.
We manufacture blocks of the highest possible
standard, the verv best materials onlv being used and
in the DOMINION WOOD BLOCKS we believe
we produce an article that has no equal.
DOMINION CREOSOTING
 COMPANY LIMITED	
Vancouver, B. C.
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
MEMBERS VANCOUVER STOCK EXCHANGE
MEMBERS VANCOUVER GRAIN EXCHANGE
MEMBERS OF CALGARY OIL EXCHANGE
DEALERS IN ALL ACTIVE CALGARY STOCKS, BONDS, ETC.
OIL STOCKS
BOUGHT  AND  SOLD
Stock Department, Seymour 6913
EXCHANGE BUILDING, 142 HASTINGS WEST
The Terminal Steam Navigation Co.
Limited
HOWE SOUND ROUTE
SS. "BALLENA" SS. "BOWENA"
...        t-,    i  ' leaves   Union  Dock  at
leaves  Union   Dock|Q,5 .(m   dft���yi Sum,ay
at 10.30 a.m., for
llowen Island, Britannia Mines, Portrait,
Mill     Creek.       (Anvil
at   9.15   a.m.   daily
Sunday at 10.30 a.m
,      n .. ,.��� Mi        Creek.       (Auvi
for Bntanma Minra| Ulandi     Mon>    We(,
and Newport.
SS.   "BRITANNIA"
leaves the Union Dock
at 9.15 a.m. daily for
Gt. Northern Cannery,
Caulfeilds, Eagle Harbor, Fisherman's Bay,
Hiuellcy's, Eagle Cliff,
invercraig. (Horseshoe
Bay,  Tucs. and  Fri.)
! and Sat.)
These trips afford passengers a magnificent view of the scenery
among the islands and glaciers all day. Do not miss these trips.
$1.00 round trip, good for day of issue only. For information phone
Seymour 6330.
HIGH-GRADE
BUILDING MATERIALS
Boultbee-Johnson & Company, Ltd.
Johnson's Wharf
Phone : Sey. 9145
BASEBALL
Week of September 14 to 20
Vancouver vs. Seattle
ATHLETIC  PARK 5th and HEMLOCK
South End Granville St. Bridge
Games start week days, 4 p.m. Saturdays I p.m. SATURDAY, SEPTF.MBER, 12 1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
Hastings
and
Gore Ave.
EMPRESS
Lawrence ft Sandusky, Lessees
MA TINEES WEDNESDA Y and SA TURD A Y
Phone
Sey. 3907
Week   commencing   Monday  evening,   September   14th,   1914
The Del. S. Lawrence Stock Company
In   COSMO   HAMILTON'S beautiful  play
THE BLINDNESS OF VIRTUE
Simple���Hum an���Truthful
"Every  mother  and  father should see it"
Prices 25c, 50c
Matinees. 25c Any seat
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
All the Latest in Motion Pictures
Sometimes  a  thrill,   sometimes  a   smile,  always  pictures   you  are
pleased to see, always a sure entertainment
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   D��AN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
ALL THE BEST AND NEWEST   IN   MOVING   PICTURES
MATINEE  SATURDAY AT 2 p.m.
Cedar   Cottage   Theatre
"THE HOUSE THAT PLEASES"
20th Avenue and Commercial Street
SATURDAY MATINEE, 2 to 5
We show the best, cleanest and most up to date pictures with a
complete change daily.
COME AND SEE
Evans,   Coleman   &   Evans,   Ltd.
IF  YOU  WANT AN ECONOMICAL   FUEL
WHEN   PLACING   YOUR   NEXT   ORDER,   ASK   FOR
AUSTRALIAN COAL
EVANS,  COLEMAN &  EVANS
Limited
Phone 2988 Foot of Columbia Avenue
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
Vancouver Breweries Limited
THEATRICAL
Empress Theatre
The offering fe.r nexl  week al  the
Empress has been acclaimi d  a
':  the greateil  plays ol thi   d
It i- tbe famous  English playwright,
l "-in.,   Hamilton's   te i sation,    "The
Blindni is of  Virt'ie."
Written on a theme thai ii actually cr) ing for dis ussion \ drai
-' nsation \ stroi -.-. gripping vital
drama, founded ou a subji cl thai it
ne.w being debati el in . -,e-iy home
throughout the in.,re civiliz
listened world, A powerful indictment againsl the presi nl fashion in
rearing childn n in ignorance of iucIi
conditions   av   will   fortify   them   t.e
with  their bfi\\i>  anel patter,  running
str. .njily te, comedy.
'Ilier. will 1,, new war picture-, the
showing changing every day ai eluring the  past  two  week-.
Kingdom   .1 I >r< ami"   The- lit���
���  .i verit-
��� ���
'11 ���   -'    1.1'.   -       Bri  dui He,11-   .'H-r
wi iti ��� ii    audeville.
. that li
ee aki   ,e  big   hit   will  lie
Eearl
is   11   -lirpri-e-    Comi ' entitled
��� ai It"����� ��� iiie ans.
Mi    En esl        ��� '.-  im n  and   Misi
Kenm th Postill, both ol South
Vancouvei   ive      man   d at 4 M p.m.,
Saturday, Septembet  :. al St. David's
groon    '..- ��upp irt< d by   Mfred Win.
I'..���!���'    hi   \. :    i ' Miss
per-
Tl ���
marri; .
Rev. .1.  R    R ���    of St.  Da
Church     '1 '
t 5228    t. Cathi
S'.U ill     '.
PANTAGES
lie-equalled       Vaudeville      Meant      Pantagr.
Vtudevtlle
E.   D.   Graham,   Resident   Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
ALL NEXT WEEK
HOWARD RUSSELL'S
Oriljiral   Playlet
" SMITHY & IHE EEL"
Three   shows   daily   2.45,   7.20,   9.15
Admission���Matinees,      15c;     nights,
15c and 25c; boxes, 50c.
CHILDREN
Cared for Week or Month
Misses HALL & WESTLEY
778 Broadway West
Phone Fairmont 2165
Miss Margaret Marriott
combat with evils and vices of the
world. Every mother and lather
sliiiiild >ee it. This is what one 01
the most prominent clergymen oi
Massachusetts says of it : "I broke
my custom lasl nighl and Baw the
play at the Worcester Theatre. 'The
Blindness >.i Virtue.' I cannot retrain from saying that I wish every
parent and every young person pasl
the age "i childhood could lee it.
There is not the slightest trace of
suggcstiveness, to say nothing of immorality, tr<.111 ilu' beginniiig to the
end e.i it. The whole effect produced
is inic eei purity and sweetness combined with a solemn seriousness that
ought t.e purge the feelings of even
the  most   shallow   and   perverse,
"The play is sure to stir int.. duty
ilu  heart of every father and mother
win. take-  parenth 1  seriously.
"REV. ALLYN  K.  FOSTER,
First Baptisl Church,
Worcester, Mass
In spite of the name thus far it has
proved a  great  winner.
Cray and Peters are experl cyclists
who have a lot of new stunts anel
paraphernalia t.. show their friends
her
Acl  S'o. 5 will be by the
Acme Four, who are -aiel t.. have
something  in.vel te   display.
i'.eeh kelley and George Catlin will
lie   among  those   present   fnee  again
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THRObuH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM  /ANCOUVER TO
ALL ^\RTS OF THE
WORLD
The Fop'ilar R
HI
"��� t" the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA  AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service  between Vancouver and the  East.
All trains equipped wiih Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
J. MOE, C. P. A.. 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE,  Gen.  Pass  Agent,  Vancouver.
Crown Prince Ferdinand and family, whose assassination was the nominal
cause of the war
Pantages Theatre
The  crowning  feature   of  the   com-j
ing   Pantages'   Bill  whieh  opens  with.1
a matinee Monday will be of unusual]
interest  from  the  fad  thai   it  is  in  a
considerable  degree  a  local   produc-i
tion,     li   is   the   gripping   dramatic i
playlet, "Smithy and the Eel," a Study I
in  criminology  and is  from  the  pen j
e.f  Howard  Russell,'who for several
seas..ns   has  been   leading juvenile  of |
the Lawrence stock company  in  ihis
city.    Mr.  Russell is. one of the ni.-st
p..pillar actOrs  who has  ever appeared   here  ami   has  a   very   large   local
following   wlm   have  ailuiireil   his   finished artistry as an actor but will be
surprised   to   learn   that   he   is   a   successful author as well.    "Smithy and
the   Eel"   is   a   play   with   a  "punch"
and it touches the heights and depths
eif human emotion, blending comedy
and  pathos  in  splendid  proportions,
It   will   be   interpreted   by   a   Strong
company   headed   by   Harry   Cornell,
formerly  a  popular  leading man and
stage   director   of   local   stock   companies   and   his   talented   wife,   Ethel
Corley, who is also a favorite here.
A second extraordinary feature oi
the coming bill will be a dainty and
bewitching musical fantasy in which
a big company of pretty girls and
talented     comedians     appear,     called
Anderson Market
The Family Butcher at
the Sanitary Shop
Try our mild cured Hams and
Bacons, machine sliced.
The place to get your Cooked
Hams and Jelly Tongue.
Don't forget we carry the finest
New Zealand Butter and Local
Eggs.
FOR A SQUARE DEAC AND
QUALITY, TRY
J. E. ANDERSON
Prop.
TeL Fair 1634
..'. 4192 MAIN STREET
Summer
Race Meeting
AT
MINORU PARK
A BIG SOCIETY FEATURE
::     ::     EVERY DAY     ::   ,.:;.,
Special Trains leave new Granville Street
Station at   12,  12.30, and   every   fifteen
minutes until 2 o'clock
ADMISSION, $1.25, Including Grandstand and Transportation
Ladies Admitted Free except on Saturdays
Races Rain or Shine SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER, 12 1914
.1
COAL -
No. 1 NUT
FAMOUS
JINGLE POT
))
$7.25 per ton
$6.75   ���
We are supply contractors to all of South Vancouver's Schools
COAST LUMBER & FUEL CO., LIMITED
4905 ONTARIO STREET (Cor. Bodwell Road)
Phone Fraser" 41
In  the  production  of    articles    of j
household   use   there  are   1.111   estab-1
j lishinents   throughout     Canada     and j
j there are R2.6.K) employees.    It would j
| stimulate industry and it would mean
| employment   for   more   if   Canadian
men   and   women   would   insist   upon |
Canadian   gooels   when   making   purchases.
WE ARE
Liberals
IN THE SENSE OF GIVING
FULL AND
LIBERAL
VALUE FOR MONEY. WE
WORK ON THE SMALLEST
POSSIBLE MARGIN OF
PROFIT BECAUSE WE
KNOW PRICE IS THE
GREAT QUESTION ON
WHICH YOUR FINAL VERDICT WILL REST.
Frank Newton
��� FAMILY =
SHOE   STORE
823  GRANVILLE  ST.
AND AT
CEDAR   COTTAGE
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND  STORE
Can  supply your need* at  right
pricei.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right at Station)
FOR GOOD
ROAD BUILDING MATERIAL
We claim we have the beat.
The largest Plant and a downstream haul.
GILLEY BROS., Limited
Dealera in
Coal, Cement, Plaster, etc.
NEW WESTMINSTER
Phone 15-16
CENTRE & HANNA
LIMITED
Established 1893
Refined Service   New Location
1049 GEORGIA ST.
Opposite new Y. M. C. A.
Fireproof    Columbarium    and
Mausoleum
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
Seymour 2425
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for public meetings,  dances, etc., to Let
Apply W. J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
HEROES OF PEACE
This
1 splendid sentence has come echoeing down the ages. Here are
heroes of peace also���firemen, policemen���and without such heroes we
should have some anxiety for our Exhibition.
Detective Levis was a hero of peace���a man who died nobly doing
his duty. The "News-Advertiser" pays the murdered man the following eloquent tribute.
A HERO AT HOME
Don't think that our heroes are all on tlie field
Where Death stalks in the war grim and gory.
No! thc annals of Peace sonic bright records will yield
Some names to adorn song and story.
Dick Levis met Death on our own peaceful shore
And not 'mid the smoke of a battle.
He heard not the murderous artillery roar
Or machine guns and rille shots rattle.
The call of stern Duty, it came to him here
And he answered that call���cool and brave.
He went to his death, spurning danger and fear,
So a Laurel Wreath place on his grave.
FELIX PENNE.
NO QUARREL WITH THE GERMAN PEOPLE
THE Rev. Mr. Unsworth has been speaking sensibly on the war.'
He says the German people will some day thank us for fighting
"the intoxicated Kaiser" and his war-besotted crowd. We have no
quarrel with the German people and when we have thrashed the military tyrants the German people will rule themselves with Britons to
help them. Thc war will forward the cause of the people in all countries. 4
GREEN AND GOLD
By Felix Penne
The green, aye, the green; 'tis a color brave and true
'Tis a. color that well mingles with the red, white and blue;
And the flag of any nation will feel prouder to be seen
Bravely flying in the breeze beside Old Ireland's lovely green.
Green, lovely green!   'Tis the color of our trees;
'Tis the color of the maple, in the springtime's dewy breeze;
And later in the Autumn���a more golden glow is seen,
While our Douglas fir and cedar are still "wearin' o' the Green."
Gold, ruddy gold; you can see it in the morn,
For it tips the glorious mountains when the day is newly born;
And it gilds the waving tree tops when the sun sinks in the west;
Yes, all Nature at her loveliest in green and gold is drest.
Gold, glorious gold!���I view avarice with scorn;
But I worship gold���in sunshine and the gold of waving corn.
No color is so precious���Ah! no color half so fair,
As the gold of golden guineas���or the gold in maiden's hair.
Hurrah! for green and gold, then.   In our Exhibition week
You can find no colors fairer no matter where you seek.
Than the green of ocean wavelet���the green of forest tree,
And the gold that gilds the cloudlets when the sun sinks down at sea.
For one week in burning August, let no "fair one" here be seen
Without a pretty favor of Vancouver's gold and green.
Yes! one and all, the short and tall, the timid and the bold,
And kiddies, too, of every hue, must sport the green and gold.
Vancouver, then, for green and gold, buds of promise, golden hopes,
Let your smiles be always golden���no one here e'er sulks or mopes;
So don your badges bravely, be you either young or old���
Let everyone be "doing it"���a wearing green and gold.
BELGIUM AS IT WAS
lly  Felix  Penne
While we were holding our Vanceeiiver Exhibition���with the true Mark
Taplcy spirit, trying to be jolly un-
def depressing circumstances���my
thoughts dwelt upon Belgium ae, I
knew it���my heart bleeds for Helgium
in mouring, remembering as I do llel-
gium in holliday attire gay with flow-
crs and flags.
I paid many visits to Antwerp,
Brussels and Ostend. I learned to
love the merry-hearted hospitable,
pleasant Belgian people���frugal, industrious, brave, and with a true artistic temperament.
The Belgians knew how to arrange
an exhibition, pageant or procession.
In every town, in every village there
were pageants and processions very
frequently. It has been the custom
for hundreds of years. In thc middle
ages these spectacles must have been
magnilicient. The narrow streets
were full of knights in glittering armour, riding on strong Flemish war
horses decked with embroidered saddle-cloths, bishops and priests in gorgeous vestments, standard-bearers,
trumpeters, heralds in their robes of
office, images of saints borne high
above the crowd, mingled with jesters and the enormous giants with
grotesque faces which were carried
along on these occasions.
The tall houses with their projecting wooden gables were gay with
flags. The windows and balconies
wcre hung with rich tapestry, and
from them the wives and daughters
of nobles and wealthy merchants
looked  down  upon   the  scene  below.
A queen of France once rode in a
procession through the streets of
Bruges and was moved to jealousy
by the sight of so many ladies decked in jewels as rich as her own. "I
thought," she said, "that I alone was
queen, but here 1 have hundreds of
rivals.f I have seen in Antwerp
splendid pageants got up on very
little provocation. A young citizen
of Antwerp won a prize at a school
of music and a fine pageant was got
up in his honor.
Happy, cheerful, kindly people I
found the Belgians. I found the Belgian towns full of art and beauty.
Oh! what a vile crime against humanity it is to carry fire and sword
through such a country.
HOW WOMEN MAY HELP
Women    of    Capital    Would    Help
Canada During Struggle by Buying Canadian Goods Only
These Women Do not Gossip
Dating hack tie the cud of the Sixteenth Century, when James I, ap-
peeinteil four "damsels of clear birth
and good breeding" to attend em his
consort, under thc direction of a
"dowager of discretion"���a personage often called "tlie Mother of
Maids." a post long since abolished
���lhe position of maid of lioneer i< a
much coveted one. Indeed, the Hem,
Sybil Cadogan, who has just been appointed a maid e>f honor by Queen
Mary, was one of over oue hundred
girls who wcre hopefully wailing to
be chosen  to till the vacancy.
Thc privileges and advantages attached to the position are many, but
a maid of honeir must of necessity be
an exceedingly accomplished young
woman. In the first place, she must
be a granddaughter of a peer, if not
nearer iu blood, for unless some special provision is made thc office cannot be held by any one below that
rank._ Second, she must be a good
linguist, not only because of the foreigners she will meet at court, but
because she will be called upon to
deal with some of Her Majesty's
private correspondence.
Her  conversational  powers    mustj
be   considerably   above   the   average, j
brightness  and  vivacity,  too, being a
distinct   recommendation.    A     talent
feer music and  singing and an ability
to read aloud  with clearness and ex- j
preaiion are also qualities, which are;
taken   into   account   in   appointing   a'
maid  of honor.
Above   all,   however,   a   candidate
must   be   a   model   of  discretion   and,
tact, who avoids gossip as she would |
the plague.   Tei a maid of honor court
secret!   arc   a   closed   book.     It   is   a|
rule tbat she  must not keep a diary,
which  recalls  the witty reply of one'
maid,   who,  when   a   female   acquaint-'
ance   remarked   that   if   she   were   a
maid of honor  shc would keep a secret   dairy,   promptly  said :
"Then yeiu would no lunger be a
maid   of  honor."
One of the curious privileges of
the post of maid of honor when in
waiting is that of being allowed to
wear a charming miniature of the
Queen set in diamonds on the left
shoulder. This ornament, which bears
thc date of the coronation at the back,
is surmounted by a flat bow of red
and white ribbon, and when the owner is in waiting is worn on the left
side of the corsage, like a decoration.
But at other times it can be worn
as a brooch or a pendant.
A maid of honor is not expected
to give up her badge when she marries of if she resigns her peist, hut
may retain it to thc end of her life,
anel would wear it on any future occasion when she happened to find
herself in tlie presence of their Majesties.
Thc courtesy title of "honorable"
is also here, where single or married,
until the end of ber existence. This
title is only bestowed upon a maid
of honor a few days before she takes
up her new appointment. She receives a formal letter from the lord
chamberlain intimating that the sovereign deems it advisable that this
style and title should be afforded her,
and that she will henceforth bc known
under this designation.
Every one may not know that a
maid of honor is expected to have a
home of her own in London when
thc court is at Buckingham Palace.
A royal carriage is, however, sent
every morning to convey her to the
scene of her duties.
The usual rule is for a maid of
honor to be in close attendance upon
the Queen from 10 to 11 o'clock in
morning until 4 or 5 o'clock in the
afternoon and again in the evening
���every day for two months in the
year, the position carrying with it an
allowance of 400 pounds a year. The
late Queen Victoria had eight maids,
but the number was reduced to four
by Queen Alexandra and is maintained  by   Queen   Mary.���Tit-Bits.
FOR
Sashes, Doors,
Windows, and
all  kinds  of
Mill   Work
SEE
1
H. N. WALKER
167 TWENTIETH AVE. W.
We  have  the  most  up-to-date
machinery.
All Doors, Windows and Sashes
morticed.
We  guarantee all our work.
PRICES RIGHT
Call  and see  us���We put you
wis--
Phone Fidrmont 836
ESTIMATES GIVEN
No! It is a mistake, Mayor Baxter did not sing "I know a Bank
whereon the wild thyme blows" at the Exhibition opening. His remarks on the Banks were not set to music���were not poetical���but they
were true.
*    *    *
British manufacturers have always been held the best. Even a
war "made in Germany" appears to be of a very bad brand.
The Briton can be led���he will not be drivem���In spite of Lord
Roberts and his continual scream for compulsory service ���"Conscription" is out of harmony with the British character, but when the Empire needs men���why then 300,000 volunteer.
At a meeting held by several prominent Canadian women in Ottawa on
Saturday last, the following resolution was passed :
At a time when the Empire is
straining every nerve against the common enemy it is essential that each
and every section of the community
should stand together. Canada is
sending her soldiers to the help of
Great Britain, but it must be remembered that scarcely less effective help
can be rendered by keeping trade and
industries prosperous through the Do.
minion. No one is able to say how
the strain of war may affect us. Already there is a prospect of unemployment on a considerable scale
during the coming winter. There are
many ways in which the evil of unemployment can be fought, but one
way is to keep up the demand for
Canadian products in order that Canadian indistries may continue in operation. Articles that are being produced in Canada are also being imported annually to the value of $104,-
639,879. By purchasing only the commodities of these classes produced in
Canada we should largely increase
the output of our industries and provide employment for large numbers
of workmen. To attain this desirable end it is hoped that insofar as
possible, housewives and others will
buy products made in Canada."
Official figures relating to the importation of goods produced in Canada Vere laid before the meeting and
it was found that in certain products
$30,337,083 worth of the $104,639,789
imported came from the United States alone. For instance, Canada, which
is a wheat country herself, imports
$368,617 worth of wheat flour from
the  United  States.
If Canadian women would see that
they purchased Canadian flour only,
this in itself would be a great help.
JCS. H. BOWMAN
ARCHITECT
910-11    YORKSHIRE   B.LDQ.
SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER
Hamilton  Bros.
Embalmers and Funeral
Director*
Parlors and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Office Phone:    FRASER 19
Residence Phone:    FRASER 25
(Day or night)
THE    CORPORATION    OF   THE
DISTRICT OF
SOUTH VANCOUVER
A little baby girl arrived at thc
home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Layley, 134
41st Avenue East, last Saturday evening.
IN THE MATTER OF THE SPECIAL
ASSESSMENT ROLL FOR THE COST
OP LOCAL IMPROVEMENT WORK
NO. 1 MAIN STREET, FROM SOUTH
SIDE OF 1STH AVENUE TO CENTRE
OF 25TH AVENUE. AUTHORIZED
BY "MAIN STREET AND FRASEK
STREET LOCAL IMPROVEMENTS
CONSTRUCTION BYLAW NO. 1
1911."
NOTICE IS HERERY GIVEN that e
Court of Revision will be held on the 30th
day ol September, 1914, at 10 o'clock in the-
forenoon at the Council Chamber in the-
Municipal Hall, at the corner of Frasei
Street anei 43rd Avenue, in the Municipality
of South Vancouver, for the purpose of
hearing complaints against the propose'!
above mentioned assessment or the accuracy
of frontage measurements and any other com
plaint which persona interested may desire
to make and which is by law cognizable by
the Court.
Dated the 29th day of August,  1914.
3���51219
JAS.  U. SPRINGFORD.
Cle-k.
The stork visited thc home of Mr
Mclntyre, 48th Ave East, Thursda>
August 27, and left a little son whirl
was welcomed by all the family.
-frUJHfc
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Line*
O. Smith. C. P. * T. A.
Ph��M : *f. 1114
C. *  Jtnn.y, O. A. P. D.
Ill Orutlllt luw
Mm :   Foet ef Ontario Street, Fraaer River Phone :   Fraaer 17
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
CANADIAN   CEDAR
LUMBER CO.
Manufacturers ol
BEVEL SIDING, BOAT  LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
Wholesale and Retail
GRIMMETT P. O.. SOUTH VANCOUVER
P. M. HAMILTON r. WILLIS

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