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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Nov 2, 1912

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Array Vol. I, No. 25
SOUTH  VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  CANADA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, V)\l
Price 5 Cents
Vilification of Burnaby
Resented by Residents
j
Mr. J. Y. Jackman Replies to an Attack Appearing in
"Toronto Saturday Night"���Some "Facta" Exposed
"When any person or persons undertake   to  install   themselves  into  the
position of public advisers in tlie mat-
er of investments, ejr in any other de- j
partment,  lliey should  themselves bc
;n a position to know whereof they arc
talking, or else plainly state they arc |
not  familiar  with  tlie  existing condi-1
���inns and not vilify any community,:
institution, or person, and then blame
; heir wrong advice lo ignorance.    Thc j
Toronto  Saturday   Might* has  instal- j
.el itself into such a position for thei
benefit   of   thc   public    whose   hard-1
earned money is being squandered in j
rlistant lands, but if lhe rest of their
advice is of the same variety as that \
.���f an article that appeared in the is-1
sue of October  19, our symptliies go I
out to the misguided public who accept their advice in 'Gold and Dross,'
which runs about 99 per cent,  dross1,
with the remaining one per cent, of
a very doubtful character."
Thc above statement was made to
a representative of "The Chinook" hy
Mr. J. Y. Jackman, of Edmonds, when
seen in regard to the following item
which appeared in the "Gold and
liross" column of that paper :
Burnaby, B. C.
"F. A. S. :���Burnaby, B.C., is not a
town, hut a municipality, and lies between South Vancouver (which is now
negotiating for entrance into the
City) and New Westminster. 1 sheiuld
tay it is about two miles square. There
are three electric lines running through
n from Vancouver to New Westminster, and property along any of these
lines is all right, but no big rise in
\alucs is likely, It is too far out.
Some parts of thc municipality are
".othing but a dense swamp, and will
never be worth anything in our time.
I'.urnaby is practically nothing but
' itintry, and it means a long pull.
Some real estate men arc buying up
subdivisions cheap and selling again
at a handsome profit, hut that is the
"illy way to make good profits out of
land so far out. Ultimately when Van-
e ouver becomes more of a manufac-
mring centre, no doubt many of thc
i.rtizans will go out there for cheap
houses, especially along the car lines,
leut indiscriminate buying by people
ihousands of miles away is a great
mistake. Burnaby touches New West-
iiinster boundary."
"I am stire it will come as a shock
to the people of South Vancouver to
learn that they are endeavoring to
ieiin  hands with  New Westminster,"
mtinued Mr. Jackman. "Yet this is
lie statement of the public benefactor.
The article does not mention that over
one-half of the western boundary of
Burnaby is tbe eastern boundary of
the City of Vancouver. That might
be saying something in Burnaby's
Favor'.   Yet such is thc case.
"Tbe next statement is still a worse
giveaway of the knowledge. He
slates that it is about ten miles square
���one hundred square miles; not very
far out, as the area of Burnaby is 38
square miles, a mere trifle of 62 square
miles from the facts of 'Gold and
Dross.' Very accurate and thorough,
ly responsible information for the investing public this?
"His next statement is correct.
There are three electric lines running
through Burnaby, also two steam lines
plus ten miles of watcrfrontagc, but
a small item like that does not matter in the eyes of this great man. He
states that property along these lines
is all right, but no big rise in value
is likely. If there should be any 'big'
rise in value in the near future we are
afraid the proposed manufacturers
would scarcely be able to purchase a
homesite close to the track in a few
years, much less the employees.
"In regard to his statement that it
is too far out, we might say that it is
about as far from the centre of Van-
COUVer or Xew Westminster to thc
centre of Burnaby as from Yonge St.,
Toronto,  to  Parkdale.
"However, the real funny part of
the whole story is that some parts
arc dense swamp, and never will be
worth anything in our time. We
would be exceedingly delighted if
'Geild and Dross' would locate a few
acres of this dense swamp that will
never be worth anything in our time,
as wc would like to get a few acres
of it.
"We fail to be able to attribute any
cause for this uncalled-for attack on
Burnaby, as a careful perusal of the
latest revised Voters' List of thc municipality shows that out of over four
thousands owners of property, only
44 live in Ontario, while about thc
same number live in other parts of
the world, and thc balance is owned
by residents of British Columbia. The
residents of Burnaby and surrounding
cities and districts have sufficient con.
lidence in Burnaby property to try to
keep it for themselves, and it is only
when a resident has a friend in some
other part of the world who desires
to share a good thing, or when someone conies here and sees an opportunity for good investment, that any
of the Burnaby real estate goes to any
outsider."
SPENCER ROBINSON
STANDS ON TRIAL
Three Charges Being Heard at the
Assize Court:
Spencer Robinson, ex-chairman of
ihe South Vancouver School Board,
was placed on trial at the Assize
I'ourt in Vancouver on Tuesday of
ihis week on tbe first group of three
if a total of ten charges against him.
The charges, one for forgery, one for
uttering and one for converting to
Ilis own use, are in connection with
.i cheque for $400 made out in the
name of Broome and Pattinson, collectors, which it is alleged by the
crown were forgwl hy the accused
and used feir his own purposes.
After several witnesses wcre on the
stand for the prosecution'and the de-
ience, the accused gave evidence in
his own behalf, making the following
statement in connection with the
cheque in question :
I was at thc Municipal Hall when
the cheque was brought to mc. It
was about four o'clock in the afternoon. The man who had it wanted mc
tei cash it. I took it to thc municipal
clerk, asking him to cash it, and he
bad not a sufficient amount of money
to do so. Thc man told mc then that
he wanted some money that day, so
I said to him, I think I can help you
out. As it happened, I had in my pocket at thc time cash to the amount of
$450, which had but shortly before
been paid me, it being one of many
regular payments on different things
tbat I received, and so I cashed the
cheque for the man, who., as far as
1 knew, was an employee of Broome
and Pattinson's, as he kept talking
about Joe all the time. There was
nothing the least bit irregular about
the man having the cheque, as he also
had the warrant.
I paid no more attention to the
cheque for several days, as I did not
need any money at the time, and it
was not until I was at Clarke & Stuart's
on school board business that I
thought of it, and asked Mr. Tod
hunter to give me the money for it.
I received his cheque for thc one that
I had, the reason for this being that
I did not like to put my name on a
cheque of the school board, being connected with that body.
The next thing I heard about it was
at the school board enquiry that was
being carried on, and on this occasion,
learning that it was being said that
there was something irregular about
the cheque, I went and searched the
records in thc Municipal Hall to see if
Will Take Active Part in Elections
Temperance and Moral Reform Society of South Vancouver
Plan Campaign
According to a circular issued by
lhe Temperance and Moral Reform
Society of South Vancouver, that body
hopes to become an important factor
in the coming municipal elections, and
a campaign lor greater publicity is
now being organized.
This society was organized at a
representative gathering eif all thc
churches and temperance organizations throughout the municipality,
held in thc South Hill Baptist Church,
on the evening of June 17 last, the
idea being that through the efforts
of this central and representative
body more effectual efforts might be
put forth to accomplish desired ends.
There arc regularly appointed officers,  including  a  president,  a  vice-
preiident for each of the five wards
of the municipality. Regular meetings
on the evening of the third Thursday
in each month have been held, such
meetings being held iu each ward alternately,
The object eef the society as stated
in the constitution is to oppose tbe I
granting or renewal of any licence
to sell intoxicating liquors, tej further every movement tei secure pure
morals and clean government, and to |
conduct a policy ot education showing
evil results of intoxicants, cigarette
sine eking, gambling, etc.
The   next   meeting   of   the     society
will be held in Ward II on lhe third!
Thursday eif November, and all sympathizers with the movement are invited tei enroll.
Annexation Finds No Favor
at Ward Three Meeting
Delegates from Cedar Cottage Leave in   Disgust When   Motion
it Unanimously Pasted Favoring Incorporation
this was thc case, and found it was a
fact that the firm of Broome and Pattinson had been overpaid the apiount
of $400.
The next day I met Broome at a
meeting which I was addressing, and
during some conversation I asked
him what he knew about thc overpayment of the $400. He said that he
knew nothing at all. I tried to get
hiin to go to Pattinson's house with
mc in order to have the matter probed.
He refused to do this, so I went
alone. Pattinson, when I saw him,
said that he had not been paid the
money, and that he knew nothing
about the matter. I then pointed out
to him that Mr. Crehan would surcharge me with the $400, and rather
than have that happen 1 would acknowledge the receipt of it, and then
I would go to the Municipal Hall ami
pay in the money myself. Pattinson,
however, refused to do as I wished.
Debate on Annexation
Thc Central Park Progressive Association has decided to organize a
debating society and thc first debate
will take place on November 7, on
thc subject of annexation. Rev. Mcr.
toii Smith will lead the debate on annexation, and Mr. C. T. Bailey will
advocate incorporation. Messrs E.
W. Cleveland, L F. Rawden, J. B.
Todrick and Thomas Prentice wcre
appointed a committee to make thc
necessary arrangements.
A request from the South Vancouver Annexation Association was considered and it was agreed to receive
a deputation from the association.
Communications were read from
the B. C. Electric Railway Company
in response to resolutions passed at
a previous meeting of the association,
stating that immediate steps would
be taken to deal with the conditions
complained of at Collingwood West
and Central Park stations.
Commissioner Returns
Commissioner M. J. Crehan returned from attending the convention at
Rcvelstokc this week. There was
no sitting of the enquiry this week
owing to the hearing of charges
against Spencer Robinson at the Assize Court.
 i^i	
School Still Closed
Lord Selkirk School at Cedar Cottage has been ordered closed by Medical Health Officer Murphy owing to
the outbreak of diphtheria in that locality.    Two deaths are reported.
A meeting e>i Ward III Ratepayers'
Association  wai held In the school,
Seeuth Hill, em Tuesday evening, with
Mr !���'. Way, president, in the chair
A deputation was present from the
Cedar Cottage Annexation Associa-
tion, At the commencement e,f the
proceedings, in introducing the deputation, the chairman stated that thc
representative! from Cellar Collage
hael ceiiiic to lay their views before
the meeting. This the deputation ��1 ��� ���
nied.   stating  that   they   were   present
to put forth the views of annexation
with the object eif forming an aanexa
tion association in S'euth Hill. The
members e,f Ward 111 Association
strongly denied this was the purport
e>f the letter received.
Mr. Cashion then spoke on behalf
of the deputation.    He claimed that
the only parties whe, were in favor of
incorporation were civic employees
and those whom these employees
could influence.   He then went on t<>
charge the Councillor fe.r Ward II
With neglecting Cellar Ceittage, after-
Wards taking up the question of police and sewerage.
Mr. Kenneth Lamond. who followed, stated that in the deputation they
bad ti ' representatives of tbe beet-
bed of annexatie.ii. The '-pirit that
animated the deputation, he continued, was one of utter selfishness.
They represented one of the earliest
developed ilistricts of Seiuth Vancouver, and bad therefore geei the major
portion of the early expenditure for
developments, and now when either
parts of the ward were calling for improvements, Cedar Cottage, which hael
see long mfiropolised the greatest portion of the ward expenditure, was
afraid  that under incorporation oilier
|parti would receive what was coming
I to ihcm.   The speaker denied that it
was municipal  employees who were
opposing annexation.   Even if it was
so,  ��id the speaker.  Mr. Cashion is
a grocer depending on the employees
for his living, and he questioned why
Mr. Cashion should make insinuations.
"It i- the same old itory of abuse,"
he continued.    "This crowd   you find
around  all  the  meetings.    They  use
me arguments.   Their only weapon is
disparagement of the municipality."
I     Mr.  Gale  held that  under any pon-
Iditi'eiis South Vancouver sheeiild annex
to the city.
Councilleir'Thomas treated the annexationists tee ;i icatbing criticism.
Producing ligures and facts the C'ejun-
eillur showed lhe evils that would
follow annexation. He gave many examples, both on this siele- and in the
Old   Country,   taking   the   instance   of
Leith, a town with the same population as Smith Vancouver, which had
successfully resisted Edinburgh   and
fought the larger cily to a finish. Neet
only had Leith progressed, but at
present was geiing tei add more ducks
'at a cost nf over a million dollars.
The Council of Vancouver e-effcrs
neeibing. will give nothing, he said.
Mr. F. Waj twitted the deputation
as to their arguments, afterwards
moving a resolution in favor of incorporation, whie.li was unanimously
carried. The deputation was 10 disgusted that they retired,
A meeti'ni was afterwards moved by
Mr, Lewii in favor of annexation.
Among tin' either speakers were Mr.
I Campbell,   Mr.      Farras,    and    Mr.
Houston,    From the beginning to thc
finish the proceedings wcre of a lively
nature.
APPLEBY���KARR   NUPTIALS
MAGISTRATE J. C. McARTHUR, who is now convalescent
Around the Municipal Hall
BY   SCRUTATOR
There passed from our midst on
Sunday last one of the best-known
figures in South Vancouver in thc
person of Mr. James Wright. Borne
from his home on Ontario Street and
laid to rest in the cemetery near the
scene of his labors, there will rest thc
ashes of him we knew so well. As
Father Time passes along wc will go
to join our old friend, but whether in
the early day or the falling gloom we
will look to see thc happy, smiling
face of our old friend James Wright
Always of a religious turn he was an
apt Bible student. Blessed with a
happy, contented nature, and being of
an obliging disposition, he was highly
respected by all who came in contact
with him. The Municipal Hall will
have many janitors yet, but never
another James Wright. Wc mourn
our old friend.
���te       *       *
The way money is spent at the
Municipal Hall would make a man's
hair turn grey. This phrase might have
become historic bad the utterance
not been made al a meeting which
quickly developed into Ihe ridiculous.
Amidst a tense stillness thc treasurer of the meeting got up. not to
laud the oratorical powers of the previous speaker, but to tell tbe gathering that was so engaged in looking
after the interests of thc ward that
there was only $3 in the treasury,
that the rent of $15 was nearly due,
and that he refused to face thc contingency. Plainly this action must
have been an insult to the gentlemen
and speakers who were present and
whose minds seemed racked with
fears as to the finances of thc municipality.
Thc treasurer was urged to retain
eeffice, but as the money was not
forthcoming he would take no chance.
ek       *       *
On Sunday morning about 8 a.m. a
friend and the writer started out for
a long walk over Lulu Island. The
previous Sunday we had alsei devoted
to the island, walking out to Eburne,
and thence.taking the car to the rifle
ranges at Richmond. Going across
country we returned over thc same
course, having obtained a good deal
of information in regard to the possibilities! of this island. Last Sunday
we devoted to a trip over another portion ol it. Early as the hour was for
a Sunday, it was surprising the number of sporting men who wcre waiting
at every street corner for a car. We
lunched  behind  a  corn   stalk.
Theflay was pleasant and enjoyable,
but thi danger was as great as il" we
had h��en on a battlefield. It seemed
as though every person who possessed
a gun and dog had turned out to
shoot eiver Lulu Island.    It is a eptcs-
tion whether, if every pheasant on
the island had been shot, there would
have been enough feathers to give
each would-be sportsman one.
The wanton waste of bird life that
was taking place was disgraceful,
Anything that could fly made a target for many of the guns, while we
noticed that quite a number were carrying rifles. One of these days there
will be a serious shooting accident on
Lulu Island, unless stricter regulations   are   enforced.
*       +        le
Sometimes, in connection with my
duties, a new day has begun as 1 wearily trudge homewards. At all hours of
the night and early morning have I
walked through South Vancouver, belt
fortunately have never been molested,
though sometimes 1 have had rather
amusing experiences. While walking
along Wilson Road about 1 a.m., neit
so hmg ago, I met a man, and as we
were both walking at a sharp clip, and
as I did not wish to jostle into the
man, 1 stopped suddenly and stepped
aside. In a moment the stranger
jumped back and demanded of me'
what I wanted. As 1 was anxious to
get home, and had no time to waste.
I made no reply, but as 1 hurried
along I heard shouts after mc for
over a hundred yards.
On another occasion the editor persuaded me to attend the theatre. We
sauntered along after the performance
was over, and I found myself Stranded without thc price. Walking along
past the Geild property on Main
Street I saw, coming towards mc,
what I thought was a hear. Looking
for lights in case assistance was required, imagine my dismay when
there was not a light visible. See there
was nothing for it but to faee the
music. On investigation the "bear"
turned out to be a man who bad imbibed too freely, and who was crawling on hands and knees in an attempt
to get home.
The experience which I enjoyed
most, however, occurred one night
about 1.30 a.m. Stepping into a passage way at 25th Avenue and Main
Street to light my pipe, I noticed a
man coming from the city. He was
on the opposite side of the street.
Waiting till bc had passed about thirty
yards, I came out and crossed towards
him and hurried to have bis company.
As I increased my speed, he increased
his; this made me more anxious to
see who he was. and the finest walking match I had participated in for a
long time took place. When we
reached Bodwell Road the stranger
was leading by about fifty yards, and
turning the corner he must have taken
to his heels, for he had entirely disappeared when  I  reached there.
A   pretty   wedding   was   celebrated
al thc residence of Mr. and Mrs. William Karr, Collingwood West, em Wed-
I nesday   night,   when   their   daughter.
Mabel  Pearl,  was  married  tei  Mr.  J.
I 0,  Appleby.    The bride  had  her  sis-
| ter   as   bridesmaid,   while   the   groom
was supported by the bride's brother,
; Leonard.     Rev.   Chas.   Sanford   per-
I formed   the   ceremony.     Among   the
! guests  were  Chief   Wand  and  abeiut
'fifteen of the groom's comrades at No.
| 1   Fire   Hall,  and   P.   C.'s   Lee    and
Vigeir.     In thc evening  Mr. and Mrs.
Appleby  left  on  a  trip  to the  Island
and the South before taking up their
residence in Collingwood.
tin   Tuesday   evening     lhe     groom
'was presented with a handsome geild
watch by the members o; No. 1 Fire
Hall.    Chief Wand made the presen-
! tation.    Speeches wcre also made by
Capt, Eberhardt and Mr. Appleby.
Lecture on Pavements
On Wednesday evening, in lhe
Municipal Hall, Mr. Samuel Lancaster
delivered a lecture on "Roads and
Road-making," also giving limelight
pictures 'if the various kinds of roads.
The lecturer described the early
road-making in Britain pri<t to the
coming eif the auto and the motortruck, On the Introduction .'i these
conveyances the question of belter
road-making was brought t<i the
front, He then recounted how different countries bail tried to make
roadways, and explained many of tlu
methods that had been  adopted.
Mr. Lancaster, who is here on behalf eef the cement interest, was askeel by ihe Dolarway Company to give
thc lecture and to show pictures of
part of ihe work done by them. While
the lecturer tried tei bc unbiassed in
bis remarks, yet he did full justice
t.e the Dolarway Company, explaining
how their system got behind man) of
lhe existing patents, thus enabling
the Company to do the work at a
cheaper rate.
At thc conclusion of the lecture
Councillor Elliott asked what was the
necessary thickness eif the concrete
bed? Not less than 6in��� said Mr. Lancaster, though some are reducing it
lei 5''-. and some as low as 4in.; but
this thickness is unable tei stand
heavy nieitor traffic feer any length of
time.
Councillor Elliott moved, and C. un
cillor Campbell seconded a hearty vote
of thanks lei the lecturer.
CEDAR COTTAGE
AND ANNEXATION
The meeting of the Cedar Cottage
Ratepayers' Association, held last
week, received more prominence in
the daily press than it deserved. Owing to this preeminence an undue
weight is given to the utterances of
the usual crowd who attend these
meetings.
One of the speakers dealt with the
leaving of Westminster Road, and a
motion was passed by those present,
that it was premature to block pave
that road until the sewer and water
mains were laid. We commend these
gentlemen for their foresight and disinterestedness in looking after the
ratepayers' interest. Could we bring
our mineN ' i believe that it was the
interests of thc municipality that
preempted them in thc framing of the
motion, then we might place them
em a high pedestal as having the welfare of all the ratepayers at heart, and
In whose custody we might with confidence place the affairs oi ihe municipality. But they indicate where
their interests lie when they seek to
turn down the paving "f Westminster Reead, It was no (pirit of usefulness that animated them; rather was
it lhe reverse. In Cedar Ceittage they
want money to put Commercial Street
in "relcr. Now Cedar Cotlage is not
the whole of Ward II. ami Ward II
has received its proportion along wilh
ihe .eihcr Wards. We grant that Commercial Street is in urgent need of
being pul in eenler. But is it Jusl to
thc either parts .ef the municipality
that groimel should be purchased tb
make ihis a 66 fee.it street anil put it
in shape feer running a car up to Victoria Reiael? This means that real
e-taU' will more than treble on this
street.
How many eef the gentlemen present
who sp.ike are interested in values on
Commercial Street? If the holders of
real estate on Commercial Street desire to have this street put right, let
them proceed along proper lines���
under ihe Local Improvement Act This
cannot be deinc till we get incorporation. As a municipality the Council
has no power to proceed under the
Local Improvement Act. It is not for
thc residents of Wanl IT to dream
that if they had annexation Vancouver
would put this street right at once.
If it is ever put in a right condition
it will only be done with South Vancouver incorporated as a city.
SCRUTATOR.
Asked to Stand for Council
Friends and supporters of Mr. J.
B. Todrick have approached the cx-
Councillor to stand again f. >r election
as representative in the Council for
Ward I in the approaching municipal
election. Mr. Todrick was Councillor for Ward I for three years, and
eluring his term of office many improvements were made in that district. Mr. Todrick has not yet announced his intentions.
Mountain View Methodists
Anniversary services of Mountain
View Methodist Church will he held
on Sunday. November 24. with a banquet Friday, . November 22. Thc
preacher. Rev. P. O. Lett, of Grand-
view Methodist Church.
School Football
In the scliei..1 football series Mc-
Kenzic and Wolfe clashed on Wednesday, the latter winning by a score of
4 to 1. Feir thc winners. March
Walden and Gilliland starred, while
the backs played a great game. Birk
S Stewart played a fine game for the
losers.
On the General Brock grounds on
Wednesday afternoon. Brock and Van
Home School met. Brock taking the
big end of a 2 to 1 score. LaBelle and
Reace wcre in splendid form for the
winners.
Card of Thanks
Mr. Richard Stewart, father of the
late J. Herbert Stewart, on behalf of
1 himself and family, desires to thank
all feir their kindness during his recent  bereavement. TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1912
BURNABY
66ft. LOTS to 20ft. LANE - pickedeposition
of this residential and liome-h>vcrs' section; viz.: e,n the se.uth half
uf Lot 23, in U. L. 152 and 153. midway between the main Westmin.
ster Koad and the li. C. I'.. R., only .'. minutes from car and right close
t.i Jubilee Station: close te. the corner of Nelson Road and Westminster Road.   There are
SEVEN    LOTS   ONLY
10 yem will need be quTck, as. once seen, they are bound to go. We
have pnt the price away below market to ensure a quick sale, and are
now quoting figures much lower than ever previously, and can take
$750 Each for Inside Lots;   $850 Each for Corners
THE TERMS are to your advantage
$100  CASH   and   $20  A   MONTH
Now. let us tell yeiu seimelhing else : These lols are high, dry, and
perfectly level. They have been cleared of stump and rock, and now
present a beautiful smooth surface. There is nothing around can
touch these lots for attractiveness or for price. They are a snap, and
need only to be seen. Consider the size, the transportation facilities,
and remember that building is going on extensively all round, and
that there arc only seven of these- cli.eiee bets, and don't hesitate, hut
come right in and see us and let us clinch the matter for you or give
you any further information you may desire.
ALLAN   BROS.
510 Pender Street West
Kitsilano Office���Fourth and Larch
Phone: Sey. 2873
Phone : Bay. 586
WALKER    BROTHERS
REALTY AND   INSURANCE   BROKERS
Have  helped  sun-kissed   llurnaby  and  South  Vancouver
S      develop from virgin forest into busy districts of homes.
They believe Hurnaby possesses all the factors necessary
to make her one day the hub of the peninsula.
VANCOUVER:
Dominion Trust  Hleick,
341  Cambie Street
EDMONDS:
Edmonds Station,
Burnaby
A, McFEE
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Phone 1038 : Edmonds, B. C.
I have thc exclusive sale of large lols on Salisbury Avenue, close
to station.   $1,000 each; on good terms.   See me about them.
PATTERSON   &   FISHER
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
6'i  acres in  Edmonds district, near Power House and facing on Vancouver
Road.    All cleared.    Price $16,000.00.  $5,000.00 cash;   balance  6,   12,   18,  and  24
months.'
POST OFFICE BUILDING, EDMONDS Phone : No. 664
WARNER, BANGS & CO.
REAL ESTATE AND COMMERCIAL AGENTS        LOANS AND INSURANCE
PHONE 1024
COLDICUTT BLOCK, EAST BURNABY
SEND US YOUR LISTINGS
Acre Homesites
In Burnaby on macadamised main road, slashed and
burnt, and close to transportation.   Price $1600.
Only $320 Cash
required; balance over two years. One of these Home-
sites will make 8 Lots. Eight Lots in this locality
will cost you from $2600 to $3200.
See What You Can Save Now
BUT
Think What You Will Make
WHEN
The Stave Lake Carline is  Built
NEAR' THIS PROPERTY
PHILIP M. RAY
537 Pender St. W., Vancouver        Phone : Sey. 6315
J. D. Fraser & Co.
We carry Special Lines of the finest
GROCERIES AND FLOUR
We also carry Hay and all kinds of Feed
Phone our store (Collingwood 25), or call.   Our delivery
service is prompt.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
AOONTeOOS ftUftNAQYS
Re Opening of Douglass Road
Last week saw tlie completion (if
another splendid thoroughiarc, when
the bridge across Still Creek em Uoug-
lass Reiad was completed and opened
to the public. For about a year this
reiad lias been practically closed to
through  traffic.    Thc    contract    was
handled by  Mr.  I* Frank   Hoy, of
New Westminster. The bridge, which
is of timber, and is known as a Howe
truss type, is 9t) feet eever all. and has
a 50-foot span. The structure rests
em twee main butts composed of 14
piles each, with brace piles and two
subsidiary buttl of seven piles each.
The main deck of the bridge, which
is sixteen feet wide, sufficient to enable two motor cars to pass, is raised
sufficient to admit of the free passage
of logs and shingle bolts to the mills
at Burnaby Lake. The needle beams,
supporting the main deck are of suf-
licent length to carry a sidewalk on
either side v, hen necessary.
The cost of the bridge is about
$3,500, and was designed and erected
under the supervision of Mr. J. Mclntyre, architect in the Municipal
Engineer's eeffice, and reflects great
credit upon his skill.
The opening of this splendid thoroughfare has resulted in the changing
for thc present of the Pacific Highway. Owing to the unsatisfactory
state of Westminster Road in places
in South Vancouver, the association
last week removed all the. Pacific
Highway signs off Kingsway Street
and placed them on Douglass Road
and Hastings Street.
*       *        ef
Flower Carnival Scheme Launched
Last Wednesday night a large body
of Burnaby residents met in the Municipal Hall and completed thc arrangements for thc holding of a Flower
Carnival at Edmonds in 1913 and following years. For some time it has
been in the minds of leading citizens
that nothing would better exemplify
the claims of Burnaby as a choice
residential district than an exhibit of
the horticultural products of the muni
cipality.
The egg-laying contest, recently
concluded at Hastings Park, amply
proved Burnaby's claim as a poultry-
raising district, as the first prize pen
of heavy fowls was bred and reared
at Edmonds.
Mr. B. G. Walker, who has been the
chief mover in the scheme, was voted
to the chair, and in a few words related his idea in the matter, and recited the steps taken leading up to the
present meeting.
Communications were read from
the Vancouver Progressive Association, Westminster Progressive Association, School Board, Board of Trade,
Victorian Order of Nurses, and Muni,
cipal Clerk Moore, expressing their
approval and assistance of these various bodies. DashwOtwl Jones, representing trie president W'th^ R. A. &
I. Society, also tendered the co-operation of their society.
Everyone present expressed their
views on the form the carnival should
take, and as a result it was decided
that the membership should bc open
to the world.
At thc election of officers, which
followed, tile following were elected
as the first officers of the Society :
Honorary president, Sir Richard McBride; Hon. Vice-presidents, H. H.
Stevens. M.P., J. D. Taylor, M.P.,
Hon. F. L. Carter-Cotton, M.P.P.,-
Reeve Weart, and W. S. Scott, Deputy Minister of Agriculture; President,
Mr. W. S. Rose; vice-presidents, H.
W. Mansfield and H. Sworder; secretary-treasurer, W. S. Vivian'; executive
committee, Messrs. E. Stride, A. Dash,
wood Jones, A. Scott, C. P. Ligge,
and A. S. Puttick, with power to add
to their number. Board of directors,
Mrs. Walker, Mrs. Puttick, Messrs 11.
Hardwick, W. S. Rose. H. Sworder,
A. Dashwood Tones, P. B. Brown, A,
McKce, A. S. Puttick, C. P. Legge,
G. Collins, D. C. Patterson, A. V. McPherson, T. B. Harrison, H. W. Mansfield, A. Scott, E. Stride, W. S. Viv.
ian and R. G. Walker.
At a meeting of the executive held
immediately after adjournment the
entrance fee was fixed at $1.00, the
date of the first show fixed for August
15 and 16, 1913, and Messrs E. Stride,
H. W. Mansfield and A. Dashwood
Jones appointed to draft a constitution.
��   *   ��
Ward VI Smoker
Ward VI Progressive Association
held the first of a series of entertainments for this season in McKay Hall
oti Tuesday last. The president, Mr. T.
W. Wilson, very acceptably filled the
chair in the absence of Reeve Weart
Mr. B. G. Walker, J. P., president of
the Board of Trade stated the aims
and objects of the association. This
very successful entertainment was
brought to a close with the sidesplitting farce, "On the Brain," presented by a company of Burnaby artists.
*    *    *
Presbyterian Concert
The best aggregation of first-class
artists that has ever appeared on a
Burnaby platform was the verdict of
the 200 people who gathered at the
new Burnaby Public Hall, Edmonds,
on Thanksgiving night. The occasion
was the formal opening of
the new hall, and was under thc auspices of the Gordon Presbyterian
Church. Reeve Weart occupied the
chair in his usual genial manner, and
for two hours handled a programme
that is seldom excelled. Those contributing to the evening's entertainment were the pick of entertainers in
Vancouver, New Westminster and
Burnaby. To pick out any favorite
would be unfair, as all received hearty
receptions. Some of those contributing were : Miss M. Smith and Mrs.
Gildersleebe instrumental music;
Misses Fraser and Laird, Mesdames
Mansfield and Godfrey and Messrs.
Spencer and Gildersleebe, soloists;
Misses Craik, duets; and Misses
Hume, Craik and Tidy, readings. The
new hall, formerly the old Municipal
Hall, was a revelation to those who
have ii'el  been  watching its progress I
Outside there is very little change ex. I
cept for the aeldition to the rear, but
inside  there  is  scarcely  anything  to I
remind one of the old Municipal Executive building.    The spacious    hall,
seating about 45tl persons, has a splen.
did   stage   complete   with   drop   curtains, footlights and wings.
The new hall is a credit to Councillor Mayne, chairman of halls and
grounds committee. Architect Mclntyre and Messrs Disuay and Tuckef
are the builders.
*    *    *
Serious  Charges Awaiting
George McPherson, 17 year old,
who was recently committed for trial
on a charge of the theft of a gold
nugget stick pin from Mr. C. S. Holland, is very likely to have additional
charges brought against him. At the
time of his arrest several articles were
found in his possession that have since
been identified by Burnaby residents
as having mysteriously disappeared
from their homes.
There are several articles that still
remain unidentified, and as soon as
these are attended to additional
charges may be laid against McPherson.
North Burnaby  Acres
"Buy acreage near a growing City," was James J.
Hill's advice when asked what he considered the best
and safest form of invetjtment.
North Burnaby acreage is undoubtedly the best investment close to the growing City of Vancouver.
We own some of the very choicest Acreage in
North Burnaby, and will sell same in blocks of fro(n
five-sixths of an acre to one and a half acre.
It is impossible to enumerate here the many reasons
why this property is a gilt-edge investment We may
say, however, that our prices are not a dollar higher
than you would have to pay per acre for 40-acre
blocks, and we give you 3 years in which to pay.
Call on us for further information.
Latimer, Ney & McTavish
LIMITED
419 Pender Street W. Vancouver, B. C
Here is a STOVE
"As is a STOVE"
Highland   Park   Acreage
We have a number of SMALL ACREAGE PARCELS on and
near the new cut-off line of the B. C. Electric Railway.
1 acre, just off Railway, $2100; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
months.
l-;4 acres, on Railway, $3500; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
months.
E.   W.  MacLEAN   LTD.
Exchange Building
142 Hastings West
McBride has a personal interest in
the homes of South Vancouver.
If he sells you a stove or a tack
hammer, he'll give you value for
your money.
This "Regal" Stove will warm your
heart.   It's a dandy little heater.
McBride has made more homes
happy than any other merchant in
South Vancouver.
H. SWORDER
EDMUNDS  RELIABLE REAL ESTATE MAN
SPECIALIST IN BURNABY PROPERTY INSURANCE
One acre close to Cut Off, $2000.    Easy terms
Opposite Power House : Lots 50x120. </4 cash; 6, 12, 18, 24 mths. $525
Another $450.   $100 cash; $10 per month
HOUSES AND LOTS TO SUIT ALL
BRING ME YOUR LISTINGS
The Settlers' Association of B. C.
P. B. BROWN, MANAGER
Phone : 664
Applications  invited for  Homesites,  Investments,  Loans,  Mortgages
Auction Sales Conducted
Property  for  sale  on  easy  terms
Hall, fnlly equipped, to rent for Concerts, Dances, Meetings
P. B. BROWN
Box 556, New Westminster
or Edmonds, B. C.
G. E. McBride & Co.
Sixteenth and  Main  Street
Forty-ninth and Fraser Street
Phone : Fairmont 899
Heaters for the Winter
The cool long nights are nearly here.   We have a complete line
of heaters.
Cartridges
The shooting season is on.   You don't need to go to the City to buy
your ammunition.   See us.
C. B.  FEARNEY 'or���Tr&ar&oba
HARDWARE, PAINTS, OILS, ST    OVES, RANGES, ETC.
Joyce Street, COLLINGWOOD
FRASER RIVER
FRONTAGE
^ Any person having frontage on
the Fraser River, within the boundaries of South Vancouver, and who
are willing to lease the same for
industrial purposes, will they please
communicate with
arrison
Sec. Board of Trade
���box 63, crry heights
i^wiMiwwiwwkHiWh SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 2, 1912
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
A Mild Smoke  q
|^^SP0��TIN6 ARENA
SOLD   EVERYWHERE
SPEND : : :::
A PLEASANT EVENING AT THE
Fairmont Pool  Room
(Bryant  Block)
20th  AND MAIN   ST.
The best tables in South Vancouver. Everything new. Personal attention by the proprietor, D. D. Den-
man.
Cigars, Tobacco ami Candy
W.'ith the opening ��� >f lhe Arena
rink to the ice skaters on Monday,
the exhilarating winter pastime is
again in full swing. Ice skating numbers Us devotees hy the thousands in
Vanceeuver and vicinity, and the large
crowds wine attended the opening e,f
the rink feer lhe season, and who havi
been in attendance eluring the week,
indicate that there is no falling off
in the popularity of the healthful pas.
time.
The Arena rink is one of lhe finest
artificial iee rinks in the world, without exception. When thc Patrick
Brothers determined to build an ice
palace here they aimed to make it
the last word in thc structure eef artificial ice rinks. That they wcre successful, and eminently so, has long
since been testified to by the hire
crowds who regularly attend this place
Geo. Jones
HOR8E   8HOER
Lame and Interfering horses will
receive special care and attention.
All kinds of hand-made shoes, run*
ning shoes, running plates, toe
plates,  etc.
All horses entrusted to me will receive  every  care  and  attention.
GOOD   WORK   GUARANTEED
571 Beatty Street
FOR QUICK PROFITS
Buy Inside Lots in
Canora, Sask.
Five lines of railway operate now into
this new fast-growing Prairie City.
Inside property at first cost, from
?2H0 per lot.   Terms.
CAMPBELL REALTY CO.,
514-515 Dominion Trust Building
Vancouver
Patronize the
Province Renovatory
Seeuth Vancouver's Pioneer
Dry-Cleaning and Dyeing Works
Work and  Prices  Right
4136 Main Sti        Cor. Of 25th Avenue
Dustin Farnum, in "The Little Rebel,"
at the Imperial Theatre, November
1 and 2
of amusement and recreation. In all
the places of amusement and recreation
in Vancouver it is doubtful if any one
is productive of more keen enjoyment
than the rink on Georgia street.
��   ��   ��
Skating at the Arena rink is skating   under   ideal   conditions.     Every
BITULITHIC
PAVEMENT
Granville   Street   South,   Before   Paving
This has the following attributes :
fl Durability; sure footing for horses; resiliency ; noiselessness; easy drainage; dustless-
ness; economy.
���J Bitulithic approaches more closely than any
other the ideal of a perfect pavement.
fl Its notable durability makes it more economical than any other paving.
���J The Vancouver thoroughfares paved with
bitulithic are an impressive object-lesson in
fine paving.
IJ Bitulithic has been adopted in over 200 cities
in the United States, and 15 cities in Canada.
.
| comfort   has   been   provided   for   the
patrons, and with a sheet of ice that!
i     unexcelled,   and   with   the  best   of
| music the charms of this pastime are
| more than visionary.
Now  that  the  opening of the  rink
I has  taken  place,  the followers of ice
! hockey   are   beginning   to   conjecture
] on   the   possibilities     of     the     Coast
League this winter.    Last season  the
league embraced llirce clubs, Vancou.
ver,   Victoria  and  New   Westminster,
the latter club winning the championship.
This  year's  organization  will  cm-J
brace   the   same   clubs,     though     thei
games   of  the   Westminster  club   will |
he   played   in   the   Royal   City      Last
season,   owing   to   the   fact   that   the
Westminster club did nol have a rink
in the Reiyal City, the fixtures of that
club were played iu this city.    Work
has now been started em putting in an e
artificial ice plant in the Horse Sinew
Building  in   that   city,  and  it   will  be
completed in time for the opening of
the Ceeast  season a  few weeks hence.
* *    *
The scramble' feer players is now on,
and while there have been a number
of announcements as to the makeup eef the Coast clubs it will probably
be some weeks before definite news
will be known as tei their composition.
An cfWt has been made by the Patrick Brother! to bring about a commission to regulate players who
play ihe professional game in all
parts e.f Canada. There has not been
the expected response from the East,
and if it falls through it will not be
through any fault of the Coast magnates. Until something a little more
definite is known abeiut that organization, it will be impossible lo offer
other than mere guesses as to the
players who will wear the uniforms
of lhe Ceeast clubs this winter. One
tiling is sure, however, and that is
that the majority of players who were
at the Coast a year agei will be back
again.
* *    *
The Coast League furnished the
best hockey played iu Canada last
winter, and the indications are that
the clubs will be every bit as strong
this season, The opening of the sea-
sem will be awaited with a great deal
of interest.
* *   ��
Last week the sportsmen of Vancouver had an opportunity eef witnessing one of thc me est remarkable feats
of physical endurance which has ever
been presented. For eighty hours
and feeur minutes, Tom Burrows,
world's champion club swinger, continuously swung clubs, breaking his
own record of eighty hours and two
minutes.    Burrows    commenced   his
hiiig test on Wednesday afternoon at
3.21 o'clock, and the motion of the
clubs never ceased, even momentarily.
The feat took place at Pender Hall,
and lhe result was received with the
greatest  enthusiasm.
Burrow's feat is a remarkable
tribute tee the achievements of physical culture. Throughout the lieng
vigil he was not distressed to any
great extent, and on its completion
he was pronounced to be in perfect
physical condition by the attending
doctors.    Himself a  great  exponent
eef physical culture, the feat will gee
down none the less to the credit of
physical culture than to the credit of
Tom Burrows.
* *   *
One striking testimony to the advantages of the muttiel system for
owners is found in the steady increase
of prize money wherever the system
prevails. The Canterbury Jockey
Club at Christchurch announces a dis-
Granville Street South, After Paving
Columbia Bitulithic limited
433 Granville St Vancouver, B. C.
Scene in "Officer 666," at the Imperial
Theatre, November 5 and 6
tribution of $164,000 for its ten days
of racing, while the Auckland Racing
Club gives $163,275 for eleven days.
*    *    *
The sprint race between Donaldson,
thc Australian, and Walker, thc South
African, over a distance of 130 yards
for $1000 and the championship of the
world, was run on a heavy track at
Taff Vale Park, Pontypridd, when
Dohaldson proved an  easy winner.
Walker, after making a bad start,
did his best to overhaul Donaldson.
For three parts of thc distance Donaldson led by about two feet. Walker
then appeared to case up, and the Australian won with nearly four yards to
spare in the remarkable time of 12
3-16 seconds, constituting a world's
record and being eight yards inside
even time.
Good-natured old man : "Can you
tell me why those other golfers over
there blackguarded me just now?"
Golfer : "Why, what happened?"
"Oh, when they hit their ball over
here I picked it up and threw it back
to them to save them thc trouble of
coining for it."
You May Be The Lucky One Tuesday
I am GIVING AWAY, ABSOLUTELY FREE, at
Tuesday's Auction Sales, One $15 Mantel Clock
ALSO ONE $12.50 PAIR OF BRASS CANDLESTICKS
J have to unload at any price, as my lease expires on December 31. V>\2. I am offering the-e
handsome inducements t�� VOL' simply to get YOU to attend these sale.-, so that YOL' can see
jn-t what wonderful BARGAINS are REALLY  going.
Sales at 2 p.m. and 7.30 p.m.
Private Sales from 9.30 till Sales begin
Ladies Cordially Invited
McMILLAN, the Diamond Specialist
541 Hastings St. West, next to David Spencer, Ltd.
J. A. SINCLAIR, Auctioneer
ARENA
Ice
Skating
Band every Evening and Saturday  Afternoon
Three
Sessions
Daily
lu   a in  25c
3 p.m  35c
S;15   p.m  50c
Children 15c
Hughes Bros'   Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET  EAST, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We  carry  everything in   the  Liquor  Line
No order too small, and none too large  for this popular Liquor Store
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
leaving our Store every Friday morning at 9 a.m.
Gladstone Hotel
First Class Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
H. G. BROWN, Proprietor
IIUHUP^wiUHUilli^^
GRANBY RUBBERS
TiW it ��� lot of diljerence in ��ar IR^ II G��s fr����h foois. Get lh. full
between rubbers carried om year ]mm |fl |lmH ���| w=ir wc nIYe :������
.Iter yea, .nd new .nappy good.  V^V recd���j , b< -ock  o( ^ ���.���
���"rice l"ii!"j    ^oa ffUtstJ know that
GRANBY RUBBERS
w��t like iron.    They hare Mrned their reputation.
Wi have a big assortment. All style*. Arctics and excluders of erery thape, lined or unlined. Complete Una of
mzm. Perfect (it guaranteed. Come in and lei us fix you
up with a pur of these famous rubbers. Pnce right. StyU
right.    Service right.      |^   PUGHE
4134 Main St., next City Heights P.
NOTHING BUT THE VERY FINEST
GROWTH OF CEYLONS AND
INDIAN TEAS ARE USED IN
Nabob  Tea
LEAD   PACKETS    ONLY
Your Grocer Will Supply You; If
not, try Your  Neighbor's Grocer
Kelly, Douglas & Co. Ltd.      ipgft * c
Two Good Lots
On 58th, near Main, facing South.
Cleared. For quick sale, $25.00 cash;
balance 3 years.
D. W. Grimmett
3324 Main Street, Hillcrest
Phone : F. 1121R
Carpenters
Wanted
Save your clothes. Call
and get a carpenter's
apron free. Pockets for
nails,   rule,  and  pencil.
��   *
McGibbon Hodgson
Lumber Company
CEDAR COTTAGE, B. C.
Phone : Fair.  1659
(Please mention this Ad.)
CORPORATION   OF  THE   DISTRICT   OP
SOUTH VANCOUVER
HEALTH    DEPARTMENT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN ihat tags
lor the collection of garbage can now be pur-
chaied from the health inspector, Municipal
Hall, corner Fraser Street and Forty-third
Avenue,  as  provided  by  the  bylaw.
Box  1224.  South Vancouver.
CORPORATION   OF   SOUTH
VANCOUVER
Licences
To whom it May Concern :
TAKE NOTICE, that licences are now due
by all hawkers, peddlers, express and draymen,   doing  business  in   South   Vancouver.
Any hawker, peddler, express and drayman
found doing business of this nature within
the Municipality without a South Vancouver
Licence will be prosecuted as provided by the
Trades   Licence   Bylaw.
WILLIAM   JACKSON.
Chief of Police.
Dated July 31,  1912.
CORPORATION   OF   SOUTH
VANCOUVER
NOTICE    TO     THE     RATEPAYERS    OR
OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE IN THE
MUNICIPALITY    OF    SOUTH
VANCOUVER
The Government Auditing Commissioner of
the above-named Municipality will have his
office open from  10 to  11   in the forenoon of
each day   (except days  on  which  the  Public
Inquiry   is   being   held)   for   the   purpose   of
Skssing accounts; and any Ratepayer or
iwner may be present and may make any
objection to such accounts as are before the
Auditor.
JAS. B. SPRINGFORD,
C. M. C.
Ruth Morton Memorial Church,
corner 27th Avenue .ind Prince Albert
Street, one block east of Fraser
Street : J. Willard Letch, B.A., pastor: residence "17 29th Avenue East.
Public worship 11 a.m. and 7 30 p.m.
Bible  School 2.30 p.m. FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1912
CHINOOK
PUBLI8HED
Every Saturday by  thc  Greater Vancouver  Publishers  Limited
HEAD OFFICE :
Corner  Thirtieth  Avenue  and  Main  Street,   South Vancouver,   B. C.
George  M.  Murray,   President and Managing  Director.
Herbert A. Stein, Vice-President and Managing Editor.
John Jackaon, Mechanical Superintendent.
TELEPHONE :    All departmenti  Fairmont 187/
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
To all points  in  Canada, United  Kingdom,  Newfoundland,  New
Zealand, and other British Possessions :
One   Year     $2.00
Six  Months      1.00
Three   Months    SO
Postage to American, European and other Foreign Countries, $1.00
per year extra.
TO CORRESPONDENTS : We will not print anonymous letters,
though inviting communication on current events, to be published
over thc writer's signature.
WESTMINSTER ROAD PAVING
THE question has been asked, Should the paving of
Westminster Road proceed until the sewers and
water mains have first been laid? It would, of course, be
desirable to have this work done, if it were possible, before the permanent work begins. Those who are anxious
to see the earliest start on the work claim that it would
be just as reasonable to delay until the sewers and water
mains are laid as it would bc to hold off a start on the
paving until the whole of the property along the road is
built up. Obvieeiisly they insist on the commencing of
this paving at once.
Undoubtedly much can bc said both for and against
proceeding with the work at this stage. Westminster
Road is not like a private street: it is a trunk highway
connecting the two leading cities of the Mainland, and the
ceest of construction will be borne proportionately by the
Government of British Columbia and the Municipality.
The road through South Vancouver is only a part of a
great highway which is to connect Vancouver with a
large number of United States cities. Along it will be a
great flow of motor traffic.
All the municipalities and cities through which this
road passes have either constructed or arc busy building
their part in the construction of this trunk road. Shall
South Vancouver, then, possess the only link in this chain
which awaits completion? We have more confidence in
our Council than think they will lack in this matter.
While the question of laying water and sewer mains is |
an important one, it may be taken for granted that the
Council of South Vancouver made provision for this work
when calling for tenders for the Westminster Road paving.
In best-informed circles it is understood that thc mains
will bc laid near the curbing on either side of thc road.
This may delay for some time the laying of cement walks,
but these could possibly be foregone for the time being
in order to secure thc permanent roadway. This plan
would work out to splendid advantage with the scheme
to widen Westminster Road, which would afford ample
room for these pipes without holding up the construction
of the walks. A suggestion has also been made that the
lanes at thc rear of Westminster Road might be used for
these pipes. Whether or not this plan is feasible has yet
to bc decided upon.
A dual system of pipes which would be required under
these circumstances would be more expensive at the initial
outlay, but it must not he forgotten that the saving would
be considerable . in connection costs. With thc double
system of pipes, connections could be made close to the
buildings, thus saving a constant tearing up of thc pavement and the cost it entails. Furthermore a constant tearing up of the pavement has a tendency to weaken thc
whole structure.
The question of water and sewer pipes is not one which
shnuld hold up the paving of Westminster Road in South
Vancouver. Westminster Road is one of the most important thoroughfares in British Columbia, and it would not
be to the credit of this municipality if such important
we irk was delayed while there was quibbling over water
and sewer pipes, which it has been shown will take their
place when the proper time arrives.
The contract for the paving of Westminster Road should
be let at once, so that at least half the road may be paved
by the end of thc winter. That would make it possible to
complete the paving of thc entire road before the com
incncemcnt of winter a year hence.
business to them as fluctuations in the market are to the
broker who sits in his office on Main Street. There must
be war or rumors of war or thc jingo would be a sorry
spectacle.
"TRUST BUSTING"
/"���\\'E oi the popular forms of amusement these days is
^'"trust busting." Australia, in this respect, occupies
the centre of thc coped arena, wiih results that serve an
object to many other pahs of the world.
Not long ago thc brickmakers of Sydney boosted the
price of their product to such an altitude (hat the cost
eif brick for Construction purposes became almost prohibitive. The Government, however, was not to bc held up,
and at once went into the brickmaking business, with thc
result that the holdup makers became a truly penitent
lot.
But nut before they had another lesson. Previous to becoming sorry the brickmakers formed a league with the
landlords and boosted the price of rents. Then thc government played its next card by erecting 800 houses, which
it rented or sold at ordinary rates.
From all parts of the Commonwealth the same story
is being heard of government activities. Whenever a
trust is formed and an effort made to bleed the people, the
Government steps in and sees that the people are given
a fair deal.
It also sees that the working-man is paid a fair salary
or wage, and that the prices charged by combinations or
systems arc fair and in open competition. In West Australia the Government runs an hotel and saloon. They arc
needed, and if the Government is eif that opinion, as it is,
it is geiing to see that they arc conducted properly.
In New South Wales thc Government owns thc railways and the street car systems, while the post and telegraph systems are under Commonwealth control.
For thirty-six cents it is possible to wire sixteen words
a distance of 5,000 miles, and for double rate thc line will
bc cleared for the message. In Victoria thc Government
runs two coal mines, with the usual result.
OUR   CIVILIZATION
ELECTING A PRESIDENT
A PEW more days and the result of the Presidential
** election in the United States will be known. Presidential elections have a dampening effect on business
across the border, and in no place will thc conclusion of
the campaign, now in its last throes, be more welcomed
than in thc United States itself, for with it over, business
may once more run in normal channels.
The campaign just closing has been replete with the
sensational. .First there was a rift in thc Republican ranks
when Roosevelt withdrew and formed a new party. That
split in the Republican party will possibly elect Woodrow
Wilson. Then followed the attempted assassination of
Roosevelt, and thc campaign of the "bull moose" has undoubtedly gathered some strength as the result of that
bullet. The probabilities are that it will not elect Roosevelt, but it will help to widen the gap between Roosevelt
and Taft, and thus tend towards the election of Wilson.
Thc campaign has been fought with bitterness, in which
no quarter has been asked and none granted. There have
been charges and counter-charges, and he will be an intelligent elector indeed who can sift from the mass of
accusations and denials the true trend of affairs. Just
how the public received these charges, however, will soon
be known.
Wall Street is backing Wilson, and while Wall Street
has made mistakes, in this case it looks as if they had picked a winner. President Taft is not on the high ebb of
popularity with thc working-man, although the Republicans have of late made a strong bid for that vote, while
Roosevelt's pronounced egotism and the "third term" cry
will be hard to overcome. Wilson as a presidential possibility is untried, but all things considered he looks to
be the favorite in the approaching election.
1ST
11 . . ~"~���~ ti
A CLIMATE TO BE PROUD OF
EWS despatches this week tell' of the "storms on" the
W.IR AXD THE JINGOES
���"THE smell of stn.ikc and the clank of steel from the
Far East are like sweet music to the jingo. Our
swashbuckling jingo is never so happy as when dilating
upon wars, so far off, and yet so near. To thc uninitiated
it would seem that his diet consists of nothing short of cannon balls and shrapnel. When he speaks he literally vomits
forth a broadside of shot like the deadly leaden pellets
from a machine-gun. Once the time; was when he could
"get it over." That was when he was taken seriously, but
thanks to thc growing intelligence of the common people
they are not now so easily gulled by the glamor of gold
braid and gold buttons.
Turkey's crumbling Empire affords a verdant field in
which the jingo may browse. The war which is being
waged there, with all the bitterness which might be expected in a Far Eastern conflict, offers boundless possibilities for the fire-eating preacher of war. He revels in the
chance that it may involve the chief nations of Europe,
for the very scent of powder is life to him.
Dr. lur Lenoir is quoted on the subject of war between
England and Germany in a despatch from Los Angeles in
one of the Vancouver papers this week. Dr. Lenoir, by the
way, is a lieutenant in the "Jager" regiment known as the
"Kaiser's Own," but judging from his statements (if he
really made them) the lieutenant must either bc enjoying a touch of American high life or he has been carried
away by the Far Eastern embroglio. Dr. Lenoir naturally
approves of the warlike sentiments of Lord Roberts, but
there will bc few who will not question the authenticity
of the interview when he is quoted as saying that Germany
is eager to go to war with England merely for the sake of
showing to the world the military advances which Germany
has made during the last thirty or forty years.
This statement is so callous and blood-curdling in its
conception that it cannot be taken seriously. While it
differs in some respects from the stock arguments pre.
sented by the jingoes that war between these two nations
is inevitable, in other respects it is on a par. The better
nature of every man must revolt at such a suggestion.
It is men of the type of Lieutenant Lenoir, however, who
create disturbances���men who can passively stand by and
see the blood of their fellowmen spilled while they cast
eagle eyes for any spoils of the war.    It is as much a
prairies. They are the harbingers of the forty below
zero spell of climate, the weather "you don't feel." Street
railway traffic in Winnipeg was demoralized, while residents groped their way through a biting and blinding
blizzard to their various places of business. For the next
six months fur coats and caps will be thc popular form
of wearing apparel in Manitoba and the Prairie Provinces.
At the Coast, residents suffer no greater inconvenience
or discomfort than a mild and unpleasant winter. Of rain
wc have plenty, but even that rain looks good when we
contemplate the extremes of climate with which the
prairies have to contend. Neither is thc sun hidden for
months at a time, for his bright and softening rays send
a tempering influence to a climate which is unexcelled.
On the question of climate, thc Coast has much of which
it may justly be proud.
Sixty-five  healthy  young  women  arrived  at  Montreal
ten days ago, and came all the way from the Old Country
to the West to get married���sixty-five of the finest of (he ! with        . _,,_.         _    	
womanhood of the Motherland who have decided to throw jhuman race. . Then  the bpy or  girl
("Toronto Star Weekly ")
Yeiu have heard peejple say that
they prefer the advertisements in the
.American magazines to the reading
matter. If you do not quite agree
with them, you are ready at least to
admit that yeiu enjoy (he pictures of
young men so smartly dressed that
eiiey at once attract the attention of
leaders in finance and industry; babies
agerly reaching out for breakfast
leee.ds; smiling negroes serving out
lhe same; homes made happy by furnaces and radiators while storm and
snow assail the house in vain; bathrooms lifted up with more than Roman luxury; children making taffy;
men soothed by tobacco; others with
beck and chin covered with snowy
lather, enjoying a shave with a justly
celebrated safety razor; fortunes made
jut of chickens and mushroejms; families moved to tears or exalted by a
mechanical piano-player. Literary
and artistic skill anil persuasive power
are displayed in a remarkable degree.
Ml this is well worth study. It illustrates the channels into which the
energies of thc people of thc United
States and Canada are largely turned.
To study it is to study civilization.
To some the study is discouraging.
They say lhat we are given over to
gross materialism. Hut is it so bad
as thai?
*    *    *
Of course, the advertiser wants
your money; and if nothing were represented but a desire for money the
outlook would be dark. Hut he also
offers service for money; and in (he
nature of the service there is hope.
In the main, it represents a constant
effort to improve the standard of living. Luxury and ostentation play a
less important part in these alluring
offers than comfort, decency, and
health. The home and the family arc
emphasized. We perceive that the
genius of the inventor is constantly
at work, endeavoring to eliminate
drudgery from household management. To build up and maintain a
home is not materialistic in any ill
sense.    It is a high ideal.
Remember that this kind of civilization is comparatively young, and
will grow and develop. It is true, of
course, that people have always valued
home life, but it was often done in a
sort of shamefaced way. The old
ideal life was outside the home. Religion, for instance, was not a matter
of keeping up a home and fostering
affection and friendship. It meant going into seclusion to meditate, or constructing doctrines for which men
were ready to die, and unhappily also
ready to kill. The science of government also was much too lofty to concern itself with keeping streets clean
and people healthy. It was a science
if preserving and upsetting dynasties,
maintaining gorgeous courts, flinging
irmy against army.
All this is not to be scoffed at. It
represented sacrifice and effort, which
are always worthy of honor. But thc
effort was largely misguided, and two
thousand years of European civilization have produced, together with
great achievements in art and literature, some ghastly failures. The war
in the Balkans is one of those failures.
Europe has millions of men in arms,
but these men connot act as a police
force for civilization.
�� �� ��
Canadian and American travellers
visit Europe and admire its culture
ind its art, which is right. But they
are apt to become discontented with
their own civilization, and here it is
necessary to discriminate. Discontent is healthy so long as it produces
real improvement. There are examples for us in Europe, but there
are also warnings.
Our immigration problems; what
are they but the task laid upon us to
repair the mistakes of twu. thousand
years of European civilization? What
have European culture and European
ideals done for those newcomers who
know nothing of the/laws of health,
who cannot govern themselves by
law and reason, who are satisfied wilh
squalid lodgings instead of homes?
Are they free from the vice of.avarice,
which we are apt to associate with
materialistic progress?
This is said, not to feistcr self-conceit, but to encourage us rather to develop along the lines of thPncw civilization tha,n to hanker aftci the old,
or slavishly, copy its mistakes. Thc
new order is..{jot a hundred years old.
When it has abolished international
war���a modest task when compared
with the long series of triumphs extending from railways to wireless
telegraphy���it .will turn the mighty
energies and* heroism that ape wasteel
in international war into a struggle
:''-   the. common  enemies    of    thc
in their lot with Canada and try their fortunes here when
success has not attended their efforts across the sea. It
is a sign of the times and is an augury for thc increased
prosperity of the Dominion of Canada. It is scarcely
necessary to add that the lot came through the ordeal
of the immigration officials with flying colors. Canada
and British Columbia will be the richer by this influx of
women who have severed all connection with thc homeland and crossed the pond to make a home in thc Western
hemisphere, which was denied them in the land of their
birth.
Dr. Michael Clarke, M.P., of Red Deer, Alberta, is generally admitted by students of Canadian politics to possess
as clear a mind as there is today in thc Canadian House
of Commons. He is a British-born Canadian and a freetrader graduated from the British school. Before coming to Alberta to farm, Dr. Clarke was for years a member of the British House of Commons At Dominion
Hall on Tuesday evening, November j, Dr. Clarke will discuss current political topics. The fact that he is one of
the right-hand men of Sir Wilfrid Latirier should not interfere with men of all shades of politics interested in the
nation's welfare attending thc meeting.
Col. Sam Hughes says that a woman's temperance
camp could not surpass in deportment the conduct of
Canadian soldiers when attending recent instruction
camps, in reply .to a charge regarding the sale of liquor.
Wonder if the Honorable Colonel ever attended such a
women's gathering?
who reads this article will witness a
series of victories for humanity that
will surpass all that humanity today
has achieved or has even dreamed.
Quaint Old Wedding Ideas
Superstition never clusters round
any episode of life more than that of
the wedding day, especially in olden
times.
Then it was customary for the
bride to present her future husband
with a bunch of rosemary, tied up
with ribbons, on his first appearance
on the wedding morning. This was
supposed to secure his love and loyalty   and to make her happy for ever.
In Yorkshire the old superstition
still abounds that nothing more unlucky could happen than for a newly-
made bride to leave the church by
a different door from that by which
she  entered.
Another quaint custom, for which
there is no known origin, is that
practised in some of the Midland
and Northern counties. This is to
ring a merry peal of the church
bells at the first reading of the banns
of an interesting matrimonial couple. It is called the "spur peal,"
which in old Anglo-Saxon means
simply "ask."
Of course, it is well known that it
is the height of luck for a bride-to-
be to dream of fairies the night before the actual ceremony. So much
was this idea believed, that many
girls would peruse fairy tales before going to sleep.
f\r\**\ e>4orn�� b!;
The People's Trust Co.
LIMITED
49th AND FRASER STREET
(South Hill Post Office, South Vancouver, B.C.)
BANKING DEPARTMENT
We conduct a regular Banking Business.   4 per cent, paid on all
deposits
Encourage the children to save their pennies in one of our
Savings Banks.   One Dollar starts them on the way to wealth.
Money Orders Issued and Cashed
Drafts       Collections
Checks on the Corporation of South Vancouver cashed.
Business hours : 9 a.m. to S p.m. Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
(the hours that suit the working-man).
REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT
Fraser Street Business Lots a specialty.   We have best listings.
Snaps in Building Lots. Lot on 46th Ave., and one on 49th Ave.,
first block west of Fraser St.; cleared; $850.
Lot on 56th Ave., first block west of Fraser St., $650.
Several high, dry cleared Lots, close to Fraser St. and Victoria
Drive, $550. $50 cash, and $10 a month.
4, 5, 6, and 7-room Modern Houses, close to the carline, from
$2,000 up, on cash payment of $150 and up.    Monthly payments.
Modern Houses to rent, $15 to $25.
INSURANCE DEPARTMENT
Let us insure your buildings in the strongest Board Companies. We can also insure your Life, your Automobile, Plate
Glass, etc.   All kinds of Indemnity Insurance.
Get one of our Accident, Health, and Sickness Policies, and
draw a revenue while yor are In any way incapacitated.
If you want an Indemnity or Surety Bond, see us.
Bring your Conveyancing to us.
PROMPT ATTENTION QUICK SERVICE
We will make your Will
Estates Managed Money Loaned Rents Collected
South Vancouver Builders' Supply Company
Dealers in Sand, Gravel, Fibre, Cement, Lime, Plaster, Vitrified
Pipe, Tile, Fire-clay, Lath, and Brick of all kinds.
Offices :  51st Avenue and Fraser Street.   Phone : Fraser 36.
Main and 29th Avenue.   Phone :   Fairmont 1940.
Fraser Street and North Arm of Fraser River.   Phone : Fraser 84.
Coal orders taken at all offices and delivered to all parts of South
Vancouver.
PORTLAND CEMENT
PLASTER	
A LARGE STOCK ALWAYS ON HAND
EVANS,C0LEMAN&EVANS
Phone 2988 Limited        Ft of Columbia Ave.
B. C.   EQUIPMENT   CO.
MACHINERY   DEALERS
CONCRETE MIXERS, STEEL CARS, ROCK CRUSHERS, ELECTRIC, STEAM,
AND   GASOLINE   HOIST8.     WHEELBARROWS,   TRANSMISSION
MACHINERY,   GASOLINE   ENGINES,   PUMPS,  AND
ROAD  MACHINERY
Phones :   Seymour 7056-7818 Officii :  606-607  Bulk of Ottawa  Bldg.
VITRIFIED SEWER PIPE AND
ALL FITTINGS
C. Gardiner - Johnson & Company
Johnson's Wharf
Phone : Sey. 9145
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
SOLE AGENTS FOR B. C.
maa SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1912
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
HEAD OFFICE, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Authorized  Capital       $2,000,000
Subscribed Capital         1,169,900
Paid up   Capital            840,000
Special attention given to savings accounts.
Interest paid at the highest current rates.
Your account very cordially solicited.
W. E. JsTdia*. Ami. Oneifcl Mania"
\V.  II.  Ronald,  Manager.
L. W. SeS.lfoed. CciMial Manlier
OEDAR OOTTAQE BRANOH.
LUMBER
Eburne Saw Mills  Limited
Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of
FIR, CEDAR AND SPRUCE LUMBER
Shingles, Lath, Sash, Doors, Turnings
and House Finishings
PROMPT  DELIVERY  BY TRAM, WAGON OR SCOW
PHONE: EBURNE 14R
EBURNE, B. C.
Bliss & Brandt
Mining, Real Estate, Timber
LOANS  &  INSURANCE
502 North West Trust Building
Vancouver, B. C.
HEATERS
The cold weather is coming and you will
require some
Stoves and Heaters
to keep your home warm.   We have heaters
from
$2.00 up
They are of the best quality, and we will puf
them up for you.
Don't forget our line of RANGES.   We
have a few Pioneers left.
FOX'S PIONEER HARDWARE
Fraser and Ferris Roads T. Fox, Prop.
Phone : Fraser 87
Donaldson  &  McDonald
Dealers in
HAY, GRAIN, AND FEED
All Kinds of Chicken Feed
4213 Main Street
Phone : Fairmont 1514
We Do Not Carry
Automobile Advertisements
IJ^e.CHINOOIC
DOES NOT REACH THE PEOPLE WHO ARE
IN THE HABIT OF DISPORTING THEM-
SELVES IN $5000 MOTOR-CARS
But wc reach 35.000 South Vancouver and Burnaby
people who buy all the necessaries of life  and a few
of the luxuries.
Our readers arc thc people of thc sound middle-class
���the people whose money pays thc annual dividends
of the B. C. E. Railway.
Therefore this paper is the advertising medium for
the man selling thc necessaries of life���from building
lots to baby carriages.
Our circulation in thc Old Country is larger than that
of all the Vancouvcrjqpcrs combined.   Weekly, a copy
of "Thc Chinook," paid for by the South Vancouver
Board of Trade, is placed upon thc reading tables of
every public library in Great Britain and Ireland.
THE
;is
Gieatet  Vancouver  Publisher
LrMiTED
������601 Main Street Phone : Fair. 1874
*%*$ THIS IS m 010 ONE BUT-
Andrew*! grandmother h;i<l been
telling liim bible itorie��, has favorite
being thai of Daniel in Ihe Hem's den.
At the age nf feinr Ile Mas taken tn a
circua for the lirsl time. When the
lion-tamer lint his head into the linn's
nieenth Andrew's exeitement knew nn
lieeiinds.     Jumping   tip   and   dnwn   he
gleefully acreamed :
"Gee, that knocks the spots off
Daniel!"
a   a)   a
There are those in Scotland���and
elsewhere���who appreciate the value
eef a generous marriage portion.
".Mac, I heard ye was cemrtin' bonny
Kate Macpherson," said Donald to an
acquaintance one morning,
Weel, Sandy, mon, I was in love
wi' the bonny lass," was Mae's reply,
"but 1 fund not she had nae siller, so
1 said to tnysel, Mac, be a man.' And
I  was a man, and meee  1  pass her by
wi silent contempt."
Thc editor of the correspondence
column! had had a busy day���a very
busy day indeed. So Ditsy, in facl,
lhat he had to enlist the services ol
John, the office boy, to read out the
correapondence.
"What is the next query?" he asked,
when he had jjeenc halfway through
the pile of letters.
"Oh," said John, "a reader in South
Africa wants to know how to prevent
hairs in his moustache from falling
out.   What have I to pul down, sir?"
"Well," replied the editor, after a
pause, "just put down, 'The best way
to prevent hairs from falling out is to
brush them lightly apart���and keep
them from quarreling.
own ticket out of his pocket and tore
the comer off and gave the ticket lu
the lady. When the train arrived at
lhe   ltatioU    the   collector    took
the
ask-
Frcderick was only four, and had just
returned to his home in Alabama after
a visit lo relatives iu Missouri. Within
a week or two he went to Sunday-
school for thc first time. The previous Sunday the teacher had told the
little ones to come prepared lo speak
a little verse from the Bible or their
Sunday school  paper.
When it came to Frederick'! turn
she said : "Frederick, this being your
lirst Sunday, I presume you haven't
a verse?"
Frederick, with a great deal of confidence, replied : "Yes, ma'am, I
have."
"Very well, let us have it."
At which Frederick chirped blithely : "Vou gotta quit kickin' my dawg
aroun'."
* ��    ��
He was an immaculate servant. To
watch him serve a salad was to watch
an artist at work. To hear his subdued accents was a lesson in the art
of voice production. He never slipped, he never smiled, and his mutton-chop whiskers marked him as one
of the old and faithful stock. But one
evening, ti; the surprise of bis master,
he showed unaccountable siglis of
nervousness. When tlie chicken came
on he confused it with "the pheasant.
He served everything in the wrong order, made blunder after blunder, and
put a final touch to his shame by upsetting the salt over the only superstitious member of thc party. Then,
at last, when the ladies had retired to
the drawing-room, he touched his
master on the shoulder.
" I beg your pardon, sir," he said,
in a respectful undertone, "but could
you manage to spare me now? My
house is on lire."
��� ���    ���
When Mark Smith, of Arizona, was
a boy, he lived on a big plantation
in Kentuckey. It was in slave days,
and one of his father's slaves was
Uncle Ike, who was the preacher for
lhe place.
Smith's father had built a small
church on a corner of tlie plantation
and Uncle Ike held forth there every
Sunday. This was pleasing to Ike,
because it not only gave him a chance
to exhort the negroes, but it absolved
ii j in  from any ol  the  Sunday chores.
One Sunday Mark went out by the
ham and found Uncle Ike silting du
e'oiisnlately under a tree.
"Look here, Ike," said Mark, "why
ain't you down there preaching?"
"Well, Marse Mark," Ike replied,
"I ain't goin' to preach to dem niggahl
no more. They's always lightin'
'monglt theyselves, an' I'm sick an'
tired an- done quil  priachin' "
"Stop your lying. Ike!" said Mark.
"You wouldn't qull lUell a soft Miap
as that.    What's the matter?"
"Well, Mars Mark," Ike replied,
"ef you mus' know, dem triflin' nig
gahs done sent me my resignashun."
* *    *
Clever wasn't the word for it. lie
was simply bubbling over with brains.
He was looking for a scat in lhe
crowded express, bul there were no
corner! left.
Suddenly he conceived a brilliant
idea. Assuming an official air. he
stalked up lo the end coach, and cri?d,
in a stentorian voice :
"All change!   This car isn't going."
There were angry exclamatieens, and
i general exodus from the crowded
car as tbe occupants hurriedly scrambled out and sorted themselves into
eethcr portions of thc train.
The smile on the young man's face
was bland and childlike as he comfortably settled himself in one of the
seats.
"Ah," he cried, "it's a splendid
thing to be clever! But I wish they'd
hurry up and start."
Just then along came the station-
master, and that official popped his
head into the window.
"t suppose," he remarked, "yeeti'rc
thc smart young man who told the
people  this carriage wasn't going?"
"Yes,"  replied  thc  young man.
"Well," answered the stationmastcr.
"you were right. The car isn't going,
and the train's ���gone!"
* *    *
As a train was approaching Llandudno a man noticed a lady looking
troubled, and asked her what was the
matter.
'"I've lost my ticket," said the lady.
"Oh. never mind: I'll work a little
dodge on the collector," and he got his
tickets.
"Where is your ticket, sir
ed of Ihe gentleman.
"I gave it to you."
"No, yeeu didn't," replied the col-
lecleer. "I shall have to call the station-
master."
When Ihe station-master arrived he
said, "Where is your ticket, young
man?"
"1 gave it to the collector. See if
Ile has a ticket with a corner torn off,"
replied   lhe   sharp  man.
On searching the collector found it.
"Now," said the young man, "see if
this liis it," as he gave him the corner
of Ihe ticket.
The collector crept away from the
carriage  dumfounded.
* *    *
Lancashire  was   his  home,  and  he
was visiting London for the first time
in his seeinewhat uneventful life.
In due course lie found himself gazing into a shop-window, in which was
displayed a great array of hats, caps,
etc., all of the latest metropolitan
style.
Thinking he we mid buy one of these
articles eif personal adornment, he
went marching into what he thought
was the shop; but somehow he took
thc wrong passage-way, and in a
short time was very much surprised
to find himself in a lawyer's office.
"An' what do you sell here?" asked
the Lancashire man in his bewilderment at thc unexpected surroundings.
"We sell fools here," replied the
lawyer, thinking to take a rise out of
the countryman.
But thc Lancashire lad rose to thc
eeccasion.
"lly gum," he cried, "you've had a
good morning, then! 1 see there's
only a couple left!"
* *    *
"Your honor, " said the prosecuting
attorney, in a backwoods court, "thc
prisoner at the bar is charged with
killing one of the most exemplary citizens of this country. Thomas Jones,
your honor, was in every respect a
model man. He was a member of the
Church; he was never known to bet
on florae!, play cards, drink whiskey,
or use tobacco.    He "
"Hold on a minute," said the judge.
"You say he was never known to bet
on a horse?"
"That's what 1  said, your honor."
"Never was known to play cards?"
"Never, your honor."
"And he never drank liquor?"
"Never drank a drop, your honor."
"And he didn't chew tobacco?"
"Never took a chew in his life."
"Well,  then,"  said  the    judge.    "I
don't see what he wanted to live for.
There wasn't anything in life for him,
and I don't see why he ain't about as
well  off  dead  as  alive.     Release  the
prisoner and call the next case."
IF YOU ARE SICK, CALL ON
Ernest Shaw, D.C.
250
(Doctor of Chiropratic)
22nd   Avenue    Eait,   close
to
Hours
Main Street
1.30 till 6.   Consultation free
Chiropractic succeeds where medicine faili. For all complaints, whether
acute or chronic, Chiropractic is jusl
the thing.
Ernest D. L. Maxwell
EXPERT PIANO TUNER
Specialties :   Player    Pianos.     Repalra,    Ton;
Regulating
164 BROADWAY WEST, VANCOUVER
Phone :    Fairmont 1125
TANKS
Wood water-tanks, wire wound wood pipe
and continuous stave pipe made in all sizes.
Municipal Construction Co. Ltd., 319 Tender
Street, Vancouver,  li. C.
Public Notices
NORTH FRASER HARBOR COMMISSION
South Vancouver
Transfer
EXPRESS & BAGGAGE
J. WILLIAMS
Cor. Ross and Bodwell Rd.
Res. Phone . Fraser 11G
Greene & Merkley
UNDERTAKERS
fl
Mortuary and Service Chapel
305 Pender St. W.
Day or Night Phone : Sey. 340
NOTICK IS IUvRICBY GIVKN that ap
plication will be made by the Municipalities
of Richmond, South Vancouver, llurnaby and
Toint Grey, all in the Province of British
Columbia, to the Parliament of Canada, at
the next session thereof, for an Act constituting the waters of the North Arm of thc
Fraser River lying west of the westerly limits
of the City of New Westminster, together
with all the branches and arms thereof to
lines drawn across the points of land forming thc mouths of the outlets of said North
Arm and branches emptying into the Gulf
of Georgia with the waters of the said Gulf
of Georgia adjacent thereto, and known as
Sturgeon Hank, a harbor under the name of
the "North Fraser Harbor"; providing for
thc future management thereof; constituting
the "North Fraser Harbor Commission," conferring power to expropriate such lands* as
may bc necessary tor the purposes of the
Commission; and defining the powers of the
saul  Commission.
Dated at Vancouver,  British Columbia, this
second day of October, 1912.
CF.O.  H.  COWAN,
602   Pacific   Building
Vancouver, B. C.
Solicitor for Applicants.
I,< wis &  Siti<'l!i��\
Ottawa   Agents.
CORPORATION  OF THE  DISTRICT   OF
SOUTH VANCOUVER
NOTICE
TO   THE   RATEPAYERS   AND   OWNERS
OF     REAL     PROPERTY     IN     THE
MUNICIPALITY     OF     SOUTH
VANCOUVER
TAKE    NOTICE    that    the    Commissioner
appointed to investigate Municipal matters in
the   above-named   Municipality   will   open   a
Public  Inquiry at to how the affairs of  the
Police  Department, and the administration of
justice generally have been carried on In the
above-named Municipality.
Any Ratepayer or Owner of Real  Property
who haa any evidence to give relative to tht
Toronto  Furniture
Company
Furnish  Houses   at   Very   Moderate
Pricci
Call and See
M. H. COWAN, Proprietor
3336 MAIN STREET
Phone :    Fairmont 1660
CEDAR COTTAGE FUEL SUPPLY
For Coal and Wood Phone Fair. 404
Order   Office:   3418   Commercial
Street, Cedar  Cottage
(Adjoining  car  terminus)
Terms Cash
Melrose Nursing Home
Special attention given to Maternity
cases.   Terms moderate.
Mrs. Edgerton
825 25th Ave. East���Phone : Fair. 987
mattcra in question is requesteel to bc present
at ten o'clock on Monday morning,  ''
lit
day ol October,  1912,
JAS.
the 14th
In the Municipal Hall.
B.   SPRINGFORD,
C. M. C.
SOUTH VANCOUVER
PRIVATE HOSPITAL
MEDICAL,    SURGICAL.    MATERNITY
Twenty-eighth  Ave.  and  Main  Street
Misses  Hall  and  Weatley,  Graduated   Nurses
Terms Moderate
Phone : Fairmont 2165
South Vancouver Dairy
4005 Fraser Street.
GOOD MILK       GOOD SERVICE
Granitoid   Pavement
A   HOME   PRODUCT
This is the Only   Pavement Constructed   Entirely of Local
Materials by Home Labor���A CANADIAN PRODUCT THROUGHOUT
DAVIE STREET
Concrete is recognized as the only material
suitable for permanent work, and is used as the
foundation for all modern pavements.
Concrete pavements have been laid extensively
in Canada and the United States, and are becoming more popular each year. Over one half
million yards of concrete pavements were laid
last year in Canada, and over two million yards
in the United States.
The discovery of a satisfactory concrete wearing surface, suited for heavy traffic streets, has
been made in Granitoid Pavement after years of
experimenting and study. In our Granitoid Pavement we have a concrete base and a concrete
wearing surface that will meet all the requirements of automobile and vehicular traffic, and ;i
pavement that will become more durable with
age. ^
An investment in Granitoid pays the highest
returns in durability and satisfactory service.
Watch Westminster Road, from Main tei
Prince Edward, also Davie Street and Coltiriibia
Street, in Vancouver,, __-_-_ *"\
British Columbia  Granitoid &  Contracting  Limited
48   Exchange   Building
Vancouver, B. C. SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, HOVEMBEB 2. 1912
Collingwood   Homesites
FOR THE WAGE EARNER
Every thinking man ihould realize that in continuing to
pay rent he is not providing for the future of his family.
For a very small cash payment a splendid Homesite may
he secured in our Collingwood Terrace Subdivision.
This subdivision runs from Westminster Koad back to thc
Central I'ark tram line, Aberdeen Street being thc western
boundary. There being no building restrictieins, any
purchaser may erect a modest cottage to suit his circumstances.
The Lots arc ready to be built on, arc high and free from
water. Electric light and City water arc available. Lots
may bc purchased for $3(1 cash and $10 per month. Ask
for full particulars.
National  Finance   Company
Limited
Tlione : Seymour 9560 Corner Pender and Hamilton
Real Estate Department
Private Exchange Connecting  all   Departments
:: A FALSE ALARM
"Coal Strike"
BUY WOOD
Stove Wood���14 inch Lengths
$3.50 per Load
COAST LUMBER & FUEL
COMPANY   LIMITED
Corner Bodwell Road and Ontario Street
Phone : Fraser No. 41 Mail Address, Box 22, City Heights
Phone : Seymour 8425-8426
Western Plate Glass &
Importing   Co.   Limited
Registered Office:
318 Water Street, Vancouver, B. C.
PLATE GLASS WINDOW GLASS
LEADED ART GLASS
Thome  Metal  Store  Front  Bars,  Bevelling  and
Silvering, Store Fronts Glazed
ALL KINDS OF GLASS
Before having your House Wired gat in touch with
J. TRIPP
Electrician, Collingwood E. and Central Park
I   AH orders promptly attended to The price is right
DID YOU EVER STOP
to figure out how much time your clerks
waste each day in walking to and
from the telephone?
An Extension Telephone
on the counter or desk will prevent it.
Only 5 Cents Per Day
for either a "WALL" or "DESK" set.
Call up the Contract Agent
Seymour 6070
British Columbia Telephone
Company Limited
D M ,i3Vooan��V
The factory building in Coatelyea
Slreel, Hi, ��� eklyn, K, 1)., win-re ;i
feather   lirm,   a   shoe   industry,   and
.1    marble  dUSl       Works      did       business
under e,nc roor, was a temple 'ef
wheels within wheels in more M'ihe>
than '.ne-. As a rale, tin- feather
operators were young ladies, the
shoe employees young women, and
the marble workers young toughs,
Every now and ihen a tough wedded
a feather fairy eir a sin ��<��� amazeeii
and   removed   her   to   the   gray   keep
ing eef .1 tenement-house remote from
factory Dues eif demarcation, but in
a strict factory society the wall between feathers and shoes was as
solid as the venerable rampart
around China, and as unscalable as
I the air barrier between Newport and
j Arverne.
Miss Lizzie Gillogilly lacked any
recollection oi parents or a Sunday-
���chool, and appeared, on the shoe
payroll as Millicent Randolph. The
shoe payroll was thinner ill point
of pages than the Almanach de
Oeetha, but n.i lover of racy reading
could have hesitated a moment between the two anthologies. The
feather auditeers, eme flight higher up,
dealt with sheets that scintillated
where the shoe sheets only glowed,
but Miss Millicent Randolph was a
braw lassie with a hat pin, and, having reached over the heads of a half-
eleezen feather fairies and taken Mr.
Me.e ltersteiii in open competition,
she had learned to love him for his
own sterling sake, and had arrived
at a devout intention nf marrying
him.
Mr. Moe Berstein broke marble for
a living. He was dancing at a certain Star Casino when Millicent saw
him lirst. Chin tee chin, solemnly,
and locked in an apparent death
lock, he and a feather fairy were doing that mixed wiggle and walk
which was the dancing fashion at the
Star, anil Millicent, who was wiggle
walking with another shoe girl, and
who had observed that before that
he had danced with another feather
fairy, and before that with still
another feather fairy, glued her gaze
to the back of his head until he
turned around, when she gave him
thc dreamy eye. Ile detached his
chin from his feather fairy's chin
and staked Millicent to the "office."
The two couples moved a few turns
nearer. Then, leaving his partner
adrift, Mr. llerstein slid to Millicent, and she and the girl with her
"broke." Mr. llerstein and Millicent
walk-danced away together. their
faces intent, mirthless. In this manner Millicent became Mr. Berstein's
regular skirt. At the time, the turban swirl having not yet bit Consel-
yea Street, she was wearing a rat
equal in size and almost in weight
to three pairs of mature men's shoes.
The worthy young men who crushed marble in the basement of thc
building where the feather and shoe
establishments were affected no rainbow names like the girls upstairs.
They stuck to their own as long as
they remained in marble, although
on forsaking marble-breaking for
house or skull, it was considered
feirm to adopt sobriquets such as
"Alias Red," "Alias Lefty," "Butch,"
etc Hut this was more as a tribute
to immemorial etiquette. However,
after he had been going steady with
Millicent for a month or two, Mr.
llerstein suddenly became the envy
of a wide circle of friends by changing his. Hut it was not for police
reasons.
Although in marble, Mr. Berstein
was no faun. He had ape arms and
legs, ankles like knees, and a neck
like a waist. His forehead (to employ a euphemism) retreated, and his
eyes seemed constantly to desire to
change places across his nose.
Across the back of his head he was
of incredible distance from ear tee
ear, and if he possessed a nervous
system at all the fact was apparent
only in thc startled suddenness with
which he dropped his marble tools
when the live-o'clock whistle blew.
One day as he was coming out of
the marble works a perfect stranger
fell under the spell of his aspect and
accosted him. Thc stranger was the
moving spirit of a local A.C. He
led Berstein around to the club and
showed him how to sit in a Corner
and get up when a bell rang, and a
week later introduced him and one
like him to a discriminating public
as : "In this corner, Stanley Carter.
In this comer, Young McGovern
(Mr. llerstein). Both members of
this club."
Stripped for battle, Young McGovern presented so sinister and
terrifying a spectacle that many of
the sports present dreamed of him
subsequently when they reached
their beds. But it was noticed by
one or two that his footwork was
hardly of the winged variety, and
that all in all his performance was
not informed by a certain essential
intellectuality.
Still, one docs not have to be a
mental Colossus in a marble cellar.
As Young McGovern he became the
terror of the marble works, and at
picnics, pleasure clubs, and dancing
casinos, he could not have been accorded greater homage if he had
been a white sacred bull. In saloons,
sticklers for the amenities were loud
in their approbation when he explained that he was treating with
respect the original stock and ramifications of the Bersteins in not taking their proud old name into pugilism.
Millicent on her part soon discovered that between Mr. Berstein, useful
citizen, and Young McGovern, public character, there had sprung up a
gulf of almost antipodal disassociation
and contrariety. His glory had gone
to his head like a rousing stimulant.
He domineered over her. He criticised her taste in dress. He formed
an amiable habit of belittling her before ladies and gentlemen and abandoning her on dancing floors. Her love
for him Increased day by day.
Millicent belonged to a charmed
circle of shoe maidens that, under the
iinne1 ami style <jf the "Lady Lilacs,"
gaw every now and then an "affair"
ai some picnic park or steam heated
casino, lhe affairs being in the main
occasions that began joyously in beei
and  progressed i<> diapasons closing
in   lei I.     Each   Lilac  paid an   initial
fifty cents for sell and friend, All
extras anel refreshments on friend.
The city, ilireiugh its hospital lervice,
bore   til'    repair  bills.
When Millicent approached her
McGovern and inquired n he mean)
t"   t'e'.V    Ild   tO   tllC   -\1 U T il t 11U11   U 11(1    ClVlC
two weeks from Saturday, McGovern
replied that her application wemld be
considered in its regular turn. NIi111
cent wenl home and enhanced herself
with a spotted veil, an lure.ic rat,
and a two-acre hat, ami returned tee
him : "We'll, Kiddo, is it t.e he youse
or certain other parlies!'"
McGovern perceived that she was
met only beautiful, hut knew how t.,
elrc-v For that matter he hail intended all aleeng that he and none other
Should   take  her   tee   the  ball.     So   he
assumed   his   terrifying  professional
fighter's face- ami demeanor and seized
lur hy the throat with both hands. Ad.
roitly Millicent withdrew a bai pin
and fixed it at the exact pit of his
stomach.
"Ceeinc on in, Kiddo, the wate-r's
line."
McGovern let go. He explained
lhat he had meant no harm, hut had
been tricked by raging jealousy into
laying violent hands on a lady. That
was all right then. Millicent approved
of male jealousy. He and she ad-
journed tee a neighboring dance-hall,
where they walk (lanced solemnly till
dawn.
Once iu the middle of a number
Voting McGovern forsook her on the
dance floor and dashed out among
the beer tables. A respectful path
opened up for him as he advanced,
hut Ile returned presently, having
missed   his man.
"A collitch guy," he informed her,
as he reaffixed his chin to her chin.
Millicent knew, of Course, that by that
he meant that he had perceived some
young man on the boundaries "look
ing her over" as she danced by. Berstein was ruthless in the matter of
men who were- met his sort 'ef men.
Ile disparaged particularly the higher
education. All young male persons
with comparatively clean collars and
hands, and shoes that had seen a
brush, he classed indiscriminately as
college guys. As he1 parted freun her
at the door of the tenement where
she hedged he promised to take her
tee ihe  Lilacs when  the day came.
The Civic and Marathon, twee weeks
from Saturday, was billed to lake place
at a mad house half-way down from
Prospect Park toward Coney Island.
There was lo be general dancing up
to midnight and then the marathon,
with a prize of ten bucks to the lady
and   gent   lasting  out  all   comers,  no
ragging t,x walking allowed. Entrance
money hall a bone���and call the rough
-.luff. During the festivities the road-
house wenild he wholly encircled by
outer darkness, wherein differing gentlemen ce.uld beat each othe: to pulp
without molestation from the bulls.
\ half eh,/en ear lines led to the spot.
But as the occasion approached
Millicent began t.e feel that there had
been occasions in the past with fewer
drawbacks lie had grown more sullen anel churlish every day. lie had
learned le, prefer saheein company to
her company. Worst of all, he convert'el with leather fairies. Three
days before the day of the dame: lie
threw up Ins marble job, and the pay
night preceding the- dance he ambush.
eel Millie int al the facie.ry and Kjok
away he r pay-envelope by iirute force.
So consequently, as he and she
journeyed danceward, Millicent was
in a blue m.eeid. Matrimony with the
man beside her would bc no flowery
path, she reflected. Berstein would
kick, beat, ami devil her. threeiigh a
Span eef weary years; she would have
iee slave and support Berstein, and in
return he would as a practice divert
himself with "other women," and in
the end would abandon her for one.
Iler forearms still showed purple and
black souvenirs eif the last pay-night,
when he had taken her money. He
Was ii" lemger a Berstein to be subjugated   with   a   hat-pin.     He   was   a
transformed and sublimated Berstein
She almost regretted that she loved
Berstein,
As Young McGovern he made the
trolley journey to the road-house in
a hair-trimmer condition of tuning
up. As he sat waiting for some one
tee heeek sidewise or sneeze slantwise
at him, he seemed to be perched on
fragile glass. His conversation was
monosyllabic, save only when it was
vainglorious, and then it dealt wholly
with the number of college guys lu-
had "trimmed" within lhe twenty-four
hours jusl elapsed. When they were
nearly at the appointed place the car
conductor, a Titan youth, came along
the   isle   and   demanded   their   second
fare-. Berstein assumed his malig
nant lighting face and refused pay
ment. The red-haired conductor fix
ed him with a blue eye and raised a
hand tee the bell-cord, "Come through
or get  eiff," he commanded, briefly.
Berstein heaved himself half up.
but Millicent pulled him back ami
paid thc conductor with the last dime
she had in the world.
"Ah, don't start nothin'," she pleaded, nestling close to Berstein, "there's
ladies present, an' the poeer slob was
on'y doin' Ilis duly."
She was vastly relieved when they
at   last   reached   their  destination.
The (lancing floor of the Casino
presented eme eif those scenes of
iiimece'iit enjoyment for which the
delicately nurtured are unfitted in
many respects. Its atmosphere was
distinctly electric. Bcrstein's eye lit
with a dull sparkle as. on the way in,
he observed an abrased and ensanguined youth being sponged from
a bucket by a group of several other
youths with their coats off, while in
at the bar a scowling herei was buying
beer for still another greeiip eef l.iud
reseuundrng admirers. Two Lilacs
sitting complacent and apart at a
table suggested a probable- cause.
As he and Millicent made their way
to the dancing floor he (hiffed his
coat and hung it over his arm, and
-.el his hat hard on his head at a
militant angle. He and Million!
glided away lee the strains <>1 "Kve-ry
Little Movement."
Milliccnl's spirits re.se-���..are-el,
in fact. Her one piece Nile and
e .-ri-.i- dre^s was a flawless lil. ami her
white liberty and feathers musharooii
hat wa.s the class all over She- poa
lessed looks i" give away t.i friends,
as she knew very well, and as Young
McGeivern's particular lady friend
she was a cynosure. She and Veiling
McGovern wen- afforded plenty of
reie.ni to (lance in. Nobody eared tei
bump McGovern After a few turns
of the floor she looked animatedly up
al  him and  said ;
"Moe, the trouble we took notice
to cumin' in looks like it was on'y
a prelim. There's a bunch more eef
it sit tin' over up against the stage."
"Huh:"  inquired  Berstein.
"I was bavin' reference to the row
of feather skirts holdin' up the wall,"
she explained. "I guess when they
Seen what they had went up against
their feeam checks teeok it een the run
in' left them without the mazume to
gel  home."
I'.erslein's answer took her by complete surprise.
"He, ye.u want a wallop in the jaw?"
he demanded.
Millicent  actually  trembled.
"What have I el.em- tee yuh, Kiddo?"
she entreated.
"I don't stand for no remarks in
regards te. yeeiing lady friends o' mine."
lu- 'cplied. fiercely. "Them dames
come' here on account o' mc."
Apparently this was quite true. He
shook himself free of Millicent, strolled over t'e the reew of feather fairies
and took unto himself fairy number
one', who, as she waltzed away with
him. cast a look eef unutterable gloating  ami  eliselaiu at  poor  Millicent.
Thereafter for a long time Milli-
cent's situation was anomalous, equivocal, ami delicate in the extreme. She
had been brought to the ball by the
lion eif the ball, anil none olher dared
isk her to dance. She pined for a
-ej.'t^ of beer, bul she hael no money
for beer. She hadn't even money i'e
;'i In inn-. Berstein danced his till with
leather fairies numbers two, thri-i-,
four, live, anel six. and even her shoe-
|irl friends surveyed her with hauteur as they floated by with lesser but
in ere tractable and tenable toughs
than  Berstein.
At last, however, a peculiar defiant hush fell over tbe room, and
some  one   near   Millicent   sneered :
"College days."
Millicent stood up and looked over
toward the main entrance.
There, in the broad door, steiod a
quartette of good looking boys who
apparently were regarding the revels
as a sort of reproduced spectacle from
the Stone-implement age. Il seemed
plain   that   they   were   on   their   way
(Continued on Page- 81
WOOD BLOCK
PAVEMENT
Wood Pavements Make Cool Streets
Everybody realizes that some pavements
seem to refract more beat than Others, Sheet
asphalt) for example, is notoriously hot, and
under a summer sun throws up a tropical heat
which is distressing;.
The city chemist of Trenton, N. J., has made
thc lirst scientific examination of this point.
Samples of the various pavements were built,
thermometers were installed, and records
taken at hourly intervals for twenty-four
hours. The results showed that sheet asphalt
and asphalt blocks were the hottest pavements.
Sheet asphalt averaged five degrees higher
than wood block, and reached its highest temperature an hour earlier.
The advantage of this coolness of wood
bloek pavement to merchants in business streets
must be obvious. Pedestrians instinctively
avoid the streets which seem hot, and the effect of a hot pavement on retail trade on hot
similiter days must certainly be considerable.
on the same principle that tlie shady side of
the street is thc best for summer trade.
Wood Block Pavement has the extreme advantage of noiselessness and great durability
under heavy traffic. Competitive tests have
repeatedly shown it to lie superior in durability
to granite block, which formerly was the most
durable pavement known. On streets like
Broadway, New York; Dearborn Street,
Chicago, Tremont Street, Boston; and Market Street, Philadelphia, it is now demonstrating the superiority of its resilient resistance
to the hammering of heavy traffic.
On a few days of the year, under rare storm
conditions, such as a light, dry snow or a thin
sleet, wood block pavements furnish inferior
footing to granite blocks, but the wood block
is no worse in such weather than sheet asphalt
or brick. On other days of the year, wood
block pavement attracts traffic, for drivers
find that in proportion to its smoothness it
furnishes superior footing, and permits greater
speed and heavier loads than are possible with
any other type of pavement.
a
Dominion Wood Blocks are Manufactured
in South Vancouver
by the
Dominion Creosoting Co. Limited SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1912
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SEVEN
; i m
'.'.-
THE DAILY PAPERS HAVE BEEN GIVING NEWS BULLETINS OF LARGE
SALES AND DOZENS OF OPTIONS ALO NG BOUNDARY ROAD AND ESPECIALLY
ALONG RIVER ROAD FOR THE PAST TW O WEEKS, AND THE MEN WHO HAVE
PURCHASED LAND AND TAKEN OPTIONS IN SUCH LARGE QUANTITIES IN
THIS DISTRICT ARE THE MEN WHO THOROUGHLY POST THEMSELVES BEFORE MAKING A PURCHASE���THEY ARE THE MEN WHO GET WHISPERS AND
INSIDE INFORMATION FROM HIGH OFFICIALS IN LARGE ENTERPRISES���AND
THEY GET THESE WHISPERS A WEEK OR A MONTH AHEAD OF THE PUBLIC.
OUR WHISPER IS :   BUY AS MUCH AS YOU CAN PAY FOR OF "RIVERDALE."
THE WHISPERS REFERRED TO ABOVE HAVE NOT AFFECTED THE PRICE
AT "RIVERDALE"���OUR COMPETITORS ASSURE US THAT OUR LOTS ARE BEING SOLD FOR HALF THEIR REAL WORTH NOW. BUY AT "RIVERDALE" NOW.
IT IS THE PRICE OF A LOT WHICH DETERMINES WHETHER THERE SHALL
BE A QUICK OR A SLOW SALE���WE WOULD RATHER SELL 25 LOTS PER DAY
AT $10 PROFIT PER LOT THAN SELL ONE LOT A DAY AT A PROFIT OF $250.
FOR WE HAVE MADE THE FAVORABLE ACQUAINTANCE WITH 25 SATISFIED
CUSTOMERS IN THE FIRST CASE, WHICH IS A VERY LARGE ASSET IN THE
REAL ESTATE BUSINESS, AND IN THE LATTER CASE WE WOULD PROBABLY
KILL THE CHANCE FOR FURTHER BUSINESS. THE FIGURES ABOVE ARE ONLY
USED AS AN ILLUSTRATION.
AFTER THE PRICE IS ACCEPTABLE, THE ONE THING WHICH PREVENTS
A GREAT NUMBER OF PEOPLE FROM OWNING REAL ESTATE OF ANY KIND IS
THE TERMS. THIS MAY BE THE LAST CHANCE FOR MANY WORTHY PEOPLE
IN VANCOUVER TO BUY "RIVERDALE" ON $15 A MONTH PAYMENTS���THE
REASON WE MAKE THESE UNUSUAL TERMS IS THAT THE GREAT NUMBER OF PEOPLE MENTIONED ABOVE ARE THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE ALL CITY
PROPERTY VALUABLE; AND BY GIVING THE GENERAL PUBLIC AN OPPORTUNITY SUCH AS THIS TO OWN AND LIVE AT "RIVERDALE," THE PROPERTY
WILL BE MORE VALUABLE AS EACH RESIDENT ARRIVES.
SPECIAL NOTE : TO THE PUBLIC WHO ARE INVESTING THEIR MONEY FOR
FUTURE PROFIT, THE ABOVE PARAGRAPH SHOULD BE OF GREAT IMPORTANCE.
THE VIEW FROM THE BEAUTIFUL SOUTHERN SLOPE OF "RIVERDALE"
IS SO BEAUTIFUL THAT IT MUST BE SEEN BY YOURSELF TO BE FULLY APPRECIATED, FOR THE MOST TRUTHFUL DESCRIPTION IN COLD TYPE WOULD
SEEM LIKE AN EXAGGERATION.    SEE "RIVERDALE."
VERY FEW, IF ANY, LOTS IN VANCOUVER HAVE AS GREAT A DEPTH AS
THE LOTS AT "RIVERDALE." SOME OF THE LOTS ARE 230 FEET DEEP, AND
WHEN YOU RECOLLECT THE USUAL DEPTH IS 122 FEET, YOU WILL SEE THAT
"RIVERDALE" LOTS ARE NEARLY TWICE THE SIZE OF OTHER SUBDIVISIONS.
IT IS EASY ENOUGH TO DESCRIBE PROPERTY IN LANGUAGE SO BEAUTIFULLY WORDED THAT THE PROPERTY WILL APPEAR LIKE A PARADISE, BUT
TAKE OUR ADVICE AND ALWAYS SEE THE PROPERTY���SEE "RIVERDALE."
PROPERTY IN OR NEAR A CITY THE SIZE OF VANCOUVER IS MOSTLY
��� VALUED BY ITS TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES, AND, WHILE "RIVERDALE" IS
WITHIN A COUPLE OF MINUTES' WALK OF THE EBURNE-WESTMINSTER CAR
LINE NOW, IT IS A WELL-KNOWN FACT THAT THERE WILL BE A REGULAR
NETWORK OF CAR LINES SURROUNDING THE PROPERTY IN THE NEAR FUTURE. SEE AND BUY "RIVERDALE" LOTS NOW, FOR THESE SAME LOTS WILL
BE WORTH THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS EACH WHEN THAT PERIOD ARRIVES.
THE COST OF CLEARING A LOT VARIES WITH THE NUMBER OF LOTS TO
BE CLEARED���THE BUYING PUBLIC FREQUENTLY HAVE TO PAY FROM $75
TO $100 FOR THE CLEARING OF ONE LOT, AND HERE IS A CHANCE TO GET A
CLEARED LOT���READY TO BUILD UPON NOW���PERFECTLY GRADED AND ENTIRELY IN GRASS, BUT DO NOT FORGET THERE ARE ONLY ABOUT 25 OF
THESE, SO���SELECT YOUR "RIVERDALE" LOT TOMORROW.
-.'"   "       .'
THERE ARE ABOUT 200 LOTS, AND 100 OF THEM ARE ALL CLEARED.   THE
PRICE STARTS AT $550, THE MONTHLY TERMS, IF NECESSARY, $15.  THE FIRST
BUYERS WILL SURELY SELECT THE CLEARED LOTS���AN IMPORTANT ITEM
TO THE BUYER.  THE FIRST BUYERS WILL GET THE FIRST CHOICE, OF COURSE,
AND THE INITIAL PRICE OF $550, AND TERMS $15 PER MONTH.
ilOIJJbJCi   DJXO./4   I19QOiTii
BE ONE OF THE FIRST BUYERS.   MARK  THIS  WELL :    SOME  OF  THESE
LOTS WILL SELL FOR $1000 INSIDE THE NEXT  TEN  WEEKS.    CALL  AT  THIS
OFFICE FOR FREE TICKETS AND INSIDE INFORMATION.
P. CHATHAM, ROOM 105 DODSON BLOCK, 25 HASTINGS STREET EAST, NEAR
CARRALL, OPPOSITE HOLDEN BUILDING.   PHONE SEYMOUR 2201.   CALL AND
MAKE ARRANGEMENTS FOR SUNDAY.
aMHOW    WOHI   YTiO   JAVUMH3T
The Modern Newspaper Plant
Skyscrapers are nut yet 10 nuiuer-1
..us in Vancouver that the recalling eif'
them by name and situation is a difficult feat for the ordinary citi/en, sit
ting in the seclusion of his own home;
but   the  iuultipliiuiie.il  of  (skyscrapers
throughout   Greater   Vancouver     will
nol detract from the distinctiveness of I
the  in w     World" building, on behalf'
ol which the claim is made that il is
the highest building in the British Em,I
I pin',   ceintaining  the    best    equipped
ten spapcr ..Iti. e m Canada.
The   building   which   is    the    new i
i heeiue  of  our  big  ointeiupeirary   is a'
1 steiry eif newspaper enterprise in steel
and   stone  and  concrete,  indomitable
pluck, ami business resource and skill.
A generation ago it was accepted as
an axieein that literary sympathies and
business aptitudes could not abide in'
the same person. Sir Walter Scott
paid his debts with the fruits of his
pen; hut though the author of the
Waverley .Novels was a Scotsman, he
uld devise no other way of meeting
financial  obligations    except    by
paying  his  creditors  to  the  full, and
ie accomplishing of this task cost
in his life. That the newspaperman
J today should possess literary sym-1
pathies ami, ahmg with these, execu-
*ive and commercial ability of a high
erder, if he would cut any figure in I
the newspaper weirld, is an imperative
'emand eif the times.
In  design    the  "World"  building is
Unique, and yet it is not  difficult to
trace its  parentage.    In  external ap-1
pearance   the  oak   has  little  resemb-1
lance to the acorn, but it is from thei
corn   that   the   oak   grows.     In   the,
ild quarters of the "World," on  Homer Street, one may see the sugges-
;ion���the seed of the design that caps
the   tower   of  thc  building  which   is
me of the landmarks of the city.
The advertising value of the new
building is apparent. Rising to a
height of 282 feet, it is a conspicuous
object in the city, viewed from any
point on land or water. By sea ..r
land it stands a striking reproof to the
g 1 naturcd  business   man   who,    a
quarter eif a century ago, conceded to
'lie newspaperman a certain facility
n the use of parts eif speech, and extended the concession mit of a wcll-
satislied and complacent consciousness that ability to string words together is but a poor thing when it is
accompanied hy profound ignorance eef
business.
Internally, the main building has a
floor space eef 8240 square feet. In
[he tower there are nine floors, and
m each floor there are six .spacious
iflfices. There are thus fifty-four eif.
flees in the tower alone. The staircases are of marble, and the offices
are finished in Philippine mahogany.
In fittings and furnishings, indeed, the
offices invite comparison with thc
best-appear ted business offices in the
city. It is almost a detail, of course,
..nd yet it is worth noting ; hot water,
as well as cold, is led into the offices.
The "World" newspaper occupies
the basement, the first floor, and the
eighth floor, all ill thc main building.
The basement is an interesting place.
It is spacious, well lighted and ventilated���almost a newspaper office in
itself, indeed. It is here that the
great new Hoe Sextuple press has
been set un. This press has a capacity
of 72.000 ten and twelve page papers
an hour, or 18,000 copies of forty-
eight-page papers in the same time.
The press is fitted with the Kochlcr
system of control. Ry this system
lhe pressmen working in danger
zones on thc press have complete
control of the starting or stopping,
and the danger of accident is practically eliminated.
Nearby this giant of the mechanical equipment of the new building,
the old press���in its day a monarch
which signalised the entrance of the
"World" upon the period of expansion which dawned when the newspaper passed into the hands of the
present management���is being installed as a color printing press. Incidentally, too, the press een which
lhe "World" relied during lhe strenuous years of its greatesi growth in
lhe past will he available for turning
��� eiit the "wuxtras" that keep the man
.���ii the street abreast of the happenings of Ihe day.
On a gallery of the basement the
mailing slaff e,f the paper find convenient accommodation, ami here Iln
papers, hot from lhe press, are deftly
handled and made ready for Instant
shipment to subscribers,
Still following the line eef mechanical
production, the visitor take* the elevator and proceeds to the eighth fl..nr,
stepping out into the stereotyping
roe,in The situation is admirable.
About thii room, eight storeys from
the ground, high .(dinged, well light,
ed and well Ventilated, one look- in
vain feer any Suggestion of lhe cramp,
ed ami elark and stuffy quarters���
comparable with those in which thc
firemen of an ocean-going steamer
are required to work���in which the
sterce.typcr    sometimes    pastel    his
working hours. The stereotyping
plant is entirely new Highly interesting it is tei watch thc heet metal
plate emerging from the mould, pail
into the machine that sweeps it of all
foreign matter, trims it e,f all protrusions, sprays it with cold water,
and passes it out to the operator cold
and comfortable to handle. A pneumatic lift conveys the metal plates
between stereotyping-room and press,
room.
The "World" now makes its own
type. In thc composing room a type-
making machine has been installed.
It does its work admirably, turning
out type in practically all size-, ready
to the hands of the men in the "ad."
alley.
Throughout the building the machinery is e,f the latest ; the "World" office is the last word to date that
mechanical art has to offer in newspaper production. Almeisi as a matter of course all the machinery is
electrically driven. The "World" has
its own transforming machinery, and
changes the electric current from thc
alternating tei the direct.
The editorial room is on the same
floor as the composing and stereotyping roeims. It is in the front of
the building and enjoys to the fullest
extent all the advantages of light and
ventilation, which are such conspicuous features of all the rooms in the
building. Arrangements for the hand,
ling of copy and thc varied and important output of this department arc
of the best, the axiom being wisely
followed that a straight line is the
shortest distance between two points.
The arrangements for heating the
building are in the forefront of up-to.
date systems. Oil fuel will be used
feir this and for the other purposes to
which fuel is applied in the building.
The oil is supplied in bulk, and the
situation of the building, adjacent to
railway tracks, permits of the cars
being run right up to the tanks and
provision being maele fur running the
oil elirect from the track to the latter.
The conveniences provided are high
class. Not only may the soiled workman wash : if so inclined he may enjoy a shower bath. The structure is
as nearly fireproof as possible. The
frame is nf steel, no fewer than 1200
tons of this material being included
in the building. The exterior is of
brick, stone, and terra cotta. with
concrete facings. The floors are of
concrete The windows and doors,
like the interior fittitiffs of the offices, are of Philippine mahogany, and
the offices will be furnished in golden
oat--.
Thc   new   nlant   that   has   been   in
stalled   on the "World's" pntering ils
new premises  cost'about MS.000. and
th- building and the land S600 ,Yi0
The business offices of the "World*
are on the irre"tnnd floor, and considerable attention hn? (Seen given to the
enninm-"! of this l^nnortan* deriart-
me'eet. The walls will i^e buff colored.
���end with wooil finishinps similar tei
thi-.se iii th* offices alreadv described
(hev sheiuld ore-eve n(rreereM.- tei 'he
business s'^ff nnrj in the visitor whom
business takes thither.
Wtiii the aelvan'iges atreadv indl
cated in the <""W of mvnpintments r'"d
the ensv hamming of freierht.  the  h't-
(t'rieT nf th- office not  '���*<.(!  in   1 11 0   ,-iis.
duction oi" the "W.erlel" is not a task
to dismav the promoters of in inier-
nris.- to the success of which the new
building stands an enduring testimony.
Man; of the offices are alreadv i'-t.
���nie', wiih the tide of commcp-iM life
jiu the city rising steadily to fill'*"
| e'Mu.'ssion nu Pender Street, Ict'.inc
i ihe offices still available will u ��� d itiht
! be easy.
| Xur is ceiiitcmplation of the "World"
[building and the story of success
Which it tells lacking in Inspiration
ami encouragement to "The' <',r. .it,t
Vancouver Chinook." When M 's. A
H. I'.erry. the managing director, ami
e'\ M i\,ir 1.. D Taylor took i ��� ������!
control "f the destinies e.f the
"World" seven years ago, the ci I
tion was only 2250.   Today it is well
..ver the .10,000 mark.
WHITE ROCK
Look ahead for next year's holidays, and secure
one of our ideal Seaside Lots, close tn b~ach. No
better holiday resort in the Province. Buy uozv and
secure than while they last.
Price $200.   Quarter cash, balance 6, 12, 18 months.
The Industrial Trust Co. Ltd.
Financial Agents
405 Dunsmuir Street
Labor Temple
Brokers, etc.
Vancouver, B. C.
Phone : Seymour 3187
SASHES AND DOORS
We have a reputation for supplying Sashes and Doors of the
finest   quality and at the shortest notice, at Prices that are right.
We have experienced men who can supply any need in the line
of Sashes and Doors.
It will be worth your while to get our prices before placing your
order.   It will cost you nothing, and will save you money.
Collingwood Sash and Door Factory
Clements & Tufnail
Dealers in Sashes, Doors, Frames, Sheet Glass, etc
Collingwood West Station EIGHT
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 2. 1912
Electric Irons
Make Housework Easy
To prove this statement we will
���end any of our lighting customers
JjotfiobntlIron on
Ten Days' Free Trial
Points in favor of the ^uH^iMf ,R0N��� * Hot ���*
the point. 2 Cool at the ��JXPy*wg*- handle. 3 Has
stand in connection with iron. 4 Ia covered by ironclad
guarantee by manufacturers.
Phone:
Seymour
S000
Carrall &
Hastings
Streets
GEO. SNIDER & BRETHOUR
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
908   Dominion   Trust   Building,   Vancouver,   B. O.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
TeI��phont�� :    Office 8��97.    World 6203.       Works  932S.    Workd  9179	
South Vancouver
Subdivision of District Lot 665
Opposite   the   Municipal   Hall,   fronting   on   Fraser   Avenue,
Wilson Roatl and intersecting streets
All Lots cleared and graded
Prices :���Fraser Avenue $2,600 each and up
Wilson Road      900    "
Other Lots        525    "
Terms :���One-fifth cash; balance 6, 12, 18 and 24 months
For further particulars apply
London & British North America Co. Limited
With which is incorporated Mahon, McFarland & Procter Ltd.
Insurance
Money to Loan
Ap-ieements For Sale Purchased
SIXTY DIFFERENT
KINDS OF BULBS
A fine lot to choose from���all in
(ine  condition
NOW  IS  THE  TIME  TO
BUY FOR FALL PLANTING
Keeler's Nurseries
Fifteenth Avenue and Main Street
FAIRMONT 817
A PRACTICAL SOLUTION FOR THE
High Cost of Living
One step in the right direction is to equip
your home with a Pease "Economy" Furnace.   The furnace without a rival.   If your
LJ     heating plant needs overhauling, ring us up
Hodgson Plumbing & Heating Co.
Linked
1136 HOMER ST.
PHONE : SEY. 2412
'You can do better at this store"
FRASER & MacLEAN
HIGH-CLASS GROCERS
26th Avenue and Main Street
OUR COMPLETE STOCK IS FRESH.  WE GIVE
BETTER SERVICE AND THE COST IS NO
MORE.   "YOU CAN PAY MORE, BUT
YOU   CANNOT  BUY   MORE"
Phone Your Wants to Fairmont 784
S^THeLAOYoFTHe HOUSE
To Enrich Lace Trimming
Any girl eer woman ran greatly ini-
provc  lace  insertion, or any  kind  of
lace, fe>r that matter, which u tee In
used feir dresi trimming. I will tell
yon how to <lo this hy dcscrihiiiK a
length eef mesh lace insertion two
inches wide, that had upon it a running floral design showing small
reese's and budl.
The clever woman who enriched
thi*. lace tee trim the ye eke of a won-
elerfnlly heantifttl lingerie frock worked the roael with small pieces of pale
pink ribbon <��f a very narrow width
anel foliage with small pieces of green
silk.
Thread a needle having a large eleni-
gated eye with the rihhoti and draw
it through the lace from the wrong
side lei the right; then twist the rib-
hem around the needle six times and
place the needle through the lace
again in almost thc same hole, full
it through rather loosely, IO that it will
in reality freun a large Krcnch knelt.
Cut the green silk Into small
���quarei one inch wide and fray out
the edges until only a little of the
solid silk remains in the centre; then
catch this up with a few stitches and
sew it te. the leaf and another one at
the base of the "reese."
Feirgct-mc nots would look very
well done in smaller kneets greeuped in
clusters of live; niimeesa can be worked with yellow ribbon, ejr you can use
any shade of ribbiett that you wish feir
these pretty flowers. This method is
pursued along the entire length of the
lace,
Another pretty touch can be added
by sewing (en crystal beads, very
small  and in  opalescent  hues.
Taney work eef this kind is pleasant
for idle hours���weirk that can be
picked up at any minute, yet when it
is finished affords a lovely trimming
even feir the most elaborate gowns.
Plain dotted net can be worked with
these little blossoms placed over the
dots at irregular intervals, not too
close together, and the blossoms can
be joined with a running thread of
green, representing stems that are
done in  the darning stitch.
No doubt your own cleverness will
suggest many more good ideas for en.
riching lace.
*        +       ef
When a Child Cries
A mother can seldom withstand the
tears of her baby, especially if it is her
lirst baby. And yet the fear that
babies will cry, or the mother's softness of heart, accounts for much of the
over-indulgence of children. As soon
as a child lincls out that a mother is
perfectly willing for him to cry if he
likes, and as long as he likes, and that
it doesn't disturb her in the least, but
she just sits complacently (outward-
ly!) by and reads or sews, crying
loses its virtue, and life from that
lessem on grows decidedly more sunshiny. Feir most of the crying of a
young child is done deliberately because the child soon finds out that it
is the way to get what he wants. "I
know  it  is  wrong  to give in   to  my
hild when he cries." said a mother
recently, "but I do it for the sake of
the neighbors."    This feeling for the
eighbors is penny wise, pound foolish.
In the first place anyone who lives
near babies expects to hear them cry
more or less, because all babies cry.
But no baby cries so much as the
one whose mother is so afraid of his
rying that she is always trying to
prevent it. Hardhearted it may sound,
but the common-sense fact remains
nevertheless   that   the   crying    of    a
���-*��r~^>'*'~*"^����*r~^**rr^t*^**^,v*���>**i**mv<��w*i,r***M*.
young child sheeiild have no weight
whatever in his management, except
U a symptom. In itself crying is not
lerious; em the contrary, it is healthful. A nieither must decide whether
the crying is a symptom eef pain, of
weariness or eef temper. Hut having
decided that, she must treat the pain,
the weariness eir the temper, but never
the crying  itself.
Thingi with Dirty Fingers
White silk, fair pages, delicate
lleiwers and human lives are spoiled
by being fingermarked. Here is a
young girl reading the details of a
divorce suit in a newspaper; her sent!
is being fingermarked. The unclean
steiry leaves a smear across the fair
page of her life. If she is not accustomed Io that sort of thing she
feels a sense of physical stain from
the reading. The same is true of
some novels and of some plays at the
theatre. They take hold eif one with
dirty lingers. Presently the souls eef
those who expose themselves to s'.tch
defiling influences are like the coats
and gowns which are smudged and
spattered and which bear the record!
of careless dinners. These effects are
inevitable. No woman���and tie) man
either��� can read or see that which
makes light of thc dignity 'er the
purity of life witheuit suffering a deg-
raelation. They are fingermarked.
The same result is true of some eef the
petty fantili.'irites e.f seecial life. Girls
sometimes permit themselves to be
addressed in terms which take out of
conversation, all the sweet and wholesome influences of courtesy. They
permit themselves to be touched, l'ut
every familiar touch takes eiff a bit of
bloom. It leaves a fingermark. The
Consequence is that some very well-
meaning but unthinking voting woman, whose only serious offence is that
of a careless spirit, become like smear,
ed books. They are offered at "second hand": here a corner is turned
down and there a soiled thumb has
left   its   mark.     They   have   become
fingermarked.
*    *    *
The Mother and the World
When a mother says that she has
not the heart to correct her child :
that a child's carefree years are so few
that she would rather overlook the
little faults and let the child have a
"free, unhampered life," it sounds
plausible and human. Hut one hard,
unavoidable truth remains that sh
cannot change. Some day that child
will he punished feer what the mother
now chooses to overlook. It is one
of the hard decrees of Nature, but it
is unavoidable. If the mother who
might exact obedience and discipline
lovingly and willingly, when the
faults are small, will not, but instead
leaves her child to imagine or infer
that there is no law for him, she
leaves the discipline to a cold and
heartless world. But come it will
without fail. And there will be no
tenderness in it : no sympathy in it.
It may cume in the guise of failures
and disappointments that will cause
years of heartache or a ruined life.
In all probability it will come too late
to be of use to the child, but come it
surely will. No man has ever gone
through the world with any success
whose early training has not taught
him that his will is not supreme. We
must all obey the law of Nature if we
will have health; the law of man if
wc will have liberty; the law of conscience if wc will have peace. But
obey something or somebody we
must!
A FALSE ALARM
(Continued from Page 6)
back to the metropolis from Coney,
and had wandered in for no better
reason than that they had wandered
iu. The automobile in which they
had probably arrived chugged outside, audible above thc rhythm of the
band. They were well dressed, wholesome-looking, merry-eyed kids, and
they seemed to have no suspicion that
they were in an atmosphere uncharged with class hatred, anarchy,
and felonious assault.
At that moment inspiration descended on Millicent. She looked at thc
best-looking of them, a slim -bodied,
fair-haired lad who was looking
directly at her. She smoothed the
front of her slip dress, pressed home
her side-combs, and felt the pins in
her picture-hat, and, assuming a manner that she thought he would recognize as that of his native Fifth Avenue,
deliberately gave him the dreamy eye.
He nudged a companion, patted his
hair, and with an eager smile gave
Millicent the office. He and Millicent  danced  gaily away.
The room, and especially Young
McGovern, was quick to note. She
felt something boring at the back of
her head, glancing over her shoulder,
and met Berstein's gaze through a
sea of faces. The faces in the sea expressed indifferently hatred, admiration, nervous expectation, derision,
and fear, but Berstein's countenance
was comforted with evil and his posture was that of a malevolent crouched
devil. His expression was so frightful that Millicent turned the color of
wet ashes.
"Kiddo," she gasped to her dancing
partner, "leggo o' me an' fade for the
door. Honest to Mike I'm sorry I
done it to yuh, Kiddo. 1 only meant
to throw him a flat. Look out��� Oh,
my Gawd!"
Her partner released her as the
dancers, in a babel of screams, yells,
curses, parted to let some one through
Milliccnt's nice boy stood staring al
her, his pink and white face expressing only a baby astonishment. The
next moment he was lost to her as
the leaping bulk of Berstein overshadowed him, and Millicent ground
her knuckles into her cars so as not
to hear the sickening rain of blows.
Then she was caught in a flying
wedge of young persons who wanted
to be anywhere else, and borne out
among thc beer-tables, where she fell
finally in a dishevelled heap.
But Millicent was not the girl to
bring disaster on a man and then
leave him to suffer alone. With twin
hat-pins and her elbows and strong
young arms she fought her way back
to the middle of the floor, and as she
reached the tornado whirling there it
suddenly quieted and she heard a per.
fectly composed well-modulated young
voice litter the command ;
"Stand back and give him air, all
of you. Here, that's not the way to
see to an injured man! Get his collar open and turn him off his back so
the blood won't choke up his throat."
Supine on thc waxed surface of the
floor lay Mr. Moe Berstein, the Young
McGovern of a heyday all too fleeting. It had been noticed at his first
professional appearance that his footwork was hardly of thc winged variety, and that all in all his performance had wanted a certain needful
intellectuality. Thick blood now
poured from an aperture where but
a breath since there had been a sound
bicuspid, and just below one of his
tight-shut eyes the flesh was begin
ning to puff up into a simulacrum of
a gorgeous olive and Alice-blue egg.
Standing over him, a hat-brim co-
qucttishly down about the region of
his cravat, was Milliccnt's late dancing partner, while all the world wondered. No one in that place had information of, nor could have believed
that this unassuming child could be
Mr. Archibald Clendennin Watson 3d,
sometime lightweight intercollegiate
champion of these United States.
But Millicent gave a glad cry as
she recognized the man on the floor.
He would never strut as Young McGovern again. It was more than
probable that at the marble works his
pet name would hereafter be "College Da-.s." But as a consistent husband and breadwinner, one gunranteed
to smoke his pipe by the fire, stand
off the landlord on the first of the
month, and fetch and carry home his
pay-envelope on Saturday nights,
surely he was a man to put faith in,
a man upon whom any young lady
could lean as on a tower.
Millicent threw a coy eye at Archie
Clendennin Watson 3d.
"Please, Kiddo, won't you stake a
girl to thc hat-brim?"
"Why, what on earth good is it to
anybody?" asked Mr. Watson, astonished.
"Ah, don't go up in the air, Kiddo,"
pleaded Millicent. earnestly. "Honest, I want it, Kiddo. Won't you
please gimme it fer to take home an'
frame?"���Eugene Campbell, in "Harper's Weekly,"
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route'to thc���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service  Between Vancouver and thc East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St, Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass Agent,  Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
H. G. Smith, C. P. * T. A.
Phone :  Sty. 7100
W. E. Duperow, G. A. P. D
527 Granville Street
R. LAING
'Fir; t Quality and Quick Delivery"
H. FIDDES
LAING & FIDDES
GROCERS
28th AVENUE and  MAIN STREET
Successor to H. McVicar
We carry an entirely fresh stock, and guarantee all goods. All
orders will have our own personal attention, and wc can assure our
customers of a prompt delivery.
OUR TEAS AND COFFEES ARE A SPECIALTY
Note address : 28th and Main Street
The Robertson-Godson Co. Ltd.
Wholesale Plumbers' Supplies, Water Works
Supplies, Corporation Brass Goods.
572 Beatty Street
Vancouver
Two   Propositions
No. 1. You rent a house at $25 per month. In one year you have
paid out $3(K), for which you can show no results. 7 per cent, interest
on $300 is $21.   So in the year you practically throw away $321.
No. 2. You bring me in $100, for which I give you a 6-room
Modem House, on Lot 33x125ft. House has fireplace, etc. Balance
is $25 per month.   Total price is $2,f300.    No loan.
In one year you have an equity of $400 in your own home.
Compare proposition No. 1 with No. 2, then call at my office and
sec this house.
R. J. McLauchlan
4123 Main Street Phone : Fair. 1607
tsjf'Ma^swis^f��\Vmk0*0^ss%srs%t1^^t
BULBS! BULBS! BULBS!
For Christmas flowers in the house, plant the
following bulbs now :
Roman Hyacinths, 35c per doz.; $2.65 per 100.
Paper White Narcissus, 25c per doz.; $1.75 per
100.
Freesias, 10c per doz.; 75c per 100.        ��. *
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
FLORISTS AND NURSERYMEN
Phone Sey. 988 and 5727
"A South Vancouver Industry"
ROBERT NISBET
LUMBER,     SASH,     DOORS,     MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  LATH,  AND  A  COMPLETE
LINE OF BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
Campbell Road Station
On the Eburne-Westminster Tram
(Foot of Inverness Street)
Phone Fraser 57 L Open Evenings
Let nie figure your bids
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORK8
1M9 ALBERT ST. PHONE : HIGHLAND S30R
ENGINEERS. MACHINISTS AND FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND SPECIALS
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
MM SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1912
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
NINE
Geo. B. Howard,
Mgr.
AVENUE
Main  and   Harris
l'hone : Sey. 7012
THEATRE        =^    -
Week of November 4 Matinees Wednesday and Saturday
THE DEL. S. LAWRENCE STOCK COMPANY
lu the' fannied play in the EngHih language
BABY   MINE
By Margaret Mayo
PRICES : 25c, 35c, and 50c
MATINEES 25c any seat
PIANOS!  PLAYERS! ORGANS!
You .will get a better PTANO for your money,
either cash or terms, from TIK )M PSON than anyone
else.
The THOMSON store is at 1127 Granville, near
to Davie. You are cordially invited to call and inspect. Xo obligation to purchase. Or send for lists
and particulars
WILLIAM THOMSON
Phone : Sev. 2832       1127 Granville St., near Davie
South Vancouver
We have the best buys in the C. T. R. district. These lots
are high and very light clearing. Price $1500.00. Cash 'A ;
balance 1, 2, and 3 years, at 6 per cent, interest.
For Sale or Exchange���Six-room Modern House, Ontario
Street. Will sell on very easy terms, or will take good
Building Lot as first payment.
J. A. KERR & CO.
Real Estate Brokers
3332 MAIN STREET        Phone: Fairmont 822
We have a Grand Dish in our
Select Fancy French Peas at 15c
SPECIALS
Swift Pride Cleanser, 3 for 25c
Ivory Soap, 5 bars for 25c
45th and Fraser; also River Rd. and Fraser
PHONE :   FRASER   99
SNAP, KNIGHT ROAD
Full-sized  Lot,  north of  Home  Road, $1200.    One-third  cash;
balance 6, 12 and 18 months.
$100 cash handles  Building Lots close to Knight Road.
THOS. Y. LEITCH
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Cor. Knight and Westminster Rds. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone : Fairmont 1653
LOOK AT YOUR TRANSFER!
Bridge Street is the first name
on the list of routes.
Some day in the near future
it will be a through street from
River Road into Vancouver,
along which considerable freight
and merchandise will be hauled
to and from the North Arm
Docks.
Look at your map: you will
observe that Bridge Street is thc
backbone of Vancouver. Its
position warrants the assertion
that property located on and
near it must increase to several
times its present value.
The carline is nearly completed to 16th Avenue, and it is only
reasonable to suppose    that   it
fe��o��Bg��^i^S EM PRESS
will reach River Road within a
few years.
We have for sale a few choice
Lots on and near to Bridge
Street and River Road.
They are selling from $550 up,
and you cannot find anything on
the  market  to  equal them.
To homebuilders we sell at
$50 cash and $10 per month.
Take the Davie car to 25th
Avenue, change to the Rosenberg Road car, get off at River
Road, and come up to our office,
comer Ash Street and River
Road.
Our man lives on the ground
and the office is always  open.
To see is to buy!
Wm. H, KENT & SON
COLLINGWOOD  EAST
Phone : Coll. IB Branch : Co/. River Rd. and Ash St.
Imperial Theatre
h'ew play- have com* te> Vancouver
-���. wreathed in the imilei t,i popular
and critical approval ai Augustin
MacHugb's sensational success, "Ol
liccr 660," which Cohan anel Harris,
the producers, will bring te. the Imperial Theatre fur twee nights begin
ning Tuesday evening, November 5.
Heeth in Xew Ycirk and Chicago
this fresh, delightfully interesting
comedy of heart throbs and laughter
made immediate captives 'ef press anil
public, and its advent iu  Vancouver
will  undoubtedly  prove  eme  e.f  the
mosl enjoyable treats of the season.
The story of "Officer 666" is interest
ing, in that the tale carries with it
one of the oldest and safest farce
situations in Stageland���that eif thc
clever impostor suddenly confronted
by the man whose name and identity
he has assumed.
It would speed the fun if all the
complications 'ef this clever piece of
ceeinery were explained in advance.
The' result of this mixture of melodrama and farce is that thc audience
is carried about from laughter to excitement and back again so often that
each act leaves the spectators as
breathless as the playing company.
���   '        . .   '    .    '
She : "They haven't found a name
for that baby in the flat upstairs yet."
He :    "The one that cries so?"
"Yes."
"Well, that's strange! The neighbors have called it everything they
could think ofl"
The proud heart-breaker : "That's
a nice little girl. Got an appointment with her tonight. Wonder if
she'll keep it."
The other one : "Oh, I think so.
She kept the one she had with me the
other night I"
The Sheehan English Opera Company will play a return engagement e,f
I three days and special Saturday matinee at the Imperial Theatre, commencing Thursday. November 7. The
opening performance on Thursday
evening will be "Martha." On Friday
evening, by special request of hundreds of Vancouver theatre patrons,
"II Trovatorre." For Saturday matinee.
"The Bohemian Girl," and Saturday
evening, the sensation of the opera
world. "The Love Talcs of Hoffman."
Since the appearance of the Sheehan English Opera Company here Mr.
Sheehan has strengthened his cast tee
a great extent by the acquisition of
Miss Helen Jeffries, a talented young
Australian lyric soprano, who, f.fter
capturing the music lovers of her native country (Australia) hioked covetously towards the great English
metropolis (London), and set sail to
conquer the musical hearts of the Empire. In this effort Miss Jeffries has
been highly successful.
Miss Jeffries sang her first per-
feermance at the Ileilig Theatre. Portland, Oregon, and was given an ovation by both press and public which
Stamped Miss Jeffries as an artist in
the opera world to bc reckoned with
in the near future.
Miss Jeffries will be with the Sheehan  Opera  Company at the  Imperial
i Theatre for three days and a special
Saturday matinee.
���   ���   ��
Avenue Theatre
Starting with record breakers for
both performances on Monday last
the Lawrence Stock Company has
continued to pack them in at the
Avenue with their splendid production
of "The Barrier." Every character in
thc long cast has been presented in the
cleverest manner and with a scenic
equipment unusually elaborate even
for thc Avenue. It is another two
dollar show at popular prices, a feat
which is getting tee be <|iiite common
at this theatre.
For next week, commencing Monday, Messrs. Lawrence and Sandusky announce for the first time in
steeck in this city a splendid presentation of Margaret Mayo's great laughing success. "Baby Mine." This play
comes with a record of.one solid year
at Daly's Theatre in New York and
is now Hearing its Becond year at Sir
Charles Wyndham's Theatre in London,
The  farcical   possibilities  of "Baby
Mine"  arc    obvious    and     Margaret [
Mayo, the talented author, has hand-'
led  them with  unusual ingenuity and
skill.    Indeed nee comedy within mem.
eery is said tee have surpassed this in I
its  swift,  compact   technique,  and  as
a laugh-producer, pure and simple, it
is bevond anything on  the stage today.
Thc play will be presented by the
Lawrence Company with an excellent
cast especially selected, and the babies
used in the play will be alone worth
the price of admission, nut lo mention the display of elegant gowns and
wraps tee be worn by the ladies of the
company. An early application feet-
seat   reservations  is  advised.
Empress Theatre
That well-known drama of Western
life "Arizona" is drawing crowded
houses to the Empress Theatre. The
vivid picturesqueness of ranch and
military life is splendidly portrayed
by the company. Charles Ayrcs particularly distinguishes himself as
Lieutenant Denton, and Isabelle
Fletcher offers a fine portrayal of the
wife, who bitterly repents a moment's
weakness. V. T. Henderson, Harold
Nelson, Meta Marsky and all the
other members of the company excel.
That delightfully exciting romantic
drama "The Scarlet Pimpernel" will
be the play to be given at the Empress Theatre next week by the company. It is based on the most fascinating part of French history, that of
the Revolution, although a great deal
of its action takes place in England.
As a novel written by thc Baroness
Orczy it has had phenomenal popularity, and when dramatized and presented in England by Mr. Fred Terry and
Miss Julia Neilson. its stage success
was equally notable. The sccnery
and costumes will be magnificent, and
this wil! bc a notable production.
* * *
Pantages Theatre
With a big music hall specialty act;
an animal feature with lots of fast
comedy and real merit: with three
other good acts; and last, but not
least, moving pictures of "A Trip to
thc Garden of Allah." the latter to be
presented in  Vancouver for the first
iii"'- in  America. Manager Wright, of
the Pantages, ha- an exceptional programme i'.r next  week.
First ami foremost are te, come
Menlo Moore's Stage- D.eeir Johnnies
with Trixie Oliver The- acl is car-
ried by live men anel a dainty, sweet
voiced young we,man. who is billed as
Annette,  th.- Queen of the Clnerus.
Howard's Animals, fenir black bears,
five dogs, anel much apparatus, pro-
viile entirely new  entertainment.  The
bears ride- velocipedes, play banjo ac-
corapanimenl   i'e   Ursa Major   s.,nK-,
wheel each other about in wheelbar
rows, and other feats.
The Arlington Four, singing ami
dancing messengers and Al. Carlton,
tin- original "skinny guy" have ccmc-
dy, music, terpsichorean and grotes-
quc laughs on tap all of the time during their acts.
The Mabel Fonda troupe of juggling acrobats also are distinctly-
������1913."
The pictures of "The Garden eef
Allah" are even better than readers
of Robert Hichens' novel might imagine. Beautiful scenes, grotesque,
almost grucseime snake dances, the
fame.ns "Ouled Nails" dance, and intimate views of the oasis paradise-
give the audience a pictorial insight
into thc other side of the world. This
film is positively the only one of its
kind in the world, it being approximately 3.000 feet long, and it is the
einly nieeving picture ever taken in the
Sahara Desert.
Hasting! & Gore    Phone Sey. 3907
BEST RESERVED SEATS 25c, 50c
To-night 6.15 Matinee S>t. 2.! 5
This  Week
Arizona
Next  We.k
The Scarlet Pimpernel
Week beginning November 4
Spadoni
The world's premier heavyweight
juggler in sensational act
Five   Other Bis  Ai tl
"Vancouver's   Live   Wire"
PANTAGES PanamaTheatre
Unequalled      Vaudeville      Means      Pantages
Vaudeville
(36   Hastings   Street)
For the Whole Family
Week  commencing  Monday, Nov. 4
SHOW STARTS-.2.45. 7.15. sad 9A0 p tn
Menlo Moore's
STAGE DOOR JOHNNIES
"GARDEN OF ALLAH"
Original   Meetie.n   Pictures
First time shown in America
���4���Other  Big Features���4
Week  of  November 4
THE FRANK RICH COMPANY
presents
The Battle of Crazysnake
I 2 Shows, 7.30, 9.15, Nightly���15c, 25c,
35c
Matinee Daily, 3 p m.���15c, 25c
Orpheum Theatre
A bill with all sorts of surprises,
ginger, comedy and music is scheduled
to open at the Orpheum during the
coming week with Paul Spadoni, the
world's premier heavy-weight juggler,
who will be the headline attraction.
Mr. Spadoni has but recently completed a teeiir of the weirld, where he
has  made a  tremendous  success.
Along the steady procession of legitimate acte>rs and actresses to accept
a vaudeville engagement, the latest
and most prominent is Ilyman B.
.Viler, feir years in stock in New
York City. He will present "The
Miser's   Dream"   capably   supported.
Davey, Dc Musey and Gctsey, a
trio of rag-timers, piano players and
burlesque artists, will make a decided
impression during their engagement
at  the  Orpheum.
Lee mad Martinek, a big foreign novelty, will cull many laughs with his
silent partner. The Rag Doll.
Both Dale and Beiyle are good
dancers. Their act is somewhat different, and will furnish a good surprise to the audience.
Grace Leonard, a wholesome looking young woman, clever and artistic.
will offer boy characterizations and
sing some good songs.
DENTI8TS
Drs. Howie & Hall
Have   opened   up   new   and   up-to-date
Dental Parlors in the Williams  Block,
Comer Granville and Hastings
We have installed all the latest and
best appliances, and are prepared to
give you the best there is in the dental
profession.
A share of your patronage is
solicited.
Gas   administered   for   the   painless
extraction of teeth.
R. O. Howie, DD.8.
Wm. S. Hall, DD.S.
Phone  Sey.  3266 for  appointment
SUCCESS
Business   College
"The School of Certainties"
COURSES IN BOOKKEEPING,
SHORTHAND     AND   TYPEWRITING,
CIVIL   SERVICE   AND   ENGLISH
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded
DAY   AND   EVENING   CLASSES
HARRIS    BUILDING
Corner Main St. & 1 Oth Ave.
Phone :   Fairmont  2075
���SNAP-
Large Lots at Central Park, close to School at.d Station.    Lot
70x165.    Price $670; one-fifth cash, balance over three years.
The cheapest buys in this district for Houses, Lots, and Acreage.
Come in and see our list.
GEORGE HORNING & CO. <*"��&��?*
FOR SALE��� Columbia double dis
JK  bALfc.���  Lo limb a   double  disc   ��->.  evcivr-     .       i. i
,     en i-      i     i.       i.r       PRANCING    taught,    in     c as
records. 50c up.   Can be bought for II  1 "
cash from C. Fecht, Page Road, off privately ��� MISS     KIDW
Fraser     Avenue     East.       Second   2184  Cornwall   Street.     Phone:
Fraser     Avenue     East.       Second   2184  Cornwall   Street,
house  across    from    Creek,    after M173 R.
6 o'clock.
ELL.
Bay.
DOLARWAY
PAVEMENT
Low   Cost ��� Lowest   Maintenance
: : Sanitary ��� Fine Appearance : :
Easy
on the Ratepayer
on the Automobile
on the Horse
Impossible to buy a better
PAVEMENT at any price
HO OUR BOND PROTECTS YOU J-1
South Vancouver Builders*
Supply Company TEN
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1912
:: SOCIAL and PERSONAL ::
Plumbing Inspector Thuresson, who
has been away on a two weeks' holi-
ilay,  has  returned  and  resumed  his
eluties.
* *   *
Thc junior and senior departments
of the Westminster Sunday School
will have a se.cial evening on Friday
evening of this week.
* *    *
Councillor Campbell has returned
from the -Municipal Convention at
Revclltoke. Reeve Kerr and Ceeiincil-
lot Third are neet expected to return
until the-end eel' the week.
* ���    *
Thc meenthly meeting of the South
Vanceiuver Order e)f District Nurses
will be held in the Nurses' Home, cor.
ner eif Chester and 47th Avenue on
Tuesilay, November 5, at 3 o'clock.
��   ���   ���
lkiilding Inspector Young returned
tei duty on Monday after attending
the Building Inspectors' Convention
at Calgary. Mr. Young had the distinction of being the only building in.
spector from British Columbia attending the convention.
* ��    ��
Thc wedding was quietly celebrated
at the Parsonage, 29th Avenue East,
of Mr. Theodore A. Thompson to
Miss Lily May Sigsworth on Saturday evening last. Rev. J. M. Letch,
B.A., performed the ceremony. Mr.
and Mrs. Thompson will take up their
residence at 4584 St. Catherine's
Street, South Vancouver.
* *   *
Miss ii. D. McKensie, superintendent of the Royal Victorian Order of
Nurses in Canada, visited the Nurses'
Home of South Vancouver and gave
a very interesting address to a number of the members on the great
work in connection with the Order.
Miss McKensie was very pleased with
the   comfortable   hemic   provided   for
the nurses.
* ��   *
Thanksgiving Day witnessed two
weddings at S. Peter's Church, when
George Langtry Bell, of Grandview,
was married to Florence Vivian
Perry, oldest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Terry, Bodwell Road, and
Joseph Rogers, formerly of Chedle-
ton, Staffordshire, Eng., was married
to Mary Ann MacDonald, of Banff,
Scotland.
* e��      ��
On Monday, November 4, in the
Oddfellows' Hall, corner Main and
30th Avenue, the third of the season's
socials will he held at 8 o'clock, under
the auspices of the W. A.; admission
25 cents, which includes refreshments.
A cordial invitation is given to all
our church people and their friends.
New arrivals arc especially welcomed
and are made to feel at home by the
Rector and people of S. Peter's.
Mrs. A. Sewell, assisted by Mrs, J.
Clark, entertained a number of their
friends at their camp on 52nd Avenue
on Tuesday evening, October 29, a
very enjoyable evening being spent.
Those present were : Mr. and Mrs.
Hamilton, Mr. and Mrs. J. Mouat,
Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Thomas, Mr. and
Mrs. E. W. Peach. Mr. and Mrs. M.
Cowcn, Mr. and Mrs. J. Sloan, Mr.
and Mrs. Allen. Mr. and Mrs. Souther,
land, Mr. and Mrs. McBride, Mr. and
Mr- Jeelinson, Mr. and Mrs. Petti-
grew, Mr. and Mrs. Prowse, Mr.
Clark, Mr. and Mrs. A. Sewell, Mr.
anel Mrs. J. Clark.
The Ladie*' Aid Society of Westminster Presbyterian Church held
their annual Thanksgiving dinner on
Thursday, October 24, iu the church
A large crowd turned out to enjoy
the good things thc ladies had pro-
videel, the tables lo'eking beautiful. The
decorations were tastefully arranged
by Miss Ilassell. The sum of $77.25
was added to the funds of the society.
The ladies wish to extend their
thanks tee all feir the abundance of
good things donated, also to Miss
Beaton and her friends who so kindly
helped with their orchestra.
MME.
GADSKI      IN
CONCERT
GRAND
Gadsld'l  generous   heart   is   shown
I by the remarkable pr. .gramme she has
j prepared feer her Grand Concert at the
! Imperial   Theatre   een     November     4.
There are enough richee, in it for half
la doxen programme*.   Only a voice of
extraordinary freshness and power
could meet such heavy demands upon
it. With consummate art she has
selected two songs by Brahms tee eepen
the programme, thereby plunging thc
hearer without delay intei a mood of
profound and rapt attention, for
Brahms of all song writers the world
has even known has given the most
Impailioned expression tei the rapture
and  patlu s of love.    The depth  and
OPEN
NEW      UNDERTAKING
PARLORS HERE
The Late Samuel Herbert Marsland
Samuel Herbert Marsland died on
Friday, October 25, at his home on
Bodwell Road after weeks of illness.
Thc funeral took place on Saturday,
October 26, from S. Peter's Church,
where the deceased had worshipped
since his arrival in Vancouver [wo
years ago. The number of friends
who assembled to take part in the
burial service showed how much l.e
was liked and respected in the locality.
Thanksgiving Services
Special Thanksgiving Day services
were held at the Ruth Morton Memorial Church on Sunday last, both
Sermons being preached by the pastor, Rev. J. Willard Letch, B.A., At
the morning services he chose as his
subject, "Lest We Forget," and for
the evening, "Thanksgiving and
Thanks Living." Special music under the direction of Miss Bodwell
was given at thc evening service. The
music included anthems by the choir
and a solo by Miss Bodwell, "He Lift-
elh Me." During thc evening service
the Ordinance of Baptism was administered. '
Grading Rupert Street
Work on the grading of Rupert
Street, between Westminster Road
and Government Street, commenced
this week. At a meeting of thc West
Collingwood and District Improvement Association this week, it was
decided to have the secretary, Mr. J.
Graham, commence making out the
deeds of 7 feet on each side of the
road to the municipality at once. All
the owners on Rupert Street, between
Westminster Road and Government
Street, are asked to get in touch with
Mr. Graham, so that the widening of
Rupert Street may bc started at the
earliest possible time.
sincerity of his appeal strike deep into
the inmost recesses of the human
heart with convincing truth and
poignant tenderness.
Following Brahms come two songs
by Hugh Wolf, full of vivid imagination and fantastic flame of thought and
such intense realism of sympathy that
the heart is strangely stirred.
Three lovely Strauss songs follow,
essentially picturesque and vivid in
their extraordinary power of adapting music to the words of the poet.
A magnificent array of great Wagnerian arias comprise the second
group of songs. Such largesse is seldom found on a single programme.
In conclusion there is a charming
scries of sparkling English lyrics.
Song Service
There will bc a Song Service in the
Westminster Presbyterian Church on
Sunday  evening,   November  ,1,   when
the following programme will be ren- ]
dered :    Two anthems by  the  choir; j
duct, Mrs. Patterson and Mr. Dunlop;
solo, Mrs. Robertson; solo, Mrs. Pat-1
terson.    Mr. Dunlop is the tenor so-l
loist, Mrs. Cook   soprano soloist and
Miss Beaton organist. ,~ |
Messrs. Greene & Merkley Have
Established South Vancouver Parlors Similar to Their Down-town
Business,  305  Pender Street  West
Wilh the advance of the times business in all lines is rapidly progressing. To be in a better position to
look after their growing trade in
South Vancouver Messrs. Greene &
Merkley have opened and fitted an
office, showrooms and chapel similar
to their spacious down-town quarters, which arc located at 3115 Pender
Street West. The new parlors���which
arc fitted along the same lines���are
situated on Main Streel, near 16th
Avenue, next door to llillcrest peest
office, and will be under the personal
supervision of one of the partners.
The offices arc fitted up in the usual
way with a private reception room on
entering. The chapel, which is nicely decorated and carpeted, being finished in white enamel, is the first of
its kind in South Vancouver, and will
bc a great convenience, as it is for
the free use of their patrons for the
holding of funeral services at any
time when the relatives do not care
to have the services held from the
home.
The showrooms are stocked with
all styles of cases from the cheapest
to the best. The entire parlors are
open for inspection at any time.
Their equipment is of the best, and
the three hearses are adapted to different ages, and are in three different
styles, black, grey, and white. Both
Mr. Greene and Mr. Merkley have been
in business in Vancouver for a number of years, and work entrusted to
them will be properly looked after.
They have opened up these parlors in
South Vancouver so as to look after
their South Vancouver business, and
a telephone call from any part of the
city or vicinity will get them at any
time of the day or night, as the place
will be always open.
This establishment is quite a necessity in any city, and will be a great
convenience to the residents of South
Vancouver, especially the chapel arrangement for holding services.
 i^i	
Thanksgiving Day Football
On Thanksgiving Day the Hustlers
Athletic Association played thc River-
view aggregation on thc General
Wolfe School grounds. The game
was keenly contested from start to
finish, and a good exhibition of football was put up by both teams. River-
view having no down-town game
fiielded a strong team, but the aggressive work of the Hustlers prevented
thc score from being more than 2 to
1 in favor of the former.
The Hustlers are doing good work
this season, and now stand at the top
of the South Vancouver and District
Senior   Amateur   Football   League.
WANTED��� Care of invalid or convalescent patient, by young
lady with general experience. Phone
Fairmont 783.
LARGE LOTS
No. 1 Road and Grant (Close to Park)
$100 below any other property in this vicinity. Small cash
payment. These lots are cleared, and some have been
resold at nearly double the price originally bought at.
Westminster Road
Double corner on Westminster Road, near Park Avenue.
Cleared. Splendid Business Site. Away below market
value.
The widening and paving of Westminster Road are now
an assured fact, and prices will soon bc on the jump. Get
in and buy now.
J. B. Todrick & Co.
CORNER PARK AVENUE AND WESTMINSTER
ROAD
Phone : Collingwood 13R
SOUTH VANCOUVER'S  POPULATION HAS
INCREASED 35,000 IN SEVEN YEARS
It contains the choicest Residential and Business
Property on the Peninsula
COLLINGWOOD
Is the heart of this thriving Municipality. We have
been established here since 1905, and invite correspondence regarding investments. We can place
money on first mortgage at 8 per cent., and transact
all financial business.
References :
Royal Bank of Canada, Vancouver, B. C.
Bank of Vancouver, Collingwood, B. C.
BAILEY, TELFORD & CO. LTD.
Financial and Estate Agents
317 Pender St. W., Vancouver, B.C.
Fire, Insurance and Loans
Collingwood East, B. C.
SASHES and DOORS
We have thc latest machinery for the manufacture of doors and
sashes.   We make them any size and any style to suit purchaser.
Our aim is to please every patron, and our work is t>f the best.
We are prepared to do work at the shortest notice. Let us give you
an estimate.    Our prices are right.
Carleton Sash and Door Factory
(Opposite Carleton School on Westminster Road)
EAST COLLINGWOOD
I
PORT MOODY
"WHERE PROGRESS
IS INEVITABLE"
PORT MOODY is very much alive just now because it is preparing for the opening of
the Panama Canal. Railroad interests arc centring their attention on the city, and
many interesting developments are under way. The new Dominion government
wharf is now almost complete, and by the new year it should be ready. The C. P. R., it is
rumored, will shortly remove their present depot to the head of the Inlet, because the new
site will be more advantageous to them when the prairie grain is routed westward. The
B. C. Electric Railway are contemplating building a line from Port Moody to Xew Westminster, taking in Coquitlam.   The Shipmasters' Association have already   received  the
plans for the proposed construction of a four-million-dollar dam across the Second Narrows,
thus making Port Moody a fresh-water harbor. The members of the Vancouver City
Council, Board of Trade, as well as prominent members of Parliament, were recently at
Port Moody looking over the site for the canal between Port Moody and the Titt River,
a distance of five miles. This will link up Port Moody with the. Fraser River, and will
convert Greater Vancouver into an island.
A considerable portion of the tide Hats at Port Moody are shortly to be reclaimed, this
considerably  adding to  the  city's  territory.    Our property,
OLD  ORCHARD
1/1
M48
Don't nurse your opportunity too long;
take it into active Partnership with
you at once, lest it leave you for other
company.
is on the waterfront and adjacent to the site for the new C. P. R. depot.   When the Panama Canal opens all grain grown west of Moose
Jaw will he shipped to Port Moody and will lie graded in the elevators which will be erected adjacent to
d just a few of tl
OLD ORCHARD
Harry A
Johnstem Co.,
422 Richards St.,
v 1
Vancouver,
B.
C.
Please  forward  me illustrated folder
property in Port Moody.
of
your
Address
We have stated just a few of the developments that are due to take place in the near future.   We have omitted one, however, Imt that we
shall announce in a few days.   We advise you to look out for it.   Most of you have already visited Port Moody and have seen its excellent
location.  Those who have not yet done so we cordially invite to come with us any
afternoon on one of our free excursions starting at 1.30.   You will then be able
to see with your own eyes what an excellent investment Port Moody really is.
We have an official map of the City of Port Moody at both of our offices, and we
invite you to drop in and see it. It is authentic, having been compiled under the
supervision of the incorporation committee.
We have a few choice high level hits which
we are selling for
$175 EACH
Terms one-fifth cash, balance half yearly over
30 months; or one-tenth cash, balance monthly
over 30 months.
HARRY A. JOHNSTON COMPANY
Head Office:
422 Richards St.
vuoonjs pi
VANCOUVER
JC
tl
Phone: Sey. 1567   Open Evenings
Branch Office:
160 Hastings St. W.
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