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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Feb 13, 1915

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Array H^puw CHINOOK
il. III. No. 40
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA,  SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 191:
Price 5 cents
Jitney Fleet of Seattle Fishboats
Fitting Out For Halibut Grounds
"Will Dot British Columbia Fishing Banks Like Flock of Gulls and
Harvest Halibut that Belongs to This Province
FACTS AND FANCIES
By "Observer"
The lame conditions thai gat c birth
he jitney busses are about to causi
i ig increase in the American halibut  lishing fleet,  already  very  large
m Puget Sound ports lasl season
fifty fishing ve���;, eve nt to tlie halibut  grounds  for  everj   one Canadian
loal On iln rich halibut banks
which lie "IT thc shores of Vancouver
1 and and northern British Columbia the hundri ds of Seattle "smoke-
b ats" are like a flock of gulls, The
chii f fishing places are in Hecate
Straits and Dixon's Entrance, between
!'��� ince Rupert and the Queen Cl n
lotte Islamls There all the year
n "nil the bi ittom-feeding halibut has
habitation.    The pasture is abund-
aiiil the fish multiply se, fast that
li is   fished   iiineii   the   grounds   be-
e over populated and the fish
when captured, show a yellow -triak
-down the back which signifies this
K uble. I" recent years, however,
tht halibut have not had ihis yellow
���:: ak, for tin halibut licet lias nol al-
ed the banks to become overcrowded The yellow streak lias been transferred from the backs of the halibut
ti the American fishermen. The
Se ittle halibut fleel of hundreds of
vessels arc all poachers, and tee the
Bkippers oi the Seattle fishboats thc
Canadian fishery protective service is
a joke, 11 is seldom that he sees the
���i eke nt' a Canadian fishery cruiser,
Wherever he funis a u>���. .<l spot, after
examining the bottom with the lead,
i Sherman's eve. ilu re he sets his fishing near, whether the -P'et is inside
the limit or ii"t. ' Iccasionally, of
course, the watchful imokeboat skipper sees funnel smoke on the horizon,
and calls in his <1<erics in great haste
SSmetimes thc fishermen have to cut
their trawls, because they haven't time
t' haul in their gear. Itut the poachers are not  surprised very frequently.
the extensive fishing grounds] there
i; not likely to be more than one pat-
re I cruiser.     Many of the Seattle fishing vessels have wireless installations.
The licet  is  so numerous that  the
shboats are almosl  in    touch    with
each  other  over  the  whole  grounds.
a fishery  cruiser appears    on    the
. nks, the American fleet  is kept  sup-
ied with information aboul her posi-
��� n.   The dories of the smoke-boats
arc often  within  hailing distance dur-
��� g the summer season.
The facts arc that thc American
shing fleet has for years been harvesting the Canadian halibut grounds,
and Canada has received very little
1 i nefil from hi r own fish. The Cana-
ii fishing flei t is very small. Mosl
i the vessels an- small and not as
well found with fishing gear as the
American boats. For years the
American halibut ile ei has been hire asing, and biggi r and better vessels are being constantly added to the
fleel The newest of the Seatth
"smoke-boats." for that is whal [he
fishermen call the gas-driven fishing
. i in. are \ i ry nnc ; nd ahle vessels,
and their e.il power plains are ! irge
. ,\ inn them ci nsidi ri ble speed. Bul
conversation with halibut fishermen
on the Vancouver waterfront latelj
has brought to lighl an inten -'���<���-���
.��� iry Thi v i itpi cl that the dull
times will add many fishboats to thc
iNin.-'i.-an hm it fli '���' this season, Ac-
cordine t" these fishermen, every
Si attic gas workboal able enough to
L-. to sea will cruise to thc halibut
rounds this year. ' )n the Puget
Round waterfronl there are large num-
bi rs of sea-faring nnn and fishermen
who formerly held j ibs ash..re, who
ore fitting i'in fishboats to go halibut
i" shing,
"They'll be just like a flock of jitneys,"   mie   fisherman   exoressed    it.
The running expenses of these smoke-
��� iats,   he   said,   were   very   small,  and
their crews  were  good  fishermen.
As a matter e.f fact, the Pacific
Coast  halibut  fisherman is the stout-
��� st  nf seamen  anil  the most  skilful of
fishermen.    Usually he  is  a  native of
" -''��� '''antic seaboard or a man
of Scandinavian stuck. Must of the
halibut fishermen arc men frum Newfoundland. Nova Scotia, Xew Brunswick, Maine and Massachusetts. "Sou-
���wegians," and British fishermen from
the Xorth Sea. They are the best
dorymen and the most able navigators in the world. Bad weather and
bail food are their daily lot, the ordinary hardships or the sea mean
nothin? to them,
By far the greated number of these
men hail from T'ugct Sonne! ports,
and fish in vessels flying the American flap. Tiny are most daring fish
pirates and il would take a large
squadron of fishery protective cruisers to keep them from poaching. Last
season the American fishboats were
so numerous on the halibut grounds
that' they made bait scarce. There
was a herring famine. Tt was impossible to get herring for bait. This is
thc best bait for halibut; each of the
hundreds of hooks on a "skate" of
trawl gear being baited with a whole
herring. But the supply of salmon
bait is inexhaustible of course and salmon for bait are easy to get. The
fishermen in hailing their trawl cut the
salmon into chunks, ^ch they call
"'shack." Therefor'- /re is no danger of a lack c' preventing the
icm y  flei:   In im  swarming the  halibut  grounds.
In the i 'nite '1 States there are about
50,000,000 pounds of halibut consumed yearly. Most of thi- comes ir"in
the Canadian halibut banks. Only
about 2,000,000 pounds of this is im-
'I ir 'in Canada, while Canada imports marly as much (of her own
fighl from American firms. Phi situation i- the must remarkable of any
situation connected with the food
supply problem today. Canadians i
employing American fishermen, Amer-
can fishing vessels, American capital
and American railways to bring to
their tables Canadian lish. The new
England Fish Company, which i- the'
'���nly large shipper of halibut from
Canada t.e tiie I'niinl States, and
which has the privilege of shipping
its fish from Canada in bond, duty
free on condition that the halibut are
caughl by American bottoms, ships
large amounts of fish which later are
sold hack tee Canadian dealers, who
pay the duty for the lish to come back
into   Canada.
Though nieest of thc halibut fishboats make large profits, ilure' are
very few Canadian vessels on the fishing grounds. The economic reason
for this is hard to guess. There is
always a good market for halibut. If
the little Seattle "smoke-boats" can
make halibut fishing pay there is no
reason why Canadian fishboats cannol do the same. The Canadian fishing fleet is increasing but not proportionately see fast as the America.i
fleet. A few years ago there were
emly about a dozen Canadian fishboats em the halibut hanks. At the
same time there were about six hundred American boats. Vet the fish
banks and the tish belong to Canada
and   i"   liritish   Columbia.
Lack of employment feer the hundreds eef gas workboats and their crews
.rn Puget Sound may send many of
them to the fishing grounds, as lack
of employment for hundreds of automobiles and the'ir drivers has filled the
streets with nickel busses. The dull
times will only improve the market
for halibut, for thousands "i housewives will buy lish at from 1- to IS
cents per peiund instead "I meat at
_'.s cents. It seams likely that the
British Columbia halibut hanks will
swarm with the dories of Puget Sound
fishermen this season. The fishery
patrol service i- adequate. Hie fishermen laugh at it. i here- will poaching and piracy galore on the banks
ti is s,ms,in. . .ie only way for Canadians to get there own fish is to catch
ihcm  themsi Ivi s,  ii  would seem.
tht fi the I i-i municipal
election in South Vancouver a bet
��� thai within six months the
Provincial Government would be in
' largi of thc affaii - if thi municipality. That prophecj is in a fair way
ol bring fulfilled, unless the presenl
reeve are! council turn over a new
leaf and begin to conduct the affairs
of the ratepayers in a busi
way and cut oul the vindictiveness
which has be n - i pronoui i i d 'luring
the past ie'w n eel -
Municipal Clerk is Exonerated
From Charges Laid Against Him
Local Notes
Th. attempl to ��� usl Ch rk Springford from ius position was a disgrace
to any municipality; and the general
employed since thc new
council came int��. power have been
such as i" warrant the government
Stepping in to take charge'. I am
glad tee see that some of the councillors are  beginning  tn realize  the  mai
Ice and vindictiveness an.l cunning behind it all, and do nol now besitati
to denounce the actions of those- responsible Had there been a fair
sprinkling of "hi councillors in office
the new council would have been
Spared many mistakes, sume of which
are likely to cosl the municipalitj
dear bei'en- the end of the year.
lie        *        *
One of the first mistakes made by
thc new council was in entering into
an agreement with Messrs. Spitzcr,
Rorick & Company for the sale of
treasury certificates, before they had
completed the contract with Messrs
Wood. Gundy & Company, Had the
reeve and council remembered the old
saying: "It is well tei be off with the
"hi love before being on with the
new." they might have spared the
municipality a good ileal of trouble
and expense, follow..ij; one or more
breach of promise actions. It is all
very well for the reeve I" say : "Let
'em law their heads off." But it is
the people who have t.e pay when
"-craps of paper" are  ignored.
* *   *
With the impetuosity of youth and
inexperience the new reeve and council entered office, in much the same
way as newly married couples enter
the state of matrimony fully believing they are going t.. avoid all the
mistakes "ther married couples have
made throughout the ages. Old folk
shake their heads knowingly, but the
young folk are confident they know
how to avoid the pitfalls into which
others have fallen; and only when
trouble comes do they realize that the
old folk knew a little mure than they
gave  them  credit   for.
* *   *
So ii has been with the esenl
reeve and council, They went iulo
office fully believing that Reeve Kerr
and previous c mncils lacked brain-.
The presenl reeve has said so on
more than one occasion. Mi Gold
! elii i > d he had all the brain:
sary  t" place  South   Vancoui
er financial position. So far muddle and 'li-' mti nt .mel eii- satisl -
tion among the municipal staff are "tn
only tangibl ��� ri suits of his n
* e|e        *
The  financial  pe isitii in  has  nol  im-'
proved.    On   the   contrary   it  is  dis-|
tinctly  more  unfavorable  than    when
hc took office.    The council is faced
with  a  threatened  action  by  the  old I
fiscal  agents,   if  the  treasury   certificate deal  with  Spitzer,  Rorick & Co.
| is persisted in.    Wood, Gundy's  may'
and  probably   will  secure  an   injunction restraining the municipality from j
carrying oul its proposed deal for the
sab-   of   treasury   certificates.     Then i
Spitzer.   Rorick   &   Co.  will   probably
bring  action  t"  recover  damages   for
breach  of  contract.    "Let    'em    law
their heads "IT." says thi   reeve.    But
in the meantime money is required to
carry een  the affairs of the municipal!-1
ty; and the only money in the treasury
i- $83,000 which Reeve Kerr arranged
for befure he left office, but which ar-
rivcil   ai'u-r   his   defeat.
* *    *
If that is the position financially,
what about thc efficiency of the municipal staff? By a penny wise and
pound foolish policy the council has
got riel of s.iine of ii- best employees,
particularly in lhe lire-department.
Mechanic Barker, for instance, a man
skilled in his work, capable of constructing an auto from start to finish.
A man who during the time be was in
the employ of tlle municipality, saved
the ratepayers hundreds of dollars by
doing wnrk on the premises which
would otherwise have had tej be sent
to Vancouver, "ne job alone which
he completed satisfactorily was estimated, before he tackled it. to ceist
$500, Mechanic I'.arker did the wnrk
during the time he was not driving
auto-truck No. 1 to fires; and for a
wage of Sim) a month, considerably
les> than he could have obtained elsewhere'. Our penny wise and pound
foolish council, without making any
enquiries, decided to cut his wages.
Result, he resigned at once and will
shortly leave fur Great Britain where]
auto-mechanics arc in great demand
at higher wages than be was obtaining iu  South  Vancouver.
Mr. J. B. Springford Answers His Critics and Convinces Council
That His Actions Were Clean and Above Board
The  Council  met  in  open   in
em   Monday   afternoon   t"  investigate
and decide upon certain charges sent
in   writing  against   Municipal    Clerk
Springford.    Tin   charges,    some    of|
which were of a serious nature, were
read OUt by the clerk, and after reading   them,  it   wa-   'i:-,'"V iTe-el   that   tl
charges  were  ii"'   signed  by  anyone,
Clerk   Springford   refused   tei   answer
.'   charges until this was done sol
that he could kneiw win, his accusers
were.    Messrs. Lewis. Way. Seymour'
ami Hobson were in the hall ami they'
we-re  prepared  t"   sign   th<
"ii behalf of the V'etcrs' League
being   done,   the   charges   were   taken
ii])  one  by  one  by  Clerk   Springford.
The  lirst  wa-  charging that  no  proper   records   had   been   kept   regarding
School   Board   monies.    This   charge
was   ably   handled   by   the   clerk   and
was shown t" be. foolish.    Mr. Springford gave a lucid statement as t" former methods and present methods, re
the bookkeeping iu the hall and was
able   t"   show    that   everything   under
Iiis   management   was   up   to   date   in
every respect.
The second charge was mail, by
Mr. Way charging the clerk with refusing to give him the pr"|ier infor-
mation he was applying feir. re insurance but instead giving out false
statements. This matter Clerk
Springford took up quite ably, showing from the minutes iu tlle hall In "ks
that he had done his work according
t" the instructions given him by llu
council ami a'.-" proved that Mr. Way
had had his equal share in tin all"t-
tnent  of   municipal  insurance.
Mr. Springford was also charged
with improper use of the money granted  for  relief  work,  $10,000  hael  been
granted for relief we.rk anel emly a
small portion used i"r that purpose.
Tin-   e-lerk   wa-   abb-   1"  show   that   he
ne exactly a- hi.-, council had
"i-ilen-el and thai tin- representation
-ent by the Provincial Government
t" investigate tin- I   d been fully sat-
that iln- monies had been spent
iu a pp'ticr  manner ami a  perfect ac-
e'"un: ' i the same ke-pt.
The against  the  Muni
cipal Clerk wa- ihi! "i having bought
supplies, ete.. feer Iiis car. and charged
them up to tin- Municipal accounts
without the authority of the council.
Clerk Springford was able i" show
had generously given the use
of his car for ihe us,- i,i the Council
when il wa- needed and how it was
used fn m timi to time for municipal
purposes and how he had only charged
for repairs which had been made ncc-
essary thr,.ugh such use being made
of  his   car.
Councillors Campbell, Stanley. Allen, Welsh, Rowling anel Street ill
turn sp'ike regarding the charges and
were unanimous in their decision that
ihe charges had not been proven
against Clerk Springford that his dealing- with the Council had all been
squari   and  above board and that  he
-t 1   cleared   before   this   council   of
all ol" the-e charges which had been
brought against him.
Messrs. Levis. Way. Seymour and
Hobson rose i" object t'e this finding
but were booted down by the majority
of the audience present and the remark- were freely and openly made
that the charges bad not only failed
but had been shown ti' be entirely
without   foundatie n.
s    *    *
Another re-ult is that owing to the
���all   t "   arms   the   demand   for   skilled
into   drivers,   and   mechanics   capable
Iof   making   repairs   to   military   autotrucks,   creates   a   difficulty   in   replacing Mechanic I'.arker iii the fire-department.    Capable men are in,I  -    pi n
titit 1   a-   Reeve   Gold  seems   te,   think.
[ucfl      nt 1 len can always be obtained, and  they    arc dear at a gilt; but
skilled, capable men in  charge of val-
uable  apparatus  like  the    fire    autotrucks   in   worth every  cm   thej   de-
i'.y   the  "Let   '"in   all   resign"
policy of Ree\ e ''" ild I ��� ������ municipalitj
has 1   -:        ." "il  man   in   T   '
!���  ma)   lose another in  Chii i  Lesti
Verb,  sap
Ratepayers Taking Keen Interest In
Business Transacted At Mun. Hall
Large Crowds Attend Council  Meetings
Officer Appointed
New Medical Health
Friends of Mrs J. W. Davidson,
Walden Street, will be glad t" know
she is red Hiring nicely. She is in
the   Bllttc   Street    11 "-pital.
* *    *
Mrs. R. C. Cook received at her
home corner Laid', ami 3rd Avenue
Tuesdav- afternoon, in honor of her
sister, Mrs. Allen Archer, who is hi i
from Arialo. Sask.. visiting relatives
and  friends  f.er  a   tew   in- nths,
* +    *
Miss  Lie I. 40th  Avenue    Wesl    is
suffering from a severe attack ol
silitis.
lie       +       ele
Mrs. Purcell, "1 40th Avenue East,
who recently underwent an operation
at St. Pauls Hospital, is improving
nicely. *   *   *
'I'he Rev, .1. R, Westman, superintendent of the Educational Conference
of the' Methodist Church, preached at
Mountain  View  Sunday  evening.
st      *     ��
The Whist Hrivc held at thc Liberal Clu.i Rooms em Wednesday evening was well attended and everyone
made' merry, e ue first prize went to
Mr. Fischer, Mrs. John Jackson won
the ladies' lirst prize' anel Mr. D. W.
Grimmett carrying off the be."by prize.
Among those who attended were Mr
and Mrs. Chamberlain, D. M. and
Mrs. Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. Blythe,
Mr. and Mrs. Fisher, Mr. and Mrs.
Sterling. Mr. and Mrs, Chandler, Mr.
and Mrs. lacksoit, Mr. and Mrs. Wood,
Mr. and Sirs. G. M. Murray. Mr. and
Mrs. Henderson. Mi-s Deiiman. Mrs.
Cordi, and Messrs. Kay. Dolan, Mouat,
Grimmett,   Irvin,   Boyd,  Stewart   and
others.
* it    *
The La.lies' Aid Society of Si.
David's Presbyterian Church will hold
a hanj.erchicf sale next Thursday
afternoon in the church building. During the afternoon tea will be serve.1
and a programme of songs, etc. has
been arranged for s.i that those attending mav have a pleasant time.
* *    s,
A Voters" League meeting was held
at Kalenberg Hall ou Wednesday.
February 10. to receive the following  reports  and  deal  with   St mc :
Auditors' report: committee on
School report; committee em Province
report; committee on Springford  case
General business was transacted
and arrangements made for thc next
public meeting.
Opening of Laurier Club Draws
Large and Enthusiastic Crowd
River Road Liberals Determined to Help Speed the Day When
Sane Government Will Be Established in B.C.
The   Liberals   of   South    \ Ivei
continuing their progressive policj
active  organization  added another  to
their long li-i "i material sui - il
the way of opening Liberal Club
rooms in the elistrict, when the Liberals .ef the Kiver Road district "pencil their new elaborate clu'.) In
ters al lhe comer eef Main Stive: and
Kiver  Road.
Tin- Smith Vancouver Libera', band
wa- m attendance and rendered a number of littiug and appropriate -election.-.
The speakers of the evening were
Mr. M. A. Macdonald, president .ef
the Provincial Liberal party ami Mr.
Ralph Smith, president of the City and
Districl   Liberal   organization.
The  chairman,   Mr.  G.   G.   McGeer,
president  of  ihe   Richmond     Districl
Liberal   Association,  in     opening    the
meeting,   complimented   the   members
'of the Laurier Club on their  splendid
Iquarters ami the apparent activity displayed  by  its   membership  an.l  assiir-
ied the membership eif the success that
I would   attend   their   efforts.
In a brief address, he took the Government to task for ignoring the
municipality of South Vancouver in
thc proposed redistribution bill In
all past re-distributions, it lu'el been
the policy of all governments throughout the Dominion of Canada lo recognize, as far as possible. County or
Municipal boundaries, but in South
Vancouver lhe government hael seen
fit to tack a portion of South Vancouver on to Burnaby. calling the new
constituency Burnaby, the other portion to be tacked em to Point Grey and
Richmond and that constituency to
be known as Richmond. From thc
p.lint of view ol" Liberalism the redistribution was highly satisfactory to
thc members of the Liberal party, for
it  assured  tlie  election  of a    Liberal
it    in both fn sc .��� msti
11   ev ,v e v.  from the   i "in:  of v ten   oi
l  ���   Municipalitj   o    South   V incout i r
ihe  altitude  ",'  the    G ivernment    in
iln- r< -pe'.'t seemed t" be quite n: a,
iii i'.if treatment which the
���i ui:- ipality had received at the hands
"i the Governmenl since ns inauguration, Mr. McGeer further sl
he felt absolutely assured that the action "f the C."V eminent in thi- respt cl
would assure the complete and unanimous supporl of ihe Lib,; ,1 i irci -
hereafter in South Vancouver by
every one having the interests "f thc
municipality al heart. It vvas further
stated by the- chairman that such an
iniquitous redistribution would, if the
Liberals were' returned t ��� power a;
the next election, be repealed and thai
a redistribution bill would be introduced vv Ik rein Vancouver Soma would
have complete recognition,
Th.' chairman then called upon Mr.
M. A Macdonald t" address the
meeting, Mr. Macdonald spoke
briefly and dealt with, in his usual
capable manner, the issues which are
agitating  the   mind-   nf  thc   people   of
the Province "t British Columbia. He
accorded iln treatment fi Vancouver
South by thc Government ami the
question of redistribution as being due
solely t" the activity of the Liberals
in the district. Mr. Macdonald alsei
dealt briefly with thc Land Question
anel with the Dominion Trust Swindle,
and also with the progress that the
Liberals in lhe Province were making
at the present time. He closed his
address with compliments of the highest nature to the Liberals of .south
Vancouver and to the Liberals of the
Laurier Club. At lhe close of his address. Mr. Macdonald received a
splendid ovation. The chairman then
called upon lhe South Vancouver
(Continued on  Pag<-  5)
A large and representative body of
iln ratepayers wen present last Friday evening at the first open meeting
of the Municipal Council. The rep rts
from the different committes were'
read and dealt with in i Batisfacl ry
manner.   A resolution ised ap-
nting R Goi in illors
Welsh. Stanlej and Rowlings committee to interview vtt irney-Genera!
Bowsi     '  ���   '      pu
to paj   ��� um llors $ KM per an
num foi  thi ii  sen i( i -
Th< r< porl    f tl    H
reporl the
:;.'.--! '11
to  build  aie      :��� -
South Va
Fleming
���   wa-   refus
\  w ith the bylaws     This i
was ad The n p< 'rt "i
the
	
pall)   with
���
B     -;   "i  W i rks
follow ed and  tin-    e]
princi|
when
w en- av ailabtc v - cept-
, ,1 and adi ipti
Th, report ol i V\ r Commit-
., e wa- then read .unl this report,
which  was  a  lenth)   one,  acl   ��
with   the  work    of    the    wate r-
v, i -rks   and   w ith   the    B agi -
ies ol the mc:: employed in this department was  fully  gone  int".
The scale of wages wa- carefully
gone over ami after a careful study
was adopted.
The   report   of   the   Finance     i
mittce  was  by  far  thc  mosl   lengthy
and   important   one   before   the   meeting  and  took   considerable  time    In
tii:- rep Tt   Mr.  1'.  II. McNeil was
pointed   Municipal    Vuditor     for     the
yeai at a salary of $960,    111  will
audit  thc books  of  'in   School   Ib.arel
for   which   he   will  be     paid     by     tlu
board.    A considerable number of accounts   and   claims   were     dealt     witb
and it was finally adopted.
\ new Medical Health Officer was
appointed at this meeting tei take the
place of Dr. Murphv. There were
four aplicants feir this position���Hrs.
Petersky, Holbrook, Duncan and
Turnbull. and after the applications
hael luen read and a vote taken by
ballot it was seen tbat Dr. II, L.
Turnbull. of 2s4- Main Street was the
choice of the council and he was
therefore appointed to the position at
a salary, fixed at $100 per month, his
duties to begin the following Monday.
Thc only other business of imnort-
ance was a communication from Reeve
Gold to the Municipal Clerk, giving
the clerk notice that Mr. A. H. Seymour had been appointed private secretary   to  the  reeve  and   asking    the
clerk to notify all heads of departments
that this bail been done, and request-
in" them to supply Mr. Seymour with
all the information he required in connection with their several departments.
Mr. Springford had replied ��� i the
reeve pointing out to him that this
could met be done without resolution
from   the   council.
After a long and heated discussion
of  this  matter,  in  which  all   of
council   took  part,  it   was  moved  by
Councillor   Welsh   and   seconded    by
ill  r  Stn et  that   this  c immuni-
VI uncil
suppoi ex-
Russ
11.30 p.m.
A - uncil
���      V
much n     ial busim -- was
It   up  and     isposi V n ���
up a good pa
the tune' and which brought out  a  full
���
t" ihe  Vancouvi Hospital.
men;   and   chart
from  Soul     \
C 'Uncil that ihe chai gi - madi   m:    exor-
'   in   many   i :   all
proportioi ri ndered.
Councillor Campbell  suggested  thai
'-  the   timi me    when
South Vancouver should take a forward step and try t i have h 'spitai
facilities of i:- own in South Vancouver. Instances were cited where
grave dangers hael existed and lives
had been imperiled by the long run
from the municipality t the hospital.
It was admitted on all ham's that this
w is so, but under the present financial conditions il was -cen to be im.
possible : i eh, anything towards having an hospital erected in South Van-
c iuvi r,  so l -ti'ii wa- all' >w-
ed to drop.
A resolution was moved and adopted that a grant of $5,000 b< made tee
the Vancouver General Hospital, this
being the same amount a- was grantee', by last year'- ,' euncil, and the
Reeve ami a deputation of the council were appointed to attend the meeting eif ihe lleespital Board to be hebl
thc  same  evening.
The appointment e.f a helper to thc
blacksmith vvas brought up and it was
referred to the Engineer and the
Chairman of the Hoard of Works to
make this appointment
Thc apportionment of money for
work iu the different wards was an
item of much discussion. The Engineer reported that the new ward foremen in the different wards had started work that morning and the work
was already laid out for the first batch
of men in the different wards. $2,000
had been allotted to each ward for
work to be started immediately, hut
(Continued on  Page  6)
/ TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  KKIIRLARV  13,  1915
*-~ aCHINOCHC
PUBLISHED
Every Saturday by the Greater Vancouver Publishers Limited
George M. Murray. Editor
HEAD OFFICE
Corner   Thirtieth   Avenue   and   Main   Street.   South   Vancouver.   B. C.
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Postage to American. European and other Foreign Countries. $1.00
per year extra.	
"The truth at all times firmly stands
And shall Irom age to age endure."
LITTLE THINGS ARE ALWAYS IMPORTANT,
MR. BOWSER!
WHEN  the Attorney-General of  British Columbia made liis great speech    upon    Dominion
Trust Company matters in the legislature last week
he referred bitterly to the "Chinook" as a mere "Little South Vancouver paper," The author of the
article "with enough truth in it to make it damnable,"
was sneered at by the Attorney-General anel was mentioned as "The South Vancouver Scribbler."
It is a matter of small consequence whether a journal be little or big physically. The biggest newspaper
in British Columbia is also the most craven vassal of
Mr. llowser. The "Chinook" is bigger, both as regards its editorial outlook and its area of printed
paper among the newspapers of the world than Mr.
llowser is, both as regards soul and body, among the
statesmen of the world.
Tlie writer may be but an humble scribbler, but the
people of British Columbia will decide whether or not
tbe eloquence of Mr. llowser overcomes in any manner the facts set forth in the "little paper" by the
"South Vancouver scribbler."
It is but natural that Mr. llowser should complain
that the journal which printed the truth about him
and the Dominion Trust Company was but a "little"
paper.
Men of the ilk of llowser have no time nor regard
for little things.
When his government passed the crooked legislation which enabled the Dominion Trust Company to
swindle the public, the members thereof did not think
of the little children and the children then unborn,
who starve today because of the Dominion Trust collapse.
Thai government bad no protection to offer the
poor little stenographer who, when her savings were
swept away in the Dominion Trust collapse anil she
was unable to find honest employment, secured a
ticket to Seattle and there suicided in Union I^ake.
Mr. llowser and liis people have small regard for
tlie little things. Neglect hy them of the little things
has rendered this great province of British Columbia
insolvent in the money markets of tlie world ami a
"Paradise Lost" to the working people al  home.
Had Mr. Bowser and the haughty Sir Richard McBride given proper attention to the little things of
government, the people of the next generation and
succeeding generations would lay laurels upon thc
tombs of two statesmen, and the memory of one would
he particularly hallowed because he was a native son.
And the little papers, the little men. the little ideas,
tlie little pennies, the little kind words and the little j
children have played such a great pari in making tlie
world grow better!
It was the "insignificant little Welshman," M.r.
Lloyd-George, who brought light to the submerged
millions of Britain.
11 was the violation of a "little scrap of paper" that
called a million liritons tn arms to protect little Belgium,
It was the Little Carpenter's Son who taught the
priests in the temple and brought hope to the hearts
of all men.
It was the little David armed with but a sling ami
the Weird of (iod who repulsed the armies of the
Philistines.
It was not tlle little article in the "Chinook" which
brought forth the great .oration by Bowser in the
House last week���the defence which occupied three
whole page- of type in Mr. Bowser's big papers, the
"Colonist" and "News-Advertiser."
It was tbe -lill small voice within the heart of the
stern Attorney-General which forced him to utter this
splendidly constructed defence, which, shorn of it- eloquence and splendor, takes the form of a simple
apology from one who has done a great wrong and
knows it.
Today the "South Vancouver scribbler" edits    a
"little South Vancouver paper."
-   And yet he is of good cheer for it has been written: !����������
"He who is faithful in small things, I will make him
ruler over many."
THE RIFT IN THE LUTE
LIFE in the British Columbia legislature would be
dull without l'arker Williams. He is fighting
the government this session with more power and
greater results than ever before.    He says the Social
ist- are nut figuring as tbe tail to tbe Liberal kite.   \\ e
are glad.    The fight is a geiod fight on its own merit-.]
The concert of the legislature weiuld he in line tune
il"   l'arker  Williams  were not there,  though  il-  liar-j
mony would sometimes coquet with discord, ami -uf-;
lirieiit   for  the  day  would  he  the  symphony  thereof.'
But l'arker Williams i- the malignant instrument whe.
disturbs   the   performance,   and    in-i-t-   on    making:
music when he i- expected to be silent while the first
violin and the flute player and the ba-- viol and the
trombone an- consigning him to the outer darkness.
It is a sail thought that -uch excellent artistic ensemble wmk should he interrupted in this way. The
legislative orchestra is so carefully trained. Tlie mas-;
tir musicians have drilled the minor performers until they have lost the characteristics of individuals,
and become merged in a uniform obedient mass.
If l'arker William- coulel only be eliminated, this
dumb acquiescence would bring the most perfect peace
thai ever prevailed in any legislative body in the
world. Tlie onlj disturbance would he when somebody let loose a fresh paroxysm of platitude-, which j
is to say of wind. Lor lhe orchestra is maele up chief-
ly of wind instruments. And the musicians are so
well trained in political decnium thai tliey even temper the wind to the occasion.
I'.ut l'arker Williams is not a wind instrument. He
is a -brill discordant pipe. He is so shrill and discordant that the res! of tlle orchestra would like to
use his hide for a new snare drum head.
When you consider the political situation it seems
remarkable that the Conservatives who sit in tiie legislature comfortably admiring themselves and daily
discovering new virtues in each other while the business of the province languishes, have no other opposition except that of l'arker Williams and his man
Friday, John Place. You have to turn back the pages
of history to the earliest times to find another example
of a government with no opposition except two poor
but honest coal miners without tbe benefits of a college education. If you take tbe trouble to travel
down the tracks of time to early days, you will find
recorded instances of similar governments to tlie one
at Victoria, which consisted simply of two or three
real administrators and a lot of dummy legislators
who praised their leaders witb a great deal of unction
and did as they were told. Hut it is generally understood that these venerated examples of government
are out of date. That we have one of them at Victoria right now is of interest.
l'arker Williams does his best, but there is so much
to do that he might well call "Help!" Ile is a man
of many parts and much wit and he needs all his personal gifts in the epic job with which he has been endowed hy circumstances.
The government newspapers assail l'arker Williams, accusing him of discrediting liritish Columbia
for the sake of making attacks on the government.
He has been criticising the government for fourteen
years and the people of liritish Columbia have only
just begun to listen to him. Xot long ago, when
l'arker Williams rose to speak in the legislature, the
reporters in the press gallery adjourned to the smoke
room. Xow they stay. Recently Parker Williams has
been worth at least two columns every time he ha- addressed the house. In prosperous times, when the
thoughtless people of Hritish Columbia downstreamed
comfortably along bonding heaver meadows and blue
skies, they did not care much what the government
did. front fiscal forgeries to giving away half the
province. Hut now the people are commencing to
take notice. The only thing that bas remained indifferent to tlie rude touch of bard times is the government  itself.
THE SILVER LINING
PEOPLE who think that good times will not return soon to Hritish Columbia are mu far sigh ted.
Prosperity cannot stay away from this province very
long.    We should hire assassins to make away  with,
a lew of tiie blue ruin talkers who are predicting that
things will grow worse and worse instead of improving.   These people are a- bad a- boosters.   'I'he sky
is always overcast when one of them is around. Earnest impartial safeblowers are better citizens and much
pleasanter to meet.   Everyone Bees the gray clouds!
in the sky, hut the blue ruin talker cannot see the sil-1
ver lining which tell- that the sun will shine through
before long.
The pessimist is generally a man whose stomach
has not worn well, or wdio has been swatted by fate
with a few assorted misfortunes, and who lacks the
fortitude of Job and other sufferers who won fame by
showing a good example to the human race. So he
talks hard times and points out to everyone that the
present is an indigo blue shade and that the future is
very black indeed. In days of prosperity he does not
change his tune but people won't listen to him then.
In dull times you will find him everywhere, on street
comers, in clubs, at dinner tables, in cars, and always
with an audience around him. He gloats over the
hard times and wallows in his subject. According to
him. prosperity has departed from the earth and will
never return. Hc can give you chapter and verse and
facts and figures to show that everything has gone to
the dogs and that mankind will be living in caves and
eating roots before many years. Business will get
worse instead of better, according to this philosopher.
What is
"a Diether ton?"
How It Is Made���
lln patent apparatus used in weighing
Diether South Wellington Coal insures
generous weight lor nil loads in sacks.
Tin city weigh clerk guarantees all hulk
loads fi 2 tons ami up by issuing a city
weigh ticket with such loads.
Weighed Before Sacking
Diether Coal is sacked liy an automatic
scale- anel ICOOp���-a new ami Interesting
device. Tin' coai tips the scale tit lt��>
poundi and so releases tin- scoop, which
deposits it in the sack. The full 100 Ibs.
musl be in tht scoop before it goes intei
the sack.
"A Diether ton" is more than merely accurate full
weight. It is a generous ton. Notice how it fills
your bin!
Delivered Promptly Same Hay Ai Ordered
Pea
$4.25
L. M.
Nut
$5.00
DIETHER
Lump
$6.50
COAL
CO. LTD.
Your hens will lay all
winter if you get your
Poultry Supplies from us
PRATT'S POULTRY REGULATOR
WILL PRODUCE
- - THE  EGGS -  -
F. T. VERNON'S
MOUNT PLEASANT
FEED STORE
255 Broadway East (cor. Kingsway)
Phone  Fairmont  18'i
until the only thing to do is to shut up shop ami g�� I
home. This kind of man infects many people with
his depressing talk, though you would think that even
the dullest intelligence would know \vhat nonsense it
is. And as people's efficiency depends almost solely
on their individual feelings, their activity and energy
curves, which show tlvj amount of work they do, fall
downward. Psychologists know that our mental and
physical powers tire reduced quicker by the influence
i of depressing talk than by weather or varying temperatures or any other minor cause. The nervous
feeling that these forecasts of future trouble like the
cutting down of wages, or the loss of work or business, sends the efficiency curve down at once. This
is one of the psychological causes of hard times.
WILL TIMES MAKE A DIFFERENCE
WHEN   times were good the disciples of  Henry
George used to come to Vancouver and look
winch gooil times  am
say:   "This shows thatIsource
Up at the new tall building
single tax had produced, am
single tax works as well in practice a- it sounds in
theory. This is a prosperous and growing city." Then
the)1 would go home and tell their friends about Vancouver, and in this way the city received some free
advertising.
Xow. when times are dull and a great many of tbe
offices in tbe tall office buildings are empty, these
single tax philosophers stay away from Vancouver.
This city im longer furnishes a good illustration of
how practicable single tax i
,1 n;0 I European countries there are hank- called land-ni' rt-
gage hank-, which were established fur the purposi of
making long-time loans, at a low rale of Interest, t"
the farmers. A farmer whose land i- worth ten
thousand dollars, inr example, wishes to borrow live
thousand deellar-. lie gives a mortgage tei the bank
for $5,000. Ile i- charged four per cent, on tlle loan,
one-half of one per cent, for the -inking fund which
takes up the loan in fifty-four years, and a quarter
of one per cent, for administration. The hank issues
bonds, in hundred dollar denominations, against this
mortgage, hearing four per cent, interest, which become quick asset-, easily circulating. With tbe payment of every hundred dollar- of this mortgage, a
bond for that amount is cancelled. Many of these land
mortgage hanks have their capital supplied by the
government. In either countries agriculture has been
revolutionized by rural credit systems. The government of liritish Columbia bas been as tardy in assisting the development of agriculture as in giving
aid to other things from which the province would
derive practical benefits. Agriculture is the greatest
f natural wealth, and in British Columbia the
government has utterly neglected it.    A wise system
of rural credits i- an absolute necessity in this prov-
BY THE WAY
m
TII
flTNEY busses have raised on a -mall scale in
\ great many citizens j Vancouver the question of color and race which have
given the Southern State- separate cars for the colored population.    It has become a common sight in
agitateel the socialization, nut e.f land j-ee jitney drivers refusing to allow- Hindus to enter
aid. Imt of ihe annual values of land. I their car-.   In several cases the Hindus have mounted
I,
of  Vancouver  who  used   to  think  -ingle  (ax  was  a
good tiling now  feel doubtful about its virtues.
I lenry Geor
as is sometime
In order to secure that result he proposed that all
taxes on personal property and real estate improvements he abolished and that public revenues he derived exclusively from a tax measured by land values,
In order t" carry out that program he proposed to
begin by abolishing all taxes except on laml values.
HELPING 'THE PARMER
MANY thoughtful people in liritish Columbia are
studying the subject of rural credit.    Canadian
hanks do imt often  lend monev on  real estate.    In
ie running boards ami insisted until thrust back by
the white passengers.
ROBINS AXD songsparrows are making tlie vacant
lot- of South Vancouver musical these warm sunny
mornings.   The warm weather certainly illustrates the
scriptural maxim which says that tlle Lord tempers
the wind to the shorn lambs, 'Hie small shareholders
who lust their -avings in tin- Dominion Trust wreck
will not suffer from cold, though they may feel the
pangs of hunger.
NURSES
CALL BAYVIEW 1097.
MATERNITY AND SURGICAL CASES
LH      FAIRVIEW   NURSING   HOME
PRIVATE NURSES
SENT OUT
978 BROADWAV WEST
��H*;
The Important Matter of Choosing Your Dentist
"The Last Word
in Dentistry."
Good  Teeth
necessary
to health
"Cheap"
dentistry
the   most
expensive
What are
"Nature
teeth"?
Advice
free
^r\ HERE is nothing sn important to your health ami efficiency as llie matter with
"V��/  your teeth.   Sound, useful, beautiful teeth should hc yours���teeth that enable
you to bile, chew and smile in comfort. Decayed teeth cause, not only continual
inconvenience, hut permanent ill-health. It is your duty to yourself to economize
in other ways SO that you may secure teeth that look natural, feel natural and perform the functions which Nature allotted to those important members.
j^SHEREFORE you should choose your dentist with great care. It is poor-
V^ economy to buy "bargain teeth." Inferior dentistry���poor materials, little
knowledge and less care���costs but little less than the right kind even at the beginning, and certainly is much more expensive in the long run.
I KM PLOY only the most modern methods, the greatest care and skill and the
best materials. Each individual case is carefully studied. When I fit you
with ray "Nature teeth" they look, fit and feel like the ones Nature gave you. And
you will find my prices no higher than those of ordinary dentists.
GOME in and allow me to examine your mouth, advise you and give you mj
estimate of the cost.    This will involve no obligation  whatever.    Make u
your mind now to see  to those  teeth,
making appointment for examination.
y
_p
Then  call, phone  or  write  to me  now,
No Gas or Harmful Drugs Used
The New
Standard Bank
Bldg., Richards
and   Hastings
Second   Floor
Entrance
Room 212
Phone  Sey.
4 6 7 9
"You Suffer No Pain"
GUARANTEE
1 HEREBY GUARANTEE lhat alt dental work performed hy me wi|] j,e absolutely
painless. II the slightest twinge ol pain is experienced by tlie patient no money need be paid
to me, or il any has been paid, it will be instantly kefi/tdcd.
I further guarantee lhat all crown or bridge work e,r filling will remain in first-class condition for a period of TEN YEAKS. If any of my work becomes defective during that time I
will replace it absolutely FREE OF CHARGE.
"THI   Mnr��nv.   *.- ^ ^^^^
OPEN   EVENINGS
"THE MODERN DENTIfT-
V1 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY  13, WIS
GREATER VANCOOVER CHINOOK
THREE
The
Telephone
THE ADVANCE AGENT OF
Comfort and Convenience
FORMS  A  CLOSER   UNION   <>l;   HOME,
BUSINESS AND FRIENDS.
FOR A LIMITED TIME, BUSINESS AXD
RESIDENCE TELEPHONES WILL BE
INSTALLED UPON PAYMENT OF $5.00
RENTAL IX ADVANCE.
FOR PARTICULARS CALL UP
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CONTRACT DEPARTMENT
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandy has a day owre at Victoria an' goes tae the parliament h-iose
tae hear his auld ireen, Wullie Bowser, mak a speech
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH  TICKETS  ISSUED
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The Popular Route to the���
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ALASKA
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Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
ta
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H.  W.  BRODIE,  Gen.  Pass. Agent, Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
C. E. Jcreney, G. A. P. D.
Phone:   Sey. 8134 527  Granville  Street
CI Where do we South Vancouver People
EA T when We are Down Town ?
Economy consists of spending  money so
that you will have more to spend
MORAL   Eat at the PENDER CAFE
727 Pender St. West
THE    PENDER     CAFE    Pender St. West
Anderson Meat Market
and Groceries
4152 MAIN STREET
Phone Fair. 1634
MEATS   AND   GROCERIES
We    specialize    in    our    hoffle-cured    HAMS,
BACOX. and AYRSHIRE ROLL.
NEW LAID EGGS -*0c Per d(,z-
POTATOES   90c ;i sack
SWIFT'S SILVER LEAF LARD, 31b. pail, 35c
ORDERS PROMPTLY DELIVERED
\\ eel freens, 1 had u wee bil o1 a
holiday tae m> iel last wei 1 ������ in
thai I enjoyed a' the man bi i auie il
came ion ..' unexpected Por ~��� .m������
reason thai 'li-i;:e need tae be gaun
intae here, I Intel tai gai owri tac
\ ; luria, an' nu' hae I afore,
I made up im nun' ihat I ��i- gaun tae
in ilie   ... Im,;,   Iin ii . ny ., i
thc while I wis ai it.
I    It's thc first timi   I hai c ��iff
sin I came lac this country, an' I can
tell yen. freens, the pairtin' ii at iiichl
im- quite affi i tin'. In fact, tae ti II
lhe truth, il ni- ;ie ti nder thai
,i taen a guid gli ��� i twa tai knoi k
awa tin heavy fceiii it my hfrl
ii ei f I wenl een board the lne.it.
Th re 3 nae n-e me tellin' yae i my
leci aboot haen a Im ilram on tm
t-'euel owre, IT- ilie very best maidt-
cine at ony time bul parti
v. when yae wauken up in ilu middle
o' tin- nicht e.n board u boal an'
ie elm' a Im qui cr someu her' doon
in thc iiijim h.>..��.-. A iij>k umler the
pully's a' richt, ink my tip.
Hooever, ii sue happened tha! wi
i.i.el a guid nicht���I in. an me an' the
le -at. Th" sea wis i in its . i v bc '
behaviour, an' I never waukencd a-
fu ������ w< pu'd ui' m tiie dock at Victoria.
Xeeei freens. as 1 said afore, this is
the firsl time I hae lefl the ������������'ne fin
I cam tae this country an' comin' a-
sheere a kin' o' funny feelin' came owre
llle.
Naebody bul mysel tae look efter,
an' a fine mornin'���"Sandy," I says
tae mysel, "yae lucky dug."
Accompanied by a ireen I hat! picket! tip e.n board the boat, we made our
wey up the pier, passed bye the parlia-
men bildin', an' efter wishin' my Ireen
guid hye. commenced tae hae a look
reenii preparatory lae locatin' senile
place' where I could get a bit break-
fa M.
Weel freens. I hail a guid hoor or
twa daundcrin' roon seein' thc sichts
an' veesitin' wan or twa places o' interest. I canna say that I saw Anything thai parteecularly taen my fancy���in fact I wis seert o' disappinted
wi' Victoria n. I saw it. I hael an alea
it wis somethin' in a cless ahum
Vain ver, hut   I   canna say that noo.
Hooever, I whilcd awa the time tac
half-past twa, when I had made up my , when I
min' 1 wml gee tae the Parliament women
bildin' an' hear Wee Wullie defend
himsel' agin' the allegashuns thai had
heen hurled at him owre the Dominion Trust swinnle.
I wisna a meenit owre quick, either,
for when I got iii tin- "Galleries" were
pretty In'. I Ine .ever I got a very
comfortable seat mysel, an' wis ahle
tac sec a' that wis Kami on.
Wi' muckle pomp an' ceremony
the speaker came ill an' the hoose wis
duly opened wi' prayer. Incidentally,
1 noticed thai the chaplain waited until the twa heid yins were in their
places ate ne he began. Thai minister
kens his duty a' richt.
The chamber in which the legisla-
teirs (fnr the luv o' Mike) -it i- certainly an imposing place���in fact the
members that compose the legislature
looked   jii-t   abool   as   muckh t   o'
place as a bohtink wml look in the
ball room 'i' ihe 11��� .t.-1 Vancoover.
Thev were a parteecularly unimpos-
in' i.e..kin' bunch li yae' except
Dicky, wha's wooly head an' Imperial lookin' countenance maks up for
a lot ee' ither deficiencies, an' the twa
members "' the oppisishun, they
were as common a lookin' hunch as
onybody wml care tae see'.
Nae wunner we hae sae muckle
prosperity in B.C. at the- pr.-mi
time. If the parliament wiul pass an
act gien them poorer tae open -nine
������White hunches" liny could fin' employment mare ut the line o' that
crew that lay hack in iheir leather
chairs; they're an iligant l"t.
Cairter-Ci'tti'ii, i">r muckle esteemed representative nae Richmond, wis
there also, an' 1 wunncreil lae mysel
whal iu the name o' a' that's guid
could the S��'th Vancoover i.'lk hae
sae muckle tae grummle aboot wi
sic an intelligent lookin' fellie
watchin' their interests. The rest o'
them (I wunna ca' them legislators
ony niarcl reclined hack in their
chairs an' lookit for a' the world like
a hunch o' kids at a magic lantern
show wunnerin' whether the man wis
gaun tae' nie them a bag o' sua ems
efter  the  performance  wis owre.
I feirge: where it says "These' be
your gods o' Israel." but tae apply it
iae B.C., if these he ihe legislators
that were appinted by the electors o
B.C. then I can verily say thai tlie
populashon o' this pre.vince arc gettin a' that's comin' tac them in they
times ee'  stress an' stervashun.
Vae canna expect tac breed a race
heirse frae a strain o' Clydesdales, an'
nae mare ean yae expect guid government frae the collecshun o' waux fee-
gurs that ceitnpiesc ihat chamber.
When Wullie got up tae defend
himsel owre the Dominion Trust bizness Dickv thumped his desk as a
signal for his marionettes tae wauken
up an' follow suit.
It could plainly he seen the Wee
Yin wis a bit nervous when he started
an' richt awa worked himsel up tac a
pitch o' excitement.
I've nae doubt Wullie rea
this wis the tichtest ceirner he'd ever
been in sin' he entered public life, an
ihe rest o' the members, includin Dicky realised that the Wee Vin bad tae
dae somethin' extra iu the oratorical
line tae pu' them not the mess.
Yaell often hae noticed, freens,
when listcnm' tae some public speaker that he generally opens Ins address
in a canna sort o' wey. gradua ly
warmiii' up tae his subject, an' finally
comin' in wi' the heavy artillery lae
convince his hearers o' the truth o
his argyments. .,,,,���.
Weel Wullie wis evidently labunn^
under a heavy strain, feir instead ef
feillowin' the usual coorse, he started
richt in wi' the "heavy" yins lirst an'
afore he wis hauf through left himsel
flo��nderin' among a mass o' detail
that  wis  sae  muckle  awa    frae     the
aliscd that
'i'ii stj in   that   the  "faithful"   '.n    the
-" evei nnienl benches  a i r<   > m mn' u.i
iin'    ilnni-e;-    ai '    ev unnerin'
when  he wis Kami  i mish.
Thai repol I "' ilu- ���!. positoi
view wi' him that appear, el in tin
"Chinook" had evidently �����.: the wee
��������� llir'l "if at" a- tii. \ -a;, , ,.,i I,, re.
I ��� " - enough truth in ii ta. mak
���'ill',' wi- 'iie a y iie pin It
V\ hale v fl lie i ;, thai w ii -.,inert hat  ������' a mystery.    T In   resl  ..' tin
lelllle   il     e   XCllallgCfl    l'".k-     I'. l'    y|||    ail'ith-
er,  vainl)   tryin'  lai   gel   ihe   drift  ������'
��� .'. ullii   nn ..in.
\n' nu' content ��i' putlin' my face
'I .' ''- T Vim.hi'-, ihey mat. ni.iltl.M>
�� aur ley priutin' in a -aie'i.nel . del -linn iln portrait n' ��� worthy premier."
Again were the elok- thumped in
' 'ken     ���'   '.lie'   "faithful's"   eli.appre.val.
lie'    't'hill'eeek'    111'    < 1U 1111 ll < I  '    W I-     tile
;l;e un n' Willing discoorse a' tIir.m��;i
'.ie frae iln wey his utterances were
received in tin- public galleries il
could   plainly   he   Men   that   the
��� didna -hare his views hy ony
means. In facl I'm prettj -hare the
"Chinook" 'II pick up quite a wheen
new   subscribers  in   the   months    tae
come wi' lhe wey iu which Wullie
Se" in   tae-   '!i-ppe\ e-   ns   writin's
Wullie'- idea wis thai in attaekhf
him an' hi- policy in regain] tac the
Dominion Trust, thc "Chinook" wis
daen it- best tae hurt the province
in the ey< - e,' ilie .>,.tsjdi; world.
If the "Chinook" wis Iae yae .������ ��� t 'e'
existence ihe unem, it lias done
enough in they twa articles tae mak
its name remain famous in the annals
11' B.C. as showin' up one o' ihe rot-
tenesl swinnles that wis ever perpetrated  -en  ony  community.
What is there to hide? Dae yae
mean tae nil me the auld country financiers Tl think ony marc "' ua if
we dinna try tac mak a clean breast
o' it an' bring thc guilty pairties tac
book. Staund lae yaer guns, Maister
Edytur; yaeve got the f.elk at llle
hack "' yae an wi' their supporl
yaell lie able lae lead in ihe honest
attempt tae bruin aboot some daicent
form    ' government  in  1'. 1'
Puir Wee Wullie; I kill o' felt haul
sorrj for yae. times, but ihen when
I thochl h' ihe puir. hcrt-brokcn folk
ilia! had lost their a' in thai swinnle,
when I thochl o' the stervill' men an'
iu Vancoover, an' when I
hiieked doon "ii ihat self-composed
hunch "' hum legislators, 1 felt almost like breakin' a' parliamentary
procedure an' gien them a wee hit o'
my ain min'.
Hooever, "every dug has his day"
an' my name's nn' Samly MacPherson
if the stai'i hasua been made iu a
wholesome clean up campaign that'll
riel tiie Province leer a' time o' lhat
bunch ie' rubber -lamps that are' better fitted for eatin' hoose bosses than
legislators "' what 1 consider should
he the finest country in ihe world,
Eh, Wullie, if yae wml only consent
tae come tae some public meetin'
where we could net a chance ee' get-
tiii" hack ai yae, hut yaer as fly as
Aubl   Nick.
1 wudna hae missed thai pantymime
feer hits, freens. I came awa feelin'
happy thai the guid wnrk had started
an' ii the electors ���>' B.C. wml jist
start an' get busy it wudna he long
afe ��re we wuel mak lhat gan" Ret up
an'  quit,
Yours through the heather,
SANDY   XI MCPHERSON
COLLINGWOOD   HONORS
THE   BIRTHDAY   OF
CHARLES  DICKENS
It is well thai in these strenuous
and anxious days vi war, as well as
in the piping times oi peace, we should
remember  our   uenefactors.
T he I'.iTipiie is. as Sir Johnstone
Forbes-Robertson saiil on Saturday
night, "enduring and suffering," anel
ii will help us in endure, ii will enable us better tn bear our sufferings,
it will stimulate our energies and our
patriotism t<> remember those whi.
nave strengthened ..ur besl resolutions, promoted 'etir cheerfulness, ami
helped us "In he of g   courage" in
the firm belief that k"",! must ultimately prevail, and "right" noi "might"
must conquer iu the end.
It was good, therefore, thai a few
enthusiasts should meel em February
7th. remembering thai lay a- ilu
birthday of ihe high priesi of
lie     chce'i'fulni Charh s
who was bom in Portsmouth
ruary 7th, 1812,
li is pleasant t" know thai "A
Nighl wiih Dickens," arranged bj Mr.
J. Francis liursill eef Gollingwood,
was one fi ihe most successful gath-
erings ner given in he nnn nl the
great author.
It is pleasant i" record that Miss
Rosalie Geoghean ol Collingwood,
wine sang and recited e.n the occasion,
proved herself a charming ami talented laely ni win nn Se.uth Vancouver
mav well be proud..
Dickens was born in 1812. PortS-
moulli was busy iu these far-off elays;
war's fell shadow was Ihen nver the
land anel. Innking backward, ii seems
a- if the Portsmouth child had come
p. fulfil a mission In give the world
a message, the message he taught as a
matured author, hy Caleb Plummer,
by "the marchioness," by Dick Swiv-
eller. and above all by Mark Tapley
���the duly of keeping a stiff upper lip
and of "being cheerful under adverse
circumstances." Tn refer again I"
ihe eloquent words of Sir Forbes-
Robertson, "Art has its mission in
times nf darkness, struggle and adversity as well as in times of sunshine, case and prosperity." The
spoken and the written word helps
every elay emr gallant soldiers to do
their arduous duty.    The pillow of the
SUCCESS
Awaits  those who are prepared  to a
when it presents itself.    Hundreds of
,r  business  opportunity
OPPORTUNITIES
Will prisrnt th' revival of business following thi.
war.    If you are  wise, ymi  will  gel  ye ur trailing bow and he ready
for ye.iir opportunity.
Our Winter Term Opens Monday, Jan. 4
iboul il NOW.     The informati Is you nothing.
Success Business College
Limited
E. Scott  Eal in,  II.A., Principal
CORNER TENTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
Fairmont 2075 VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone Seymour 1946
ENGLISH COLLEGIATE SCHOOL
1150 ROBSON STREET, VANCOUVER.  B.C.
Miss HILDA A. POMEROY, Principal
Certificated at the B i f Education, England.
Trained at  Hishop Otter College. Sussex.
Associate of Arts at Oxford University.
Certificated at 'Trinity College of Music���Piano and Harmony.
English Literature and Science Distinctions at Examination.
SUBJECTS TAUGHT.
ALL ELEMENTARY STUDIES (Preparatory and otherwise).
and
NEEDLEWORK (Plain and Fancy).
DRAWING AND PAINTING (All branches).
MATHEMATICS.    Matriculation Syllabus, London University.
BOTANY AND  NATURE STUDY.    With  Microscopy if desired.
LANGUAGES (By arrangement).
TAILOR  DRESS-CUTTING  AND  MAKING   (London  Academy).
SWIMMING, PHYSICAL CULTURE, ATHLETICS, ETC.
ENGLISH LITERATURE (Poetry and Prose;.
Pupils of any age prepared in any of thc above subjects, by ar-
rangement, DAY or l'.\ ENING.
TERMS
Parents are requested to call in person and interview Miss Hilda A.
Pomeroy,  Principal  English Collegiate School
EDUCATION
PARENTS SHOULD HAVE THEIR
DAUGHTERS
ATTEND THE
Burrard School for Girls
850 BURRARD STREET
Miss B. II. CARTMILL, I
rincipal.
FOR  TERMS,  Telephone   Seymour   184/,  or  culi  in person.
,"���",'""*-l.c'icr ami endured ihe better,  w,
Uickcns, | told    because   ol   tin   cheerful   nn
wounded hern is the sotter inr having   some   "g I   story"   under   i;   to
which���m respite"- ir un pain���the
aching eyes may turn an.l which may
soothe lhe mind which has gone
through an experience ni Iwrrnr-
which even ilu- inn ol a Dante could
nni describe
We have heard how .. party of London artistes journeyed to the seat oi
war ami with music ami -.lie -by lln
exercise e.i' histrionic art���gave our
brave "Tommies" a respite from ilu
toil fi iln trenches, maele them forget, i ' i fe ee briel moments, the heir-
rors ai.'l sorrows "i iheir bloody, necessary work. The n en fought the
better, watched ile  better, worked the
arc
incuts thus >.'euchsafed io them "Dickens in Camp" was recited that night,
tin- poem iu w Inch Un i I lartc has de-
scribi il hnw ihe storj ��� !' "Little Nell."
read aloud, moved and softened the
hearts nf rough gold miners in this
tugged West. The imagination .ef
the peeet eliel Inn anticipate. A story
ha- come frmn the "front" which tells
tis how, by the dim light in the camp,
wiih the shrapnel shrieking al its
dreadful work not ia: away. "The
Christmas Carol" was read tn a mass
..f British troops ihi.- Yuletide just
past. Wounded nun forgot their
pains in sympathy for "Tiny Tim."
and men whose hanels were bloody
with carnage, hut morally clean���for
they had fought iu a righteous cause
���watched with tense face- fnr the
arrival nf "Old Scrooge," and -cream-
eel with delight when he raised his
poor clerk's salary. The weird of
Dickens has not lost its magic. The
aid of the apostle nf cheerfulness may
well be invoked in these troublous
limes, fnr be leaches that dark clouds
will some time turn their silver lining
tn the eye and that envy. hate, even
tlle lust of bloodshed, must at last
give way to the gospel of "Peace "n
earth, goodwill among men." It is
well that these artistic literary birthdays should be remembered and ccle-
hrateel as Collingwood does it.
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can   supply   your   needs  at   right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right   at   Station)
G. BUSH
Begs tn inform the inhabitants of
this locality that he is opening a
first-class
Meat   Market
at
4556 Main Street
(Between 29th and 30th Ave.)
Un SATURDAY, DECEMBER
5, with a first-class stock of M^ats,
Butter, Hams. Bacem, Eggs, etc,
at prices to suit the times.
Don't   forget   the  Address'
4556 MAIN STREET
(Late Street's)
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable  Hall for oublic meetings,  dances,   etc., to Let
Apply W.  J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
WILLOW HOSPITAL ���
Miss HALL and Miss  WESTLEY, graduate nurses
CORNER OF
BROADWAY and WILLOW
Patients Received from $15.00 Per Week
Phone  Fairmont  2166
' ^Ipiw CHINOOK
il. III. Ni
4(1
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA,  SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1915
Price 5 cents
Jitney Fleet of Seattle Fishboats
Fitting Out For Halibut Grounds
Will Dot British Columbia Fishing Banks Like Flock of Gulls and
Harvest Halibut that Belongs to This Province
'lhe same conditions that gave birth
he jitney busses are aboul to cause
i ig increase in the American halibut fishing fleet, alread) very largi
Fi in Puget Sound ports lasl season
fifty lishiiig vessels wenl to the halibut grounds for every one Canadian
at. On iln rich halibut banks
which lie off the shores of Vancouver
Island ami northern British Columbia the hundreds of Seattle "smoke-
b ats" are like a Hock of gulls. The
chief fishing places are in Hecate
Straits and Dixon's Entrance, between
Prince Rupert and the Queen Charlotte Islands. There all the year
n 'ind tlle bottom-feeding halibut has
his habitation, The pasture is abund-
.1- '. and the fish multiply se. fast that
unless fished upon the grounds be-
ce 'iit: over populated and thc fish
���when captured, show a yellow streak
���deewn lhe back which signifies this
tr. able. In recent years, however,
tin halibut have not had this yellow
streak, for the halibut Beet has not allowed the banks to become overcrowded. The yellow streak has been trans-
fcrred from the back- eef the halibut
1' the American fishermen. The
Se title halibut fleet e.f hundreds of
vessels are all poachers, antl tee the
shippers nf tlle Seattle fishboats tlle
Canadian fishery protective service is
a joke. It is seldom that he sees the
smoke of a Canadian fishery cruiser.
Wherever he finds a good spot, after
examining the be.tteitn with the lead,
t Shermans eye. there he sets his fishing gear, whether the spot is inside
the limit or nut. Occasionally, of
irse, ibe watchful smokeboat skip-
per sees funnel suiokc on the horizon,
and calls in his dories in great haste.
Sometimes iln fishermen have t<e cut
their trawls, becntts: thev haven't time
ti haul in their gear, lint Ihe poachers are not surprised very frequently.
:i the extensive fishing grounds, there
i.s not likely to bc meere than one patrol cruiser. Many of the Seattle fishing vessels have wireless installations.
The fleet is se. numerous that the
' -lihe.ats are almost in touch with
each olher nver Ihe whole grounds.
!i a fishery cruiser appears mi the
hanks, the  American fleet is kept sup-
ied with information about her posi-
��� ii.    The iherie- nf the  smoke-boats
often within hailing distance dur-
ng the summer season.
The fads are that the American
fishing fleet has fnr years heen harvesting the Canadian halibut grounds,
and Canada has received very little
benefil from her nnn fish.   The' Cana-
n fishing licet is very small. Most
oi the vessels are -mall anil imt as
well found with fishing gear as the
\merican boats. For years the
American halibut thet has been increasing, and bigger am! better vessels are being constantly added to the
fleet. The newest of the Seattle'
"smoke-boats." for that is what the
' shermen call tin gas-driven fishing
sl i in. are very fule and ahle vessels.
and their oil power plants are large,
giving them considerable speed, lint
c nversatlon with halibut fishermen
nn the Vancouver waterfront lately
has   hr..tight   to   lighl   an   interesting
��� ��� irj Thev expect thai tin' dull
��� mi",   will   add   many   fishboats   t"  the'
<\m"'i''au hai it ih et thi- season, Vc-
r.-.rihii'-T in these' fishermen, every
Seattle gas workboal ahle enough t"
go in sea will cruise i" ih.' halibut
['rounds this vear. On the Puget
.- un.l waterfront there arc large numbers e.f sea-faring men and fishermen
who formerly held jobs ashore, who
are lining .in fishboats t'i gn halibul
i shing,
"They'll he inst like a flock of jit-
neys," eme fisherman exoressed it.
Thc running expenses fi these s'imkc-
boats, he saiel. were vcrv small, and
their crews were good fishermen.
As a matter nf fact, tin- Pacific
Coast halibut fisherman is the stout-
< st of seamen and the mosl skilful of
fishermen. Usually he is a native of
���- ..... Atlantic seaboard or a man
"f Scandinavian stock. Mosl oi the
halibut fishermen arc men from Newfoundland, Nova Scotia. New Brunswick, Maine' anel Massachusetts. "Sou-
-evcgian.s," antl liritish fishermen from
lhe North Sea. They are the best
dorymen and the most ahle navigators in the world. Bad weather anil
le-'d food are their daily Int. the ordinary hardships of the sea mean
nothinsr to them.
By far tiie greated number of these
men bail from Puget Sound ports,
and lish in vessels flying the American flag. Tluy are most daring fish
pirates and it would take a large
squadron of fishery protective cruisers to keep them from poaching. Last
season the American fishboats were
so numerous on the halibut grounds
that they made bait scarce. There
was a herring famine. It was impossible to get herring feu bait. This is
the best bait for halibut; each of the
hundreds of hooks on a "skate" of
trawl gear being baited with a whole.''
herring. But the supply of sahn/iii
bait is inexhaustible of course and'salmon for bait are easy to get. The
fishermen in baiting their trawl cut the
salmon into chunks, which they call
"shack." Therefore there is no danger of a  lack  ol  bait preventing the
jitney fleet from swarming the halibut grounds.
lc. ihe United States there are about
50,000,000 pnuuels ni halibut consumed yearly. Most ni this comes from
the Canadian halibut banks. I Inly
about 2,000,11't pounds "i this i- imported from Canada, while Canaela im-
pnrts nearly as much Im' Inr own
fish) from Vmerican linns, fhe -ii-
uatiini i- the must remarkable tti any
situation connected wiih the fmni
supply problem p.day. Canadians are
employing American fishermen, Amer-
e'an fishing vessels. American capital
and American railways In bring in
their tables Canadian fish. The new
England Fish Company, which is the
"iiiy large shipper of halibut from
Canaela to ihe United Stales, and
which has the privilege nf shipping
its fish from Canada in bond, duty
free. 'm condition that the halibut are
caught by American bottoms, ships
large amounts of fish which later are
snhi hack tee Canadian dealers, who
pay the duty for tlle lish to come hack
into   Canada.
Though most eef the halibut fishboats make large pre.lits. there are
very few Canadian vessels on tbe fishing grounds. The economic reason
feir this is hard tee guess. There is
always a good market for halibul. If
the little Seattle "smoke-boats" can
make halibut fishing pay there is no
reason why Canadian fishboats cannol do the same. The Canadian fishing fleet is increasing hut nol proportionately so fast as the American
fleet. A lew years ago there wcre
only about a dozen Canadian fish-
boats een the halibut banks. At the
same time there were .about sis hundred American he nits. Vet the fish
hanks and the fish belong lo Canada
and  to  British  Columbia.
Lack of employment for the hundreds of gas workhoats and their crews
mi Puget Sound may send many of
them lo the fishing grounds, as lack
nf employment for hundreds of automobiles and their drivers has tilled the
streets with nickel busses. Thc dull
times will only improve the market
for halibut, for thousands of housewives will buy lish at frmn 12 tn 15
cents per pound instead of meat at
25 cents. It seams likely that the
British Columbia halibut hanks will
swarm with the tlories of Puget Sound
fishermen this season. The fishery
patrol service is adequate. The fishermen laugh at it. there will poaching anil piracy galore on the banks
this season. . .ie only way fnr Canadians tn get there own lish is tn catch
I them themselves, it would seem.
r|"  tne, ;'���'���''������     :  tl ancja| position     Se   far iiiud-
I   discontent  and    dis
tion among the munii ipal -1 if)   u ���   thi
only tangible ri suits of his re
Friends of Mrs. J. VV. Da
Walden Street, will be glad to know
-he i- recovering nicely. She is in
the   Butte  Street   Hospital.
* *        *
Mrs. R. C. Cnnk received at her
home corner Larch and 3rd Avenue
Tuesday afternoon, in honor of her
sister, Mrs, Allen Archer, who is here
from   Arialo,  Sask..   visiting   relatives
and irie'iiils  for a  few months.
+   *   *
Mis- pjel, 40th Avenue Wc-i is
suffering from a severe attack   if ton-
sililis,
* *       e|e
Mrs. Purcell, 71 -tilth Avenue East,
who recently underwent an operation
at St. Pauls Hospital, is improving
nicely. *    *    *
The Rev. .1. R. Westman, superintendent of the Educational Conference
of the' Methodist Church, preached at
Mountain  View  Sunday  evening.
* ele        *
The Whist Drive held at the Liberal Chi.. Rooms on Wednesday evening was well attended and everyone
made merry, i lie first prize went to
Mr. Fischer. Mrs. John Jackson won
the lathes' lirst prize and Mr. D, W.
Grimmett carrying off the booby prize.
Among those who attended were' Mr.
and Mrs. Chamberlain, D. M. and
'Mrs. Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. Blythe,
, Mr. and Mrs. Fisher, Mr. and Mrs.
Sterling, Mr. and Mrs. Chandler, Mr.
and Mrs. Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Wood,
Mr. anel Sirs. G, M. Murray. Mr, and
Mrs. Henderson, Mi-s Denman, Mrs.
Cordi. and Messrs. Kay. 11.elan. Mouat,
Grimmett, Irvin, Boyd. Stewart and
others.
ele        *        el.
The Ladies' Aid Society of St.
David's Presbyterian Church will hold
la banJ;erehicf sale next Thursday
afternoon in the church building. During the afternoon  tea will  be served
I antl a/programme of songs, etc. has
been arranged for so that those attending may have a pleasant time.
* *    *
/A Voters' League meeting was held
/t Kalenberg Hall on Wednesday.
February 10. to receive the following  reports  and  deal  with  same :
Auditors' report; committee on
School report: committee on Province
report; cntiimittec on  Springford case
General business was transacted
and arrangements made for the next
public meeting.
election in Smith Vancouver a bet
was made thai within si> months the
Provincial Government would be in
chargi of the affair- of the municipality That prophecy is in a fair way Th, financial position has
,." ���n�� /"'filled, unless the presenl ,,,,,;. , ���. .1;,. ,,,������,,,v ,, ia ,,,..
reeve and council turn over a new inctly ���������., unfavorable than when
^,,;;1"1 bte��'n ��� ' ,nd��c "'���}' ��Bm�� he took office. The council is ia,- 1
of the ratepayers in ., busmess-llke witn a threatened action by the old
"���.'. ,''"' "" "nl ''"' vindictiveness fisca, agentg ,. the treasury certifi-
s beens, ,������,.,��� eunceel during ,,-���,   Spitzer,   Roric|<   &   Co. j
:-  persisted in.    Wood, Gundy'8  may
..������.ml  probably   will   secure  an   tnjunc
Municipal Clerk is Exonerated
From Charges Laid Against Him
Mr. J. B. Springford Answers His Critics and Convinces Council
That His Actions Were Clean and Above Board
the pasl few ���.��� ��� el ���
The attempt to ousl Clerk Springford from his position was a disgrace
to any municipality; and the general
methods employed since the' new
council came into power have been
such as to warrant the governmenl
stepping in to lake charge. I am
glad to see that -mne of the councillors are beginning to realize the malice and vindictiveness ami cunning behind  it  all.  and  d
jiiieii restraining the municipality from
carrying oul its proposed deal for the
sale of treasury certificates. Then
Spitzer, Rorick .V Co. will probably
bring action to receiver damagi - inr
breach of contract "Let 'em law
their  heads  nff."  -ays  the  reeve.     But
'in the meantime money is required to
carry on the affairs of tlle nuiuicipali- |
ly; and the only money in the treasury
-. not now hesitate  " W000 ,'hl,1' R��ve ':,rr a"���*"1
to denounce the actions of those re-   ""' befo/e '"' lc" ��fflce' bm wnlcn Lr' i
Bponsihle.     Hael   there   been     a     fair   rlved   after   '"'   defeat
prinkling of old councillors in office
the   new   council   would     have     been
If  that   is  the  position   financially,
spareel many mistakes, senile of which I what about the' efficiency of the muni-
are likely to  cn-!    the    municipality cipal   staff?    By  a  penny  wise    and
dear  hei'ere  the  end  of the  v
pound   foolish   policy   the   council   hat
geit rid of smile of it- best employees,
,,        ��� ,, , ,    .     particularly  in    the    fire-department.
one ol the first mistakes made by foechanic yBarker, for i���,tancFe, , ���,,,,
llie  new   council   was  in  entering  "
mt
an agreement with Messrs. Spitzer.
Reeriek & Company inr the sale of
treasury certificates, before ihey had
completed the contract with Messrs.
Wood, Gundy & Ceempany. Had the
reeve and Council remembered the old
saying: "It is well t'e be e,ff with the
old love before being on with the
new." they might have -pared the
municipality a good deal of trouble
and expense, follow.,lg one or more
breach of promise actions. It is al!
very well for the reeve to say : "Let
'em law their heads off." But it is
the people wini have to pay when
"scraps of paper" are ignored.
��� * ��
With the impetuosity of youth and
inexperience the new reeve ami council entered office, in much the same
way as newly married couples enter
the state of matrimony fully believing they are going to avoid all the
mistakes 'ether married couples have
made throughout  the ages.    Old feilk
skilleel in his wnrk. capable ol constructing an auto freem -lart to finish.
A man who during the time he was in
tlie employ of the municipality, saved
the ratepayers hundreds of dollars by
lining wnrk nn the premises which
would otherwise have had to he sent
to Vancouver, fine job alone which
he completed satisfactorily was estimated, belnre he tackled it. to cost
$500. Mechanic Barker did the work
during the lime he was not 'Iriving
auto-truck N'o. 1 to tires; and for a
wage of $11)0 a month, considerably
les- than he could have obtained elsewhere. Our penny wise and pound
fn,.lish council, without making any
enquiries, decided to cut his wages.
Result, he resigned at once and will
shortly have for Great Britain where
auto-mechanics are in great demand
at higher wage- than he was obtaining in  South  Vancouver.
*        e|<        *
Another result is that owing to the
fall  to  arms  the  demand   for   skilled
The Council met in open me
on Monday afternoon to investigate
anel decide upon certain charges lent
in writing against Municipal Clerk
Springford. The charges, some of
which were of a serious nature, were'
read out by the clerk, and after reading them, it wa- discovered that the
. ��� - were not signed by anyone,
Clerk Springford refused to answer
to the charges until this was done so
that he could know who his accusers
wer.- Messrs. Lewis, Way, Seymour
and Hobson were in the ball and they
we're- prepared to Bign these charges
��� ii behalf ��� f the Voters' League. Tl it
being done, the charges were taken
up on,- by nne by Clerk Springford.
The first wa- charging that no proper records hael been kepi regarding
Schoo] Board monies. This charge
was ably handled by the clerk and
wa- shown i" be foolish. Mr. Springford gave a Inch! statement as t" former methods and present methods, re
the 1 kkeeping in  the hall ami was
able to show lh.u everything under
his management vvas up to date in
'���very  respect.
The secnul charge wa- made by
Mr. Way charging the clerk with refusing to give him ihe proper information he vvas applying for, re insurance but instead giving out false
statements. This matter Clerk
Springford toe.k up finite ably, showing iri im the niinutes in the hall books
that he had deine his work according
to the instructions given him by the
council ami also proved that Mr. Way-
had had his equal share in the allnt-
inenl   of   municipal   insurance.
Mr. Springford was also charged
with improper use of the money grained  for  relief  w.irk,  $10,000  had  been
d for relief work ami only a
small pnriinn used for that purpose.
The clerk was abb tei show that he
had done exactly ai his council bad
ordered and that the representation
senl by the Provincial Government
le, investigate this had been  fully sat-
thai tin ninnies had been spent
iii a proper manner and a perfect ac-
count of the same kept.
The lasl charge against the Municipal Clerk was that of having bought
supplies, etc., for his ear. and charged
I hem up to the Municipal accounts
without the authority of the council.
Clerk Springford was able to -how
he had generously given the use
of his car for the use of the Council
il was needed and how it was
used from time to time feer municipal
purposes and hnw he had only charged
for repairs which had heen made nec-
essary through such use being made
of his  car.
Councillors Campbell. Stanley. Allen. Welsh. Rowling and Street in
lurn spoke regarding the charges and
win unanimous in their decision that
iin charges had not been proven
against Clerk Springford that his dealings with the Council had all been
square am', above board and that be
stood cleared before this council of
all of these charges which had been
lire night  againsl him.
Messrs. Lewis, Way. Seymour and
lleebsem re.se to object to this finding
but were booted down by the majority
eei the audience present and the remark- were freely and openly made
that the charges had not only failed
Inn hail been shown te. be entirely
without  foundation.
shake their heads knowingly, hul the auto drivers, and mechanics capable
young folk are confident they knowjof making repairs to military autotrucks, creates a difficulty in replacing Mechanic Barker in the fire-department. Caiiabie men are not SO plentiful as Reeve Gold seems to think
[neffi : nl men can always be obtained, and Ihey are dear at a gift; but
-kill, d, capable men in charge
uabl apparatus like the lire auto-
tre worth e\ i ry cent they demand. By the "Let 'em all resign"
policy of Reeve Gold the municipality
has lost   t good man in Tom
r in Chief Lestei
how tn avoid the pitfalls int.. which
others have fallen: and only when
trouble comes eh, ihey realize that the
..Id folk knew a little more than they
gave them credit for.
��    *    *
So it has heen with the presenl
reeve and council. They wenl into
office fully believing that Reeve Kerr
and previous councils lacked brains
The present reeve has said so .en
more than one occasion, Mr. Gold
Ifli veil he had all the brains nee. -
sary  to place  South  Vancouver  in  alVerb,  sap.
Ratepayers Taking Keen Interest In
Business Transacted At Mun. Hall
Large Crowds Attend Council  Meetings    New Medical Health
Officer Appointed
Opening of Laurier Club Draws
Large and Enthusiastic Crowd
River Road Liberals Determined to Help Speed the Day When
Sane Government Will Be Established in B.C.
Thc Liberals of South Van nver
continuing their progressive policy ol
active organization added another to
their lmig list of material successes in
ihe way ni opening Liberal Cluh
rooms in the elisiriet. when the Liberals e.i the River Road district .'pencil their new elaborate club headquarters al the corner of Main Street anel
Kiver  Road.
The South Vancouver Liberal band
wa- in attendance and rendered a number of fitting and appropriate selections.
The speakers of lhe evening were
Mr. M. A. Macdonald, presidenl of
the Provincial Liberal parly and Mr.
Ralph Smith, president of the City and
Districl   Liberal   organization.
The chairman, Mr. G, G. McGci
presidenl of the Richmond District
Liberal Association, In opening thc
meciing, complimented the members
of the Laurier Club on their splendid
quarters and the apparent activity displayed by its membership and assured the membership of the success that
w.iuld attend their efforts,
In a brief address, he took lhe Government m task fm- ignoring th.'
municipality oi Souih Vancouver in
the proposed redistribution bill. In
all past re-distributions, it hud been
the policy nf all governments throughout the Dominion of Canada he recognize, as far as possible. County eir
Municipal boundaries, but in Snuth
Vancouver the government had seen
lil to lack a portion of South Vancouver em to Burnaby. calling lhe new
constituency Burnaby, the other portion t.i he tacked on to Point Grey and
Richmond and that constituency tei
be known is Richmond. From the
point of view of Liberalism the redistribution was highly satisfactory to
the members of the Liberal party, for
it  assured  the  election  oi a    Liberal
candidate in both tin
I l">V ev . r,     fl    -HI ,  VV    ni
the Municipality of South Vani
the attitude ���.' ih. G vernment in
this ia -pt ci seemed to he quite in accord with the treatment which the
municipality had received al the hands
of tiie Government since iis inauguration. Mr. McGeer further stated that
he felt absolutely assured that the action i if the Gi v eminent in this res|
wouhl assure the complete and unanimous supporl of the Liberal I
hereafter in Snuth Vancouver by
every one having the interests fi the
municipality at heart. It was further
: by the chairman thai such an
iniquitous redistribution would, if the
Liberal- were returned to power at
the nexi election, be repealed and thai
a redistribution bill would be introduced wherein v ancouver Seiuth would
have' complete recognition.
I h chairman then called upon Mr,
M. A. Macdonald to address the
nieeling. Mr. Macdonald spoke
briefly and dealt with, in his usual
capable manner, the issues which are
agitating the minds of the people of
the Province ol Uriiish Columbia. He
accorded the treatment of Vancouvei
South by the Government and the
question of redistribution as being due
solely tn lln activity of the Liberals
in the district. Mr. Macdonald also
dealt briefly with the Land Question
anel with the Dominion Trust Swindle,
and also with the progress that the
Liberals in the Province were making
at the present time. He closed his
address with compliments of the high-
esl nature to the Liberals of .south
Vancouver and to the Liberals of the
Laurier I'hib. At the close of his address. Mr. Macdonald received a
splendid ovation. The chairman then
called upon thc South Vancouver
(Cntiiir.ued on  Page  5)
A large ami representative body of
itepayers vi ere present last   Fridaj  evening at the first open meeting
>   ''in. il.    Thc re'pnris
frmn   tin-   d:ifl mmittcs   were'
ith   in  a   satis
manner.    A resolu pass
pointing   !'. ��� .     G  Id ai d  C luncillors
Sl m   y and
intend        'v ��� -General
���
n unii ipality
���     ���' '.ii   per  annum  foi
T'iic report of thc I:
I    ���  '
permission
���
South vei      -
'.!���. Fleming
compij  ��it'i the bylaw s.    This t
port  of
ml tii
'ing   princi-
p [i|     .'.���',     jtimal ic  fin
I   and   wilh   little
I      ��� '  ni Wnrk-
followi I ���    ' port,  which
prinei; wnrk   pr  |
[., he done in the different wards when
iuii'ls were available vva- also accepted and adopted   is read
Thi repi n 'I ii Wati r Committee was then read and this report,
which wa- a lenthj one, and which
dealt with ihe work ..f the waterworks and with '.he wages and salar-
ies fi llie men employed in this department was fully gone into.
The scale nf \v.n..es vva- carefully
gone over ami after a careful study
was adopted.
The report of the Finance Committee was by iar the most lengthy
and important one hei..re ihe nieeling ami took considerable time. In
iin- report Mr. 1'. 11. McNeil wa- ap-
I ���������..-.fl Municipal Auditor I'm' the
year at a salary of $%(). He will also
audit thc books "f the Scln.nl Board
fnr which he will be paid by the
board. A considerable number nf accounts and claim- were dealt wilh
and it was finally adopted.
A new Medical Health Officer was
appointed at this meeting to take llle
place of Dr. Murphy. There were
four aplicants for ihis position���Drs.
Petersky, Holbrook, Duncan and
Turnbull, and after the applications
hae! been read anil a vote taken by
balleet it was seen that Dr. IT. L.
Turnbull. '���'' 2s4- Main Street was the
choice of the council and he was
therefore appointed to the position at
a salary, fixed at $100 per month, his
duties to begin the following Monday.
The only other business of imnort-
ancc was a communication from Reeve
".old to the Municipal Clerk, giving
the clerk notice that Mr. A. H. Seymour had heen appointed private secretary   to  the  reeve  and  asking    the
clerk to notify all heads of departments
that ihi- hail been done, and request-
in" them t., supply Mr. Seymour wiih
all the information he required in connection with their several departments.
Mr.   Spring!..rd   bad   replieel     ti
pointing out to him that this
- af I nol he .' .ne w ithout resolution
from  the council.
After a hai'.: am',  heated discussion
of  this  matter,  in  which  all  of
part,       was  moved
illor   Welsh   ami   seen'   led
.
bi   filed,    Ail   ft   'le   rouncil
SUppe   I ' CN-
I
t 11.30 p.m.
V   special  meel uncil
whei
much ii ial business was
rcso-
h ��� ".'.  up a        '   : .-I fi
nd which b a full
illl      vv   I       fl
I.,  ih,   Vancom ei
Mn li . : iticism v. :���- ma i
���
from  Soutl    \ u :ou\ er  ami  it
wa- the general of I      Coun-
cil that  the chai
bitant in man) cases an.! out "i all
proportion  ',"  tin   service  rendered.
Councillor Campbell suggested that
perhaps lhe time had come when
South Vancouver should take a forward   Step   and   try   to   have   hospital
facilities ,,i ii- �����ii in Smith Vancouver. Instances w.r, cited where
grave dangers hail csisteel anel lives
had been imperiled by the long run
from ihe municipality t" the hospital.
It was admitted on all bauds that this
was s". but under the present financial   Conditions   il   wa-   seen   tn   be   illl-
possible to do anything inwards having an hospital erected in Smith Vancouver, s,, the suggestion was allowed to drop.
A resolution was moved and adopted that a grant of $?.fXXl be made t'i
ihe Vancouver General Hospital, this
being ihe same amount as was granted by last year's council, and the
Reeve ami a deputation of tiie council were appointed i" attend the meeting ni the Hospital Be,ard to be held
the  same'  evening.
Thc appointment eif a helper to the
blacksmith was brought up and it was
referred to the Engineer and the
Chairman of the Board of Works to
make  this appointment.
The apportionment of money for
work in the different wards was an
item of much discussion. The Engineer reported that the new ward foremen in the different wards had started work that morning and the work
was already laid out for the first batch
of men in the different wards. $2,000
had been allotted to each ward for
work to be started immediately, but
(Continued on  Page 6) TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY.  FEBRUARY 13,  1913
^S^CHINOOK
PUBLISHED
Every Saturday by the Greater Vancouver Publishers Limited
George M. Murray, Editor
HEAD OFFICE:
Corner   Thirtieth   Avenue   and   Main   Street,   South   Vancouver.   B. C.
TELEPHONE:   All departments Fairmont  1874
NIGHT  CALLS Fairmont   1946 L
Registered   at  the   Poit   Office   Department,   Ottawa,   ai   Second   Class
Mail Matter 	
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
To  all   pointa  in   Canada.   United   Kingdom,   Newfoundland,   New
Zealand, and other British Possession!:
One   Year    i $2 00
Six   Months      100
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Postage to American, European and other Foreign Countries, II 00
per year extra. 	
"The truth at all times firmly stance
And shall Irom age to age endure."
LITTLE THINGS ARE ALWAYS IMPORTANT,
MR. BOWSER!
WHEN the Attorney-General of British Columbia made his great Bpeech upon Dominion
Trust Compan) matters in the legislature last wcrk
he referred bitterly to the "Chinook" as a mere "Little Smith Vancouver paper." The author of the
article, "with enough truth in it to make it damnable,"
was sneered at by the Attorney-General and was mentioned as "The South Vancouver Scribbler."
It is a matter of small consequence whether a journal he little nr big physically. The biggest newspaper
ill Hritish Columbia is also the must craven vassal of
Mr. Bowser. The "Chinook" is bigger, both as regards its editorial outlook ami its area of printed
paper among the newspapers of the world than .Mr.
llowser is. both as regards soul and body, among the
statesmen of the world.
The writer may he hut an humble scribbler, but the
people of liritish Columbia will decide whether or not
the eloquence of Mr. llowser overcomes in any manner the facts set forth in the "little paper" by the
".Snuth Vancouver scribbler."
It is hut natural that Mr. llowser should complain
that the journal which printed the truth about him
and the Dominion Trust Company was but a "little"
paper.
Men of the ilk of llowser have no time nor regard  ;,
fur little things.
When his government passed the crooked legislation which enabled the Dominion Trust Company to
swindle the public, the members thereof did not think
of the little children and the children then unborn,
who starve today because of thc Dominion Trust collapse.
That government had no protection to offer the
poor little stenographer who, when her savings were
swept away in the Dominion Trust collapse and she
was unable to find honest employment, secured a
ticket to Seattle and there suicided in Union Lake.
Mr. Bowser and his people have small regard for
the little things. Neglect by them of the little things
has rendered this great province of British Columbia
insolvent in the money markets of the world and a
"Paradise Lost" to the working people at home.
Had Mr. llowser and the haughty Sir Richard McBride given proper attention to the litlle things of
government, the people of the next generation anil
succeeding generations would lay laurels upon the
tombs of two statesmen, and the memory of one would
he particularly hallowed because he was a native son.
And the little papers, the little men, the little ideas,
the little pennies, the little kind words and the little
children have played such a great part in making the
world grow better!
It was the "insignificant little Welshman." M.r.
Lloyd-George, who brought light to tlie submerged
millions of Britain.
It was the violation of a "little scrap of paper" that
called a million Britons to arms to protect little Belgium.
It was the Little Carpenter's Son who taught lhe
priests in the temple and brought hope to the hearts
of all men.
ll was the little David armed wilh hut a sling and
the Word "f Coil who repulsed the armies of the
Philistines.
It was not the little article in thi' "Chinook" which
brought forth the greal oration by Bowser in the
House hist week���the defence which occupied three
whole pages of type in Air. Bowser's big papers, the
"Colonist" and "News-Advertiser."
It was the still small voice within the heart of the
stern Attorney-General which forced him to utter this
splendidly constructed defence, which, shorn oi its eloquence and splendor, takes the form of a simple
apology from one who has done a great wrong and
knows it.
ists are not figuring a.s the tail to the Liberal kite.   W'e I
are -Tad.    The fight is a good tight em its own merits.
The concert of. the legislature would he in tine nine j
if l'arker Williams were not there, though its harmony wouhl sometimes coquet with discord, and fill-1
ficieni for the day would be tiie symphony thereof.
I'.ut l'arker William- is the malignant instrument who
eh-turbs the performance, and insists on making
music when he is expected to be silent while the Iir-t
violin and the flute player and the bass viol ami the
trombone are consigning him to the outer darkness.
ll  i- a sad thought that such excellent artistic ensemble wnrk should he interrupted in thi- way.   The
legislative orchestra ii so carefully trained.   Tlu master musicians have drilled tlie minor performers tin-'
til  they  have  lost   tlle  characteristics  of  individuals,
ami become merged in a uniform obedient mass.
If  l'arker  Williams could  only  he eliminated,  this
dumb acquiescence would bring the most perfect peace
thai  ever prevailed  in any  legislative body    in    tlu
world.    Tlic only disturbance  would be when  somebody  let  loose a  fre-h paroxysm of platitudes, which I
is to say of wind.    For the Orchestra is made up chief-'
ly of wind instruments.    And the musicians are so:
well trained in political decorum that they even temper the wind to the occasion.
I hit l'arker Williams is not a wind instrument. He
is a shrill discordant pipe. Ile is so shrill .and discordant that the rest of the orchestra would like to
use his hide for a new snare drum head.
When you consider lhe political situation it seems
remarkable that the Conservatives who sil in the legislature comfortably admiring themselves ami daily
discovering new virtues in each other while the business of the province languishes, have no other opposition except that of l'arker Williams and his man
Friday, John Place. You have to turn back the pages
of history to the earliest times to find another example
of a government with no opposition except two poor
but honest coal miners without the benefits of a college education. If you take the trouble to travel
down the tracks of time to early days, you will find
recorded instances of similar governments to the one
at Victoria, which consisted simply of two or three
real administrators and a lot of dummy legislators
who praised their leaders with a great deal of unction
and diil as they were told. But it is generally understood that these venerated examples of government
are out of date. That we have one of them at Victoria right now is of interest.
l'arker Williams does his best, hut there is so much
lo do that he might well call "Help!" Ile is a man
of many parts and much wit and he needs all his personal gifts in the epic job with which he lias been endowed by circumstances,
The government newspapers assail l'arker Williams, accusing him of discrediting liritish Columbia
for the sake of making attacks on the government.
Me has heen criticising tlie government for fourteen
years and the people of liritish Columbia have only'
just begun to listen to him. Not long ago, when
Parker Williams rose to speak in the legislature, thc
reporters in the press gallery adjourned to the smoke
room. Xow they stay. Recently l'arker Williams has
been worth at least two columns every time he has addressed the house. In prosperous times, when the
thoughtless people of liritish Columbia downstreamed
comfortably along bonding heaver meadows and blue
skies, they did not care much what the government
did. from fiscal forgeries to giving away half the
province. But now the people are commencing to
take notice. The only thing that has remained indifferent to lhe rude touch of hard times i- the government  itself.
What is
"a Diether ton?"
How It Is Made���
Tin patent npparatui n-''l in weighing
Diether Se.nih Wellington Coal iiuurei
��� it,.n- weight for .ill loads in sacks.
Th, citj weigh clerk guarantees sil hulk
; .,,;- oi _' torn and up by issuing a city
���,v, il'Ii ticket with  such 1<>;i<l-.
Weighed Before Sacking
Diether Cosl is sicked by an automatic
. ,,i, ,n,,i icoop���a new snd interesting
device. Thc coai tips the scale al 100
pounds and io releases the scoop, which
deposits it in the sack. The full 100 Ibs.
musl in- in the scoop before it goes intei
the suck.
"A Diether ton" is more than merely accurate full
weight. It is a generous ton. Notice how it fills
your bin!
Delivered Promptly Same Day As Ordered
Nut Lump
$6.50
Pea
$4.25
L. M.
$5.00
DIETHER
COAL
CO. LTD.
Your li' ns will lay all
winter il you ��rl your
Poultry Supplies Irom us
PRATT'S POULTRY REGULATOR
WILL PRODUCE
-  - THE  EGGS -  -
F. T. VERNON'S
MOUNT PLEASANT
FEED STORE
255 Broadway East (cor. Kingsway)
Phone Fairmont   IM'.
the only thing to do is to >hm up shop and K��� European countries there are banks called land-m. rt-
home.   This kind of man infects many people with |g*g�� banjes, which were established for the purpos
hi- depressing talk, though you would think that even
the
lullest intelligence would know \vhat nonsense it
is. And as people's efficiency depends almost solely
mi their individual feelings, their activity and energy
curves, which show the amount of work they do, fall
downward, Psychologists know that onr mental and
physical powers are reduced quicker by the influence
of depressing talk than by weather nr varying temperatures or any other minor cruise. The nervous
feeling that these forecasts of future trouble like the
cutting down of wages, or the hiss of work or business, sends the efficiency curve down at once. This
is one of the psychological causes of hard times.
making long-time loans, at a low rate of interest, to
the farmers. A tanner whose land is worth ten
thousand dollars, for example, wishes to borrow live
thousand dollars, Ile give* a mortgage to the bank
for $5,000. Ile i- charged four per cent, mi the loan,
one-half of one per cent, lor the sinking fund which
takes up the loan in fifty-four year-, and a quarter
of one per cent, for administration. The hank issue-
hiinds, in hundred dollar denominations, against this
mortgage, bearing four per cent, interest, which he-
come quick assets, easily circulating. With the payment of every hundred dollars of this mortgage, a
bond for that amount is cancelled. Many of these land
mortgage hanks have their capital supplied by the
government. In other countries agriculture has been
revolutionized by rural credit systems. The government of liritish Columbia has been as tardy in assisting the development of agriculture as in giving
aid  to other things  from  which the province would
up at the new tall buildings which good times audi derive practical benefits.   Agriculture is the greatest
single tax had produced, and say:    "This shows that | source of natural wealth, ami in liritish Columbia tht*
single tax works as well in practice as ii sounds in government has utterly neglected it.    A  wise system
theory.   This is a prosperous and growing city." Then of rural credits is an absolute necessity in this prov-
they would go home and tell their friends about Van-1 ince,
couver. and  in this way  the city  received  some  free
advertising.
Xow, when times are dull and a great many of the!
offices in  the tall  office buildings are empty, these
single tax philosophers stay awav fmrn Vancouver.
This city no longer furnishes a good illustration of
how practicable single lax is.    A great many citizens
117/./, TIMES MAKE A DIFFERENCE
WHEN   times  were good  the disciples  of   Henry
George used to come to Vancouver and look
[01
BY THE WA\
r
.   !
i
lh'. JITNEY busses have raised on a small scale in
Vancouver the question of color and race which have
nl   Vancouver  who  used  to  think  single  tax  was a given the Southern  Stales separate cars for the col-
good thing now feel doubtful about its virtues. ored population.    It has become a common sight t'��
Henry George agitated the socialization, nut of land! see jitney drivers refusing to allow Hindus to enter
as is sometimes said, but of the annual values of laml. I their cars.    |n several cases the Hindus have mounted
In nnler lo secure that resull he proposed that all
'.axes mi personal properly and real estate improvements he abolished and thai puhlic revenues he derived exclusively from a tax measured by land values.
lu order to carry out that program he proposed to
begin by abolishing all taxes except mi html values.
HELPING TIIE PARMER
in Hritish Columbia are
TIIE SILVER LIN IXC
PEOPLE who think that good limes will not return soon in liritish Columbia are nol farsighted.
Prosperity cannot -lav away from this province very
long. We shouhl hire assassins to make away wiih
a few of tiie blue ruin talkers who are predicting lhat
things will grow worse and worse instead eef improving, These people are as had a- boosters. The sky
is always overcast when one of them is around. Karu-
est impartial safeblowers are better citizens and much
pleasanter to meet. Everyone sees the gray clouds
in the sky. hul tlle blue ruin talker cannot see the silver lining which tells that the sun will shine ihrough
before long.
The pessimist  is generally a man  whose  stomach
ha- not worn well, or who has heen swatted hy fate1
with a few assorted misfortunes, anil who lacks the!
fortitude of Job and other sufferers who won fame by
showing a good example to the human race.    So he
i talks hard times and points out to everyone that the
MANY thoughtful people
studying the subject of
hanks
nol   I'lten   lem
rural creiht
money on real
Canadian
estate.     In
the running boards ami insisted until thrust back by
ihe white passengers.
ROBINS AXD songsparrows are making the vacant
lots iif Smith Vancouver musical these warm sunny
mornings. The warm weather certainly illustrates the
scriptural maxim which says lhat the Lord tempers
the wind to the she mi lambs. The small shareholders
who lust their savings in the Dominion Trust wreck-
will not suffer from cold, though they may feel the
pangs nf hunger.
Today the "South Vancouver scribbler" edits    a'present is an indigo blue shade and that the future is
"little  South  Vancouver paper."
'-  And yet he is of good cheer for it has been written: ���, -  ��� '!*>���
"He who is faithful in small things. T will make liim
ruler over many."
THE RIFT IN THE LUTE
IFE in the Rritish Columbia legislature would be
dull without Parker Williams. He is fighting
the government this session with more power and
greater results than ever before.   He says the Social-
L
very black indeed. In days of prosperity he dot's not
change his tune but people won't listen to him then.
In dull times yotl will find him everywhere, on street
corners, in clubs, at dinner tables, in ears, and always
with an audience around him. He gloats over the
hard times and wallows in his subject. According In
him, prosperity has departed from the earth and will
never return. Hc can give you chapter and verse and
facts and figures to show that everything has gone to
the dogs and that mankind will be living in caves and
eating roots before many years. Business will get
worse instead of better, according to this philosopher.
NURSES   a
MATERNITY AND  SURGICAL CASKS
FAIRVIEW   NURSING   HOME
BALL BAYVIEW 1097.
975  BROADWAV WEST
PRIVATE  NURSES
SENT OUT
MlM JONES
;D%iL;
The Important Matter of Choosing Your Dentist
Good  Teeth
necessary
to health
"Cheap"
dentistry
the   most
expensive
What are
"Nature
teeth"?
Advice
free
"The Last Word
in Dentistry."
CIIKKK Is iiiethius; se, Important t<> yur health ind efficiency as the matter with
your teeth.   Sound, useful, beautiful teeth should he yours   teeth that enable
yuu tn bite, chew ami smile in comfort.    Decayed teeth cause, not only continual
inconvenience, hut permanent ill-health.   It is your duty to yourself to economize
in other ways so that you may secure teeth that look natural, feel natural and perform the functions which Nature allotted to those important members.
/Vi HKRKFORE you should choose your dentist with great care. It is poor
^, economy lo buy "bargain teeth." Inferior dentistry���poor materials, little
knowledge and less care���costs hut little less than the right kind even at the he-
ginning, and certainly is much more expensive in the long run.
X  EMPLOY only the most modem methods, the greatest care and skill and the
best materials.    Each individual  case is carefully studied.    When  I  fit you
The New
Standard Bank
Bldg., Richards
and   Hastings
Second   Floor
Entrance
Room 212
Phone  Sey.
4 6 7 9
with my "Nature teeth" they look, fit and feel like Ihe ones Nature gave you.  And
you will find my prices no higher than those of ordinary dentists.
GOME in and allow me to examine your mouth, advise you and give you my
estimate of the cost. This will involve no obligation whatever. Make up
your mind now to see to those teeth. Then call, phone or write to me now,
making appointment for examination.
No Gas or Harmful Drugs Used
"You Suffer No Pain"
 GUARANTEE	
I HEREBY GUARANTEE lhat all dental work performed by me wilt be absolutely
painless. If the slightest twinge ol pain is e��perienred by tbe patient no money need be paid
to me, or if any has been paid, it will be instantly tefi/ntled.
I further guarantee that all erown or bridge work or filling will remain in first class condition for a period of TEN YEARS.    If any of my work becomes defective durini
will replace it absolutely FREE OF CHARGE.
uring that time I
D%g;
OPEN   EVENINGS
"THI MORERN DENTIST" SATURDAY, FEBRUARY  13, 1915
GREATER VANCOOVER CHINOOK
THREE
The
Telephone
THE ADVANCE AGENT OF
Comfort and Convenience
FORMS  A  CLOSER   UNION   OF   HOME,
BUSINESS AND FRIENDS.
FUR A LIMITED TIME, BUSINESS AXD
RESIDENCE TELEPHONES WILL BE
INSTALLED UPON PAYMENT OF $5.00
RENTAL IX ADVANCE.
FOR PARTICULARS CALL UP
SEYMOUR 6070.
CONTRACT DEPARTMENT
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH  TICKETS  ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
ttJ
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H.  W. BRODIE,  Gen.  Pass.  Agent, Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
C. E. Jenney, G. A. P. D.
Phone:  Sey. 8134 527  Granville  Street
^ Where do we South Vancouver People
EAT when We are Down Town ?
E-onomy consists of spending  money so
that you will have more to spend
MORAL   Eat at thi PENDER CAFE
727 Pender St. West
THE    PENDER    CAFE    Pender St. West
Anderson Meat Market
and Groceries
4152 MAIN STREET Phone Fair. 1634
MEATS   AND   GROCERIES
Wc    specialize    in    our    home-cured    HAMS,
BACON, and AYRSHIRE ROLL.
NEW LAID EGGS 40c per doz.
POTATOES    90c a sack
SWIFT'S SILVER LEAF LARD, 31b. pail, 35c
ORDERS PROMPTLY DELIVERED
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandy has a day owre at  Victoria an' goes tae the parliament h'ose
lae hear his auld fretn, Wullie Bowser, mak a speech
Weel freens, I !;:..' a wri e liit o' .1
��� tae iu\ -. I lasl weel
thai I i njuyi d a I h mai ��� bi i ause il
i .um- vei i .,' uncxprcti el For lome
reason that dinna in nl tai tie satin
iin.ee here, I had tai gai ewn tae
\ ictoria, an' no' hai
I m.nli n|i iti> min' thai I h i- gaun m
!,". iln- whole Im.li an enjoj mysel
: ill   I  wil hi n.
It's tin lirsl time I hai l< ft the wife
-in I came tai ihis couiur). an' I i an
tell you, freen - tin |i lirtit ll ..i nicht
wi> quit) affi ctin'. In facl, tai ti li
yai the truth, it n;- sac tendi i thai
,i  tai ii a guid gh -- .,   knock
aw i tin i.f.t\> feelin' frae mj herl
afore I wenl on board the boat.
There's nae use mi tellin' yae ony
lees abool haen .��� bit dram nn my
road eeu re. It's the \ erj lie -t m
cine hi uny time but partei - ularly
so when yae wauken up in thc middle
o'   the   in. In   e,n   board  a  boat   ���  an'
feelin'  a   bil   queer   s ewhere  doon
in tin- injun house. A flask under the
[Hilly'- a' richt, tak my tip.
Hooever, it sae happened tha'. wc
had :i guid niclit ���I  mean nn   an' the
|e   'lit. Tile     -e-U     V\ '���:     'ill     11-      . .       bl      I
behaviour, an' I never waukened a-
fore ��e pu'd up ii thc dock at Victoria.
N'oo freens, as I said afore, this is
tlie- firsl time I hae I'i: the wile (in
I cam tae this country an' comin' a-
shore a l<in' i i' funny feelin' came mvr.-
me.
Naebody
an'   a   tine
tae- mysel
hut mysel tae look efter,
mornin'���"Sandy," I says
'yae lucky dug."
\ccompanied liy a freen I hail picked up e,n luearil tlie- boat, we mailr oor
wey up the pier, pas-eel live- the parlia-
men bildin', an' titer wi-hiu' my freen
guid live, commenced tac hae a look
renin preparatory tac locatin' senile
place where I could get a hit hrcak-
I'ast.
Weel freens. 1 hail a guid hoor or
twa daunderin' roon seein' tin- sichts
an' veesitin' wan or twa place- e,' interest. I canna say lhat 1 saw onything that parteecularly taen my fancy���in facl I wis s.ert >,' disappinted
wi' Victoria a- I saw it. I hail an idea
it wis somethin' in a cless abuni
Vanceeiiver. but   I   canna say  that  11 ��� >��� ���
Hooever, I whilcd awa the time tac
half-pasl twa, when I hail made up my
min' I wiul go tae the Parliament
bildin' an' hear Wee Wullie elefcnel
himsel' agin' the allegashuns thai had
been hurled at him euvre the Dominion  Trust  .swinnle.
I wisna a meenit owre quick, either
for when I got in the- "Galleries" werr
pretty fu'. Hooever I got a very
comfortabh seat mysel, an1 wis ahle
tae see a' that wis gaun on.
Wi' muckle pomp an' ceremony
the speaker came in an' the house wis
duly opened wi' prayer. Incidentally,
1 noticed that the chaplain waited until ilu- lua heiil yins wi-re in their
places afore he began. That minister
ken- his duty a' richt.
Thc chamber in which the h-gisla-
teers (for the luv n' Mike) sit is certainly an impeisiiiK place���In fact the
members thai compose the legislature
looked   ji-i   abool   as   muckh t   o'
place as a bohunk wud look in the
ball room o' the Hotel Vancoover.
Thev were a parteecularly unimpos-
in' lookin' bunch If yae except
Dicky, wha's wooly head an' Imperial lookin' countenance maks up for
a lol o' ither elelicie-ncii-s. an' the twa
members o' the oppisishun, they
were as common a lookin' bunch as
onybody wud care tae sec
Nae wunner we hae sac muckle
prosperit) in B.C. at the present
time.    If the parliament  wud pas- an
act gien  them ; 'er tae open  some
-While Lunches" they could fin' employment mare in the line ������' thai
crew that lay back In their leather
chairs; they're an iligant  lot.
Cain,ir-'Cotton, oor muckle esteemed representative frae Richmond, wis
there alsee. an' 1 wunnered tae- mysel
what in the name o' a' that's guid
could the Sooth Vancoover folk hae
sac muckle tac grummle aboot wi
lie an intelligent lookin fellie
watchin' their interests. The rest o
them II wunna ea them legislators
ony marc) reclined back in their
chairs an' lookit for a' the world like
a bunch o' kids at a magic lantern
slum- wunnerin' whether the man wis
Kami tae nie them a ban o' ��wi eticl
efter  the  performance wis owre.
1 forget where il says "These be
your gods ������' Israel," but tac applj it
tae B.C., ii these bc the legislators
that were appintcd by the electors o
H C then 1 can verily say that lhe
populashoil u' this pr..vince arc gettin' a' that's comin' tae tbcm in thry
times .,'  stress an'  stervasluin.
Vae canna expect tae breed a race
hnrse frae a slrain O1 Clydesdales, an
nae mare can yae expect guid ge'vern-
mcnl frae the cullecslum .. waiix fee-
gurs that compose ihat chamber.
When Wullie got up lae defend
himsel owre the Dominion '1 rust bizness, Dicky thumped his desk as a
signal for his marionettes lae wauken
up an' follow suit.
It could plainly be seen the Wee
Yin wis a hit nervous when he started
an' richt awa worked himsel up lae a
pitch  n'  excitement.
I've nae doobt Wullie realised that
this wis the tichtcst crner he'd ever
been in sin' he entered public life..an
lhe rest o' the members, liichidni Dicky realised that the Wee Yin ha.', tae
dae somethin' extra in the oratorical
line tae pit' them not the mess.
Yaell often hae noticed. freens,
when listenin' tae some public speaker, that he generally e.pcus his address
in a canna sort o' wey. gradua y
w-armin' up tac his subject, an finally
comin' in wi' lhe heavy artillery tae
convince his hearers o' lhe truth 0
his  argyments. .  ,
Weel Wullie wis evidently labonn
under a heavy strain, feir instead rf
followin' the usual course, he started
richt in wi' the "heavy" yins lust an
afore he wis haul threiugh lett himsel
flnumlerin' among a mass o' detail
that  wis  sac  muckle  awa    frae     the
questyin   tbat   the   "faithful"   on     :i ���
got ernmeni be m he     .-,.  .   >, ,�� mn' an'
-hin'    then wunnerin'
��In n In- ��i, gaun ia,   ii eni
tbe  lie :��� ��itoi ���
:,    lh.
 k"   had   i i iiliiuly   no!   th.    .���. i ,
I' llle   s    "ge.al"   j|
I'hi re - enough truth in il  tai   mak
��� l ."   w i-   'in-   ei - y   hi-   |.iit   il
Whatever Iie meant by that wil iome-
t   u    a   in> -le l>       'I I '   .,'   the
bunch e xchanged iooki anoth-
.    nli    in in'     .M     gel    tin    ei- :
al   'A ul'ii-  in. ant.
An' in.' e-.eiilrttt in' putiiii iui face
alonji ui' Am..hi'-, ihey mak maitteri
u.iur by printin' in a -an ..inl . di
im tin portrait o' mer worthy premier."
Again ii ere tin- eh-���k- thumpi .1 in
���-kin  o'  th.-  "faithful's"  disapproval.
I In   Chinook' In- damned" wii lhe
i ' \\ utile's disci  n -.  a  tii-  ug i
but  frae the wey his utterancei  wcre
in   the   publii      galitri'--     ee
In  tae   disprove  its  writin's
Wullie'.-  idea  wis  that   in  attackin'
him an' hi- policy iu  regaird tae the
Dominion   Trust,  thc  "Chinook"   wis
daen   il-   Inst   tac   hurt   lhe   province
in the eye- o' the outside  inerld.
li the- "Chinook" wis tae y.u- ool e,'
existence the morn, it has done
i ei .ugh m they twa articles tae mak
its name remain  famous
>' B.C. as showin' up o...
ten.-i   -ninnies   that   wis   ever   perpe
tratiel e.u  uny  community.
What is there to hide? Dae yae
mean tac tell nn- tin- auld country financiers 11 think ony mare "' us ii
nt  dinna  try   tae   mak   a   clean   breast
i' it an' bring the guilty patrties tae-
be .ok. Staund tac yaer gun-. Maister
Edytur; yaeve- got the folk at the
back o' yae an' wi' their support
the   honest
the annali
the  net-
nacK   e,    yae   an    wi      liuir     supporl
yaell   be   able-   tai-   hail   in   the   heenesl
attempt Iae bring al I    some daicent
form o' um ernmeni  in  I'. C
Puir Wee Wullie; I kin o' fell hauf
sorry for yae. times, but then when
I  thochl e>' ihe puir, hert-broken folk
, Ilia! had lost their a' in that swinnle.
when I thocht o' lhe stervin' men an'
w'omen iu Vancouver, an' when 1
looked eh,mi mi thai self-composed
bunch o' bum legislator-. I felt almost   like-   breakin'   a'    parliamentary
j procedure an' gien them a wee bit o'
inv ain  min'.
pr
my ain min
Hooever,  "every
an' my name's n
if   f
dug   has   hi-   elay"
Sandy  Mac I'bcrson
itart   hasua   been   made   in   a
wholesome   clean   up   campaign   that'll
ill   the   Province   for   a'   time   o'   that
bunch  "'  rubber  stamps  lhat  arc  better fitted tor eatin' hoose bosses than
b gislatot
be   the   I
tted tor eatin' hoose bosses than
lators   o'   what   1   consider   should
e o what i consider shou
the finest country in tin- world.
ill, Wullie, if yae wud only consent
come tae some public meetin'
���re wc could get a chance o' get-
hack at vac. but yaer as fly as
d  Nick.
wudna hae missed that pantyniimc
��� lots, freens, 1 came awa feelin'
ppy that the guid wnrk had started
' if the electors n' B.C. wud jist
irt an' gel busy it wudna be long
ire wc wiul mak that gait" get up
unit.
Yours through lhe heather,
SANDY   MACPHERSON.
E
tae
whe
tin
An I
I
f
ha|
an
sta
at'
an'  quit
COLLINGWOOD   HONORS
THE   BIRTHDAY   OF
CHARLES DICKENS
It is well that in these strenuous
and anxious days ot war, as well as
iu lhe piping times set peace, we should
remember  our  uenefactors.
J he Empire i-. aa Sir Johnstone
Forbes-Roberta >n said on Saturday
night, "enduring and suffering," and
it will help us to endure, n will enable us belter to bear our sufferings,
n will stimulate e>ur energies ami our
patriotism to remember those whu
have strengthened "in- best resolutions, promoted om- cheerfulness, am!
helped US "to be ol geee eii courage' in
ihe firm belief ihat g I inu-i ultimately prevail, ami "right" nut "might"
musl conquer in the end,
It was goeeil, therefi n i. that a few
enthusiasts should meet m February
7th, remembering thai daj as the
birthday of the high inn st of optimistic cheerfulness���Charles Dickens,
wh.e was born ai Portsmouth "ii February  7th,  \X\2.
It is pleasant t" know ihat "A
Night with Dickens," arranged bj Mr.
J. Francis Bursill of Collingwood,
was one oi Ihe most successful gatherings ever given in lion.u- oi the
great  author.
It is pleasant to record that Miss
Rosalie Geoghean of Collingwood,
who sang and recited ou lhe occasion,
proved herself a charming and talented lady ol whom Souih Vancouver
mav well be proud..
Dickens was born in 1812. Ports-
mouth was busy in these far-off days;
war's fell shadow was then over the
land and. he.iking backward, il seems
as if the Portsmouth child had come
to fulfil a mission lee give lhe weirld
a message, the message lie taught as a
matured author, by Caleb riiimmer.
by "the marchioness," by Dick Swiv-
eller. and above all by Mark Taplcy
���the duty of keeping a stiff upper lip
and of "being cheerful under adverse
circumstances." To refer again lo
the eloquent words of Sir Forbes-
Robertson, "Art has ils mission in
times of darkness, struggle and adversity as well as ill times of sunshine, case and prosperity." Thc
spoken and the written word helps
every day our gallant soldiers iee do
(heir arduous duty.    The pillow of the
SUCCESS
Awaits  those who are prepared  to
when il itself.   Hut.
cept  their  business  opportunity
OPPORTUNITIES
Will  ; folli dung the.
war.    Ii  \ ou are-  wi-.,  you   ..ii' training  now   and he  ready
for f, I why.
Our Winter Term Opens Monday, Jan. 4
��� ���   .   about it KOW.     TI.'- information coats >   ;i nothing.
Success Business College
Limited
E  See :t 1 late ii, I'..A., Principal
CORNER TENTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
Fairmont 2075 VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone Seymour 1946
ENGLISH COLLEGIATE SCHOOL
1150 ROBSON STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Miss HILDA A. POMEROY, Principal
Certificated at tin   Board ol Education, England.
Trained at  Bishop litter College, Sussex,
Associate of Arts at Oxford University.
Certificated at Trinity College of Music���Piano and Harmony.
English Literature and Science Distinctions al Examination.
SUBJECTS TAUGHT.
ALL ELEMENTARY  STUDIES  (Preparatory and otherwise).
and
NEEDLEWORK (Plain and Fancy).
DRAWING AM) PAINTING (All branches).
MATHEMATICS,    Matriculation Syllabus, London University.
BOTANY AXD NATURE STUDY.    With Microscopy if desired.
LANGUAGES (By arrangement).
TAILOR   DRESS-CUTTING   AND   MAKING   (London  Academy).
SWIMMING, PHYSICAL CULTURE, ATHLETICS, ETC.
ENGLISH LITERATURE (Poetry and Prose).
Pupils of any age prepared in any of thc above subjects, by arrangement, DAV or EVENING.
TERMS
Parents are requested to call in person and interview Miss Hilda A.
Pomeroy,  Principal  English Collegiate School
EDUCATION
PARENTS SHOULD HAVE THEIR
DAUGHTERS
ATTEND THE
Burrard School for Girls
850 BURRARD STREET
Miss B. II. CARTMILL, Principal.
FOR TERMS,  Telephone  Seymour  1847, or
��_all   in  person.
wounded hero i- the softer for having some "good story" under it to
which���in respites from pain���tlie
aching cye-s maj   turn and which ma)
-.'"ilu tlu- mind which has gone
ihfi iiigh an e xpei ii nee ��� hi irri irs
which c\ en -.in- i" n of a  I lante
Hot   eh-Selilei
We hav < heard hi >�� a part) of L >n-
don artistes journeyed to tin -ea: fi
war and with music ami song���bj the
e xere'-. ol histrionic an -gave our
hrave- "Tommies" a respite fri m the
ioi' oi' ilu- trenches, made them forget, for a iew lerii-l moments, the horrors ano sorrow - "i tin ir bhiod), in c-
c--.ei> work, Tin- nun fought : ii
better, watched the better, work- -   -
��� ..inl . ndtll e d ihe betti r, we are
told, because "i tin cheerful moments thus vouchsafed i> them. "Dickens in Camp" was recited that night,
lln- poem in which Itret Harte ha- elc-
5cribi el how iln- -tory i : "Litth Nell,"
read aloud, tii.>\ n��� < 1 and softened ihe
hearts nf rough gold miners in this
tugged Wesl The imagination of
the poet iln! hut : nticipatc. \ storj
has conn- from Ihe "front" which tells
us how. liy lhe elini light in the camp,
with the shrapnel shrieking at iis
dreadful work- nut far away. "The
Christmas Carol" was read to a mass
.I British troops thi- Yuletide just
pasi. Wounded men forgeet their
pains in sympathy for "Tiny Tim."
and men whose hanels were bloody
with carnage. Inn morally clean���for
they had fought iu a righteous cause
���watched with tense faces feer lhe
arrival eef "Old Scrooge," and scream-
eel with delight when he raised his
poor clerk's salary. The word of
Dickens lias not hist its magic. The
aid oi tlle apostle of cheerfulness may
well hc invoked in these troublous
limes, leer he teaches that dark clouds
will some time turn their silver lining
to the eye and that envy, hale, even
thc lust of bloodshed, must at last
give way to the gospel of "Peace on
earth, goodwill among men." It is
well that these artistic literary birthdays sheiuld lie remembered and celebrated as Collingwood does it.
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can   supply   your   needs   at   right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right  at  Station)
G. BUSH
Ih-^s t,i inform ihe- inhabitants of
this locality that he is opening a
first-class
Meat  Market
4556 Main Street
(Between 29th and 30th Ave.)
On SATURDAY, DECEMBER
5, with a first-class stock of Meats,
Butter, Hams, Bacein, Eggs, etc.,
at prices to suit the times.
Don't   forget   the   Address:
4556 MAIN STREET
(Late Street's)
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable  Hall for oublic meetings,  dances,  etc.,  to  Let
Apply W.  J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
WILLOW HOSPITAL
Miss HALL and Miss WESTLEY,  graduate nurses
CORNER  OF
BROADWAY and WILLOW
Patients Received from $15.00 Per Week
Phone Fairmont 2165 FOUR
GREATER   VANCOUVER    CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY   13,  1��I5
jVhune  hair 2302
4429 Main Street.
Cl i Tt i THE
MAIN ST. AUTO CO.
(or
\1  i'i i   REPAIRS  AND  ACCESS" IRTES
Tin   Besl  Grade of I liis and Gn ascs kept in il >ck,
Auto  Killing Station on Premises.    Shell Gasoline 20 cents a gallon.
Mill: Foot of Ontario Street. Fraser River Phone: Fraser 97
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
C ANADIAN CEDAR
LUMBER CO.
Manufacturers of
BEVEL SIDING, BOAT LUMBER
HIGH-GRADE CEDAR LUMBER AND LATH
Wholesale and Retail
GRIMMETT P.  O., SOUTH  VANCOUVER
P. M. HAMILTON' F- WILLIS
Hughes Bros' Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET  EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We carry everything in Wines, Liquors and Cigars
No order too small, and none too large  for this popular Liquor Store
Store open every evening until 11 p.m.
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
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THE
BANK OF VANCOUVER
Has Napoleon's Secret BeenFound
By F. N. Maude
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
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It is common knowledge that the
French armies of 1870 were very badly handled, bul few except experts
realize how completely the whole apparatus for the conducl at large armies in ilu- field had deteriorated since
tin- days e,f iln- Great Emperor,
Immediately after thc War of '70-
71 tin ablcsl of the surviving officers,
thoroughly conscious of the mistakes
that had been made, took iu hand Ihe
reorganization of the stall services.
Minus) a> a firsl step they obtained
from the Governmenl a decree for the
formation oi ���,, Military llisteiry Department, endowed with ample means
feer research intei all llle documents
of the revolutionary and Napoleonic
epoch, which existed in tlle archives
eef the War Ministry. In this department they then tested every applicant
for Staff duties, and carefully selected
those who showed any capacity lur
research, combined wiih tiie power eef
adequate literary expression, Hy degrees tluy gathered together a very
exceptional body of writers. Then
.suddenly anise among them the genius.
I hate im documentary evidence tu
produce em this p.,int. I tell Ihe story
as I received it frum my French
freinels. ami especially Colonel Cliar-
rier. According tee my informants it
was a Captain Gilbert of the French
Engineers, "Im (whilst collating the
Napoleonic campaigns, with Moltke's
practice always at the back e.f his
mind I   suddenly   noted   llle   fact   that
unlil  the  outbreak  uf  the  campaign
..f 1805, the lirst stage nf which ended at I'lm, there had never been in
liisteery anything even remotely rc-
sembhng the strategical method employed liy Napoleon, and fur the very
Kuud reason, that until that moment
the problem of combining em une battlefield the action nf several corps
moving een more or less parallel mads
under a single undivided command,
had never arisen. This was because
circumstances fur the first time compelled an army to distribute itself into many columns, thus risking defeat
in detail, in order tu find food fur men
and   horses  numbered  by   lhe   100,000,
and marching without organized transport service. To meet llle difficulties
these proceedings involved, Napoleon
devised      the      following      expedient.
though he well understood its thinners. Tei guard against the risk of
a concentrated attack upun a single
column he adopted the quite common-
sense solution e.f sending cavalry as
a screen far in advance uf his main
army, tu give timely warning eif his
enemy's whereabnttts, su that his
scattered columns cnuld be closed
within supporting distance before the
enemy could overcome the resistance
inherent  in any one uf them.    In this
manner he marched to Ulm, where at
length he succeeded in mure ur less
surrounding sume 20,(KH) Austrian!,
and inducing their surrender. A singularly inadequate result to obtain
by the employment eef nearly 2tX),000
iruups fm- tun months,
Moreover, h was only by accident
that he found even these JO.IKII1 within
the sweep of his nel, because, but fur
unexampled bad luck, ihe Austrians
should have cleared out eef the trap
wilh their last baggage wagon a guud
live lieuirs befure the trap closed un
them. Now, Captain Gilbert noticed
that this march half across Eurupe
tu Ulm served Mullkc and lhe Prussian staff as lhe model fnr their great
advance frum the Rhine tn the Mns-
elle, which resulted in the investment
of Bnzaine in Metz. With regard lee
Ihis event both Captain Gilbert and
his colleagues possessed information
��� ef which at that dale (almui 1885) no
nne iu Berlin had even a suspicion.
Further, lie noticed thai, whereas Napoleon never afterwards repealed this
particular method, yet invariably hereafter secured a crushing numerical
superiority at the decisive point "ii
each battlefield, Moltke and his staff
continued in develop the Ulm model,
and eventually hypnotized themselves
and their whole army inin llie conviction lhat  they had al  last  secured tlle
royal,road t" victory, a means which
unly needed ruthless energy in its
execution to bring aboul an unfailingly decisive result; and from this result nl aUtO-SUggestion they have never since deviated. Pursuing Iiis investigations, Gilbert was nexl struck
by a Idler written by the Emperor
to M.ii-hai S'eiilt ..ti October 3th,
1806, in winch he explains his design!
againsl the Prussian army in Tliurin-
gia.      In   tlle   Idler   there   occurs   tlle
following phrase:  "Vims  pensez que
-    ce   serait   une   belle   affaire   que  de   se
porter  autotir  ele-  cette   place  en  un
bataillon   earn-   de   2K),IKK)   homines."
I Probably  many  hundreds  of eyes  had
head   Ihis   paper   before   Gilbert   came
upon ii. Imt it  took the Intuition uf
] his genius to discern thai it was no
mere figure eif speech, but contained
the whole uf an extraetrdinarily wide
ranging idea. Plotting the position
eif his trneips Napoleon was leading,
iii diagram form, one notices al once
I thai they are grouped al the four angles nf a square, one diagonal of which
lis directed Inwards the enemy. About
6H.0OII are in each group, and can bc
readily funned fur action tn meet an
unexpected attack coming from any
direction. Under the tactical conditions nf these days, it was quite bc-
yontl reason to suppose that 60,000
French troops under a picked marshal
could be eiverwheltned by any force
in Eurupe in less tlnm forty-eight
hours' fighting and manoeuvring;
therefore, if these groups wcre not
more than thirty miles asunder, according in the condition of the disirict. fresh Iruups cnuld appear on
the battlefield in ample time to avert
anything in the nature of a disaster
���and victory generally falls tn the
man   whu   has   the   last   fresh   reserve
iu hand.   So it would have happened
CHIMNEY SWEEPING CITY *S��a^5?
phi r.���    ce.ni srt   i/e    nn, e:<s    nieuTrn
Phone Seymour 5293
FLAG  POLES   PAINTED
409 Dunsmuir Street
at Jena, had lhe Prussians attacked
Napoleon's "bataillon carre," ur hail
they even elected iee receive its onset
united. Hut their staff and generals,
lieing in fact beaten by llu- terror of
Napoleon's name, even before his advance guarel appeared, obligingly separated themselves inte, two portions,
each ut which could be dealt with hy
thc nearest groups oi iln- French
square, without calling on the mass
oi ilie reserves at all.
The   Prussians,  however,  were  the
last army uf the uld school, viz., one
organized to inarch as a single- unit,
living  from ils uwn  transport and tint
frum tlie country, which Napoleon
encountered in person before Waterloo. From this time forward his enemies  were c pelled  t" move againsl
him, anel Ie.r the same cause, in lines
eei parallel columns, exactly as lu- himself had deme against Mack a! I'lm ,';
Now it was that the Emperur perfected his method, inventing the
phrase: "one ne manoeuvre pas qu' au-
tour d' une pointe fixe," in plain English "ye.u must have a pivot to swing
nn." It became the duty eef his strong
advance guard, cavalry, infantry, and
artillery tee attack the enemy wherever
it met him, and huld him by lighting,
retreating or menoeuvring, whichever
best suited the situation and circumstances, whilst the square in rear, i.e..
the three remaining groups, wheeled
round te. either Hank as convenient,
and delivered with fresh iruups a
smashing blow upon lhe enemy at a
poinl eef ilie Emperor's uwn chuice.
Thus nut unly did he ensure the employment uf unwearied men against
those already worn mu with much
lighting, hut in addition he destroyed
all power uf iniative un his enemy's
side, while preserving lhe secret uf
where his blow was tu fall until it was
tun late inr the latter tee bring up reinforcements tn meet it: and this advantage proved greater iu proportion
tee the total number uf Irmeps on either side.
Napoleon had said thai he never engaged in a battle unless he had 999
chances nut nf a 1,000 in his favor.
Now the Emperur was a born mathematician, and particularly careful a-
bout ligures���for his uwn consumption, In his words, therefore, this
meant that once his plan was made,
and his manoeuvre or "swing of the
square" had begun, nothing the enemy
cnuld do wemld prevent the realization of his. Napoleon's, will, Only an
earthquake, nr sunn- other meteorological manoeuvre, cnuld prevent his
manoeuvre from attaining its purpose,
liul Clausewitz, in all essentials
Moltke's itiieir, in a long summary nf
the many causes which interfere to
hamper a general's design, had wound
up by staling that uf all these many
dangers lhe greatest would always remain the "independent will-power uf
one's opponent." Contrasting these
twu attitudes uf mind towards the
same problem, both men possessing
Intellectuality nf a very high order,
it became perfectly apparent tu the
, rench staff lhat Napoleon, in making
his statement, affirmed absolutely thai
he had. iu fact, acquired the pnwer ni
destroying ihe independent will-power
nt his adversary, and as a consequence
had lie.thing tei fear from him. A lew
I trial campaigns nil the map served
finally   tn  establish   the   truth   of   this
assertion,
That the conclusions drawn by the
French staff are Bound can be shown
by a simple diagram, within lhe reach
nl everyone's capacity. Draw nn a
sheet ni paper senile half-dozen parallel lines representing columns "I
troops twenty nr thirty miles lung,
and Ihen 'anywhere near lhe centre
line pin down nnc curner 'if a square
uf paper which will serve Inr the Napoleonic lozenge nr square; then pivot
it about in either hand. Ii will be immediately apparent tbat whichever
way the "square" rotates il musl bring
superior numbers against the columns
it confronts, because the centre of
gravity eel the "square" has a shorter
distance to travel, and lhe greater the
number of the enemy's columns, the
greater tlu- advantage tu ilie "square."
finis if Germany invaded  France mi
a fr.mt i.i ISO miles, say iu len columns '���!' (io.oiki nun each, a French
army nf unly 400,000, in fuur equal
groups at the angle's eef lhe square,
could always bring iis whole 400,000
inte, action against 200,000 ur .IUI.IKK)
of the enemy, before Ihe latter could
bring reinforcements from ihe distant
think- I., the' assistance nl the columns
assaulted.
NOW, if we turn tu the events nf
lhe presenl campaign we can understand the tremendous efforts iln- German staff put forth in overwhelm and
destroy the British contingent.
Tn begin wilh. we Iinii a slrmig allied     advance   guard   between     Mems
and Charleroi, which immediately fixes and destroys lhe "independent will"
uf   their   German   adversary,   lhat   acts
almost automatically mi the suggestions conveyed ny its antennae, its cavalry. Al mice the great columns
swing  in  In  attack   and  envelop   their
opponent, exactly as Napoleon endeavored tn du at Ulm, and as Moltke
successfully did at Wiecrth and Sedan.
But   now,   quite    unexpectedlyi    the
British, wlm n- -ood fortune for all
of ns. held the post of lionur, developed the kind nf resistance nu German nfficcr ever expected from truops
���least of all, from the "despised mercenaries." as they were pleased to
consider mir men.
Up tei about the third day of the
retreat, I believe the German staff
still felt confident uf victory; but a-
biml tbat time I imagine Ihey began
lee question whether indeed tliey had
nut under-valued the essence- oi the
Nanoleonic strategy, and when, putting mil all Iheir strength, Imaging
udels eef al least live tn nne against us,
they still failed I" break us. the siis-
piciem  musl have gruwn lee conviction
that   Joffre,  as    generalissimo,    was
holding them, and they began tn lose
their   heads;   1   know   them   so   well.
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ITS DUSTLESSNESS���Does not pulverize; thc
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We manufacture blocks of the highest possible
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155 FRONT STREET WEST
Phone Fairmont 122
Keeler's Nursery
Grower and Importer of Plants, Bulbs, Roots and Shrubs
Cut Flowers and Design
Work  a   specialty.
Flowering and Ornamental Shrubs feir Spring and
Fall   planting.
One  hundred  varieties  of
Rosea  of  Choice  Sorts
and   three   hundred   varieties   of   Dahlias.
Phone Fairmont 817
YOU WILL FIND OUR PRICES MODERATE
Cor. FIFTEENTH AVE. and MAIN  ST  ::  MOUNT  PLEASANT
VIOLIN EXPERT
Old and valuable violins carefully repaired.
Guitars and mandolins repaired. Bows rchaired.
Violins  bought.
JAMES TAYLOR
531  RICHARDS ST. Phone  Seymour  3415
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORK8
1(41 ALBERT ST.                                                                      TELEPHONE
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131
Freem this time onwards, ii seems in
me thai iln machine, so carefullj organized nnd trained by Moltke, began
t.e take charge e,f the man The staff
no  longer  controlled  lln-   machine  as
intelligent thinkers, but became inei.-
merized by Iheir own phrases. Sedulously  repeated in  every  lecture-room
and text-book f'er several military
generations.���Contemporary   Review. SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY  13,  WIS
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
AVENUE
MAIN    AND      HARRIS
Phone���Seymour   4634
Matinees  Wed.     and   Sat.
Monday,   Tuesday,   Wednesday and Wednesday Matinee
Feb.  15, 16, 17
MAUDE
LEONE
THE AVENUE PLAYERS I broderick
PRESENT I o'farrell
THE MASTER MIND
By Daniel  D   Carter, from the book  b)   Marvin  Dana.        \    Crlmi
hi.nn.i   without   un   underworld   seting,     \  gripping lull
defeated  vengeance,     \  splendid plaj  nl politic* mid clever   intrigue
1      .      l vi nings, _'.">��� .nni 50c��� Matinee, any seat,
\-k  il     Tr, asurer   iboul   your  Se us���n Ticket*
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
Do Not fail to see "ZUDORA," Thanhouser's Greatest Photo Play
3000 Scenes. Caste of 1000
FRIDAY and SATURDAY.    Read the Story in the Monday "Sun" by
Harold McGrath
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   DEAN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
oming   Wednesday.   January 27,    THE    MASTER     KEY
GOOD LITTLE BUSINESS
m- FOR SALE **P
RENT CHEAP
Cor. 25th Ave. and Main
What Has the B.C.
Electric Done to
Promote the Prosperity
of British Columbia ?
During the last three years it has distributed to its employees in the form of
wages a total or
$13,200,000
At the present time it is distributing to
its employees approximately
$200,000 per month
These facts should [be   of
interest to you
30,000 Price Tickets
Signs and Window Notices in stock
Price from 15c. per doz.
Every kind of Sign or Letter made
to  order
T. WEST
JANES ROAD P.O. So. Vau.
Mr. W. W. Robertson
TEACHER OF VIOLIN
Open for lev more  pupils
Terms Moderate
4223   WINDSOR    STREET
South Vancouver   Phone Sey. 4284
THEATRJCAL
Avenue Theatre
,U'."fHp Tuesday and Wednesdaj
ami V\ednesday matinee, ihe Avenui
1 '.' md.   I., , ���
Broderick   O'Farrell,  will   I,
1
drama  without
an stirring si
���I     unbelievable     hypnotic
i ��� ngi ful   hate
inij pri ni| I
sultillji    i
��� ll   in-   - ..ll   with
' 'Us   hate  ii In. h   will  ...
���
Ie.r has I ffer to thi
iine.i .
1   whieh   througii   hii   I evi
' barrier to
Horded    t*        eal
dram lay il  is
not  in be rill  be
maele       I    ll>     Mi
Bli nr.'   alais   Mag  ii    I lii        he   un-
and   innocei
11 '1   ill,,I   ���'.:,
tl
��� I
���
Mi '.   w i ..I,
-   all   billed     I
like her.   Thi
South   Hill   Palace   cf   Varieties
	
ve up
tandan
il    ��� as    '!" in d.     I
are all of thc  hif,
i      '
est is  the  latesl
bring hoi
resi nl   I In      ���   ii   '���' nrli '.
\"  i '.!   ��� \V, li
ne  ilaj   and   S,   irda;    and   I
.' pari are in no mean class.    In
facl il   ' i uld   "   ���  fe   ���
Scene  frcm   "The   Master   Mind,"  the weird melodrama  which will be presented by the Avenue   Players next  week
to this character a charm and whole-
someness which  will  be  refreshing.
As Andrew Watkins, "The Master
Mind," Broderick I I'Karrell is cast in
a   role  whick   will  call   for   unstinted
praise from all whose g 1 fi rtuni   il
will   Ih'   tn   witness   i.i-   performance.
As .1. Willis .- ij re, dramatic critic of
the Seattle "Times" said in his ri vii Vt
of  VIr, i I'Farrell's performance al
Seatth   theatre, ' stagi     manner,
isms in  1"-  pai'    ���<   Vndi ew   W atkins
bring i i mini    In    ai    Kyrlc  Believe's
famous   charactei   "Raflflt ���"   foi   b
in figure of speech and facial resi nib
lance does    In  dra��  to mind Bell   ���
Uf.   T.   Layne  a-   Cortland   Wi i
right   the   dominating   I listricl    \t< n
mi   wlv se   forceful  il t< llecl   is   i
againsl  "1 he   Masti i   Mind"  is  -
tremendous  si n     an    ii tensi Ij
dramatic   situation   in   the   denounce
:i,,,i  in  the  third  ae I   whii li    "   * '
ri9e  to   with   thai   I  n    understanding
�� hich e har icterizes  liis  work.    Hov
ard   Russell  as  Creegan.    the    artful
cracksman  and  prince ol   lighl I i
,    j  ntry   though   gi< en   a   th ml
pari I- pin Irnj   w ill mai     ihi   mosl    I
il   ,ni.l  therebj   gel     lii
tribul    from his many admin rs.    b
ward   Lawrem     ���'-     Walter     Blount,
alais Diamo ��� the pseud
will derive  froi    this i larae    I
hmlerworlcl    a    full      understanding.
Dais)   0' Urn   as   Mrs    Bl unt,
Milwaukee    Sadie  and     Lee     ll
as   her   husband   crime-partner,     will
persist  in  making themselves   i   p
nam featuri  ol the play bj  reason ol
their bicki ring and impromptu  wil
\s "The Chi colate Soldier is
booked for ihi lasl three days ol the
week "The Mastei Mind" "ill be given only Monday, Tuesday. Wednesday with the special matinee on \\ i d
nesday.
I e.f the "turns" put e.n at this popular
;!ietii-c woulcl draw applause in an} of
I the orthodox playhouses.
Smith Vancouverites in general and
those   resident   within   two   or   three
miles   eei'   S.inth   Hill     in     particular,
I weiuhl  ilu  well  to  give   thi ���       us
j weeklj   call     I hie'   t isit  w ��� uld  ensu
; therti  bece uning a  ri gular devol e.
The popular manager, Mr. \
desertt s the thanks i if all lovi
the " M ivies" for tii    higl    tati
is attained     Tl
is   sple ndiilly  ' iii out,  the si ating ac-
nnii ulatii 'ii   particul . vi r>
ii-  assun
In ���:-.    Tin     In atre   i-   sil
on 45th and   Frasi r,        lion
south '.I the Municipal  Hall.
Fantages  Theatre
Coming to Pantages for the week
commencing next Monday afternoon
are the Mnu and Jeff ol vaudeville
and they are even funnier than the.
originals of Bud Fisher's cartoons.
The famous long and shorl Marco
Twins are the mirth-makers wine will
add ne tlu- gaiet) of Vancouver liming the week and win, answer the
above discription.
By wav ni an added attraction
Manager Graham is bringing on the
Five Musical N'oises in their picturesque act "A Gala Day in Old Seville."
This is unquestionably one of the premier musical features now touring in
vaudeville and is invariably a gretat
success wherever presented. Their
programme appeals to all classes and
is both classical and popular in its
composition.
The tin-he dramatic playlet, The
Operator" is alsei scheduled and is
sure t'e prove a knockout ll is ael-
mirahly played by Leo Cooper and his
fine company.
The Three Alleys In their phenomenal perch act will attract  wide at-
Opening    of     Laurier     Club     Drawj
Large   and   Enthusiastic   Crowd
(Continued  from 1
to render se\ 11 al  si 1.  tioi - and
.it  tin of , Riven
'
chaii man   then     iih      ip, .������   Mi.
Ralph Smi ss tii
VIi   Smith said:    If 1 ilj
i    the ti mper display ei .   I'i
��� incial i -I.   -    '
��� I   �� lien  ansvi ei im,
f   tl nts,   ::    ni.
.e ��� '\ helming   powei
au ditioi
sclf-conlidi "i ��� �� Inch alv, aj - a��
public hostility. This i a com
i ��� be  expi   ted fi ,   mi i .  a<
i ustomeil as tin ) yeai -.
: - -i'e ,il.  in ih,   legi
unly  and out  of it I pari
ganization,   al   all   times   rcceii n
heart}   agreement   to   anything
j think  lil   in  say.
This is jus! as true of the min ���
being backed up in tin
the hustings for everything they saj
or do and never appealing to a public
assembly when even a question might
be askeel. The possession of this
haughty nublic spiril was to be expected. N'nw that iheir maladministration of public affairs is plainly seen
by an indifferent public in the past and
lii slavish party following, this will
avail them nothing. The very organization of power which has helped
ihcm i , cany ,oi a secret administration I'm' their party's interests principally, lias induced them to lapse intn such excesses which by its own
weight lias suddenly disclosed Itself.
If the' advice of Liberals had been
taken lasi election, these tendencies
would hare been corrected as they
presented themselves, many even
{would have been avoided and the McBride Government itself wemld have
been saved the humiliation of a sudden  reverse  anel  political  defeat.
It is not an extravagance t�� sav
that we can .enly have an effective administration when we have a vigilant
opposition. It is lime feir a change
and a change would enable them tee
(jet their backs  straightened and their
kneel strengthened by a long spell on
the  "ther   side  of  The   In,use.     Ai   for
their   followers,   there   is   nothing   t"
their  political  cnelit  but  their bjyalt)
te,   tiie:r   leaders   whether   Uny    were
C riticism i- thc lasl
'.  Government should
��� '". tiny hai ���   leen in power Per
eleven years, they  ha had
de-
; rymg oul a pi
���
d in,i
and
lailui t  they  a|
���
���
���
I
recog
1
Mem        >i nai
dom       ne i
��� eut the
Ul-Stl HI    WUIloUl    Will 'A ���
iponei
without   any    intentional     untairi
little usetul
ave ''."iie- that littl I
inn c 1.. ��� pai ��� in nni n ��� in - me nu-
; ��� anl directions and wasti tul and
i ttrai aganl in nthi rs. I hey have
plundered and blundred until they have
cn ated a spirit ol politie al unresl and
distrust,     tncj nei  r ai-
tempted anj political reform. i In j
haic spem the revenues freely, without oeing able to -hi..'. ���. alui received
ni thirty cents on thc dollar. This
great and rapid and startling growth
ol provincial outlay, without the public seeing any important returns has
forced its consideration e-n all thought-
ml electors and we will prove this indictment. Ju-i for the present occasion I will give y��� ni a few samples of
extravagance which consists "i a little e,ii  tor the Tory  machine.
Mr. Smith brought oui sunn- telling
figures in regard to Strathcona I'ark.
showing where the government, in
spite ni the - e-calleel hard times had
dissipated the sum of $234,215, of
which the supervising engineer, Mr
Thompson, ni Seattle had received 25
per cent, of the total amounl expended.
Royal Commissions
Nn governmenl in the history of
the Dominion or any of the provinces,
,i,i- ever taken such flagrant advantage of the powers it possesses tee appoint commissions, with ilu- deliberate intention of enriching its partizans,
as has the McBride administration of
British Columbia. During the past
two year-, the following commissions
manned by trusty henchmen of the
McBride  machine  were  appointed.
'I he following are the costs with
-nnn particulars gleaned from thc
Public   Accounts :
Labor Commissi n , $4 1.552 (In
thi- commission were riv< commissioners, consisting uf Messrs. II. Cj Parsons. \. X. Harper, John Jardine. R.
V Stoney, .1. A, McKelvie, These
gentlemen appropriated for their ser-
���i i - and trat i Iling i xpi nses $33.911
for eight nn mills' work. Add F R.
McXamara's travelling expi i -
. ill . as sccrel try, S4 864, The bal-
e up ol sundrj iti ms, advertising,  etc,    Mr,   Parsons    va
���      machine   candidati    f n   I    I-
timbia  rieliiiLi.  his  share pinn
er  on   this       'i nmii
months   ii
i '       ���,'.".       I re|   ���
commission ha\ e  ibsi duti I)   n
VI ilie
R  yai   Commission    m    \gri< i
;    rin   i" rsoni
-   - si> mem    r�� a
��� ,-\.  X mi   eif ihi se me mbi
i ��� practical fai mi
- .   ���
A .   H.   II.-
Lu 'as,   I. .1   Cani| bell, S. S
Kitson, W,  I euiiea". and Si .- i    r;   C
I',   Christens n    Tw u of thesi
i   ���
Tin   an
,;ie nses by thc n
tin-  con '
.   i
���
ticularl
d l throu I
I'he   l
Mi   \v-    i
the   i icies
ing inti ���     blenis
ductie ;
,
132   la) s laboT expenses     i   I
w "inii n'ul   commissi     . fi iui
ssary to call in tin   st n i 'i - of a
secretarj  al S: 15'' p< i   month   also tin
.mi    ' ai   . mini nl timi of ac
Mi ssrs,   Mai wick,   Mitchi 11,   Peat  and
Co.,  wh  -i   fees  amounted   to  $2,594.
Another  interesting  matter  connec
w ith   this   commissi m   -il   sei ms
have been something of a family com-
PANTAGES
Unequalled        Vaudeville      Means       Paotage.
Vaudevnie
E.  D.   Graham.  Resident   Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
THE MARCO
TWINS
Mutt   and   Jeff  of   Vaudeville
And   Other Great Acts
Three   shows   daily   2.45.    7.20.   9.15
Admission���Matinees,     15c;     nights,
15c   and 25c; boxes.  50c.
Order   now
your  Wedding   Cakes,
Christmas
Cakes and   Real  Scotch
Shortbread,
frcm
A.
BLYTH
Bak-r
and  Confectioner
Cor.   of   JOHN  and   28TH   AVE.
CENTER & HANNA
LIMITED
Established  1893
Refined   Service    N'ew  Location
1049 GEORGIA ST.
Opposite new Y. M. C. A.
Fireproof      Columbarium      and
Mausoleum
OPEN   DAY  AXD   NIGHT
Seymour  2425
One   cent   per   Fowl,   per   Week
Poultry  Keepers
will get Ik Ft results from constant
"B&B"
Poultry Spice
And    EGG   PRODUCER
A  1 ten   ''iili''. Pick-me-up and
Drop-cm-dnwn
Once   Tried Always  Used!
Guarantei d  I r suit      il
fed   a . nt   (in
everj  s
3 lb.  sack.  45c.' 6>/2  lb.  r.ack, 90c.
100   lb.  sack.  $12.00
Manufactured in Vancouver.    Sold
Everywhere
H   I    Cleg!        i      cl
��� tari .and
disbursed   i i   Mr   H. $1,310
as steu   j ra , iher b   Thi
thi'
���  -  $ 10.1  -
Mr.   Smi eten
commiss    ns. viz: Ind
I
showed
how   th nni
been   expi ncil sei;
.-   II
\i   tin    cle,s smith's
say   n, ���     ���' ��� thanks  to  |
Mr.   Ra I le o|
IllCtt    f'Jt
haviiiK   doi
,,ii  ii- espoi
, ���
���i. ���  .
ill  iii-  ;���
ee   i
with tin    I.
then  , ' ng of l
v'   -:   ������   '      \ nti , ������ '              nil iiinei -
menl was   n f the chai       n I
the   reguli the   Laurier
Liberal ild take   place
al   the   club   rooms mer
Main   Streel    md Ri, i r   Road     in xt
Tuesdaj    evei big ai  8   o'cl >ck,   ��In n
all Liberals in tin distrie t an  request-
i ed tee attend    ��� ��� , '     an   interest   in
1 the organization.
Go to
ANGUS
FOR
TUNGSTEN LAMPS
And Electrical Repairs
36  Twenty-fifth Ave, East
PHONE FAIRMONT 720
J
V
- SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY.  FEBRUARY   13,   1915
We are the exclusive South Vancouver Agents for Jk
the famous J
JINGLE POT Coal
COAST LUMBER & FUEL  CO.,
Phone Fairmont 2500
Phone Highland 226
LIMITED
Phone Fraser 41
I jitney busies we,n't attempt to K"
Anyway, "opposition is the life "f
trade." Tbat is whal British Columbia ami Vancouver in   particular   is
i very much in need of. When fares
ip cheaper tiny, iln- 1'.. C !���'. R. will
be in the same nosition as tin- city of
Glasgeivi   (Scotland) corporation were
in; lhev could nol al tirst understand
how a hall penny fan weiuhl pay, Hul
ii did. Thousands ol people wlm seldom used lhe ears at all were bringing in iiiillieeus nf half pennys (one
cent) tei ilu- cars amazing results,
enormous surpluses at end of financial
year. I'.. C, E. '< "u" thou and do
likewiie." People will ne.t walk then
a- they aie compelled i" eh. mew [heic
hard times I" MVC big ear fares
J. W. LECKIE.
EVERY TIME
YOU MAKE
PURCHASES
From these FIRMS
Y
OU WILL BE SATISFIED
DEALER   IN
HAY.   GRAIN   and   FEED
POULTRY SUPPLIES
CORRESPONDENCE
Editor CHINOOK:
Sir, Would you permit nie to give
a little resume nf a Council nieeling
I attended last Friday when matters
very important were up for discussion.
It is for the purpose uf getting ratepayers to attend Council meetings in
the future thai I append the following whieh, 1 think, is a very impartial
report of the proceedings at that meeting,
The crowd was there tn overflowing
oi our modern and up-to-date hall,
and the disappointed were many who
had to turn away and lose the show.
And it was sume show, at lhat.
The Reeve and Council were out in
full force, nu absentee frum their
ranks being reported. Reeve Gold
started tbe ball a-rolling by calling
the meeting to order and asked the
clerk to read the minutes and communications.
First communication: A special invite to the Reeve and Council to a
grand dance to be given by the Ladies
of the Maccabees; accepted, "f course,
so keep your eye on that dance���it
will be some classy affair.
The next item started some fireworks going. Our noble Reeve finds
bis work so heavy and bis time taken
up so much with job-seekers, etc., that
he must have a private secretary, and
therefore, generous fellow, he appoints Mr. Seymour to lill the position, with full powers, at his own expense. Hc appoints Mr. Seymour to
that important office, and instructs
tbe Municipal Clerk to notify all the
Councillors that Mr. Seymour must
have full run of tlie Hall and Municipal affairs, "in fact, a second reeve."
Alas, alas, the Council didn't quite
sec it that way; Councillor Campbell
thought there was enough detectives
around tbe Hall already and as it
seemed to lower tlle dignity of tbe
Council to have another one, he must
strongly object; in fact be was bold
enough to say be would not stand for
it.
GARDENS   :-:   ORCHARDS
SELECT  AND   PLANT  EARLY
In  our  stock  of  over  $100,000  we  have  everything  to  meet  reasonable  human  desire   in   making   beautiful   gardens;   in   flowering   plants;    flowering   and   evergreen
shrubbery;  rose bushes;  shade trees; hedge stock,  etc.     Also large and small fruit
tree stock for your orchards and gardens.
Buy  from  us  and  thereby  encourage  home  production   for   home  consumption  and
a full dinner pail.
Our prices defy competition. Catalogues mailed free on application.
ROYAL NURSERIES LIMITED
Head Office :    710 Dominion Bldg.. 207  Hastings St. W..  Telephone Seymour  5556.
Store :     2410  Cranville   St..   Fairview,   Telephone   Bayview   1926
Greenhouses and Nurseries at Royal, Telephone Eburne 43
Then 'Councillor Russell jumped
up   and   "(lew    righl   'iff   the   handle";
he considered it added   to the dignity
of ihis noble body, by lhe Reeve having a private secretary, especially as
the Reeve was paying fur him out of
his own pocket, and Ile couldn't see
hnw anyone bad any right to object
to the move of his friend, the Reeve.
Councillor Stanley then raised bis feeble veeiee against this, then followed
Councillors Allen and Street, with the
result that Councillor Welsh, seeing
bow the tide was running, moved that
this communication be filed.
This was carried, Councillor Russell only dissenting. Poor Seymour,
this clipped bis wings of authority and
curtailed bis powers quite a bit. This
act rather reduced the physical powers
of our hard-working Council, and for
a time things went along smoothly,
in fact, so smoothly that when the
resolution was read pertaining to a
raise of salery for our Council, bringing their salary up to $900.00 per year,
not a word eif objection was raised
and the resolution was safe on its way
to Mr. Bowser.
Hard times did some one say. Well,
not bard enough to keep our noble
fellows at the Municipal Hall from
asking Mr. Bowser to let them have
liberty to vote themselves $900.00 as
their hard-earned wages. Where the
money is to come from, why what do
we care? Tbe Councillors will see
to that.
Docs anyone know Hobson around
here. If you don't then you haven't
been to a Council meeting recently.
He's very much in evidence there.
Why don't the Reeve give him a position as principal dictator to the Council? He seems to feel he is needed in
that capacity, and why does the Council and Reeve tolerate this kind of
thing   around   the   Hall.       This   man
A view of the filling and crowning machines in our bottling department, having a capacity
of turning out 36,000 bottles per day
eJP
THE BEER  WITHOUT A PEER
Is a beverage of absolute purity. It is a safe drink, because unlike milk and
water, it cannot carry deleterious germs; a sane drink, because it does not unbalance tbe mental organs. It gives vigor to the body, is a constructive, not
destructive agency, and adds to one's strength and endurance when intelligently used.
When ordering your Spring tonic, ask your dealer for Cascade Beer. The
Popular Beer, at the Popular Price.
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER  BREWERIES   LIMITED
wanied in. anil obtained, permission
to address tbe Council and talk all
kinds of nonsense, taking up valuable
time and simply bringing ridicule upon himself and those who allowed
him lee ihi so ��� a splendid vaudeville
show but not business, nor businesslike.
The closing minutes of Monday's
meeting     were     certainly     interesting
and entertaining if nothing else. One
ratepayer wanted to know if it was a
fact that certain men when applying
for positions bad been asked by some
of the councillors to what political
party they belonged, 'ibis raised another storm and pandemonium reigned
for a few minutes. Councillors Stanley, Welsh and Russell tried to make
it appear that this had been asked
simply in a joke, bul this explanation
didn't seem to bc satisfactory to the
most of those present and some of the
ratepayers soon told them so. The
meeting at this point was adjourned
and tbe curtain rung down on what
is becoming a regular up-to-date
vaudeville show.
Trusting you will insert this in your
valuable paper, Mr. Editor, as I think
it will give ratepayers in general an
idea of how things are being run up
there.���Yours, etc.,
A RATEPAYER.
Editor Chinook :
Sir,���1 was rather surprised to read
a letter from "Ratepayer" in your last
week's issue regarding the "Jitney"
buss in South Vancouver. From the
first I have advocated this or any
other opposition that likes to come
along and thus compel the B. C. E.
Railway to find their way to some of
those long promised car lines in our
municipality. We have a new reeve
and new council. The old reeve and
council had many interviews and trips
over the proposed routes with tlle officials of the B. C. E. R. who no doubt
were desirous of getting away from
their clerks into the open air and to
get smiled upon and patted on the
back with a luncheon and cigars
thrown in by thc South Vancouver
municipality and which expense "Ratepayer" has to pay his share. They return from this enjoyable trip and in
a few days the B. C. E. R. officials
write thc Reeve and Councillors, that
owing lo the state of the money market, etc., they cannot see Iheir way
clear to lay car lines on the proposed
routes. Later, out of an enormous
"reserve"   fund   they  pay  a  dividend.
This putting off and playing with
the public has been tolerated leiilg
enough and it is high time we had jit-
neys and every oilier opposition. I
hope the residents of South Vancouver will have common sense enough
to see that by encouraging opposition
Ihey will gel better and cheaper service. 1 alsu hope the present reeve
and Council will do all in their power
to encourage them.    It has been i>os-
sible  hing ago,   as   the   latter  pari   of
this letter shows to extend their lines;
las in tin employees, how many Dagoes
��� are employed in the number given by
your Correspondent.     I   hope  we  shall
seal see- large numbers of jitney busses in S.nitli Vancouver. No doubt
there must be some kind of control
uver these men who are operating
these BUtos, and 1 feel sure when they
themselves are properly organized
(as I think Ihey will be sunn) that
Ihey will agree In do all in their power
for the prevention of accidents and
il any should occur that they will put
themselves under the protection "f an
insurance scheme for the purpose of
meeting any claim for damages or
hiss of life. I have no patience with
the cry of some people le> put such
restrictions on this perfectly legitimate enterprise that would put them
out of business. Rather let us encourage them as no doubt this is a business with a great future. Besides, it
was high time the B. C. E. R. had
some kind of opposition. They simply have done just as they pleased
with the public of Vancouver for
many years and with all due respect
to their past and present managers
they have not to my mind used the
opportunities of advancement thev
might have done. How many badly
I served districts have time and again
called for tbe laying of lines of rails
without success. Corporations and
municipalities were nothing to them
I if they did not think thev would move.
! Move they did not. Two years ago.
| for instance, Knight Road was to
I have a line of cars, no attempt has
j been made yet. Then there is Wil-
! son Road and a large number nf other
districts that the B. C. E. R. might
have with their large capital and big
reserve, made these districts much
more thickly populated than they are
today. Why should people have to
walk eight and ten blocks to a car?
Other cities get the cars to these outlying districts and thus make them
preferable to the city to live in. Even
now the B. C. E. R. should bc forging
ahead in face of this opposition, as it
is easy to see that there are many
places   where   the   cars   can   run   that
THE  WOMEN  OF  RUSSIA
How   They   Minimize   the   Ravaging
Effects of War
Illy   Princess  Sasha  Ktopotkin)
During the war more than at any
other   time   the   general   efficiency   of
the women plays an  Important  pan
in the success of their country, This
is especially see where there is conscription, for il is inevitable that life
should become dislocated when all or
most uf the men are withdrawn frum
it. Iii Russia women fill so many
posts which in other countries are the
privilege of men, that they are still
there te. carry een the work when the
men are gone���and in any case they
are willing to take up a variety of occupations from which ihey are barred
at ordinary times. It is true that they
arc welcomed and given all kinds of
jobs. Women act as clerks in banks
and they occupy every kind uf peisition
in the municipal organizations even
in times of peace. In certain villages
ihey are occasionally elected as "ilcs-
siatki"���that is a kind of policeman
amongst whose duties is that of collecting the young men whose time has
come to serve in the army. During tbe
Napoleonic wars there was even a
woman "starosla" (elder of a village).
Xastasia���that was ber name���led her
villagers, armed with scythes and
pitchforks, against Ibe French invaders and took a great number of
prisoners.
The Cossack women for many
years fought side by side with their
men, going into battle armed with
anything tliey could lay hands on.
This tradition, for it became a tradition that the women should lake an
active part in any battle, seems to
have originated in 1774 when the Cossack town of Naaur was being besieged by the Tartars. The Gissack
women helped ny pouring nut only
boiling water and tar on tbe besiegers, but also the soup which they were
cooking. Finally they became so bellicose that they sallied forth from the
town dressed in their best red sarafans, armed and angry, and attacked
the Tartars witb great success.
And the Russian peasant women of
today seem capable of living up to
these traditions. Only a few days
ago when a German aeroplane fell in
a village near the frontier, the women
who were bringing in tbe harvest
rushed to the spot anel smashed the
machine, belaboring the twee aviators
with their fists and hay forks. They
evercanic them, although the Germans
endeavored to defend themselves with
revolvers, and held them until some
soldiers arrived and rescued the prisoners.
The women are ready, however, to
show their energy in more peaceful
ways as well, and we hear that they
arc conducting almost the entire tram
and  postal  service  in  both  capitals.
In lhe villages their work is more
varied and strenuous. At all times
the peasant women wnrk siele by side
with their men in almost all the Held
work���especially at harvest time, But
when the men are gone the entire'
wnrk of the village has to be carried
un by the women, with the help of
only the very old or the very yuung
male population,    Once the hearvest
is brought in���and fur thai they wurk
from before dawn till after sunset���
the peasant weemen have to turn their
bands lei threshing the corn, to felling
trees, shoeing the horsei and, later,
ploughing; and all this besides their
own wnrk, which Includes -pinning
and weaving.
It i- a tragedy for every agricultural country to I"-'' Its nnn, but,
where the women are capable "f carrying em the work, the tragedy is !������<���-
si'iii'il. Ami In such countries when
there is war tin succeil nt the war is
to a great i-\lcnl ensured by lln   niiiii-
ini/i'il possibilities of famine,
Though Russian women have', as
yet, no-vote, still in almost all classes
Ihey enjoy absolutely the same righls
and privileges as the men.    And in the
struggle for greater political rights
tiie sexes work together demanding
them   fur   both.
It is greatly lo lie regretted tbat at
such a time as the present English
women are not more freely admitted
I'i work which under ordinary circumstances is discharged by men. They
woulil most undoubtedly acquit themselves creditably, and prove their powers of adaptability not less than
their Russian sisters. ��� The Ladies'
Realm.
W. T. HALL
(Successor   to   Donaldson   &   McDonald)
4285 MAIN STREET
Phone   Fairmont   1514
Terms   Cash
0
RDER Your MEATS
From   The   Family   Butcher
at  the Sanitary  Shop  today.
Telephone   Fairmont   1634
Anderson's Market
J. E. Anderson,  Prop.
4192 MAIN STREET
U
SHOULD   PATRONIZE
THE CITIZENS
That   helps   protect   your homr   in
war   time   anil   z"*   force them   out
of   business   _y   buying from   the
alien.
HONEST    PRICES.      HONEST    WEIGHT
At
Main St. Fish Market
4131 MAIN STREET
s
INGER SEWING
MACHINE
South  Vancouver  Branch
Machines   Rented.    Exchanged    and    Repaired
Needles,   Oils   and  All   Parts
Agent   for   "CANADA'S   PRIDE''   Malleable
Range.   $1.00   down   and   $1.00   per   week
4095 MAIN STREET, Cor. 25th Ave.
Phone   Fairmont   1548 A.   F.   McDonald
A
TELEPHONE Fair. 720 for
NGUS
PLUMBING   ::   HEATING
ELECTRICAL REPAIRS
A SPECIALTY
No order too large or too small for
prompt service
V
ERY BEST OF
TAILORING
UP TO DATE
J. & H. FERGUSON
The Main Street Ladies' and Gent.'s
Tailors
3834 MAIN STREET (Nr. 23rd Ave.)
Phone Fairmont 2489
E
XPRESSING
and HAULING
B. R. GRAY
42  TWENTY-FIFTH   AVE.   EAST
Furniture. Piano Moving and Express Work
Work promptly attended to and our prices
are   right. Phone:   FAIRMONT   80:
[RS. ARMOUR
Doctor of Electricity
25     years'     experience     Removi:- ;
Diseases  and   their   Causes
SPECIAL    TREATMENTS. MASSAC ���;
Appointments can  be made for Treatment    I
your own home.
Terms   on   Application
Residence:    3837    MAIN     STREET
(Cor.  22nd  Avenue  West)
0
NLY     THE     BEST     OF
MATERIAL      USED      IN
REPAIRING YOUR
BOOTS AND   SHOES
AT  MY STORE.
JOHN STEPHEN
3324 MAIN STREET
Satisfaction Guaranteed.   Prices Right
N
ONE BETTER I     TRY
LIBBY'S GROCERY
6404 MAIN ST. (Cor. 50th)
For FIRST CLASS PROVISIONS
FLOUR AND FEED, Etc.
Give us a trial and be convinced of
quality and quantity. All Orders
promptly delivered. Try our special
Ceylon Tea. Leave your address and
have our solicitor call for your order.
Ratepayers  Taking  Keen  Interest  in
Business Transacted at Municipal
Hall
(-Continued from Pane 1)
owing to the larger numbers of men
lii'iiiie, idle iii some wards than in
others Ihis caused some criticism and
discussion. It was pointed out that
in Ward 3 there wcre over 400 men
out of work, double of what there was
in any of the other wards, but the
$2,000 for each ward was finally
adopted. Tiie Councillor and ward
.foremen of each ward were (riven
power to employ the men, the health
inspector to assist them in giving
names of the most deserving cases in
their different wards.
The meeting was adjourned till
Thursday morning when the council
would meet again to take up matters
pertaining to the duties of the newly
appointed medical officer, and also reports of charges made for patients
during the past year.
E
VERY Man should patronize
Antiseptic Cleaning
and Pressing Co.
Manager -        F.   W.   RIGBY
2900   MAIN   ST.    (Cor.   13th   Ave.)
Guaranteed Best Work only
Reduced Prices. Goods called Ior and delivered
PHONE   FAIRMONT   812
Open  8   a.m.   to   7   p.m.       Saturday   9   p.nl'
Y
OU WILL GET VALUE
AND SATISFACTION BY
PATRONIZING
Crossland's Store
4520 MAIN  STREET
A nice clean stock of Groceries,
Candys and Tobacco.

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