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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Feb 15, 1913

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Array Wpn* CHINOOK
�� A Half Million in 1917
Vol. I, No. 40
SOUTH VANCOUVER,   B.C., CANADA, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY  15, 1913.
Price 5 cents
Realty Deals Investigated
by Commissioner Crehan
Ex-Reeve Pound and Councillor Third Explain Receipt of
Money on Main Street Corner Deal���The Evidence
Moneys paid in connection with
certain really deals came up for investigation by Commissioner Crehan
at a sitting eif the enquiry een Wednesday 'ef this week.
The point was raised in connection
wiih the purchase by the municipality, the- I'.riii>h Columbia Electric
Railway Company, ami ilu- Provincial Government of 71 feet of corner
property 'en Eighteenth Avenue and
Main Street in August, 1909, for road
widening purposes, the price paid being Slii.Sui). There was also another
portion uf ilu- property, about 16 feet,
...eld .-it tin same time in Mr. J. F.
Griiiitni-lt   fe.r $.11X111
According   I"   ilu-   evidence   given
before   tin-  Commissioner   tlu-  nego-
tiations feer iln- purchase oi the prop-]
eriy  from  Captain   Westerland  were
carried   through  by  Councillor  John
Third,   and   in   lhe-   course   "f  his   examination Mr. Third stated that there
was im commission paid mi the trans-1
action for ihe Municipality. He stated]
further, however, that In- had received $HK| from  Mr. Grimmett,    which
was absolutely in accordance wiih a
private agreement and had nothing to
dee  with  ihe sah- eef lhe property  in,
the   Municipality.    According  to  the
evidence  Mr. Third's action  in  insisting em having a net price on the property se eld to Semth Vancouver resulted in a direct saving of $500 to the
ratepayers.
Questioned if he received any "present" from Captain Westerland, Coun.
cillor  Third  declined  tee answer  mi
the ground that if he did it was
private business, anil bad nothing to
<le> with the properly purchased feir
the municipality.
Ex-Reeve Pound, however, stated
frankly that after the deal had been
put through Councillor Third gave
him $150, half of whieh lie (Mr.
round)  paid over to his partner.
Mr. Arthur Waldon, formerly in
partnership with ex-Reeve Pound,
stated that in August, 1909, he knew
frum rumors that a deal feer the
property at the corner of Eighteenth
Avenue was being negotiated with
Messrs. MeKim and Hamilton, but
later he learned. that Mr. Pound and
Councillor Third were interesting
themselves in the negotiations. It
was. hc saitl, understood between
himself and Mr. Pound that no matter what office any deal went through
there would be half commission coming to their office.
Commissioner Crehan t Did you
receive any commission?
Witness : Possibly a week after
the deal went through I received $75
from Mr. W. A. Pound, and 1 was
informed that il was part of $150 he
hail received from Councillor John
Third as pari commission, he (Third)
had   gut   mit   of   tlie  purchase  of  the
linn seventy-one feet should be purchased for road widening purposes
nt $10,500. anil the balance of the
property was sold Mr. Grimmett  fm
$300(1.
Commissioner Crehan : Did you
pay any  commission  out  of that.
Witness :     Xo.  sir.
The Commissioner : Veen did nol
pay commission to Councillor Third
or ex-Reeve  Pound?
_ Witn'e8S : Xo. sir. When Mr.
Third came lee nie 1 told him the
price eif $13,500 wa-   net.
Further questioned, Captain West,
erland said the sab- to Mr. Grimmett was a private deal which Councillor Third negotiated.
Mr, George Roden (a ratepayer):
Did you pay any commission on ilu-
deal  with  Mr. Grimmett?
Witness : Is it necessary I should
answer that,  Mr. Commissioner?
Commissioner Crehan: I think
yem should answer it.
Witness : I did not pay any "commission." It was distinctly understood that  the price quoted was ab-
ilutely net.
lu reply I.. Mr. Pound, the witness
said Councillor Third did not make
any agreement in regard to commission.
Mr. J. K. Grimmett gave evidence
as to the purchase of a 16-foot corner of the property owned by Captain Westerland Ihrough Councillor
Third, and he stated that he was so
pleased at having succeeded in getting possession of the property, which
adjoined a lot of which he was the
owner, that he voluntarily gave Councillor Third $100 for (he trouble he
had taken in the matter. It was, he
said, purely a private transaction, and
the gift to Mr. Third was quite voluntary on his part.
William Hartley, another witness,
stating that he represented K. R
Stewart, said that in D. L. 339 (Ward
One) there had been eight or nine
new roads opened last year, but no
provision had been made for draining the roads, consequently, he said,
there were no ditches on Fifty-sixth
Avenue, and the water flowed over
the road and into K. R. Stewart's orchard.
Commissioner Crehan : Any damage done?
Witness : Certainly, the water is
doing damage and 1 quite expect that
there will be a number of dead trees
in the spring. Those trees are sixteen years old. and are worth $20
each.
Municipal Engineer Clement was
called in. and having heard the witness's statement lu- promised to 1...>k
into lhe matter ami ie. reply later.
New Features for Readers
Rattlers of "The Chinook" arc reminded <��/' Sandy MacPher-
son's column which is appearing in tins paper from week in week.
Tin- third oi these articles appears in tins issue. Sandy MacPherson litis an observant eye, a keen sense of Scottish humor,
and a prolific pen. and tn our readers we would again recommend this column
Attention is also drawn to the series nf articles which are ap-
pearing weekly from the pen of Felix Penne. Mr. J. Francis
Bursill is a writer nf more than local fame and his contributions
arc always breezy, interesting and to the point.
Full reports nf the meetings nf the Collingwood Parliament
will also appear from week to week.
Burnaby District Prospers
Under Wise Business System
Reeve MacGregor and able Councillors Form Live, Efficient, Aggressive Board of Directors for this
Youthful Civic Corporation
Around the Municipal Hall
BY    SCRUIATeOR
(ine eef iln- mosl magnificent views
to In- seen in South Vancouver al the
present lime is ilu- snow-covere el
mountains. Lying acn ss tin Burrard Inlet, in ill -ir rugged boldness
with their snow-covered sides, they
present a picture of grandeur that is
hard to excel, These mountains have
always had a fascination fm- me ami
every summer I make several trips
lee them.    However, 'lie picture they
present   just   now   i-   SO   perfect   thai   I
could nol resisl ilu- temptation to go
eiver and have a walk up th,- sides t"
make a closer inspection. S" "ii Sunday last I found myself making the
journey i" the intake at the top of
Seymour Creek. When I reached my
destination 1 was surprised to find
how easy lhe walking was. The snow-
was linn beneath the feet and one got
along much easier than they can at
present in South Vancouver. In fact
I had a little girl with me who, without any assistance made the journey
both going and coming without once
complaining 'ef being fatigued.
Though the mountains have the appearance of having hail a much
heavier fall than Semlli Vancouver,
yet my experience is that there has
been the heaviest fall of sneew in
South Vancouver. From the time 1
left the car till I returned I never
met a single pedestrian on the way.
This is as tine a walk as anyone
could desire and I am surprised thai
of all the number of limes I have been
on these mountains I have never yel
met a single South Vancouver person that 1 know.
I was introduced to Mr. McGatty
of East Collingwood for the first time
this week. He possesses all the characteristics of a son of Erin. Like the
usual Irishman, he is always willing
io spring a conundrum, lie put one
on Commissioner Crehan and who,
as far as we know, has yet been unable to solve it. Mr. McGatty said
l.e   tlu-   Commissioner:     Thi*    water
lank   at   CollingW 1   was   empty   all
summer:  the  water pipes  leaked, and
ihe   water  flowed  into  my  basement
.mil ile odi '1 ii What puzzles the
Commissioner is: If the lank was
empty  and  the  pipe-  leaking,  where
did  tin-   waler  come   from  thai   11 1-
ed ihe basement?
AAA
Xo one seems to fully realize just
whal ill deal between lhe C.N'.R.
and the Cily will have upon ilu future
prospects of our Municipality. Already the C.N'.R. are largely interested in Smith Vancouver, If they are
able p. successfully carry through
their negotiations as to False Creek
ihen il means that then will be weirk
in abundance for all the lalner thai
eau be funnel. We have watched the
proceedings uf tlie negotiations very
closely and consider if anything, lhat
the Cily has gut the best of the bargain. Perhaps those that are kicking
so hard at the terms as agreed upon
have   rcas'in   for   their  kicking.
East Collingwood is te> be congratulated in being the lirst section
of the Municipality tu form a Mock
Parliament. Every encouragement
should be given towards the advancement of this association. It is in such
Schools as these that some 'if theme est in.ted matters have been trained anil where their first oratorial
power was brought to light. As an
educative medium for Municipal matters these associations stand par excellence. Emulation is the highest
form of flattery, so the example that
East Collingwood has Set is being
followed by those in Fraser Avenue.
Il is rumored that a second parliament is being formed there. Mr
Janes, the head of the Tax Department, has the matter iii hand and we
understand he has already secured a
large number of signatures to feerm
such an association. The life ami
vitality shown in such always depend
un lhe energy eif a few: action spells
success, inaction decay ami death. If
tin- Mock 1'arliameiu in Fraser Avenue is lee be a success then il is to
Mr. Janes and his conferes who eau
pul that vim into it which will carry
it uver all obstacles and make- the
success il she mill be.
Iii reply to questions by the Commissioner, the witness said only a
portion of the property sold by Captain Westerland was required for
road widening and that the other portion was sold i" Mr. J. I-'. Grimmett,
but Ilis impression was that the commission was on the purchase of
property on the corner, though ii
might have been on the property sold
to Mr. Grimmett.
Questioned by ex-Reeve Pound, the
witness saiel he did nol remember Mr
Pound slating that as a member of
the municipal council he could nol
aeeepl any commission on the transaction He said the $75 was paid in
bills and thai at the time Mr. Pound
had a number of ulher bills in his
hand which might have amounted pe
$75 en- more,
Asked if he had the books used
during the partnership, the witness
said "yes." ami he stated that one
leaf   he   had   cut     out     because     the
amount  of $100 commission on the
sale of a house oil Prior Slreel had
been, lu- said, altered from $100 tee
$250 and that the alteration was in
Mr, Pounds writing. Unfortunately, he said, lie hael lefl Ihe leaf at
home.
Mr. Pound : Do you remember
at that time that I said I did not wish
the amount I had given you to go
down as commission on the Eighteenth Avenue property because at
smiie future date some person might
say that | |u,i been getting commission .em of the sale to the municipality?
Witness I    Yuu may have said that.
Mr. Pound : When I gave you the
commission I said ii was In connection with the Eighteenth Avenue corner?
Witness :       Yes.
Captain Westerland stated thai the
property on Eighteenth Avenue,
which he sold tee the municipality was
approximately seventy-one feet an'
was part of property with a frontage
of eighty-eight feel. He understood
at the time, he said, that he was 'cll-
ing the property to the B. C. Electric Railway Company. Councillor
Third, he said, carried out the nei���. ���-
tiations. The gross price fnr tec
w-hole of thc property was S -1.P00.
which Mr. Third said was too high,
and as there was to be no commission
be agreed to sell for $13,500. After
discussing  the  matter  it  was  agreed
Commissioner M. J. Crehan
Caricature   of   British    Columbia's   leading   business   doctor   drawn   for   the
"Chinook"  by  Mr.   Harry  Palmer,  the clever  artist
on  the  Vancouver  "World"
Daily enquiries being held by
Commissioner Crehan at the
Municipal Hall have been
bringing that gentleman very
much in the public eye. Commissioner Crehan is a chartered accountant who has few
peers throughout Canada in his
profession. His professional services have been the salvation of
many a private as well as
municipal corporation in this
Province. Commissioner Crehan comes from the Green Isle
originally. He has the wit of
an tiish barrister, the dignity
of a Supreme Court judge, the
diplomacy of a Richelieu, and
his name will long bc remembered in the history of South
Vancouver.
South Vancouver Teachers
A dance and social will be given by
the South Vancouver Seheeed Teachers' Association at Lester's Hall, oil
Friday, February 21. There will he-
dancing in the ballroom from 8.30 to
12, with a social evening, games, etc.
in the hewer hall. A buffet supper will
be served from 10.30 to 12. Marino's
orchestra will be in attendance. The
patronesses are Mrs. A. Graham,
Miss Burpee, Mrs. Dr. Belle II. Wilson, Mrs. Robertson, Mrs. I). Turn-
bull Dance Committee, Miss Buller.
Miss Calvick, Miss Purest. Miss Gem.
mell, Miss Mackinson, Miss <). C,
Morrison, Miss Walter, Mr. Jekyl,
Mr. Siniius. Social Committee, Miss
Ainslee, Miss Dixon, Miss Gunn,
Miss Hindle. Miss !���'. Morrison, Miss
Henderson, Miss Trenholm, Miss
Winslow,   Mr.   Creelman.
 U       ITfll      I	
Epworth League Social
The Epworth League of the Mountain View Methodist church held a
social evening on Monday night.
February 10. The Ferris Road Epworth League were invited and nearly
all of that party wcre present. An
entertaining programme was provided which was followed by the National Anthem Rev. Tye and the
pastor of the church addressed a few
words to the eighty people present.
"Ours," declares the ratepayer of
Burnaby, " is the best governed municipality in the whole- oi Canada, On
our council board," he boasts, "are-
to be found business men e.i integrity
ulii, run the municipality along business  liin S."
l 'iiile-r the administration of Ree> -
Wear! it is well known thai every
reason was advanced necessary for
the Burnaby ratepayer to throw out
his chest with civic pride.
Wiih 1). C. MacGregor in the
Reeve's chair at the delightful civic
headquarters al Edmonds there is
���very evidence up'en whieh to predict
thai thi interests of the district will
receive the same careful attenion in
the ilium- that they received in thc
past with possibly just a si i
MacGregorism thrown in to mark improvement,
Re e\ - MacGregor has under him a
most capable council. He is a civic
official eef proved ability himself, ami
there is every likelihood that the
thriving city which lie-- between South
Vancouver ami Westminster will
make giant   strides during  1913.
This year, mi the Burnaby Board of
Wurk-. we find Councillor A, MacDonald, a man who has occupied a
place on lhe llurnaby be .aril feer years
at lhe head eef the table. Ile lives in
X'eerih llurnaby ami represents Warel
5. Councillor MacDonald was fur
years an alderman in the City uf Vancuuver. and therefore an old war-
he. rse in mailers municipal, anil he!
brings an absolute maturity of judgment t" bear upon his office.
Burnaby's   Council   is  made  up  of
a cosmopolitan group eef men. Councillor P. W. Fan Vel was born in the
Channel   Islands,  and     he     came     to I
Canada   frum   Xew   Zealand.    This  is]
Fail Vel's second  year mi   the board.
He  is   ihe  chairman   of  the  finance
committee,   anil   he   received   his   experience in the game eef finance from
many years in the lumber trade. Councillor Fan Vel has a large sawmill onl
the   Pole   Line   Road.   He   is   a   big
husky   British-Canadian,   and   a   valuable man to Burnaby.
From MacKay comes Councillor
T. W. Mayne. As a member feer
many years eef the Hurnaby Sell'ml
Board he has done good work feer his
community. Last year Councillor
Mayne served as chairman uf the
school board, ami also as Councillor,
This year. Councillor Mayne will concentrate his efforts een his Council
we irk.
T. I). Coldicutt, of Burnaby East,
has been prominent in Burnaby affairs fm- years, lie lirst came into
preeminence in a mailer which related
I-, ih I',. C. Electric franchise over
in Burnaby. T. I), was against the
B. i' Electric However, Councillor
Coldicttti i- ai present focusing lii-
efforts mi ilu- improvement of lii-
Ward, ami he is proving himself a
successful puhlic servant, II-- is an
energ :tic gentleman, a large business
mail, and Burnaby would he the worse
if T. 1). Coldicutt were i" remove his
personality from that sunny district
There is a man mi ihe Burnab) Council w hu is one uf iln- besl know n men
\ s, possibly in Canada. Alexander
MacPherson lives on Salisbury
Avenue, ant al that point which is
possibly more beautiful than any
other e,u tlu- Vanueuver peninsula
Councillor MacPherson i- building
up a community of homes. I le- In,- a
di.ze-n lieitisi- under the coursj of
construction at iln present moment,
and when In- plans ar-- fully carried
oul Mr. MacPherson will like-ly have
a i-iiy fi hi- own opposite ihe Edmonds civic buildings. Alexand r
MacPherson i- a Canadian, bred
from I lie.lilan<i siuek. ami In- i- ..ne
-.1 the most enthusiastic hors nen
in the West Ai present he does not
keep a stable, but at various times
��� luring tin- pa-- ten years Iii- colors
have been prominent on every ra e-
track iu America.
From Bristol, England, ci ��� - -
Councillor Eber Stride. He is a pi- ���"-
eer in sunny Burnaby, a worthy citizen, ai d a spl "'iii; man. Coune il
Stride i- a lover of nature, am! his
hie vocation has been iln- nursery
: usini - - lie has a large plan on
iin- Kingsway, and In- brings to the
Municipal Council, aesthetic tasl s
vhieh will have their mark on the upbuilding "f that wonderful community.
Ami fm this aggregation fi worthy
Councillors of Hurnaby there could
be found nu meere successful chief
than Mr. D C. MacGregor, the Reeve.
When 1). C. MacGregor ran fe.r the
eeffiie he- described himself on he official paper- as a plain farmer. He
is a farmer Also he is a financier, a
patron uf the arts, a horseman, a sup-
peerter of ail good undertakings, and
apart freun lhat a genial Highla.nl
gentleman wine can at times "spoke
the Gaelic, whatever."
Reeve MacGregor looks un Burnaby as Sir Thomas Shaughnessy 1.���<ek-.
em the C. P. R., or Mr. Sperling looks
een the B. C. Electric Railway. e.r as
Mr. M. Spencer looks upon ihe Spen-
cer slures, and he governs himself accordingly. Burnaby is purely a bu-i-
ness matter with the man from Rub
Reiy's clan. Reeve MacGregor dues
nut spend all his time about the
Municipal Hall at Edmonds. He anil
his Councillors decide upon the larger
questions that arise freun elay tu day
in the conduct tti the municipality.
I They hire experts to lueek after the
I detail weirk fur them, and if the experts don't make good���well, lhe
: Reeve cuts iheir heads off. Hut this
doesn't happen very often. However, the Reeve and his Councillors
mind their business and the municipal
experts employed in the different departments ai Edmonds mind their
business, and that is why the average
Burnabarian is prepared tu swear that
Bonnie Burnaby is ihe best governed
municipality in the whole of Canada.
"In Days of Yore"
Arrangements have been completed
��� ���        grand  musical  e\ ening   in
iin    View   Methe disl    Chun h,
c inn i- of Sophia  and  Tn entj -i-ightii
Avenue,  on   Thursday  nighl   of
week, al 8 o'clock,
Speech From Throne Before
the Collingwood Parliament
Tlu- Collingw I  Parliament���they
will nol allow il to be called a "Muck"
Parliament���met on Saturday nighl
ai -.In- Collingwood Institute, Colling.
wood East, The "House" was well
arranged���"Mr Speaker" mi an ele-
���. i:..I -eai backed by a gigantic
'"Union Jack": the treasury bench, a
row "f high backed chairs anil even a
witness box for iln se who give evidence before iln- assembly. The
House will have "a bar"���in the technical not the fluid dispensing sense���
to keep "strangers" off ihe floor eef the
II.-use.
By the way, "Strangers" are welcome���through the introduction fi
members, and if ilu- general public
will attend and listen lu debates
(ladies are welcome) ihe proceedings
will prove interesting ami much information will he gained on political
topics am! un  'The Rules fi Debate."
li was made abundantly evident ��� >n
Saturday nighl 'hat iln- proceedings
-hail proceed on strictly parliamentary   lilies.
Tin- "Speaker" (Mr. W. II. Kent)
called the 11- -use iu order very sum'
afler eight. There were uver thirty
present. It is to be hoped there will
he a large attendance tonight, and thc
full "House" of 42 members made up.
Members, get  your  friends  lo join.
Si veral new members wcre introduced ie- lhe Speaker. Mr. Thomas
Todrick i> the secutiel member fm Victoria; Mr. Hearndon represents Nanaimo; Mr. Orrell, Newcastle, and Mr
Telford, Kamloops. Other constituencies were represented as follows:
Comox, 11. X. Lister; Saanach, L. C.
Sailer: Alberni. Page: Grand Feirks.
J G. Lister: Cowichan, B. Miller; Islands. L. W.  Bailey.
The Cabinet
The  Conservatives  are  ill   the  majority
The premier announced the Cabim I
as follow -
Premier and Minister eif External
Affairs���C. T. Bailey
Minister fi [ustice ami Sccretan of
State���Tin -   Todrick.
Minister of Finance ami Revei
II.  S.  Orrell
Minister ol Public Works and Fisheries���R,  Telford.
11 will be -een in lhe King's Speech
lhat other ministers an- iu In- appointed.
Mr. W, Morris has been elected by
the   Liberal   parly   tu   lead    "the   �� Ip-
position."   An Independent party
very  much in evidence.
The Speaker's Address
The "House" then listcncel wilh al-
tention   t..  the   following   "Inaugural
Address"  from  thc "Speaker":
Gentlemen t.i ilu- Collingwood Parliament��� In taking in\ -eat and :���--
-uniing ihe honorable position to
which ymi have appointed me. I am
gratified to think thai both sides uf
the House���ami also those Indep
cut members who have not declared
allcgienee lo any party���have unanimously shown confidence iu placing
me in this position,
1 beg i,i a.sure th.' Heeiise thai - ���
far as m me lies 1 shall endeavor to
deserve that confidence by adhering,
as close as possible, to the strict rules
uf debate and guiding ihis House 1"
:i fair consideration of whatever subject comes before yuu.
It will gratify me to hear every
subject discussed with the warmth���
and even the vehemence���which
comes from personal conviction, and
I wish here to throw out the hint that
it is quite possible to express opinions
wiih   great  force  without  for  a  mo-
(Continued on  Page lit TWU
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15. I9jt
ROUNTeOOS ftURNAftYS
goo��Nie Ranks-��� Qraes
The   Ratepayers'   Association   held |
a  largely attended  meeting  of  Ward!
VI   in   the  McKay   Hall  last   Friday
nighl.   Mr.   Wilson   in   the   chair,   siip-
pe.i led by Secretary   V  E.  I lamer
i in the motion of Mr. George the
minutes of the previous meeting were
read and confirmed, and the meeting proceeded to hear the reports of
the two delegates to the Council meeting pe eliscuss the franchise of Hull. C.  Electric  Railway  Company.
Mr. Eraser, who -puke first, icem-
ed i" think that he and Delegate Russell hail scarcely hael a fair treatment
in nol being heard until the last, as
the prrviuiis ten -peakers hail all op-
posed lhe views e.f Ward V 1 A niee-
tieen i.e withdraw iln- appeal against
the court's decision in favor of the;
H. C. K. Company hail been defeated
un ihe motion uf Mr. Russell, ami a
further   motion   e.n   lhe   part   'ef   Mr.
Fraser wa- carried that another meeting be- held before meeting ilu- B. C.
Electric  Railway Company again.
li was then moved by Mr. Peter
Graham anil seconded by Mr. John
Murray that the meeting suppurt lhe
stand taken hy iln- meeting held on
February 3. ami this was unanimously carried.
Mr. Winch, in a very eloquent
speech, protested against the thirty-
seven years' franchise being given;
away by the Wards, ami especially
against the scramble by each Wanl
fur itself. Mr. Winch also claimed
that tin- B. C. !���'.. Company does not
place the Burnaby Franchise in its
assets, in which view he was support.
eel by the chairman. On being asked
for ids views Councillor Mayne declared for getting all the concessions
possible, and Mr George followed
with   the  argument   that   the  matter
Corporation of the District of South
Vancouver
NOTICE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
All licenses are now due and payable to the Municipal Hall.
Notice is hereby given that proceedings will be taken against any person
or persons iii default afler lhe 28th
day  of  February,  1913.
WM.  JACK SOX.
Chief of Police
Corporation of the District of South
Vancouver
DOG TAX
Dog Tax will be collected at the
Municipal Hall in future. Dogs found
running at large without having a
license  tag will  be  impounded,
WM.   JACKSON,
Chief of Police
should ge, to the Privy Council rather than that surrender ihould be
made. In his opinion lhe Council
had used the delegates as a buffer.
The app.-al against the franchise
comes 'en in court em the INili of
February, ami the delegates reported
there had been a motion lee withdraw
it, This was turned down on the moll f Mr. Russell, and on the motion of Mr. Fraser another meeting
was arranged for before further conference with B. C. E. Company.
lu defending the action of the
Council in the matter Councillor
Mayne declared thai the H C. E.
Company has an unassailable position,
a statement wilh which Mr. Patter-
Son disagreed, ami Mr. Ross, mp-
porleel by Mr. Bolder, strongly urged
letting the court settle it.
li was ihen moved by Mr. Donald
Ross, and seconded by Mr, George
thai the Reeve ami Council be instructed Io lodge an immediate appeal iii court, and thai Councillor
Mayne should du his best lu carry
oul  Ihe wishes of Wanl  VI.
A discussion next Peeik place as |e>
instructions tu delegates, in which
Messrs. Fraser, Winch. Coulte, P,
Rumble, Reess, McCormick, Graham,
John Murray. Jas. Murray, Rnss.-ll
and George took pari. Amongst the
concessions suggested by Chairman
Wilson were: "Thai lhe Council say
whal leniels anil lines be built; thai
the franchise terminate wilh lhat of
Vancouver, and that a 5-cenl fare and
free transfer be granted in   Burnaby.
Ii was further moved by Mr. Reess.
seconded by Mr. Jas. Murray, thai
the delegates oppose ami reporl any
concessions offered by the B. C. E.
Ceimpany, and Mr. Coulter also moved that the various associations gel
together and discuss negotiations,
Messrs. Ross, Winch ami I lamer to
represent  Ward  VI.
*       A     'S}
Two new branches of the Rale-
payers' Association are to be formed,
one at Alta Vista, the other at Edmonds. The secretary for the Alta
Vista branch being Mr. F. Tadinan,
and for Edmonds,  Mr. Vivian.
*       1.       *
It is preiposed lo aller the name of
Royal Oak Station to Alta Vista,
there being not infrequently confusion
caused iu Post Office arrangements,
A deputation from Ward I which
waited on the Council received promise of aid, when the B. C. E. R. to
whose province the matter belongs
should move  in  the alteration.
A      A     i-
The members of Ward VI Progressive Association certainly needed the
exhortion of the chairman at their
meeting on Tuesday night, to look
after their own interests by supporting lhe association. There was but a
small attendance when Mr. Wilson
called the meeting to order, and in
the absence of thc secretary very little
business was transacted.
The report of thc social and dance
held on January 28 was presented,
a  satisfactory  balance  being    shown
of $13.50. This was adopted on the
motion oi Mr. Keefer, seconded by-
Mr.  Frank   Rumble
A question which came under dis-
cu--iuii was thai "f the present unsatisfactory slate of Ihe Voters' List,
many eef he ratepayers duly qualified
p. vote being unable Io rcre.nl iheir
desires,   owing   Io   senile   slight
ality.
these ami all intending member-
requested i" note thai meeting!
held em second and fourth Tues
To suitably mark lhe autpicioui
of Si. Valentine, and also to cite
ilu amusemenl 'ef the inhabitan
Burnaby a conccrl ami social is
given mi Friday lhe 14lh. ill
form- jubilee Methodist Church. Il w
carried oul bv iln- Ladies' Aid Se.
(Julie- a few new names were added ! and a \ cry
.  the association's  membership, ami - arranged.
nl programme ha
a ri-
arc
lay-
dav
r for
Is   of
Iee   lie |
lhe
ill be
cielv.
been I
ABOUT MEN, WOMEN
AND BOOKS   I ��*-*.. |
*
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W.  BRODIE,  Gen. Pass Agent,  Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
H. G. Smith. C. P. Sc T. A.
Phone :   Sty.  7100
W. E.  Duperow, G. A. P. D
S27   Granville  Street
There has been one topic ol conversation this week which has absorbed
all     attention���the   tragic   death     of
brave  Captain  Scott.
* *    *
Polar exploration has always had
for me a strange fascination, the results oi early associations. In Waterloo Place. London, stands a fine
statue of Franklin, who in the frozen
north met with a fate similar to that
of Scott. Franklin was lost. Captain;
McClintock in "The luex" wenl In
search of him and came back with
relics which Bhowed that the gallant
explorer was dead. Then the Statue
was made, My brother, a sculptor,|
worked on ii and a- a child I saw the
figure grow day by day; while Lady
Franklin, the beautiful widow of the
h.si explorer, gave hinls as to the
likeness.
* e|:        A
I remember all the talk about the
fate of Franklin. 1 will give a prize
of a handsome book to the school
boy or girl who first sends to "The
C h'in oe ek" addressed to Felix Penne,
the epitaph on Franklin written by
Tennyson. This paragraph cut from
"The Chiin mk" must accompany your
lei ter.
N'e.w luuk up your Tennyson and
see how the winds written about
Franklin will apply to Scott,
* st    *
Mrs. Scott, the widow of the hero
of the Semth Pole���God comfort her
���has not suffered the suspense which
Lady Franklin endured for so long.
The fate of Scott has soon been
learned, but Lady Franklin had to
wait for years and spend a fortune
in expeditions before Captain McClintock   brought   news   of   her   1ms-
band's fate.
+   *   *
Brave Scott! That last message is
grand in its touching simplicity. 11
will rank in history with "Take care
of my dear Lady Hamilton," of Xelson, and "Don't let poor Nelly starve"
of Charles the Second. And there is
no one who can utter one word
against the Empire taking care of
Scott's widow. There were matters
for discussion in the case of Emma
Lady Hamilton and Xell Gwynne.
! Heaven rest their souls���they were
fair or frail���but I love both of them
and they did much for dear little England.
st   *t   *
I have written some lines above
aboul iwo brave men and about three
wonderful and beautiful women and
Hnw a word about books.
e|<      *     *
My dear Mr. Douglas of the Carnegie Library, why, oh why, did you
not send me a telepathic eir wireless
message to tell mc you were geiing
to give that chat about books to the
Canadian Women's Club. 1 would
have burgled the place to hear you,
but I flatter myself (perhaps I do
really Hatter myself) that where
books are talked of Felix Penne is
not unwelcome, I did not hear you,
alas! I have read a report of your
lecture and I simply say "Thank
you!" and I add you must give a talk
at Collingwood on books. We will
have you there if wc have to kidnap
you.
.ie    *    *
Mr. Douglas, there is one way you
can make amends for met gelling me
lo your lecture. Rake the four quarters of the globe for "The Arctic
Crusoe."  by   Percy   B.   St.  John.
* *    *
.This splendid story of Arctic adventure   I   reail   over  50  years  ago  and
i I  want  tei be a  boy again.
If there is a better boy's story than
I "The   Arctic   Crusoe"   1   have   yet   lo
lind it.
* *    *
Girls!   and   parents   of   girls.      Xew
I Westminster has a May Queen on
i May  Day.    North  Vancouver has a
May Queen un May Day. I am working  wilh a committee of ladies  feir a
May Day celebration in South Van.
couver Write ami tell me what yeiu
think of il. Will you help? You
will!    Thanks!     Send  nie ymtr  name
and address.
For smile lime past Mr. J. Francis
Bursill (Fellow of lhe Royal Historical Society) of tin- Collingwood
Library, has been preparing a lecture
with the title "The Lure of the Pole."
IL- will now add ihe Btory "f Captain
Sce.ii I.. the tragedy of Franklin and
other siories of Arctic exploration.
Thi- lecture, with lantern slides, will
be given at lhe library at an early
dale. Library societies would do
well tee secure this lecture during the
present  lecture season.
* *        He
Mr.   I'ilbladu   al   Ottawa   expressed
ilu-  opinion   that  ihe  outlaying  dis-
i tricts  of  Vancouver  had  to  pay  too
much   ber  the  delivery  of  telegraphic
messages.    The people of South Vancouver will certainly agree wiih  the
gentleman,    A South Vancouver man
| received a telegraphic dispatch lo the
effect that a relative had died and left
him a legacy.    When lie had paid the
! charges on the message his little for-
j tunc   was   considerably   reduced.
* *   *
One swallow docs not make a summer, and one case, or a dozen  cases
I of  destitution  in   ibis  abnormal  wca-
! tl.LT, does not make South Vancouver
[a  "poverty stricken  district" as some
of the papers have called it.
+    *    *
A cheese was dropped from a
grocer's sleigh in Burnaby and it was
picked up by a man, and thereby
hangs a moral. Judge lloway said
there was "no case" and the Prosecuting Counsel, who was there to make
"a case" if he could, agreed, and here
is the moral: Judge Howay thinks
there should be a Crown Prosecutor.
Wc think so too, not only to prevent
the waste of time and money when
there is "no case" but to "go for" the
many fraudulent men who escape
when there is a very decided case
against them but nobody to set the
law in motion without incurring expense and risk.
* *    *
The following books have just been
added  to  the Collingwood  Library:
Polar Exploration, by W. S. Bruce.
British Columbia, by R. E, Gosnell.
Picturesque Australasia, two volumes
(presented by Mr. Hutchings). South
America, by Bryce, and about 500
magazines.
Mr. .1. Francis Bursill has received
a consignment of books from his son
in London and hopes to have another
parcel at an early date.
Bunks fur buys are much needed,
who will send some tn the Collingwood  Library ?
Mr. Grcenslade entertained a number of friends at a party in his home,
corner Fraser and Fifty-eighth, Wednesday night of this week.
TRY- NEW- LIFE
Tlu- whole family can use it. Every "TRY-NEW-LIFE" is
maele uf the ver) besl matt-rial ami liy the musl ski lied workmen,
anil if given reasonable care every one of tin- machines will
last a lifetime.
"TRY-NEW-LIFE" will relieve pain. X" matter whether ii is
a splitting headache, rheumatism, indigestion, neuralgia, ur many
other ailments, "TRY-NEW-LIFE" will bring relief.
Write for particulars or call at the office of the Hamilton-Beach
Sales Co., 707-708 Bank nf Ottawa Building.
Also on sale at
HAMILTON-BEACH   SALES  CO..  721   Yates  St.,  Victoria
BARBERS'   SUPPLY   CO..  617  Robson  St..  Vancouver
BURNS    &    CAIRNS'    DRUG    STORE.    Vancouver    Block,
Vancouver
CEDAR COTTAGE PHARMACY.  South Vancouver
NORTH   SHORE  DRUG   CO..   North   Vancouver,   B.C.
PEOPLE'S   DRUG  STORE, 25th and Main Street
Vancouver
Hamilton-Beach Sales Company
707-708 Bank of Ottawa Building
Vancouver, B.C.
Business  Men  Meet
Cedar Cottage, South Hill and other
busy spots in South Vancouver must
look to their laurels. Collingwood is
going ahead and making such strides
lhat one is inclined to think it aims
at being "the hub" of South Vancouver.
On Tuesday night the business men
of Collingwood���"antl district"��� emphasize "ami district" for Collingwood is nol selfish and narrow���met
and  formed an  association  which  has
every prospect e,f becemiiiig interesting, popular, and above all���useful.
Tin- title of tlu- new association is
"Ceillingwood and District Business
Mm's Association," All business or
professional nun in Collingwood or
district having interesl in the well-
being, progress, devetopmenl and im.
provement of the large area comprised in Warel 1 should gel in touch
with the tradesmen ami other members who will introduce them for
membership.
The next meeting of lhe association will he on Thursday next week
at ihe Collingwood Institute. Ii
~ li�� eii I'I he- .1 good meeting for the association was given a line start by a
!\ery representative body of nun who I
met  on Tuesday night.
Councillor Wilbers accepted the
leeesiliein of Honorary President, and
in an able speech he sketched wmk
which was needed to be done for the
improvement of Wanl 1���and he
would be glad indeed lo have lhe SUg.
gestions, advice, and co-operation of
such a representative body eif men.
lie would do his very besl for the
district he hail lhe heeiior lo represent.   (Cheers.)
Mr. William Morris. School Trustee, a well-known business man was
elected President, and Mr. A. Martin
will be the capable and energetic
secretary. ''Publicity is the life blood
of such an association as this," said a
member���and as the doings of the as.
soeiation will be all for the good of
the people Mr. J. Francis Bursill was
appointed Honorary Press Agent tee
give the association "bold advertisement"
Thc full personnel of the association will be published next week.
Suffice it to say here that Mr. Ha-
wterlh (iif ihe Collingwood Hank of
Vancouver) is treasurer, that the Rev.
Mr.  Pringle is one eef lhe Vice-Prcsi-
WALKER   BROTHERS
REALTY  AND  INSURANCE   BROKERS
* Have helped siin-kis,e-il   llurnaby and Smilli  Vancouver develop freim
virgin forest into busy districts of hollies.
Tlu-y believe Burnaby possesses all iln- factori necessary to make
her 'Hie elay the hub of lhe peninsula.
VANCOUVER;
Dominon Trust Block,
.141   Cambie  Slreel
EDMONDS;
Kdinontis Statioi
llurnaby
A. McFEE
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Phone 1038
Edmonds, B. C.
I have the exclusive sale of large lots on Salisbury Avenue, close
to statics.   $1,000 each; on good terms.    See me about them.
PATTERSON   &    FISHER
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
61/,   acres  in   Edmonds  district,   near   Power   House  and  facing  on   Vancouver
Road,     All   cleared.     Price   $16,000.00.   $5,000.00   cash:   balance   6,   12,   18,   and   2-1
months.
POST OFFICE BUILDING,  EDMONDS Phone:   No.  661
WARNER, BANGS & CO.
REAL ESTATE AND COMMERCIAL AGENTS
PHONE  1024
COLDICUTT  BLOCK,  EAST  BURNABY
SEND US YOUR LISTINGS
LOANS AND INSURANCE
H. SWORDER
EDMUNDS   RELIABLE REAL ESTATE MAN
SPECIALIST IN BURNABY PROPERTY INSURANCE
One acre close to Cut Off  $2000.    Easy terms
Opposite Power House : Lots 50x120. % cash; 6, 12, 18, 24 mths. $525
Another $450.   $100 cash; $10 per month
HOUSES AND LOTS TO SUIT ALL
BRING ME YOUR LISTINGS
Highland   Park   Acreage
We have a number of SMALL ACREAGE PARCELS on and
near the new cut-off line of the B. C. Electric Railway.
1 acre, just off Railway, $2100; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
months.
l-J'4 acres, on Railway, $3500; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
montN.
E.  W.  MacLEAN  LTD.
Exchange Building
142 Hastings West
GEO. SNIDER & BRETHOUR
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
909   Dominion   Trust   Building,   Vancouver,   B. C.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
Telephone! :    Office 8497.    Works 6203.        Works  9328.    Works 9179
Lumber h Lath a Doors
Buy Our Shingles
SPECIALTY-
PROMPT DELIVERY
We Have the Equipment
COAST LUMBER & FUEL
COMPANY  LIMITED
4905 Ontario Street Cor. Bodwell (34th Avenue)
Phone :   Fraser 41
ijnMbtt'g
A Pure Old German Lager, brewed
specially for the Home. Order a case
from your dealer today.
CANADIAN BREWING & MALTING
COMPANY LIMITED
dents, that Mr. Pringle nf the Colling,
wood Lumber Yard is another Vice-
President, and that men as well
known as Mr. Fraser, Mr. Orrell,
Mr. Livingstone, Mr. VV. II. Kent,
Mr. Hickman. Mr. Bailey and perhaps   twenty   oilier   active     men     are
earnest iii making this association a
success;
The meeting at its first gathering
discussed the dirty and dangerous
conditions of certain highways, the
untidy   state   of   the   railway   station,
iln paving eif an important thoroughfare, and as the Rev, Mr. Pringle,
who presided, Mr. Hickman anel
others saiel���the association g"i '"
seriems work before ils was an hour
old, So llnesc wishing lhe best progress ami improvement of Ward 1
should gel iii touch with this association anil walcli "The Chinook" ''"'
rcpeeris of ils interesting doings.
The nexl meeting will he held on
Thursday at 8 p.m., Cbllingwopd
Institute. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
20 % off Heaters
Now's your chance to get a
heater cheap.
We want to reduce our stock.
The best place to buy Hardware is
McBRIDE'S
Corner Sixteenth Avenue and
Main Street
Corner 49th Ave. and Fraser Street
states, it is not uncommon lo tind na- j that their is practically no hope of
fives with thirty-six or even more; their' Re.yal Highnesses the Duke
teeth, hut the white man of tomorrow | and Duchess of Connaught returning
L. Cagneux. an aviator, UCended I An award will shortly be made by
ll.WM) feet iii a moaoplane, carrying I the committee, headed by Sir Kdmund
Miss Davies, an English aviatrix, at Walker of Toronto, appointed hy the
a passenger. This flight established | Government last year to choose the
a new French record for altitude with
McBride's Hardware is the
Hall Mark of  QUALITY.
SASHES AND DOORS
We have a reputation for supplying Sashes and Doors of the
finest   quality and at thc shortest notice, at Prices that are right.
We have experienced men who can supply any need in the line
of Sashes and Doors.
It will be worth your while to get our prices before placing your
order.   It will cost you nothing, and will save you money.
Collingwood Sash and Door Factory
Clements & Tufnah
Dealers in Sashes, Doors, Frames, Sheet Glass, etc.
Collingwood West Station
a passenger.
��       ��      A
The advocates and opponents of
the single tax at Calgary have com-
promiied, and no plebiscite will be
taken on this question. A compromise has been effected on the basis
of reducing the tax on buildings from
25 to 15 per cent, of their valuation.
* St     A
Chas. H. Denton, Tillsonburg, was
elected Warden of Oxford County on
the sixty-second ballot, Thii was a
record in the county, no choice ever
having taken se> long te, make. Voting went on from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
one day, and 1(J a.m. t'i 12 iie.eui the
following day.
ele        *        *
The following Canadians have been
admitted to the fellowship of the
Royal Colonial Institute: Messrs. J.
G. Crerar (Calgary), W, S. Heffer-
nan (Edmonton), J. McKinery (Edmonton), CharU-s Xelson (Vancouver), G. Greyham Palmer (Vancouver!,  J.   1).  I'mitem   (Edmonton).
* *        e|e
"Unless we get snow it will seriously affect the lumbering industry in
Ontario this winter." said Mr. Aubery
While. Deputy Minister uf Lands anil
Forests, "The absence eif snow is
now being felt by the lumbermen.
They cannot get supplies in eer
logs out, and unless the situation
changes it means that the season's
nit  will  be materially reduced."
ef       et.       *
A Kingston surgeon has performed
an operation for appendicitis in the
General Hospital there in exactly
seven minutes from the time the patient was placed on the operating table.
It toeek just exactly three minutes lee
make1 the incision and remove the appendix. It is claimed that this is a
Canadian record.
The suffragettes in London are
planning "an exciting civil war," according to an announcement made by
Mrs. Eiiinieline Pankluirst at a meeting of the Women's Social and Political Union. The militant suffragettes,
said Mrs. Pankluirst, are preparing all
sorts of effective strokes. She especially rejoiced over the exploit at
the Tower of London, where a case
containing some of the Creiwn jewels
wast attacked, and she praised the
raids maele by the suffragettes on the
gedf links. She concluded: "The
Government must quickly give us the
vote or go. The women will use every
method, constitutional as well as unconstitutional, to turn the Cabinet
out."
best design feer the proposed King Edward memorial on Parliament Hill.
Some forty-two designs were submitted to the committee by Canadian and European sculptors. Tir.
committee, at its first cxaminatiein of
will be lucky if he has twenty-eight
There is a tendency feer the first, ele
venth  anel   twelfth
thus leaving nine ^^^^^^^^^^^
on either side ejf ihe body. The legs
and arms are destined to shrink in
length, 'nil the hand, which today
shows immense progress compared
| with that of our remote ancestors, will
to  Canada  from  England  next  summer   to   complete  the   two-year  term
ribs  to  disappear, | of office  for which  his   Royal   High-
instcad  of  twelve 1 ins-   was   appointed.    The  illness  of
hcr   Rejyal   Highness  the  Duchess  of
Connaught  will, it is said,  require a
serious  surgical  Operation    in    England, and it is doubtful if she will be
able feer months to cieme t'i take any
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ in public functions.    Under the
of independence of the fingers.    The | circumstances   it   is   expected   that  a
new Governor-General will have to
lie appointed. As yet nothing is
known in Ministerial circles as to the
the designs some weeks ago, could not I ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
agree on its choice. A second meet- to 1823 have just been received by Dr.
ing was held in Ottawa, and it is un-; J. S. W. McCulIough, Deputy Regis-
derstood an agreement was reached, j trar-General of the Province. The
but the result will first be communi- j marriages were cemducted by Stephen
cated to the Government. The amount j Conger, who was sworn into the of.
voted for the statue is $20,000. t lice of Magistrate at Kingston on July
*   *^^| 1-'. 1803, and in his own handwriting
j the  records  are  engrossed.    Among
I the number many well-known names
little   toe   will   become   smaller.
*    *    *
Some   seventy-six    manuscript    re-  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
cords  of marriages  conducted in  thei probable successor of his Royal High.
eunty  of  Prince  Edward  from   1803 j ness.
The Bishop of Birmingham, discussing the question of fasting during Lent in "The Birmingham Diocesan Magazine," speaks thus of the
danger of overstrict adherence to the
rules of abstinence: "I have found
sometimes that the Anglican lakes
even the rules of fasting too literally.
Senile day I hope the Church will deal
with the whole question of abstinence )"i
on lines suited to our own age and
circumstances. I only ask now for
a judicious and wise observance on
the part of devoted enthusiasts, but no
weirils can be too strong ill calling
upon people generaly t'e use Lent as
a season for not ele,thing themselves
in or even increasing the garments of
undue ami selfish luxury."
��olarwa
Pavement
" IT IS PERMANENT BECAUSE IT IS CONCRETE "
Low Cost���Lowest  Maintenance
Sanitary���Fine Appearance
On the Horse
On the Automobile
On the Ratepayer
L
Impossible to Buy a Better
PAVEMENT at any Price
OUR PRICE ON THE WESTMINSTER ROAD CONTRACT
IS $65,000 LOWER THAN ANY
OTHER BIDDER. DOES THIS INTEREST YOU, MR. TAXPAYER?
We are Laying Dolarway on East
Victoria Drive, South Vancouver
South Vancouver Builders' Supply
A sensation was thrown into Jewish circles at Los Angeles by the
statement made by Rev. S. 11 cellt, the
most prominent rabbi on the coast,
advocating marriage with Gentiles
by followers of Israel. Rev. Ileclit
saiel in part: "The question is not,
shall a Jew or a Jewess marry a
Christian, however, the innate sense
of self-preservation might look with
disfavor upon such marriages, simply
and solely because in them is a tendency to weaken Judaism? There is
no one in the ranks of real liberalism
who would not admit that the voice
of the heart is more powerful than
reason and logic and philosophy; and
there is no rabbi who would refuse to
acknowledge the legality and validity
eif civil marriage."
in the county are found, one of which
is the record of the marriage of Richard G. Clute and Sarah Ann Goldsmith, under license from his Excellency Francis Gore, Lieutenant-Governor eef Upper Canada, dated March
8, 1810. Thc marriage was solemnized on the 12th of the same month.
try registration of marriages
wilh lhe Registrar-General was not
known then, and was not introduced
until 1K69. These records were in the
possession of the widow of the late
j Nelson Conger, 221 .Major Street. Toronto, and were secured for the department through the instrumentality
of Mr. Geo. A. Kingston, K.C., of Toronto,   whose  wife  is  a  great-grand-
| daughter  of  Stephen   Conger.
The latest development in (he western freight rates inquiry is the employment by the Dominion Government of Jean Paul MuIIer, the L'nited
States "rate case expert." Mr. MuIIer has been retained to assist Mr.
James Bicknell, K.C., of Toronto, and
will  leave  New  York  in a  few  days
The professors of the Medical
faculty of Munich University are up
in arms against the favor shown by
the authorities to Prince Ludwig Per.
iliiiaiul. cousin of the Regent of
Bavaria, who is not a qualified physician, but practises medicine at his
palace. As the Prince charges nothing f"r his services, he generally gives
free- thc necessary medicines and surgical appliances t-e poeir patients. His
practice has grown till it has become
teen big for comfort in the palace.
The Minister of Education has there-
fore given the Prince the use of one
of tin- university buildings. This action i^ resented by the professors, as
the privilege was hitherto monopolized by members of iln- faculty. The
Ministerial reply is that the State
should encourage- doctors who work
lor ne.thing.
* *        =te
The criminal law amendment act of
ri|J. popularly known as the white
slave traffic bill, has just come into
operation in Great Britain, and, whatever may be the opinion of reviving
the practice of fogging those persons convicted under thc act, it is
true lhat so far tlu- moral effect of
the new law has been salutary. From
France comes the news that several
well-known procurers ami procur-
esst B have already, after years of residence   in   England,   fled   tei   France
and take up liis residence in Toronto, Und that Deputy Denais is preparing
where he will go over the mountains  to interrogate M. Stceg, the Minister
,of the   Interior, on  the  subject, ask-
ection of French
furniture   objects
i late Henry Op-
will be sold at Christie's in
A magnificent col
eighteenth   century
eef art, formed by th
penlieim
the coming season. It contains many
superb examples of French cabinet-
making, tapestries, sculpture, porcelain, pictures and some fine decorative panels by Boucher. For a short
while the collection was offered in
certain quarters en bloc for $250,000,
but nothing came of the negotiations.
According to the best expert opinion,
the sale publication is likely to realize
anything from $150,000 tei $250,000.
Oppenheim was a banker and financier with large interests in Egypt. He
was a great friend of Leird Beaconsfield, lo whom lie sold, ��� >n behalf of
Ihe Khedive of Egypt, for thc British
Government, a majority of the Suez
Canal shares, amounting to four millions sterling.
+      A      A
Bernard   Shaw,   the   adaptation     of
whose play, "You  Never Can Tell,"
eif exhibits in the case, which was
prepared by the traffic department of
the Canadian Pacific, and which
formed the basis of the defence of
the western roads. Hc will devote
himself tee an analysis of the exhibits,
wit a view to attacking the reasonableness of the western rates generally, regardless of lhe question of discrimination. If the Government's new
expert produces new anel lengthy exhibits anel raises new issues, "r puts
a new complexion on the case, it is
highly improbable that the case will
be finished at the next hearing here,
which Chairman Drayton at the conclusion e,f the last hearing said was
his desire. It is highly probable that
further hearings will have to be had,
and that no decision affecting western
rates can be reached feer several
months.
ele        *       =f
If the promises of scientists are ful-
lilleel.   radium,   the   market   price     of
which is now $3.1100.000 a pound, will
soon  be produced in  large quantities
mi  a  commercial  scale.    An  Anglo-
French   company,   capitalized  at  $1.-
000,1100. lias been formed for the purpose of taking over the South Terras
mines in Cornwall, which have hitherto   been   worked   for   iron   and   tin. I
Heaps  of  supposed  worthless  debris;
have been  deposited  on  high  dumps,
and  an  analysis of these  dumps  has I
revealed  the  fact  that  they  are  rich |
ing what steps the Government has
taken to exclude from France foreigners whose sole means of livelihood
has been derived from the white slave
traffic, and also to see if the English
peilice cannot furnish sufficient evidence against returning French slavers to send them to local prisons.
Meanwhile a new department to put
into execution the act has been created at Scotland Yard, the members of
which have full power to arrest on
sight any suspicious person seen leaving with, or meeting, any young girls
al the railway stations or bo;.t landings. Heretofore such arrests could
only be made upon sworn charges or
upon ocular evidence of the police
that a crime was being actually committed.
Edison and  Music
In an interview with Musical
America. Thomas Edison, the inventor, expresses some extraordinary
opinions concerning music, to which
he is at present devoting special at-
tention. He thinks there is something wrong with music, and intends
!���' find out whal it is. This is the
way   he   explains  his  views:
"Music." he said, with emphasis. "I
am thinking about nothing but music
these days; am working along musical
lines, and I am dreaming about music.
Anil when. I get through I shall know
abemt it.
"1 am reading everything I can get
hold of that refers to music. I am
reading your paper and the papers
that ihe other fellows get out. I am
reading what is being done in music
at home and abroad. I am reading
everything I can find that has ever
been written about music and I am
surprised that so little is known about
music!
just produced in Paris, has been hav-1 \��� pitchblende, from which radium is j 111
ing a hot time at  the hands of the extracted     Mine.   Curie,   Prof.   Jean!'  -
French   critics.    Abel   Herman!,   the   Danysz  of the  Faculty des  Sciences
distinguished writer  and  critic, after 0f parjs; Prof. Jacques d'Anne, form-
tracing a certain relationship between   erly chief of staff of Prof. Curie, and
British humor and French humor, ex. j prof, jniv 0f Dublin University have
presses the following opinion: "He is  reported "" the mine, which, accord-
immoderate, he is  rough,  he  is  dry. |j���g t,, their opinon, may prove to be
The great fault with this author which the richest mine of the kind in  the
renders his word sarcasms irritating | world.    Of the loose ore in the gal-
to the last degree is that his cruelty   U-ries   and   on   ihe   dumps   are   sonic I
is disproportionate to the persons and   17,000   tons  ready   for  shipment     to
the   objects.     Shaw   has   no   sense   of   France    where   a   reduction   nlanr   fori-.  ^      *      .   , ^_^__^^_
j ���      """-   wiicic   a  ie'iue.ni'11  plain  ioi   study   leir   at   least   two   years   yet.
When   I   get   through   my   investigations  I  expect  to know all about it.
:,nd a precursor, and that hc is shak-1^TuiVf&'SOaM'The woridYsup!'    ""':'" heen astonisned t" nnd how
tug society to the foundations because  ply ,,f radium is now 32 grammes. It
hc has toppled eever a few  lu-s ol the  is  announced  that  continental  bank-
social   order.     When   e,m    sees   how   erj   and   Uriiish   engineers   have   sub-
even   revolutions  change  so  slightly scribed   the  capital   for  the  working
lhe face of the world one can hardly by a new process, invented bv  Prof.
help smiling at his poor perspective. Erich Elder of Heidelberg I'nive-r
I   wbilld  not  like   to  grieve  Shaw  by  by  which   the  costly   method  of
saying things that will surely be most   ducing   radium   has   b
disagreeable   in   his   ears,   but   I   am J jzed.
obliged  to.    Mr.  Bernard Shaw is in i i^HI
thc   offensive.'        ^^mm^^smm^sm^^^msm^sssssmmsmmssssssssssssssss^^^^^^mmmm^mmmmmmm
lee make the youth of Canada self-
controlled, erect, decent and patriotic
through miltary and physical training,
instead of growing up, as under present conditions of uncontrolled gabbing nightly about town or city
streets, into young ruffians or young
gad-abouts; to insure peace by a na-
  ��  reduction  nbnt  MM       )ml.'   I  ��'"'"< l0  k'cP  I  this
proportion  whatever,  and he  thinks their treatment Is be"ng erected  .^ 'StUdy   ,,ir   at   least
nortecP,HeSthXah  "uTT l"1  " !? estimated that jl  ""��< i s H5.000
a  loiter.    He thinks he IS a prophet i millegrammes of radium of the gross
suP-|much discord there is in music; how
much waste there is, how much
lis composed which is worthless. I-am
going to find out why more people
are nol interested in music. In brief,
I  am going io find out what  is t|le
stty,
pre)
revolution-
Aii Ottawa despatch says: "Foodi
for cats���$30." This somewhat uni- j
que item of expenditure on page 98 j
of that massive volume of statistics J
known in officialdom as the Auditor-1
General's    report     for     1910-11    has
oaught tlie eye and puzzled the brain < tional preparedness for war
f  Mr.   Oliver  Wilcox,  member   fo
j North Essex.    Mr.  Wilcox wants to
know what kind of cats are thc particular   "cats"     referred   to.   and   how
they came to hc connected with the
civil service.    So he has placed upon
'the order paper of the House the fol-
j lowing  motion:   "For  a   copy   of  all
! letters,   telegrams,  papers  and   docu-
I ments relative to an item of expendi-
' ture which appears on page 98 of the
Auditor-General's report for the year
_., to make
the military camps and drill halls
throughout Canada clean, wholesome,
sober and attractive to the boys and
young men of the Dominion; to give
the final touch tei Imperial unity and
crown thc arch of responsible government by an inter-Imperial Parliament, dealing only with Imperial affairs, these are some of the ideals of
Col. the Hon. Sam Hughes. Minister
of Militia, as expressed to large
Napanee audiences.    Col. Hughes de-
!?!,��".UJ "!\m��Jly:. J����d_!OT. cat.s' W'j dared   that   the" cadet" movement
nd a detailed statement showing the
bill of fare for thc said cats; whether
they are domestic  cats or wild  cats,
j-tnd if they are still in the service of
! the Government, together with all in-
i formation leading up  tee the said expenditure of money."
ef       *        *
The men of the future, according to
A. F, Ledoubie, professor of medicine
at Tours, will have large heads, fewer
j teeth and shorter arms than the man
I of today. They will compare with
| him unfavorably in stature. The professor declares that the evolution of
the white man will produce a type
wherein thc upper part of the head
will be strongly developed, the forehead will be broader ami rounder, owing to the fact that our food becomes
increasingly easy to masticate, the
human jawbone will diminish in size
and strength and the number of teeth
will be reduced. Among the primitive races of Australia, the professor
Canada was one of thc most potent
agencies for good any government
could devise. In essence it meant controlled recreation feir the youth of the
country, the inculcation of habits of
discipline and manliness, physical,
moral and mental strength, and the
only sure foundation for national
security. Since he had assumed office, six American Generals had come
to consult him as to the progress of
the cadet movement in Canada. He
believed that a sane militarism was
good national economy. He declared that militia lands on St. Helen's
Island and Lafontaine Park in Montreal, turned over by the preceding
Governments to the city, were today
worth forty-seven million dollars,
sufficient to more than realize his
ideal of a drill-hall for every town in
Canada.
It is learned by a "Toronto Globe"
correspondent on reliable information
matter with music.      ^^^^^^^^m^mm
"1 have already discovered that
music is pitched too high; that much
one hears is disagreeable; that singers
force- their voices; that the majority
of compositions arc futile, unintelligible, not worth the time spent in
writing. Why should not more people be interested in so-called geeod
music? Is it not largely the fault of
the composers? Take the effort and
time used in working out a symphony.
Consider the finished product. How
much of it is worth while? How much
should never have been composed to
bore the public? ... 1 have tried
to put myself in the mind of one
swayed only by scientific lines. I
have tried to analyse the appeal of
rhythm, of emotion, of inner beauty,
of even tempo.
"More than thirty grand operas
alone have been played for me. I
have listened to 14.000 songs. I think
I have discovered some new things.
It may be that 1 can sec things in
music that no one else can because
of my deafness; certainly, 1 have
found much to jar as well as much
that is beautiful. The result of my
investigations and study will be to
furnish the public with records that
will appeal to the public. I am going to find out just what the public
wants."
A Schoolboy's Definition���An abstract noun is a thing which has no
existence, as  love.
"Your stomach is so affected that I
fear we shall  have to operate for itr
removal."     "All   right,   remove   it;/
never  use  it  anyhow."    "You  ne/
use it?    What business are you/
"I am a poet."
"Dear me, I think I'm the
erablc creature in thc world,
the  matter?"    "I'm  trying'
this magazine's advice ot'
happy." / FOUR   ~'
^pv.aCHINOCHC
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GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY  15,  19U
sooner adopted than the business increased in so marked
a degree that the post office profited considerably.
It is reasonably certain that a reduction in parcel post
rates would be a profitable undertaking, so far as the
department is concerned.
It would draw business from a hundred directions.
The number of letters posted last year reached the astounding total of 566,140,000.
Docs anyone pretend that parcel post is doing an adequate business when only one parcel is mailed to every
seventy letters?
If. by bringing the producer and thc consumer nearer
each other, it also helped to reduce the cost of living, we
cannot have the parcels post too soon in operation.
THE SCOTT EXPEDITION
/CONQUEST of the South Pole has been dearly bought.
^ Appalling i�� its details, thc fate of the Scott Expedition is one of the bitterest incidents of recent years, particularly in view of the fact that the expedition had accomplished its purpose and would bc soon in a position to
announce to the world the result of its scientific observations It will be hard to convince the world, however,
that the sacrifice of human life was worth the data which
will be furnished to scientists and others interested in
what after all is a very debatable question. Of course, the
details of the fate of the expedition furnish another tribute
to British endurance and courage, but even this will be
pver-shadowed by what many will consider a needless
loss of life.
The effort of man to penetrate the secrets, of the poles
has been a costly one. The loss of the Scott party will
bring to mind the fate of the Franklin party in their attempt to gain the Xorth Pole in the eighteenth century.
The only manner in which the incidents differ is that
modern conditions have made it possible to learn more
quickly and accurately the fate of the most recent Polar
expedition.
With the conquest of both the North and the South
Poles, it is probable that any further attempts to peer into
the mysteries of these ice-bound regions will for the time
cease. Curiosity to a certain extent will be appeased and
there will be little call for courage in these channels for
men like Scott and Franklin.
INTEREST IN MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
SOME method should be devised to keep up the interest
in civic affairs during the entire year. With the civic
election only nicely over, there is a disposition on the part
of too many ratepayers to sit back on their oars until the
approach of the next election. This is suicidal in the interests of clean, progressive government. The candidate
who is well-posted on civic affairs and who wishes to impart that knowledge to the electorate in an impartial
manner is too often defeated. If anything could be done
to popularize such addresses and to encourage sane and
informing public speeches on thc part of candidates, a
marked advance along civic lines would bc achieved. If
every ratepayers' association aimed to embrace something
more than a select few, such an interest in municipal
affairs might bc fostered as to guarantee intelligent speakers an attentive and responsive audience. It will only be
by fostering an all-year-round interest in the municipality's
business that electors will be taught io welcome addresses
of the kind which ought to be thc rule among candidates.
It is useless to expect men who had all year paid no attention to civic affairs, except to read spicy dialogues in
the papers, to attend meetings at election time with a
keen appetite for information on important topics.
If the day ever comes when the schools arc social centres for the various districts, and municipal topics there
discussed in much the same leisurely way as they are
around the stove in the general store of small municipalities, there will be a keener public interest in the views
of candidates for election to Council. At present very
few of these appeal to the people with a constructive programme. Some have no policy at all, except to get elected. Other: seek office hy thc denunciation route, telling
electors how terribly inefficient is the civic administration,
and how it will fall to pieces altogether if by any chance
they arc themselves left at home. But the surest road to
municipal success today is to grab as many "strings" as
possible, and pull vigorously for the last two months of
the year. That is why Councils do not accomplish the
best results.    The  ratepayers have  themselves to blame.
THE HOME WORK PROBLEM
THE  home  work  question  continues  to agitate  most
households   in   which   there   are   children   attending
school.
It is not settled because it is one of those questions
which it is impossible to settle by 8 hard and fast rule
applying to all cases.
The fact seems to bc that home work does not hurt the
child who has learned how to do it.
The great business of education is to teach children
to think.
Once they have acquired that power the work of thc
schools becomes easier the further they advance along
the course.
The ability lo do home work by themselves is a proof
of lhe power, and the growing ease of home work with
practice is an evidence of growth in the direction which
is going to count in the advancement of the child when
he gets out into the world.
The complaint of parents as to the injurious effects of
home work arise mainly in cases where home work has
been imposed on children who have not been taught how
to do it, and who work themselves into nervous flurries
trying to commit strings of words of whose meaning they
have only the vaguest sort of idea.
There is a very old story of a college boy who tried to
teach a district school.
One of the children did not know his letters, and the
teacher marked off the first ten on the page of the primer
with the direction, "You learn those for the first lesson."
Eventually it dawned on that college student that the
child could not tell A from B until the teacher had taught
him which Was which.
Then he took his first step towards becoming a successful teacher,
There is���or, at least, there used to be���too much marking off pages on the book to be learned at home, without
consideration of whether the child knew what thc
passages meant.
Under that system the public schools offered a splendid
chance to those children whose parents knew how to
teach, who supervised the home work and saw that it
was done without too great strain.
But such children are a small minority in the schools,
and such parents would sec that their children were
taught even if no public schools existed.
Thc great problem, especially in a city like this, is that
of the children who can't get help at home.
How are they to bc taught so that they can do home
work?
It is fundamental that they should be taught to think,
and when they have learned that they can do home work.
But how to teach them to think is "up to" the teachers.
The process is not clear, but it is clear that something
more intimate is required than marking off ten letters on
a page with the command that they be learned.
A New Immigrant Route
("Toronto  Globe")
Several recent announcements tend
to bring into greater prominence thc
Panama Canal now nearing completion. One is the assurance, given
publicly two days ago, that before the
close of this year a commercial vessel
will traverse the canal from ocean to
ocean, which event will signalize the
opening of the new canal to traffic.
Another is that already the owners of
two German steamship lines have decided to carry emigrants from Europe
to American Pacific ports for the
same ratcf as to American Atlantic
ports with ihe canal tolls added. A
third is that while immigration from
Europe to the Pacific slope has heretofore amou..t-d to very little, it is
certain to be speedily and greatly increased. It is expected that the genial
climate of the Pacific States and Provinces will make them attractive to
the people of southern Europe, who
at present suffer severe hardships
while becoming acclimatized in the
eastern cities and  towns.
In connection with this very theme
"The Boston Transcript" calls attention to the fact that while immigration from Europe to the Atlantic ports
of the United States has for many
years been enormous, the same sort of
immigration to the Pacific ports has
been quite insignificant in amount.
During the fiscal ycir 1911-12 there
came to New York 605,151; to Philadelphia, 43,749; to Boston, 38,782; and
to Baltimore, 21,667, while only 3,958
landed at San Francisco, and only
40,000 more reached the Pacific slope
by overland transcontinental routes.
It will be interesting to note the effect of the opening of the Panama
Canal route mi the volume and
direction of immigration during, say,
the fiscal year 1913-14.
The "Victoria Times" puts thc number eef immigrants from Europe to
British Columbia last year at 96.389,
and the number of land pre-emptions
at 3,655. This shows that the vast majority of the newcomers must have
settled down in cities or have gone
into service as laborers on public
works. British Columbia may reasonably expect to find the stream of
immigration from Europe greatly increased a few months hence, and it
is the duty of the authorities, both
Dominion and Provincial, to prepare
for the larger influx. The more
Europeans who come the better if
they are of the right sort, for British
Columbia needs population, But
European immigrants have to be
carefully scrutinized, and those going
to the Pacific ports should be dually
subject to close inspection. "Undesirables" should be as uncompromisingly deported from one side of the
continent  as   from  the  other.
THE PARCEL POST
""THE parcel post has not been long in operation in the
* United States, but long enough to produce results;
and from these results can be formed at least a preliminary judgment respecting the practicability of the system
and its benefit to thc public.
The system went into operation on January first, and
during the first half of that month, in which there were
twelve working days, more than five million parcels were
despatched in forty-five leading cities which produce
almost half of the postal revenue, at a charge of $395,2,86.
Had ordinary postal rates been paid on these parcels the
charges would have amounted to $942,394.
Thc parcel post, therefore, saved to the people of the
United States more than half a million dollars during the
first twelve days of its operation. Had comparison been
made with express rates the saving would have been
greater still, for most of the parcels despatched were entitled to minimum rates, and the minimum parcel post
rate is only 7.7 cents, while the minimum express rate is
25 cents a parcel.
From the very start the parcel post has been doing a
large business, but there has been no congestion and no
interference with the ordinary postal service in these
forty-five cities from which detailed reports have already
been received.
The increased business was distributed through a large
postal organization, and the increase of work to the individual was trifling.
The post office clerks handled on an average only
twenty-eight parcels each a day, and this included both
outgoing and incoming parcels.
As for the carriers, their average was only nine parcels
a day. This is the record of a beginning and it is encouraging.
It will be remembered that when the rate for letters
was reduced from three cents to two cents there was an
immediate and startling increase of business.
In like manner the two-cent rate between Canada and
Great  Britain,  which  seemed  ridiculously  low,  was  no
A BOOM IN FAMILY TREES
IT is reported that a German princeling nets a nice little
* annual sum from the cultivation of Christmas trees.
There are still more people who derive incomes from the
provision of family trees. At the present time there is a
boom in thc family-tree trade. The genealogist follows
one of the most curious professions to be found. Thc rise
of the millionaire and the increase in titled persons have
combined in recent years to make thc calling fairly remunerative. It is a remarkable coincidence how many
millionaires can trace their origin to old and titled families.
Thc genealogist who delves through musty records and
connects a pork-packer with the Plantagencts is assured
of a small fortune for his plans. Like the diamond miner,
the genealogist's chief incentive is the knowledge that
luck may come his way if he only perseveres.
The Republic to the south of Canada is the El Dorado
of the family-tree merchant. There pedigree-hunting has
become more fascinating than freak dinners and auto
speeding. A certain Professor Jordan, writing to "The
London Standard," claims to have made a remarkable
discovery. He states that very soon many American
families will be able to trace their descent to Kings.
There can be little doubt that -.-spirants to his honor can
be satisfied in return for a consideration. Family trees
are as easily provided as Christmas trees if money is
forthcoming. The Rockefellers and other unadorned
plutocrats have acquired title deeds to ancient family
names that may mollify thc wounded pride of aristocrats
who have to auction their titles in the matrimonial markets
of New York or Chicago. The monarchial system, however, is not altogether unknown in thc United States, and
the son of an oil king, a steel king, or a pork king may
hold his head as high as some of the descendants of
robber Knights and Barons. Why not? Both have preyed
on the public.
But a German genealogist, Dr. Roth, has beaten his
fellows in the tree trade out of the market by the discovery of the only legitimate heir to the Crown of Ireland.
Hc has issued a book in which he professes to prove that
the legitimate descendant of Brian Boru, who fought the
Danes at Clontarf, Dublin, in 1014, is the present Duke
of Anhalt. The Duke, while thanking the author for a
copy of the book, does not propose to disturb the peace of
Europe by marching on Dublin to seize possession of the
Irish Throne. Dr. Roth thinks the Crown of Ireland has
claims to distinction superior to those of a petty Germ
Duchy. In this every Irishman will concur. But the
Duke of Anhalt has no desire to put the matter to the
test, and Mr. John Redmond will be spared the complications that might arise in Ulster were the Duke to land
at  Carrickfergus  and  march  towards  the  Boync.
The High Cost of Living
To the February number of "The
Canadian Magazine" Professor Mackenzie of the University of Toronto
has contributed a more than ordinarily interesting article on the high cost
of living. The author is a mathematician, but not all mathematical experts are expert statists, and Mr.
Mackenzie's article shows that he is
one of the few who are both. It is
quite impracticable in the course of a
brief review of an elaborate and
closely-reasoned paper to give many
of the details it supplies as evidence
of the correctness of the author's
conclusions, but those conclusions
themselves are well worth reproducing. The causes of the high prices
of foodstuffs arc according to him,
three in  number:���
"The world-wide result of increasing gold supplies, of unproductive expenditure of labor and material in preparation for war, and of the checking
of agricultural development owing to
the migration citywards, induced by
protection in the food-exporting
countries;
"The Canadian policy of protection
has permitted further increased prices
in Canada to an average of thirty-
three per cent, above their level in
1900;
"The private monopolies apparently existing in our big cities in connection with some of the businesses
if food distribution, the poor transport facilities, and a system of taxation unsuited  to  rapid city growth."
In support of these contentions Mr.
Mackenzie gives three statistical
tables covering the course of prices
during the years 1900-1911: first, of
general prices "in the great free market of London"; second, of Canadian
food prices as published by the Canadian Labor Bureau; and third, of retail prices in Canada during October,
1912, as published in "The Canadian
Labor Gazette" for November last.
The third table shows that retail
prices of food are for most articles
higher in Montreal than in Toronto,
and higher in Toronto than in such
tenvns as Charlottetown, Sorel, Hull,
Peterboro', Orillia, Owen Sound,
Chatham, Stratford, and Sault Ste.
Marie. The article will well repay
careful study by those who desire information on the subject.
Several cases of destitution have been reported in South
Vancouver. Unusual winter weather conditions have no
doubt tended towards increasing suffering at a time when
the pinch is most keenly felt. It would be a disgrace to
South Vancouver were want and suffering not to receive
a helping hand, and the various churches, aid societies and
ratepayers generally have earned more than a passing
word in giving assistance liberally at a time when it is
most needed.
Queen Mary Hive (No. 22) L. O.
T. M. held their regular meeting on
Wednesday in the Oddfellows' Hall,
South Vancouver, when thc officers
for the ensuing year were installed by
Provincial Deputy and her assistant,
the Misses Jackson. Commander,
Lady Kalenberg; Lieutenant-Commander, Lady Keogh; Finance Auditor, Lady Radcliffc; Past Commander,
Lady Mullet; Record Keeper, Lady
Pound; Lady-at-Arms, Lady E. Mullet; Chaplain, Lady Seaton; Sergeant,
Lady Dane; Sentinal, Lady Pickeral;
Picket, Lady Dewaney. After business a dainty repast was served at
the home of Mrs. Kalenberg. Their
annual ball was held on Wednesday
in Kalenberg Hall, corner of Main
and Bodwell Road.
The People's Trust Co.
LIMITED
49th AND FRASER STREET
(South Hill Post Office, South Vancouver, B.C.)
BANKING DEPARTMENT
We conduct a regular Banking Business.   4 per cent, paid on all
deposits
Encourage the children to save their pennies in one of our
Savings Banks.   One Dollar starts them on the way to wealth.
Money Orders Issued and Cashed        Drafts       Collections
Checks on the Corporation of South Vancouver cashed.
Business hours : 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
(the hours that suit the working-man).
REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT
Fraser Street, close to Forty-ninth Avenue, 33 feet; $2,600 cash.
Cleared Lots, 33 feet, high and dry, $550.   $50 cash, balance easy
payments.
One Cleared Lot, close to Fraser, facing south, 33 feet; $850.   $100
cash, balance easy payments.
Page Road, high location,   facing south; $800.    $100 cash, balance
easy.
INSURANCE DEPARTMENT
Let us insure your buildings in the strongest Board Companies. We can also insure your Life, your Automobile, Plate
Glass, etc.   All kinds of Indemnity Insurance.
Get one of ctr Accident, Health, and Sickness Policies, and
draw a revenue while yotl are In any way incapacitated.
If you want an Indemnity or Surety Bond, see us.
Bring your Conveyancing to us.
PROMPT ATTENTION QUICK SERVICE
We will make your Will
Estates Managed Money Loaned Rents Collected
HARRY KAY
PAINTER   AND   DECORATOR
Phone: Fair. 326       4518 Main St.
South Vancouver Builders' Supply Company
Dealers in Sand, Gravel, Fibre, Cement, Lime, Plaster, Vitrified
Pipe, Tile, Fire-clay, Lath, and Brick of all kinds.
Offices :  51st Avenue and Fraser Street.    Phone : Fraser 36.
Main and 29th Avenue.    Phone :   Fairmont 1940.
Fraser Street and North Arm of Fraser River.   Phone : Frater 84.
Coal orderi taken at all offices and delivered to all parti of South
Vancouver.
Phone 2988
Limited       Ft. of Columbia Ave.
VITRIFIED SEWER  PIPE AND
ALL FITTINGS
C. Gardiner - Johnson & Company
Johnson's Wharf Phone I Sey. 9145
ROOFING TILE
California Mission Roll
Spanish Roll Plain Square
In Colors Red and Green
EVANS,C0LEMaN&EVANS
B.C.   EQUIPMENT   CO.
MAOHINERY  DEALERS
CONCRETE MIXERS. STEEL CARS, ROCK CRUSHERS, ELECTRIC, STEAM,
AND    GASOLINE    HOISTS.      WHEELBARROWS.    TRANSMISSION
MACHINERY,  GASOLINE  ENOINES,  PUMPS,  AND
ROAD MACHINERY
Plionu :  Sevmour  7056-7816 Oflicci :  606-607   Bank  ol Ottawa   Bldg.
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
SOLE AGENTS FOR B. C SATURDAY,  FERRUARY   15,  1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
K1VK
APOLOGY TO
THE PUBLIC
Owing to thc weather conditions which have existed feir
the past few weeks, we regret to state that we have not
heen aide, as heretofore, to extend to our customers the
prompt deliveries of stovewood, lumber, etc., which their
patronage merits.
In our effort to satisfy the demand fur stovewood we
have spared no expense and in this connection have increased our yard crew and also hired additional teams
to facilitate deliveries. Wc, however, trust that our patrons will appreciate the fact of our having, under such adverse conditions, done all possible to meet their demands.
\Yc respectively solicit a continuance of their valued
patronage.
Coast Lumber & Fuel Co. Ltd.
Corner Bodwell Road and Ontario Street
^, THIS IS ANOLO ONE BUT-
A surge..11. who was very yeiung
i .-md shy. wal alked He ilinncr by a
lady, who wai at least fifty, and tried
to pass herself eiff as twenty-live, and
apparently imagined that being rude
and tom-boyiib enabled her to sustain the youthful allusion. At dinner
she asked him to carve a fowl, and
never having carved a fowl before,
and being painfully shy, he made a
mess of it.
Instead nf trying to cover his confusion, his hostess called attention to
it pointedly by looking down the table
and saying loudly   "Well, Mr. P.	
may be a very clever surgeon, but
if 1 wanted a leg cut .eff 1 should not
come to you to do it."
".Vei, madam," he replied politely,
"but then, you see, you are not a
chicken!"
The procession had just passed
along Market Strce*. which was
crowded  with   sight-seers    from    all
"Wonderful!" gasped the friend
"But  what   a   pity   it's   scratched!''
"Yes. it is rather." replied the multimillionaire, carelessly, turning tee Ins
wife, "Martha, perhaps ye.u'd better
not let the children have any more
diamonds to play with."
* ���    A
One of the big railre.ad lines has a
regular form "f reporting accidents to
animals on its line. Recently a cow
was killed and the track foreman drew
up the report. In answer Io the
question. "Disposition of carcass?"
hc  wrote:   "Kind  and  gentle."
* ���   *
Dc Sot" had just landed in Florida.
"I am looking for thc fountain oi
youth." he Stated to the keeper of the
winter resort whee met him on the
wharf.
"Waiter." shouted the latter, "a
Scotch highball for the gentleman!"
Your
Best
Chance
To get doors cheap.   Make
your openings tn suit these
Penaleer   Jeelm   Sharp    Williams,   of
, i Mississippi,  met  Senator-elect    ' illie
parts.   A good-natured policeman hadU (if  KentuckV) in .,  Washing-
for a long tune been answering an ^n h(lr| ,obby ,h(, othef evening,
"Look her.-. Ollie," sai'l the Mi--1--
MONEY
CAN'T
BUY
BETTER
All Grocers
Kelly, Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Donaldson   &   McDonald
Dealers in
HAY, GRAIN, AND FEED
All Kinds of Chicken Feed
4213 Main Street
Phone : Fairmont 1514
The Robertson-Godson Co. Ltd.
Wholesale Plumbers' Supplies, Water Works
Supplies, Corporation Brass Goodc.
572 Beatty Street
Vancouver
Two   Propositions
No 1 You rent a house at ?25 per month. In one year you have
paid out $300, fur which you can show no results. 7 per cent interest
on 8300 is $21     So in thc year you practically throw away $321.
No 2 You bring me in $100, for which I give you a 6-room
Modern House! on Lot 33x125ft. House has fireplace, etc. Balance
is $25 per month.   Total p'ice is $2,600.    No loan.
In one vear you have an equity of $400 in your own home.
Compare proposition No. 1 with No. 2, then call at my office and
see this house.
R. J. McLauchlan
4123 Main Street  Phone : Fair. 1607
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
1949 ALBERT ST. PHONE :   HIGHLAND 530R
ENGINEERS. MACHINISTS  AND  FOUNDERS
!RON AND BRASS CASTINGS ^ HyDRANTS AND SPECIALS
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
There was evidently something On
Mrs. Nerviss's mind. For several
days she had been very much preoccupied, and finally Nerviss himsclt.
fearful that he might in senile way
have been the cause of it, made certain inquiries designed to clear up
the  situation.
"I hope you didn't mind my coming in so late from the club last Tuesday night, Maria," hc said. "One
o'clock is an unholy hour, I know;
but, really, I couldn't help it very
well.    You sec "
"Not at all, James, dear," the good
lady answered. "1 should hate to
have your friends think you wcre
henpecked. Really, I was glad you
stayed as long as you wanted to."
Nerviss  drew  a  sigh  of  relief.
"Then what is the matter with
you, Maria?" he demanded. "You
can't deceive me. You arc worrying
about  something."
"1 certainly am," said the lady, hcr
voice tremulous. "I am very much
worried. Do you think the people at
our bank  are  honest,  James?"
"Why, certainly," laughed Nerviss.
"Whatever made you think they
weren't?"
"Well, something very strange has
happened lately." said Mrs. Nerviss.
"and I think you ought to look into
ii. You know you have been giving
me my allowance lately in banknotes, and 1 have been depositing
them at the oank?"
"Yes, 1 am aware of that, said
Nerviss. ,
"Well, somehow or other I don t
like the looks of that receiving teller.
James," said the lady, "and so for the
past three weeks I have been putting
my initials on every note deposited,
up in one comer, and yesterday Mr.
Cleaver, the butcher, in cashing a
cheque for mc handed me one of
those  marked  notes!"
"Well, suppose he did? demanded
Nerviss.'   "What of it?" .
"What of it?" echoed Mrs. Nerviss.
What of it? Doesn't that prove that
theisc bank people arc letting other
people use my money.'" .
It was at this point that Nerviss
was attacked by a violent spasm of
coughing, which, in her description of
it to the doctor. Mrs. Nerviss declared was so like a laugh that at first
she believed hcr husband had suddenly thought of something funny.
old laely'.- questions t'e the best uf his
ability, but he was beginning to tire
a little.
"And what's your truncheon for.
policeman?" inquired the Inquisitive
dame.
"Why to ketch a feller a rap over
the noddle wiv if 'e gets vl'lent," responded Bobby.
"Dear'y, dear'y me Anel what are
those numbers C 291 for?"
"Hidentificashun   purposes,   mum,"
saiel Bobby laconically, turning away.
"Anil whit, policeman," said the Old
dame, catching  him by the arm.  "is
that strap under your chin for?"
"Well,     muni,"     snorted     Hobby,
"that's  ter  rest  me jaws on  when   I
I gels   tired  answerin'  silly,  rediculous
questions."
ef   *   *
A lady entered  the post-office one
i day  and  leisurely  commenced     turn,
ling over ihe pages of the public directory.    Presently an elderly gentle-
��� man. whee also wished to consult the
directory, entered. Soon another gen.
tleman entered, ami teeok his place bc-
! hind the old gentleman.   Hc was soon
I joined by a third, and then a fourth,
until   quite  a   respectable  queue   was
formed, waiting on the lady to finish
her  search.
The lady seemed in no hurry, however, and continued idly turning over
the pages of the directory, until at
last, when the patience of the crowd
was almost exhausted, the elderly man
next her said:
"Pardon me, madam, but can 1 assist  you  in  your  search?"
"Oh,  no,   thank  you,"  replied    the
lady, politely, "1  am only looking fur
a nice name for my new pup."
*    *    *
At a meeting of railroad officials
recently, the superintendent of the
Lake Shore road made a talk on the
efficiency of employes, and said that
hc was going to try and make his
men all along the line take a personal
interest in the operation of the road.
Accordingly he made a trip over the
line and had a personal talk with the
foreman of every section gang. One
of the men he approached was Mike-
Flaherty, who had charge of about
two miles of track somewhere down
in  Michigan.
"Now, Mike," he began, "I want
you to look after your two miles of
roadbed just as if it belonged to you
personally. Wc are running sume
fast trains and wc want them to be
always on time. I want you to look
after thc interests of the road just as
though you were one of the highest
officials of the line. Your work is
just as important as that of any officer, and 1 will depend on you to sec
that the Twentieth Century Limited
goes through here on time? Do yuu
understand?"
Mike was duly impressed with the
responsisibility thrust upon him, ami
lie was out two hours earlier than
usual the following morning inspecting every inch of his two miles ol'
roadbed. It was in perfect condition.
Then he looked at his watch and
waited until it was time fur the fast
train to whizz past.
li hadn't arrived at one minute past
the schedule time. Neither had it
come ten minutes later. Fifteen.
twenty, thirty-live minutes elapsed.
Mike was furious. Then the big mogul
engine: loomed up in lhe distance,
thundering along at sixty-live miles
an hour.
Mike jumped in the centre of the
track and waved his red lantern vigorously. The long train came to a stop
and the engineer and fireman sprang
from the cab.
"What's the matter?" they shouted
in  unison.
"That's what I want to know,"
ejaculated Mike.
"Here ye are thorty-fivc minutes
la-ate. I've got orders to see that this
train is on time. Flow in th' name ov
hivin can I do it wid you gettin' here
late?"
.on dumbfounded to reply, the cn-
ginemen climbed aboard and pulled
oul, while Mike admonished them
never  to let  it  happen again.
sipplan;  "'lee  you  know  the director
.if the census���Dr. Durand?" g
"Sure I know him. Senator! Why?" it
answered the' Kentucky congressman.
"Weil.  I'm going te, denounce him
ami his no-account census in the Senate the first chance  I  get, because ������'���
the gross inaccuracy in ihe statistic
oi population which is given "tu."
"H w's that?" aske.l Mr. James,
"Why. down in my State'." explained   Senator    Williams,   "thc   census
gives   a   population   of   two   million,
counting   nun.   women   and   children
anil negroes, ami  I   have already  ha1'.
mure than  three million applications
i..r post-office appointments."
with its ill feeling, vanishes, thc ��e,rld j
will be a better place."
The     speaker   was   William     Dean i
Howells.    He continued:
"Put   the   trusts   deserve   no   credit
for working toward this good, feer thei
���trusts' meelive is evil.    The trusts, in-|
deed,   treat   the   public   as   the   tramp
trraleel  the ge,|fer.
*    *    *
Ceorge   Aele  was   talking  about   his1
lasi viui tee London,
"I   like to knock    about    London j
ale ii'-'    he'   laid,  "studying  the  places
of historical interest; and I remember with particular pleasure a g'eeid
deed that I performed at otic 'ef Lon.
don'l InMe.rii' landmarks for a Chicago
we,man.
"It was a rainy fall day, arid I  sat   u()(,rs an(J savc money. A few
eiver  a  beefsteak  pudding and  a  mug
of   bitter   at   the   Cheshire   Cheese   in   odd   Sl'zeS ;   like   2   ft.   IjV  6   ft.
Fleet .Sir, ��� :
"The Chicago we,man entered. H"S-   %   inches,   ailll   2
well's   'Jeehnsun'   in    her   hand.     The
Cheshire   Cheese   was.   you   know, C) inches.  Regtlla
Johnson's favorite tavern, anel the woman   had   been   told   that   the   great   YUi ���]     TL I       i    <fr1  IC
man's  autograph  could  still bc  seen   Willie   1 Iiey   LRSt   yl.LO
penciled on '.ne of the walls.
'The waiters teeld her they knew
e.i no such autograph; but the wo.
man. with dauntless Chicago spirit.
began a long, long search, upstairs
and down,
"While -lie' was upstairs a warm
w of benevolence suddenly rose up
my  breast,  and,  taking   a   pi nctl
it. by 6 ft.
ar price $2.40.
or we will give one free with
order.
every $20
A regiment in India was about tn
bc inspected by a general just out
from England, who was very particular that the captain eii every company should know the name eei every
man iu his ceimpany, and also where
he came from. Now, it happened that
the captain of this particular regiment
had just returned after twelve months
leave, and during his absence many
changes  had occurred,
(In the nuirning eef the inspection
the captain addressed his company as
follows:
"Now, men, the general is very particular     that   1   should   know     e\ery,
and also to what county jh:"'
Now,  there  are    many  m'.!ne>'-,    ,,
1  asked,
from my pocket, I wrote- with quaint
eighteenth century  flourishes on  the
wall   he-hiiiel  in.',  'Sam  Julius- >n.'
"Tin-   woman   on   her   return   from
upstairs spied tin- autograph and was
overjoyed.     Is   it   imt   amazing   how
much happiness we can give to others1
by these Huh acts of kindni ss."
+       *       A
"'My g 1 man,' sai'l tlie golfer in
anxious tones, 'have you seen a golf
Shall   hereabouts?      If-   my   lasl   ball,
and if I l"-e' it  1 -hall ha\ e to gh e up
my  ehy'- game  ami  return   to  town."
"The tramp, a villainous looking individual, answered:
"'No, ho--. I ain't si-en no golf ball,
Imt I've got one in my pocket that I
brought from home what I don't mind
-i Ilin' to yuu feir a couple of dollars.'"
McGibbon Hodgson
Lumber Company
20th Avenue
CEDAR COTTAGE, B. C.
Phone :   Fair.  165!)
Graham B. Nichol, who. being the
best poker player in the national capital, plays with some of Washington's
biggest anil richest men, was being
told one morning of a game the evening before when a stranger had lost
an immense sum of money.
"That's always my luck!" lamented
Nichol. ''Whenever there's a lot of
soup around, I'm about twelve blocks
away with a fe>rk in my hand."
=*      *     A
The man who dumped a basketful
of banknotes on his fire for kindling
set an extravagant pace for wealthy
spenders. He was fairly outdone,
however, by the financier of whom it
is told that he was so rich that he
never used a motor-car more than
once, had a gold-topped hat, wore
seventeen fancy waistcoats at a time,
and his house was a perfect revelation.
He was now in the act of showing
its wonders to a friend.
"This mirror." he murmured, "is
worth a hundred thousand pounds."
man s name
he  belongs.     Now,  there  are
here   who   are   strangers   to   me.   so
whatever   1   say  your  names  are.  or
where you belong to, mind you don'l
contradict it."
The general at length arrived, and
as he passed down the lines he stopped before a man and said to the captain:
"This is a smart looking soldier.
What is his name?"
"Brown,  sir,"  replied  the  captain.
"Where docs he come from?"
"Wiltshire, sir."
Thc general passed on, and soon
stopped before another man.
"What's  this man's name?"
"Jones,  sir."
"Where does he come from?"
"Devon,  sir."
"Ah, I'm a Devonshire man myself.
Tine county is Devon, is it not, Private  Jones?"  said  the  general.
Private Jones looked startled for a
moment, and then, in a broad Irish
brogue, replied:
"Bedad, an' there ain't a foincr
counthry in the wurrld. yer 'onner."
* *    *
Several evenings ago a young man
repaired to a telephone office and
rang up Ins sweetheart at her residence.
"Is thai yeeu'"
"Yes. George, dear," came the reply.
"Are you alone?"
"Yes. darling."
"I   wish   1   was  there.''
"1   wish so. too."
"If I were there, do you know what .
I  wouhl  do with  my darling?"
"No.  George,  I  do not."
Ami then, somehow, the lines got
mixed, and  this  is  what  she hear I:
"Well. Pel pull her ears back till she
opened her mouth, and then Pel put a
lump  of  mud  in  it.    If that  didn't
answer, I'd give her a sound thrashing."
And  then  Marion  fainted
Now they never speak as they pass
by, and the man, who was talking to
his farrier about a horse says that
anybody who will advise a man to put
his arms around the neck of an ob.
St.reptrous mare and whisper words
of love in its ears ought to be hung to
the nearest lamp-post.
* *    ��
Poor old Patrick! lie was but a
shadow of his old self. He was a
soldier boy who'd" been serving in a
minor war in the hill country of India, and he'd had a rough time, be-
did!
So seedy, so thin and worn indeed.
was Patrick that he was invalided
home that he might have an early up.
portunity of pulling himself together,
and showing that he was truthfully a
brawny son of Erin.
As he stepped ashore from the
troopship at Southampton, his cousin
Timothy stepped up to meet him.
"Why Patsy, my bhoy," remarked
thc cousin, "it's right glad that I am
to see ye're back from the front!"
Patrick looked grieved and sad,
chastened and ill at ease.
"Bedad, Tim," he said. "Oi knew I
was thin, but Oi'm bothered if Oi
thought Oi was as thin as all that!"
* *    *
P. T. Barntim, once succeeded in
emptying his big show at a time wdien
it was densely crowded, and thousands
wcre waiting outside to obtain admission. Hc knew that a start was
all that was needed to effect his purpose, but how to manage that was the
rub. At length a bright idea occurred
to him. Painting up in large letters
on a piece of calico. "This way for the
Egress." he hung it up at a convenient
angle of his show.
* et    *
doing  away   with
competition.
A little boy, seeing a gentleman in
the street, placed himself in a convenient place to speak wilh him;
when the gentleman came up the boy
pulled off his hat. held il out t
gentleman, and begged for a
cents.
aiel  the gentleman, "you
ask   lor   manners     than
Hilton & Webster's
BILLIARD AND
POOL PARLORS
Headquarters    for    the    South
Football   Club.
Hill
���Money!"
bettei
the I An ideal place to spend a social hour.
few i 	
Fraser Street, between 46th and 47th.
said  lhe  b.
'tor  what
"The   trusts   are
competition   and   when
1 thought you had the most of."
* *   *
Because he had been a naughty
little boy���a very naughty little boy
���he was sent tee heel without any
pudding. Hut in the evening, when
liis brothers and sisters all were fast
asleep, he crept downstairs, a tearful
little white-robed figure, and. going
into lhe library, said to his mother;
"Mumy. you told me never tu go to
sleep till I'd made peace with my enemies; so I've come down to forgive
you and daddy for being su rude tu
me at dinner tonight."
* ��    *
He came in and laid down some
suspicious-looking bills, with a genuine dollar bill on  top.
"I want to pay for that barrel of
potatoes  I gut."
"Can't lake this money." said the
dealer.
"Why  not?"
"Most  of it  isn't  good."
"The top layer i- g 1. is it not?"
"Yes."
"That's ihe way it was with the
potatoes."
Mr. Temple Stanyon (says Dr.
Birchl 'en some exigency borrowed -.
sum .if money of Mr. Addison, with
whom he lived mi terms of intimacy
and friendship, conversing "ti all sule-
jects with equal freedom. But from
this lime lie- agreed implicitly to
everything Addison advanced, and
never, as formerly, disputed his p.e.-i-
tieeiis. This change <ei behavior did
not long escape the- notice of so a :ute
an observer, to whom it was by no
means agreeable. It happened one
el.iv th; i a subject wa- started, e.n
whieh they hai! before controverted;
but now Mr Stanveeti entirely acquiesced in Mr Addison's opinion,
withe.ut otiering one word in defense
nf Iii- own. Addison was displeased,
and vented his displeasure, bv saying
with some emotion. "Sir. either contradict  'lie < ii* pay nie my money."
* *    *
Blue sky promoters are men so
optimistic where other people's
money is concerned that they will
promote not merely barren gold and
silver mines, but  the blue  sky  itself.
Postmaster General Hitchcock was
talking about a blue sky promoter
who had been convicted  of fraud.
"This man's mine," he said, "reminded me in its scarcity of gold of
the railway sandwich.
" 'There ain't n.e ham in this here
sandwich,' a man growled, seated on
a high stool before the marble bar
of an old-fashioned railway restaurant.
" 'Oh. you ain't come to thc ham
yet.' the attendant answered easily.
"The man ate on a while longer.
Then   he  growled  again:
" 'There   ain't   no   ham   yet.'
"'Oh.' said the attendant, 'you've
bit over it  now.' "
* A      *
Those who have ever hunted flats
in New York know well that till a
venial of five thousand or six thousand dollars a year is reached flats
ar? incredibly cramped. Indeed, in
a good neighborhood even a five thousand dollar flat is likely to be a tiny
one.
Discussing this phenomenon, Professor Brander Matthews said at a
luncheon:
"I remarked to a lady the other day:
" 'Why, madam, your dog wags his
tail up and down!"
" 'Yes,' she replied, 'he has to. We
are compartivcly poor, you see, and
Fido was raised in a five thousand
dollar flat.'"
C. M. WHELPTON
BUILDING CONTRACTOR
ESTIMATES GIVEN
Phone : Fraser 34 ��� 46th Ave. and Fraier
GREENE & MERKLEY
UNDERTAKERS
SOUTH   VANCOUVER   OFFICE
AND CHAPEL,  16th AND MAIN
STREET
DOWN       TOWN       PARLORS :
305    PENDER    STREET    WEST
Phone :   Sey.  340.  Day  or  Night
Telephone Fairmont 718
Public Notices
CORPORATION   OF   SOUTH
VANCOUVER
NOTICE    TO     THE     RATEPAYERS    OR
OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE IN THE
MUNICIPALITY    OF    SOUTH
VANCOUVER
The Government Aeeliting Commissioner of
lhe above-nnnird Municipality will have his
office open from 10 to 11 in the forenoon of
tach (fay (except elays on which the Puhlic
Inquiry is being lichl) for the purpose of
passing accounts: and any Ratepayer or
Owner may be present and may make any
objection to such accounts as are before the
Auditor.
JAS. n. SPRINGFORD,
C. M. C.
DR.   A.   J.   BRETT
DENTIST
.-E,   Cor.  25th  Avenue  and   Main  Street
Phone:     FAIRMONT   2056
Phrenology �����* Palmistry
Mrs. YOUNG
(Formerly of Montreal)
GIVES   PRACTICAL   ADVICE   ON   BUSINESS  ADAPTATION,  HEALTH
AND   MARRIAGE
805   Granville   Street,   Corner   Robson
Hours: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
"Say, stranger, you-all hain't seen
nuffin' of a razor-back hawg, 'bout
seven hands high, with a cow bell
round his neck, an' answers to the
name of Jeff, hev yuh?" SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY 15. 1913
The Thirteenth Member
By Perley Poore Sheehan
The idea of capturing Janos Island
had been running through Ferguson's
mind feer year-,. It had consoled him
in adve.Mly, bue.yeel him up when his
luck was at its weer.st. It was attractive tee him em many countl, Il would
be a vengeance on society in general.
It would net him a fortune. Above
all, it would be a glittering adventure���the kind he hail dreamed about
ever since he was a little boy.
If you look at the United Slates
Coast Survey maps, you will see that
Janos Island is little more than a
sand-bar, two miles wide and eight
long, ten miles off the mainland. The
little port of Carytown is the nearest
coast-town, and twelve miles inland
is the large manufacturing city of
New Bruniwlck, None of these facts
are particularly interesting in themselves. They are interesting only in
connection with the great fact that
kept recurring to Ferguson���Janos
Island was the private property and
playground of a small club of millionaires. In other words, once a
year there were assembled on this
sand-bar, practically cut off from the
entire world, a dozen men whose
combined fortunes approximated one
million dollars.
When these men and their families
came to Janos Island, it was with the
purpose eef playing at "simple life."
They brought few servants. They
had even vetoed the installation of
wireless telegraphy���that would have
meant the stock-market and importunate secretaries. Their only connection with the mainland and all that
they had left behind them, once they
had set foot on Janos Island, was the
swift little yacht Astarthc. which did
regular ferry-service once a day, and
their own fast power-boats.
This annual dip into isolation was
precisely what rendered the place
dear to them. It was a club rule that
there should bc no guests. The caretaker had instructions to enforce this
rule, and, if necessary, to keep trespassers  off with  a  load  of shot.
This exclusiveness had galled Ferguson from the tirst. Hc came from
an excellent family in the North. He
had thc Ph. B. parchment of a large
coflege, was a fraternity man, and
numbered among his acquaintances
the sons of men who were the social
equals, in every respect, of Janos Island's clubmen.
But he was poor. His impatience
of restraint and his thirst fur travel
and emotions had kept him so. He
was not without will-power. He had
a way of carrying through things he
had once begun, however distasteful
they might prove before they were
finished. It was that way with his
four years in college.
He had restrained himself a hundred times, perhaps, during those
four years, from running off and seeing the world. Immediately after
graduation, he started out to do this
very thing with scarcely a dollar in
his pocket. He went to London in
a cattle-boat, heaved coal to Hong-
Kong, and loitered in the Orient for
three years, sea-tramping to those
countries which happened to have attractive names. He came back to
America in the forecastle of a millionaire's yacht. And that is the way
he  got  acquainted   with  Janos.
He had about severed relations with
his family and early friends. For the
most part, their politeness and pros-
aicness jarred on him. He remembered his early religious training with a
shudder. It was all restraint and
"Thou shall not's." He reveled in
doing what he wanted to do. Desire
was his only law. Moreover, hc backed all this up with the clear reasoning of a college logician. And Omar
was his prophet.
From the first, it had occurred to
Ferguson, Ph. B��� that it wouldn't be
much of a job for a few good fellows
to raid Janos Island, some dark night,
and carry off whatever they wanted.
It would be infinitely less difficult
than the capture of a three-masted
schooner, which thing he had helped
to accomplish somewhere off Borneo.
The young idea was still revolving in
his head for the first time, one day,
when hc slipped ashore from the
yacht and started in to see what he
could see.
Apart from the central clubhouse,
each of the twelve members of the
club���the membership was never allowed to exceed this number���had a
villa of his own. Ti.ese all fronted on
the shore.
Half a mile back from the shore
was a farmhouse and extensive
stables. This was where the caretaker
resided and tended the club's herd of
blooded Jerseys. Extensive olf-
links adjoined this settlement, and be.
yond, covering the entire remainder
of the island, was a beautiful forest
of pine, palmetto, magnolia, and other
Southern trees, which sheltered unnumbered deer.
It was quite thc thing for wealthy
Janos Islanders to go out in these
woods and "shoot their own venison"
���not so very difficult, seeing how
numerous and tame the deer were.
Still, the forest was extensive enough,
Ferguson could easily see, to serve
as the secret base of operations for
quite a large party.
A fine road skirted the shore right
around the island. Ferguson was following this road with aimless interest
when a brusk voice addressed him:
"I say you, where are you going?"
The accent was pronouncedly English.
Ferguson turned ieisurely and saw
a stout, smooth-shaven man in English stable-clothes. The fellow carried a shotgun and looked peevish.
Ferguson surveyed him with prompt
hatred.
"An' who are you, may I ask?" he
demanded in turn. The question
wasn't for the sake of information. He
had seen  the caretaker before.
"Well, of all the bally impertinence
of a bally deckhand!" the man exclaimed. "Get back to your ship, or
I'll report you."
"I'll make you swallow those words
some day, you bloke," said Ferguson
softly, but earnestly, as he turned to
obey. Often, after that, in his troubled
dreams of Janos Island, hc meditated
on just what the punishment of the
caretaker should be.
Any man who knocks about the
world as Ferguson did, encounters
men of his own type. There are more
potential pirates floating around than
most people ever dream of. There is
probably one, possible more, in every
big liner, iu every battle-ship, in every
white, palatial yacht���bold spirits,
wl'io would, if they only knew Imw,
rise up and take that which they
coveted. PergUIOft counted up at
least a score of men he knew that he
could depend upon, men like himself
in their readiness to play for high
stakes if they once had the chance to
"sit in,"
lie knew that if he could get these
men together, lay his plan before
them, and offer to lead the way, they
would back him to their last drop of
blood. The plan, moreover, was simplicity itself.
He would assemble his force gradually, in thc guise of fishermen, up and
down the coast in the neighborhood
of Carytown. When everything was
ready, they would make the wooded
end of Janos, .some dark night, in a
sloop. The spark of a strange motor,
even with the muffler on, might give
rise to suspicion.
Just before daylight, the members
of the invading party could deploy
and thus pick up Janos Islanders at
their leisure, as they golfed or shot
tame deer, likewise the caretaker, who
was to be gagged and tied to a tree
pending further orders. All members
who had not been caught by ten
o'clock���the hour that the ferry-yacht
Astarthc sailed for Carytown, were
to be hunted down the moment that
smart steamer was beyond signaling
distance.
There was to be no quarter for any
servant or any one else who proved
obstreperous. As soon as all twelve
of thc millionaires���or, in any event,
as many as wcre on the island at the
time of the raid���had thus been taken
they were to be carried .aboard the
sloop and transported, to a certain
safe hiding-place that Ferguson knew
about, and held there while he himself hastened to the neighboring city
of New Brunswick with one of the
prisoners and collected one million
dollars.
This was really the only risky feature of the whole business, and he
was ready to shoulder it himself.
That was Ferguson's plan in its
general outlines. He changed it often
in detail, at times thinking it best to
seize the Astarthe, or ,at least, several
of the larger powerboats, and then rejecting this as provocative of too
much bloodshed. There might be
bloodshed enough, anyway, as it was
to be understood and impressed on
the prisoners from the outset that not
only thoy, but their families, would
pay the penalty at the slightest sign
of treachery.
the detail of the amount to be required as ransom was also a matter
of much speculation. He would have
preferred to make this sum less than
a million, but finally decided that no
smaller amount would be adequate
when divided among twenty men.
Two years after his first bow to
Janos Island, hc actually went to
Cvrytown and joined the shrimping
fleet. He stayed over for the mullet
and the shad. He felt that fortune
was dangling there, just in front of
him, like a ripe orange on the other
side of a barb-wire fence.
several times he sailed completely
around Janos Island, noting details of
its topography and simple shore-line
He caught far glimpses of girls and
young men playing tennis; he Hushed
angrily when he saw stout men on
the club piazza looking at him
through their binoculars. He recognized Commodore Sammus, in whose
yacht he had sailed. Often he was
at thc Carytown pier when the Astarthe arrived or sailed.
He watched thc boat and her passengers with passionate interest. In
his hands, he told himself, lay their
destiny���they in their while paint and
white   flannels,   he  in   his  oilers  and
rubber-boots.
There was one girl, particularly,
who often came over from the island
colony, so utterly aristocratic, exqui-
ifte and beautiful, that Ferguson
yearned for hcr and hated hcr at the
same time. She had the tilt nose and
perfect poise that insinuate the divine
right of class and riches. The captain of the Astarthe stood at the head
of the gangway and pulled his cap:
every time this fair creature went
ashore. She seemed to take this
salute as another divine right of hers.
Said  Ferguson, looking on:
"I'll  kiss  that  girl  seinic  day."
Little side remarks. like that, are
occasionally prophetic,
He thus counted his temptation and
toyed with it for almost a year, his
plans becoming ever more and more
[definite. He even .had a note-book
with a number eef names and addresses
in it. With a little inquiry, he believed
that he could now get his twenty
whenever he wanted them. Then
suddenly, iu a fit of revulsion���or,
was it reversion to type���he turned
his back on Carytown and Janos,
found a berth on a lumber-boat, and
sailed for the Pacific.
If he thought that he was thereby
putting Satan behind him, he was mistaken. The idea was more or less
present in his mind all the time. He
had birth and education; why
shouldn't he have riches as well?
Other men, no better than himself,
were lolling on the decks of their
own yachts; why shouldn't he?
This old refrain was beating
through his brain one hot, malodorous night in the harbor of Saigon. He
could see Janos Island, its opulent
tenants, its tilt-nosed girl, on one
side, and himself on another. It was
like a complicated equation in algebra
���an equation he had almost solved,
not quite.
He sprawled there, pondering over
it, as he had often sprawled on thc
floor when thinking over other problems in college. It happened that
now, as it often happened then, he
had a flash of clairvoyance���of clear
vision, literally.
He leaped to his feet the prey to
almost painful excitement. He walked up and down, up and down, on the
irem plates of the deck, smoking ner-
veeiisly iu an effort to allay his emotion. "I'm going to do it. I'm going to do it," were the only words
that his mind would form, lie knew
that his solution was complete.
In spite uf liis eagerness and confidence, which were now unwavering.
it was just a year to a day when
everything was in readiness. Every
circumstance was in favor of success.
All twelve members, with their families, were present on lhe island. It
was the night of the club-supper and
informal hop. The weather was misty
and cool. Not a villa showed light,
except in the servants' part of the
heitisc. On the other hand, the big
central clubhouse was brilliantly illuminated, Evidently the quarry was
there in a herd.
At nine o'clock Ferguson sauntered
leisurely along lhe hard-shell footpath leading to 'he club's front steps.
He was immaculate and groomed as
he had seldom been since he left college. His linen was of the finest.
Twenty guineas he had paiil a Bond
Street tailor for his dinner-coat alone,
lie was batleas���the islanders never
wore hat after sun-down. His hands
hail been manicured daily for a week.
He was not only handsome, hc was
distinguished. Certainly, he was cool
and self-possessed.
lie walked up the club steps with
lhe air of proprietorship that he hail
noticed of the old, distinguished men
he was after. There were a dozen
matrons seated on the shadowy
porch. From within came the sound
of a mechanical piano, laughter,
voices, and dancing. It gave him a
little shooting pain of homesickness,
almost regret.
A fat and oily buller, hastening on
Some errand which he evidently considered important, was passing
through the lobby just as Ferguson
entered. A page was dosing inside
lhe door.    Ferguson chose the butler.
"I say," he exclaimed rather crossly   "where is  my uncle?"
"Yeeiir uncle, sir?" The man was
leirn in an effort to appear polite and
at the same time lie accomplish his
errand.
'Commodore Sammus," Ferguson
snapped.
"<>h. sir; I beg your pardon, sir,"
said the buller, much relieved; "you'll
find him in the card-room, sir." Then,
as he noticed Ferguson's look of annoyance, he hastened to add: "Right
up.stairs tei the right, sir."
Ferguson's foot was already on the
stairs, and the butler sprinted on his
errand. Somebody had ordered an
ice, probably,
It was as Ferguson had imagined
ami hoped when he chose this particular evening. The twelve members
of the Janos island Club were assembled there together. They were
not missing anything by the absence
of wireless and the stock-market.
There were two round tables covered with green baize. At each of these
tables sat six men. They were all
past middle-life���two circles of shining liald heads and gray hair. Thc
room was electric with the silence of
high stakes, broken occasionally by
monosyllables tittered ill a low tone,
and lhe clear, cool click of ivory chips.
It was not a large room, but rather
cozy, with a cheerful log-fire in a
cavernous fireplace. There were leather lounges and easy chairs, and two
"Iher green-topped tables besides
those the members occupied. In the
centre of each of these was a polished
wooden box containing additional
cards and chips. This was flanked on
either side by cigars and cigarettes.
Ferguson noticed this much as he
was quietly opening the door. Then
as he entered, he recognized the play.
er at the second table directly across
from him as the man for whom he
hail we irked and whom he had just
adopted as his uncle. It was Com-
meedore Sammus. The old gentleman
seemed t.'j be terribly intent on what
lie held in his hand.
Ferguson smiled as hc noticed that
his ex-employer was winning. A moment later he had turned the key iu
the lock, This ejonc, lie walked over
t'i one eef the vacant tables and sat
down. He had feared an immediate
outburst of alarm and violence. The
ease and quietness of his entry nerved
linn for what was to follow.
The shifting of interest is always a
swift anil subtle thing. In later years,
Ferguson could never quite recall just
how or when the senior members of
the Janos Island Club ceased to bc
engrossed m himself. He had sat
there for several minutes watching
Commodore Sammus seesaw bets
with a man opposite whom sonic called Israel and others addres: ed as
Moyd.
By this Ferguson knew it to be
Israel Floyd, owner of the New
Brunswick cotton mills. He even reflected humorously on the fact that
while Floyd played poker, his mills
were going fui[ blast to furnish him
lhe wherewithal. Then Ferguseui
found himself the centre of twelve
pairs of eyes. At the same time he
saw a hand moving over toward an
electric push-button.
"Don't do that," said Ferguson, and
his voice was almost coaxing. "Don't
ring that bell. I don't want you to.
And let no one stir."
Some of the members were looking
at him with chins down, with profound surprise; others with their
chins up, to get a better focus through
Iheir glasses. While they watched
him thus, Ferguson reached into the
satin inside pocket of his dinner-coat,
and from each brought out an automatic revolver. These he laid on the
table in front of him like a conjurer
about to perform a trick. His sense
of power was now absolute. It steeled and exhilarated him.
"I don't mind if you move your
chairs around in a more comfortable
position," hc said; "you're all in the
game."
A small slender man with a white
goatee and a fighting eye arose from
his chair with alacrity and started to
take a step forward. Ferguson had
him instantly covered. Friends of the
little man pulled him back with cries
of "Sit down, general!" "Presently,
general!"
The general resisted for a moment,
standing erect.
"I demand to know what's thc
meaning of this nonsense," he said.
"In my day young gentlemen didn't
fool with firearms unless they meant
business." He looked at Ferguson as
tin nigh he would like to chastise him.
Ferguson was smiling, but his eyes
were hard and unflinching,
"1 mean business, all right, general," he said evenly; "and yeeu sit
down, or 1 shoot." The general allowed himself to be pulled into a less
prominent  position,    "Just  to avoid
mistakes," Ferguson went on, "I may
as well tell you gentlemen, now, that
the first suspicious movement by any
one of you will mean a fusilade."
He paused, and deathly silence prevailed. The expression on the faces
of the little assemblage had previously been somewhat mixed���a mingling
of surprise, anger, annoyance, of
pleasure even, according lo the degree
of interest that the owner of the face
had been taking in his luck at cards.
As Ferguson finished speaking, the
only look that met his scrutiny was
one of settled gravity and consternation.
"Vou men wcre playing poker," he
continued more gently; "and you had
your lives in the pot, and the lives
of your families in the pot"���there
was a movement and a catching of
breath at this���"the lives of your
families in lhe pol, till on the strength
of one lone Jack, a Jack with a shotgun.    Do you recognize this?"
Hc put two fingers into the pocket
of his waistcoat and brought out a
gorgeous diamond horse-shoe. Not a
man there but knew it the rroment
he laid eyes on it. The club had presented it to the caretaker last Christmas.    Ferguson tossed it into the fire.
There was nothing impatient or
hasty in the action. It merely meant
thai .1 sparrow had fallen in the hunt
lor big game.
"Suppose," Ferguson said, "lhat the
oiilside world calls your bluff, sends
over twenty men; that they surround
your club-house, ready to sheiot down
you and your wives, and your sons
and your daughters, at the first signal.
You're all business men; what's it
worth to call the game off?"
"It's money he's after," some one
whispered.
Ferguson looked in the direction of
the voice.
"Not exclusively," he said.
Thcie vvas another interval of cold
and dripping silence.
An elderly man with a purplish face
and small, brilliant eyes sat near the
fireplace. From portraits of him that
Ferguson had seen in the newspapers,
he knew that this was Henry Q. Still,
well, the New Brunswick banker.
From the first, Stillwell had sat
with his hands 011 his knees staring
at Ferguson as though he were
hypnotized. The mention of money,
however, seemed to stir his brain to
activity.
"What do you thiiik it's worth to
call the game off?" he asked without
emotion.
Ferguson reached over and took a
cigarette from the table, lit it, and
slowly inhaled. From the ballroom
below there came a faint gust of
music.
"It will suit my purpose," he replied, "if I receive from each one of
you a cheque for one hundred thousand dollars."
"Do you mean," asked the banker,
"that you demand a million dollars?"
"Somewhat more than that," said
Ferguson very calmly.
Several of the members stirred and
glanced at each other. It broke the
spell. Commodore Sammus cleared
his throat, then blurted out:
"I'll be hanged if you get my
cheque!"
There was a buzz of approbation
mil encouragement, broken almost
immediately by a discreet but rapid
knocking at the door.
Ferguson picked up a revolver in
one hand and raised the other to command silence.
"What is it?" hc called.
"Beg your pardon, sir," came the
voice of a servant, "but Mr. 'Awkins
is below, sir, and asks wery particular
to bc seen."
"What does hc want?" asked Ferguson. Ilis eyes were busy. There
was a moment of breathless suspense.
He had guessed who this Mr. Hawkins must be.
The voice from the other side of
the door was evidently charged with
suppressed excitement.
"He says, sir, as how hc was set
upon by a band of ruffians, and gagged and bound and robbed, sir."
Ferguson smiled.
"Hawkins has been drinking again,"
he said slowly and distinctly. "Tell
him to wait, and we'll all be down
presently." There was a sound which
might have been a sigh of relief, or a
stifled guffaw, or both, followed by
retreating footfalls. Turning toward
Commodore Sammus, Ferguson said:
"Our signal is three shots. Shall I
lire  the  first one?"
Thc commodore had gone fish-eyed
and red in the face. He had nothing
more to say. No one had anything
more to say for the moment except
Stillwell, who was naturally cool in
emergencies, and who, besides, remembered that down-stairs, somewhere, was Mary, his only daughter.
The banker glared at the yachtsman.
"You'll write your cheque, Sammus," he said dryly, "and I'll write
mine."    He turned to Ferguson.
"I believe that you arc bluffing���
you and the caretaker," he said dispassionately; "but we're not in a position to call you."
Said Ferguson: "Count out Hawkins, please.    I  tied him up myself."
There was a cheque-book, ink, and
pens in the drawer of one of the card-
tables. It wasn't the first time that
they had been requisitioned at the
close of a game. Ferguson, still
smoking, watched one after another
of his prisoners come forward to the
table, write, and withdraw. Commodore Sammus accomplished his task
with sullen humiliation; the general,
with visible ire; Israel Floyd, coldly,
(Continued on Page 8)
For Sale
One Lot, Block 7,  D.L. 195a, price $650.    Quarter cash, bai,,
6, 12 and 18 months.   Owner will accept $525 all cash.
Victoria Road���Six-room house, 33-foot  Lot,  cleared,  Block  V
D.L. 352.   Price $3,300.
Agreements for Sale Purchased and Money to Loan
at Current Rates
The Yorkshire Guarantee
&  Securities Corporation Limited
440 Seymour Street
Phones: 6188 and 6189   R. Kerr Houlgate, Managt r
Phone : Seymour 8425-8426
Western Plate Glass &
Importing   Co.   Limited
Registered Office:
318 Water Street, Vancouver, B. C.
PLATE GLASS WINDOW GLASS
LEADED ART GLASS
Thome  Metal   Store  Front  Bars,   Bevelling  and
Silvering, Store Fronts Glazed
ALL KINDS OF GLASS
"A South Vancouver Industry"
W. L. GOODWIN
SUCCESSOR TO ROBERT NISBET
LUMBER,     SASH,     DOORS,     MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  LATH,  AND  A  COMPLETE
LINE OF BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
Campbell Road Station
On the Eburne-Westminster Tram
(Foot of Inverness Street)
Phone Fraser 109 R P.O. Box 16
Let nie figure your bills. Open Evenings.
MACADAM & COMPANY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
418 Winch Building Vancouver, B.C.
Wood Block
PAVING
Gold  Nuggets
How do nuggets of gold originate?
Sometimes a mass of the precious
metal worth a thousand dollars or
more is found. By what process was
so much gold compacted into a lump?
An attempt was made not long ago
to answer this question. An investigator in Australia cut and sliced and
polished gold nuggets with the sole
purpose of finding out just what is
their structure. The first thing he
discovered was that there is one curious point of resemblance between
gold nuggets and meteorites. Both,
when polished and etched with chlorine water, exhibit a crystalline structure. In the case of meteorites, the
lines thus exhibited on the etched
surface are called Widmannstattian
figures, and their presence is said to
be one of the most invariable
characteristics of those metallic
bodies that fall from thc sky to the
earth.
But it is not meant to be implied
that gold nuggets have fallen from
the sky because they exhibit a crystalline structure recalling that of
meteorites. The resemblance is apparently only superficial, and the
crystals of the nuggets differ in form
from those of the meteorites.
Another curious fact is that when
a nugget is heated in a Bunsen flame
explosions take place on its surface.
Blisters are formed which continue'
to swell until they burst with a sharp
report and bits of gold are violently
scattered about. It is evident that
the nuggets contain either gases or
some liquids or solids which are easily
converted into the gaseous form, the
expansion of which produces thc explosions.
 ��� ^ ��� ���
The Fastest-growing Tree
Hard, fine-grained, durable wood
usually grows slowly. A most remarkable exception is the eucalyptus,
and this it is that gives the tree its
great value as a means of reforestation. It is said that the eucalyptus
grows five times as rapidly as any
other tree. Seedlings have been observed to make an average growth of
six inches in height a day; and one
tree in California attained a height
of one hundred and twenty-five feet
and a diameter of thirty-six inches in
nine years. The eucalyptus will not
thrive where there are frosts, but in
the South it promises to go a long
way toward filling the place once occupied by other hardwoods, which
have been greatly reduced by demands for furniture, carriage, and
cooperage stock. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY  15,  1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SEVEN
Gladstone Hotel
First Class Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
H. G. BROWN, Proprietor
Cambie Street will eventually become the leading thoroughfare between the North
Arm and Burrard Inlet, and today there is no better investment on the market. A
brief study of the map should convince you that our statement ia correct. We have
a few choice lots on Cambie Street facing West.
Price $1625 each;   leash;   balance 6-12-18-24 month
These arc between Sixty-sixth Avenue and River Road. We have also a few
choice homesites  from  $500  each,  that  are  worth  investigating.
Wm. H. KENT & SON
COLLINGWOOD  EAST
Phone : Coll. 18 Branch : Cor. River Rd. and Ash St.
Hughes Bros'   Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET  EAST, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We carry everything in the Liquor Line
No order too small, and none too large for this popular Liquor Store
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
leaving our Store every Friday morning at 9 a.m.
BITULITHIC
PAVE MENT
Granville   Street   South,   Before   Paving
This has the following attributes :
���J Durability; sure footing for horses; resiliency; noiselessness; easy drainage; dustless-
ness; economy.
(J Bitulithic approaches more closely than any
other the ideal of a perfect pavement.
���J Its notable durability makes it more economical than any other paving.
*l The Vancouver thoroughfares paved with
bitulithic are an impressive object-lesson in
fine paving.
<fl Bitulithic has been adopted in over 200 cities
in the United States, and 15 cities in Canada.
Five Million Descendants
An extraordinary instance of thc
complete change which the interference of man is able to effect in the
productions of a country is furnished
by the history of certain coffee plantations in Central Africa.
Some time ago a small coffee plant
was sent from the Botanical Gardens
in Edinburgh to Blantyre in Nyassa.
From this single plant, in the course
-of sixteen years, about five million
coffee plants have been derived, and
the soil is so well adapted to their
nourishment that they have become
���one of the main sources of the prosperity of the British settlements in
that country. Yet, until it was artificially introduced, the coffee plant
was unknown there.
The little plant whose arrival in a
strange country was  the cause of so
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandy  meets an' auld frien' an' they veesit some folk up in Sooth
Vancoover
llellei, Sandy!    I was walking doon
Granville Streel the ither nlcht when
1   heard   the   above     salutation     and
turnin'    roon   I   Ken  ;t   surprise    for
Itandln1 richt there wA a frien' I had
left in the Auld Country.    It I  cx-
pectit   tae   see   Onybody   oot   here   I
thocht   Jnckie   Mackenzie   wud   hae
I been the last.    Hooever, efter we hael
got talkin' a bit he asked me tae come
lawa' wi' him and see his nierried sis-
jter; she lived up in Seioth  Vancoover
jllaen an Im ir ��� er twa tae spare I  wil
jnaethin' loth, IO efter gaun across the
re.ael ami haeii a hit 'Irani tae ceeinent
eieir frlen'lhlp and keep nut the cauld.
1  keiit  the  maw  was  lyin' pretty
Granville Street South, After Paving
Columbia Bitulithic Limited
433 Granville St. Vancouver, B. C.
weel fe,r that; he's been a guiel frien'
tae me moiiy a time when I've
been chocked up wi' the cauld an'
been threatened wi' broonkateys, an'
I dinna ken hoo I could hae steeoel
this winter here wi' its snaw and freest
if it hadna been for his lOOthin' wey.
I niieht as weel mention I got a letter
frae a lady reader this week threat-
eiiin' tae discontinyac her subscrip-
ihun lae the "Chinook" if she fund
eee.t I wis ony frien' o' Cluny s. She
mentioned she wis a member ��' the
Auld Kirk at hame (I wuiiner what
she meant?) an' hail been a devout
church-goer sin she cam o.it here. 1
wrote  an'   told  her   that  although   I
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
HEAD OFFICE, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Authorized Capital     $2,000,000
Subscribed Capital        1,169,900
Paid-up   Capital           840,000
Specia' attention given to saving! accounts.
Interest paid at the highest current rates
Your account ver,   cordially solicited.
L. W. Sharfoed. Oner*! Manager W. E. Jardinc. Ami. Oneial   Manage!
COLLINGWOOD E. BRANCH.        E.  N. Haworth, Manager.
deep oeel there, we jumped on the; wis nae relation o' Cluny's still I had
Davie ear al Alain Streel. ji-.I in time [every respee' for him, and though 1
afore the gates shut. I asked Jock had fund the Kirk pretty cauld somc-
lioo he liked it not here and hoo times I had aye fund Cluny a pretty
things were daen wi' him. He said lie warm frien'���even some o' the elders
was getting on fine; although he' fundi smacked their lips ower 'im.
thing! strange a bit at first he lunel    Hooever, that's gettin' awa' frae the
K'et   intae   the'   rin.     W'e   ge.it   off   at subject,   as   ChaarTie   the   hirst     saiel
Twenty-fifth,  and   lie   said   we'd  jilt when they knockit his bloke off, and
be as weel tae walk; liis lister'l ii - Tam   seemed  tae  enjoy   ma  ill-natur.
WIS ahejeet tell blocks off and this wis i hit ��'v set tae an' made a richt guid
thc only objecklhun he had tae livin' supper. I praised Tain's wife's cookin See.-,th Vancoover wa- the changin' in' sae much that he telt me lae' cut
frae the Davie ear tae the Rosenberg. " ""������ '��� didna pey tae praise a wo.
lie didna blame the 11. C. Elektric.
They   were   gien   a   guid   se-rviee   he-
man   tae   her   face  too  much���they'd
-um   commence  tae  think  they  were
the   whole   cheese.     She   went   away
tae   see  if  the  bairns   were  a'richt  ill
an'  efter  we  had  lichted    oor
ceegars   an'  got   talkin'   a   while   we
landed "ii antther thorny subject.   It
was   weel   efter   twelve   o'clock  an'   I
askeel Tam if there wis a hotel aboot
the folk ee.et  here started  '"r '  didna care about walkin' hame!
kept  kickin',    The  com.|tae the city at that time o' niclit, an'!
me he wudna alio' me oot;
that niclit, he got away
tween Twenty-fifth an' the river, but
that wisna the p'int. It wis haen t; e
change frae yae car tae the ither that  bed
he   wis  d i   em.    11   had   auited  a'
richt   a   while  ago  when   there  were
very few lioe.ses past Twenty-fifth and
they wer'na gaun tae pit  on  through
ears   unle-
kickin'  an
pany. J'iek said, had bin construction I efter tellin
work gaun  on  a' the time,  dcmandiii' I ��' 'he hoo
HEATERS
The cold weather is coming and you will
require some
Stoves and Heaters
to keep your home warm.   We have heaters
.from
$2.00 up
They are of the best quality, and we will put
them up for you.
Don't forget our line of RANGES.    We
have a few Pioneers left.
FOX'S PIONEER HARDWARE
Fraser and Ferris Roads T. Fox, Prop.
Phone : Fraser 87
big expenditure o' money, anil tiny
wer'na gaun tae bother themselves
aboot a sma' maitter like this if the
��� ni the hotel business,   lie says that's
wan   o'   the   tilings   that   Sooth   V'an-
iver's  very much  ill  the backgrun'
folks themael'i were quite content, He w,''. 'ls :i' verv weel tae talk
said lhe company wer'na bad tae dale
'f they were dill tlie richt thing
By lhat time we hail got Up tae
Jock's sister's hoose anil she ami her
man gave us a richt warm welcome,
They had a nice, cosy wee hoose anil
ii vis fine an' warm. lie told nie
he wis a carpenter lae trade and had
been ..ol here lower years. He had
been backward in gettin' a job fm- a
while when lie cam oot first until he
fell intae their slap-bang-wallop methods, but efter that lie could get a'
the work he wanted. Ile had bocht
fowcr lots dpotl near the river twa
years ago when they were pretty
cheap, and lasl year he hail pitten up
a couple o' hoe.ses on twa .e' them.
Wi' a pairt ie' the money he realize'!
on them he had sent hame for the
wife an' fower bairns last vear, and
when she cam oot she liked ����� that
wed that she wrote <Ji' advised her
brither tae conic richt awa' oot. lie's
a  carpenter tae an' the  twa   .,'  them
al i
pittin' hertn out o' a man's road, but
while's it's the ither wey aboot. If a
man could get a gless o' beer or a
dram when he felt like haen wan, it
wuel   save   him   spendin'   an   boor  or
twa    rinnin' el i  tae  the city    and
takin' mare than wis guid for him.
Ile says it's a' very weel tae talk an'
say that a man shouldna touch it, but
what was worse for any man than lae
try and keep somethin' frae him when
he wantit it. There's lots o' richt guid.
livin' folk oot here that have nae use
for a man that gauns and forgets
himsel' but wha like a dram noo and
then when they feel like it, an' it does
them nae herm. Ye canna mak' a
man teetotal by sayin' they're gaunna
be nae hotels up here and the suner
the kirk folk come a wee bit doon off
their high-burse the better it'll be
for a' body, lie telt me the bawr
aboot the Sooth Vancoover Board o'
Trade "no haen a suitable place for
_ i a dinner they were gien tae somc-
hae jined company an' went intae the body" an' haen tae gaun outside the
building line, an' they're makin' pretty Municipality tae ha'd it; it wisna a
weel oot o' it. As lie said, the coun- c��ffey-an' they were efter that niclit,
try has its drawbacks in hits .)' ways!'""' .'am 5avs> 'n his peroration,
but takin' it a' in a' the working-jnan what's the use o' being hypocreetical
has a chance here that he never had ?boot it; yae only encourage crime the
at hame���nae maitter hoo pro.eeeient j it.'lcr WQy by makin' blin' pigs. W'e
hc wis at his trade���an' has a pros- didna argue wi' him on the question,
pec' in front o' him if his health's '' w's 'ate and 1 went tne bed for I
pared  that he could never dream o'  WH^ .ncc.(! tac ,,e up early tae get doon
fruitful a development is said to be
still living, carefully tended in a garden at Blantyre. Its surroundings
are far more congenial than those
which it enjoyed in frosty Scotland
before its possessors had dreamed
that it was to be transformed from
an exotic curiosity into the admired
mother of a great plantation.
"I thought I told you not to eat
any porterhouse steak without my
permission."
"So you did, doc; so you did."
"Then why are you disobeying my
order?"
"This won't delay the paying of
your bill. doc. This steak^ is being
paid for by my friend here."
at hame. The country being young
and haen sic fine natural resources
it was only tae be expeetit that the
Auld Country capitalists fund it a fine
place for investin' their money. The
only fault he fun was that he thocht
the Government should make it a wee
bit mare attractive for a fella tae gaun
farmin' or ranchin', for it was almost j''raw niclit.
impossible for a man tae gaun on a
bit land an' start tae clear it himsel.
It wis slow wark and maist often before he had gotten a' half-an-acre
cleared he wis sae darned weel disgusted that he chucked il iip an' shifted intae the toon. The country wis
losin' through that for every acre a
man cleared and raised somethin' on
wis for its benefit; there wis soine-
thin' useful bein' pie educed and wc a'
stood tae benefit Ihrough it. This
wee bit touch " eckynomics fairly set
the pat bilin' an' when one ie' us happened tae interject the word Socialism!
the first car; it wis the first time
I had been oot o' hoose at niclit
since I've been nierried, an' I kent
1 wud hae a hot time wi' thc wife.
Hooever, I had the consolation that
she kent Tain's wife, and wi' that
trump caird up my sleeve J knew I
wud get  the better o'  her.    1   had a
LUMBER
Eburne Saw Mills  Limited
Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of
FIR, CEDAR AND SPRUCE LUMBER
Shingles, Lath. Sash, Doors, Turnings
and House Finishings
PROMPT   DELIVERY   BY TRAM, WAGON OR SCOW
PHONE: EBURNE 14 R
EBURNE, B. C.
Yours through the Heather,
S.W'DY MacPHERSON.
Why Is a Bagpipe?
Where,  we disirei to know, did  the
Scot get the notion that a bagpipe is
a musical instrument?    Or isn't that
the idea?���"The Atchison  Globe."
For Sound Investment Buy Lots in
RIVERDALE
At the corner of Boundary Road and River Road. There is no
better located property in South Vancouver���at the price���on the
terms���with the wonderful view���the beautiful southern slope���
the perfect contour���CLEARED���the possibilities and assurance
of
..DEVELOPMENT   AND   PROFIT
Price $550. Terms $15 cash. $15 per month, or with an increased cash payment we will make the deferred payments quarterly, half-yearly, or yearly, as desired bv the purchaser.
P.   CHATHAM
Room 105, 25 Hastings Street East, opposite Holden Building
Phone : Seymour 2201
What Scot ever called the pipes a
| musical instrument? Isn't Brother
Ed. Howe a practical man? Surely
he knows the origin of thc pipes. In I
the old wicked days bands of predatory   English   marched   over   the'   bor-j call it. sir?" he replied contemptuous
able to tolerate music, he couldn't
stand the violin. When someone told
him lhat the playing of the violin was
a difficult matter,    "Difficult, el" you
there wis a rumpus   Jock's sister had I dcr;    Thav wcrt, M bold and sturdy I
been   settin    the   table   preparing   tae  a, the gcots ami
gie us a bit supper an' she bangs
doon her liaun'. makin' the cups an'
saucers dae a jig, an' says that's
enough���I'll no' hae ony o' yer I. L. I1.
or S.D.F. talk here���Tam (that wis
her man's name), yer a'richt crackin'
awa' aboot things iu general, but when
yae start on that topic ye lose yer
temper and there's the deil tae pey.
I wis sit tin' like a hen on a hot gridle
tar greater in number.   Cluny MacWhauppert, the Laird I
of Glengarramoyle, in desperate need
of a  sure defense, invented  the  pipes
in secret and never let a skirl out of'
them  till   he  faced  the  invading  Sas-1
senach   on   the  bloody   field.     Then,
Cluny   blew   a   melody   so   fierce,   so
eldritch, so grinding and blistering to
the soul,  that  every clansman  ripped
and slashed his nay through the Eng-
ly.     "1   wish   it   were   impt
"London  Chronicle."
stble
Now,
Scot-
he
into a plowshare, but he will always
uphold the pipes to beat the band.���
Harper's  Weekly."
ami made tne excuse that 1 wanted a |jsh hordes, intent on only one thing
moothfu o fresh air, and Jock foi-1���10 escape the fiendish screeching of
lowed me oot by antther door and the pipes. And that is why every
starts lauchin tae bate the band. He grateful Scot to this day cherishes thc
telt me Tam was an avvfu beggar on bagpipe, the preserver of Scottish in-
bocialisra; he wis a member o wan dependence. He has beaten his sword
���> the pairties at hame and had a
great reverence for Keir Hardie. Phil
Suowden, Ramsay McDonald and the
rest o' the Labor Pairty, and it wis
guid policy no tae talk aboot politics
wi' him, for if yae argyed again him lie
lost  his  temper  an'  there  wis  h 1
tae pey. We went inside again an' I
could sec that Tam had been gettin'
a dressin'-up frae the wife an' wis
pretty sheepish lookin', so we kent
no to encroach on that subject again.
The wife telt us tae sit in noo for the
supper wis ready, an' Tam brings oot
the bottle tae gie us a bit drap o' the
Auld Kirk. Afore he fills it oot he
showed me the label on it; says he,
"MacPherson. ye're nae frien' o' Cluny
MacPherson, are yc?" Gee, I lost my
rag at that, for nearly everybody I
speak tae asks nie the same sully
question, an' although there's only
wan Cluny an' "he wis weel kent in
Scotlan'" an' I've nacthin' tae say agin
him mysel, in fact him an' I agree
verra weel. still I dinna think it's guid
mainners tae be aye askin' sic a question. There's thousands o' MacPher-
son's in Scotland, but there's only
wan Cluny (an' he's the rale Mackayl.
an' though 1 canna claim kinship wi'
him, I enjoy the internasluiiial fame
he's acquired, and I dinna think him
an'  I'll  ever  fa'  oot,  I  like  him  too
Are Bagpipes Musical?
Charles Keene's delight in the bagpipes is not necessarily relevant to the
question of music and work. We have
lirst to decide whether bagpiping is
music. A Milwaukee jury in 1895
found emphatically that it was not.
To advertise his company a theatrical
agent had sent the pipes around the
streets, and a horse, taking fright, ran
away and got killed. Sued for damages, the company pleaded that it had
done nothing unlawful, since street
music was permissible in Milwaukee.
But the jury held that "music" did not
cover the pipes. Then there is the
case of Dr. Johnson, who admitted
that he did not like music, and had
scarcely any perception of it, but
seemed fond of the pipes, and would
stand with his ear close to the great
drone.
Dr. Johnson had views of his own
about music, which he described as
"the only sensual pleasure without
vice.'' On another occasion he said:
"It excites in my mind no ideas, and
hinders me from contemplating my
own."    But, though Johnson was just
They had parted years ago.
in thc deepening shadows of
land's twilight,  they met again.
"Here be  the old  stile,  Annie,
said.
"Aye; anil lure be our initials that
you carved. John." she replied.
The ensuing silence was only broken by the buzzing of an aviator overhead.
Honey-laden memories thrilled
through the twilight and flushed their
glowing cheeks.
'Ah, Annie," exclaimed John, suddenly seizing her fair, slim hand,
'ye're jist as beautiful as ye ever were,
an' I hae never forgotten ye, my
bonnie lass!"
'And ye, John," she cried, while her
blue een moistened tremulously, "are
jist as big a leear as ever, an' I believe ye jist the same!"
only der language of mine own goun-
try und der Angleesh. I dink you better ask a boliceman where der Chinese gonzul lif. und p'raps he zend
you back to your own gountry free
eif charge."
"A bally foreigner! Wot a sell!"
muttered the baffled cockney, and
turned  disgustedly away.
"Xa. na, ma laddie!" chuckled thc
householder, as the other departed.
"Ye dinna tak' mc in. Ye're nae mair
Sc it than I'm German."
Anyone who picks a Scot as easy
game is sure to be disappointed. They
are a charitable folk, but they positively will not be gulled. Their
"canniness" is well illustrated in this
incident.
He was a tramp, and had come, in
the course of his wanderings, upon a
neat little villa in the suburbs of London. In the front garden a big, fair-
bearded man, in a tam-o'-shanter, was
stooping over a  flower-bed.
"Hoo's a' wi' ye, man, the day?"
called out the wayfarer, simulating
Scotch as well as he could in the hope
of profiting thereby. "Ah'm doon on
ma luck, laddie, an' makin' for Glesca,
ma ain toon," continued the tramp.
"Ah ken richt well a brither Scot like
yersel' winna see a kintraman in sic
sair necessity wi' oot haudin' oot a
helpin' hand."
"Mine vriendt," replied the big.
bearded man, "I oondershtand nod de
Ghinese.     I was C-herman, und spik
The steamer had left Greenock pier
and Tonal, the baggage man, was
busy among thc bags and baskets.
The old lady was nervous and particularly trying as to the disposal of her
luggage. She had it shifted several
times with varying instructions, until
Tonal got aggravated.
"Oh!    You go to ta teevil."
She complained to the captain of
incivility, with thc result that Tonal
was told to go and apologize. Searching out the offended one, he asked:
"Are you ta woman I sent to ta
teevil?"
"Yes, I am," was the indignant reply.
"Weel, ta capen says ye needna go."
 i^i	
A dapper little traveling man,
whose appetite appeared to be in inverse ratio to his size, stopped at a
hotel in a  small Southern village.
"Here, corporal," he said, hailing
a venerable darky who acted as
waiter; "bring me a couple of nice,
soft-boiled  eggs "
Disposing of the eggs in an incredibly short time, the drummer
again beamed upon thc colored man.
"Ah, captain," he exclaimed, "those
eggs were fine! Bring me two more."
After the second pair had gone the
way of the first, the drummer again
signaled the old man.
"Major, may I have a couple more
eggs, done in the same excellent
style?"
Bowing and scraping apologetically,
the old darky replied:
"Ah'd like mos' powerful well to be
a general, boss, but dey ain't no mo'
aigs." EIGHT
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY  15,  1913"
Short Lesson in Household
=Economy=
Are you using carbon lamps for lighting ?
Do you know that Tungsten lamps give three times the amount
of light obtained from the carbon lamp with the same consumption
of current?
Would it not be advisable for you to secure this improved form of
lighting ?
After you have considered the above queries visit our salesrooms
and ask the lamp counter clerk to demonstrate the difference between the Tungsten lamp and the ordinary carbon lamp.
For convenience of our customers we carry a full line of Tungsten
lamps, of an improved type, in stock.
Carrall &
Hastings
Streets
1138 Gran,
ville Street
(Near Davie)
Vancouver
South Vancouver
Subdivision of Portion Block 15, D. L. 330 and 331
Fronting on River Road and Sixty-ninth Avenue. Prices
$450 each lot and up. Terms, fifth cash, balance 6, 12 and 18
months.
FRASER RIVER FRONTAGE
River and B. C. Electric Railway frontage, 89.57; Victoria
Drive frontage, 187.84. Price $9,000. Terms, $1,000 cash, balance over three and a half years.
London & British North America Co. Limited
With which is incorporated Mahon, McFarland & Procter Ltd.
Corner Pender and Seymour Streets
Insurance Money to Loan
Agreements  For  Sale Purchased
HEATING
If your heating plant is not satisfactory, see us. We
instal the "Pease" system of hot water and warm air.
See us for your plumbing repairs. We employ only
experts.
Hodgson Plumbing & Heating Co.
Limited
1136 HOMER ST. PHONE : SEY. 2412
Furnace and Plumbing Repairs a Specialty.
A Better Garden
than you  ever had before
can be bad by sowing
Ritchie's Seeds
Write today for tins beautifully
illustrated catalogue
Brimful with cultural directions
FREE ON REQUEST
RITCHIE BRAND & CO.
SEEDSMEN
723 ROBSON STREET Phone Sey.  1892
BULBS! BULBS! BULBS!
For Flowers in the house, plant the following
Bulbs now:
Roman Hyacinths, 35c per doz.; $2.65 per 100.
Paper White Narcissus, 25c per doz.; $1.75 per
DO.
Freesias, 10c per doz.; 75c per 100.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
FLORISTS AND NURSERYMEN
Phone Sey. 988 and 5727
NOTES OF INTEREST TO THE
LADY OF THE HOUSE
Seeing the Wind
One may see the wind and by
means of an implement no more complex than an ordinary hand-saw. On
any blowy day, the wind being, say,
in the north, hold your saw with its
ends pointing one to the east, the
other to the west. Then place the saw
as if you were about to cut the air
upward and let the teeth, which are
then of course on top, tilt over until
thc flat part of the saw rests at an
angle of forty-five degrees with the
horizon. You will then "see the
wind." Glancing along the teeth of
the saw, one sees the wind pouring
over them much at water poura over
a fall.
Trimming Lamps
Despite the reign of the electrolier
the lamp still has many followers.
Many take to lamps because they
must; some because the light it sheds
is softer, more becoming and better
for  the eyes.
When a lamp fails to give a good
light do not waste time reviling the
manufacturer, but look to your own
duties.
Perhaps the wick is crooked, or too
short or not in squarely. Rub off the
top of the wick each day with soft
paper, and if it fails to draw pull it
up on the catches or get a new one.
Unless sure you can put in the wick
correctly send thc lamp to a store and
have it done properly.
Perhaps a new wick is less necessary than removing thc oil with which
it is clogged. Boil in vinegar and
water and dry thoroughly.
Fill your lamps daiiy. Never light
a lamp that is nearly empty, as it in-
j creases danger of explosion. Fill a
i lamp by daylight; if it must be done
' after dark, keep away from a llame
and wipe all oil from the outside.
Even with the best oil a poor light
I results if the burner is not clean. They
should be washed once a month in a
quart of cold water, to which has
I been added a tablespoonful of washing
soda and a little soap. Boil several
hours, pour off the blackened water,
cover with fresh boiling water, soap
and soda, boil five minutes, rinse in
clean hot water, and rub dry with a
clean  soft cloth  that is not Iinty.
Lamp chimneys may bc rubbed off
with soft paper daily, and when smoked should be washed in hot ammonia
water, rinsed in cold water and polished with a tea towel and soft paper.
* *       e|e
Cooking by Measure
"I'd give a dollar," said tbe man
who coddles his stomach, "to find a
cook wdio doesn't measure. She
would gladden my soul. The cook
who dbes tilings by guess is a rare
bird nowadays. She has genius, else
she could not dispense with thc cast-
iron rules that regulate modern cookery, and geniuses arc seldom indigenous to the flatbousc kitchen.
"But there used to be plenty of
them. Why, I remember thc time
when half the kitchens in the land
gloried in a guess-work cook. It did
a fellow's eyes and his entire internal
organization good to watch her. She-
would take a pinch of this, a handful
of that, and a dash of something else,
and mix them all together, and the
result would be thc most delectable
titbit that a fellow ever put in his
mouth.
"Lord, Lord, but eating was a pleasure in those days. It isn't so now.
In these whirligig times, everything
has a machine-made taste. That's
because the cooks measure so much.
Instead of trusting to inspiration
as a heaven-born cook is bound to do,
the kitchen queens of today measure
even the salt they put in the porridge.
No wonder such cookery lacks individuality, and is all on the same
dead level of mediocrity. Merciful
heaven, what ails these biscuits?
They're as heavy as lead."
"Possibly the cook made a mistake,"
said the man's wife. "I got a ne v
cook yesterday���einc tbat cooks by
guess. I am afraid she didn't put
enough baking powder in the biscuits."���"New York Times."
* A      A
Desserts   from   Canned   Fruit
Plum Custard���One pint of canned
plums, two tabiespoonfuls Hour, one
tablespoonful butter, three eggs, three
tabiespoonfuls powdered sugar, one-
half cupful of granulated sugar, rich,
thick cream. Stone and stew the
plums; then lay them in the bottom
of a pudding dish and sprinkle the
granulated sugar over them. Make
a cream as follows: Add two table.
spi.einfuls of flour to two cupfuls of
milk and cook together until thick
and smooth. Remove from the lire
and add the butter and the lightly
beaten yolks of the eggs. Pour this
cream over the plums in the mold and
bake the whole for ten minutes in a
moderate oven; then cover the top
with a meringue made by beating
the leftover white of tbe eggs with
the powdered sugar. Brown lightly,
allow to ceeol and serve with whipped
cream.
Fruited Gelatine���One package of
flavored gelatine, one pint of boiling
water, and pour half of it into a bow]
or mold. Arrange the fruit���peaches,
pineapple, cherries or whatever you
desire���in the gelatine, and set away
to harden. When firm, pour in more
gelatine and lay in more fruit; allow
to get linn and then pour on the rest
of the gelatine. When stiff, unmold
and garnish with the rest of the fruit.
Serve with sweetened whipped cream
slightly flavored with vanilla. After
a little experimenting yeeu will be
able to obtain delicious combinations,
but in the beginning you will find it j
tin best plan to use orange gelatine
With oranges, cherry flavor with cherries, etc.
Pineapple Sponge���Two heaping
tabiespoonfuls gelatine, one and one-
half cupfuls of boiling water, one and
one-half pints of canned pineapple,
one cupful of granulated sugar, whites
of f'eiir eggs. Dissolve the gelatine
with half a cupful of the boiling water. Put thc pineapple with its juice
into a saucepan, adding the sugar and
thc rest of the water. Cook slowly
for ten minutes; then remove from
the lire and add the gelatine. Strain
into a basin and cool. Whip up the
white of the eggs stiffly, and gradually add them to tbe mixture, beating all the time until it begins to
thicken. Pour into a wet mold. Turn
out when set and serve with a soft
custard.
Peach Pudding���One quart of canned peaches, one cupful of flour, one
cupful of sugar, one teaspoonful baking powder, one tablespoonful melted
butter, four beaten eggs, two cupfuls
of milk, one-quarttr teaspoonsful salt.
Mix the flour and sugar well and add
the melted butter, beaten eggs, milk,
baking powder, salt and peach juice;
whip thoroughly for four minutes.
Place the peaCTies in a buttered lluilding mold and pour the custard over
them. Bake in a moderate oven until rich brown in color, and serve with
thick  cream.
��� ��    ��
How  to   Dry-Clean   Curtains
Many housewives own curtains of
Arabian lace. They realize that a
great amount of their beauty is lost
after washing. The lovely ecru tint
lias disappeared, and to recolor them
is  not  always  satisfactory.
These curtains can be dry cleaned
in   the   following  manner;
Spread a sheet or two upon the
floor and lay thc curtains carefully
on them.
Mix two parts of boiled oatmeal
with one of salt.
With a clean brush rub this mixture thoroughly through the curtains.
Hang out eif doors for a couple of
hours and the curtains will be sweet
and clean.
In Ibis simple way they may be
frequently cleaned. If the dust is not
allowed to settle in them for any
length of time they will wear much
longer.
This bit of information should be
well received by the housekeeper, for
it saves a wonderful amount of time
and labor.
* e|.        A
New Styles for Neckwear
It is hard to decide whether the
majority of women prefer the long
ste.les eif fur or the neat little ties
and liny collarettes fastening tightly
around the neck. The snugness of
these little ties makes them delightfully comfortable on a cold day. They
can be fashioned from a scrap of fur.
Many women have made most attractive ones from a pelt that bad already done duty as a neckpiece. It
is not a difficult feat to remodel fur
if one remembers that it should always bc cut on the under skin with
a sharp penknife or points of the
scissors, and the edges lightly overcast together. Just a strip of fur is
often sufficient for a tie when it is
combined with silk or velvet. Moleskin, ermine, mink, lynx, skunk, caracul and seal are all used in this way
with great success.
��    ��    ��
Three-Piece Suits
One of thc most satisfactory garb
combinations that any woman,
wealthy or poor, can add to her wardrobe is the so-allcd three-piece suit.
In reality it is a dress and coat, and
has, therefore, more scope than the
tailored jacket and skirt. Thc one-
piece frock has always, more or less,
answered the problem for those who
cannot have the use of a private
vehicle, and must depend on train and
street car for transit.
What to buy or order that will bc
elaborate   enough   for  wear    at    the
opera, matinee, bridge, concert, or
club meeting, and also on the street,
has never been answered more satisfactorily than in the way just mentioned.
On the street such a jacket and skirt
harmonize well, and are more elegant
than the tailored suit, and very much
more effective than the separate or
the long coat on nvist persons���especially those who are a little stout.
Once Indoor*, thc coat slipped off,
its dainty white or bright colored
satin lining giving a note of color as
it is slipped over the back of the
chair, the one-piece dress, with its
fashionable lines and air, is all that is
correct and satisfactory in appearance.
The difficulty comes in harmonizing
the coat design with tbe skirt, for the
coat has to bave a tailored jacket effect, and the skirt must keep somewhat the tailored loeek, but with more
softness and intricacy of cut in tbe design. Thc coat need not be of the
same material, but there must be the
relation  of material or color.
Accommodation Brooch
l Ine of the new bowknot pins set
in a jewelled rim has a feature thai
makes it useful. It is apparently a
black moire ribbon framed in small
diamonds lint this ribbon instead of
being stationary may be removed and
other colors substituted tee match any
costume.
One pin of ihis suit is nearly three
inches long and is worn to catch up
lace or drapery on the corsage or as
a hair ornament, Buckles for watch
fobs can be found ill thc same styles,
so the ribbon of the fob may be
changed tie match different gowns.
*       *        *
Ambassador Imprisoned
lu bygone days foreign envoys have
been imprisoned by the Sovereigns to
whose courts they were accredited but
Baron Veen Kiderlen-Waechter enjoy.
ed lhe unique distinction of having
been imprisoned by his own Government while serving as its representative at a foreign court; In IS'ti, when
Minister at Copenhagen, th.' Baron
fought a duel  wiih a  Berlin  editor,
and severely wounded him. For this
be was sentenced to three months' imprisonment in lb.- military fortress
eef   Ehrenbreltstein,    King   Christian
IX. with whom the jovial diplomat
was a great favorite, raised no objection to a Charge d'Affaires taking his
place for a time, and when I lie Baron
had purged bis offence be returned lee
his post.
The Thirteenth Member
(Continued from Page 6)
as one who doesn't expect to pay.
Stillwell and most of the others wrote
their cheques almost good-naturedly.
philosophically, at least.
When they had finished. Ferguson
said:
"Mr. Stillwell, will yotl look over
these slips, and see that they are all
in order?"
The banker drew up his chair to
the table where the scattered cheques
lay and examined them with professional speed ^nd thoroughness, lie
then straig. ,i w them into a neat
pile and profL 'ed them to Ferguson.
"They are correct," he said simply.
As herguson took them, his hand,
for thc first time that evening, might
have been seen to tremble.
"Gentlemen," he said, "to all intents
and purposes, my business with you is
done. We've played a pretty stiff
game���dangerous for me, full of new
sensations for you. It's been a fair
game. If there be any among your
who doesn't think so, and who intends to welch when these cheques
are presented for payment"���Israel
Floyd flushed but remained silent���
"let him step forward now, and he
can have bis paper back without the
slightest hindrance."
"Thc game wasn't fair," some one
cried from the baek eef the crowd.
"The    game    wasn't    fair,"    Israel
Floyd   and    Commodore    Sammus
(,-choed,
"Vou threatened us with loaded revolvers," the voice concluded.
"And our families," added Floyd,
Ferguson   picked   up   a   revolver,
pointed it at the fireplace, and snapped the trigger half a dozen times.
There was no report, lie tossed the
weapon into the embers, tlun proceeded t'i dee the same with tbe other.
Neither of  them  bail been  loaded.
"I was bluffing," he said seeftly. "1
bluffed your caretaker, ami lied him
oul on tbe pier to avenge an eeld insult: bluffed ye.ii gentlemen, because
I wanted wealth; but, somehow���"
fill'" the new  and altogether slrane,.���
silence that fell on the little assem-
blaged as Ferguson paused there sift_
eel   the   strains   of   a   waltz   lhat   hail
been a favorite e.f his in undergraduate elays.    IU- held a fortune in bis
hand.     On  one  side  he  could  see  the
white yacht, the big automobile, thc
I'ark Row heitise, the deferential ser-
vants that this money meant; and een
the ollur his old life eef daring and
hope and  untraninicli d  freedom���and
something else, something vague, intangible, suggested by ihis waltz thai
was a favorite '>f his in undergraduate
elays.
"Bul somehow," he wenl em. "I sort
of feel that I bese as well as win. Mr
Siillwell'1���he turned impulsively tee
(he banker���"you take all this. Any
cheques not called for within a fortnight  can  be  turneil over tei charity."
He- bail thrust Ihe paper inlie the
banker's hand, unlocked the iheeir, and
thrown il open while the twelve' -till
stood there stupefied.
The music eef lhe e-bl wall/, swept
iu mi them, together with the rhythmic, swishing tread of many feet.
Death and danger of death seemed
suddenly remote. They elected Ferguson a member for the night.
And later on he danced with tbat
excruciating aristocrat of the tilt neese
���she happened to be Mary Stillwell,
daughter of Henry Q. It wouldn't be
gallant to tell whether his early prophecy concerning her was fulfilled
just then. But it will probably turn
out all right. The last time that I
heard Ferguson he was working for
a trust.���"The Scrap Book."
DOMINION
Creosoted Wood  Block
PAVING
Wood Block Pavements always attract traffic wherever they are in use.
The reduction in the noise accomplished by the use of Dominion Wood
Blocks greatly improves the value of
stores and offices, facilitates the transaction of business, frequently brings
about higher renting values and higher assessment values. It attracts pedestrian traffic as well as making the
streets a more important thoroughfare for vehicles.
Wood Block Pavement has the extreme advantage of noiselessness and
great durability under heavy traffic.
Competitive tests have repeatedly
shown it to be superior in durability
to granite block, which formerly was
the most durable pavement known. On
streets like Broadway, New York;
Dearborn Street, Chicago; Tremont
Street, Boston, and Market Street,
Philadelphia, it is now demonstrating
the superiority of its resilient resistance to the hammering of heavy
traffic.
ID
Dominion Wood Blocks are Manufactured
in South Vancouver
by the
Dominion  Creosoting   Company,   Limited SATURDAY, FEBRUARY IS, 1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
NINE
^ .'SPOTTING ARENA
The probabilities of a series of
games between the Coast champions
and the Allan Cupholders b"ek good,
Winnipeg is eager to see the Ceeast
champions and communications are
jiow pitting between the two bodies
concerning a series of matches, Amateur hockey is riding on the popular
wave in the I'rairie City and with
gates which net as high as $2,500 it
Should not be such a great financial
undertaking to send a team to Winnipeg.
Over iu Victoria they have already
subscribed $500 leewards making the
trip, providing a Victoria team wills
the championship. Vancouver enthusiasts may be relied upon to make
a generous response sheeiild the team
from    the    Mainland   win   lhe  Coast
honors.
* *    *
Thc lirst real international wrestling tournament ever staged in British Columbia or feer that matter ill
the Dominion will take place at the
Vancouver Athletic Club, Friday
evening of this week. Fourteen grap-
plers from the University 'if Washington will go em the mat with as
many representatives "f the Winged
V. Chet Mclntyre concluded arrangements with the officials of the university last time he was down in
Seattle and some greal sport should
lie witnessed when the boys get together. One of Ihe features 'if the
show will be the tact that it will be
ladies night al lhe' club, The wrestlers will wear full-length tights with
sleeveless uppers anil the fair sex will
have a chance to witness the sport.
The Vancouver physical director
has already got all eef his boyB lined
up for the show. The list includes
all of the local cracks. Si\ minutes
will be allow eel for the preliminaries
while two six minute and one three
minute bouts will rule in lhe finals if
necessary. All told there will be
twenty-one bouts eluring the night
with nothing bul wrestling een the
card. The show will start at 8.30
o'clock sharp.
* *    +
There is a possibility lhat the six-
men games may be adopted by the
Coast League next season. After a
try-out of one week with the seven-
men game the National Hockey Association, which is the big noise in the
East, has reverted to the six-men
game and it loeeks as if il had come
to stay in that part of the country.
According to advices from the East
every team down there with the exception of the Ottawas is in favor of
the six-men game and even the Senators are divided  amongst  themselves.
An Eastern critic explains why. lie
declares that the ice surfaces are not
large enough for seven-men hockey,
as the game is  played  today.  Seven-
tween th ��� Victoria city champions of
the Victoria City Amateur Hockey
League and the Rowing Club, champions of the Vancouver City League.
T. O. Mackay. manager e,f lhe Rowing Club team has received a formal
challenge from the Victoria league,
and the series will be arranged just
as soon as the Capital City schedule
is completed.
The Rowing Club has also another
game >>ii its bands for the Vancouver
anateur championship, Black Brothers' team, champions eef the Vancouver Commercial League, challenged
the Rowing Club to play off for the
cily title and a game has been arranged lor Saturday evening at the
Arena, between ft and 7 o'clock.
A baneuei was tendered the Rowing Club team at the Elysium Hotel
last Saturday night and about thirty
players ,.ml their friends sat down to
a inie^t satisfactory dinner. R. R.
Wallace, manager of lhe Bank of
Montreal, was in the chair. Mayor
Baxter, who was in attendance, presented the Harry Godfrey championship trophy to Captain Burnett, and
Frank Patrick, on behalf of the rink
company, presented the champions
with handsome gold lockets. Speeches
were delivered during lhe eeiurse of
ti'v evening by Fred Taylor, Reggie
Woodward, Tommy Baker and T. 0.
Mackay, and a very pleasant evening
was   spent   by   all   hands.
Quebec toeik a stranglehold on the
Eastern race on Saturday night, and
tlie Coast champipns will in all probability have tin' present cup-holders
t.e Ink horns with in their attempt tee
wrest the hockey championship of the
weirld.
Victoria at the time of writing loeeks
the best bet in the Ceeast race, though
Vancouver still has a chance, Prac-
tically everything depends on the result  of  the'   match  Ibis week.
11 is expected (hat the Coast champions will leave tier the East immediately upon the close of the Ceeast sia-
Bon. Efforts are being made to have
the CUp games played on artificial ice
in Toronto, bill Quebec will have
something t��� > say tee this and it is a
question  if they will consent.
The Coast magnates think that
their request Bhould be grained for
several reasons: the playing ice of the
rink in Quebec is not all thai it might
be and the accommodation for spectators is limited. As the Coast champions will have t'i depend on gales
tee a large extent, the question of rink
accommodation therefore becomes an
important one. Both these matters
are aside from the point of ice, which
in the early spring is a fickle thing
in the East.    Then games at Toronto
Mile  Adeline Genee and a member of her company, Imperial Theatre,
Monday, February 17
men hockey was all right in the days
when the point never went over the
half-way mark and the cover point
scarcely ever ventured out that far;
when the point used to "lift" the
puck from his own stamping ground
to the other end of the rink, ami. perchance, score a lucky goal. But that
day has gone by in professional hockey and there is no indication of its
immediate return.
In the old game the three forwards
in a line, with the rover behind them,
came skating down the ice, passing
and re-passing the puck to beat the
defence. Do they do that today? They
do not. Why not? Because, frankly,
with teams of even strength they
can't play that sort of game because
the forwards check back. The development of thc cheeking back game
and the development of the attacking
defence game has thrown the old
ideas of combination right out of
gear. Incidentally, also, it has made
the ice sheet too small for the seven-
men style.
Frank Patrick is now considering
a change in the style of game for
next winter, and it would not be surprising if an announcement is made
'" that effect before the opening of
the next season.
A series of games, for the coast
amateur hockey championship will be
P'��yed during the next few weeks be-
| would be a test of the ability of the
two clubs on neutral ice.
The suggestion thrown out from
the Coast is a good one, and it will
practically assure the cup series if
Quebec   can   only   see   along   similar
lines.
*    *    *
Canada's entry to the Davis Cup
competitions in England next summer has been cabled by W. F. Suin-
merhayes of Toronto. Secretary of
the Canadian Lawn Tennis Association. The matches will bc played in
June. The sending, of the entry does
| imt necessarily mean that Canada
will be represented.
The organization of a Canadian
team is a matter for the Executive
Committee "f the Canadian Association. There is a feeling in tennis circles that it would bc unwise to send
a team unless it be fairly representative of Canada. The Provincial organizations, the representatives of
which comprise the Executive of the
Canadian Association, are in a position to select the best men. Mr.
Summerhayes is in communication
with Montreal. Ottawa, St. John and
other tennis centres with reference
to the organization of a team. Perhaps the only player who is sure of a
place is R. B. Powell of Victoria,
B.C. Powell compel ed for Canada
at  the Olympic Games of 1908.
There are several players in Canada  who would be entitled to early
consideration were it not the desire
of the association to make the team
a strictly Canadian one. Messrs.
Baird, Sherwell, Eoulkes and others
have demonstrated unusual ability in
the Provincial and national tournaments.     Baird   is   a   Scotsman,   while
Sherwell and Foulkei an- Englishmen. An announcement of a definite nature may be expected from the
tennis governing body in about ten
days. Present indieialions are that
Germany, France, Australia, England and the United States will be
represented at the Davis Cup competitions.
*    *    *
Falconry in Britain, although not
much is heard of it by the outer
world, is still successfully carried on
in quieter parts of the countryside.
The number of devotees of this beautiful and very interesting form of
sport is by no means inconsiderable, if
one remembers the difficulty of carrying on hawking at the present day,
and British falconers were never
keener, though they were once much
more numerous, than they are at present. In Caithness during the past
season���quite a short one��� a falconer with a small stud of eyess peregrins, killed no fewer than 122 brace
of grouse, a result whieh seems to me
astonishingly good, Game-hawking
with peregines yields exceedingly fine
sport, and besides grouse, partridges,
where the country is fairly wild and
open, give excellent results, if the fai.
cons an- well trained anel know their
I business. Mallard and other wild
fowl also afford capital flights with
peregrines, whieh in the wild state
kill many of these birds. The Xorth
American peregrine is, in fact, always
known in the States as the "duck
hawk." Rook-hawking is another very
fine phase of sport, and on Salisbury
Plain and in other places this form of
falconry is well known. I.ark-hawking with merlins is one of the prettiest kinds of speert, and to 111..-���- who
have watched these beautiful and diminutive falcons lleewn at larks on the
open     downs   of   Wiltshire   there     is
nothing more  delightful,    With  the
keen and powerful goshawk, rabbits
and hares are successfully overcome.
Along hedgerows the goshawk is a
marvellously smart performer, and
the way this grand raptorial will nail
a rabbit even as it enters its burrow
must be seen to be believed.���"London Sporting and Dramatic News.
A:     it     st
The accidents of the hunting field
are particularly few compared to the
numbers who go out with hounds,
says an English writer, referring lee
some events of the present season.
The'se Lord Lonsdale (1 think) estimated at 30.000. Take the mortality
"f any population, and it runs generally to about 12 to 20 a 1.000 per annum. I doubt whether fatal hunting
accidents on the 30,000 run to one-
half a unit per thousand. And a good
many in the one-half are not really
due to hunting at all. Thus the late
Marquis of Waterford's death was re.
eeirded iu connection with hunting,
but it had nothing to do with it.
Neither had Miss Eilgate's death last
week, which was also due to drowning when watching for the return
from hunting of her sixty-three years
a Al. I-. 11. father which affords of
itself a curious moral on the comparative dangers of hunting and of doing
nothing In patticul&r.
���i >* St
In the year 35te B.C., on the night
of the birth of Alexander the Great,
an Ephesian, from a desire for future
fame, set fire to the magnificent Temple .1 Diana at Eplnsiis Only the
walls and a few columns were left
standing. He expl.-.tid the deed by a
painful death al the hands of his fellow-citizens, atnl the Ephesians pass-
eel a decree '.' his naitic should nevet
be ui'.-il'ict'cd. It v.:;.-. levealed later
by the Greek historian. Thenpompus
of Chios, And this is the irony of
fame that today, more than two thousand years after, time has preserved
for us the name of Heroslratus. who
destroyed one of the wonders of the
world, while lie is lost that built it.
So, while the marvellous performances of John Jim Thorpe are expunged from all the records, the facts
remain, like the brazen slippers of him
who threw himself into Etna's volcano. What he has done cannot be
e bliteraled, though the retribution of
lime makes clear that he accomplished these things in company in whieh
he had no right. The mills of the goels
have ground him exceeding line, for
the young Indian lacked the essential
element of permanent success in life
���the quality of straightforwardness.
Thc penalty he pays is the greatest
that can be exacted, and there will be
universal regret at such a pitiful ending of a remarkable career. Il is thc
end, too, for the prospects of the professional are not inviting, and Ilis rewards no compensation for the sullied
fame eef the amateur.���"Toronto
Globe."
Hustlers Play First League Game
On Friday night last the Junior
Hustlers' team dropped the first game
of the Sunday School Basketball League to the Kitsilano Methodist. The
game was played in the Hustlers'
gymnasium and "was fast throughout,
the winners having the best of it by
two points only. Owing to sickness
of one of thc Hustlers' team, they
wcre unable to field as strong a team
and were consequently outplayed by
their  large opponents.
"Remember the Alamo"
Dare-devil cowboys, moonlight battles with painted Indians, scalping-
knives, horse stealing���all these,
which in youthful days we used to associate with the history of Texas, are
now things of the past. Even the
peaceful side of cowboy life is disappearing, for the great ranches,
many of them a million acres in extent arc fast being cut up into farms
and market gardens.
A famous Landmark of the old days
of blood and slaughter, however, still
stands boldly in the city of San Antonio, the largest city in Texas. It is
called thc Alamo, and is one of the
early stone churches built by the
Spaniards when they took possession
of that part of America.
In 1835, after being the scene of incessant fighting for years, thc city of
San Antonio was held by the Texans.
The Mexicans, however, had for hing
been looking hungrily across the Rio
Grande River, and at last sent their
renowned general, Santa Ana, to conquer the country. Santa Ana and his,
forces reached San Antonio and besieged it.
The defending garrison e,f Texans
was only a small one. The siege
went on for weeks, and the Texans
found their plight desperate. Hundreds had been slain, provisions wcre
at the lowest There remained no alternative but to retreat into the
Alamo, which was thc building best
adapted for defence.
Inside the Alamo Colonel Travis
and Lieut-Col. Bowie (thc originator
of the famous bowie-knife) called the
roll. They found they had exactly
one hundred and ninety men. Less
than three bushels of corn remained.
Six thousand Mexicans were pouring
a terrific fusilade upon the garrison..
For twenty-four hours lead hissed like
rain upon lhe walls anil through the;
windows. Colonel Travis sent out a
messenger by night with a pathetic;
appeal for assistance. Whether the
messenger succeeded in penetrating
the enemy's lines was never known.
The merciless bombardment continued.
At four o'clock in the afternoon of j
March 3 a lull occurred in the attack on the Alamo. It was taken advantage of by Colonel Travis t" a'
ilre-- hi, force. The old Colonel stood
for sonn time speechless with emotion "My companions," he at length
saiel, "siem necessity compels me t<i
employ a few moments afforded by
this probably brief stoppage in the
fight to make known t" you the- most
solemn anel melancholy, and yet perhaps 'he in, -st welcome fact thai men
can realize. Our fate is sealed.
Within a few days, perhaps within a
few hours, we must be in eternity.
My in.--rtiner has not returned and
! my call remains unanswered. ()ur
business i-- nol t.e make further effort
i tee save our lives, but te. choose the
j manner of our death. Shall we sur-
reiieler anil be deliberately shot without taking ourselves the life of a
Bin gie enemy? Shall we try to
cut our way thneugh ihe Mexican
ranks and be butchered before we
have killed thirty of them? 1 am opposed i" either method, Let us withstand our enemies to the last and kill
as many of them as possible. Kill
thrin as they leap within. Kill them
as they killed our companions, ami let
us continue to kill them as long as
one of us remains alive. I leave every
man to his own choice, though. If
any man prefers to surrender eer tee
attempt tee escape, he may do so. My
own choice is tei stay in the fort and
die for my country, fighting as long
as breath shall remain in my body.
This I -hall do, even if you leave me
alone. Do as you think best, but no
man can die with me without affording me comfort when death comes."
Tbe Colonel then drew a line upon
the ground with his sword. "Every
man who will stand by me come
across the line," he said. With two
exceptions every man crossed over.
One of those to remain was Lieut.-
Col. Bowie, who had been desperately
wounded early in the fight. "Boys,
I'm not able to cross the line," he
said, "but I wish some of you would
lift my cot over there." Feeur men
immediately obeyed his request. The
other man who remained behind,
named Rose, subsequently made his
escape. If it were not for him we
should have had no record of the last
stand in the Alamo.
The Mexicans advanced lo lhe final
attack at four o'clock on the morning
of March 6. They reached the fort,
planted scaling ladders, and began
ascending. After an hour of fierce
| conflict, during which men bad fallen from tbe ladders by the score, the
column of General Castillon succeeded in making a lodgment in the upper
part. This advantage was a mere
prelude to a still more desperate
struggle. The doors of tbe Alain.,
were barricaded by bags of sand as
high as the neck oi a man. "The
Texans fought like devils," says a
Mexican historian, "It was at short
range, muzzle to muzzle, hand to
hand, musket anil rifle, bayonet anil
bowie-knife���all mingled in confusion.
The crash of arms, lhe shouts of defiances, the cries of the wounded and
dying, made a din infernal."
The Texans defended desperately
every inch of the feirt. When, overpowered by numbers, they were forced tei abandon one room, they would
rally in the next and defend it until
resistance became impossible. The
Alamo was entered at daylight, but
the fight did not cease until ten
o'clock. NTot one of the garrison was
spared. The bodies of the heroic Tex.
ans were burned by order of Santa
Ana, but were afterwards reverently
buried by Colonel Seguin, of the Texan Army. "Remember the Alamo"
was the war-cry of the Texans for
the rest of thc war. Santa Ana gained great confidence by his success
and marched on the city of Houston.
Here he met the Texans in force under General Sam Houston. "Remember the Alamo" rang in thc Mexican
leader's ears when he and his force
were overthrown at the battle of
San Jacinto, the battle which practically ended the war and gave Texas
ber independence.
time for the change, which is generally effected when they arc but a few
months old.
It is not the preservation of the fish
but the preservation of the spawn and
the fry that is required.   I'-r this purpose  the  co-operation  of both  countries is necessary.    The salmon making   their   way   northward   along   the
American   sluere   toward    the     straits
leading   to   the   Eraser   are   subjected
to   destructive     methods   of   trapping. I
When  they reach the Canadian coast
the regulations are in a measure pro-1
tective.    The  coast  line  curves  westerly and turns sc.th of the 49th par-i
allel. making another stretch of American  coast   where    the    destructive
appliances are again encountered.    In
the Straits of Georgia and on toward
the spawning beds in thc  Eraser and I
other    streams    regulations    are    en-1
forced,  but  these  arc not  preventing
depletion.    The only effective method
of insuring a supply- of jpawn for the I
hatcheries is to deposit the fry in the
rivers where they will reach  the salt j
water at the right time.    Each year's.
re-stocking    will  bring  a   return    of
adult   salmon   four  years  later.    The
fishing license systems on both sides
of the line should be so designed as
to  require   the   contribution   of   sufficient spawn properly handled to supply  thc  hatcheries  and  prevent    depletion.���"Toronto  Globe."
A Mild Smoke
Church From the Sea
After 306 years thc ancient church
and churchyard at Eceles, Norfolk,
have been given up by the sea.
Many years ago the church and a
village of 66 houses stood at some distance from the sea. but the wai -
gradually encroached on the land, and
in 1604 2.000 acres of land were overwhelmed. All the inhabitants were
drowned, and only the tower of the
church remained visible.
During the recent gale an extraordinary scouring ot the beach removed
every particle' of the teui> uf sand covering the church and churchyard. Ti'''
action of the waves has so worn away
the earth that the bottoms of tin-
graves are now level with the surface, their shapes being plainly discernible in  the solid clay.
On one day no fewer than 36 skele-
i tons were exposed, one of which hail
; the arms crossed on the ter^ast. In
j the ruined church a bronze key and
| escutcheon were found. They are believed to belong to thc church chest.
The tower stood until quite recently, but was then destroyed. The sand
is now returning again, and. the sea
| is taking back what it had given up
for a few days.-���".Norfolk News."
SOLD   EVERYWHERE
SPEND : :: : :
. PLEASANT EVENING AT THE
Fairmont  Pool  Room
[Bryant  Block)
20th AND  MAIN ST.
The best tables in South Vancouver. Everything new. Personal attention by the proprietor, D. D. Den-
man.
Cigars, Tobacco and Candy
TAXICA
416. ABBOTT   i
4W^0;oEu%4388
wo
ILL
Special Rates to Municipal
Hall and other South Vancouver points.
ARENA
Ice
Skating
Band every Evening and Saturday Afternoon
Three
Sessions
Daily
10 a.m.
3 p.m. .
8:15  p.m.
25c
35c
50c
Children 15c
Depletion of Salmon
The salmon of British Columbia arc
an important element in Canada's
food supply, and the threatened depletion of the Fraser and other rivers
is a serious menace. As the salmon
can bc caught only in the spawning
season, and as they spawn but once
and die, ordinary close-season provisions will not be effective. When
thc salmon approach the rivers from
the Pacific, in whose unexplored
depths they have spent their four
years of life, they have ceased to take
food. Spawning is the closing act of
their life history. Fish allowed to escape up the river never return. They
die, and their decomposed bodies are
washed down unnoticed. The fry
hatched out in the agitated rapids die
if transferred too soon to salt water.
It is also fatal for them to be detained in fresh water beyond the natural
-The-
B. C. Telephone Co.
 Limited	
lias opened an office at it> HIGHLAND
EXCHANGE, CORNER TURNER AND
VICTORIA DRIVE, where CONTRACTS
E< )K SERVICE and requests lor moves will
be received by lhe Clerk in charge.
LONG   DISTANCE  SERVICE   to  all
points can .also be had from here.
Xo Payments of monthly bills will be
received. All accounts arc payable at
ihe HEAD OFFICE, 555 SEYMOUR
STREET.
HIGHLAND OFFICE
OPEN EROM
8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. week days, except
Saturday.
8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Saturday.
CLOSED ON SUNDAY.
British Columbia Telephone
Company Limited
CORPORATION OF SOUTH
VANCOUVER
Westminster   Road,  Local   Improvement, Court of Revision
Take notice, that thc meeting of
the Court of Revision advertised to
be held on February 21st. 1913, in
accordance with Westminster Road
Paving By-Law 1912, is hereby cancelled in accordance with Motion 1
of the Special Council Meeting held
on January 27th, 1913; and all persons
concerned shall take this as the official   notification   thereof.
S. H. WEST,
2-8-15 Assessor
CHARACTER CIRCULATION
There is a difference between
the hastily read street car paper
and the paper that is delivered
into the home; the paper that is
absolutely independent and wholesome; that the men respect and
the women admire���that is the
paper whose advertising columns
carry confidence to the reader���
that is the paper whose advertising
patronage is valuable. TEN
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY  15
THE WORKERS' PAGE
Edited by J. W. Wilkinson, to whom all communications should
be  addressed,   Room 210,   Labor Temple, Vancouver, B. C.
There are signs that the strike of
halibut fishermen will soon he settled.
A telegram received in Vancouver
this week by the officials of the Halibut Fishermen's Union brought the
information that a settlement has
been reached in Seattle, and this will
doubtless have some effect on the
local situation. The Seattle men, like
the fishermen here, asked for a raise
from one cent to one and a half cents
per peeund of fish caught by them.
They have compromised on a basis of
one and a quarter cents per pound
caught. The trouble had reached a
stage where something had lo happen. Boats were geeing out with nonunion crews. The fact that the men
were non-union was not the difficulty
as far as the owners of the boats were
concerned, but they knew no more
about catching halibut than any land
lubber does. The result was that captains came back to port ill disgust,
and sometimes minus one or two men
who had been left in Davy Jones'
locker.
ele        ef       *
The fight which the Trades and
Labor Council lias made to get a
minimum wage of $3.00 for X hours
feer the laborers who will be engaged
on the work involved in the i alse
Creek agreement, seems for the time
being to be won. On the night when
the Council was considering the
agreement, many members of the
Trades and Labor Council and the
Civic employee! Union were present
and watched the proceedings with
keen  interest.
*      A     A ,
The Bakers' Union held another of
thc series of Social Evenings which
they have planned for the winter
months, in the Labor Temple last
Saturday night. The usual programme of songs and such was lhe
order of the evening. In addition to
that the bakers make a specialty of
inviting non-union men to these af-
fa.irs, wilh lhe result that they "bag"
a few new members every time, and
the method strikes them as a very
pleasant way of organizing. They
have secured the assistance of a committee from the Trades and Labeir
Council for the purpose of interviewing the City Hospital Board with the
object of trying to induce that body
to use union-made bread in their institution.- The same committee will
endeavor to have union-made bread
supplied to all city institutions where
that  commodity can  be consumed.
A    .#.    A
The Trades Council holds its charter under the "Benevolent Societies
Act" and beneath its charter of incorporation  is  sheltered its material as
upon the unanimous action of thc
rank and file of the membership, and
also that a great deal of the money
of union men is spent on goods made
under unfair conditions, by the wives
of union men who do not understand
what they are buying because their
husbands have not explained the matter to them.
* #   *
The carpenters held a successful
dance last Friday evening. February
7, in the large hall of the Labor Temple. About two hundred dancers
were present, besides a number who
did not shake the gladsome hoof. Supper was served during the evening
and the gathering broke up in thc
wee sma' hours with everybody delighted.
* s)   ���
The Trades Council is anxious to
gather information as to the wages
and working conditions of employes
in shops, stores, offices, etc., for presentation to the Royal Commission
on Labor Conditions in Hritish Columbia, which will sit in Vancouver
em March 7. This information is very
difficult to obtain owing to employes
iu these places fearing tbat by giving
the information they will be brought
into prominence anil lose their jobs.
If anyone is desirous of giving such
information and yet does not wish to
settlement, the Board shall, on the
written application of both parties,
mi as a hoard of arbitration, or arrange for the services of such other
arbitrators as may be acceptable to
both  parties.
*    *    ��
Dr. Prands E. Franczok, Commissioner ot Health for Buffalo, testifying recently before the State Investigating Commission, gave the following evidence: "It is a blot on our
civilization that conditions such as exist in canning factories near Buffalo
are allowed to continue after once being exposed There we have the spectacle of children as young as four
years old working from eight to ten
and eleven hours a day, under conditions that are far from sanitary. I
have learned that women have worked in these canneries 119 hours in one
week, and in one specific instance, I
know of a woman who worked 117
hours and received only $11.75. A
woman working like that, 21 hours
out of 24 hours, would be a physical
wreck in two months. The wages
were so small that the children were
forced into the canneries to add $2
or $3 a week to the support of the
family, and their working hours were
almost as long as those put in by matured women. Often large numbers
of women, girls, boys and men are
housed together in such a way that
there has been a great increase in the
number of young girls who go
astray."
A     *     *
A very pessimistic note as to the
demand for girl labor is taken by the
report of the Birmingham Education
Committee   (England)   which   is  just
come forward personally, if they will j tn hand.    Il stales that the market is
call at  Room 210 Labor Temple,  or  terribly  overstocked  with  girls    wh
write to J. W. Wilkinson. Secretary
of the Trades and Labor Council at
that address, any information given
will be much appreciated and no one
need fear that their name will be
divulged if they do not wish it to be.
The Council is particularly desirous
of gleaning sonie information as to
the working hours and conditions of
bank clerks direct from the lips of
senile of themselves. Enough is
known to prove that the average
workman with a trade union in this
city, has no need to be at all jealous
of a bank clerk, cither as regards
wages or the amount of independence
he is able to retain. But the trouble
is that bank clerks cannot be persuaded to come forward, owing to the
fear of losing the job which they admit is little better than slavery. They
have a tendency to scorn what they
class in. their minds under the general
term "working man." and they don't
seem to be quite certain where they
belong. They have no trade union
and the conditions which they work
under are a true reflection of that
fact.
if       ef       *
Three  thousand  girls  employed  as
telephone operators by the Bell Tel
sk for situations as shorthand and
typewriting clerks in offices. It is
not unusual for 200 or 300 girls to
apply for one office jeeb which is advertised. Throughout the year, the
demand for boys and girls in nearly
every industry has exceeded thc supply, but this applies more especially
to boys and girls just leaving School,
*    *    *
The Trades and Labor Council of
Vancouver has fifty organizations on
ils roll with an aggregate membership
of close upon  eight thousand.
Experiences  in   Haunted
:: Houses ::
i'"""""    ">    .-'ti'wu. i vm    ii.i    linn vi i.ii    us- i      , �� - .        ,: ,
sets, such as its shares in the Labor ! ',ho!le  Comp;Vly "j  Boston   hav��  or
Temple, etc. A notice of motion was
laid on the table at a recent meeting asking that the charter be abolished in order hat the Council could institute boycotts. It was turned down
hy a very decisive majority, who were
not prepared to endanger the certain
value of the Labor Temple for the
imaginary advantages of the boycott.
It was pointed out that a successful
boycott did not depend upon the deliberations  of a  hundred    men,    but
Toronto  Furniture
Company
Furnish   Houses   at   Very   Moderate
Prices
Call and See
M. H. COWAN, Proprietor
3336 MAIN STREET
Phone :    Fairmont 1660
SOUTH VANCOUVER
PRIVATE HOSPITAL
MEDICAL,    SURGICAL,    MATERNITY
Twenty-eighth Ave. and  Main Street
Misses   Halt   and   Westtey,   Graduated   Nurses
Terms Moderate
Phone :  Fairmont 2165
NURSES SENT OUT
IF YOU ARE SICK, CALL ON
ERNEST SHAW, D.C.
(Doctor of Chiropratic)
22nd   Avenue    East,    close   t
25C
Hours : 1.30 till 6.
Avenue    East,
Main Street
Consultation free
Chiropractic succeeds where medi-
.ine fails. For all complaints, whether
acute or chronic, Chiropractic is just
the thing.
Patronize the
Province Renovatory
South Vancouver's Pioneer
Dry-Cleaning and Dyeing Works
Work  and  Prices  Right
4136 Main St.        Cor. of 25th Avenue
South End Cleaning Co.
First-class    Cleaners,    Pressers    and
Tailors
A  trial  will    convince  you.    Prices
Reasonable
Open  Evenings
4375 Main Street   .   South Vancouver
MACK'S
HORSESHOEING AND GENERAL
BLACKSMITHING
SHOEING  A  SPECIALTY
DAVID   S.   McKAY,   MANAGER
South Hill P.O. Box 105
ganized a union, chartered under the
electrical workers affiliated with the
American Federation of Labor. Since
they organized the girls have increased their wages and improved their
hours and general working conditions
In this industry there is great need
for organization, and we hope that
the girls employed by the telephone
companies throughout Canada will
see the advantages of organization,
because only by organization can they
belter their conditions, and if the
i girls have been successful in establishing and maintaining an organization iu the "City of Culture." why can
they not do the same thing in Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver and all
other cities in  the country?
ele       *       *
At the last meeting of the Trades
Council, the Bartenders reported that
they had sent $25 to the striking miners of Vancouver  Island.
e|<        *       *
The "B.C. Federationist Ltd.,"
which is the newspaper of trade union movement in the city, and which
up to the present has been owned entirely by the Trades Council, is now
to be half owned by the B. C. Federation of Labor, that body having purchased a half share in the paper. The
paper is edited in the Labor Temple,
printed in thc basement of that building, and has a weekly circulation of
between 3,500 and 4.000 copies, in addition to a big exchange list.
A      A      A
The International President of the
Cooks and Waiters Union is expected
in Vancouver shortly, and will then
address an open meeting in the Labor
Temple.
e��       el,       *
The Amalgamated Society of Engineers in the Old Country have secured
several increases in wages of late at
the following places: At Irvine wages
are to be advanced two shillings a
week making the rate thirty-four
shillings; at Huddcrsfield two shillings per week advance; at Preston,
one shilling; at Chorley, three shillings: at Chapeltown, one shilling; at
Landore, two shillings now with another shilling in April. In lhe London district it has been mutually
decided to recommend payment for
overtime at rate and a half.
*      A      A
There has been established in Dundee, Scotland, a Conciliation and Arbitration Board "to mediate, and, if
desired, to arbitrate between the employers and the emplnyed of Dundee
and district in any dispute which may
arise." The initiative was taken by
the Citizen's Union, the United Free
Church Presbytery, and other public
bodies during thc prevalence of recent
disputes, and subsequent conferences
led to the question being brought under the notice of the Trades Council
and the Chamber Of Commerce. Subsequent negotiations resulted in the
preparation of the scheme now announced. The Board consists of 12
members, four elected by the Trades
Council, four by the Chamber of Commerce, and four others co-opted
from the general body of citizens by
the other eight members. The chairman will be one of the nominees of
the Chamber of Commerce, and the
vice-chairman will fall to a nominee
of the Trades Council. When a dispute is in progress, or expected, the
Board shall take steps to bring the
parties together, and in the event of
such   conference   failing   to   effect   a
Not so very long ago thc mere
mention of the word "ghosts" excited
general ridicule; today it is otherwise. Thc numerous testimonies of
reliable people to the effect that they
had seen or heard phenomena unaccountable by natural causes at length
led to an earnest and widespread desire to take the matter up and make
a systematic investigation.
Societies devoted to psychical research sprang up in various parts of
the world, and, although no very
"showy" work has been accomplished,
a vast amount of evidence has been
collected, which goes far to proving
the actual existence of haunted houses
and the occurrence of supernatural
(styled by some "superphysical")
manifestations.
The Doctor's Request
It is not, however, of the doings of
research societies I am going to write,
but of my own experiences. The
publication of my book, "Some
Haunted Houses of England and
Wales," by Mr. Eveleigh Nash, some
years ago led to a large number of
people writing to me to know if I
would investigate inexpicable happenings at their houses, and the work so
interested me that I eventually set a
side for it a certain portion of each
year.
One of my most exciting recent
experiences was at a house in a
Southern watering-place, owned by
an old schoolfellow of mine, whom I
will call Dr. B .    At his earnest
request I spent "Twelfth Night with
him."
"I won't tell you what form the
haunting takes place," he said. "I
want you to find out for yourself, and
then we will compare notes."
The house was the last one in a fine
old crescent, that in all probability
had been erected about the beginning
of the nineteenth century. It had thc
deep and rather gloomy basements,
long passages, and narrow staircases
characteristic of that period. In the
daytime it looked cheery enough, but
directly the sun set and the evening
shadows made their appearance it underwent an unpleasant metamorphosis. There is a peculiar something in the atmosphere of a haunted house that sooner or later betrays
itself to me; in this instance it was
most pronounced.
By the Light of a Candle
I at once set to work to locate it,
and at length arrived at the conclusion that it weas most in evidence
on the top landing, back staircases,
and in the basements, which spots I
resolved would constitute my nocturnal beat. As arranged, directly
the household had retired to bed I
crept out of my room and, stealing
softly across the thickly-druggeted
floor, took up my position at the top
of the stairs leading to the basement.
Hour after hour passed in perfect
silence without anything happening,
and I had almost begun to despair of
witnessing any phenomena, when a
sudden noise below set my heart violently throbbing. It was thc sound of
someone scraping���scrape, scrape,
scrape���on a hard, metallic surface.
Impelled by a fascination I could not
resist, I crept gently down the wooden stairs, and, aiming for the direction of the noise, perceived a bluish
white light proceeding from a half-
open door.
Cautiously approaching on tip-toe,
I peered in. Opposite me, eagerly
engaged in examining the contents of
an iron box, was an old woman. She
was kneeling down by the side of a
deep hole, and the light from the
candle she had set beside her, falling
on her face, revealed a countenance
which for sheer devilry would have
been difficult to match.
I could not see what was in the
box, but from the clinking sound she
made as she passed her fingers
through its contents I judged it was
full of coins. After amusing herself
in this way for some seconds, she
carefully closed the lid, placed the
box in thc hole, covered the latter
with a flagstone, and cemented the
crevices.
That done, she gave a low chuckle
of satisfaction and, pitking up the
candle, advanced to where 1 was
standing. In mortal agony lest she
should perceive me, I shrank back.
Out she came���on into thc black,
narrow passage, and, gliding pass me
hcr pale, sinister eyes fixed smilingly at the gloom ahead of her, ascended the staircase. At the top she
paused; there the sound of a violent
scuffle, a chorus of awful, bloodcurdling screams, the rush of several
heavy bodies through the air, a couple of terrific thuds at my feet���and
all was still.
That was enough for one night's
vigil. I lost no time in getting to my
bedroom, where I remained with the
lights "full on" till morning. My doctor friend was greatly interested when
I related to him what had occurred.
"You must be far more clairvoyant
than any of us," he said. "We have
never seen anything, only heard such
noise as you have described���scraping
and screaming. I will have the cellar
excavated at once."
He did in my presence, and under
one of the flagstones we discovered
an iron box. Imagine our astonishment when, on opening it, we saw
fifty golden sovereigns and two sets
of false teeth!
In the Dark
At ray suggestion he buried the
teeth in a church yard and gave the
sovereigns to a local charity. From
that time the hauntings ceased. A
year or so later he wrote to me saying: "After endless inquiries I have
at last ascertained that this house was
once occupied by two old ladies, reputed to be misers. They were frequently quarrelling, and were found
one day at the foot of the kitchen
staircase with   their   necks  broken."
I underwent rather a different experience to this in a house in one of
the London suburbs. Hearing that the
place was supposed to be haunted, I
pretended I wanted to look over it
with the idea of renting it, and with
this plea obtained the keys from the
agent. I entered the premises after
sunset, and armed only with a candle,
was proceeding to make an examination of the place when an icy current
of air blew out the light, and I was
left hopelessly stranded in thc dark���
in the intense dark, for the sky was
heavily clouded, and there were
signs neither of moon nor stars.
To add to my predicament, I could
not find my match-box.
Coming to the conclusion that the
best thing I could do was to remain
where I was, I flopped on the floor,
; nd had just succeeded in making myself tolerably comfortable when the
sound of someone moving about over,
head sent the blood to my heart. Who
on earth���what on earth could it be?
What but a ghost? For assuredly
nothing else would be in such a house
at such an hour. The sounds came
nearer and nearer, over the landing,
down the stairs, and���horror of horrors���into the room towards me.
Nearer, nearer, nearer! At last,
unable to bear the suspense any long,
er the hair on my head literally standing on end, I jumped up, and, in a
voice quivering with emotion, asked
in Heaven's name, who it was and
what it wanted. For some seconds
there was an awful pause, and then a
voice, equally weak and frightened,
faltered out, "That is just what I was
going to ask you!"
An Actual Tragedy
We were both so relieved we burst
out laughing. The owner of tbe voice
was another ghost-hunter, who, oddly
enough, had singled out that house
and night for his investigations. On
hearing me move about downstairs,
he had made sure it was some kind
of phantasm, and had just managed
to screw up sufficient courage to go
and look. We spent the rest of the
night in each other's company, but,
beyond the sound of one or two rats,
there were no other manifestations.
So much for the humorous side of
psychical research work.
Now for the tragic. I was looking
oyer a house one day with the occupier, who had only just commenced
his tenancy.
"I wish you would tell me whether
you have any peculiar sensation when
you enter this room " he said, ushering me into a large bedroom on the
first floor.
"Good heavens!" I exclaimed,
"what's that?"
"What?" my friend asked.
"Why. that thing suspended to the
rafter over your  bed!"
"There's nothing there," he said, his
cheeks ashy pale. "What do you
see?"
"A skeleton!" I gasped. "A skeletop
swaying to and fro!"
And, unable to bear thc sight of it
any longer, I beat a precipitate retreat.
"It's very odd," my friend observed,
a few minutes later, as we helped ourselves to brandy. "I can never see
anything there, though I frequently
have the sensation of being strangled
���of feeling something tight round
my throat. Do you thing someone
hanged himself there?"
I nodded.
Exactly a week afterwards I received a blackedgcd enveloped from my
friend's brother.
"Isn't it dreadful!" the contents
ran. "Charles (that was my friend's
name) was found this morning quite
dead, hanging by a cord to the beam
at the foot of his bed!"
The house is now vacant. Too eerie
a home for me!
c.H.i. c:
Table Showing the Wonderful  Growth  of the
C-H-I-C in less than Twenty Months
50/
/-_ Interest   at   the
/ O P" Annum.
First Loan made April 22nd, 1911	
Loans   made   during   month   of   December. *
1911    HOOOm)
I.0311S   maele  during   month  of June,   1912 $170001X1
u,mf.*?.".. :'u.rin*. .m.��".'.".. ��!. .A.ugus.': $22,000.00
Loans   made   during   month   of   November, -.��� .  -
,. ,���"'-' ���  $34,300.00
I'.iut   of   November,   1912,   Loans   pending ��.���- -_. -.
(being   put   through)  $65,000.00
Loans   niaele   ami   other   Loans   in  process ^
8r��u"* ir.. .mo.m.". .���'. .Noran: $99,300.00
December   15th,   1912.     Loans  made,   and Hsnnm   a��a\,.
������-*���.�����.-��. $225,000.00
Sec Our  Representative
Canadian Home Investment Co.
t,     , r.^ LIMITED
Head Office:     2nd Floor.     PACIFIC      BLK.,     VANCOUVER,     B    C
11 B-Ci   ORi����: Victoria,   Prince   Rupert,   Kamloops,   Nelson
lit and New Westminster
1 PI-TICK OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL NINE O'CLOCK 1
"IT  IS  THE  MAN  IN   THE  OVERALLS
WHO   IS   BUILDING   UP   VANCOUVER"
Every Clothier
Sells Them
We Build Overalls
WHALE
BRAND
SIZE���STRENGTH���ENDURANCE
Made in Vancouver in a UNION shop.    Every
working man in Greater Vancouver should equip himself with Whale Brand garments.   They are built for
wear and tear.
A. WADDINGTON -:- 22 Water Street
F. J.  Rolston G.   II.   Batcheler
Good Old-fashioned Meals (or Hungry Men
Prompt, courteous service In the cleanest, daintiest dining-room
you could imagine.
HARD BY THE MUNICIPAL  HALL,   ON   FRASER   STREET
Special   attention   paid   the   palates of civic officials and  employees.
UNIQUE CAFE
G.   H.  Batcheler,   Manager
Corner   Forty-Ninth   Avenue  and Fraser Street.
The Last Fight in Armor
The last fight in armor occurred
during Napoleon's time. In 1799, the
main army of the French having withdrawn from the town of Aquila, a
body of some four hundred soldiers
remained in the place, whose inhabitants were well disposed toward them.
But the peasants of the surrounding
region were bitterly hostile and, rising in revolt, penetrated the town and
drove the Frenchmen into the for.
tress, which was small and weak, yet
powerful   enough   to  hold   the  insurgents at bay with its cannon.
These insurgents numbered ten or
twelve thousand. They barricaded
the street and loopholed the houses
so that they were safe from attack,
but this did not satisfy them. They
wished to take the fort, which, without artillery, was manifestly impossible. Finally some cunning brain devised a scheme that came near to being successful.
Between the fort and the nearest
houses there lay on the glacis, without carriages and resting upon pieces
of wood, twelve guns which the
French had not had time to take into
the fort with them. The position of
the guns exposed them to fire from
biith sides, so it was not thought they
would bc interfered with, though by
way of precaution two of the guns of
the fortification wcre kept trained
upon them.
One night the sentinel heard a
noise. He fired, but the sound continued and did not immediately cease
after other shots, though it seemed
to draw farther off. When daylight
came it was seen that, under cover of
darkness, the insurgents had reached
the nearest gun, attached a rope to
the breech, and then, fastening the
rope to a capstan in the nearest
house, had attempted to haul the piece
away,
Had it been a military man who
tried thc trick, he would have succeeded, but the peasants did not know
enough to thrust rollers tinder the
gun before hauling, and consequently
the breech dug a furrow into the soil
which soon became deep enough to
stop further progress.
Nevertheless, the besieged were
much irritated by the occurrence and
determined to prevent a repetition of
it. They cannonaded the house from
which the rope issued, but when the
walls fell they found that the capstan
was in the cellar and, consequently,
uninjured, although blocked for the
time by debris. This did not content
them. Then it was that the commandant of the fort remembered having
seen stowed away in it somewhere a
dozen suits of ancient armor. He
selected twelve of his coolest men,
gunners and grenadiers, clothed them
in this armor, and sent them out to
spike the guns.
Covered with steel from head to
foot and carrying spikes and hammers, the men marched heavily, awkwardly, out of the fort and moved in
dead silence toward the coveted guns,
the white smoke curling about their
mailed figures, and bullets pattering
harmlessly against antique helmet and
corselet. Many of the peasants were
horror-struck and believed the strange
figures to be diabolical and invulnerable, while, after the first anxious
moment was passed, their own comrades, looking from the walls, broke
into exultant roars of laughter.
The twelve latter-day knights returned safely from their raid, having
spiked the guns and cut the rope.
Though many times hit, they had but
one wound among them, a slight one
received by a soldier who had wrong
ly adjusted a "brassart," so that it
fell off and left his arm exposed. Thc
insurgents were discouraged; and,
though the blockade continued, there
was little more fighting and the besieged were soon relieved by their
friends.
for
"What?" exclaimed the wealthy
Cleveland papa, who had put his son
to work in order to teach him a few
things. "What? Fired after working
one week?"
,"Ycs, dad.    I  was discharged."
"What   was   the   trouble?"
"They    said  I  was  too green
them."
'���] paid a bill the first time the col-
lector called!"
"Aha! And now you see how foolish you were?"
"Yes, dad.    I'll never do it again.
"My son, you have served your apprenticeship and learned your lesson.
You may now come into the 'Hi00
with me."
When the late Major-Genera! F. D.
Grant was stationed at Fort Sam
Houston as commander of the Department of Texas, the cook of the
household left, and Mrs. Grant spent
several days trying to get another
one.
One day an impudent, incompetent
woman applied. She delivered as hcr
ultimatum that she was to have two
afternoons off, the use of the kitchen
for the entertainment of her society
friends, and various other dispensations. Gen. Grant came into thc room
and heard her.
"Do you speak French?" he asked.
"Who?   Me?   No, sir."
"Do you play on the piano?"
"No, sir."
"Well," said the General, "we cant
think of having a cook who isn't able
to speak French and play on tn<
piano."
The tragedies of early marrieel hie
were illustrated in an incident that occurred not long ago in a Baltini"'0
household.
A young wife sought out her mother-in-law with a most agonized expression and threw herself jflto a
chair  with  an  outburst  of  grid.
"Has anything happened to
Henry?" anxiously asked the mother,
in-law.
"He's taken to staying put at
nights!" wailed the unhappy wife.
"It doesn't seem possible! HOW
long lias this been going on? How
late does he stay away?"
"Well," sobbed the young woman,
"you know he usually leaves the office at 5 o'clock. Night before last he
did not get home until 6. and ��><
night he didn't set foot in the house
until 6.20! Oh, what shall I do? W ��'
shall I do?"
"You used to want to hold W
hand before we were married,' ������
complained. "I'd like to now,' s:1,d
he easily, "hut it weeiilel keep J-'n
from  your  hetiusework,  my  dear. SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY   IS,  V>\3
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
ELEVEN
Geo. B.  Howard,
Mgr.
AVENUE
THEATRE
Main  and   Harris
l'hone : Sey. 7012
WEEK OF FEBRUARY \7 MATINEES WED. & SAT
DEL. S. LAWRENCE and  MAUDE  LEONE
In tin  Sparkling London and New Ye.rk Success
A WOMAN'S WAY
Misa  Leone   .ill wear hcr wonderful $5000 crystal gown
iu this production
PRICES:    25c, 35c, 50c. -       MATINEES���25c. Any Seat
For Quick Service
Many times you are in a hurry for tome thing to prepare quickly
for lunch eer dinner, Below we give you a li-i of the many handy
things we have for you. Our preempt service, i..,,. brings them to
vou when you want them.
SWEET I'i "'I' \ToKS. 3 lb. cans thc can 25c
Hi ii iT I IS SPINACH, 3 lb. cans the can 25c
BABY  BEETS, 3 lb. cans the can 25c
AYLMER CHICKEN 1 lb. can 50c
HEINZ PORK AND BEANS 1 lb. can   20c anel 15c
HEINZ Ti i.M \Tn SOUP 2 tins 25c
ASPARAGUS   HI'S  the can 25c
LIBBY'S LUNCH TONGUE the can 30c
HOLBROOK'S MARAFAT  PEAS package 10c
LIBBY'S MINCE MEAT per lb. 20c
HOTCHKISS FRUITS per can 30c
CUST VRD POWDER two packages for 25c
Fraser & MacLean,
26th Avenue and Main
Phone:   Fairmont 784
SNAP, KNIGHT ROAD
Full-sized  Lot, north of  Home  Road, $1200.    One-third cash;
balance 6, 12 and 18 months.
$100 cash  handles  Building  Lots close to Knight Road.
THOS. Y. LEITCH
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Cor. Knight and Westminster Rds. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone : Fairmont 1653
Heaters for the Winter
The cool long nights are nearly here.    We have a complete line
of heaters.
Cartridges
The shooting season is on.   You don't need to go to the City to buy
your ammunition.   See us.
CD       rrADMCV    Formerly Manitoba
���    0*     \T CAflll EL T Hardware Co.
HARDWARE, PAINTS,  OILS, STOVES, RANGES, ETC.
Joyce Street, COLLINGWOOD
MAIN STREET
33-ft., one Muck north of Rosenburg Road,
Cleared and graded.
PRICE $2,900
$900 cash; balance 12 and 18 months
A few davs onlv
J. A. KERR & CO.
Real Estate Brokers
3332 MAIN STREET        Phone: Fairmont 822
STOP!    LOOK!    LISTEN!
KOBIN  HOOD  FLOUR���$1.75
BUTTER 3   lbs.   for   $1.00
EGGS 3 dozen for $1.00
AYRSHIRE BACON 30c per lb.
WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION
All orders receive our own personal attention
Quick Delivery Assured
LAING &  FIDDES
28th  AVENUE and  MAIN STREET
TEMPLE THEATRE
Cor. 26th AVE. AND MAIN ST.
FIRST CLASS MOTION PICTURES
PROGRAMME CHANGED DAILY
Geo. Jones
HOR8E   SHOER
Lame and Interfering horses will
receive special care and attention.
All kinds of hand-made shoes, running shoes, running plates, toe
plates,  etc.
All horses entrusted to me will receive  every  care  and   attention.
GOOD   WORK   GUARANTEED
571 Beatty Street
H^-^ftT VANC0UVERS LEADING
W"
PLAY HOUSES-
Mile.  Genee
.Mile-. Genee and her superb com.
pany will be at the Imperial Theatre
Monday next, February 17. Of this
world-famous dancer the "< *, r.ui.l
Rapids N'ews" of January is. has the
j following to say:
"Lulled into a trance by thc music
'���i the symphony orchestra, swept
back into ye olden times by maids
with powdered wigs and hoop skirts,
guided through old-fashioned minuets
by gallant lovers with plumed hats in
I gorgeous settings of royal gardens,
I ii   was  difficult   after  witnessing  the
perform! f  Adeline    Genee    al
Powers' Theatre last night to wake
up and realize that we were in an age
of bunny hugs and turkey trots.
The exhibition was a remarkable
presentation both i'i scheme and i-x<-.
cution Et r.i si ene was permeal 'I
"'ith thc personality of Adeline
Genee; the. costumes were fm<n<'~''���'
and illusive Brilliant effects wi re obtained with .i judicious manipulation
ol lights.
1 'i Adeline Genee nothing new can
!>�� -���',',i She i- as dainty, as charming and more accomplished than . vei
\ ' greater tribute can be paid to her
art than to say that al .ill limes shi
appeals to the aesthi tic sensi. She
ne complishi - spectacular and remark
able feats, yel Iln re i- feeling in eve r ���.
movement; she portrays tragedy,
anger and coquetry with her arms and
toes
M. Volinin was well received in his
numbers with Genee and won marked
favor in his s .le, dance. His work is
pleasing and his whirls in mid-air a
decided achievement.
Mile Schmolz was featured in several dances and i- a disciple of Genee
j Her personality is charming and lie r
work promising,
The sttpporl of the orchestra and
well trained corps of ballet is worthy
of i-..nini.ni. They were dominant factors in making the performance one
"i iln- mosl unusual presentations of
its kind to ever \ Mi the city."
Seats are now e.n ..-,*,���
ivel ��� all finely depicted, and will rank
as "ii. ..I Mr, Lawn nce's besl i 'ele-.
The "Hlackie" Daw e.i Howard Russell was another line piece of work
and a  g'.e.el  second  for   Wallingford
\- Fanny Jasper, Maude l.ee,in- did
ii..i have much t<�� do, bul did that
little witli the surety and ease of an
artiste, ;��� i��� ���! confirmed the- good opjn.
i'.ll    eall-e '!    lev    lle-r    work     as     1 'egg \
O'Mara. Mr. Layne, Ethel Corley,
Dimple Kelton, Harry (.'"null. Louis
Ancker among others In-Ipe-el materially i" make the production a huge
success.
For next week, starting next Monday evening, iln- attraction will be
Thompson Buchanan's sparkling comedy of present day life ami manners,
"A Woman's Way." Thi- brilliant
anel original play ran i.er e,VI-r a year
al tin- Lyceum Theatre in New York
with tin- favorite actress,Grace <'.e-..ri_'<-.
a- Marieeii Stanton, anel -he- siarreel in
i!  for two year- on lhe- reeael wilh un-
Canada. Dramatized hy George M
Cohan from iln- very |i"|eiilar -te.rii-
of lhe; >;nt] ��� name', il ;- admitted 1'
be "in- of the- very besl comedies pr".
duced in years anel only equalled bj
that othei clever effort "Brewster's
Millie.n- " We all hat e known a "'.��� I
Rich Quick Wallingford," anil Van.
couver ha - sevi ral of them even m m
Tie.- di light ful pari e.i the plot is th.it
two in -n arc maele- honest through
wihl . a! -' hcmi - they invent ie,r ihe
fleei mn of iln- inhabitants e,i a dull
rountry village Incidentally every
one concerm 'I. ine-luehnu tin- "hi citt-
zens, are made rich. The- play opens
in lhe- hotel of the- town ami -he.w-
the sleepy, dull inhabitants Into
iln-ir midsl suddenly comes Wallingford ami -.-I- them all agog with a
scheme he claims he has developed
I., build a mammoth factory in tin
i. un for the- manufacture of Covered
Carpet Tacks. Blessed with an in.
sinuating manner ami apparent sincerity, like- all men of iii- type, he
-.".ii win- ilu- confidence of the citi-
zens and they all eagerly buy up
stock in the- supposed company Jusi
as Wallingford is about t ��� ��� "clean up"
ami make a "get-away" orders com-
in,-rn-.    I"   pe ur   in   feer   the-   l.'ie-k-,   a
"Broadway Jones"
Geo. M. Cohan's greal American
play. "Broadway Jones," will he the
attraction at the Imperial Theatre
I',"' three nights, commencing on
Piu-selay next, February 18.
������Broadway J.,iK->." thc centre character in (u-,e. M. Cohan's successful
play "f that name, is a Connecticut
youth, who has left a half-interesl in
n Chewing Cum Factory, ami lor five
years has squandered his money
along Broadway.
When iln- play opens he is dollar-
less, bul ha.- iln- reputation of being]
a millionaire. To recoup his fortune
he- decides to marry a rich old widow,
a determination which his friend Wallace is advising him against. Ai this
point the news arrives that a kind
uncle has died and lefl him the oilier
half eef ihe Chewing Gum Factory,
valued at over $1,000,000. The Chewing
Gum Trust offers to buy him out,
but instead of selling he goes to the
little Connecticut town, when- his
factory is located, ami there meets
liis fau- in the pretty book-keeper 'if
ihe concern, who was al-.e hi- uncle's
private secretary, ami "Broadway
Jones" is transformed into "Jackson" Jones e.f Jonesville, for th.- resl
oi hi- happy life.
The rapid fire dialogue of this
comedy is said to he- wonderful. The
audience catches ihe enthusiasm wiih
which Mr. Cohan has imbued his
hero, anil lhe applause is constant
ami inspiring, In fact there is a
laugh almost every minute- in "Broadway Jones."
A      A       it
Avenue Theatre
The faces .if all connected with the
Avenue have heen wreathed in smiles
all the week, for it has been a ease of
EMPRESS
Hastings & Core    Phone Sey. 3907
BEST RESERVED SEATS 25c, 50c
To-ni8ht H. I 5 Matinee Sal. 2.! 5
This  Week-
Hands Across the Sea
N'ext  Week
Get Rich Quick
Wallingford
PANTAGES
Unequalled       Vaudeville       Meant       Pantages
Vaudeville
SHOW ST ARTS--- 2.45. 7.15. and 9.10 p.m
Sirignana's
BANDA  ROMA
17���Musical   Artisti���1"
Elaborate   scenery   ami   beautiful
lighting   effects
5���Other Pantages Acts���5
including
THE GRAY TRIO
U EEK   BEGIKXI.VG   FEB   )7
Wm.   Holliday  and  Robert   Carlin
In descriptive playlet
"The   Battle  of  Bay   Rum"
The Five Loja Troupe of Gymnasts
4���Other Big S. & C. Acts���4
Grace Morrisey in "Broadway Jones" Imperial Theatre.
February 18,  19. 20.
interrupted success, Ai ihe \venue
Maude Leone will appear in this role-
anil il might have been written fe.r
her so closely ehees it iii her attractive personality, ami -he is sure to
make a hit in ii. As Howard Stanton, In-r husband, Del Lawrence will
he- in hi-, element, ami there are- in
addition enough important pari- in
the cast to lit all iln- favorites of the
company with a character ju-i suited
(.. their abilities. The play is a pure
delicious comedy with jtisi the faintest
trace fi a moral lesson arrayed iu the
nay trappings of good wholesome fun.
11 is a dressy piece, ami will allow
tlu- women of ilu- east I,, wear some
elaborate gowns.
Miss Maude Leone "ill wear in
the lasl aei of "A Woman's Way her
famous gown composed entirely "i
crystals���ii weighs 87 pounds���consumed nearly four years in ilu- making, anel is valued al $5,000. Il i- the
only one "i ii- kind iu existence, and
������very woman in Vancouver will ttn-
dountedly wish to see- ii.
syndicate from Chicago offers him
many thousands for the option he
holds mi some worthless land, and he
finds himself in unexpected position
of booming a wild eat scheme into a
genuine success.
DENTISTS
Drs. Howie & Hall
Have   opened   up   new   and   up-to-date
Dental  Parlors  in  the Williama  Block,
Corner Granville and Hastings
We have installed all the latest and
best appliances, and are prepared to
give you the best there is in the dental
profession.
A share of your patronage is
solicited.
Gas    administered    for    the    painleas
extraction  of  teeth-
It. O   Howie, DD.8.
Wm. 8. Hall, DO.*.
Phone   Sey.   3266   for  appointment
Empress Theatre
That most excellent English drama
"Hands Across the Sea" is drawing
very large houses to tin- Empress
Theatre this week where lhe succession  fi  exciting    seem-  i-   meeting
Orpheum Theatre
General Grant's descriptive adjective with regarel tee war has nothing
whatever to eh. with "The- Battle of
Hay Rum," which will he- fought on
the ( Irpheum stage during ihe coming
week hy \\ ilham I lolliday and
Robert Carlin. two well-known .ml
former legitimate actors, one supporting Robert Mantell am1 ihe other
playing a German comedian,
The added feature attraction will be
provided by Tin- Five Loja Troupe ol
Gymnasts whose somersaults ami
oilier hair-raising stunts will keep
(Irpheum patrons , ai 'he- edge "i their
chair.-.
Sada   Wander,  a   pretty  ami    viv-  a	
acious young miss, and (',.-,,ree- Stone,   ��� _       .        __ ..
will present "The  Beauty Shop." fcrHCSt    U.     L.     MaXWell
Allien Moore ami Myrtle Young,
whee hate' been making a big hii along
tin- circuit, will display both beaut)
ami talent Miss Voung ha- tin- distinction "i having posed for Charles
[Dana Gibson, for one of lu- pictures
called "Blonde Beauties "
HAMILTON BROS.
Embalmers and Funeral
Directors
Parlors and Chapel;
6271 FRASER STREET
Phone : Fraser 19
(Day or night)
EXPERT   PIANO  TUNER
Specialties .-   Player    Pianos,    Repairs,     Ton:
Regulating
164 BROADWAY  WEST. VANCOUVER
Phone :     Fairmont 1125
"*'*i                   jlT^
"      'i
��� 9**fjj��
1'*
.
���flftwi
,f   ���
<i     .
\
Scene from "A Wcman's Way," Avenue Theatre, next week
SUCCESS
Business   College
"The School of Certaintiei"
COURSES IN BOOKKEEPING,
SHORTHAND     AND   TYPEWRITING,
CIVIL   SERVICE   AND   ENGLISH
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded
DAY   AN��>   FVENING   CLASSES
HARRIS   BUILDING
Corner Main St. & 10th Ave.
Phone :   Fairmont  207S
"sold out" for every performance of I
"Get Rich Quick Wallingford" thus
far. and feer the twee ur three remaining performances the advance sales
indicate the same. It has been an
unusually line production event for
the Lawrence Stuck Company, ami
every member in the long cast has
acquitted themselves admirably, and
it would be difficult i" conceive of a
better presentation of this snappy,
up-to-date, breezy comedy. Del
Lawrence gave a line delineation of
Wallingford, the impressive speech,
the ingratiating manner, and thc
abounding self confidence of the man
with great applause. There are five
acts and eleven scenes and the wealth
of views presented is a delight ��������� the
eyes. The splendid plot is developed
in an interesting manner. Isabelle
Fletcher, Mela Marsky, Mary Stevens.
Charles Ayres, V. T. Henderson,
Harold Xelson. T. B. Le mis. Louis
Veen Wiethoff, Chauncey Southern
and Frank McQuarrie, all play with
Iheir  accustomed  s'<ill.
'et\!  week will  be offered a  com
plete presentment    of    that    famous
comedy   "Get   Rich   Quick     Wallingford" as produced in New  York City
ami   ..ii   t.eiir   all   over   America   anil
Speech From Throne Before
the Collingwood Parliament
i lontinucd from Page 1 i
ment doing violence to the courtesies
of debate.
(.e ntlemcn of this 1 lonorable 1 roust
', ��� mu | i.ike of thi- gathering
I will i enture to h..p, is the view of
everyone "I you, and a view shared
bj thc ai-nle- public who will watch
e'tir proceedings, not only with curie,-ity but, I hope, wnh deep interest
We arc living in strenuous times. Thc
. ������ life of the small self-contained
ci n i imii!>��� is being merged into the
busy, bustling and compctitivt life of
i greal i ity, ami n., matter whal a
���nan'- trade, business    or    profession
may  la-, there ��i!l In-  tim< if he  i-
to lake his full share "i civic respon-
sibilitie:���when In- will he- called upon
to eeeie.ll lh. merits of the in,':
tions put before him���and perhaps
not ,,nly have i" form opinions for
himself, bul .a ti-,- his influence ami
powers ���.,-' persuasion .ten from the
public platform
It therefore behooves you. ��e-:nle-
m< -i. i \ ery - me , if you��� the ��� -1,:. si
anil   lh-    ye   mgl 51     I      i, ..ill   i..   guidi
your thoughts into logical channels,
to learn in look at a question not eenh
on I,.ah sides hut all round���to learn
i" lueik ahead and anticipate ihe pro-
hable   results  ol  any   measure  whieh
[may lu- pul forward For consideration,
ami ihen. having made up yeepr mind
as in iln- merits of the question, tei
learn how to present it in a manner!
which shall he attractive ami convincing  to others.
Gentlemen���Thi- House will not
fulfill   ils  destiny if it  merely aff. irds
. a couple ,,f hours harmless amusement. I believe thai the training ami
practice here received will be used
"outside" to mould our local and perhaps "tir Imperial future, and therefor.-, gentlemen, I ask you tee enter
up.en your discussions with earnestness, with conviction and to bring to
ihe e-.ensieleraiii.il of the subject before
you all tin- though! ami attention you
can tind the lime to give.
1   mete  with  pride  ami  satisfaction
that  you  have placed   prominently  in
(Continued on Page 12)
Fraser Avenue Notes
A new bakery concern will open
feer business in ihe course ,' a few
day- ai the old stand "t the l
Avenue Bakery, which lately went out
fi leu-nie-- Tin- inv. firm i- adding
le, the ovens ami will have a larger
plant.
* *    *
In -piaknie. of the re-aI estate niar-
ke- \lr J S Kirk, ilu well-known
Fraser Wenue dealer, stan-el thai pro-
perty has been moving more briskly
since ilu- ground i- again above the
-n ,w Hi- ot'tie-i ha- concluded sev-
deals in the past few days, ami
Mi Kirk is sending a plan "I some
local property te a man in ihe Upper
Country wh,. has interested a number of prospective purchasers. Other
offices "ii ihe Avenue are filling in
ihiii li-is in order i" meet 'he demands of ihe >pring trade. Prices
i:,' firm although steadily climbing
* *   *
Chas Field, the groct r wl ise il re
was burnt a few weeks ago, has
secured a mw building near his "hi
-land.    He re-opened this week
ek        *       A
1 Mi Thursday night, February 6,
Mr ami .Mr^, Yeoman, Forty-sixth
Street, entertained a jolly crowd of
friends ai their pretty home. Music,
_ ii-" - ami dancing occupied thc
minds i f all till a Ian- hour.
A        *        He
Tie- Wyn-One Club, an organization of ye,ung people from Si. Luke's
Church, River Roael. meet Friday
night. February 14. at Timlick Mali.
Valentine games will lee the feature
"f the evening.
* *    +
The Jones Millinery and Drygoods
Store has moved from Fifty-sixth
and Fraser.
* *   *
Rev. Owen Rulkley wil! give a
series of lectures during the Lenten
seasein. They will be held in St.
Mary's Hall. Fifty-second Street, at
S pin., on February 13. 20 and 27.
March 6, 13 and 21. The lectures will
be on topics suitable to the season.
* *    *
J. F. Sinclair, thc real estate dealer
��� ef Fifty-second Avenue and Fraser.
has moved his office * ll'u' doors
north. mmm
�����*���-,
mm
1
TEN
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY  15.  1913
THE WORKERS' PAGE
Kdited by J. W. Wilkinson, to whom all communications should
be  addressed,   Room  210,   Labor Temple, Vancouver, B. C.
There are signs that the strike of
halibut fishermen will soon be settled.
A telegram received in Vancouver
this week by the officials of the Halibut Fishermen's Union brought the
information that a settlement has
been reached in Seattle, and this will
doubtless have some effect on the
local situation. The Seattle men, like
the fishermen here, asked for a raise
from one cent to one and a half cents
per pound of fish caught by them.
They have compromised on a basis of
one and a quarter cents per pound
caught. The trouble had reached a
stage where sometliing had io happen. Boats were going out with non_
union crews. The fact that the men
were non-union was not the difficulty
as far as the owners of the boats were
concerned, but they knew no more
about catching halibut than any land
lubber does. The result was that captains came back to port in disgust,
and sometimes minus one or two men
who   had   been   left   in   Davy   Jones'
locker.
* *    *
The fight which the Trades and
Labor Council has made to get a
minimum wage of $3.00 for 8 hours
for the laborers who will be engaged
on the work involved in the 1 alse
Creek agreement, seems for the time
being lo be won, On the night when
the Council was considering the
agreement, many members of the
Trades and Labor Council and the
Civic i.mpluyces Union were present
and watched the proceedings with
keen  interest.
* *    *
The Bakers' Union held another of
the series of Social Evenings which
they have planned for thc winter
months, in thc Labor Temple last
Saturday night. The usual programme of songs and such was the
order of the evening. In addition to
that thc bakers make a specialty of
inviting non-union men to these affairs, with the result that they "bag"
a few new members every time, and
the method strikes them as a very
pleasant way of organizing. They
have secured the assistance of a committee from the Trades and Labor
Council for the purpose of interviewing the City Hospital Board with the
object of trying to induce that body
to use union-made bread in their institution.. -The same committee will
endeavor to have union-made bread
supplied to all city institutions where
that commodity can be consumed.
����       He        ef
The Trades Council holds its charter under the "Benevolent Societies
Act" and beneath its charter of incorporation is sheltered its material assets, such as its shares in the Labor
Temple, etc. A notice of motion was
laid on the table at a recent meeting asking that the charter be abolished in order hat the Council could institute boycotts. It was turned down
by a very decisive majority, who were
not prepared to endanger thc certain
value of the Labor Temple for the
imaginary advantages of the boycott.
It was pointed out that a successful
boycott did not depend upon the deliberations   of a   hundred    men,    but
Toronto  Furniture
Comp
any
Furnish   Houses   at   Very   Moderate
Prices
Call and See
M. H. COWAN, Proprietor
3336 MAIN STREET
Phone :    Fairmont 1660
SOUTH VANCOUVER
PRIVATE HOSPITAL
MEDICAL,    SURGICAL,    MATERNITY
Twenty-eighth  Ave.  and  Main  Street
Misses  Hall  and  Westley,   Graduated   Nurses
Terms Moderate
Phone : Fairmont 2165
NURSES SENT OUT
IF YOU ARE SICK, CALL ON
ERNEST SHAW, D.C.
(Doctor of Chiropratic)
25C   22nd   Avenue   East,   close   to
Main Streel
Hours : 1.30 till 6.   Consultation free
Chiropractic succeeds where medi-
jne fails. For all complaints, whether
acute or chronic, Chiropractic is just
the thing.
Patronize the
Province Renovatory
South Vancouver's Pioneer
Dry-Cleaning and Dyeing Works
Work and Prices Right
4136 Main St.        Cor. of 25th Avenue
South End Cleaning Co.
First-class    Cleaners,    Pressers    and
Tailors
A  trial  will    convince   you.     Prices
Reasonable
Open  Evenings
4375 Main Street   -   South Vancouver
MACK'S
HORSESHOEING AND  GENERAL
BLACKSMITHING
SHOEING  A   SPECIALTY
DAVID   S.   McKAY,   MANAGER
South Hill P.O. Box 105
upon the unanimous action of the
rank and file of the membership, and
also that a great deal of the money
of union men is spent on goods made
under unfair conditions, by the wives
of union men who do not understand
what they are buying because their
husbands have not explained the mat.
ter to them.
* *    ��
The carpenters held a successful
dance last Friday evening, February
7, in the large hall of the Labor Temple. About two hundred dancers
were present, besides a number who
did not shake the gladsome hoof. Supper was served during the evening
and the gathering broke up in the
wee sma' hours with everybody delighted.
* *    *
The  Trades  Council  is  anxious to
gather information as to thc wages
and working conditions of employes
in shops, stores, offices, etc., for presentation to the Royal Commission
on Labor Conditions in British Columbia, which will sit in Vancouver
on March 7. This information is very
difficult to obtain owing to employes
in these places fearing that by giving
the information they will be brought
into prominence and lose their jobs.
If anyone is desirous of giving such
information and yet does not wish to
come forward personally, if they will
call at Room 210 Labor Temple, or
write to J. W. Wilkinson, Secretary
of the Trades and Labor Council at
that address, any information given
will be much appreciated and no one
need fear that their name will be
divulged if they do not wish it to be.
The Council is particularly desirous
of gleaning some information as to
the working hours and conditions of
bank clerks direct from thc lips of
sonic of themselves, Enough is
known to prove that the average
workman with a trade union in this
city, has no need to be at all jealous
of a bank clerk, either as regards
wages or the amount of independence
he is able to retain. But the trouble
is that bank clerks cannot be persuaded to come forward, owing to the
fear of losing the job which they admit is little better than slavery. They
have a tendency to scorn what they
class in. their minds under the general
term "working man," and they don't
seem to be tjuite certain where they
belong. They have no trade union
and the conditions which they work
under are a true reflection of that
fact.
* *    *
Three thousand girls employed as
telephone operators by the Bell Telephone Company in Boston have organized a union, chartered under the
electrical workers affiliated with the
American Federation of Labor. Since
they organized the girls have increased their wages and improved their
hours and general working conditions
In this industry there is great need
for organization, and wc hope that
the girls employed by the telephone
companies throughout Canada will
sec the advantages of organization,
because only by organization can they
better their conditions, and if the
girls have been successful in establishing and maintaining an organization in the "City of Culture." why can
they not do the same thing in Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver and all
other cities in the country?
it   #   *
At  the last meeting of  the Trades
Council, the Bartenders reported that
they had sent $25 to the striking miners of Vancouver Island.
it    %    st
The "B.C. Federationist Ltd.,"
which is the newspaper of trade union movement in the city, and which
up to the present has been owned entirely by the Trades Council, is now
to be half owned by tbe B. C. Federation of Labor, that body having purchased a half share in the paper. The
paper is edited in the Labor Temple,
printed in the basement of that building, and has a weekly circulation of
between 3,5(H) and 4,0<)0 copies, in addition  to a big exchange  list.
A     A     *
The International President of the
Cooks and Waiters Union is expected
in Vancouver shortly, and will then
address an open meeting in the Labor
Temple.
* *      *
The Amalgamated Society of Engineers in the Old Country have secured
several increases in wages of late at
the following places: At Irvine wages
are to be advanced two shillings a
week making the rate thirty-four
shillings; at Huddersfield two shill--
ings per week advance; at Preston,
one shilling; at Chorley, three shillings; at Chapeltown, one shilling; at
Landore, two shillings now With another shilling in April. In the London district it has been mutually
decided to recommend payment for
overtime at rate and a half.
*       *        ek
There has been established in Dundee, Scotland, a Conciliation and Arbitration Board "to mediate, and, if
desired, to arbitrate between the employers and the employed of Dundee
and district in any dispute which may
arise." The initiative was taken by
the Citizen's Union, the United Frete
Church Presbytery, and other public
bodies during the prevalence of recent
disputes, and subsequent conferences
led to the question being brought under the notice of the Trades Council
and the Chamber of Commerce. Subsequent negotiations resulted in the
preparation of the scheme now announced. The Board consists of 12
members, four elected by the Trades
Council, four by the Chamber of Commerce, and four others co-opted
from the general body of citizens by
the other eight members. The chairman will be one of the nominees of
the Chamber of Commerce, and the
vice-chairman will fall to a nominee
of the Trades Council. When a dis
pute is in progress, or expected, the
Board shall take steps to bring the
parties together, and in the event of
such   conference   failing   to   effect  a
settlement, the Board shall, on the
written application of both parlies,
sit as a board of arbitration, or arrange for the services of such other
arbitrators as may be acceptable td
both  parties.
* *    *
Dr. Francis E. Franczok, Commissioner of Health for Buffalo, testifying recently before the State Investigating Commission, gave the follow.
ing evidence: "It Is a blot on our
civilization that conditions such as exist in canning factories near Buffalo
are allowed to continue after once being exposed. There we have the spectacle of children as young as four
years old working from eight to ten
and eleven hours a day, under conditions that arc far from sanitary. I
have learned that women have worked in these canneries 119 hours in one
week, and in one specific instance, I
know of a woman who worked 117
hours and received only $11.75. A
woman working like that, 21 hours
out of 24 hours, would be a physical
wreck in two months. Thc wages
were so small that the children were
forced into the canneries to add $2
or $3 a week to the support of the
family, and their working hours were
almost as long as those put in by matured women. Often large numbers
of women, girls, boys and men are
housed together in such a way that
there has been a great increase in the
number of young girls who go
astray."
* *       ef
A very pessimistic note as to the
demand for girl labor is taken by the
report of the Birmingham Education
Committee (England) which is just
to hand, It states that the market is
terribly overstocked with girls who
ask for situations as shorthand and
typewriting clerks in offices. It is
not unusual for 200 or 300 girls to
apply for one office job which is advertised. Throughout the year, the
demand for boys and girls in nearly
every industry has exceeded the supply, but this applies more especially
to boys and girls just leaving school.
* *    *
The Trades and Labor Council of
Vancouver has fifty organizations on
its roll with an aggregate membership
of close upon  eight thousand,
Experiences  in   Haunted
:: Houses ::
Not so very long ago the mere
mention of the word "ghosts" excited
general ridicule; today it is otherwise. The numerous testimonies of
reliable people to thc effect that they
had seen or heard phenomena unaccountable by natural causes at length
led to an earnest and widespread desire to take the matter up and make
a systematic investigation.
Societies devoted to psychical research sprang up in various parts of
the world, and, although no very
"showy" work has been accomplished,
a vast amount of evidence has been
collected, which goes far to proving
the actual existence of haunted houses
and the occurrence of supernatural
(styled by some "superphysical")
manifestations.
The Doctor's Request
It is not, however, of the doings of
research societies I am going to write,
but of my own experiences. Thet
publication of my book, "Some
Haunted Houses of England and
Wales," by Mr. Eveleigh Nash, some
years ago led to a large number of
people writing to me to know if I
would investigate inexpicable happenings at their houses, and thc work so
interested me that I eventually set a
side for it a certain portion of each
year.
One of my most exciting recent
experiences was at a house in a
Southern watering-place, owned by
an old schoolfellow of mine, whom I
will call Dr. B .   At his earnest
request I spent "Twelfth Night with
him."
"I   won't  tell
haunting   takes
you   what   form   the
place,"   he   said.    "I
want you to find out for yourself, and
then we will compare notes."
The house was the last one in a fine
old crescent, that in all probability
had been erected about the beginning
of the nineteenth century. It had thfe
deep and rather gloomy basements,
long passages, and narrow staircases
characteristic of that period. In the
daytime it looked cheery enough, but
directly the sun set and the evening
shadows made their appearance it underwent an unpleasant metamorphosis. There is a peculiar something in the atmosphere of a haunted house that sooner or later betrays
itself to me; in this Instance it was
most pronounced.
By the Light of a Candle
I at once set to work to locate it,
and at length arrived at the conclusion that it was most in evidence
on the top landing, back staircases,
and in the basements, which spots I
resolved would constitute my nocturnal beat. As arranged, directly
the household had retired to bed I
crept out of my room and, stealing
softly across the thickly-druggeted
floor, took up my position at the top
of the stairs leading to the basement.
Hour after hour passed in perfect
silence without anything happening,
and I had almost begun to despair of
witnessing any phenomena, when a
sudden noise below set my heart violently throbbing. It was the sound of
someone scraping���scrape, scrape,
scrape���on a hard, metallic surface.
Impelled by a fascination I could not
resist, I crept gently down the wooden stairs, and, aiming for the direction of the noise, perceived a bluish
white light proceeding from a half-
open door.
Cautiously approaching on tip-toe,
I peered in. Opposite mc, eagerly
engaged in examining the contents of
an iron box, was an old woman. She
was kneeling down by the side of a
deep hole, and the light from the
candle she had set beside her, falling
on her face, revealed a countenance
which for sheer devilry would have
been difficult to match.
I could not see what was in the
box, but from the clinking sound she
made as she passed her fingers
through its contents I judged it was
full of coins. After amusing herself
in this way for some seconds, she
carefully closed the lid, placed the
box in the hole, covered the latter
with a flagstone, and cemented the
crevices.
That done, she gave a low chuckle
of satisfaction and, picking up the
candle, advanced to where I was
standing. In mortal agony lest she
should perceive me, I shrank back.
Out she came���on into the black,
narrow passage, and, gliding pass me
her pale, sinister eyes fixed smiling.
Iv at the gloom ahead of her, ascended the staircase. At the top she
paused; there the sound of a violent
scuffle, a chorus of awful, bloodcurdling screams, the rush of several
heavy bodies through the air, a couple of terrific thuds at my feet���and
all was still.
That was enough for one night's
vigil. I lost no time in getting to my
bedroom, where I remained with the
lights "full on" till morning. My doctor friend was greatly interested when
I related to him what had occurred.
"You must be far more clairvoyant
than any of us," he said. "We have
never seen anything, only heard such
noise as you have described���scraping
and screaming. I will have the cellar
excavated at once."
He did in my presence, and under
one of the flagstones we discovered
an iron box. Imagine our astonishment when, on opening it, we saw
fifty golden sovereigns and two sets
of false teeth!
In the Dark
At my suggestion he buried the
teeth in a church yard and gave the
sovereigns to a local charity. From
that time the hauntings ceased. A
year or so later he wrote to me saying: "After endless inquiries I have
at last ascertained that this house was
once occupied by two old ladies, reputed to be misers. They were frequently quarrelling, and were found
one day at the foot of the kitchen
staircase with  their necks broken."
I underwent rather a different experience to this in a house in one of
the London suburbs. Hearing that the
place was supposed to be haunted, I
pretended I wanted to look over it
with the idea of renting it, and with
this plea obtained the keys from the
agent. I entered the premises after
sunset, and armed only with a candle,
was proceeding to make an examination of the place when an icy current
of air blew out the light, and I was
left hopelessly stranded in the dark���
in the intense dark, for the sky was
heavily clouded, and there were
signs neither of moon nor stars.
To add to my predicament, I could
not find my match-box.
Coming to the conclusion that the
best thing I could do was to remain
where I was, I flopped on the floor,
;nd had just succeeded in making myself tolerably comfortable when the
sound of someone moving about over,
head sent the blood to my heart. Who
on earth���what on earth could it be?
What but a ghost? For assuredly
nothing else would be in such a house
at such an hour. The sounds came
nearer and nearer, over the landing,
down the stairs, and���horror of horrors���into thc room towards me.      ,
Nearer, nearer, nearerl At last,
unable to bear the suspense any long,
er the hair on my head literally stand,,
ing on end, I jumped up, and, in a
voice quivering with emotion, asked
in Heaven's name, who it was and
what it wanted. For some seconds
there was an awful pause, and then a
voice, equally weak and frightened,
faltered out, "That is just what I was
going to ask you!"
An Actual Tragedy
We were both so relieved we burst
out laughing. Thc owner of the voice
was another ghost-hunter, who, oddly
enough, had singled out that house
and night for his investigations. On
hearing mc move about downstairs,
he had made sure it was some kind
of phantasm, and had just managed
to screw up sufficient courage to go
and look. We spent the rest of the
night in each other's company, but,
beyond the sound of one or two rats,
there were no other manifestations.
So much for the humorous side of
psychical research work.
Now for the tragic. I was looking
over a house one day with the occupier, who had only just commenced
his tenancy.
"I wish you would tell me whether
you have any peculiar sensation when
you enter this room," he said, ushering me into a large bedroom on the
first floor,
"Good heavens!" I exclaimed,
"what's that?"   ���
"What?" my friend asked.
"Why, that thing suspended to the
rafter over your bed!"
"There's nothing there," he said, his
cheeks ashy pale. "What do you
see?"
"A skeleton!" I gasped. "A skeletop
swaying to and fro!"
And, unable to bear the sight of it
any longer, I beat a precipitate retreat.
"It's very odd," my friend observed,
a few minutes later, as we helped ourselves to brandy. "I can never see
anything there, though I frequently
have the sensation of being strangled
���of feeling something tight round
my throat. Do you thing someone
hanged himself there?"
I nodded.
Exactly a week afterwards I received a blackedged enveloped from my
friend's brother.
"Isn't it dreadful!" the contents
ran. "Charles (that was my friend's
name) was found this morning quite
dead, hanging by a cord to the beam
at the foot of his bed!"
The house is now vacant. Too eerie
a home for mel
CHIC.
Table Showing the Wonderful  Growth  of  the
C-H-I-C in less than Twenty Months
50/
/��� Interest    at   the
/O p"  fsnntsm.
Kirst  I.oan maele April 22nit,  1911  ,
Loans   maele   during   month   of   December.
19"   H000.n.j
Loans   made  during   month  of  June,   1912 $17,000.00
Loans   made   during   month    ol    Auguat, *">"> nnn o,
1912  $11,000.00
Loans   made  during  month   ol   November, A- . ���_���
1912   $34,300.00
hnd   of   November,    1912,    Loans   pending ->-- -,-,-   -_
(being   put   through)  $65,000.00
Loans   made   and   other   Loans   in   process ^
Lcr>9,'2ur:ng. .,hr. .mon'h..��' ,te $99,300.00
December   15th,   1912.     Loans   made,   and Jf��OOI- AAA An
1 ' �����5s ��datc $225,000.00
See Our Representative
Canadian Home Investment Co.
���    . ~��� LIMITED
Head Office:     2nd Floor.     PACIFIC      BLK���      VANCOUVER,      B.   C
It B.C.   Offices: Victoria,   Prince   Rupert.   Kamloops,   Nelson
III and  New Westminster
j 01TICE OPEN t;vF;NIN(iS UNTIL NINE O'CLOCK!
"IT  IS  THE  MAN  IN  THE  OVERALLS
WHO   IS  BUILDING   UP  VANCOUVER"
Industry
Every Clothier
SelU Them
We Build Overalls
WHALE
BRAND
SIZE���STRENGTH���ENDURANCE
Made in Vancouver in a UNION shop.    Every
working man in Greater Vancouver should equip himself with Whale Brand garments.   They are built for
wear and tear.
A. WADDINGTON -:- 22 Water Street
P. J. Rolston .  G.  H.  Batcheler
Good Old-fashioned Meals for Hungry Men
Prompt, courteous  service in thc cleanest, daintiest dining-room
you could imagine.
HARD BY THE MUNICIPAL  HALL,   ON  FRASER  STREET
Special   attention  paid  the  palates of civic officials and employees.
UNIQUE CAFE
G.  II.  Batcheler,  Manager
Corner  Forty-Ninth   Avenue  and Fraser Street.
The Last Fight in Armor
Thc last fight in armor occurred
during Napoleon's time. In 1799, the
main army of the French having withdrawn from the town of Aquila, a
body of some four hundred soldiers
remained in the place, whose inhabitants were well disposed toward thenl.
But the peasants of the surrounding
region were bitterly hostile and, rising in revolt, penetrated the town and
drove the Frenchmen into the fortress, which was small and weak, yet
powerful  enough  to  hold  the  insurgents at bay with its cannon.
These insurgents numbered ten or
twelve thousand. They barricaded
the street and loopholed the houses
so that they were safe from attack,
but this did not satisfy them. They
wished to take the fort, which, without artillery, was manifestly impossible. Finally some cunning brain devised a scheme that came near to being successful.
Between the fort and the nearest
houses there lay on the glacis, without carriages and resting upon pieces
of wood, twelve, guns which the
French had not had time to take into
the fort with them. The position of
the guns exposed them to fire from
both sides, so it was not thought they
would be interfered with, though by
way of precaution two of the guns of
the fortification were kept trained
upon them.
One night the sentinel heard a
noise. He fired, but the sound continued and did not immediately cease
after other shots, though it seemed
to draw farther off. When daylight
came it was seen that, under cover of
darkness, the insurgents had reached
the nearest gun, attached a rope to
the breech, and then, fastening the
rope to a capstan in the nearest
house, had attempted to haul the piece
away.
Had it been a military man who
tried the trick, he would have succeeded, but the peasants did not know
enough to thrust rollers under the
gun before hauling, and consequently
the breech dug a furrow into the soil
which soon became deep enough to
stop further progress,
Nevertheless, the besieged were
much irritated by the occurrence and
determined to prevent a repetition of
it. They cannonaded the house from
which the rope issued, but when the
walls fell they found that the capstan
was in the cellar and, consequently,
uninjured, although blocked for the
time by debris. This did not content
them. Then it was that the commandant of the fort remembered having
seen stowed away in it somewhere a
dozen suits of ancient armor. He
selected twelve of his coolest men,
gunners and grenadiers, clothed them
in this armor, and sent them out to
spike the guns.
Covered with steel from head to
foot and carrying spikes and hammers, the men marched heavily, awkwardly, out of the fort and moved in
dead silence toward the coveted guns,
the white smoke curling about their
mailed figures, and bullets pattering
harmlessly against antique helmet and
corselet. Many of the peasants were
horror-struck and believed the strange
figures to be diabolical and invulnerable, while, after the first anxious
moment was passed, their own comrade?, looking from the walls, broke
into exultant roars of laughter.
The twelve latter-day knights returned safely from their raid, having
spiked the" guns and cut the ropd.
Though many times hit, they had but
one wound among them, a slight one
received by a soldier who had wrong
ly adjusted a "brassart," so that it
fell off and left his arm exposed. The
insurgents were discouraged; and,
though the blockade continued, there
was little more fighting and the besieged were soon relieved by their
friends.
"What?"    exclaimed    the    wealthy
Cleveland papa, who had put his son
to work in order to teach him a few
things.   "What?   Fired after working
one week?"
"Yes, dad.    I was discharged."
"What   was  the   trouble?"
"They    said  I  was  too green    for
them."
"1 paid a bill the first time the collector called!"
"Aha! And now you see how foolish you were?" . ���
"Yes, dad. I'll never do it again
"My son, you have served your apprenticeship and learned your lesson.
You may now come into thc office
with me."
When the late Major-General F. D.
Grant was stationed at Fort Pa"1
Houston as commander of the Department of Texas, thc cook of tlie
household left, and Mrs. Grant spent
several days trying to get anothef
one.
One day an impudent, incompetent
woman applied. She delivered as lie'
ultimatum that she was to have two
afternoons off, the use of the kitchen
for the entertainment of her society
friends, and various other dispensations. Gen. Grant came into the room
and heard her.
"Do you speak French?" he asked
"Who?    Me?   No, sir."
"Do you play on the piano?"
"No, sir."
"Well," said the General, "we can1
think of having a cook who isn't able
to speak French and play on the
piano."
The tragedies of early married h'e
were illustrated in an incident that occurred not long ago in a Baltimore
household.
A young wife sought out her mother-in-law with a most agonized expression and threw herself into a
chair  with  an  outburst  of grief.
"Has anything happened ,0
Henry?" anxiously asked the mother-
in-law.
"He's taken to staying out &'
nights!" wailed the unhappy wife.
"It doesn't seem possible! How
long has this been going on? Ho"'
late does he stay away?"
"Well," sobbed the young womai)'
"you know he usually leaves the office at 5 o'clock. Night before last he
did not get home until 6, and last
night he didn't set foot in the hoo"
until 6.20! Oh, what shall I do? Wh*1
shall I do?"
"You used to want to hold fl>>'
hand before we were married," su'
complained. "I'd like to now," sat"
lie easily, "but it would keep }���'���'
from  your  housework, my  dear." SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY  15, 1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
ELEVEN
Geo.  B.  Howard,
Mgr.
AVENUE
THEATRE
Main  and   Harris
Phone : Sey. 7012
WEEK OF FEBRUARY 17 MATINEES WED. & SAT.
DEL. S. LAWRENCE and MAUDE LEONE
In th.' Sparkling London and New Yurk Success
A WOMAN'S WAY
Mi-- Leone will wear her wonderful $5000 crystal gown
iu this production
PRICES:    25c, 35c, 50c.
MATINEES���25c. Any Seat
For Quick Service
Many tinier you are in a hurry feer some thing to prepare quickly
for lunch or dinner, Below we give you a list of the many handy
things we have for you. Our prompt service, too, brings them to
ye ni when you want them.
SWEET POTATOES, 3 lb, cans the can 25c
BOOTH'S SPINACH, 3 lb. cans the can 25c
BABY BEETS, 3 lb. cans the can 25.-.
AYLMER CHICKEN 1 lb. can 50c
HEINZ PORK AND BEANS 1 lb. can   20c and 15c
HEINZ TOMATO SOUP 2 tins 25c
VSPARAGUS TIPS the can 25c
LIBBY'S LUNCH TONGUE the can 30c
HOLBROOK'S MARAFAT PEAS package 10c
LIBBY'S MINCE MEAT per lb. 20c
HOTCHKISS FRUITS per can 30c
CUSTAR D POWDER two packages i<tr 25c
Fraser & MacLean,
26th Avenue and Main
Phone:   Fairmont 784
SNAP, KNIGHT ROAD
Full-sized  Lot, north of  Home  Road, $1200.    One-third cash;
balance 6, 12 and 18 months.
$100 cash handles  Building Lots close to Knight Road.
THOS. Y. LEITCH
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Cor. Knight and Westminster Rds. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone : Fairmont 1653
Heaters for the Winter
The cool long nights are nearly here.   We have a complete line
of heaters.
Cartridges
The shooting season is on.   You don't need to go to the City to buy
your ammunition.   See us.
CD       CCADWCV     Formerly Manitoba
���    Da    rCMIfllCiT Hardware Co.
HARDWARE, PAINTS, OILS, STOVES, RANGES, ETC.
Joyce Street, COLLINGWOOD
MAIN STREET
33-ft., one block north of Rosenburg Road,
Cleared and graded.
PRICE $2,900
$900 cash; balance 12 and 18 months
A few days only
J. A. KERR & CO.
Real Estate Brokers
3332 MAIN STREET        Phone: Fairmont 822
STOP!   LOOK!   LISTEN!
ROBIN HOOD FLOUR���$1.75
BUTTER 3   lbs.   for   $1.00
EGGS 3 dozen for $1.00
AYRSHIRE BACON 30c per lb.
WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION
All orders receive our own personal attention
Quick Delivery Assured
LAING & FIDDES
28th  AVENUE and  MAIN STREET
TEMPLE THEATRE
Cor. 26th AVE. AND MAIN ST.
FIRST CLASS MOTION PICTURES
PROGRAMME CHANGED DAILY
Geo. Jones
HORSE   8HOER
Lame and Interfering horses will
receive special care and attention.
All kinda ot hand-made shoes, running shoes, running plates, toe
platea, etc.
All horsea entrusted to me will receive every care and attention.
GOOD   WORK   GUARANTEED
571 Beatty Street
He~f,.fiTVAN<0UVegS LEADING
a^HA  p^Y HQjjseg-
Mile. Genee
Mile. Genee and her superb ceni-
pany will bc al the Imperial Theatre
Monday next, February \7 Of this
world-famous dancer tin- "('.rand
Rapids New-" of January IX, has the
following 1" lay:
"Lulled Into a trance ley the- music
��� ef the symphony orchestra, swept
back into ye' olden times by maids
��iili powdered wigs and hoop skirts,
guided through old-fashioned minuets
ley gall.nn lovers with plumed ban in
gorgeous settings of royal gardens,
it was difficult aii.r witnessing the
performance of Adeline Genee at
Powers' Theatn last night to wake
up and realize that wc wen- in an ag
of( bunny hugs and turkey trots.
The exhibition was a remarkable
presentation both in scheme and exe.
anion. Every scene was permeated
with the personality of Adeline
(ee-ne-e-; the costumes were exquisite
and illusive. Brilliant effects were obtained with a judicious manipulation
of lights.
Of Adeline Genee nothing new can
be said. She is as dainty, as charming and me,re accomplished than ever.
No greater tribute can be paid to her
art than to say thai al all times she
appeals to iln- aesthetic Bense. She
accomplishes spectacular anil remarkable feats, yel there is feeling in ever-,
movement; she p.-nrays tragedy,
anger anil coquetry with hcr arm- and
toes.
M. V'eliniii was ��,ll received in hi-
numbers with Genee anel won marked
jfaveer in hi, solo dance. Ilis work is
pleasing anil hi- whirls in miel-air a
decided achievement.
Mile. Schmolz wa- featured in several dances and j- ,-, disciple 'ef Genee
I Her personality is charming ami her
| work promising.
The'  support  of the orchestra ami
well trained corps of ballet is worthy
| eel comment. They were dominant fac-
Itors in making the performance one
'it ilu- mosl unusual presentations nf
its kind t.e ever visit the city."
Seai> are now nn sale,
.'���e'li all finely eh-pie-ie-el. ale! will rank
a- ..in- e.i' Mr. Lawrence's besl ne],--.
Tin "Blackie" Dav. of He.war.l Rui
-ell was another fine piece of we.rk
and a good second for Wallingford.
\- Fanny Jasper, Maude Leone did
ii'el have mm li In eh,. 1ml eli'l lhat
little wiih the surety ami ease of an
artiste, ami confirmed the' good opin-
i-eii  caused hy  he-r  work  as   Peggy
O'Mara Mr. I.aym-. Ethel Corley,
Dimple Helton, Harry Cornell, Louis
Ancker among others helped materially iee make iln- production a huge
success
For next week, starting next Monday evening, tin attraction will be
Thompson Buchanan's sparkling comedy uf present elay life and manners,
"A \\ "man's Way." Thi- brilliant
ami "riginal play ran for hut a year
at the Lyceum Theatre in Mew Yeerk
wiih the favorite actress,Grace George,
as Marieeii Stanton, anel -In- -larre-el in
il leer two years em the road wiih un-
Canada. Dramatized hy George M
Cohan from tbe very popular stories
e,f  the   -am     name,   il   i-   admitted   t'
he one e.f ihe very besl comedies pree-
duced in years anel only equalled b\
thai 'ether clever effort "Brewsi ri
Millions." We all have known a "Gel
Rich Quick Wallingford," ami Van.
couver ha- several "i them even now
Tin' delightful pari of the plol i- thai
i��e, in n gre maele honest through
wild cal schemes they invent for the
fleecing e,i the inhabitants of a dull
country village, Incidentally every
one concerned, including the old citizen-, ar.' made rich. Tin play opens
in the hotel 'et tin town and shows
the sleepy, elttll inhabitants Into
tbeit midst suddenly comes Wallingford ami sets them all agog with a
scheme he claims he ha- developed
tn build a mammoth factory in iln
town feer the manufacture of Covered
Carpet Tacks. Blessed with an Insinuating manner and apparent sincerity, like all men nf his type, he
seeem win the confidence of the citizens ami they all eagerly buy up
stock in ihe supposed company, Just
las Wallingford is about tee ���clean up"
ami make a  "get-away" eenlcrs  com-
Imence   tie   pe.ur  in   fur   the-   lacks,  a
SUCCESS
Business  College
"The School of Certainties"
COURSES        IN BOOKKEEPINO,
SHORTHAND    AND   TYPEWRITING,
CIVIL   SERVICE   AND   ENGLISH
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded
DAV  AN5  FVENING CLASSES
HARRIS   BUILDING
Oorner Main St. & 10th Ave.
Phone :   Fairmont 2075
"Broadway Jones"
Geo. M. Cohan's great American
play. "Broadway Junes." will he the
attraction at the Imperial Theatre
feer three nights, commencing on
1 nesday next. February IS.
"Broadway Junes." the centre character in Geo. M. Cohan's .successful
play eif thai name, is a Connecticut
youth, wlin has left a half-interest in
a Chewing Gum Factory, ami fnr five
years has squandered his money
along Broadway.
When the play opens he is dollar-
less. but has the reputation of being
a millionaire. Tn recoup his fortune
he decides in marry a rich old widow,
a determination which his friend Wallace is advising him against. At this
point the news arrives that a kind
uncle has tlied and left him the other
half of the Chewing Gum Factory,
valued at over $1,000,000. The Chewing
Gum Trust e.ffers in huy him nut.
but instead eef selling he goes tn the
little Connecticut town, where his
factory is located, ami there meets
his fate in the pretty book-keeper eef
the concern, who was also his uncle's
private secretary, and "Broadway
Jeincs" is transformed into "Jackson" Jones of Jouesville. for th.' rest
if his happy life.
The rapid fire dialogue nf this
comedy is said t.i he wonderful. The
audience catches the enthusiasm with
which Mr. Cohan has imbued his
hero, and the applause is constant
and inspiring. In fact there is a
laugh alnn;st every minute in "Broadway Jones."
*    *    *
Avenue Theatre
The faces of all connected with the
Avenue have been wreathed in smiles
all the week, for it has been a case of
EMPRESS
H.atingt & Gore    Phone Sey. 3907
BEST RESERVED SEATS 25c, 50c
To-nighl 6.15 Matinee Sal. 2.! 5
This week-
Hands Across the Sea
Next Week
Get Rich Quick
Wallingford
PANTAGES
Unequalled      Vaudeville       Means      Pantages
VaudeviMe
SHOW STARTS---2.45. 7.15. and  9Wp.ni.
Sirignana'-
BANDA ROMA
1"���Musical    Artist-���I"
Elaborate   icenery   ami   beautiful
lighting   effects
5���Other Pantages Acts���5
including
THE GRAY TRIO
Grace Morrisey in "Broadway Jones" Imperial Theatre,
February 18, 19, 20.
interrupted success. Al the Avenue
Maude Leone will appear in this role
and it might have been written for
her SO closely dues it lit her attractive personality, ami she is sure tn
make a hii in it. As Howard Stanton, her husband, Dei Lawrence will
be in his element, and there are in
addition enough important parts in
ihe east tn lit all the favorites of the
company with a character just suited
to their abilities. The play is a pure
delicious comedy with just the faintest
trace oi a moral lesson arrayed iu the
gay trappings of good wholesome fun.
It is a dressy piece, anel will alleew
lhe women of the east tn wear some
elaborate gowns.
Miss Maude Leone will wear in
the last acl of "A Woman's Way' her
famous gown composed entirely eef
crystals���it weighs 87 pounds���con-
stimed nearly four years in the making, and is valued at $5,000. It is the
unly one of its kind in existence, and
every woman in Vancouver will un-
douotedly  wish  tn see it.
Empress Theatre
Thai must excellent English drama
"Hands Across lhe Sea" is drawing
very large houses to the Empress
Theatre this week where the succession  "f  exciting    scenes  is  meeting
syndicate from Chicago offers him
many thousands for the option he
holds on some worthless land, and he
finds himself in unexpected position
of booming a wild cat scheme into a
genuine success.
*       A       A
Orpheum Theatre
General Grant's descriptive adjective with regard to war has nothing
whatever in do wilh "The Battle of
Bay Rum." which will be fought mi
ihe Orpheum stage eluring the coming
week hy William Hnlliday and
Robert Carlin. two well-known anil
former legitimate actors, one sup-
porting Robert Mantell ami the other
playing a German comedian.
The added feature attraction will be
provided by The Five Loja Troupe of
Gymnasts whose somersaults and
nlher hair-raising stunts will keep
( Irpheum patmns nn the edge eef their
chairs.
Sada Wander, a pretty ami vivacious young miss, and George Stone,
will  present  "The   Beauty  Shop."
Albert Moore and Myrtle Young,
who have been making a big hit along
ih' circuit, will display both beauty
and talent. Miss Young has the dis-
tinction of having pie-eel for Charles
Dana Gibson, feer one nf his pictures
called "Blonde Beauties."
WEEK  BEGINNING  FEB,  17
Wm.  Holliday and   Robert  Carlin
In  descriptive  playlet
"The  Battle  of  Bay  Rum"
The Five Loja Troupe of Gymnasts
4���Other Big S. & C. Acts���4
DENTISTS
Drs. Howie & Hall
Have   opened   up   new   and   up-to-date
Dental Parlors in the Williams Block,
Corner Granville and Hastings
We have installed all the latest and
best appliances, and are prepared to
give you the best there ia in the dental
profession.
A share of your patronage is
solicited.
Gas    administered    for   the    painless
extraction of teeth.
R. O   Howie, DD.S.
Wm. 6. Hall, Dat.
Phone  Sey.  3266  for  appointment
HAMILTON BROS.
Embalmers and Funeral
Directors
Parlors and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Phone : Fraser 19
(Day or night)
Ernest D. L. Maxwell
EXPERT PIANO  TUNER
Specialtiea :   Player    Pianos.    Repaira,    Ten:
Regulating
164 BROADWAY WEST, VANCOUVER
Phone :    Fairmont  1125
Speech From Throne Before
the Collingwood Parliament
(Continued from Page 1 <
fl&H&S
peuXorV,.
'      ' i.e>.,��
Zr.%f.     �� CT *
Scene from "A Wcman's Way." Avenue Theatre, next week
"seild out" for every performance oi
"Get Rich Quick Wallingford" thus
far, and fur the two eir three remaining performances the advance sales
indicate the same. It has been an
unusually fine production event for
the Lawrence Stock Company, and
every member in the long east has
acquitted themselves admirably, and
it would be difficult in conceive of a
better presentation of this snappy,
up-to-date, breezy comedy. Del
Lawrence gave a fine delineation of
Wallingford. the impressive speech,
the ingratiating manner, and the
abounding self confidence of the man
with great applause. There are five
acts and eleven scenes and the wealth
of views presented is a delight to the
eyes. The splendid plot is developed
in an interesting manner. Isabelle
Fletcher, Meta Marsky, Mary Stevens.
Charles Ayres, V. T. Henderson,
Harold Xelson, T. B. L.=ftus. Louis
Von W'ieilieiff, Chauncej Southern
and Frank McQuarrie, all play with
their accustomed s'cill.   .
Next week will be offered a complete presentment of that famous
comedy "Get Rich Quick Wallingford" as produced in New York City
and   on   tour   all   over   America   and
ment doing violence te. the courtesies
of debate.
Gentlemen of this Honorable House
���The  view   1   lake  of  Ihis  gathering
I will venture to hope is the view of
everyone of yuu. and a view shared
by the ouside public who will watch
our proceedings,  n. ��� t  , >111 >- with  cur-
iosity but, I hope, with deep interest.
W'e are living in strenuous times. Thc
village life of the small self-contained
community is being merged into the
liu-y. bustling and competitive life of
i great city, and no matter what a
man's trade, business eer profession
may be, there will be times���if he is
to take his full share of civic responsibilities���when he will be called upon
in weigh the merits of the propositions pui before him���and perhaps
met only have t.e form opinions for
himself, but e,t use his influence and
powers 'i persuasion even from the
public platform.
It therefore behooves yem. gentle-
nun, every one of you���the oldest
anel the youngest���lee learn to guide
your thoughts into logical channels,
In learn to look at a question not only
een both sides but all round���to lcarii
1" look ahead and anticipate the probable results of any measure which
may be put forward for consideration,
and then, having made up your mind
as to the merits of the question, tei
learn how to present it in a manner
which shall be attractive and convincing to others.
Gentlemen���This House will not
fulfil! its destiny if it merely affords
a couple of hours harmless amusement. 1 believe that the training and
practice here received will be used
"outside" t.i mould our local and perhaps our Imperial future, and therefore, gentlemen. I ask you to enter
up.en y.eur discussions with earnest-
iu --. with conviction and t'i bring to
ihe consideration of the subject before
you all the thought and attention vou
can find the time to give.
I note with pride and satisfaction
that you have placed prominently in
(Continued on Page 12)
Fraser Avenue Notes
A new bakery concern will open
for business in the course of a tew
days at the old stand of the Fraser
Avenue Bakery, which lately went out
of business. The new firm i- adding
to the eevens and will have a largei
plant.
* *    .
In speaking eel' the real elate market Mr. .1. S. Kirk, the well-known
Fraser Avenue dealer, stated that property  has  been moving meere briskly
i since the groiuul is again above the
snow. Hi- office has concluded several deals in the past few days, and
Mr Kirk is sending a plan eel seime
local property tei a man in the L'pper
Country who has interested a number of prospective purchasers. Other
offices   eiii   the   Avenue   are   filling  in
j their lists in order to meet the ele-
mands of the spring trade. Prices
.ne  firm although steadily climbing.
���le A        *
Chas. Field, the grocer whose store
was burnt a few week- ago, has
secured a new building mar his old
stand,    He re-opened this week.
* *   *
<)n Thursday night, February 6.
Mr. and Mrs. Yeoman, Forty-sixth
Street,  entertained  a  jolly  crowd  of
friends at their pretty home.    Music,
games    and    dancing    occupied    the
; minds of all till a late hour.
* *        el.
The Wyn-One Club, an organiza-
| tion of young people from St. Luke's
Church. River Road, meet Friday
night, February 14, at Timlick Hall.
Valentine games will be the feature
of the evening.
* *    *
The Jones Millinery and Drygoods
Store has moved from Fifty-sixth
and Fraser.
* *   *
Rev. Owen Bulkier will give a
scries of lectures during the Lenten
season. They will be held in St.
Mary's Hall, Fifty-second Street, at
8 p.m., nn February 13, 20 and 27.
March 6, 13 and 21. The lectures will
be on  teipics suitable to the season.
ele      *      A
J. V. Sinclair, the real estate dealer
of Fifty-second Avenue and Fraser,
has moved his office a few doors
north. .   . TWELVE
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY IS. 1913
I
Speech From Throne Before
the Collingwood Parliament
(Continued freun Page 11)
your rules that "thc dignity of the
chair must be upheld." That, gentlemen���properly carried out���will not
be a personal tribute to me, but a tribute to yourselves, for 1 believe the
desire of every member is to so order proceedings here as to win the
admiration, and possibly provoke the
imitation, of other cities in liritish
Columbia.
I will say, in conclusion, gentlemen,
that my conviction is, that if the
whole Province was dotted with debating societies we should see a
purifying and elevating of our public
life.    (Cheers).
On the million of the Premier it was
agreed that "Mr. Speaker be thanked for his address and that the same
be entered on the minutes."
Then came proceedings which
showed that members take matters
seriously,
The member for Grand Forks complained that no minister was provided for education eer for art. The Premier said that the Cabinet was not
yet complete.
Notice of this question  was given:
"Does the Government justify the
expenditure entailed in sending the
Minister of Public Works to London
to attend the Congress of International Highways Associations���or the
achievement of making highways and
the border of our neighbors, the United States of America?"
The Minister of Finance will reply
tei this tonight.
An honorable member asked if Mr.
Crehan, the South Vancouver Auditor,
was justified in threatening those
who expressed an opinion on the outcome of the inquiry. The Minister
of Justice said Mr. Crehan���in his official capacity���bad no right to inter
fere with a proper expression of
opinion.
Other question* were put. The
Premier read "The King's Speech,"
which was as  follows:
GENTLEMEN OF THE HOUSE
OF COMMONS:���it has been .a
source of the deepest satisfaction to
me to see the almost universal prosperity which reigns throughout the
Dominion, and to witness the energy
and enterprise which are shown in tbe
developing of thc rich resources of the
land,
It is most gratifying to observe that
the trade of the Dominion is increasing rapidly and steadily, the aggregate trade for the last fiscal year being the largest on record. During
the present year the same steady increase has been noted, and it is anticipated that the total volume of our
trade for the present fiscal year will
greatly surpass that of any previous
year in our history.
The revenues of the Dominion continue to expand, and in every branch
of business anel industry there is a
remarkable activity which gives assurance of continued progress and
prosperity.
A copious and welcome stream of
immigration has poured into our
country during the past summer. The
volume of immigration during the
present year is greater than during
any corresponding period of our history, and in larger measure than
usual it has been drawn from the
British Islands.
The labors of the husbandman have
been blessed with an ample return;
and, although in some districts the
weather has been unpropitious for the
harvest, it is expected that the total
value of our field crops will be greater than in any previous year.
Important discussions will take
place and conditions will be disclosed
which render it imperative that thi'
effective naval forces of the Empire
should be strengthened without delay.
My advisers are convinced that it is
the duty of Canada at this juncture
to afford reasonable and necessary aid
for tbat purpose. A bill will be introduced accordingly.
It is abundantly evident that the
highways of Canada constitute an important part of an efficient scheme of
transportation. The necessity for improving our existing facilities in this
regard is manifest and a bill will be
introduced for the purpose of enabling the Dominion to co-operate with
the Provinces in the accomplishment
of Ibis  most desirable  purpose.
It is satisfactory tei know that the
proposal of my government to cooperate with the governments of the
various Provinces in promoting the
agricultural industry has met with
hearty approval. The appropriations
already made in connection therewith
liave proved to be of marked benefit
to the country. After a careful study
of the whole question my advisers
are convinced that co-operatiein with
the Provinces on well-defined terms
and conditions will achieve the best
results along the lines of agricultural
instruction. Any such policy to be
effective must bc continuous. Accordingly, a Bill will bc introduced
by which a substantial sum of money
will be set apart far the purpose of
assisting the Provinces for a term of
years in this highly important national  work.
It is extremely necessary and desirable that the Constitution Act should
be amended in a number of important matters. There will, therefore,
be submitted for your consideration
and approval a Bill amending and
consolidating the Constitution Act.
Several other Bills will be submitted,   including   the   following:
A  Hill governing ELECTIONS.
A Bill amending the IMMIGRATION ACT.
A Bill amending the MILITIA
ACT
A Bill amending the CRIMINAL
CODE.
A Bill to validate TAX SaLE
TITLES.
It has been deemed necessary to
provide eight portfolios in the Cabinet, as follows: Premier and Minister
for External Affairs, Minister of Justice and Secretary of State, Minister
of Finance and Revenue, Minister of
Public Works and Fisheries, Minister
of Militia and Marine, Minister of the
Interior and Agriculture, Postmaster-
General and Minister of Labor and
Immigration, and Minister of Trade
��nd Commerce.
Of these eight offices the first four
have been  filled as  follows:     Messrs.
C. T. Bailey, Thomas Todrick, II. S.
Orrell anil Robert Telford. The remaining offices will be filled as speedily as possible.
The estimates for tile next fiscal
year will be submitted at an early
elate. They have been prepared with
due regard on the one hand for
economy, and mi lhe other hand for
Ihe necessary development eif the resources of thc  Dominion.
I invite your earnest consideration
of the subjects to which I have alluded and I invoke lhe Divine Providence   upon   your   deliberations.
The King's  Speech  will be debated
tonight, Saturday.
The   Government   then   introduced
a Mill fe.r the Constitution of the Collingwood Parliament which will duly
appear in the columns of "The
Chinook" when it comes up for debate.
The House, as a matter of courtesy, felicitated Mr. Murray, one of
the firm of "King's Printers" to the
House, on his marriage. The House
ihen went into committee; Mr. L.
Bailey in the chaii. and a very business-like session was closed in proper form.
The Whips
All be in your places promptly at
eight. Thc important question of the
night for the meeting will bc settled
and the Speech from the Throne discussed.
"GOD SAVE THE KING"
HUNTER PRINTING CO.
3851 Main Street
Phone:    Fairmont  1988
PEOPLE'S CARTAGE
Cor. Bodwell and Main
Phcne:     Fairmont   1544
STREET BROS.
Builders and Auctioneers
4258  Main  Street
Phone:     Fairmont   1492
W. J. PROWSE
Real  Estate,  Loans,  Insurance
4609 Main St. Phone: Fair. 783
JOHNSON   BROS.
General   Sheet   Metal   Workers
Furnacea   a   speciality���installed    by   experts.
Cornice,  akylighta  and roofing,  electric
ligna   and   all   kinda  braaa   and
Cor.  27th Ave.  ft
Phone
copper  fixtures
Main  St., South Vancouver
Fairmont  2386
J. R. PEACH
Real Estate
Cor. 24th Ave. and Main St.
Phone:    Fairmont 2250
WINNOTT STORE
AND   POST   OFFICE
General Merchants
Stumping  Powder  Our  Specialty
Phone:     Fraser   100 46th  Ave.   ft   Main
 Reeve ft  Harding. Props.	
LITTLE   MOUNTAIN   REALTY
COMPANY
Real   Estate   and   Commission   Brokers
H. N. Hallberg. Manager
MAIN   STREET  SPECIALIST
Cor.   Main   ft   29th   Ave.       South   Vancouver
Always the best in Meats, Fish, Poultry,   Fruits and Vegetables at
PEASE'S   CASH   MARKET
MAIN   ST.   (Between  29th  ft  30th  Ave.)
J'
5604 Main
S.   Vancou
W
St.
ver
GOOSTREY
Broker
(41st Ave. & Main St.)
Phone:   Fraser  64
See
M.  A.  BEACH
FOR    SPRING    SHOES
26th Ave. & Main St.
The  Up - to - date  Grocery Store
Try our Special
Blind of
40c TEA
STUDY OUR   PRICES
BEFORE GOING
ELSEWHERE
Our
40c Coffee
ia Invigorating
K.  S.   FLOUR per sack $170
SPRING-BROOK BUTTER  3 tba  for 1.00
RANCH   EOG8    3 dozen  f..r I.0O
STRICTLY  FRESH   EGGS per doccfl n.45
ASHCROFT  POTATOES  per sack 1.40
FINEST SUNKIST ORANOE8 16 f,,r 0.25
MOTTO:   "We Lead, the Others Limp Along"
SLOAN'S   GROCERY
4493 MAIN STREET (Corner 29th Avenue)
PHONE:   FAIRMONT 1657
Try
LIBBY'S  GROCERY
Cor. 50th Ave. & Main St.
For   First-Class  Provisions,   Flour,
Feed, etc.
ROSS & MACKAY
Kitchen and Builders' Hardware, etc.
Cor. 51st Ave. & Main St.
Vancouver, B.C.
For   Everything   That's   New   in
MENS AND  BOYS'  FURNISHINGS
Go  to
LAWSON'S
Next   door   to   Temple   Theatre
Cor. 26th Ave.  &  Main St.
Lawson's Cash Grocery
Good things to eat. Best of provisions
at lowest prices
CORNER 32nd. and  MAIN  ST.
Between   General   Brock   School   and   the
"Chinook"  Office
When   you   want   your
BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED
Get   them   done   by   a   man   that   has   learned
hit   trade
F. SLINN
Boot   and    Shoemaker   and    Repairer
4524   MAIN   STREET
D. S. McPHERSON
PRODUCE   MERCHANT
Try our Butter,  Eggs,  Cheese and Provisions.
For quality, these will please you.
Ordera   Solicited
Cor.   26th   AVE.   ft    MAIN,    VANCOUVER
THOS. J. HANRAHAN
Concrete,   Cement  and   Sewer
Contractor
Phone:  Fair. 807       109 26th Ave   E
R. B. LINZEY
JEWELLER
4132   MAIN   STREET
SQUARE DEAL REALTY CO.
Greater  Vancouver  Specialists
R. G. Simm, Manager
Phone: Fair. 807 4132 Main St.
Plant Your Dollars in Fort Salmon
The Hour of Fruitage Is at Hand
INSIDE LOTS���$50 per lot, payable $15 per lot cash down,
and $5 per lot every month for seven months. No interest.
No taxes. 5 per. cent, discount for all cash. Indefeasible title
to all lots.   No charges for writing deeds or for notary fees.
CORNER LOTS���$62.50 per lot, payable $22.50 per lot cash
down, and $5 per lot every eight months. No interest. No
taxes. 5 per. cent, discount for all cash. Indefeasible title to
all lots.   No charges for writing deeds or for notary fees.
Fort Salmon Townsite, twenty miles north from Fort George, is beautifully situated on the banks of the Salmon River, whieh flows through thc centre
of the richest agricultural and pastoral district of British Columbia, the Great Salmon River Valley, famed for the wonderful fertility of its soil.
Three hundred actual settlers purchased farms in this valley last year; hundreds more but await the coming of springtime to look over the country and
choose their future possession so that they may be there with their products while the railways are being constructed, and afterward. Northeastward is the Great
Peace River Country, the southern portion of which will also be tributary to Fort Salmon.
By virtue of its unique situation Fort Salmon occupies a peculiarly advantageous position in relation to the whole surrounding country. In fact, as a site
for an exceedingly large, beautiful and important marketing centre there is none better situated in the whole province of British Columbia.
To the planner of a great city it would seem that here at Fort Salmon the forces of nature had excelled in providing most efficient sanitary and drainage
facilities, and in addition, an inexhaustible supply of pure water sufficient for a very large population.
Additional railway communication is being provided for by many government chartered railways about
to commence construction from Edmonton, Alberta,
to Pacific Coast points via the Peace River Country
and the Salmon River Valley. The contour of the
land is such that to secure easy grades for their steel
and at the same time tap rich freight-producing districts, the railway lines must inevitably run Fort
Salmon way.
Already the B. C, and Alaska has surveyed a line
right through from Fort George to a point about three
or four miles north of Fort Salmon and construction
is scheduled to begin early this coming spring.
Naturally, the time to buy lots in Fort Salmon is
before the railways are completed through. Values
will take a mighty big jump as soon as the rails reach
the new townsite. Present-day prices are exceedingly
low���$50 and $02.50 per lot.   These prices, we believe,
 Map of	
 BRITISH COLUMBIA.	
shewing Existing * FVojected Railways
>~ I ���
\,r     ^ ���     A.LBE.RTA
\.  '  ^'4"   Co'",'-
UNITED STATE.6
AtSMaul*
are the lowest at which town lots can be purchased
anywhere in British Columbia. With the spring rush
of settlers into the surrounding district there will be a
marked increase in values.
Land in the vicinity of Fort Salmon averages about
$15 per acre, and the typical farm contains eighty
acres. The investment in lands anil equipment for the
300 settlers who purchased last season represents an
outlay of about $700,000; a very good beginning, indeed.
The climate of Fort Salmon and its tributary country is singularly delightful, extremes in temperature
in it lieing great. Summer days are warm, nights are
cool. Rainfall is not excessive, and yet there is no
lack of sufficient moisture to assist in nurturing the
crops. The winter months are comparatively mild to
those of the prairie provinces, and the leaion is much
shorter.
Buy Fort Salmon Lots
Every lot in Fort Salmon fronts on a street 66 feet wide and runs back to a lane of 20 feet. Size of lots is 33x120 feet, with the exception ot" a few somewhat larger. An indefeasible title is given to every purchaser immediately upon completion of payment in full. The plan of the townsite has been duly accepted
and filed in the government land registry office���everything is in proper ortler to hand over clear title deeds. The government of British Columbia owns a quarter interest in Fort Salmon but has not offered any of its holdings for sale.
Every lot you pay for in Fort Salmon lies directly in the pathway of a remarkable growth in population. Tt is surrounded by the richest agricultural
and pastoral district in British Columbia. It is yours���all your own, deep down iu the centre of the earth and up to the blue sky���yours is the joy of ownership
when you buy a lot in Fort Salmon. Banks may fail, cities burn, stock exchanges go mad with panic, but your lot remains serene ami unruffled: the hay, the
wheat, barley, oats and vegetables of the nearby farmers grow just the same, and adtl to the wealth of the distributing centre where the marketing is done. Come
to our office and learn more about Fort Salmon and it^ wonderful possibilities. If you cannot come send us your name and address and we will -.end your our
illustrated literature.    Come today or write today.
Western Canada Townsites
LIMITED
Sole Owners and Selling Agents
ROOMS 8, 10, 11, 12. 407 HASTINGS ST. W.
Office Open Evenings 7.30 to 9.30 o'clock
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phones:   Seymour 40.38 and 6430
COUPON  14
 ^
WESTERN CANADA TOWNSITES LTD.
Upstairs, 407 Hastings
Street West,
Vancouver, B.C.
Gentlemen,���Kindly semi rae a ci
(rated  booklet  .'mil  full infiirmatiiii
Salmon Teiwnsite.
py e.f your
regarding
illus.
Port
 _ Jj

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