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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Nov 7, 1914

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Array Will the Provincial Government intervene for the protection of the depositors in the Dominion Trust Company? Does the Government propose to stand idly by while the savings of working girls, the monies of widows
and orphans and the homes of working-men are in danger of being swallowed up ? With folded hands the Gov-
ernnment watched the trembling which preceded the downfall of the Bankers Trust Company, the Acadia Trust,
the Peoples Trust and other "Trust" companies which have been swept away. The Government encouraged by
its silence the robbery practiced by the Canadian Home Investment Company on the working people of British
Columbia���the most outrageous piece of sand-bagging any public ever suffered. Are the Dominion Trust Company
depositors to be protected?    Why is the press of British Columbia silent on this subject?
3*<Cutt CHINOOK
Vol. III. No. 26
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA,   SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1914
Price 5 cents
The Dance of the Mannikins
THESE arc the days of slaughter in Hritish Columbia.
All about they arc falling ��� big and little. Thirty
thousand dollar houses on Shaughnessy Heights arc going
under the auctioneer's hammer for one-fifth of the cost of
building. Merchants who have heen in business in Vancouver for twenty years are going on the rocks���going out
into the streets, crushed and broken in heart and.pocket
book.
Financial structures built up by men who had faith in
the future of Vancouver are toppling and crashing to the
ground, bringing death to men and poverty to widows and
orphans.
Despair walks in the streets.
Industry has been dealt a stunning blow. The army
of the unemployed increases n strength. The ranks of the
petty thieves are becoming latter. Tlie police are kept
busy at their posts. Somebody's daughters are making
the legion of the painted host grow bigger day by day.
Meanwhile long-haired orators tell us to have confidence. It's the war, so they claim���the war has wrought
at this distant point in the Empire such calamity.
Yet we are not being invaded. We arc not deluged by
refugee Belgians, Our great buildings have not heen
shelled. Our private homes have not heen turned into Red
Cross hospitals. No German general has demanded indemnity from us.    We are feeding no army.
The same sun shines on liritish Columbia. The same
coal and gold and silver is being mined from our hills every
day in the same old way. We have the same earth under
our feet, the same sky overhead, the same great railways,
the same docks, the same streets, the same magnificent
buildings. Wc have the same unlimited forest areas, the
same salmon running in a hundred rivers.
Yet, some one whistles in the east, and starting with
the Premier and his government and running right on
down to the smallest shop-keeper, we dance like a quarter
of a million mannikins.
Without trying to explain away local conditions,
blaming them upon the war or upon the hanks, we might
just as well admit that the blame for the situation in British Columbia rests upon the shoulders of the people of
British Columbia.
We have a sufficient range of natural resources in this
province to sustain many millions of people. We have lumber enough to build a house and barn for every man and
woman on the Xorth American continent, We have produced millions of gold in the past year. We have unlimited
coal areas. We are a fruit growing and agricultural country, a timber country, a mining country. Should a great
wall be erected around liritish Columbia, we have thc resources in keep ourselves and not give up one of our little
luxuries. We could issue paper money, printed on our own
paper with presses manufactured by ourselves. We could
give our takings of placer gold for one year and guarantee
a generous circulation of money.
But alas, many years ago the system was inaugurated
in British Columbia of handing over our natural resources
to great corporations. Our timber limits have gone at
ridiculous prices; our agricultural lands have passed out ol
the hands of the crown into thc hands of land gamblers;
our coal lands have gone to the big interests; our mineral
areas have been swallowed up. We have imported yellow
men to "take our golden fishes from the rivers.
Thc man who led in the dissipation of our heritage was
the big mannikin, Sir Richard McBride. He and his lawyer, William Bowser, are the responsible parties. The
people of British Columbia who were beguiled into trusting these two betrayers are accessories after the fact. History will brand us as having been criminally negligent in
guarding the greatest chest of wealth ever given to a people.
In our sister provinces a partial moratorium has been
pronounced for the protection of legitimate business. In
our sister dominions the hanks have been taken in hand by
the government for the benefit of the people represented
by,the members of the government.
' Our govrnment is under the thumb of big interests.
Our government is unable to turn a hand (fdr our benefit.
Sir Richard got $6,000,000 for the P. G. and E. Railway by
getting the other provinces to come to our aid and endorse
for us at the bank.     But then that $6,000,000 was to help
Collingwood Children Invited to
Attend Apple Show and Movies
Mr. Bursill Wants Them All to be His Guests Today.    Notes of
Interest from Collingwood Where Business is "As Usual"
Twenty-five      Collingwood       East
children   are'   invite-el   t.i   meet   Mr.   J.
Francis   Bursill al    iln-    Collingw 1
Easl station Saturday afternoon at
2.311 Mr. Bursill promises i'e pilot
llie tei I,, the Apple Show :it the In-
dustrial Bureau. There the young-
si. rs will lee treated te, apples .'unl
later Mr Bursill will entertain tin- l"i
at a moving picture theatre. Remember! 2.30 Saturday p.m., N'ovember a.
All .'lie.- welcome up to twenty-five.
MERRY LITTLE APPLE GIRL IS
AGNES MARGARET BURGESS
This  South  Vancouver Tot  Observed
Apple Week by Helping Her Dad
at the Picking
Vgnes Margaret Burgess is the
daughter of Mr. am: Mrs. Donald
Burgess, 75S4 Prince Edward Street,
Se .iit h Vancouver. Her father picked
hi- apples this week ami tlu- little one
Captain Alaister  Mackenzie,  Majuba survivor will lecture in S. Van. shortly i
Cedar Cottage Snapshots
Mr. ami Mrs. Jeihn Simpson, of
Bella Vista Street, celebrated their
wooden wedding anniversary on the
evening of October 28th with an informal dinner party.
*   *   *
Mr. Geo, Keith, of 18th At enue,
memriis tlu- loss fi \\\f valuable rhodo
dendrons sti il< n if 'tu hi- hn1. n i n
Saturday  night.
The younger ,-e t fi Robson M i ti
orial Church hail the time of their
lives e.n Friday evening when tin Sunshine Missieeii Circle celebrated Hallowe'en with a Masquerade Party
The seheieel rue.in nf the church was
fittingly decorated for the occasion
��iih corn stalks, apples, pumpkins ami
jack ee' lanterns, ami "there was a
sound "' revelry by night" a.- in games
and contests tin- merry masqueraders
frolicked in the guise oi ghosts, clowns
ami Turkish maidens. Arrayed in a
costume ��>f perhaps her great grandmother's lime. Mis��� Hilda Manuel
took the prize as an "Old Lady," her
disguise being sn complete that met
even her nearest friends deteeted her
identity. A popular feature e.f the entertainment was the Witch's Cave,
presided over by a real witch, whose
i characteristic costume seemed tee indicate that she had only just arrived
through space via the broomstick
route, and was quite prepared to eli?.-
pense destinies to all who applied. She
stirred the contents of her cauldron
and brewed her mysterious charms
over realistic flames of red in a most
scientific manner, from such ingredients no doubt as toads and bats and
serpents' eyes. Judging, however,
from the merry laughter eif the inquir
ies ai thi- shrine of fate, tin' magical
pol contained for them i mly thai f er
which ihey were seeking happiness.
At the close of the program, appi s,
home-made candy ami pumpkin pie.
in genen 'ii- abundance, n e re lh�� i
lectable refreshments served. While
the committee were justly proud of
the social success of the evening, they
u i n also gratified thai then was a
pleasing addition 'ef $11.80 i" the
ireasury   of iheir  society.
* *        It      '
There was much rejoicing last Saturday aim .im members of ihe' South
Vancouver High Sc-he,. .1 Hockey
team when in a game, played "ii lhe
High Si-li,,��� il grounds, tiny won from
the Xeirinal Sell.neI team at the rale eel
() to 0.
* +    *
The new Emanuel Baptist Church
een 32nd Avenue and Gladstone Road
'cis dedicated last Sunday with impressive ceremonies, beginning with
tbe dedication sermon in the morning,
an address by Prof. Odium in lhe afternoon, and a sermon liy Rev. I'. C.
Parker in tlle evening. On Monday
evening there was a most enjoyable
social and public meeting, and een
Tuesday evening an excellent concert.
all exercises being well attended.
Rev. R. C. Blunden is the pastor of
Emanuel Church, and the enthusiasm
of both pastor and people speaks well
for  the success of the new church.
��       *       *
On Friday last, Mrs. Frank I). Kidd
gave a social afternoon lo her many
friends in honor of Mrs. A. Mirylces
eel" Yakima, Wash. The guests were
invited to come representing the title
eef a book���and there were many and
along a vested interest.   Not a dollar of it will find its way
into the pockets of our own working men.
If it were not for the fact that Great Britain is today
at war to smash down a policy which threatens every man
in the empire with tbe penalty of suffering the very conditions which we in British Columbia are today yoked, the
people of this province would be within their rights and
would be sustaining the best British traditions in rising up
to a man in open rebellion.
Anniversary services were hehl in
Km ex Presbyterian Church, Colling-
weeiiel. ..n Sunday, November 1 The
church wa- tastefully decorated with
flowers anel leaves by tiie Girls' Club.
In tlle morning an eloquent and powerful sermon wa- preached by Dr. McKinnon, of Kitsilano, on the text
"Launch out intei the deep ami lei
down your nets for a draught." In
the afternoon Mr. J. II McVety -p.>ke
clearly and effectively "ii the relation
the church should take t.e the great
problems of the labor world. In tbe
evening the church was crowded :������
ns capacity In hear Dr. George C.
Pidgeon, fi Westminster Hall. Dr.
Pidgeon preached a masterly sermon
iu his own inimitable style based on
the story of Jacob. The musical part
nf the services under the elircctiien of
Mr. Tait anil the church choir as-i>t-
eel bv a line orchestra i- deserving of
special mention. On Monday al 8 p.m.
a congregational seecial was held at ;
which there was a large attendance i
of members, adherents ami friends.
Dr. Fraser, oi First Church, was the |
speaker nf the evening Ilis address
although brief was greatly enjoyed.
I i| i gentlemen who spoke briefly
and interestingly were Rev. Mr. Gil-
lam, of the \'". _' Roael Mission, Rev.
Angus Camer m nf Henderson Church,
llurnaby. Rev. I-'.. Wesley Morgan fi
Collingwood Methodisl Church. Ri
\V l;. Burton, ni Beaconsfield. ind
Rev. A Mogel, of Collingwood. 'I
taking pari in the programme were
Mrs latnie- m. Mis- Ruby Thomps in
Mr. Duncan, Mr Gi --^ Grigoi
Miss I.in-iii, McKay accompanist.
I luring ning lig  I   'efreshments
. I l e ��� '..
At a largelj attended meetini
ed h, the ladies Cei tral Park ami
l Ilii ^''. nod, ai 'In re sidence nf Mi-s
Lester, Aberdeen Street, tn organize
i bi me ;; of ; , Red Cross Socii tj.
Mr. J. R. Seymour, of Vancouver, in
ih. chair, outlined ihe dutii - .,<������', the
following officers ware elected: Miss
1. r, president: Mr- C. 11. Clark.
sident: ami Mr-. I irapi si cn -
i.i: :',;��� executive consisting of a
number fi prominent ladies of iln'
district. Mis- Lester naw an account
"1 the w.erk which hail already been
accomplished ami told of the vast
amounl yet t'i be done. Several eef
those presenl were enrolled a- members ami the branch is started on a
sound basis.
Tuesday afternoon at Collingwood
Institute Miss Grace Goddard will
commence  classes in  folk dances.
climbed into thc  f"rks e.f this heavily
loaded   tree.
Mr. Burgess takes gnat pride in
hi- orchard and is always wall rewarded  i"r his efforts,
Correspondence
wonderful device- used t" represent
volumes e.f various kinds and ages.
With the guests of the afternoon Kipling's "Light that Failed" seemed to
be either the most popular, or the
benek most easily represented, feir four
"in of the 23 presenl had chosen t.e
personate this famous novel, some by-
wearing a burnt < .lit match, other's
using the burnt end of a tiny candle.
"The Rosary," "The Man e.n the Beix,"
"Women and Labor," "Under Two
Flags." "Mill on the Floss," "Laven-
dar and Did Lace," "Three Men in a
Boat." and other well known books
were amusingly represented, making
the contest interesting and mirth
provoking. Mrs. A. L. Hambly proudly carried off thc prize���a very beautiful book. There were other contests w;hich, with music and refreshments, added to the enjoyment of the
occasion, In entertaining her guests
Mrs. Kidd was assisted by Miss Campbell and Mrs. Drew, while Miss Jean
Crawford and Miss Hazel Wood helped with  the  refreshments.
PANDERING TO THE
WORKING   MAN
Ti,. tin- Editor .'f the "Chinook."
. Sir.- I- il nol ab'.in time that South
Vancouver  councillors    ceased    their
pitiable'   pandering   to    the    so-called
�� ��� rking man voter ami havi the manliness '" seek re-election "ii the work
accomplish! d for thi   municipality as a  whole'-    South  Vancou-
'��� :r  council  has  di me  well  this  j ear,
much   better   in   proportion   to   popi
lation than Vancouver or all tin   surrounding municipalities bil ed    in
: work for residi nts in the municipality.    What   nee,--i'i.    therefore,
��� ig t" the working man voter, a- si am' i 'i  the couticilt >t - appear
to be trying to do, by seeking lo force
���  general  cm  of 20 per cent   in  --.'-
ai!, -.-
If salarie- are 20 pet cent, too high
cm them by all means; bul anyi t e
win, glances oyer the S.euih Vancouver pay roll knows thai compared
wiih salaries paid in Vancouver for
similar work the salaries are low rather
than high Then win- in the name ol
common sense should councillors
seek te. cut the salaries -till furthi r?
I will t,n you why, Mr. Editor. Because councillors are afraid of the
working man veeter, who i.s icalous of
thc permanent start'. Because coun-
cillors would dee an injustice tee the
few members of the staff, whose
v.ete s spread over the seven wards
do mn cunt for much, rather than
offend the working nun wh" crowd
around  the municipal  hall each day.
II.iw does the council hope to secure efficient service il" discontent and
a sense of injustice is fostered among
the permanent staff? Do councillors
not realize that cheap service is very
often extremely costly to a municipality? Do they mu realize that discontent and slackness may cost the
municipality dear iu thc eiid.
Municipal employees all over the
Province watched the head-chopping
which occurred in South Vancouver
early iu the year: with what result?
That good efficient servants now in
the employ of other public be .dies
say : "1 should require a live-year
guarantee before I would take service
with South Vancouver council."
Cheap and inefficient service may always be secured in abundance; but
good men. men who realize their
wierth. require some security that they
will not be sacrificed to jealousy and
the electioneering of men who care
nothing for justice or fair-play so long
as they secure their return to the
council.
...  1-,-URPLAYER,
South Vancouver. Xov. 5.
���-��� TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATl'RDAY.   NOVEMBER  7,   1914
m
C^CHINOOK
PUBLISHED
Every Saturday by the Greater Vancouver Publishers Limited
Ceorge M.  Murray,  Editor
HEAD OFFICE:
Corner   Thirtieth   Avenue   and   Main   Street,   South   Vancouver,   B.C.
TELEPHONE:   All department! Fairmont   1874
NIGHT  CALLS Fairmont   1946 L
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"The truth at all timet firmly standi
And shall from age to age endure."
M
RF.Sr.MPTlOX OF work .111 Main Street will mean I
a merry Christmas for many families whose prospects
during the- past few weeks were not very bright
��� ��    *
IF THE SOUTH VANCOUVER amateur theatrical people continue to develop, Manager Young, of
the Palace of Varieties, South Hill, states that Pantages and I.new will begin sending scouts out with
Big Time contracts for the local talent.
* *   *
REEVE KERR'S visit to the money magnates of]
FINANCIAL SHOWDOWN POR B. C.
VNITOBA has passed a moratorium measure
ami  Saskatchewan has done    likewise,     The
Vfanitoba measure has gone into effect ami though
private business has gained much from it. the "Financial Post" ol Toronto views the measure with alarm.
The "Post" compliments Sir Richard   McBride upon
his wisdom in stalling off any measure of relief for
ihe people of Hritish Columbia.
The- ''Financial Post   says 1
"Practically speaking, Manitoba is  tlie only province of the Dominion that has bolstered up its position Toronto was highl) successful, we are informed.   It
l\ moratorium props.   We do not for a moment be-1. would reem thai South Vancouver's abilit) to secure
lieve that such a measure was necessary.   What would l.irge parcels of money in these troublous days speaks
have occurred in Manitoba without this artificial bote-j wei]  ,\,r the Municipality.    We notice neighboring
tering up e.f speculative transactions will have sooner municipalities have discontinued all work, practically.
en- later to occur.    The evil day is only postponed. a   a   a
Those who have followed a conservative course and  GE )RGE w , m ,   ,,,- liK. w.n,, E!gh( t\uocstktion,
have not endeavored to annex wealth through specula-  ,��� ,,,.. ,.,.,��� who ,,,,,,. ������. ,llV ,������ ,,f ,|R. CHICi ,wJn.
.    . , . .,.���,. ������,.. .,,.���, ,tion have ��" ,ur'' '"' ���'''' from  moratorium props. ,Ik,   mil ,,���,,.,.,, .K.li(���, .,���,ilM ���,.,, fl..m(| M     ,i||c.
' HSRE IS  ""��� ' REMIERt Without this measure some of the victims of specu- of tlu. hoMers ,���- contracts,    His ,lT,���.(s ,.,.���,���,,, in
IT would seem thai Sir Richard McBride 1- the fair- lation would now be in trouble,   They mighl just as the complete exposing of the affairs of the C.H.I.C.
weather premier of the Dominion.   When there are well suffer now as later on.   Adjustment of specula- The action i- -iili nendine in the courts
honor- to do, you can always find Sir Richard at \ ic- tive positions >-.as due in Manitoba, as in other prov- *   *   *
toria.   When such an imperial event as the welcoming! inces. whether ihe war had occurred  or not, and ii   ,-,,,,  ,  ,,,,���.,, ,
.,,,,,.   ..      ...       .,       ,       ,-���   ,,. ,     , ��� |.   .��� ,  , . |,(|l\  V PAPER to state that a man ts nearly, twenty
ot  11.M.S.  New Zealand take- place. Sir Richard is   is illti-ive and dangerous to interfere 1>\  -i.ittitenv ac- ^^���   ^���
��� . .... ��� ��� years
on duly with liis high hat in hand.    When Cabinet tion in the desirable process by which speculation and
.Minister- from I Mlawa visit lb, Sir Richard is always  speculative prices will be eliminated or minimized.
at home.    When the  American  Fleet  anchors off     "Saskatchewan has passed a moratorium bill but
Esquimalt, Sir Richard i.s the lirst to put off in a cutter ( we do not anticipate that so careful a gt ivernment will
to shake hands with tlie admiral and dine witli him.  find it necessary to put il into force.     Sir Robert Mc-
At the gay and festive functions, at the lip battles for  Bride, in liritish Columbia, says that there will be no
the Flag, Sir Richard is the grand man, moratorium in that province.   If any province, and
J lilt when  the black clouds  gather over the  land J we speak advisedly, was over extended  in the matter
where will you find onr hold, red-breasted premier? of land contracts ii was British Columbia.   The pe'o-
Like the son^j birds who with the first breeze- of aut-1 pie there, however, have shown courage in facing their
$Cy00
per Ton
Delivered
Phone Seymour  1441
limn take wing for the warm southland, Sir Richard
quits his patriotic roundelay and with neck feathers
on end hc flics away.
The last time our knight took wing was when the
good citizens of Xanainio began to fall on the necks of
their brothers with daggers and rocks. The labor war
over there had been scarcely proclaimed when the
Prime Minister of liritish Columbia was safe over the
United States border being entertained in that haven
which today offers shelter to Alvo von Alvensleben.
This year it was shortly after the smash-up of the
National Finance Company that Sir Richard left for
more salubrious clinics. In thc meantime the Dominion Trust Company has gone smash. Sir Richard is
still away. He will likely remain away while the financial earthquake is upon us. After the carnage
which is being wrought as a direct result of his negligence in shaping the laws of this country touching
upon trust companies, Sir Richard will come hack and
advise us again to have confidence.
It is not fitting in one who carries a liritish knighthood to run away from duty.
es
liabiliti
hi.'i  has
time wi
and swallowing their losses,     liritish Cohim-
tcted  wisely and her action   at so critical  a
stand  her in good stead when better days
come.    The agitation for a moratorium had its effect
and seriously interfered with payments."
liritish Columbia MUST SWALLOW' her losses)
Sir Richard and the "Financial Post" are companions
in arms firm in their allegiance to the large interests.
Doubtless the little financiers and small business men
of this Province have only had a taste of whal is in
store for them. Sir Richard and his masters apparently intend to carr)' on for the next few months a
financial jag cure institute. All inflicted with the
speculative instinct will be compelled to take a course
in this institution. Some of the patients will be turned
out cured of the habit for all time. Others will only
be temporarily cured. The balance will strangle to
death on the paregoric and salts and whisky and blue
vitriol and the nearest thing they will ever see to a
moratorium will be a crematorium.
THE TRANQUILLE
IN the past the Tranquille Sanatorium has been an
institution of immense value to the people of liritish Columbia. Mope has been found within its doors
for many a one stricken with the dread white
plague. At Tranquille innumerable patients have been
restored to health and those unfortunate persons whose
malady had been allowed to go too far have found
Christian treatment at the expert hands of the skilled
doctors and nurses at Tranquille.
Public bodies throughout the Province have been
notified that Tranquille Sanatorium is in serious financial straits, and has issued an urgent appeal to cities
and municipalities. The Anti-Tuberculosis Society
points out that the average cost of upkeep is about $2
per patient per day. Municipalities pay $1 per day
for indigent patients, in cases where they admit liability, and the government grant figures out at about
80 cents. Many indigent patients, however, come
from unorganized districts, or the municipality from
which they come to the sanatorium disclaims them as
not being bona fide residents, hi the circumstances.
a deficit is inevitable. The institution has only kept
afloat so far by using for maintenance a grant originally made for building purposes. This is now exhausted. To close the doors, however, is unthinkable,
and the society has therefore issued this appeal.
South Vancouver cannot do a great deal just now
to aid the Tranquille Sanatorium. But our people
can do their bit The doors of the institution must
be kept open, The last dollar of the public funds
should go to keep up the noble work of lighting the
white plague.
Many patients, penniless and neglected, have been
taken from South Vancouver to Tranquille, where
treatment was afforded them similar to that given
the most wealthy. The upkeep of the institution is
properly a task for the Provincial Government, but
since that body is not able to handle the work unaided.
then every healthy man and woman in liritish Columbia should contribute whatsoever can be spared.
APPLE WEEK
MR. J. FRANCIS BURSILL is entertaining five-
and twenty of the youngsters of Collingwood
East today (Saturday) at the big apple show at the
Industrial Bureau, Vancouver. The party will personally inspect every box of apples in the exhibit and
will likely personally sample as many different brands
of apples as capacity will afford. An apple a day,
like the onion, keeps "Old Sawbones" away. Mr. Bursill knows this and his effort to make the children of
Collingwood East better friends with the king of fruit
is worthy of much praise.
EJ
BY THE WAY
M
AT THE APPLE exhibition this week many noble
examples of the fruits of graft are to be seen.
* 4   4
SOUTH VANCOUVER, in proportion to population, has the smallest police force in the world.
* *   #
MR. EUGENE CLEVELAND, had he not been tied
to the house through a slight illness, no doubt would
have had an exhibit at the apple carnival which would
have topped them all.
* *   #
DISCUSSING THE land question, it might be said
that enough vacant laud may be found in Smith Vancouver to supply dried apples for all the colleges and
boarding schools in America.
* ��   *
IN' CERTAIN' SECTION'S in the east, the cider .apple is the most popular variety. A gnod pannikin of
hard cider is a good thing once in a while.
* #   ��
MR. V, L. MacADAM, the well-known local cm-
tractor, having recently become the father of another
son, carries himself with an optimism and cheerfulness which bids defiance to the financial stringency.
e   ��   ��
oi'R REFERENCE last week to the police question
was designed for the eyes of the members of the police
committee. Seven policemen in the whole of Soulh
Vancouver! When this information gets out all the
crooks on the Pacific Coast will head for South Vancouver. We all remember the robbery- of the bank at
Central I'ark and the successful raid of the Hillcrest
branch of the Royal liank.
* #   4
FROM OBSERVATIONS on the street cars, gum
is getting a terrible maxillation for its money these
days. Chewers are developing a high standard of
efficiency. Spearmint, which in the humming days
of 1910 was scrapped after a half hour's action, is
now being prosecuted mercilessly while the flavor
lasts, after which it is then lapelled for further service.
���      4 --eft
THE MANAGER of the City Market still has the
City Council buffaloed. It's amusing to watch the
Mayor and Aldermen in their deep investigations of
this department. The city market is a filthy spot.
Upon this point all are in agreement. Tbe filthiness
of the place would scarcely indicate that the manager's
services are indespensible.
er than he really is, has been declared to be
a crime more serious than high treason. Municipal
rnspector John Burns, whose associates on the Main
Street paving work recently presented him with a
diamond watch charm i> not seventy-six by a long shot.
Mr. Burns is still in tbe prime of life. When he was
a boy they didn't have linotype machines, but he claims
that the printers (and editors) were a mighty sight
more considerate and much  more given  to accuracy
4 4 4
TWENTY YEARS ago the agricultural outlook in
liritish Columbia was much brighter than it is today.
At that lime we were producing practically all the
staple food stuffs necessary to sustain lhe population,
That was before the influx of the speculators, Twenty
years ago the following item appeared in the columns
of the Chilliwack "Progress":
"An exchange says that when you talk of there being a better place than liritish Columbia, every potato
slyly winks its eye, every cabbage shakes its head,
every beet get red in the face, every onion feels stronger, every wheat field is shocked, barley strokes its
beard, corn sticks up its ears, and every foot of land
kicks. The horses even denounce the statement with
a neigh."
ft ft ft
FOR TIIE BENEFIT of its contemporary, the Coquitlam "Review," the new paper at busy Port Coquitlam, has the following: "Say! If the 'Star,' our
contemporary is so anxious to carry out the assumed
obligations to subscribers, previous to liquidation, what
about the other obligations���the unpaid wages for instance ?
ft   ft   ft
THE REEVE of 1'oint Grey has invited his unemployed to seek engagement on the work being carried
out in that district by the Greater Vancouver Sewerage Commission. In his statement to the press Reeve
Churchill says that all the unemployed of that municipality will be accommodated. How many South
Vancouver residents are employed on the work in this
Municipality? There are some, it is true, but the
charge is made that more local men might be employed, were it not for certain red tape which has to be
gone through.
* * #
ADVICES FROM Ottawa say that 100,000 Germans
in L'nited States are planning the invasion of Canada.
The Fenians, '66, made a had mess of their invasions.
What the Irish failed to accomplish, the Prussians
might do well not to undertake. The only way the
Germans of the I'. S. can conquer Canada is to reduce
the price of Annheuser-Rusch.
Our
���elebratcd
washed
mil
coal
will   re
miiiii at $5.(10 per
ton e
li-liv-
iTl-el.
Of llie- tinu- In ing,
llllil
lugh
lome
if nil;-   leecll
competitors
have
trieel
te, secure
-   ellll'     ������!
lh,'
.-������al
hill     ll
ive   failed,
this    ;
pparently
-]" al -
feer itself
"26  Years in  Victoria'
KIRK & CO.
929 Main Street
The MARSTON SHOWCASE CO.
JOINERS AND CABINET MAKERS
3764   COMMERCIAL   STREET
P.O. Box 574, Cedar Cottage
Phone Fairmont 989
OCR FRIEND Maclntyre is the new president of
tlie Ward Eight Liberal Association. If Mac can
direct the vote in his ward with the thoroughness witb
which he handles IS. C. E. R. cars, the enemy had better take cover.
'��WpiL:
The Important Matter of Choosing Your Dentist    7n%eLna,u*��rd
^TsjllERE is nothing sn important tn your hea
\^S yuur teeth.   Sound, useful, beautiful teeth
Good Teeth
necessary
to health
Ith mill efficiency ai the matter with
 should he yours���-teeth that euiihle
you to bite, chew and smile in comfort.     Decayed teeth cause, nut emly cu11ti1111.il
inconvenience, hut permanent ill-health.   It is ymir duty to yourself tu economise
In other ways so that you may secure teeth that look natural, feel natural and
form tiie functions which Nature allotted to those important members,
per-
"Cheap"
dentistry
the   most
expensive
What are
"Nature
teeth"?
Advice
free
CHEREFORE ynu should choose your dentist  with great care.      It  is poor
economy  to buy "bargain  teeth."    Inferior dentistry���poor materials,  little
knowledge and less care���costs hut little less than the
ginning, anil certainly is much more expensive in the
right kind even at the belong run,
ton
And
I   KM PLOY only the must modern methods, the greatest care .'11111 skill and tiie
best materials.    Each individual case is carefully studied.    When   I  lit y
with my "Nature teeth" Ihey look, fil and feel like the ones Nature gave you
you will find my prices no higher than those of ordinary dentists.
GOME in and allow me
estimate of the cost,
your mind now to see to
making appointment for examination,
to examine your mouth, advise you and give you my
This  will involve nn obligation  whatever.    .Mak
those  teeth.    Then  call,  plume or  write t��
me  now,
The New
Standard Bank
Bldg., Richards
and  Hastings
Second   Floor
Entrance
Room 212
Phone  Sey.
4 6 7 9
No Gas or Harmful Drugs Used
"You Suffer No Pain"
GUARANTEE
I HEREBY (U'AKANTEE that all dental work performed by mc will be absolutely
painless. If tbe slightest twinge of pain is experienced by the patient no money need be paid
to me, or if any has been paid, it wilt he instantly refunded,
I further guarantee that all crown or bridge work or filling will remain in first-class condition for a period of TEN YEARS. If any of my work becomes defective during that time I
will replace it absolutely FREE OF CHARGE.
mw,
-THI annrnve K. ^        I^B***^
OPEN   EVENINGS
-THE MODERN DENTIST- SATl'RDAY,  NOVEMBER 7.   1914
QREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
Who Exposed
the Graft ?
THE B.C. INDEPENDENT
UNDERTAKERS LIMITED
(Formerly Sill & Miller)
652-654 BROADWAY WEST   ::   Phone Fairmont 738
Tin -nine Phone Number, FAIRMONT 738.
that has for the pasl SEVENTEEN MONTHS
saved -ee many heart-broken relatives THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS will connect ye.u with
the above firm, which POSITIVELY GUARANTEES prompt and courteous treatment at ONE
HALF iln- expense charged by the COMBINE.
INVESTIGATE AND BE CONVINCED.
Modern Chapel and -ill our first-class services
ABSOLUTELY FREE. Uttomobilc equipment
in connection,
B.C. Independent Undertakers Ltd.
652-654 Broadway Weat
Cut   Flowers and  Design
Work   a   specialty.
Flowering and Ornamental Shrubs leer Spring and
Fall  planting.
One  hundred  varieties  oi
Roses   "I   Choice   Sorts
ami  three  hundred  varieties   of   Dahlias.
Make the Round
Trip by Telephone
DO YOU REALIZE THAT    x , \
A Long Distance Call
Means Two Messages
You Get Your Answer
Immediately
SPECIAL NIGHT RATES
CALL LONG DISTANCE
B.C. TELEPHONE CO. LTD.
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandy   Congratulates   the   Edinburgh  Folk on the Associashun They
Hae Organized
zil
Phone Fairmont 738
Keeler's Nursery
Grower and Importer of Plants, Bulbs, Roots and Shrubs
Phone Fairmont 817
YOU WILL FIND OUR PRICES MODERATE
Cor. FIFTEENTH AVE. and MAIN  ST   ::  MOUNT  PLEASANT
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUUH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM /ANCOUVER TO
ALL F<VRTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Ruu'e t�� the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
tf
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass Agent, Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Line*
H.  O.  Smith. C. P. * T. A.
Phone :   Sey.   8134
C. V   Jennejr. 0. A. P. D.
Stl  Granville  Street
Weil freens, I guess maist ee' yaeIhii word feer it when be telt them be
II hae noticed that at last we h��e I wis a peace-lovin'guid-natured son ������'
formed an  associashun  in  Vancoover I chid.
lerivin' its membership frae the sons i Naw. naw, Andry, the auld couatrj
���ni dauchters "' \ulil Reekie resident folk wunna believe what yaer tryin'tae
in  this corner o' the  liritish  Empire  peddle oot iae them about the kaiser.
made famous by Dicky McBride an
ee Wullie Bowser.
lhe need o' sic an associashun wud
be apparent tae anyone an' when a
inn e, min' intimated thai he had
sei abool the organizashun, weel I wi-
rale gled,
I   hail  thochts   mysel  yae   time  o'
.yin' my haunil ai  the organizashun
1 hey   hae   hail   ,,wre   mony   instances I
lae tin contrary.   But maybe the auld
layin', "Birds e,' a leather lle.ek thi--'
gither" is very applicable tae the |
Laird e,' Skibe,.
Iloeet mon! Andry. forget iti When
we banish thc Kaiser lac- senile iceberg
lip  ill  llle  Arctic  regions yae  ean   lak i
peace   an'   yaer   wee
yaer  pailacc
bizness, but the  idea, like a  lot  mare. | shorl   kilty  wi' yae an'  prepare yers<
the liet time  yaell
yaer  ireen   le
! hae later e,n.
Ve.ur- through llie heather,
SANDY  MACPHERSON
 ��� ^ ���	
At Home
On Thursday oi last week Mrs.
(kei. i J. K. Kobertson and the Women's Association oi St. David's
Church were "At Home" at thc Manse
to the ladies and friends of the congregation. There was a line gathering. Tiie short programme of music
was rendered by Mrs. W, S. Jamieson
of Collingwood. a former member of
Mr. Robertson's choir in Grand l-'eirks.
W. Grant oi Ring-
rood Street, and Mrs. W. W, Rob-
rlson  of  Windsor   Street.
wit nippit  in  the bud, feir as  sune as
I  menshuned it  tae thc wife she pul
the tin hat  on  it
Hooever, I ken fine -he's no' agin
onything o' ihi- nature, but it's a pc-
Clllyiar thin* whenever I nieii-lum
onything that's likely tae he tae her
advantage she immediately smells a
rat.
I had pinted ool tac hcr the desirability o' sic an instituihun. Hoo that
it wud bring the Edinburgh folk in
touch wi' yin anither. he lhe means .,'
rein-win' auld acquaintances, an' incidentally makin' new yin't.
"Weel Sandy." she says; "I dinna
think yae need lae farm an associa- ;,ls.. Mr< Wm
shun tae mak ony new acquaintances
���ill facl I tlv-ik yae hae a hanged
sichl eewn- mony the noo. A merried
man has quite enough tae dae at hame
withoot gaun an' wa-tin' his time
bletherin' wi' a lot o' auld cronies."
Vae could see that she didna thoroughly unnerstaun what 1 wis drivin'
at
I explained tae her that it didna
necessarily mean lhat I wud he ony
mare ool the house than usual, an' that
if it did wc wud hc baith  thegither,
ie.r it   wisna intended  tae he ony  -tag "^T    ��� .   ���    .    77"
orga.ii/.ashun. .     ,The Ka"er At Home
We didna argy eeny mare aboot ii ' Miss Topham, win. taught English
that nicht hut i could sec she still!1'.1 tlR' only daughter of the German
had her doubts as tae ils aims an' ob- ; Emperor, drawn, in a heiok just pub-
jecks. Hilled, a real picture eef the household
It wis jisi the ither dav she made | which i- dominated by a restless mas-
the crack tac mc lhat Scotsmen made I,er- A removal to or freun one eef the
puir merried men. It wis a" richt when | l"rl> Royal palaces lakes place at
Ihey were coortin'. she cemlccnyicd. j ~l,"r' notice, and with whirlwind
butter wudna melt 111 their month lull   ��Pecd,    "Wc are like the  Israelites at
Miss
Rutherford���Topping
Mr William Rutherford and
Minnie Topping, both of Vancou
were married by Rev. J. R. Robertson
at St. David's Manse, on Friday, October 30th, at 7 p.m. Mr. and Mrs.
James Grieve were witnesses tee the
ceremony. The young couple will
take up residence in the city.
when il came tac inanin' guid efter
they were merried it wl quite anither
questyin. She went n�� tae illustrate
heeo the Canadian men done a'nuisl a'
thc wnrk p..m abool tin ieee.se an'
treated their wives as if they were
their swcctlierts still (gee whiz 1 ���
"Ililt a Scotstnan." tac gie yae her ain
weirds; "if there's onything hc can pan
off on tae the wife tac dae. he'll die it.
Break the slicks, empty thc ashes.
shake ihe carpets, mak the beds, wash
the dishes, in fact I've heard o* sonic
o' them even deniaiindin' tae get their
breakfasts in "-heir beds on a Sunday
mornin'. If I had my life tae begin
owre again." she conteenvics. "it wudna be a Scotsman I wud tnairry."
What dae yae think o' that for a
character, freens! I expostulated wi'
her an' telt hcr it wis a maitter o'
opeenyin. What wis nred in the hone
wud come oot ill thc Hesh.
While I didna attempt tae deny
lhat seeme o' they darned Canucks
overstepped the limits o1 manly propriety��� I askit her if she thocht the
Canadian weemen were ony the better
ee't. I gien her my opeenyin as tae
them an' I ceiuld see that 1 had struck
a sympathetic cord in her hert.
"What guid dis it dae them." I asks;
"maybe it gies them mare time lae
pent iheir faces an' dye their hair, but
yaeve telt tile yersel that a hale lot o'
them yae talk tae are aye complaitiiu'
about haen sare heids an' feelin' oot-
o'-sorts. an' it's no' the lirst time yaeve
telt me. either, if they wud dae a wee
bitty marc wark they wudna he aye
sae near deein'. "
Hooever. that's gaun awa off the
questyin a'thegither, as Dicky said
when they askit him where that Beeven
millyutl  surplus  had  went.
1 wis doon at the meetin' that nicht
llle .society wis formed, an' yae can
bet yaer sweet life if ihat getherin1 win
ony criterion, then the Wild Reekie-
ites are gaun tac mak the Vancoover
folk  sit up an'  tak notice.
There wis a cremel o' ahoot cichty
present an. linen, it wis rale graiind
tae hear the "braid Auld Scottish
tongue," if the Edinburgh dialect can
ceuue under sic a dclinecshun.
The Glesca folk used tae refer tae
the folk in Edinburgh as bein' kin' o'
uppish: "I'cannics an' red herrin'" an'
���p-nle an' povertv' wsri iwa voyi in
which ihey used lae express their
love feer Us. but if ony St. Mungo fellie had heen present that nicht he
wiul hae got B rude shock if hc thocht
WC were ony  the less sociable.
I've nae doobt '11 hae mare ta��, tell
yae ahoot this assoeiashun as time
goes  em   an'   in   the   meantime   I   wud
advise a'  Edinburgh  fedk  tae attend
tlie getherin'  next  Tuesday  nicht.  tlle
10th.
*   ��   *
1 wunner if ony o' yae noticed in
the papers the ither nicht a paragraf
where it menshuned that the folk o'
Dunfermline, the place where Andry
Carnegie wis horn, had taken a hit
umbrage agin him an' started daen
some damage tae his statue an' some
mare o' his "benefackshuns."
Tae tell yae the truth, freens. I wis
richt gled tac read that.
I min' the time when if yae dared
say a word agin the steel magnate in
Dunfermline toon yae wud hae been
arrested for high treason. He had the
folk o' lhe auld grey toon bocht haund
an' lit wi' an elegant system o' bribery. The provost an' toon council
done the proposln', but Andry done
the  disposin'.
Hooever. there wis aye yin or twa
that dared tae speak the truth an'
telt the folk that what he wis gien
tac them in the shape o' legacies wis
bein' extracted oot O lhe bluid o' men.
weemen an' bairns in his gigantic
mills owre in Amcriky.
Andry wis a cocky little devil an'
because he happened tae cat an' drink
yae time wi' the heid hoch owre in
Germany  he  thocht the folk wud tak
the Passover," grumbled one lady of
the Court. "We must always have
eeiir loins girt, our shoes on our feel���
sliiees suitable for any and every eec-
casioti. lit for walking on palace Hours
or down muddy roads���our staff in
emr hand; nobody dare relax and settle down in be comfortable." The
Emperor disapproves of people who
want to settle down and be comfortable. In a jeelly. good-humored but
none the less autocratic kind of way,
he sets everybody doing something.
As regards the Crown Prince's
character, Miss Topham says:���"He
is an ardent soldier and a typical Ho-
hcnzollern. with supreme confidence
in the slar eif his family, anil earnestly
desires lo live his own life in his own
way. to move with the times, to be
a child of his century; and it is probable that with a little more experience of life, especially perhaps of that
discipline of sorrow which initiates
most men into a new sphere of
thought, he will develop into the man
the world hopes to see in him���something steadfast and strong, and perhaps a little meirc silent."
CANADIAN'S WAR SONG
To
"Shove    the    Kaiser's    Whiskers
Down His Throat"
There is a delicious whiff of the
West about thc war song of the Canadian cavalry contingent which will
be heard on the battlefields oi Europe.
This contingent, composed of liritish
Columbian Roughriders, and now
known as the 31st B.C. Horse, sang
its song on its way from Vancouver
to Valcartier camp. The four verses
of the song are as  follows.���
Hritish Columbia heerse are we,
From Canada's Pacific Sea.
To make the Kaiser understand.
lie must respect mir Motherland,
Now  we're e,n our way tee war;
What the hell are we ge'ing for?
We're geiing t'i get the Kaiser's goal
And shove  his   whiskers  down   his
throat.
W'e are the B.C.  Il'irse, you see,
And on our  way  t" Germany.
We'll   slick  as  eene  through   thick
and thin.
And  fighl  our  way  to old   lierlin
We'll make him bow and scrape to
us.
l-'or stirring up this nasty  fuss;
We'll make him dance the Highland
fling.
And "Rule.  Britannia," loudly  sing
Settling  tbe  Belgian   Farmerr   in
Saskatchewan
A movement haling iu view the
settlement of Belgian farmers ill
Saskatchewan has been started at
Regina and is receiving good support. Lieutenant Governor Brown
having agreed to act as patron to the
Belgian Relief Ceimmittee in charge.
Careful attention will be given to the
details of the scheme in order that
the results may be satisfactory. The
Pootmans Bros,, who are of Belgium
extract and residents of Regina. are
auieuig the members of the relief committee, and are endeavoring tei carry
out thc scheme lo a successful conclusion. It is claimed thai the Belgian farmers are among the nuest
skilled in the world, and with the desolation of Iheir own land, caused by
the war. it is recognized that many of
them will have to emigrate to other
lands, and as Saskatchewan has an
abundance of land, not now cultivated, the opportunities for these Belgian farmers to settle in this cannery
wemld be great. Lieutenant Governor Brown, in discussing this scheme
recently, pointed out that the Belgians
would make excellent dairymen and
market  gardeners.
What
a
Proud
Bird
He Is!
%
The
Reason
He's Fed
on Stuff
from this
Store
V
MARTIN'S
FLOUR   AND
FEED   STORE
49TH AVE. and FRASER STREET
We sell at the lowest prices for cash.   All orders promptly attended to
Glazed Cement
Sewer Pipe
B.C.
Is the choice of property owners in
every cily where its value has been
demonstrated. It gives good service
and has durability.
Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe Co.
155 FRONT STREET WEST
Phone Fairmont  122
Milk! Milk! Milk!
Turner's Pasteurized and Germless Milk and Cream is the best
diet for Infants and Invalids.    Superior for tea, coffee and cocoa.
AND GOOD FOR EVERYBODY
Sold at  10 quarts for $1.00.
Visit our big new modern dairy and we will show you why it
is we can supply you with the best milk and cream and buttermilk
and butter sold in  Greater Vancouver.
TURNER'S DAIRY
OFFICE AND DAIRY i    Cor. ONTARIO AND 17th AVENUE.
Phone Fairmont 597
More Light and Better Light for the Home
USE TUNGSTEN LAMPS.���This is advised as the Tungsten Lamp
gives three times the amount of light of a carbon lamp on the
same consumption of current.
USE CONTINUOUS WIRE DRAWN FILAMENT LAMPS.���This
type is the only class of Tungsten Lamp you should use. Don't
fail t'i ask for it when you buy Tungstens. It bears the same
relation t'i other types of Tungstens as does ilu- best grade ol
steel to cast iron.
We carry at our Salesrooms a full line of the best type of Tungsten Lamps as noted above. Our prices are exceptionally low when
the high standard of our lamps is considered.
Ask our clerk to demonstrate the difference between a Tungsten
and Carbon Lamps, using the same amounl i f current.
Carrall and Hastings Streets 1138 Granville Street (near Davie)
GLADSTONE    HOTEL
FIRST CLASS WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS R. CURRY, Prop.
HOUSEHOLD GOODS and OFFICE FURNITURE
*wi\:i<
IN THE  ONLY  REAL  PADDED MOVING VANS IN  B.C
CAMPBELL STORAGE COMPANY^
MOVING - PACKING- STORAGE-SHIPPING
fll PHONE SEYMOUR 7360. OFFICE 857 BEATTY ST. g|
���___^_
 ;	 FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,  NOVEMBER
High
Grade
Shoe
Repairing
Done by
Modern
Methods
WE DO WORK CHEAP, BUT NOT CHEAP WORK
GOODYEAR SHOE
REPAIRING CO.
625 PRNDER STREET       VANCOUVER
CEO. H. MORRIS. Prop.
TO THE WAR
BRITON AND GERMAN MEET ON WAY TO ENLIST
By ROBERT E. PINKERTON
Hughes Bros' Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We carry everything in Wines, Liquors and Cigars
No order too small, and none too large for this popular Liquor Store
Store open every evening until 11 p.m.
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
Leaving our Store every Thursday and Friday morning at 9 a.m.
Price List mailed free on application
MILK
How Satisfactory it is to the Housekeeper  to   be   sure   that
the MILK, CREAM and BUTTERMILK    she    receives    is
Pasteurized and Germless.
Delivered in Sealed Bottles, Perfectly Sterilized.
BEACONSFIELD HYGIENIC DAIRY
905 Twenty-fourth Avenue East
Phone Fairmont 2391 L PRICE & GREEN, Proprietors
GRAND   fENTRAL   flOTEL
GRAUER and GRAUER
The place where they "keep hotel"���
A fully modern hostelry, near at
hand to South Vancouver���it's the
"Grand Central" when you go to
Eburne.
EBURNE   STATION,   B.C.
JOINT SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
Incorporated
1908
A Joint Savings Account may be opened at the Bank of Vancouver
in the names of two or more persons. In these accounts either party
may sign cheques or deposit money. For the different members of
a family or a firm a joint account is of'en a great convenience. Inr
tercst paid on balances.
THE
BANK OF VANCOUVER
Anderson Market
The Family Butcher at
(he Sanitary Shop
Try our mild cured Hams and
Bacons, machine sliced.
The place to get your Cooked
Hams and Jelly Tongue.
Don't forget we carry the finest
New Zealand Butter and Local
Eggs.
FOR  A   SQUARE  DEAL  AND
QUALITY, TRY
J. E. ANDERSON
Prop.
Tel. Fair 1634
4192 MAIN STREET
FOR
Sashes, Doors,
Windows, and
all  kinds  of
Mill   Work
THE
CORPORATION  OF
DISTRICT OF
SOUTH VANCOUVER
Extension of Period of
Rebate on Taxes
NOTICE is hereby given that the
peril ul for obtaining rebate on taxes
has heen further extended to November KI. 1914. Any person not having
received a lax statement can do so
hy applying to the undersigned'.
Taxes in arrears up In and including
1913 will he liable to he sold for
taxes   after   December   31,   1914.
WILLIAM  RILEY,
Collector.
SEE
1
H. N. WALKER
167 TWENTIETH AVE. W.
We  have the most  up-to-date
machinery.
All Doors, Windows and Sashes
morticed.
We  guarantee all our work.
PRICES RIGHT
Call and see us���We put you
vrin
Phone Fairmont 836
ESTIMATES GIVEN
Al live n'clnck of a bright August
iih.nling Hilly Throop rolled emt eef
hi- blanket!, with po e.tljer thought in
liis unliarliered head than to cross lhe
lake ;iinl spend the day in the raspberry patch. At ten o'clock be had
starred fnr Europe, singing "Kulc
Britannia," and al 10.05 he had taken
his inst prisoner of ��.n.
At   six   n'clnck   hadn't   kneeivn   there
was a war. mn had he .suspected I hai
ihere-   might  be  one.    Hilly    seldom
gave  thought   tee  anything  more  im-,
portanl   than  lhe  placing of WOH bait   fed llis 'l"i"g anything las
a trip ti, Winnipeg three years befure,
had seen two German comedians in
a i Ina tie' This man didn'l talk like
them, hut the "iss" and lhe "aheaeli���"
inn   lhe   same.
"Say.''   he   demanded,   "are   ye eii   a
Dutchman?"
"A Dutchman I am not A Dutchman cornea front Holland. I am a
German."
The   lighl   danced   in    Billy's   eyes.
He had nol  hoped In lind Ihe foe se,
seieui.    Hut his woods caution prevell-
h.   Ii might
or the selling of a fisher trap. Bill
il was througii such things that Hilly
made his living; perhaps he v/as imt
ni a deeper grove than most of us.
At seven o'clock lie mel old Sam
Mclveir in lhe middle of White Oiler
lake. Half a mile away he' knew lhat
Sam had a new hunch of trouble, The
swing of his paddle told it plainly,
and Milly Waited unlil his fellow trapper nas alongside.
"Whal's  wrong,  Sam?"  he asked.
"Everything, Hilly, everything;," was
lhe mournful answer.' "We'll starve
this winter sine'. There's no way out
of il."
"Whal's lhe matter? Have they
ipiii  making  cartridges    ami    snare
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for oublic meetings, dances, etc., to Let
Apply W, J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
wire?"
"Worse than that. There won't he
any market for fur this winter because Europe won't buy any. Sugar's
gone up a dollar a sack, and Hour's
going to he cheap al any money. A
prior  Irapper'll just  naturally  starve."
"What's eating Europe that they
won't buy .any fur?" asked Billy, genuinely  interested   for   once   in   Sam's
I roubles.
"This terrible war, son, this terrible
war. It's the greatest war the world
has ever seen, and no one knows
where it'll end."
"Are we fighting?" demanded Hilly
eagerly.
"Yes, we're in it, too. The telegraph fellow ij> the station heard a
mess.ige'iwo days ago that England
declared war on Germany."
"And  that means  Canada, too?"
"Yes, Canada, too."
The niournfulness of Sam's lone had
a depressing effect for a moment, and
then Hilly remembered that Sam
would he mournful while hc was taking a silver gray fox from a trap.
"Whoop!" he shouted as. with a
mighty swirl of his paddle, he turned
his canoe and started hack across the
lake.
"Where arc you going?" cried Sam.
"To lhe war," answered Hilly, without missing a stroke or turning his
head.
Hilly paddled  straight  lee his  cabin.
II was (he work of half an hour to
put a few clothes, a little grub, a tent
and a blanket in packsack, Then he
took all Ihe cartridges he could and,
cleaned his rifle and hurried down to
the canoe without stopping to close
the cabin door. Before nine o'clock
he was headed for the railroad, fifty
miles distant, singing "Rule Britannia"
as he paddled.
There was nothing deep or intricate
in Billy's reasoning. Sentiment governed his actions, as often as logic,
and "how?" or "why?" rarely retained him. The main idea was all he
cared aboul. Details hc ignored or
trod under foot.
Thus, when Billy started to war,
lhe whyfor of the fighting or the
means of getting into action never
entered his head. He wanted to go,
and he started. If he found rapids
in his'.way/'he'd riiii them or make a
portage. But he wouldn't worry about
them until ' the 'white waler showed
over the how.
Billy's precipitance was not due to
a martial spirit. In all his life in thc
wilderness he had not had a ipiarrel.
He had even passed slights with a
laugh, for he was so lacking in conceit that he din't consider himself, as
plain Billy Thneop, of much importance.
Bul now, with England at war. it
was another matter. He was still
Billy Throop. but a subject of the
king, and he knew (he king needed
men like him. Even then, where there I
could have been reason for conceit, he
lacked It. There is no more resourceful, self-reliant, competent individual
in the world Ihan the Canadian woodsman, and there were few heller than
Billy.
As he ncared the south end of
White Ottfr lake, Billy had also developed a fair amount of animosity
for Germany and Germans, lie didn't
know anything about Ihcm hut the
mere facl thai liny were lhe objects
of his country's wrath was sufficient.
IK1 swung lhe canoe up lo the shore
al the end of lhe portage wilh a final
burst of his song, only to slop iu thc
middle of llle last line. Or, rather,
Ile ended with "B'joii', b'jou'", for a
man was sitting on a rock at lhe edge
of lhe water.
"Good morning," the stranger replied, and Billv fell a tingling stripe
down the middle of his hack. Never
had he heard the words spoken with
just lhat accent, and to him it was
a subconscious warning, a warning
recognized only by men who have developed a sixth sense in a life in the
open. He glanced down to see that
his  rifle was ready.
"Could you tell me, please, from
where you are going?" asked the
stranger as Billy stepped carefully
ashore.
"From where I'm going?" repeated
Hilly with some amazement. "Sure,
I'm going from home."
"And  to where  iss it you  are going?"
"I'm going to town."
That "iss" doubled a growing mistrust and he faced the stranger warily.
"Then perhaps it iss that you could
take  me?"
"Perhaps I could, but where's your
i.vire?"
"That  I do not know.    Since  day
before yesterday it has been lost already."
The  "already" settled it.    Billy, on
he a trap. He turned with greal unconcern lei his canoe and lifted ont
Ihe pack and rifle. Then, llle rifle iu
his right hand, he faced lhe man on
llle  rock.
"Sn yeeu're a German, eh? Well,
just crawl down off that nee-k and don'l
make any funny moves. You're my
prisoner."
"Hut why should you make "l" me
a prise,iiir? I have no money, nothing to steal."
"I'm no robber!" exclaimed Hilly
angrily. "I don't want your money.
You're a prisoner uf war." Then he
added, when llle olher failed lo show
Comprehension: "Didn'l you know
we're fighting?"
For the lirst lime the expression of
the stranger changed.
"You  mean  that it  is declared,  lhe
war?" he asked,  eagerly.
"You bet, Dutchy.    We're fighting."
"Then  I  would  wish lei gal  I'i  lhe
United Stales that  I  may .return  l>
fighl with the Kaiser.'
"If wishes were sleigh dogs, every
Indian in the bush would he: driving
Ihrough the front door of a wholesale
liquor, store. My v/ish is the one lhat
goes this time, und you mooch ah nig
with me to Port Arthur. They'll he
waiting for you  there."
The German had slid down fr'jtn thc
rock and stood before Billy. For th"
first time thc woodsman noted the
hollow checks, the dill eyes. Then
he remerlecrri1 what the othiv hail
said about lo.'illg his canoe.
"You  looked  sorl   of  peaked.   Dutchy,"   he   said   in   a   less   belligerent
tone.    "Had anything  to cal  lately?"
"Not for Iwo days, since I have lost
myself."
Billy instantly forgot the war. He
knew too well what it meant to be
lost in tlie woods; he had heen hungry  loo many times himself.
"Get back onto lhe rock and lake
it easy while I rustle up some grub,"
he commanded, "There's no reason
you should starve just because you're
a German."
Hilly had out his axe hefeire lhe
stranger was hack on his seal. In the
next live minutes Ihe "prisoner" saw
faster movements than he had ever
thought possible. Wood was cut, a
fire started, a kettle hung in the blaze
and lard heated in a frying pan. A
loaf of sour dough bread was sliced
and dried moose meat denuded of its
black casing and.laid in thc grease.
Billy didn't talk; he was loo busy.
The German didn't speak because of
amazement and a damp mouth. The
odors that reached him were far more
savory than ever emanated from a wiener schnitzel or hassenpfeffcr. When
at last the meal was ready, Hilly
watched his prison'er with interesi.
The German did nol eat rashly or
hurriedly, however. He proceeded
leisurely, hut surely, without thc rush
with which the hushman attacks his
three meals a day. Talking during
meal time was against Billy's code,
hul he saw thai lhe German's pace permitted him time for words. And he
was curious.
So. when the meal was finished, Billy had the story. Karl Sussdorf. graduate of Bonn���he didn't tell Billy thai,
or some of the other things���son of a
prosperous manufacturer, had come to
America In study American manufacturing methods, and, incidentally, to
invest some of his father's money. A
gold mine in western Ontario had interested hiin, and he was returning
from an inspection of lhe property, with an Indian guide, when he had
wandered from camp one evening and
never fniind Iiis way hack. When
Hilly met him. two days later, he had
aboul given up, and. weak freun hunger, had sat down al lhe end of lhe
While' Otter portage t<> await the possible chance of being found.
"Well. Dutchy. that's hard lines."
was Billy's comment as he picked up
lhe dishes and began lo wash them.
"Here you are, lost in the hush and
wanting tee get hack tee lighl me. and
here I am. hurrying OUI In light you.
and we meet right here on White Otlcr
porlage. Hut I suppose that's one of
lhe' chances nl" war, as they say. And.
as the chances are againsl you. we'll
just mooch on down to lhe railroad."
He stood up suddenly and looked at
Sussdorf.
"I suppose I ought to lie you" up,"
he said, "hut lhat would he a lot of
bother. If you promise not to try
to run away* or hit me on the head
with lhe axe when I ain't lookin', I'll
let you go that way."
"I give you,,my word. Mr. John Bull,
that 1 will not make an escape or with
the axe or anything else hit you. 1
have served in der Kaiser's army, and
I know of war the rules, as do you."
"Me? I don't know anything about
the rules. I never even saw an army.
Hut I'm willing to take a man's word."
Together they journeyed the rest of
the day. Sussdorf in the bow with a
sincere but inefficient blade, and Billy,
again singing 'Rule Britannia," heaving the canoe albng from the stern.
He was not angered by the lack of
assistance he received. Who'd ever
expect a Dutchman to paddle anyhow?
Despite the German's assurances.
Hilly was watchful. He kept the rifle
near him and, on portages, he made
Sussdorf take the canoe and go a-
head. They had another meal in mid-
afternoon, for Hilly intended to paddle
until late before he made camp. At
Twin   Lake   portage,     however,     the
SIX   REASON!
WHICH ACCOUNT FOR THE SUPERIORITY OF
CREOSOTED WOOC
BLOCK PAVEMENT!
ITS DURABILITY���Does not crumble or pul er
ize under tlie densest traffic; second only to gra iin
blocks
ITS EASE OF REPAIR���No difficulty being eX.
penenced in removing and replacing the blocks, no
expensive plant or skilled workmen required.
ITS SANITARY QUALITIES���Creosote bein,'
highly antiseptic and waterproofing material ins'; nt-
ly destroys all genus, prevents the absorption of
street filth and consequent decay.
ITS NOISELESSNESS���The rattle and bang ol
vehicles passing over its smooth surface absorbed
and muffled till the quiet of the dirt road is obta��n>cd.
ITS DUSTLESSNESS���Does not pulverize; ihe
heaviest traffic only pounding down the wood filnes
to offer the greater resistance.
TTS CLEANLINESS���Having a smooth surface and
being waterprooi it does not differ in this respect
from asphalt.
We manufacture blocks of the highest possible
standard, the verv best materials only being used and
in the DOMINION WOOD BLOCKS we believe
we produce an article that has no equal.
DOMINION CREOSOTING
 COMPANY  LIMITED���
Vancouver, B. C.
E. W. MACLEAN, Ltd.
MEMBERS VANCOUVER STOCK EXCHANGE
MEMBERS VANCOUVER GRAIN EXCHANGE
MEMBERS OF CALGARY OIL EXCHANGE
DEALERS IN ALL ACTIVE CALGARY STOCKS, BONDS, ETC.
OIL STOCKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Stock Department, Seymour 6913
EXCHANGE BUILDING, 142 HASTINGS WEST
CANYON  VIEW HOTEL
CAPILANO,   NORTH  VANCOUVER, I? C.
H. LARSON, Manager. I>.  LARSON, I'roprietoi
(Continued on page 6)
*
/
%
/
Pi
���tu
4
' w__
iiU*     'd'
"T'I
���l.-'St
-rtr-i������
^Stikikw
1
���
Elevation 625 feet. One hour's trip from Vancouver Telephone 146
SCENIC   DELIGHTS,   FISHING.   HUNTING,   MOUNTAIN   CLIMBING,   Etc.
Unequalled Resort for Holiday, long or short.      Family Rooms
en suite with special rate.
Modern appointments throughout, spacious grounds, high-class icrvice at moderate
rates.    Easy trail to top of Grouse Mountain, altitude 3,000 feet
-4>
TERMINAL   CITY  IRON   WORKS
1949 ALBERT ST. TELEPHONE   HIGH.   ISI
ENGINEERS, MACHINISTS AND FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND SPECIALS
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTION'
WILLOW HOSPITAL
Corner BROADWAY and WILLOW
PATIENTS RECEIVED  FROM $15.00 PER WEEK
Miss HALL and Miss WESTLEY, graduate nurses
Phone Fairmont 2165 SATURDAY.   NOVEMBER
1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
Hastings
and
Gore Ave.
EMPRESS
Lawrence & Sandusky, Lessees
MA TINEES WF.DNESDA Y and SA TURDA Y
Phone
Sey. 3907
Week   commencing   Monday evening,   November  9,   1914
THE LAWRENCE STOCK COMPANY
With
MISS  LUCILLE PALMER
In the uproariously funny College play
THE COLLEGE WIDOW
By GEORGE ADE
Prices  25c   50c
Matinees 25c any seat
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
The Million Dollar Mystery
OCTOBER 9 AND 10
Forty-six reels.    9 miles of film.    Hull of thrillr.  adventures and sensation never before attempted.
Also a chance to win $10,000.    See manager for particulars.
THEATRICAL
Empress Theatre
Ve-xi week ilie' Lawrence Company
"'"I offci ..i tin- Empn -- 'I ieatn
starting Mi.nda) evening, November
': tne famous play ol college life by
George   Adc   entitled,  "Thc    I
H illeell."
Vs .ni . exposition of the
oi some 'ei .,ur college s thii i/erj popu-
"       '�� withoul an equal and the
satire is to goi ���! hum red thai even
[he rah rah boyi ai .1 girli whom il
luis thc hardcsl laugh the loudi it al
'he  inappj  dialogui   and funnj   situa
Georgi    Vdi
��iili up-to-date -I.ii g and "The  Col
legi   \\ ie! iw" is a ��� lassie in I
11  i - e new |
������     \   t    -,���       .     popular  prices,  th
high   coyaltj by   iu
and  tlie bin
Ursqualled
E.  D
i
H
meritorious  which  thi
ithletic -i'i.   ire'  1 ai  >��� l   proffi red    I "
nt - a widi  i.-in
nil  manner   of   tastes  and
should find  u imething in it te   et
Topping ilu  bill ni'   1
Guy Ra�� - �� K Company in ., ���
ly iiiii-i. al  id) calli
yiionymoui   \[ i~- I 'lai ge i    a daintj  lit!
wl:n   -i;:- i   and  i' ni i
���-   of   her   nuelie-e   i
topics     I : ��� va  thai  i
lie-  presidi nt  of t       Bol rd    ef  Tl
Home  5<  ri tai     and no��   hi   ii Firsl '
I...re! of the   Admiralty.
I   ri membi r  the  nr-t time   I   I
him in the House.    We- hael jusl been
eloquence
For  spontaniety !
-public]
���  i   little   We Minimi i- not  to
at< n   in   England   t daj      Your
-   Item   1.,  talk!     Mr.
'
di] I  ii. itii
��� Ik
bul hi  - ii
ill     Then i ami  Winston,   A-
had prepare '
and - i upulous pains    The h- usi   ie a- I
hill's tall
.n
\\ in-i
PANTAGES
Vaudeville      Means      Pantafi*
Vaudeville
Graham,   Resident   Manager
Phone Seymour 3406
ALL NEXT WEEK
The Great "Girl" Show
"YESTERDAYS"
shows   daily    2.45.   7.20.   9.15
Admission���Matinees.     15c;     nights.
15c and 25c; boxes,  50c.
liul   tin-
>','"" " " '";��   *" ' nil, mindgleam-
*������     ' ' .ii-li and ii
|wn 'Plet'  ,,!1, u"rk"' mak,n�� '
of Churchill's   11 ou*
���
man     'S" < .n fee I thai
ri-l;ir>   of   State    alie
g  compan;   m edi 'I  for th
propel    presentation,    combining    to idyl of childhood one of the mos
*eep ii oui of the hands ol the aver- ligbtful "girl" acts thai has ever visit-
gets and producers. i <��� the C   tsl     I hi  sta - havi
li  will  bi   pul  on  i    thi   Empn ss ''"''''"':'    |1, :"' "':i;')
with thc full cast anil a small armj of
i If
i-  tl
DREAMLAND
H.   H.   DEAN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
ALL THE BEST AND NEWEST   IN   MOVING   PICTURES
MATINEE  SATURDAY AT 2 p.m.
iinii
lupcrs. and witl Oi   iln   sl  11 mei  im
efl Mi      Lucill    P tlmi I   --��� ill be ,ur"
seen in the title role, and ii  fits her "'c'   Musicians, a  company of
charming   personalitj   admirably.     In colored  nnn  who havi   a  ripping
ihe   verj   funny     characteri;  ���   ��� trumental    iingit       ind  dancing
Flora   Wiggins  will  appear   Margarel The;   plaj   all  n
Stirling, Mr   Layne. '>hich go i
Law rence,
r  favorites
Marriott, and M
Mr. Russell, Mr. Edw
Collins  with  the  othi
have iiiiieiirt.-mt roles,
football enthusiasts will have
their innings in "The Coll ge W idow,"
a large pun of tht interesi of the story
centering   in   this   popular   game
Pantages  Theatre
From along the line comes the un
animous verdict that the- show under
lined  f ir   Pastagi -  nexl  wei I.
of   the   mosl   evenly     balanced
maki   up ie compli te or-
\|;    i' and  m  add
wili jpl       "  "  mi lodii - and lh    mor - r
cenl ragtimi   succi sses.   Th
n pri -' nt    im    oldl  -
Se ml  cm i    ton  'ie lil and the atm ���
p| eri    if thi cl place ari   care
fully  preserved.
i Ithers of importance on    tin
who   will   add   to   the   gaiety,   of   the
week     in     Wun-,luver    are .     Arthur
Whitelaw, the  Irish Chatterbox; Mi-
t'.eiiiie-II  et  Xcinuiir in ii  singing and
medancing  act  and  Thi   Great   Harrara,
un! world's    in.niieii -n roller skaters.
nu to  rea
-
he  i-   under     !
, - msni ���-    i '-���-!   th
en '1 up b)   sheei      -        f ��ill     'I"
immei n   Chui  hill him
self is highly strung and nervous.    11
��� tinualh
em.ering and ing, alwaj
ted,   alv. ays   si nsitive   to   impt
itlessi
tn   In   up looming
i'i       .-   -:,      Vet   nutv ardly   he     -
self-reliant, cool, somi tin   ) qniti
and     tatui sque.     I lard
icts,   Inn   :i   brilliant   -
and lei did  metaphoi
Ihe garb
Lord of tbe
ty.    Tlie- sl eking
lly, Winston  wai only
ctary.      It was
known    by    those    n Ine kn m   these
i  was not
spicu-
liul   McKenni
Admit ul  even i
ght that he
and "Reggie" might vcrj   -.i-i! cl
their
mutual I abim i  did
not entirely appr eve but Wit
his way.   So he c ime i main-
-
ng. ll
-   the
one  man  I
W inston took   ��� iblem
-.  to I"- prep n il, I le determined
that,  I    aui
the i e tested, I
iinii
He v in,-ul.
Cedar   Cottage   Theatre
"THE HOUSE THAT PLEASES"
20th Avenue and Commercial Street
SATURDAY MATINEE. 2 to 5
... We show the best, cleanest and most up to date pictures with a
complete change daily.
COME AND  SEE
Palace Varieties Theatre
SOUTH HILL
45th Avenue and Fraser Street
FIRST    CLASS    MOTION    PICTURES    AND
AMATEUR THEATRICALS
(fl Where do We South Vancouver People
EA T when we are Down Town ?
TALK   POLITICS.   ELECT   REEVES
AND COUNCILLORS AND DECIDE
THIS WAR OVER ONE OF OUR
25c. DINNERS
THE    PENDER    CAFE   Pender St. West
 -.
CHURCHILL
By HUGH S
THE  MAN
.EAYRS
AT
THE
HELM
-in e-rli and display il ard
its entirel  . a gl  ri  us n hole, in wl nig  I     Hi   decided               -  e  should
argument, p rsuasie n   truth  and - more overpi         bf
gery, play each their pari lo the I -      ones      He   went   after  in-
��� l ige. e in all forms, in all plai es
You would nevei   thinl   tl   I
ind in all ; '���  he  went afti r
il   hard      Ruthlessly   I ���    assailed   red
t.-ipe-.    ll,   drovi   his lanci   of  Reform
CENTER & HANNA
LIMITED
Established 1893
Refined Service    New Location
1049 GEORGIA ST.
Opposite new Y. M. C. A.
Fireproof     Columbarium     and
Mausoleum
OPEN  DAY  AND  NIGHT
Seymour 2425
JCS. H. BOWMAN
ARCHITECT
910-11    YORKSHIRE   BLDQ.
SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER
FOR GOOD
ROAD BUILDING MATERIAL
We claim we have the best.
The largest Plant and a downstream haul.
G1LLEY BROS., Limited
Dealers in
Coal, Cement, Plaster, etc.
NEW WESTMINSTER
Phone 15-16
On Sunday afternoon there was a
large turnout to the Bursill Institute
to hear the lecture by Mr. Donald
Downie on the war situation, he taking for his topic "Red Ruin in Belgium," which held  the large audience
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND  STORE
Can supply your needs at right
prices.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right  at  Station)
in the keenest interest. There wcre
some wonderful war pictures displayed and a collection was taken up to be
applied to the construction of a rifle
range in the basement of the institution tei be used by the reservists.
there was a picture much in vogue
several years ago called "Dignity and
Impudence." li g<et to be a very popular picture, particularly a- it was supposed to point a moral to small ]h-h-
ple who forgot the delightful maxim
aboul being seen and not heard. There
were two dogs in the picture. ' >nc
wa�� a rather venerable anil noble
looking ma-tiff of years and sub-
���tance, who sat quietly and philosophically looking at a small whelp of a
terrier who had an irritatingly impudent expression���dignity and impudence.
Daring an intimate sketch nf the
Right Honorable Winston Spencer
Churchill, M.I'., distinguished soldier,
First Lord of the Admiralty, descendant of the Marlboroughs, undoubted
genius, blatant egoist, anil general
gen nl fellow, brings back memories of
that picture.
Not that Winston could be said to
exactly personify dignity. Perhaps
when lie gets a little older lie may be
able to, but at present, dignity in his
make-up is conspicuous by iis absence. A volcano is very impressive
but it is t.eie thoroughly surcharged
with violence t" be considered dignified, li is a lively, bound-breaking
thing, that respects no sense of order;
a bursting, blustering, will-be-free kind
of affair, thai cares feir no convention
and would���if it could���laugh at the
Frenchman's phrase "de rigettr."
Winston Churchill is a human volcano in more ways than einc. When
you are most sure that he is ipiiet.
you wake with a start t.e find that he
was only somnolent, and the eruption
is a hint thai il might be well to get
out of the way, for verbal lava i.s sometimes very li,it. Tliey call Winston
Churchill, "l'enfant terrible." It i- a
tribute, for the child wlm is terrible-
usually ile.es things when he grows
up. li is not the studious book-loving,
lesson-learning youth who has the
biggest representation in the cabinets
of the world. And yet the Terrible
One can be sauve���when it suits him.
Here indeed is a strange admixture,
a make-up of complexities. Perhaps
a good key tee such a make-up is the
face and figure of the man himself.
Winston Churchill is forty years old;
and looks it. Hc is of rather more
than medium height, thick-set, and
stocky. His face, the faee eef the
Marlboroughs, whose lil<���>'<! runs in
his veins, has for its no est outstanding
i feature the broad massive brow, which
the Marlboroughs have had for generations. Receding far from the forehead���which by the way. its owner i-
feenil of caressing, when be is struggling with some Admiralty problem
or preparing a retort t'��>r Beresford���
is a rapidly thinning mass of hair. The
color is a sort of nondescript red. It
just misses being bronze and it certainly could never be mistaken for
golden. A pair of merry blue eyes
provide reminder that Winston, despite the cares of Empire, is a confirmed optimist.
The broad brow and the merry eyes
are the real indices of the problem
"What is the real Winston?" For the
eene points clearly to a sagacity and
wisdom and finished cleverness, which
even Ilis opponents concede him, while
the either indicates a certain boyish
frankness and love of fun that will neit
be damped, even by the importance of
being Mr. Churchill. Some years ago
Winston came to Canada, and those
who saw his father before him, saiif
"Here is another Randy!" And saving the beard, here is another Randy
���in externals at any rate. But Winston is very different from Lord Randolph in personality and temperament.
Barely had he finished with Harrow
and Sandhurst than he decided to go
in for soldiering. To begin with, the
glory of war appealed tei him. It was
fine to go and be a soldier, and do all
sorts eif hare-brained and dare-devil
things and get into all sorts of predicaments just for the sheer fun of
getting out again.    Unconsciously, he
got
hoy.
how ti
was wise in his choice of profession
He   needed   the   discipline   which   th
army alone could give.    It was fitting
thai  he -heiuld learn the need of re-n
, , . , ,i liriiiunni-
striimi   and   constraint   which   taught  iiSDe(ji    \
him thai he didn'l know everything ;
���then. In 1895 he served with the"
Spanish forces in Cuba. He "as then
twenty-one. Of course he goi into
tin- linn-light and he came home with
the Order of Military Merit pinned '��n
his uniform. Later he sav service
with ihe 31 st Punjab Infantry in India. In 1898 came the Nile Expeditionary Force, and Khartoum. Winston was aide-de-camp to Sir William
Lockhart, and gained a second clasp.
In the liner war he was a lieutenant
in the Snuth Africa Light Ileer>e. The
idea came to him that he might make
gei'nl as a war-correspondent, so in
1899 he joined the staff of the Meirning Post iii that capacity. Winston
made his coin excitement. Those were
the days when war corresponding
was exciting.
A steiry is told of him when he had
been made prisoner of war in this
campaign. A general of the opposing
forces held up the train that beere
"Winnie" and his fellow prisoners.
The general was -truck with this
young man with the near-red hair anel
ilu  impudent grin, who gave himself
up.
"May I have special privileges? I
am a war correspondent," said the
yuung man with the utmost sangfroid.
"Yem tight tem well to be treated a>
a civilian." came the general's retort;
and Winston became a prisoner. Bul
he escaped a month later. Spi"ii K"ji.
Vaal Krantz, Pieters, Johannesburg,
and Pretoria followed each other in
quick succession. Winston cami
through them all and came home to
England with six more clasps! Then
is nee doubt that he made a gee.eil soldier. No man of his age has 31 i
more service. No man of his age has
written more beee.ks. mi service. There
arc those who said that he wanted
ilie War Office job which Haldane
got. Bul the Admiralty was - wie-
wdiere in the offing.
IK- had a hard road t'i travel. He
made ii hard himself. In I'M' a Conservative, he was elected member lor
Parliament for < lldham In 1906 he j
was sitting as Liberal member for
Parliament for Manchester. And
thereby hangs a tale. T'e begin with, |
Winston, tin nigh an aristocrat by birth
and up-bringing was a democrat b)
persuasion, Hc decided that the Conservative leaders had nothing to offer
the people. And so, himself a patrician and coming of a long line of patricians, he left the Conservatives tee
join  thc   Liberals.
There has always been an idea in
the public mind that a man who changes his political creed is fit leer neith-
ing but tee be trodden underfoot eii
men. 'Churchill became aware of it.
'Turncoat" became his noun in apposition. It wa> hurled at him by
every paper, which a week before had
considered him the coming maii in
the Tory camp. Winston tok nee notice. He changed his seat in the
Heeu.se. ereissing over to lhe Liberal
benches, and the demonstration of
abuse from his old confreres, was appalling as it was galling. The climax
came when hc went to dine at his old
club, the "offileer's tent" oi the Conservative party. As he sat down,
every man in the room left his seat
and Winston was left alone with the
waiters.
Meanwhile, Sir Henry Campbell
Bannerman was wise in his day and
his generation. He saw that Winston
wanted office. He gave it to him.
Winston became Under Secretary  for
���:-i   same  W inste >n  w hn talks  le    , ��� iu
if you are abb- to gel him by him-ell
The outstanding facl that he i- bon-Uwifl anel straight at tl
heiuiniie. and good-fellowship. I wasjfoe of Officialism in high places. The
lucky enough to get an interview with "le! order gave place to a new and a
him a few months agn al the Admir- better. Nor was he unreasoning. He
ally. The interview was a scries of knew that, ii a new broom was to
surprises, Firsl of all I couldn't un- sweep clean, the ground musl be sur-
| derstand   why   Hi-   Majesty's     Firsl   veyed beforehand and the places where
t   the   Admiralty   should   wear  the unwanted gathered noted,
shabl
"[such a  shabby  Irock-coat.    I   thought
s' Cabinet Ministers lived ami died Beau
Lon!   "i  the   Admiralty   should
i If   course,   criticism   there   was   in
abundance    Tiie- pi rsonnel of the Heel
���\nil  when   he   -poke   he   was   changed.    Cries  of   shame     Oil
he actually lisped!    Sur-   fuel   was   inti  dm   d      Howls  of  de-
number two!    Where eliel he get rision.    Other  reforms  got  the  -nine
the splendid burst of rhetoric that he  reception     Winston's chief critic was
gave t.e the House?    But  I  think the   that   fine   old   sea-dog   Lord   Charles
main thing thai impressed me was his   Beresford.     1   remember   that  "Cbar-
sniile
elelll"
we,rel
you.    II   1
That smile captivate
cratizes  you.  if  I   may  use  the-
It puts ye ai in a rare good hu-
nieir, I don't wonder thai Winston is
popular with the boys of the King's
Navee! Such a smile is worth much
as an election a-set. Taken in conjunction with the awful frock-coat, il
makes ynu feel that the First Lord of
the Admiralty is a very human fellow
after all.
Winston's secret of success as a poli-
���as he i- familiarly styled���got
up one day at St. Stephens, and slated
Winston unmercifully for half an hour.
It was the old and the experienced
trying to chasten the new and the
untried. The new and the untried
rebelled. Then- never was a more
scathing retort than that which Winston administered. "Before the noble
lord gets up." he thing out, "he never
l-ii'.w- what he is going 1" say. When
he is up he- doesn't know what be is
tician is Iiis personality and his native 1 saying.    And  when  he  sits down  he
cleverness.   He is a g I judge of hu- doesn't  know   what    hi     has    said."
man nature.    I  asked a  Libera!  Whip I Beresford's   face,  always   red,  wenl   a
nee  why  it  was  that  Churchill   had  trifle  redder.
em anel g<a up so quicklv. 'My
was the reply. "Churchill knows
handle men." Yc. that is the
secret.
It is not for the Admiralty to mend
the times in which we live. That is
a lask which lies in e'lher and bitter
hands than mine. But the task t"
which the Admiralty is pledged, the
task which, with the ungrudging assistance ''f Parliament, it can and will
fulfill, is I" carry this nation scathless
through any time, good e.r bad. winch
may be in store."
With these words Winston laid
down the swagger uniform of the Sec-
If sometimes, impulsiveness displaced wisel un. the net result is good
and very good. 11 is due to Winston
Churchill thai Britain's fleet _ was
ready ill a trice to baiter the Kaiser's.
It is his organization of the navy that
has been and is Britain's security. It
is his omniscient command of ilu- sit-
that is Britain's safety, so far
as lur navj  is coi ci rned,
Thus, th< descendanl of Marlborough remembers his forefather, and
with the memories ������!" Blenheim and
Malplaquel pigeon-holed in his mind
for constant reference, iustifies his
place as the  Man al  the   Helm.
Billy Bolton, in "The College Widow," Empress Theatre
NURSES   a
Call   BAVVIEW IMT
MAVMNITY  AND SURGICAL CASES
FAIRVIEW   NURSING   HOME   "TSaW"
 9TB ���KOAOWAV WOT Mis. JONCS
���
 -  -     -  ��� SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   NOVEMBER  7.  1914
Mr. W. W. Robertson
TEACHER OF VIOLIN
((pen i- r i- >������  more pupils
Terms   Mud
4223   WINDSOR   STREET
South Vancouver   Phone Sey. 4281
A.   BLYTH
Baker  and  Confectioner
Wedding Cake specialist.   Why go
further for ycur Hcrr.e-made bread
and pastry than the
Cor.   of  JOHN  and   28TH   AVE.
Central Park Notes
A long fell want in this district is
being filled bj Messrs. Shaw & Mc-
Cort, who have opened a flour and
feed -teere al iJle corner of Kingswa)
and Smith Avenue, opposite the I'ark
Gate, where they will always keep
in stock all classes of feed, and hope
by preempt attention to onler- to merit
th.   custeiiii of this district.
The Agricultural Hall present- a
busy appearance these day- as the
Women'- Institute eef Canada i- conducting a sen iug school under the
directions of Mis- Taylor, the Government Instructoress. Mr-. Hell is
president anil .Mr-. Thos, Todrick i-
ilie secretary.
A popular lecture will In- given by
Mr. Donald Downie, I.C.L.. in the
Agricultural Hall on Monday evening.
November ''. when his subject will be
"France and the French." As Mr.
Downie was a long time a resident nf
the seat of the war and i- familiar with
the French and Belgian people, his
lecture will be interesting. The following artists will contribute to the
musical portion of tin- program :
Madame t'e. I. feffery, soprano; Madame (',. W Mill, contralto; Mr. [.
Lloyd Hughes, the Welsh tenor; Mr.
G. W. Hall, baritone. The accompanist will be Miss (alius ami the Rev.
J. Richmond Craig will occupy the
chair. Tin- admission is free but a
collection will In- taken in aid of tlle
Burnaby ami Soulh Vanceeiiver War
Fund. i'he Reeves e,f both South
Vancouver ami llurnaby are expected
to be presenl.
+    * ,*
An    exceedingly    enjoyable    social
evening wa- held in the- School Room
of the Central I'ark Presbyterian
Church. Monday, when a reception
was given in honor of the newly ordained minister and his wife. Mr. W.
Kirkland presided eever the large and
enthusiastic gathering, and ill felici-
tious terms extended to Mr. and Mrs.
Craig the assurance of the congregations continued loyalty and heartiest
support. Mr. Craig thanked the congregation for their kindness and sympathy, ami expressed tlle hope that
the harmony ami good wil! which had
been shown both towards himself and
hi- ivil', .-.nl which ha.! ei me so much
tee build Up so robust :, cause in the
old   church   would   continue.
Songs and games ele.. contributed
by Messrs. Vinall. Hayes, ami Mes-
dames Todrick ami Jeffrey, added
much to the enjoyment of the evening. Mr. T. M. Howai presided at
the organ. An interesting feature of
the evening was the presentation <���;'
a beautiful umbrella to Rev. Mr Ireland as a mark e,f esteem and appreciation of his services as moderator
during the time the congregation was
without a pastor.
FAIRVIEW SAND & GRAVEL CO.
MOVES PREMISES TO MAIN ST.
Well-kncwn Bui.ders' Supp'.y Concern
Have Taken New Offices and
Prerri''s   Adjoiring   City   Market
Pri y'e --ii e    firms   are    111
: Si" e i. v here the mosl conven-
- ���!  in'-; less    premises    in
ei"  Vancou* - r  may   I c   had    al
-  v::hin  reas nt,    Among  -
.i in-  recent!}   changed  to  Main
Streel is the Fairview Sam! aiel Gravel
Company,    a    concern    well    known
throughout ilie peninsula ior its good
am! square dealings
The Fairview Sam! ami Gravel Com-
pany may now be found at 1572 Main
Sireet. adjacent   to  the  Cit)   Market
Building. Tin bunkers ol tlle i-' oil-
leai'v arc located ill tlie rear, up- ll
False Creek.
Mr. L. M. Dicther i- tin- m tnaging
director of tin- Fairview Sand ami
Gravel Company which has now been
in existence for more than a year, being the concern which took over the
assets ami equipment of the Producers' Rock ami Gravel Company, with
which company Mr. Diether bail been
employed for a number oi year-.
South Vancouver ha- good reason
tee remember ihe Fairview Sand and
Gravel Company. In tin large Main
Street   paving   project,   the   Fairview
peeeple were among llle linns supplying large  quantities  of  material-.
Collingwood East Notes
Mr.  Cecil  Carley.  who  feir  tlie  past
six years lias been connected with the
Fraser  Grocery   Store  is  leaving  this
ue-ek for Keiuian. California, tee take
up alfalfa fanning.    Mr. Carley. who is
well and favorably known by all the
residents "f Collingwood, will lie missed. It seems i"" bad that the people
of tin- province have to migrate ill
order to get on thc land.
St       *       *
The Collingwood Reservists had a
route march on Monday evening when
they marched from the drill to the
Carleton School grounds. They were
put through a stiff drill by Capt. Williamson, after which they marched
back te, the drill hall They presented
a line appearance ami citizens who
turned "til to see them were well
pleased.
Why Buy Cheap American Koal?
Freight  and Duty on Washington   Coal  amounts to $2.00  per ton
Can you expect "Good Goods" at the price?
BUY "QUALITY COAL" MINED IN B. C.
THE FAMOUS "JINGLE P0F--WE SELL IT
COAST LUMBER & FUEL CO., LIMITED
Phone Fairmont 2500
Phone Highland 226
Phone Fraser 41
OFF TO THE WAR
(Continued fremi page 4l
South Hill Palace of Varieties
The South Hill Palace of Varieties,
45th and Praser Street, has been built
at the request of many peeeple e.f this
district by Mr. Abrain Yeeiing, who
has almiest exclusively employed Seeuth
Hill labor t>> erect it. It i- the object
uf the management t" e,ffer to the
public a variety entertainment at popular prices, and lo do this your support is requested. The management
believes that there are many good entertainers in South Vancouver and
would like to eiblain their hei]), also,
suggestions eef our patrons will be
warmly welcomed. Give us a fair
share of your support and your money
will go to improve the snow. It is
nut the object of the management tu
make a large prolit Imt to offer ii
good healthy variety pastime anil
therefore we wanl ynu to support us
by your patronage and suggestions.
Tiie management will spare no expense i" give you ilie kind of entertainment  that you will like.
It is met eeitr object to buck any
"ther .interests in South Mill. lull
rather to improve our district. We
particularly beg lo direct your attention that the price of admission is HI
cent- and children 5 cents, and in order to offer a good show at these'
prices your friendly support is needed.
The People of Vancouver Have Tired of
Bakers' Goods.     Come and Get the
Good Old HOME MADE
SPECIALTIES
Soda  Scones 3  for  10c.
Cream Scones 5c. each
Potato; Scones... .20c. per doz.
Treacle Scones  3 for 10c.
Pancakes    20c. per doz.
Crumpets 20c. per doz.
Fruit Cakes 2 for 5c.
Oatcakes 2 for 25c.
EXTRA SPECIAL.���Meat Pies, Friday and Saturday 5c. each
Black Puddings... .2 lbs.  for 25c.Oatmeal  Pudding 20c.  per  lb.
SCOTCH HAGGIS (to order)
Weekly supply New Laid Eggs from West Burnaby
MARGARET M. REID
2450 MAIN SIREET ('&3JS-)
woodsman saw that the two days of
fasting were telling eeti Iiis prisoner's
Strength anil he decided tee make camp
at once. The tent wa- up and tlle
meal consumed quickly, ami live minutes  afterward   Karl   wa-  asleep,
Billy did met need rest, nor was Inin the mood for it. There was still
nearly twu hours eef daylight, anil he
had eiften wanted to investigate the
country beyond ihe ridge at ihe foot,
��� et which thev were encamped. So. I
assured that bis prisoner was sleeping
| soundly.   lie  look   his  rifle and  disap-I
ipeared iu the brush.
When Hilly returned an hour later,
two  canoe-  were  leaving  tlle  portage
southward bound,   lie ran across ihe
| open space t" the tent, the lirst genu-
! ine anger of his life boiling furiously.
"I'll catch him yet." he whispered
to himself as be ran.
Ile threw back the flap eif the tent.
Karl was just crawling in between tlle
i blanket   folds.
"Well, holy mackitiawl" Billy cried.
"Vou didn't  sneak, did you?"
Karl looked up. blinking, slowly
comprehending. Then he stiffened
up  suddenly.
"I gave t.> yeeu my word that I
would not an escape make." lie -aiel
slowly and with dignity.
Hilly turned away from the tent and
sat down em a windfall before the lire.
He  felt strangely subdued.
"lie ceiuld of got away, and he
wouldn't," he muttered. "Xow, whei'il
a thought that of a  Dutchman?"
A little later Hilly went baek and
wakened  his  prisoner.
"Who are those fellows?" he demanded.
"They tell me they are from the
United States, making a trip by canoes iu  the forest."
"Did you tell them who you were?"
"Xei.    They did not ask."
"Did you know they would be in
the Stales in another day?"
"Yes, so Ihey told me."
Billy went back lo his windfall and
sat for a long time. At last he crawled into the tent. Ile let Karl keep
all eif lhe eene blanket, and lie did not
waken him the next morning until
breakfast was reaely. Then his lone
was comradely a- he called:
"Come on. lad. and throw some of
this into you. We've geit a long
hike leeilay."
Breakfast over, Hilly packed up.
loaded the canoe and indicated that
Karl  sin mid  get   in.
"Don't we make this a portage, as
yen   say ?"  he asked.
'Not this nn lining. There'- an eas-
ici   way around."
All elay thej paddled. Nol once did
Billy sing "Rule Britannia." His arms
worked steadily, hour after hour, but
hi- iniiiel was troubled. Karl hail spoken the day before of the rules "i
war and Hilly didn'l know whether
h.' wa- following them. He had always thoughl of war as being closely
linked with hatred, am! he' found ihat
lie could nol hate a man like his prisoner.    Then, al  noon, he got  an  iel.-a.
"I'm my own general yet awhile!"
hi exclaimed i" Karl's mystification,
and tlie canoe -hot ahead faster than
e i er,
I.ate thai afternoon they rounded
a point in a large lake ami saw a long
line eef birch brak teepees "ii ilie shore
before them. Still silent, Hilly turned
iln- canoe iu. ami In- ami hi.- prisoner
got  out.
"Wail a minute, Dutchy." he commanded and climbed along Ihe bank.
Five minutes he was back with an
Indian.
"This is M'i.i-e-"iice." he explained,
"lie- a good Indian and he won't let
you gel lost And he won't charge
you   t"o   much."
"What is it vou mean?" asked Karl
blankly.
Hilly grasped the German by the
shoulder and about  faced him.
"See that shiere over there? That's
tlle United States. Didn't you know
you were travelling south all day today? Well, another half hour and
you'd be where 1 couldn't touch you.
Moose-oiice will take you to Tower,
and you can get along from there all
right because there'll be steel rails
to keep you from getting lost. B'jnu."
and he ran down the bank to his canoe.
"Hut." cried Karl as Hilly was about
to push off. "I do lint understand.
I am your prisoner."
"That prisoner business is all off,"
explained Hilly. "Don't want any
prisoner."
"You mean I can���." and Karl held
out liis hand to grasp Billy's.
Billy smiled when he saw the expression in the other's eyes.
"You can. lad." he said. "Hurry
and  get started."
Karl  wrung his hand excitedly.
"T can't thank you." he began.
"Thank nothing." exclaimed Billy.
"I'm lighting Germany, not a German,
but I'll meet you in Europe next
week."
AT HALF PRICE
300 H KMST1TCH ED DAMASK TA BLE SKTS���
Come  In  a  great  variety  eef  patterns.    To  clear
at    HALF   PRICE
$20.00   Set   foi-    $10.00
$15.0(1   Set   for     $7.50
$10.00  Set   for    $5.00
LADIES' LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS���$3.00 a
dozen   value.     Sale rt�� ���   nn
price,   per   dozer)    ^l.UU
7m VARDSOF VERY FINE UNEN���36 inches
wiele;   slightly  imperfect,    Usual Q(J
85c   value.     Sale   price    U��3C
5(10 DAMASK TABLE SETS at prices** CA
to clear al. per set. $3.50, $4.50 and. . .. ��P��>.OU
2.000 DAMASK TABLE CLOTHS���All sizes and
patterns t'i clear at cost.    This is a chance lo buy
Damask Table Cloths.
200 YARDS  PILLOW  LINEN-45 inches wide.
Usual  55c   value.     Sale nmi
price,   per   yard     jOC
300 DOZEN GENTS' IRISH LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS���Value $2.50. *i r-/v
Sale price,  per dozen    ��J)l.oU
100 TABLE SETS���Hand embroidered; scolloped
edges; 25 pieces.    Usual $10.50
the set.    On sale, the set	
$5.50
YORKSHIRE  BLANKETS���70 by
90.   Value $rt.5l).    Sale price	
$4.50
LINEN    PILLOW   CASKS���Hemstitched   ends;
very  line quality.    Usual price $2.25.       d*|   PA
Sale  price,  per  pair
loo  DOZEN   LADIES'   LINEN  HANDKERCHIEFS���Value $2.00. 7C
Sale  price,  dozen    I DC
ALL IRISH CROCHET LACES AXD INSERTIONS at HALF PRICE
50 IRISH LINEN DRESSES���Very line hand-
embroidered. $40 value for <��/��� fft
$8.50; $30 value   for    ��|>O.DU
NOTTINGHAM LACE CURTAINS are selling
very low.    We have 900 pair, ami are     A|   nn
offering them at a'pair 65c, 75c anil ��|>1.UU
1,000 YARDS LINEN Ck.\*\\ TnUF.i,
LING���Sale price, 5 yards feer 	
50  PAIRS  ONLY   FAMOUS  IRISH   LINEN
EIXISI I h'.D SHEETS���Size 72 by 90
Reg.  $2.00   value.     Sale   price,  pair...
300 VARDS LINEN CRASH-
I'er   yard    	
$1.35
25c
10c
700 YARDS OF IRISH  LINEN���36 inches wide,
Usual 35c.    I In sale 1 f*
30 HOLTS LIXEN TEN TOWELLING��� Ifi
Sale price,  per yard    IDC
per yard
Jim YARDS PURE IRISH LINEN SHEETING
���ii3 inches wiele.   Very fine quality. CC
Usual $1.25.    On  sale, per yard      DsjC
300 YARDS PURE IRISH LINEN SHEETING
���72 inches and WI inches.    Value *|   /W\
Up le. $2.50.    Sale price, pet yard    Jpl.UU
5 BOLTS I.IXEX FINISHED SHEETING���
Finest quality made   Will wear a life- Ar
time, S4 inches wide.  Usual 65c. Sale price.. TTuC
50 DOZEN' SILVER BLEACHED NAPKINS���
Size 20 by 20.    Usual  $2.00 dozen. *|  or
Sale   price,   do-den     yl.ebD
SHEETS, SHEETS, SH Eh, tS���Hundreds of
pairs we are offering at wholesale cost. All full
sizes.
$2.00 sheets for. per pair   $1.50
$2.75 sheets  for, per pair    $2.00
EMBROIDERED BEDSPREADS - Draw,,
thread work, hemstitched clgc: 90 bj ��t��a rn
l00' f; < value at $6.50. Sab- price, ��J>J.jU
50 LINEN  TABLE CLOTHS-Silver bleached;
site 60 by 6ft  Can nol be repeated 7��
at  llu- price       IOC
IRISH  HAND CROCHET YOKES-
Usiial $1,00 up I" $1.50.   Sale price
75c
300 PAIRS DAMASK BORDERED TOWELS���
Pure linen;  value $1.75 pair.
Sale price,  per pair   	
loo 1,1 xex CRASH CUSHION CASES
���Good value at $1.25.    Sale price  	
$1.00
50c
SHEETS���Embroidered, Value up
to $6.50.    Sale price  	
$2.50
SPECIAL, SPECIAL ��� MARCELLA BEDSPREADS���AH double sizes and the As 7(-
priees are cut to $3.00, $2.50 and   $1.1O
CIRCULAR PILLOW TUBING���Comes in 40.
42 and 44 inches.    We have cut m -i   f\f\
the price to 5 yard- for   ��pl.UU
PILLOW CASES���Size 22x38.
Sale price, per pair   	
35c
PILLOW CASES���Value 65c pair.
Sale   price,   per   pair   	
50c
SPECIAL SALE OF DOWN COMFORTERS
The Finest Values Ever Offered
20 ONLY COM PORTERS in line French sateen;
exquisite designs.    Regular (f���� r*/\
$8.50.     On   sale   for    ��p0.dU
EMBROIDERED     PILLOW     CASES���Value
$2.00.    Sale price
Per   Pi
$1.00
20 ONLY COMFORTERS with good satin bor-
eler- and line sateen centres; beautiful �����T PA
patterns.    Regular  $10.50.    On   sale...  spl.DU
250 YARDS LINEN TABLE DAMASK���72 inch.
Comes iu assorted designs. Usual $1.00       "7[��
up to $1.25.   Sale price, per yard I DC
30 ONLY COMFORTERS, very line satin coverings in all the latest art shades and*| rt (Jf\
patterns.    Reg. $16.50.    On sale  .    ��pl*��.DU
Irish  Linen  Stores
532 GRANVILLE STREET
���W GREAT *���*
Clearance Sale
Our lease expires shortly and under present conditions we are not renewing
the lease. We have decided to sell right out. We have the largest and most
select stock in Canada to choose from���the prices will be a guarantee that we
intend a genuine clearance. We have decided to place different lines on sale
every day at prices cut to the very extreme until the entire stock is sold.
CHIMNEY SWEEPING CITY ^    h ^        ^
Phone Seymour 5293
FLAG POLE8 PAINTED
best equipment in Vancouver
409 Dunsmuir Street

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