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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Mar 1, 1913

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Array %m CHINOOK
f A Half Million in 1917
Vol. L No. 42
SOUTH VANCOUVER,   B.C., CANADA, SATURDAY, MARCH \,V>V,
Price 5 cents
Industrial Activity in Great
Evidence in New Westminster
Period of Remarkable Expansion in the Royal City���Passing of Harbor Bill Gives Great Impetus to Business
���Large Developments Under Way
There i> a tide in tbe affairs of all I While mi the subject of industries,
cities, which if taken at the flood some recent developments may be
leads On to fame and fortune. In the mentioned. Xew industries of every
ease of New Westminster this flood I kind are constantly being introduced
may be dated, fot all practical pur-! into the Royal Cily, such varied
poses, from ilu- inception of the manufactures as those of chocolates,
Fraser River Harbor and Improve, matches, wagons, wheels and nails
ment scheme, although the tide com- being recent examples. The Pacific
nienced to appreciably flow with the . Chocolate Company, which comrnenc-
city improvements inaugurated under led business in November, is now in
Mayor Lee, At any rate, it is since full swing and the writer was inform-
lhe launching of the harbor scheme ed hy Mr. Marb, the manager, that
that the Royal City has received the the output since that date bad more
greatest publicity and is making the than doubled. The approximate <>tit-
most   rapid  industrial  progress put   of  chocolate  and   cocoa   of  this
Take, for instance, the mailer of in. i firm is at the rate of $120,000 a year,!
dtistries.    It  was  somewhat  of a  re-J the trade being chiefly with  Vancou-!
velation   to  many  people   that     New ver,  New  Westminster,  Victoria and,
Westminster was recently announced   other parts of tlie province.    Ill  con-
as  ranking  third  in  the  West iu  in-  nection  with the chocolate factory is'
dustrial importance, only Vancouver a condensed milk department and it's'
and     Winnipeg    taking    precedence.  "Utility"  brand  has  a  large  and  in-!
Moreover,   figuring  on  a  percentage creasing sale, an average of a couple
basis   of   population,   Xew   Westinin-  of cars being shipped per week. One I
ster even leads these cities as regards of   the   specialities   of   this   company,!
those e.-.iployed in industrial pursuits.   "Marb's  Chocolates" is  having a big;
Facts and  figure,, prove this enviable | demand in the coast cities.    It is the
position  of  the  Royal   City  with   its  ambition   of  the    Pacific    Chocolate
meagre population of 18,000 or 19,000.  Company   tei   make   their   cocoa   and
The old adage that facts are stubborn   chocolate  as  famous  in   Canada    as
tilings  is  no  truer  than   that  figures   Fry* and  Cadbury's products arc all
are eloquent.   At least they are if on  over the world,
the right side of a man's banking bai-j     An   important   industry
ance or denote the comparative progress of a city. As regards New
Westminster the annual industrial
output  is   valued  at  about  $7,250,000,
of New
Westminster is that of Schaakc's machine works now controlled by the
Heaps Engineering Company of Vancouver,   the   business   of   which     has
WHY SOUTH VANCOUVER SHOULD AID
PASSING OF C.N.R. AGREEMENT
Every person living in South Vancouver who has a vote on the
C.N.R. Agreement, which will be voted upon in the City of Vancouver
on Saturday next, should vote for that agreement, and every man who
has a vote should make sure that he casts his ballot.
The passing of the C.N.R. Agreement will mean much to South
Vancouver. It will mean activity in the City of Vancouver which in
turn will have a beneficial effect upon South Vancouver. But it will
mean more than that to South Vancouver. It will have the effect of
centralizing business closer to the borders of South Vancouver. It
will have the effect of lining up a powerful influence towards the borders of South Vancouver, which in furthering and aiding its interests
will aid and further the interests of South Vancouver.
It is a well-known fact that to have terminals in the heart of
a city amounts to a saving running into millions in the course of a
very short time, by the elimination of cartage charges. With railway
terminals in False Creek, South Vancouver merchants should be
amongst the first to enjoy reduced cartage charges, and South Vancouver residents, as  consumers, should  immediately benefit.
An analysis of the agreement will show that it is a good one so
far as the City of Vancouver is concerned. It is doubtful if any
railway agreement can be presented which is so free of loop-holes.
If there are loop-holes in the present agreement they have not yet
been found by the Solicitor of Vancouver, by at least two private and
well-known solicitors in Vancouver, and by the Attorney-General of
the Province who has also given the agreement close scrutiny and
who is of the opinion that the interests of Vancouver have been protected on every point
There has been some opposition to the agreement. That was to
be expected. But the great bulk of noise has come from those who
have private axes to grind. Private interests, with some, seem to
be of more paramount importance than the public weal. Failing
sound argument they have even stooped to a campaign ef mud-slinging and personal abuse.
While not so vitally interested as the City of Vancouver, South
Vancouver, nevertheless, should come to the aid of those in Vancouver who are exerting every influence to have the agreement ratified
by the electorate. South Vancouver stands to gain immensely should
this agreement go through. Those in this Municipality who have a
vote on the agreement should exercise their franchise above all things.
Mayor Baxter Explains Points
in the C. N. R. Agreement
Vancouver Chief  Magistrate   Claims That Bargain Will
Mean Millions of Dollars to That City���What the
Company  Will  Pay  For  Land
with an annual pay-roll of nearly substantially increased during recent
$2,200,000 distributed among 2240 months, The tools and machinery
employees and giving 13 per cent, of j uf this company have an immense
the city's population as industrially sale in both Canada and thc United
engaged compared with 6 per cent, so ' States, and on the completion of the
employed in Vancouver. These in-I new works, with the additional trans-
dustries of thc Royal City are mainly porta tion facilities, trade is expected
related tn lumber, metal, fish, farm : to be very materially increased. The
products and meat. In this total of J pile-driver and logs were sent down
$7,250,000,   of  which   (ever    $3,000,000 j the river from  Ruskin this week and
is contributed by the lumber industry, the immense Fraser Mills output
is nut included, although practically a
cuiitributary suburb of Xew Westminster. These mills, by the way,
which were recently closed down owing to the unexpected and long spell
of somewhat prairie winter weather,
are now getting into full swing and
during the last two weeks many
French-Canadians as well as English-
speaking Canadians. Swedes and Norwegians have been able to quit their
enforced sojourn at the hotels of the
Royal City.
operations on the new works will
probably commence early next week.
Another addition to the industrial
activity of the Royal City are the new
gravel bunkers being erected for the
B. C. Transfer Company. These will
be completed before the end of this
week and will be ready to begin
operations on Monday. They have a
capacity of 500 yards hoisting power
and can unload from eilhcr boat or
car. The entire plant, which includes
rock screens, rock crushers and gravel
(Continued em Fagc 12)
TO   APPOINT   COMMISSION
FOR THE NORTH ARM
Various Councils  Notified   to   Name
Delegate to Joint Meeting
TENDERS RECEIVED FOR
WESTMINSTER ROAD PAVING
Around the Municipal Hall
BY SCRUTATOR
Annexation is now dead.   A sore.
ness has been lefl ill I lie minds oi
many, but "Time, ihe healer of all
diseases,"   will   work   its    own     cure
There is no need leer exultation <>i> the
part of those who have won, rather
let all join together now and weirk
for what will In- Ilu- In-I interests of
the Municipality as a whole. Reeve
Kerr and Councillor Dickinson have
set a good example in this respect.
Other annexationists should take
their cue from them and work accordingly. It should now he lhe aim
of every ratepayer in Seiiilh Vancouver   to  do  the  best   liny  can   foi   lhe
Municipality.
*   +   *
There has been and siill continues
to be many mysterious visits In Victoria. One can only conjecture as to
what these visits mean. That the
visits are uf mure than usual interest
In sume of the ratepayers, is certain;
they have developed the keen instinct
of a Sherlock Holmes. One trait in
the characters produced by the great
detective was that in arriving at a
conclusion he always looked at it
from the other man's point of view.
The amateur detective of the present
day in South Vancouver is apt to
look it only from his own point of
view, and in deducing; the facts and
arriving at a conclusion, he arrives
at a conclusion that oft-times puts
him in a ludicrous position.
*       *       ef
In these days of stress and trouble
when the Municipality has passed
through so much, wc must eeffer our
strongest protest against the mud-
raking that is going on. Some people
seem not to be able to exist unless
they live in a state of mud-throwing,
The minds of such people seem to become warped up and narrowed so that
they can find no good in anything
unless emanating from themselves.
Give the Council a chance now. They
have fulfilled their platform pledge.
Their failure has been through no
lack of effort on their part; they have
been beaten by powers greater than
their own.
* A      A
Charlie Hodgson, the popular President of the Board of Trade, goes
baek to power for another year. For
four successive years he has been
elected unanimously. This is a mark
of favor and esteem by the Board to
tbe President which we are confident
he  appreciates.
* *    *
A Mock Parliament for Fraser Avenue is now about to become an accomplished fact. Last Saturday I
Pi.id a visit to the one at Collingwood
an-1 must heartily congratulate its
members. The proceedings were in
an orderly manner, the questions
were well put.   The various ministers
Thc joint Municipal Harbor Committee held a special meeting at the
government agent's office at which it
was decided, in pursuance of Clause
6, of the North Arm Harbor Hill, to
notify the councils of Point Grey,
South Vancouver, Richmond and
Burnaby to send a delegate to a convention for thc appointment of a representative on the harbor commission. Notices to that effect have been
sent to the various councils.
The hill provides that the commission shall consist .of three commissioners, two of whom shall be appointed by the govenior-general-in-
council and one, in writing, by at
least a majority nf the four persons
elected, one by each of the municipalities of Richmond, South Vancou-
I ver, Point Grey and llurnaby fur the
purpose.
The commissioner appointed by the
municipalities is to hold office for
three years, subject to removal and
iuniil his successor is appointed.
lie is eligible fur re-appointment.
I Nu member of tlie councils uf the
municipalities  interested is eligible tn
replied tu them in a becoming man
ner.     Speaker   Kent   lent   dignity   to I j,,V ��� corflm
lhe chair,  whilst   Premier  I'.   1.  Bay-      'file  ceimmittee   decided   te.  make  a
ley showed all lhe vim and resource-  further   call   upon   each   uf   lhe   four
fulness  thai  tlu- leader eef a young, municipalities tei complete the finan-
energetlc party should dee.    ] he Clerk  (.u| arrangements.
the House, with Ins venerable ap- Among those present al the meet-
in arance, kin i.e iln- assembly a dig-hng were jjr. G II. Cowan, the gov-
nity ami composure fining with the ernment agent; Mr. R. C. Hodgson,
work it was undertaking. Next week pre8tdent nf ihe South Vancouver
the  Opposition  are  confident    that|Board of Trade; Mr. B, G   Walker,
Question of Permanent Improvement
Again Before Board of Works
At a meeting of the Hoard nf
Works tenders for the paving of
Westminster Ruad were received
from Messrs. Ledinghain & Copper;
British Columbia Granitoid Contracting Company Ltd.; Canadian Mineral
Rubber Company; Columbia Bitulithic Company Ltd., and M. P. Cotton Company Ltd. The amounts of
the different tenders were not men.
tinned. They were referred In the
engineer   fur  tabulation.
Thc engineer recommended thai
three-plank sidewalks be laid een the
south side of Sixty-second Avenue
from 200 feet cast of Main Street to
Fraser Avenue; on the smith side nf
Fifty-eighth Avenue from Main
Street in Prince Edward street, and
on the south side of Fifty-seventh I
Avenue from Prince Edward Street I
174 feet east.
Questioned as to ihe amount uf
money still unexpended under Ilylaw
No. Seven which was passed last year
authorizing the raising uf $900,000, oi
$130,000 fur each of the five- wards,
Mr. Clement said that lhe unexpended balance had been redistributed
among the seven wards as follows:
Ward I, $5S.312; Ward II. $46,562
Ward 111. $44,271; Ward IV, $22,001
Ward V. $78,120;  Waul VI, $54,282
Tin- report e.i' tin- engineer was
adopted and nn ilu-  tion ni Councillor Dickinson In- i
Om- .if ihe most Important matters
upon which iln- Vetera of Vancouver
will express an opinion will n-im- before them leer endorsatieeii e,r rejection
��� -ii Saturday <>i next week. Thai
question is the Canadian Northern
Railway Agreement. South Vancouver being in a large measure interested in this matter, a representative "i
"The      t'llilleeeek"      waited      ll|l"ll      .M,lV"|-
Baxter of Vancouver ihis week and
was courteously accorded an interview.
"Lil me say right at lhe -Ian."
said His Worship, "that next t.. the
C.P.R. railway, lhe Canadian N'or-
thern Railway is the greatest Canadian road. By tin- end eet' this vear
tin- company will have no less than
In,nun mile- of track in operation,
"In the agreement which will come
before the veeters next week." he continued, "Vancouver is nut asked to
give away 113 acres of land. The
C.N'.R. i- paying no less than $30,820
per acre for the land. Let me explain how this amount is arrived al.
Tin- C.N.R. are buund to spend, independent nf their terminals, approximately eme million dollars in filling
in Main Sireet. They are also bound
l.e spend another million dullars in
constructing sewers and water
courses through the bed nf False
Creek. If these sewers are- diverted
from False Creek the company still
stands  bound  to  pay  the  cost.     Half
the cost eif tin- Scott ur Carolina
Street bridge across the property,
which is t'i be borne by the railway,
represents an.ether $200,000, while
other fills, building uf retaining wall,
etc., will hring the amount that the
C.N'.R. will spend entirely independent of their terminals to the large
sum uf $3,483,299. This is an unbiased estimate of our Engineer. On
this basis the C.N'.R. is paying $30.-
N20 per acre fur lhe land. Alderman
Hepburn says that he would support
the agreement if it cnuld In- shown
that the city was getting $30,000 an
acre, I say tha the city is getting
nn ere  than  $30,000  per  acre.
"Then the property is being sold to
lhe C.N'.R. .en such terms that il
makes ihe C.N'.R. a trustee of that
property fur ilu- City fi Vancouver as
railway terminals forever. Hy the
agreement ilu- C.N'.R. can never sell
their terminals unless the purchaser
agrees  to  carry out thc    stipulations
now imposed by ilu City "i Van.
(���inner. Then when a new railway
desires to come i" Vancouver the
matter i> referred to tin- Lieutenant-
Governor-in-Council and ilu- CNR.
railway must abide by Ins decision
without appeal. Even iln- rental
which tlu- railway shall pay shall be
fixed by iln- Lieutenant-Governor-in-
Council. All matters oi a controversial   matter  -hall  be  settled  by  him.
"It i- my opinion that railways
comprise one "i ilu- greatest city
builders. Tlu- C P.R. have brought
iln- Cily of Vancouver up t-. ii- present -late- Inn thi- i- n ,i ilu- time
win n we should stop. Rather have we
reached a stage where the incoming
��� if ilu- C.N'.R. wili el" u~ infinite good.
Besides thi- ilu- C.N.R. are bound in
make Vancouver iln- hom�� port of
their trans-Pacific Steamship Lines.
Surely this is another Ine concession.
"I have im excuses in uffcr in supporting this agreement," conclud id
His Worship. "I expressed myself in
favor of the agreement before the
election and promised that if elected
1 would eh. all in my power !<��� see it
through. 1 am prepared t<i stand by
my guns. I have been made the object of a mud-slinging campaign by
sume, but I desire to say that 1 am
not frightened by men like Sir
Charles Hibbert Tupper. F. C. Wade,
R. Cassidy and others wine have private reasons for opposing the agreement."
A delegation oi War.l VI Ratepayers1 Association held a public
meeting at Dundonald School, River
Road, Wednesday evening. February
26. The meeting was called to discuss the B. C. Electric Railway franchise. Many interested residents attended.
The   Misses   Margaret    and    Clara
J.illusion.   ..i   Port   M ly,   attended
ilu- ball given by thc teachers of
South Vancouver at Lester's Hall,
Friday night, February 21. They have
been the guests of Miss F.. Dickie.���n,
Fifty-eighth Avenue.
 1   mm   s	
'ihe foundation of the new public
school near Knight and Ferris roads
has been completed and the con-
tractors are hauling brick and slate
for construction  work.
Board of Trade Year Reviewed
r-RESlDENT AND SECRETARY PRESENl   REPORTS
they will be able in defeai iln- Government, In such an event a coalition
Cabinet will in all likelihood he form-
ed. So keen is tbe enthusiasm fur the
Muck Parliament iu Collingwood that
wc  understand   then   is  nut   a   single
seal  vacant.
* ���    t
I saw Miss I'i. W. Johnson, uf
Westminster, at une ol ihe Council
meetings, Naturally one would imagine thai this lady who has such a
keen grasp of civic affairs and who
can give bolh the School Hoard and
the Council many pointers, would he
a strong suffragette. This is not so;
Miss Johnson does not believe in
women's suffrage, thinking women
don't weigh civic matters up enough.
"How many of them, do you think,"
she said, "intelligently read up and
digest a money bylaw?" Miss Johnson is one of those ratepayers that
help to guide Councils along the road
of economy and keep to the rigid
letter of the law.
* *    *
My first experience of the Council
silting in private session was on
Wednesday evening. I have no desire to undergo a repetition; the long
weary wait on the Council returning
lo tlu Council Chamber gets on one's
nerves. However, it is essential
these private sessions should take
place as it is not in thc best interests
of municipal business that all the
rk uf the Council should be on
public view.
One of the first acts of the Council
must bc an addition to the present
Municipal Hall. The building is altogether inadequate to house the present  staff.
e|e       *       A
The School Board had a long conference with the Council on Wednesday as to ways and means.
ef       A       A
Many of thc Representatives of the
pavements firms are as well-known
around the Municipal Hall as some
of the prominent officials are. The
persistence with which some of the
competing contractors' men hang
around the Hall ought to yield some
results to the firms they represent.
In justice to the contractors it is
really now time that the pavement
contracts were  settled.
ex-president; Mr. George Coldicott,
president;   Mr   McGregor,  president
of lhe Point Grey Hoard ol Trade,
and Mr. Kenneth Lainond, of South
Vancouver, who was appointed secretary in the jniiii committee,
if   tin
Central   Park   Jottings
An  Interesting    gathering
Central Park Branch of iln- Women's
Institute teeuk place- .in Thursday
evening in the Fisher Hall. Hiacoiis-
lield. After the general business
meeting a good attendance of members listened with great pleasure to
a special address from a well-known
Vancuuver lady, Mrs, Kemp, who is
always to the fore in all kinds of
work which affect women's interests.
Having just returned from Victoria
where she had been one of the delegates appointed to meet thc Premier.
Mrs. Kemp was full of the subject
of women suffrage, and indeed, what
might be comprehensively termed
equal rights tn women." She described thc reception of the delegates
and their claims, and told how great
had been her personal disappointment
over their non-success. Mrs. Kemp
commented strongly upon the treatment the women delegates had re.
ceived.
After Mrs. Kemp's address tea was
served, and a pleasant conversation
followed. The institute was then
invited by Mrs. Kemp to meet the
Women's Council on the first of
March, in  Vancouver.
In St. John's Church on Sunday
night the Rev. W. J. Johnson feelingly referred to the death of Mr.
Broom. Mr. and Mrs. Broom have
only been in Canada about three
years, and much sympathy has been
expressed for Mrs. Broom.
proee-ce!   with   all   work   that   can   be
done under No. VI Bylaw, which provides for ilu- clearing and grading .,i
roads.
The engineer was authorized to
construct box eirains e.n Fifty-first
Wciuic from George Street 885 feel
west; McMillan Street sen is thc
roadway; lane between Main Streel
and Sophia Slreel. frum Twenty-fifth
Avenue   tu   Twenty-eighth     Avenue;
Tu  tin   Officers ami   Members of ilu
Semth  Vancouver  Board of Trade:
Gentlemen,- \\     'in c again reach
eel   thai   point   when   ��e-   musl   look
back  and   review   the  work   wc  have
accomplished  niu-inn  the  past    year
Very marked progress has been made
uthorized tolin   iln-  municipality;  on   every  hand
tirst   lane
F
w esl
it
Fraser between
riy-sevcntli and Forty-eighth ave-
nues ami between Forty-eighth and
Forty-ninth avenues; Twenty-sixth
Avenue from Quebec to Main Street.
The engineer's nomination of the
following   men   fur   the   positions   uf
ward foremen, their appointments tee
date  frum  March   1  at $4.25 per  day
was  approved  and   recommended   to
the  Council   fur  adoption:    Ward   I
Mr.  George  Kerr;  Ward  If,  Mr   1)   dividual
Pugh;   Ward   III.   Mr.  J.   \V.  Smart:!"'"' wer
Ward  IV,  Mr.    Joseph    Bruckshaw;
Ward    V,     Mr.     Frank     Hagenaars;
Ward VI, Mr. W. II. McLeese; Ward
VII,  Mr.   W.   II.   Stuart.
A report from Building Inspector
Young in regard to a-firc at an apartment house in Stainsbury Avenue,
Cedar Cottage, was submitted tu the
effect that the building had nut been
finally passed and was not finished
when a fire was lighted in lhe furnace. The building department's requirements, the report stated, had
since been complied with and the furnace bed put in a thoroughly satisfactory condition.
we  see   signs  fi  progri ss  ami  pros
;pe-rit\; in ever) direction we see temporary roads giving way i" perman-
ant .un -. evi ry w eck vat ant lots ,.i e
becoming i a e r and few er, and the
day  i-  not   far  distant   when  it  will
(be difficult t" ootain an unimproved
lot in South Vancouver,    During the
Iyear real estate values have made no
marked progress, and I am nut sorrj
|at Ihif b cause before any great in.
ere;.-' i.,kes place I would like lo
see ilu majority of lhe residential
lots pass nil" iln- hands <>f the work-
ingman.    Whin  a   lot   goes  beyond
I the price oi $HHm we know thai a
rking   man.  te.  dei  himself ami  his
similar mannci t" tne railways com-
missii ii
Cheaper Light and Power
\\ <    A*ere hopes   ihat   an   a.
ment would have been arrived at between tin Western Canada Power
Company and 'lu- Munii i, ility,
whereby light ami power would have
been purchased al half tlu ;������ isi it
price W hib ncgi itiatii ns wen in an
interesting state they were suddenly
dropped, Biid from some u 11 ����� ; -
able- reason we ha\ - up to tin- pi i -
i-nt  been  unable  t--  gel   ilu- nege
tieellS     lee,pelldl.
North Arm of the Fraser
During iln- year ��, were successful iii geiiing Richmond, Point Grey
and Hurnaby I" join with us in pro-
meeting a Harbor Hill which I am
pleased te- say has passed the Do-
ininion house in iln- form a- suggested by ihe joint committee which pro-
viele- inr tin- appointment of three
mmissioners.     Let  us    hope    that
family justice, cannot go   beyond this they,   when   appointed,   will   I"    li
To Aid Annexation
Ex-Reeve W. A. Pound, who returned from a trip to Victoria, stated
that Premier McBride informed him
tha while thc Government could not
see its way clear to approve the annexation bill, legislation is under consideration which will make the amalgamation of districts easier than at
the present time.
Ward V Conservatives
The Ward V Conservative Association at a meeting elected the following officers: President, F. Way:
vice-president, S. 11. Greer; secretary,
J. G. James; treasurer, C. M. Whelpton; executive, R, S. Lewington, F.
J. Rolston, T. Houston and C. A.
Graham; delegates to South Vancouver central executive. T. Houston:
delegate to Richmond central. F.
Way. The constitution and bylaws
of the South Vancouver Conservative Association were adopted. Addresses were given by Mr. R. C.
Hodgson, president of the association and others.
Magistrate J. C. McArthur, who
was indisposed owing to a cold is
again about and attending to his
various duties.
price. During ilu- year the Council
ge,i a Government Commissioner appointed, Although this is outside
our province as a board, yet as in-
ratepaycrs it was a matter
all interested in. Whatever
iln finding of ilu- Commissioner may
be. nothing but good can result from
lhe appointment. The mistakes of
iln past will be a guidance for the
future.
During the year through the efforts
of the board a postal delivery was secured for certain sections nf the
municipality. We hope before thc
.nd of iln present year a more fully
extended delivery service will lie
given, so that it may embrace every
part  nf South  Vancouver,
Transportation
Double car tracks have been laid
on Main and Fraser Street. The
hoard tirst initiated the agitation for
this, and can lay certain claims to
getting these lines extended. I am
sorry lhat the B. C. Electric Railway Co. have not yet carried out
their promise to make a cross car
line through the municipality. This
must be one of the first matters taken
up by the new officers and pushed
to a  successful issue.
Telephones
Although we have had different
deputations to wait on the Telephone
Company no progress can be made.
Tbe present rates charged are such
as to become a clog on business. A
Strong agitation must bc set on foot
to get government control of this
public utility. Failing this I would
like to see a public utility commission
appointed that could deal with all
public utilities such as telephones,
light, power and transportation in a
wires, as the value ot such an undertaking cannot be computed in dollars
and cents, not only feer one district,
but the whole eef Western Canada.
In lhe past the functions of this
board have heen badly handicapped
thr.iugh -lie greal increase thai was
taking place in "real estate." The
fevenshness is now greatly abated,
a large population has been brought
within the municipality. Work must
be provided feer the Workers and in
ihis the board must take an active
part. Unfortunately the municipality i- unable to grant any concession
for the location of industries which
will make the gelling of small factories here very difficult, however. T
am confident that with a strong, energetic committee a fair amount of
new industries will be located this
year.
As the board is now about to cmer
upon the work for which it is meant
to perform, it is necessary that every
business man within the municipality
should take an interest in it. The
members should bring it under the
notice of all their friends. We don't
want members for their subscriptions;
what we want is members who will
take an active, intelligent grasp .ef
the affairs of the board, always remembering that whatever work they
are doing in the furtherance uf the
municipality they are also helping on
their   own  individual  interests.
In conclusion I thank the members
for the honor they have done me in
electing me president during the past
three years I have met with nothing but unfailing kindness at your
hands; I have been interested in the
work of the board; my only regret is
that I had not more time to devote
(Continued on Page 12) TEat
HE**. CHINOOK
��� A Half Million in 1917
Vol. i., No. 42
SOUTH VANCOUVER,  B.C., CANADA, SATURDAY, MARCH 1,1913
Price 5 cents
Industrial Activity in Great
Evidence in New Westminster
Period of Remarkable Expansion in the Royal City���Passing of Harbor Bill Gives Great Impetus to Business
���Large Developments Under Way
There is a tide in the affairs of all
cities, which if taken at the flood
bads on to fame and fortune. In the
case of -New W'cstminster this flood
may be dated, for all practical purposes, from the inception of the
F'raser Kiver Harbor and Improve- mate
ment  scheme, although the tide coin,   being
While een the subject of industries,
some recent developments may be
mentioned. Xew industries of every
kind are constantly being introduced
into Ilu- Royal Cily, such varied
manufactures as those of chocolates,
wagons,   wheels   and     nails
recent examples.   The Pacific
mi-need to appreciably flow wilh the Chocolate Company, which commenc-
city improvements Inaugurated under led business in November, is now in
Mayor l.ee. At any rate, it is since full swing and the writer was inform-
the launching of lhe harbor scheme ed by Mr. Mark, the manager, that
that the Koyal Cily has received tin iln- output since that date had more
greatest   publicity  and   i.s   making  the ' than doubled.    The approximate OUt-
if in
most  rapid  industrial progres
Take, for instance, the mailer
duslries.     It  was  somewhat  of a  revelation   to  many   people   thai     New-
Westminster was recently announced
as  ranking  third  in   the  West  in  industrial  importance,  only   Vancouver
and      Winnipeg    laking
Moreover,  figuring on  a
basis   of   population,   .New   Westmin
Ster even leads these cities as regards
those e.'.iployed in industrial pursuits.
Facta and figures prove this enviable
position   of  the   Royal   City  with  its
meagre population of 18,000 eir 1",000.
put of chocolate and cocoa of this
firm is at thc rate of $120,000 a year,
the trade being chiefly with Vancouver, New Westminster, Victoria and
other parts of the province, lu connection with the chocolate factory is
a condensed milk department and it's
precedence. | "Utility" brand has a large and in-
lercentage creasing sale, an average of a couple
of cars being shipped per week. One
��� if the specialities of this company,
"Marh's Chocolates" is having a big
demand in the coast cities. It is the
ambition of the Pacific Chocolate
Company to make their cocoa and
chocolate   as   famous   in   Canada    as
all
The eeld adage that facts are stubborn
things is no truer than that figures Fry* and Cadhury's products ai-
are eloquent. At least they are if on over the world
the right side of a man's banking balance or denote the comparative progress of a city. As regards New
Westminster the annual industrial
output is valued ai about $7,250,000,
with an annual pay-roll of nearly
$2,200,000 distributed among 2240
employees and giving 13 per cent, of
tbe city's population as industrially
engaged compared with 6 per cent, so
employed   in   Vancouver.     These   in-
An important industry of New
Westminster is that of Schaakc's machine works now controlled by the
Heaps Engineering Company of Vancouver, the business of which has
substantially increased during recent
months. The tools and machinery
of this company have an immense
sale in both Canada and thc United
States, and on the completion of the
new works, with Ihe additional trans-
WHY SOUTH VANCOUVER SHOULD AID
PASSING OF C.N.R. AGREEMENT
Every person living in South Vancouver who has a vote on the
C.N.R. Agreement, which will be voted upon in the City of Vancouver
on Saturday next, should vote for that agreement, and every man who
has a vote should make sure that he casts his ballot.
The passing of the C.N.R. Agreement will mean much to South
Vancouver. It will mean activity in the City of Vancouver which in
turn will have a beneficial effect upon South Vancouver. But it will
mean more than that to South Vancouver. It will have the effect of
centralizing business closer to the borders of South Vancouver. It
will have the effect of lining up a powerful influence towards the borders of South Vancouver, which in furthering and aiding its interests
will aid and further the interests of South Vancouver.
It is a well-known fact that to have terminals in the heart of
a city amounts to a saving running into millions in the course of a
very short time, by the elimination of cartage charges. With railway
terminals in False Creek, South Vancouver merchants should be
amongst the first to enjoy reduced cartage charges, and South Vancouver  residents, as  consumers,  should  immediately benefit.
An analysis of the agreement will show that it is a good one so
far as the City of Vancouver is concerned. It is doubtful if any)
railway agreement can be presented which is so free of loop-holes.
If there are loop-holes in the present agreement they have not yet
been found by thc Solicitor of Vancouver, by at least two private and
well-known solicitors in Vancouver, and by the Attorney General of
the Province who has also given the agreement close scrutiny and
who is of the opinion that the interests of Vancouver have been protected on every point
There has been some opposition to the agreement. That was to
be expected. But the great bulk of noise has come from those who
have private axes to grind. Private interests, with some, seem to
be of more paramount importance than the public weal. Failing
sound argument they have even stooped to a campaign ef mud-slinging and personal abuse.
While not so vitally interested as the City of Vancouver, South
Vancouver, nevertheless, should come to the aid of those in Vancouver who are exerting every influence to have the agreement ratified
by the electorate. South Vancouver stands to gain immensely should
this agreement go through. Those in this Municipality who have a
vote on the agreement should exercise their franchise above all things.
Mayor Baxter Explains Points
in the C. N. R. Agreement
Vancouver Chief  Magistrate   Claims That Bargain Will
Mean Millions of Dollars to That City���What the
Company  Will  Pay  For  Land
One eef ilu- m.i-i important matters!now imposed by tin- City of Van.
upon which iln- voters of Vancouver couver. Then when a new railway
will express an opinion will come be-ldesires to come i" Vancouver the
fore them fen- endorsation e,r rejection matter is referred i" ilu Lieutenant-
��� eii Saturday of next week. ThatIGovernor-in-Council and ihe C.N.R.
luestion   is   tlu-   Canadian   Northern  railway   must   abide   by   his  decision
dustries of the Royal City are mainly | porta tion facilities, trade is expected
related to lumber, metal, fish, farm to be very materially increased. The
products and meat. In this total of! pile-driver and logs wcre sent down
$7,250,000, of which over $3,000,000 j the river from Ruskin this week and
is contributed by the lumber Indus- operations on the new works will
try, the immense Fraser Mills output! probably commence early next week,
is not included, although practically a      Another  addition   to  the  industrial
TO   APPOINT  COMMISSION
FOR THE NORTH ARM
Various Councils Notified   to   Name
Delegate to Joint Meeting
contributory suburb of New Westminster. These mills, by the way,
which wcre recently closed down owing to the unexpected and long spell
of somewhat prairie winter weather,
are now- getting into full swing ami
during the last two weeks many
French-Canadians as well as English-
speaking Canadians, Swedes and .Norwegians have been able to quit their
enforced sojourn at the hotels of the
Royal City.
activity of the Koyal City are the new
gravel bunkers being erected for the
II. C. Transfer Company. These will
be completed before the end of this
week and will be ready to begin
operations on Monday. They have a
capacity of 500 yards hoisting power
and can unload frum either boat or
car. The entire plant, which includes
rock screens, rock crushers and gravel
(Continued
Page   12)
Around the Municipal Hall
BY   SCRUTATOR
Annexation is now dead. A soreness has been lefl in the minds of
many, but "Time, the healer of all
diseases," will we.rk ils own cure
There is no need leer exultation on the
pan of those who have won, rather
let  all jeein  together
rk
feir what will be the
the   Municipality  as
Kerr and Councillot
set   a   good   example
now   and
besi interests "i
a whole-.    Reeve
Dickinson  have
ill   thi-   respect.
(Ither annexationists should tak
their cue fnem them and we.rk accordingly. It sheiuld now be the aim
of every ratepayer in S'eiilh Vancouver to do the best they can fot lhe
Municipality.
��    *    ���
There has been and still Continues
to be many mysterious visils to Vic-
loria. One can only conjecture as te.
whal these visits mean. Thai Ihe
visits are of more than usual interest
to some of the ratepayers, is certain;
they have developed the keen instinct
of a Sherlock Holmes. One trait in
the characters produced by the great
detective was that in arriving at a
conclusion he always leioked at it
from the other man's point of view.
The amateur detective of the present
day in South Vancouver is apt to
look it only from his own point oi
view, and in deducing the facts and
arriving at a conclusion, he arrives
at a conclusion that oft-times puts
him in a ludicrous position.
replied tei them
ner. Speaker Kent lent dignity to
the chair, whilsl Premier 1;. T. Hay-
ley showed all lhe vim and resourcefulness that the leader of a young,
..nergetic party should do. The Clerk
of the House, with his venerable appearance, lent to lhe assembly a dig-
nily and composure fining with the
work it was undertaking. Next week
ilu-   Opposition  are  confident    that
they will be able lo defeat the Gov-
ernment, In such an event a coalition
Cabinet will in all likelihood be formed. So keen is the enthusiasm f"i the
Mock Parliament in Collingw I that
we   understand   there  is  not   a   single
seal vacant,
���   ���    ���
I    saw   Miss E, VV. Johnson,   of
Westminster, at one of the Council
meetings, Naturally one would imagine that this lady who has such a
keen grasp of civic affairs and who
can give both the School Board and
the Council many pointers, would he
a strong suffragette. This is not so;
Miss Johnson does not believe in
women's suffrage, thinking women
don't weigh civic matters up enough.
"How many of them, do you think,"
she said, "intelligently read up and
digest a money bylaw?" Miss Johnson is one of those ratepayers that
help to guide Councils along the road
of economy and keep to the rigid
letter of the law.
The joint Municipal Harbor Committee held a special meeting at the
government agent's office at which it
was decided, in pursuance of Clause
6, of the North Arm Harbor Hill, to
notify the councils of Point Grey,
South Vancouver, Richmond and
Burnaby to send a delegate to a convention for the appointment of a representative on the harbor commission. Notices to that effect have been
sent to the various councils.
The bill provides that the commission shall consist .of three commissioners, two of whom shall be appointed by the governor-general-in-
council and one, in writing, by al
least a majority of the four persons
elected, one by each of the municipalities of Richmond, South Vaflcou-
', ver, Point Grey and Hurnaby for the
' purpose.
The commissioner appointed by the
municipalities is to hold office for
three years, subject to removal and
until his successor is appointed.
         lie  is   eligible  for   re-appointment.
~~  No   member   of   the   councils   of   thc
? ,'H'.''',mK[.,nu'.": municipalities interested is eligible to
bc a commissioner.
Thc committee decided to make a
fun lur call upon each of the four
municipalities to complete the financial arrangements.
Among those present at the meeting were Mr. (',. II. Cowan, tin- government agent; Mr. R, C. Hodgson,
president of ihe South Vancouver
Hoard   of  Trade;   Mr.   B.   G.   Walker,
ex-president;   Mr.   Ceorge Coldicott,
president;    Mr.    McGregor,   president
of  ihe   Point   Grey   Il.iard   of  Trade,
TENDERS RECEIVED FOR
WESTMINSTER ROAD PAVING
Question of Permanent Improvement
Again Before Board of Works
Railway Agreement. South Vane
ver being to a large measure inter, slid iu tin- matter, a representative of
"Tlu- Chinook" waited upon Mayor
Baxter "i Vancouver this week and
wa- courteously accorded an inter-
, lew.
"Let me say right at the start,"
said His Worship, "that next i" the
C.P.R. railway, iln- Canadian Northern Railway i- iln- greatest Canadian road, ity the end "i thi~ year
ihis company will have no less than
10,000 miles eef track in operation.
"In the agreement which will come
be lore- the letters next wick," Ile Continued, "Vancouver is nol asked to
give awav 113 acres of land, Tlu
C.N.R. is paying no less than $.31 i.sjii
per acre for the land. Let me explain how this amount is arrived at.
Tlu C.N.R. are bound to spend, independent of tluir terminals, approximately one million dollars iu filling
in Main Sireet. They are also bound
Io spend anotln-r million dollars in
constructing sewers and water
courses through the bed of False
Creek. If these sowers an diverted
freim False Creek the company -lill
stands hound to pay the ceest. Half
ilu- cost '���!' tin- Scott e.r Carolina
Street bridge acp.ss the properly,
.which is to be borne by the railway.
represents another $200,000, while
other fills, building e.f retaining wall.
i etc.. will bring the ,'11)1011111 lhat the
I C.N'.R. will spend entirely independent of Iheir terminals to the larg,
sum   of     $3,483,299.     This   is   an   un-
At a meeting of the Iteeard of
Works tenders for the paving of
Westminster Road were received
from  Messrs.  Ledingham  &  t'opper
i,n;1('l,���u''-1n""|ii'|(;rni,"!d C��.?.traCtT!biased estimate of our Kngineer.    1 In
r^.u.:"'":-"!.1.:!:1:: %5*?��.Ml��?!^|thh basis the C.N.R. is paying $311..
H20 per acre feer the land. Alderman
Hepburn says that he would support
the agreement if it could be shown
that thc city was getting $30,000 an
acre. I say tha the city is getting
more   than '$30,000   per   acre.
"Then tlu- property 1- being sold to
tin- C.N.R. ..11 such terms that it
makes tin- C.N.R. a trustee of that
property for iln- c'itj oi Vancouver as
railway terminals forever. By the
agreement the C.N'.R. can never sell
their terminals unless the purchaser
agrees to carry out the    stipulations
Rubber Ceimpany; Columbia Hitu
lithic Company Ltd., and M. I'. Col-
ton Company Ltd. The amounts of
the different tenders were not mentioned. They were referred In the
engineer for tabulation.
The engineer recommended thai
three-plank sidewalks be laid on the
south side eif Sixty-second Avenue
from 3)0 feet east of Main Street to
Fraser Avenue; on the south side of
Fifty-eighth Avenue from Mam
Street in Prince Edward street, and |
on the south side of Fifty-seventh
Avenue from Prince Kdward Street
174 feet east.
Questioned as  to  the    amount    of J
money still unexpended under  Bylaw
No Seven which was passed last year
authorizing the raising of $'KI0,IKili, or1
$130,000 for each  of the  five  wards,
Mr  Clement said that the unexpended balance    had    been    redistributed
among   the   seven   wards   as   follows:!
Ward   I,   $58,312;   Ward   11.   $46,562;
Ward III. $44,271; Ward  IV. $22,006;
Ward   V, $7S,I20.   Wanl   VI, $54,282
The
without appeal Even the rental
which ih railway shall pay shall be
fixed by ilu- Lieutenant-Governor-in-
Council. All maiici- oi a controversial  matter  -hall  In-  settled  by  him.
"li is my "pinion that railways
comprise one of iln- greatest city
builders. Tin- C.P.R. have brought
the City "i Vancouver up t" its pre-
si-ni -late- bin tlii- i- nol Ilu- tune
when we should stop. Rather have we
reached a stage where tlu- incoming
eef the C.N.R. will el" 11- infinite good.
Besides this tin- C.N.R. an- bound 10
make- Vancouver iln- home port 'ef
ilu-ir trans-Pacific Steamship Lines.
Surely thi- 1- another big concession,
"I have ine excuses l.e offer in sup-
porting thi- agreement," concluded
Hi- Worship. "I expressed myself in
favor of tin- agreement before the
election and promised that if elected
I would eh, all ill my pe.we-r I" see it
through. 1 am prepared te' stand by
my guns. 1 have been made iln object eef a mud-slinging campaign by
some, bul I desire te. say thai I am
not frightened by men like Sir
Charles Hibbert Tupper, F. C, Wade,
K. Cassidy and others wh" have private reasons for opposing the agreement "
Kate-
public
A delegation 'ef Ward VI
payers' Association held a
meeting at Dundonald School. Kiver
Koad, Wednesday evening, February
26. The meeting was called te. elis-
cuss 1I1 I'.. C, Electric Railway franchise. Many interested residents attended.
The .Mis-es Margaret and Clara
Johnston, oi Port Moody, attended
the ball given by the teachers of
Seeuth Vancouver at Lester's Hall,
Friday night, February 21. They have
been the guests of Miss I-'.. Dickieson,
Fifty-eighth Avenue.
, ������ ^ ���
Tin- foundation of the new public
scheeeel near Kniglii and Ferris roads
has been completed and the contractors are hauling brick and slate
feer construction work.
Board of Trade Year Reviewed
PRESIDENT AND SECRETARY PRESENl  REPORTS"
and Mr. Kenneth Lamond, eef South
Vancouver, who was appointed secretary to the joint committee.
el      till
In these days of stress and trouble
when the Municipality has passed
through so much, wc must offer our
strongest protest against the mud-1
raking that is going on. Some people
seem not to be able to exist unless
they live in a state of mud-throwing.
The minds of such people seem to become warped up and narrowed so that
they can find no good in anything
unless emanating from themselves.
Give the Council a chance now. They
have fulfilled their platform pledge.
Their failure has been through no
lack of effort on their part; they have
been beaten by powers greater than
liie.'r own.
*       He        *
Charlie Hodgson, the popular President of the Board of Trade, goes
back to power for another year. For
four successive years he has been
elected unanimously. This is a mark
of favor and esteem by tbe Board to
tbe 'President which we are confident
be  appreciates.
.���       *        *
A. Mock Parliament for Fraser Avenue is now about to become an accomplished fact. Last Saturday I
P.'.id a visit to the one at Collingwood
and must heartily congratulate its
members. The proceedings were in
an orderly manner, the questions
vtere well put.    Thc various ministers
My first experience of the Council
sitting in private session was on
Wednesday evening. I have no desire to undergo a repetition; the long
weary wait on thc Council returning
to the Council Chamber gets on one's
nerves. However, it is essential
these private sessions should take
place as it is not in the best interests
of municipal business that all the
work of the Council should be on
public view.
One of the first acts of the Council
must bc an addition to the present
Municipal Hall. Thc building is altogether inadequate to house the present   staff.
* *    *
The School Board had a long conference with the Council on Wednesday as to ways and means.
* *    *
Many of the Representatives of the
pavements firms are as well-known
around the Municipal Hall as some
of the prominent officials are. the
persistence with which some of the
competing contractors' men hang
around thc Hall ought to yield some
results to the firms they represent.
In justice to the contractors it is
really now time that thc pavement
contracts  were  settled.
Central   Park   Jottings
An   interesting    gathering
Central Park Branch of the Women's
Institute    took   place  on   Thursday
evening in the Fisher Hall. Beacons-
Held. After the general business
meeting a good attendance of members listened with great pleasure lo
ti special address from a well-known
Vancouver lady, Mrs. Kemp, who is
always to the fore in all kinds of
work which  affect  women's interests.
Having just returned from Victoria
where she had been one of thc delegates appointed to meet thc Premier,
Mrs. Kemp was full of the subject
of women suffrage, and indeed, what
might bc comprehensively termed
"equal rights to women." She described the reception of thc delegates
and their claims, and told how great
had been her personal disappointment
over their non-success. Mrs. Kemp
commented strongly upon the treatment the women delegates had re.
ceived.
After Mrs. Kemp's address tea was
served, and a pleasant conversation
followed. The institute was then
invited by Mrs. Kemp to meet the
Women's Council on thc first of
March, in  Vancouver.
To the ' iii'ii-.-r- and  Members of the
South Vancouver Board "i Trade
Gentlemen,    We hai e again reach
..I   that   point   when   wc   musl   look
back  and  n vie ��   the  v., rk   we  hatc
repe.rt  of  the   engineer    was  a nplished  during   the  past    year
adopted ami on the motion of Coun- Very marked progress has been made
cillor Dickinson he was authorized to  in   tin   municipality;   on   every   hand
proceed   with  all   work   that   can   be  w<   sei   signs of  progress  and  pros
done under No. VI Bylaw, which pre'    perity; in every direction wt sei  tent
lieles  ior the clearing ami grading of  porary  roadl  giving  way  to  perman-
roads. mi ones; every ��1 ek vacant lots are
The    engineei   was  authorized    to becoming   fewei   and   fewer,  and  the
day  1-  nol
I be difficult
engineer  was  autnonzei
construct   Imx   drains   em   Fifty-first
Avenue from Geiirge  Street 885  feel
west;    McMillan   Streel   across    tin
roadway;   lane   between   Main   Streel
and Sophia Street, from Twenty-fifth
Avenue to Twenty-eighth Avenue;
first lane wesl of Fraset between
Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth avenues and between Forty-eighth and
Forty-ninth   avenues;    Twenty ~jvih
Avenue from Quebec to Main Street.
The engineer's nomination of the | j
the positions "i
appointments to
at $4.25 per day
recommended  to
[ar
following  men   for
ward foremen, their
date  from  March   1
was   approved   and
lislant when it will
I,, "main an unimproved
l"i in N'nih Vancouver. During the
yeat real 1 state \ aim - ba> 1 made ne
marki el progn ss, and I am not sorry j
at this because before any gnat In-1
ci case i.eki ��� place 1 would like t< 1
see- the majority of the residential
le.t- pass intei the hands of the work,
ingman. Winn a l"t g"(- beyond
the price "i Siooo we Know thai a
working  man. to do himself and hi
the Council for adoption: Ward I,
Mr. George Kerr; Ward II. Mr. I)
Pugh; Ward III. Mr. J. W. Smart;
Ward IV, Mr. J.iseph Bruckshaw;
Ward V, Mr. Frank Hagcnaars;
Ward VI, Mr. W. 11. McLcese; Ward
VII. Mr. W.  H. Stuart.
A report from Building Inspector
Voung in regard to a-firc at an apartment house in Stainsbury Avenue.
Cedar Cottage, was submitted t.e the
effect that the building had not been
finally passed and was nol finished
when a fire was lighted in lhe furnace. The building department's requirements, thc report stated, had
since been complied with and the furnace bed put in a thoroughly satisfactory condition.
family justice, cannot gee   beyond this   they,   when
price.     During  the   >car   lhe   Council
gut a Government Commissioner appointed     Although   this   is    outside
our  province  as  a  board,  yet  as  in-
-iniiiar manner to the railways commissi' m.
Cheaper Light and Power
W 1   wi ���     ;'.   Iii pi -   that
in.-rn would     ..'  been arrb >-'l al
iw een   the   W 1 stern   Canada    Pow er
Companj .       Municipi I
1 ���  I--,   lig      ind pon 11  wi mid
I". 11   pui' i   sed   al   hall   11"   pi
pi n-e     W hib   negi itiatii ins were in an
interestit g   slate  they  ��ere  suddenly
.In  ppi ' --111      -'   Ilie-     llll. X|'l ill   -
able reason   -1   hai r up to the ;
e-nt  been  unable  i" gi 1  the nee- tia-
ii"iis reopened.
North Arm of the Fraser
IluriiiL! tin j 1 ar \\e were successful in getting Richmond, Point Gi
and llurnaby tn join with US in pro-
moting a Harbor Bill which I am
pleased i" say has passed tlu- !)"���
minion house in the form as suggested by the joint committee which pro-
rides  feer tin- appointment  of    three
mmissioners. Let us hope that
tppointed, will be live
wins, as the value i.i such an undertaking cannot be- computed in dollars
and cents, nol only lor one elistriet.
but   ilu-   whole   of   We-teru   Canada.
dividual ratepayers it was a matter j In the past the functions of this
we were all interested in. Whatever board have- been badly handicapped
the finding e.i the Commissioner may through the great increase thai was
be, nothing hut good can result from taking place in "real estate." The
ihe appointment. The mistakes of feverishness is now greatly abated,
'.In- past will be a guidance for the a large population has been brought
future, within the municipality.    Work must
Pitring the year through the efforts [be  provided   feer  ilu-   Workers  and
of the board a postal delivery was se-
In St. John's Church on Sunday
night thc Rev. W. J. Johnson feelingly referred to the death of Mr.
Broom. Mr. and Mrs. Broom have
only been in Canada about three
years, and much sympathy has been
expressed for Mrs. Broom.
To Aid Annexation
Ex-Reeve W. A. Pound, who returned from a trip to Victoria, stated
that Premier McBride informed him
tha while the Government could not
sec its way clear to approve the annexation bill, legislation is under consideration which will make the amalgamation of districts easier than at
the present  time.
Ward V Conservatives
The Ward V Conservative Association at a meeting elected the following officers: President, F. Wav:
vice-president, S. H. Greer; secretary.
J. G. James: treasurer, C. M. Whelp-
executive,  R.  S.   Lewington,   F.
ton:
J. Rolston, T. Houston and C A.
Graham; delegates to South Vancouver central executive, T. Houston;
delegate to Richmond central. F.
Way. Thc constitution and bylaws
of the South Vancouver Conservative Association were adopted. Addresses were given by Mr. R. C.
Hodgson, president of the association and others.
Magistrate J. C. McArthur. who
was indisposed owing to a cold is
again about and attending to his
various duties.
cured for certain sections of thc
municipality, We hope before the
nd of the present year a more fully
extended delivery service will be
given. SO that it may embrace every
part  of South  Vancouver,
Transportation
Double car tracks have been laid
1 en Main and Fraser Street. The
board tirst initiated the agitation for
this, and can lay certain claims to
getting these lines extended. I am
sorry that the B. C. Electric Railway Co. have not yet carried out
their promise to make a cross car
line through thc municipality. This
must be one of the first matters taken
up by the new officers and pushed
to a  successful issue.
Telephones
Although wc have had different
deputations to wait on the Telephone
Company no progress can be made.
The present rates charged are such
as to become a clog on business. A
stremg agitation must be set on foot
to get government control of this
public utility. Failing this I would
bke to see a public utility commission
appointed that could deal with all
public utilities suih as telephones,
bght,  power and  transportation  in  a
_ in
this the board musl take an active
part. Unfortunately the municipality is unable to grant any concession
for thc location of industries which
will make the gelling of small factories here very difficult, however. I
am confident that with a strong, energetic committee a fair amount of
new industries will be located this
year.
As ilu- board is now about to i-im-r
upon the work for which it is meant
to perform, it is necessary that every
business man within the municipality
should take an interest in it. The
members should bring it under the
notice of all their friends. We don't
want members for their subscriptions;
what we want is members wh.. will
take an active, intelligent grasp of
the affairs of the board, always remembering that whatever work they
are doing in the furtherance of the
municipality they are also helping on
their   own   individual   interests.
In conclusion I thank the members
for the honor they have done me iu
electing mc president during the past
three years. I have met with nothing but unfailing kindness at your
hands; I have been interested in" the
work of thc board; my only regret is
that I had not more time to devote
(Continued on Page 12) TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 191.1
rountcoos RUftNA&YS
gONNie QANKS"* QRA6S
\> the retiring president "f the
Burnaby Hoard of Trade Mi. B. G.
Walker expressed in his annual report his cordial wishes for the fu-
tiue success of the board, and assured
the members that though retiring in-
t.. private life be would watch with
profound interesi the steps they
would lake. Mr. Walker gave in
considerable detail an account of the
board's work during the past year,
dwelling   with     particular     emphasis
upon the harbor scheme tier the North
Ann of the Fraser River. Mr. Walker te.eek great pleasure ill noting the
increased interesi that the inhabitants
were showing in the Hoard of Trade.
a- evidenced by the increased membership.
A warm and unanimous vote of
thanks was accorded Mr. Walker, and
also the secretary, Mr. T. D. Coldicutt. and the usual election of officers
for the ensuing year followed. These
were: Hon. president, Reeve D. C.
McGregor; president. Mr. T. D.
Coldicutt; vice president, Mr. W. S.
Rose; secretary-treasurer, Mr. H. VV.
Mansfield: executive committee,
Messrs. L. L. Macpherson, R.
Thorpe, P. B. Brown, A. Scott, E.
I',. Stride, A. I.oblcy. B. E. Tucker
and L. C. Hill. 'The board reappointed as its representatives on the joint
barb.er committee for the North Arm.
<ef  the  Fraser  River  Messrs  Walker
and Coldicutt.
* *   *
On Friday morning the important
question of tarnsportation will be
discussed by Mr. R. II. Sperling, general manager of the B. C. R, R. Co.,
and the Hurnaby delegates, the latter consisting of Reeve and Council
and two delegates from each of tbe
wards who attended the conference.
It is very earnestly hoped that an
agreement may be made whereby
transportation facilities will be afforded at an early dale, and if an
agreement can be made and further
procedure in the law suit rendered
unnecessary, great satisfaction will be
felt.
lie        *        *
At the Council meeting on Monday night Assessor Steffens made a
Statement showing excellent growth
of the municipality as regards the
taxable value of laud. Nearly a million and a half dollars is the total increase for the year.
* *      A
The proposed alteration of the
name Royal Oak to Alta Vista received a set back by the petition presented by fifty residents. If any
change was made the protestants considered it  should  be  to  Oakalla.
* *    *
The Councillors disagreed as to the
selection of a site for the proposed
erection of a new police su..station.
North Burnaby needs a substation
with police office and sleeping quarters, also a public hall and accommodation for hose reel and fire apparatus. The discussion which took
place showed the needs of various
localities. It was felt by Councillor
MacDonald that the rapidly expanding district of Vancouver Heights
needed the station, there being thickly populated parts near thc car terminus. Councillor Fail Vel strongly
advocated the claims of the North,
giving it as his opinion that the new
luiilding sheeiild be somewhere in the
neighborhood of Delta Avenue, a
rapidly  growing district.
Halfway between Boundary Road
and the Xe.rth Road was the best
place in the opinion of Councillor
MacPherson, thereby keeping clear
..i tin- Vancouver border, to which
Councillor MacDonald replied that
such an arrangement would necessitate another ball being built at Vancouver Heights, where, he urged, it
wa- specially wanted by lhe chief of
police,
* *        *
The nee els eel Wanl I 11 for a road
t'e   the   Hurnaby   Lake   car   line   were
next     considered,    and    Councillor
Coldicutt moved that ilu $1,400 already allocated to Second Street
should In- expended in clearing thai
slreel to the extent allowed by the
funds. The Council agreeing in this,
il was further arranged that a report
should bc furnished by the Engineer
as l.e the cost of making an extension
to thc car line.
I   (i   t
At the Vancouver Heights, Burnaby. Presbyterian Church, on Friday the 27th, an entertainment will bc
given, taking the form of a two act
comedy entitled "Mrs. Briggs of the
Poultry Yard." The cast is an excellent one, and everything points to
an enjoyable evening.
* *   *
Mr. B. G. Walker, who at the recent election was the opponent of
Reeve Macgregor will shortly take
up his residence in  Victoria.
* *        *
Iii the McKay Hall on Tuesday
night there was a well-attended meeting of the Ratepayers Progressive
Association of Ward VI. The Secretary/Mr. W. Hart, being absent, his
place was taken by Mr. Bennett, and
President W. T. Wilson occupied the
chair. The minutes of the previous
two meetings were adopted on the
motion of Mr. Frank Rumble, seconded j Mr. James Murray. Mr.
Fraser reported that an informal
meeting had been held last Friday at
Alta Vista, and there seemed to be
every probability of Ward I falling
into line with Ward VI at a coming
meeting on Wednesday next, when
delegates from both Wards will confer. A matter of interest having
arisen in the removal of one of thc
road foremen, a petition was presented, asking the support of the association in placing the matter before the
Council; this, on the motion of Mr.
W. Ralph, seconded by Mr. H.
Kinney. This was strongly opposed
by Messrs. F. Rumble and Lomas as
being outside tbe province of the association. Discussion on the franchise and the coming Friday confer
ence with the B.C.F..K followed in
which   Messrs.     W.     T.     Whitehead
(Alta   Vista),   H.   M.   Fraser   (Ward
VI deli-Kate I. J. Murray. James Mur-
i.-iy, T. Mayne, Lomas, Coulter and
Winch  took part
A      A      *
The Burnaby Council sets many
good   examples.     In   the   paving     of
Kingsway between Smith Vancouver
and New Westminster a start een the
work will be made at no less than six
places simultaneously. This will enable Ihe Council to see an early completion of the paving. At the last
meeting an appropriation of $3,200
was made to make an alternate route
for traffic during the paving operations.
The Council also gave permission
to Councillors McPherson, Coldicutt
and the Chicf-of-Policc to sell, buy
or transfer any or all horses in order
to bring the efficiency of the police
department up to its highest standard.
 1  ^  ���	
Edmonds Notes
Mr. E. Hcpper bas severed his connection   with   the   Edmonds   General
stores,   which   is   much   regretted   by
his  friends.
* *    *
Dr. Geo. A. Watson has been reappointed   medical   health   officer   to
the municipality.
%    it    a
A. S. Neilson, of the Edmonds General Store is having a beautiful bungalow built on the Arthur  Road.
ele       *      *
Mr.   D.   West   has   returned   home
| after   spending  a   fortnight   in   Kamloops.
* *      *
It was with regret that residents
of llurnaby have heard that Mr. B.
G. Walker is thinking eef moving over
to the Capital City. Mr. Walker has
held several positions of trust in thc
municipality, and has done a good
deal to help the surroundings of Edmonds.
* *    *
Mr. F. M. Britton returned -from a
visit to California, which he look
after bis bard work on the Hurnaby
Council. He is looking much improved as a  result of the trip.
* A     it
The Edmonds Furniture store report business favorable.
* *    *
S. R. Clark, clothes cleaning and
dyeing, has started business in the
Welsh  Block.
* *    *
J. B, Whitburn has taken up his
residence with Mr. J ,C. Bonser, Wise-
Road.
* *    *
Tbe weekly social of the Edmonds
Club  was  held  on  Wednesday.
A       A       A
The Edmonds Whist Circle is giving a whist drive at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. P. B. Brown. A number
of the younger people have been invited.
* *    *
Mr. and Mrs. P. B. Brown and Miss
I'hyliss Brown spent the week end
at White Rock making plans for the
Bummer holidays
* ' *   *
The Burnaby Hockey team defeated tbe Sapperton club tei the tunc of
1-0.
* e|.        *
The Burnaby Boys' Club were
greatly delighted by beating Sapperton; thc club rooms arc decorated
with all kinds of pennants and pic-
lures of sport, etc.
* *    it
llurnaby Grass Hockey Club went
down lo a rather severe defeat from
Vancouver. They played on the Vancouver ground owing to the Burnaby
ground   being covered  wilh   snow.
e��        *        e|,
The Edmonds Development Company declared a dividend eel' ten per
ceni   for lasl year's work.    They hope
I"  'I"  big  business  this  vear.
e��    *    *
_ Ii   is   reported  that   Miss   Gwenn
Cox has arrived back from thc
Prairie and is slaying with friends
in Ilie City.
* *   ��
T. F. Reid and W. A. McDonald
have taken over the office iu which
Mr. Sworder conducted a real es-
late- office. They arc opening a coal
and wood, sash and deior factory office.
* +      A
D. C. Patterson has invested in a
motor car; it seems that real estate
is looking up.
AAA
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Jackman have
left  for  a  short trip  to Victoria.
et      *      *
A meeting of the shareholders of
the Edmonds Development Company
Ltd. was held in the Moreton Hall
on Thursday, February 20. A fair
attendance of members were present
when the president submitted the annual statement. Mr. W. S. Rose,
secretary, was called upon to read
the statement for the past year. The
condition of affairs seemed to be a
healthy one when it was declared a
ten per cent dividend be paid. Mr.
B. G. Walker resigned from the directorship. The following officers
were elected for the ensuing year :
President, C. R. Gordon; manager.
P. B. Brown; secretary, W. S. Rose;
directors, E. L. Sands, R. D. Dunlop and T. M. Britton. A committee
meeting met afterwards and disposed
of the business.
 1 ^ ���	
Collingwood Pool Room
The pool room which Mr. Leon E.
Harris has conducted on Westminster Road, near Joyce Street, has
been transferred to Joyce Street near
the B.C.E.R. station, Mr. Harris having purchased the old stand of Messrs
Taylor & White. Mr. Harris announces that he will open a first-class
barber shop in connection with an
up-to-date pool room, while it is his
intention at an early date to put in
baths. An up-to-date establishment
of this nature will be a boon to Collingwood residents.
Collingwood Parliament
There was a goeid attendance at the
Collingwood Parliament on Saturday
night. The "strangers' gallery" was
full, so was the "ladies gallery" and
the proceedings were animated from
lhe slart. All honorable member
tried to spring a joke on "Thc King's
Printer" by asking if tile female head
printed on "Parliamentary Paper Nee
_'" was not a concession to the suffragettes?
Tbe Speaker answered wilh dignity
that the honorable member must not
allude to "The King's Printer" as a
member of the House. For ally
error committed the King's Printer
must answer at thc Bar of thc House.
"Bul," said Mr. Speaker, "doubtless
instead of the head of a suffragette it
is thc head of Miverva the Goddess of
Wisdom, who I hope will inspire
some of our doings; the House bad
bitter proceed to business."
After speeches by Mr. Van Home
and others the King's Speech was
adopted. Ministers had a severe
heckling on "The Rainbow," "The
Coal Strike," and other matters, and
there were indications that by the
aid of "the cross benches" tbe Government will be in for a lively time.
Next Saturday, this night week, will
be a "private members night," and
there is promise of some initiative
legislation. The Minister of Justice
introduced an "Elections Bill" which
was read a first time and which is
given below.
The House decided to purchase thc
standard book "Parliamentary Por-
cedure and Practice," to which allusion  is made in  another  column.
Thc Clerk of the House spied "a
distinguished stranger," Mr. Kenneth Lamond, Secretary of the South
Vancouver Board of Trade, who, the
"House" having formally adjourned,
addressed the members.
"I have been an interested specta-
lor of your proceedings tonight,"
said Mr. Lamond, "and 1 congratulate
you on the admirable order of your
procedure and the ability and acumen
displayed during the debate. I can
readily perceive that a parliament like
this is destined to be a factor in the
building up of Greater Vancouver.
Annexation being for a time at least
out of thc sphere of practical politics
must not let us delay the wheels of
progress. Jupiter bids us put our
own shoulder to the wheel, lift our
wagon out of any awkward  rut  into
prescribed by form "A" of tbe Schedule I'i this Act and filing lhe same
with   the   Secretary  of  Slate.
3. Every person duly qualified,
who has made and filed his application tee be placed on the Registry of
Electors, as provided for by Section
2 ol ihis Act, at least two weeks before lhe date of any election, and
who has paid the registration fee as
hereinafter provided for, and all taxes
due to the Government shall be entitled to vote at any election.
4. Every person, on applying to
have his name placed on the Register
of Electors, and before he shall be en-
tilled to have his name placed on the
Register of Electors, shall pay to the
Secretary of State a registration fee
of twenty-five cents, which shall bc
credited ill payment of one week's
tax.
5. There shall be due to thc Government from every elector a weekly
tax of twenty-five cents, and any
elector who is in default in payment
of said tax for three weeks shall be
struck  off the  Register of  Electors.
6. No Asiatic or Indian shall bc
entitled to have his name placed on
the Register of Electors.
7. Every duly qualified elector
shall be entitled to have his name
placed five times on the Register of
Electors, and shall have one vote for
each time his name appears on the
Register of Electors.
8. Every elector shall signify in
writing, on form "B" of the schedule
to this Act, to the Secretary of State,
at the time be files his application to
be placed on the Register of Electors,
the electoral district or districts in
which he wishes to vote, and his
name shall be placed on tbe Register
of Electors accordingly; but no electors name shall appear on the said
Register more than five times.
9. Every elector shall be entitled
to one ballot for each vote to which
he is entitled, and shall bc entitled to
vote on each ballot fnr as many candidates as there are members to be
elected for the constituency named
on such ballot.
10. Candidates must be nominated
in writing by a proposer and seconder
on the form "C" of the schedule to
this Act, which nomination must be
assented to by the candidate, and thc
form must be filed with the Secretary
of State before eight p.m. on tbe day
of election.    All candidates and their
which it  has fallen, and go triumph-  proposers   and   seconders     must     be
antly on our way. Thc Board of
Trade has done, is doing good work;
it must have the support of other
bodies and will welcome indeed thc
support of such an active and intelligent body as this in any movement
for tbe public good. I hope that
other parliaments may bc formed,
and if they arc they cannot do better
than ask you, gentlemen, to give them
a start. I have to thank you for permission to say bow much I have enjoyed an interesting, intellectual
evening." (Cheers.)
The House soon after adjourned.
TO THE WHIPS
Beat up a good attendance for tonight, Saturday, thc Clerk has received an intimation that some "distinguished visitors" from the City will
bc present.
A THREE LINE WHIP
Mr.   Liberal  Whip,  do  not  let   the
Liberal  side appear    "an    array    of
���tnpty benches.'
Liberals bc in  your  seats  at  eight
sharp.
"GOD   SAVE   THE   KING"
*   *   *
A Bill Respecting the Qualification
and Registration of Electors, and
the Regulation of Elections.
This ACT may bc cited as the
"ELECTIONS ACT."
1. Every male British subject of
lhe full age of eighteen years, not being disqualified by this Act. shall be
entitled to have his name placed on
the Register of Electors.
2. Every person desirous of having his name placed on thc Register
..I Electors shall make application
therefor  by   taking    the    declaration
ele
duly  qualified  voters  tor  some   electoral district.
11. In the event of no more candidates being nominated for any constituency than there are members to
bc elected for that constituency the
Secretary of State shall declare such
as are duly nominated 'elected for
such  constituency.
12. In the event of more candidates being nominated for any constituency than there arc members to
be elected a poll shall be held, from
nine o'clock p.m. to ten o'clock p.m.
on the day of election, and thc voting
shall be by ballot, which ballot shall
bc in thc form "D" of the schedule
to this Act.
13. The Secretary of State shall
act as returning officer at any election, and may appoint such deputies,
assistants and clerks under him as
may be necessary to properly conduct
the election, and immediately after
the close of tbe polls be, with the
aid of his deputies, assistants and
clerks shall count the ballots and announce the results of the election, and
make a return thereof to the Clerk of
thc House of the members  elected.
14. In the event of any memner
ceasing from any cause to be a duly
qualified member his seat shall be
declared vacant, and a election shall
bc held to elect a member to represent thc constituency for which such
member held his seat.
15. Iu all matters not provided for
by this Act, and when a precedent
shall be required, the returning officer and his deputies shall be governed
by thc Elections Act eef the Province
of  Hritish  Columbia.
Id. The appendix lo this Acl shall
he and   form  a part of this Act.
17. This Act shall conic into fierce
and effect immediately upon its being
issented to by the Governor-General.
APPENDIX
Schedule "A"
I, the undersigned, do hereby apply to have my name inserted on tbe
Register of Electors.    I do solemnly declare that 1 am a male British  Subject of the full age of eighteen years, and am duly qualified to have my name
placed in the said register.
Dated   Signature
Schedule "B"
I. thc undersigned, having made application to have my name placed
on the Register of Electors for the Collingwood Parliament, signify my.desire
to have my votes entered on thc Register of Electors as follows:
Number of
Votes
Vote for the Electoral  District of	
Dated.
.Signature
Schedule "C"
We, thc  undersigned, being duly qualified voters,  hereby  nominate
 as a candidate for member for
the Electoral District of	
Dated   Proposer
 Seconder
I hereby assent to the above nomination
Schedule "D"
.Candidate
ELECTORAL  DISTRICT  OF	
 MEMBERS TO BE ELECTED
DOE, JOHN
ROE,  RICHARD
STILES, JOHN
WALKER   BROTHERS
REALTY  AND  INSURANCE   BROKERS
Have helped sun-kissed Hurnaby and South Vancouver develop from
virgin forest into busy districts of homes.
They believe  Burnaby  possesses all thc factors necessary to make
her one day the hub of the peninsula.
VANCOUVER: EDMONDS:
Dominon Trust Block, Edmonds Station,
341 Cambie Street Burnaby
A. McFEE
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Phone 1038 : Edmonds, B. C.
I have the exclusive sale of large lots on Salisbury Avenue, close
to statica.   $1,000 each; on good terms.   See me about them.
PATTERSON   &   FISHER
REAL ESTATE AND  INSURANCE
6yt  acres in   Edmonds district, near  Power  House and facing  on Vancouver
Road.    All  cleared.     Price  $16,000.00.   $5,000.00  cash;   balance  6.   12,   18,  and  24
months,
POST OFFICE BUILDING, EDMONDS Phone :  No. 664
WARNER, BANGS & CO.
REAL ESTATE AND COMMERCIAL AGENTS
PHONE  1024
COLDICUTT BLOCK.  EAST BURNABY
8END US YOUR LISTINGS
LOANS AND INSURANCE
Highland   Park   Acreage
We have a number of SMALL ACREAGE PARCELS on and
near the new cut-off line of the B. C. Electric Railway.
1 aire, just off Railway, $2100; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
months.
Wa acres, on Railway, $3500; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
month*.
E.  W.  MacLEAN   LTD.
Exchange Building
142 Hastings West
GEO. SNIDER & BRETHOUR
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
909   Dominion   Trust   Building;,   Vancouver,   B. O.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
Telephones :    Office 8497.    Works 6203.       Works 9328.    Works 9179
A Wonderful Invention
One of the most wonderful inventions of the present day is "Try-New-
Life." Health and with it happiness
and contentment is based to a large
measure on good circulation of thc
blood. Without good circulation,
health can never bc hoped for. With
good circulation, good health is certain. "Try-New-Lifc" invigorates
and causes an increased blood circulation. "Try-New-Lifc" therefore
becomes a fundamental factor in
seeking for good health.
"Try-Xew-Life" bas been put to
the severest tests and it has not been
feuind wanting. Some of the cures
that it has effected border on the
marvellous. "Try-New-Lifc" is tbe
very latest scientific method of slimit-
lating a healthy circulation by the
use of electrical application. Drugs
and stimulants are nol used anil tlie
method is so simple tbat a child can
operate it.
Nol a day passes but thc power of
"Try-New-Life" is proven in the most
"le^iiiiatc and painful cases. Leading
Xew York physicians and specialists
pronounce it the greatest help thai
Buffering humanity has ever known,
and ii is being universally adopted bj
the medical profession, Weak, tind
and worn-out nerves arc wonderfully
invigorated   and   strengthen! d   by   the
daily  use  of "Try-New-Life."     It   hire i .es the vitality of the active body.
A weak, thin arm Of leg is proof e,f
poor    circulation,    Exercise  of this
member daily would restore il tee
health and strength. "Try-New-Liie"
will do this quickly and easier than
exercise,   without   loss   of   energy   or
subsequent fatigue.
Demonstration! of "Try-New-Life"
have been made in Vancouver and
South Vancouver and its efficacy has
been more than proved to the most
skeptical. One treatment is sufficient
to do this. It is now on sale at the
People's Drug Store, corner of Main
Street and Twenty-fifth  Avenue.
Collingwood Cuttings
A lecture will be given by the Rev.
E. W. Morgan, B.D., on Friday
evening in thc Methodist Church, on
"A Trip up the Yang-tsu-kiang." It
will bc well illustrated by a series of
fine lantern views, and will deal with
many interesting sides of missionary
effort  in West  China.
* *    *
Wc note with pleasure that Mr.
Brinnen, whose premises wcre so recently destroyed by fire, has opened a new and ceunmodious store
on the opposite side of the road from
his old premises, under his old title,
"Thc Pioneer Dry Goods Store." Mr.
Hrinnen has his new stock in splendid condition and array, and in every
way his store is worth a visit of inspection.
+        e��        *
Another successful social and dance
was held in the Collingwood Institute on Wednesday night of this
week under the auspices of a committee of Collingwood ladies. Great
preparations arc being made for the
masquerade and fancy dress dance
which will be held on St. Patrick's
night. All attending this function
are requested to wear masks.
* *    st
"Should women have an equal right
to vote with men?" was the question
discussed by the Y. P. G. of Knox
Presbyterian     Church,     Collingwood
NOTICES
$25   cash,   balance   $10   per   mom
purchases from owner cleared lot,
carline,    all    conveniences.    Box i
Chinook, 3-1
Young girl, 8 to 10 years, wanu
to mind three-year-old buy; go
home and clothes. Apply 6304 Qu
bee Street.
CHIMNEYS
FIREPLACES   BUILT
PLASTERING   DONE
Terms  Moderate
Write 823 Seymour Street or
PHONE:     SEY.   8864   L
Harris'
Pool Room
Come and enjoy a game at
HARRIS'    NEW    ROOM    ANI>
NEW  TABLES
"Hurry-Up" Barber Shop
JOYCE ROAD
COLLINGWOOD EAST
Corporation of the District of South
Vancouver
NOTICE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
All licenses are now due and payable to the Municipal Hall.
Notice is hereby given that proceedings will be taken against any person
or persons in default after the 28tli
day of February,  1913.
WM.  JACKSON,
Chief of Police
Corporation of the District of South
Vancouver
DOG TAX
Dog Tax will be collected at the
Municipal Hall in future. Dogs found
running at large without having a
license  tag  will  be  impounded.
WM.   JACKSON,
Chief  of  Police
East, and after a vigorous debate
the "ayes" had it. Mr. Stanley
Thompson was the leader of thc affirmative side, and he was ably supported by Mr. Donald Reid, Miss McLean, Miss Wilbers and several other
speakers. Mr. John Crawford led tin'
opposition to woman's suffrage, ami
he was backed by Mr. William Millar, Mr. John Mclntyre and other- SATL'KDAY, MARCH  1,  19!
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
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Ltd. 113-116 Bank of Ottawa Building
THE WORKERS' PAGE
Edited by J. VV.  Wilkinson, to whom all communications should
bc  addressed,   Room  210,   Labor Temple, Vancouver, B. C.
=^
The lasl meeting ��� >f the Trades and
Labor Council ua> addressed by aldermen of the City Council who are
opposed to the proposed agreement
between the City anel the C.N.R.
Those who spoke in opposition t" the
agreement were Messrs, Hepburn,
McBeath, Kirkpatrick, McMasters.
Alderman Cameron spoke in favor,
and Mr. Cottrell was present on be-
i hull" of the Board of Trade. There
were ninety delegates present representing the fifty unions affiliated with
i the Council, and all the speakers were
accorded n quiet hearing, The effect
of their visit will probably be more
than even they expected. Mayor
Baxter would have been present but
fe.r the fact that he had arranged tei
speak at other meetings "ii the same
subject.
i e|<       *        *
All   the   miners     and     others   who
j work iii and around the Britannia
mines came e,ut on strike on Tuesday,
February IH. In all about 500 men
are affected. The trouble has been
brewing for some time. Last summer the management of the mines re.
fused to allow the miners' secretary
tee visit them in the miners' time, and
Otherwise sought to prevent the miners from having Iheir union. A board
of arbitration was appointed under the
Industrial Disputes and Investigation
Act to inquire into the trouble. The
report of thc board was favorable to
the miners but the company refused
to accept the findings of thc board
and the friction still continued. The
union secretary was prevented from
visiting the miners by the company
which owned all the property round
the mines and would not permit trespass. However, at four o'clock last
Christmas morning the miners held
a meeting and selected officers including Kerr McNeil, as secretary.
Matters went along until February
17, when the superintendent informed
McNeil that his services were no
longer   required.     The   miners     then
i held a meeting and a committee was
appointed to interview the superintendent and ask the cause of McXeil's
! dismissal. Thc superintendent refused to reverse his action or to discuss the matter with the men, with
the result that all hands quit and
came down to Vancouver. A meeting
was held on Friday afternoon, February 21, in the Labor Temple when
arrangements were made to carry on
thc strike and to warn till men who
might be persuaded to go to Britannia, that a strike was on. A further
meeting was held in the Labo-
Tempie last  .Monday afternoon  when
j routine business was transacted and
reports received from pickets.
* ele       *
F. A. Acland, the Deputy Minister
of Labor at Ottawa, has telegraphed
tn the local correspondent of the
Labor Gazette asking for all particulars of the strike at the Britannia
mines.
* *   *
The Victoria Trades and Labor
Council will take part in the Carnival
in be held in thai city during thc
forthcoming summer.
ele       *       *
The' amalgamation of the three
! principal railway unions of Great
. Britain was accomplished at a conference held ieii February 14 in Lou-
dun. The new organization is lie bc
called the National Union of Railway,
men.    It absorbs  the  Amalgamated
Society of Railway Servants, the
l'nited I'oinlsmens' and Sigiialmeiis'
I'niiiii. and the General Railway
Workers' Union. The three societies
have a membership of two hundred
thousand.     The   executive   ceimmittee
will be invested with drastic authority for ordering or ending a strike on
: terms   which   it   deems   satisfactory,
'without   the   taking   of   a   ballot   of
the men.
ele       A       A
Out of all the eighty-nine men who
j were engaged at Edmonton to conic
land work at thc coal mines in Cum-
j berland, only one reached Cumber-
laud. The others dropped out of the
party on the way to Vancouver, with
the exception of fourteen who went
on to Nanaimo and were met there
by the miners and informed of the
situation, when thirteen of them refused to go further. Thc miners
state that the one strikebreaker that
went to Cumberland cost $2000.
* *      A
The union bakers held another of
their social evenings in the Labor
Temple last Saturday night, when
about one hundred were present including several of the members'
wives and children. An excellent
vocal programme and refreshments
were provided, and the whole affair
went off satisfactorily.
* =k   *
At the sitting of the Labor Commission held in Nanaimo, Charles
Smith said hc had been brought from
Edmonton under a misrepresentation
of affairs at Cumberland. On the recommendations of a Mr. Ferris, who,
he believed, was an agent of thc coal
company, he visited an employment
agency at Edmonton, paid his dollar,
and was engaged to come to work at
Cumberland. He stated that he asked if there was a strike at Cumberland, and was informed that the
miners were only out for a holiday.
There were eighty-nine men in the
party when it left Edmonton, and although hey were promised food on
the way down they only had some
bread  and cheese.    The party  began
te, think everything was met right
when al Mission thc company police
in charge of lhe parly spoke eef keeping the cars back se, as te, he able lo
rush the party through Vancouver in
the dark. Upon arrival at Vancouver,   C I'R.   police   t'eeek   charge     of
llletll     I'lllK     Of      tllC      train,     bUl      Se.llll'      eet
the men got away and others came
-en  I,,  Nanaimo  and  quit  the  part)
there.
it     it    it
The jeiint ceimmittee (ef the Trades
and Labor Council, the Board of
Trade, and the National Council of
women nut again last Monday in the
Labor Temple to further consider the
proposed Acl to regulate the wages
and hours "f women and girl workers
in shops, offices, etc. The committee
consists "t Mrs. Kemp. Mrs. McCor-
ley, anel Mrs. Forbes McDonald, from
tin- National Council of Women;
Messrs W. Hepburn and J. N. Harvey from the Board eef Trade, and
Messrs. J. Wilton, H. C. Benson and
J. W. Wilkinson representing the
Trades and Labor Council and the
Typographical   Union.
* *       A
The convention of District No. 18
of the United Mine Workers of America was held in Lethbridge last
week, and endorsed Socialism as the
political expression of working men.
District includes the mainland of
British Columbia and Southern Alberta
* *   *
An open meeting of the Lathers'
Union was held in the Labor Temple
hist Monday night for the purpose of
organizing and to consider ways and
means nf improving the material interests uf those working in the trade.
=|e * +
The State of Washington has the
most up-to-date Compensation Act in
the world. Lawyers and insurance
companies are eliminated from all
participation in lhe administration of
the Act. Industries are taxed by the
Sttite according to the risk involved
in their operation, and workmen
when injured apply direct to the commission which is appointed by the
State to administer the Act. Certain
sums arc paid for certain classes of
injuries, and the money goes direct
to the injured person without any reduction for lawyers expenses, or danger of having to fight a powerful insurance company.
* *     it
Clem Stubbs, President of District
No. 18 of thc United Mine Workers
of America, was summoned to Ottawa three weeks ago to testify before the Old Age Pensions Committee of the House of Commons, lie
urged the adoption of the principle
and stilted that it would result in
great benefit to the working classes'
generally, and to none would it appeal   more  than   tee   thc  miners.
* *        ele
The Australian trade uniutis are!
sending out warnings to intending
emigrants as there is acute unemployment in almost every trade in
the Commonwealth, Replying t"
questions asked in the New South
Wales Assembly. Premier McGowan
said thai the state employed about
2(H) emigration agents in Great Britain, paying them !!������ fixed salary, lull
allowing them $5.mi for each adult
agricultural laborer and domestic servant secured, $2.50 for each wife eef
an emigrant, and each child "I twelve
and upwards, and ine shillings for
each child between three .'ind twelve
years of age
* *    *
The addresses of ihe aldermen on
the False Creek Agreement took up.
so much time at ihe last meeting of
the Trades and Labor Council that
the adjourned meeting had !������ be held
last Thursday night.
* *        ele
The carpenters are talking about !
asking for a rise in wages lo $5.00 per I
day on May 1st next.
* +        *
John Sully, the well-known member of lite Builders' Laborers Union,
is to go out in March as the agent of
the Civic Employees, when they hope
to consolidate the builders' laborers
and civic employees into one union
of laborers.
The Copeman
Automatic Electric
Cook Stove
SEE IT IX FULL ' IPERATION AT
THE PURE FOOD SHOW
IMPERIAL RINK, ENGLISH BAY
FROM FEBRUARY \7 To MARCH 1
Don't fail to see this wonderful stove.   Free distribution eif
roast beef sandwiches and coffee.
OUR DEMONSTRATOR WILL EXPLAIN Till-: WORKINGS OK THE STOVE TO YOU
The HINTON ELECTRIC CO. Ltd.
606 GRANVILLE STREET
Most Wonderful
Invention of the
Past Century
Is Being Demonstrated at the
Pure Food Show
Imperial Rink
McFarland's Wave Motor, a device
for harnessing the power of the Sea Waves,
will revolutionize the Industrial Status of
the World.
Invented after twenty years nf labor
by 1. D. McFarland, Jr., a Vancouver man.
(��n English Bay, the McFarland Wave
Motor is heing demonstrated, and it- wonderful possibilities are lieing shown.
The McFarland High-Pressure
Six-Cylinder Pump
The McFarland Six-Cylinder Engine
The British American
Manufacturing and Power
Company Limited
per   cent.    Tbe
arbitration,
matters  will   go   to
Grimsby is threatened with a great
industrial upheaval in the fishing
trade, and unless negotiations give
promise early of a settlement. Eastertide, as the chief season of the year,
for fish, is suggested as thc most
likely time to declare a strike. At
present there is not the slightest suggestion of compromise between the
trawl owners and the National Sailors'
and Firemens' Union, which, claiming
some 9000 local members, has submitted a list eif demands feir increased
wages for all grades, fishermen, engineers, market workers and laborers
���together with other far reaching reforms. The men claim that they can
force full acceptance of their demands, while the owners state that
the scheme propounded cannot possibly be carried out. In these circumstances a strike in the near future
seems probable, affecting some ten
thousand workers.
t    *    i
Scottish coal owners and men have
failed to agree on the question of the
wage rate. Representatives of both
sides met in Glasgow. The miners
asked for an advance of 25 per cent,
on the 1888 basis, and the coal owners
for a reduction of twelve and a  half
Tbe strike of Bradford dyers is
now in its sixth week. By a vote of
21123 against 1760, the strikers have
declared again against piece work.
The dyers ask for 14 cents per hour
among other concessions; the Bradford Dyers' Association have offered
a  piece  work  basis.
it    At    *
The Trades Council is advertising
as follows: Working men and women who are engaged in any industry
for which there is no trade union are
requisted to bring or send particulars
as to their wages, hours and general
working conditions to the Vancouver
Trades and Labor Council, Room 210.
Labor Temple. The information is
required for presentation to the Royal
Commission on Labor on March 7
next. If you are not satisfied with
the conditions under which you work,
send your complaints and information. All communications will be
treated as strictly confidential.
Red Tape in Germany
The  following is an  illustration  of
the beauties of bureaucratic administration  in  Germany:
It appears that in the Post Office
Department at Berlin, if a clerk
wishes a new lead-pencil, he must
turn in  to  the proper authority    thc
stump of the one that has become too
short for further use. In one case
clerk received his new pencil without
returning the end of the old one, and
before this error was discovered this
clerk had been transferred to another
office. Shortly after the assumption
of his duties at his new post this clerk-
received an official intimation that he-
had neglected to turn in his pencil
end. By this time, however, the end
had disappeared. In order to avoid
official reprimand, the resourceful
clerk purchased a new pencil, cut off'
a piece about the length of the missing end, and despatched it to the
stationery department. Evcrvbodv
was accordingly satisfied.
Banishing the Avalanche
Along the side of an Alpine raff-
road an ingenious device has been put
into use to prevent avalanches from
falling upon the track. A wall has
been built which intercepts tlie sliding snow and forces it to precipitate
itself in a leap, whereby it clears the
road-bed and hurls itself into a canal
upon  the other side.
"Why don't you make Johnny wash
his  hands  once in a while?"
"They are taking finger- prints at
his school," answered his wife, "and
you know how the child loves to
excel." SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1913
A NEAR CALL
Written  for "The  Greater  Vancouver    Chinook"    by    "Prospector."
One day in the early summer, some
years ago. I was walking aimlessly
along Hastings Street. 1 felt sick
and tired of city life; the mountains
and stream were calling to me, each
day their voices were becoming loud.
er and louder iu my ear. More and
more there was sounding the murmur
of the stream and the moaning of the
wind amongst the tall timber. I had
spent the winter ill the city. Coming
in freim a prospecting lour the October previous 1 was seized with an illness which had kept me prostrated
all the winter, my convalescence having been slow. Thanks to a good
constitution 1 was on a fair way to
recovery, after the doctors had advised me to.make my will and put my
affairs in order.
I had just left the doctor's office;
he had made a thorough examination
of me, giving me the comforting assurance that all trace of the disease
was gone, but under no circumstance
whatever was 1 to overtax my
strength or to go out on a prospecting expedition. The thought of remaining inactive was annoying, I
wanted to be off and away, thc city
had nn interest for me; what was I to
de,? Whilst in this mood of thought
I saw try, an old prospector whom
I had met three years previous up in
the Cariboo district. Ile was crossing
the street towards the car station. I
hurried after hint and touching him
on the shoulder he turned round and
when lie saw who I was his hand was
out at once. Fry always got the name
of being a white man, both demanding and giving a  square deal.
He asked me to come up to his
hotel with him; I accepted the invitation, glad of anything to kill the
time. We had lunch together and
sat and related our experiences and
prospects since we had last met. I
told i''ry that the doctors had feerhid-
den me to go out, but 1 also told him
of my determination to make another
trip in spite of his warning.
Fry tried to dissuade me, but it
was of no use. So just before I rose
to go Fry said,"Look here, old chap,
if you are determined to go, you
might meet me at Fort George in
three months. I am going to look
for a streak up there for a syndicate
who arc sending me; if I don't go
for them 1 am going to meet Bob
Gibson, an alderman in Winnipeg,
who is going up there to stake some
land."
Two days later I saw Fry off. After
that I seemed unable to rest. I
heard that Jim Baxter was going up
to Ashcroft and along the Cariboo
Road to Fort George, thence to
Hazelton, where he was to stake off
some land for some parties that had
engaged him. I cannot remember
now how I first heard of Jim's journey, but I lost no time after hearing
it till I had hunted Jim up. 1 told
him I was anxious to join him but
that I was not much good for going
the pace too much. In a moment
Jim had me in the hand. "Why boss,"
he says, "I am in no hurry; it don't
matter if I don't get there till
next year, you come and join me, we
can make the pace to suit." Two
days later found Jim and I speeding
on the train out of Vancouver to Ashcroft. When we arrived there we purchased three horses, one as a pack
horse, the other two for our own use.
We took a plentiful supply of provisions with us' and struck for the
mountains. It was on the morning
of the third day after we had left
Ashcroft, Jim said to me. "Vou stay
here all day, 1 am going up that
mountain, I have a hunch that I may
strike something." I was anxious to
go with Jim, but he thought the journey would be too much for me. So
Jim set off to try his luck. After he
was gone about an hour I thought of
doing a little prospecting of my own
around thc camp. As I had noticed
bear tracks near the place I took my
rifle with me. After I had hobbled
the horses and made up a small lunch
so thai I did not need to return till
the afternoon. I set off. Having walked about a mile and finding no indications of minerals, I sat down to have
a smoke and rest, when I observed
a black hear cub.
I had made a promise to the hotel
people with whom I had been staying
that if 1 came across a cub bear I
would bring it home. Xow that the
opportunity had conic I thought this
was  a  good   chance  of securing  the
youngster. I knew the mother would
not be far distant, so 1 saw to my
rifle. I lay flat on my stomach,
watching the cub gamboling about. 1
noticed it always jumped like a kitten
behind a boulder of rock. 1 conjectured the mother was lying there and
was unaware of my presence as I was
lying to the lee side of her. As afterwards proved, my conjecture was
correct.
After patiently waiting for about an
hour, I was rewarded by seeing the
nn it Iter bear come from behind the
boulder and run to the cub. Whether
I had made a noise in lifting my ride
or instinct told her of danger, I cannot say, but the old bear turned and
looked at where 1 was lying. The
shot offered was too good to let slip
so in a moment 1 had drawn the trigger; I aimed to strike her on the fore.
liead. Wherever 1 struck she must
have been Stunned; waiting for a few
minutes I saw no movement of life,
so taking my rifle in my hand I went
up to the prostrate bear. The cub in
the meantime was whining and crying over the mother, It paid me attention lo tne, so 1 sat down and refilled my pipe and lit it; I knew the
cub would not leave the mother so
there was no cause to hurry. After
1 had got my pipe all right 1 went
over to secure the cub. I fastened the
little beggar by the neck with a belt,
ami was wondering if it would be
worth while cutting up the animal to
get bear steak. That vvas thc last I
remembered 'for twenty-four hours.
I thought a great rock had fallen upon
nie and that 1 was falling into a great
chasm.
Jim Baxter came back to the camp
in the evening. He found everything
as I had left il, but there was no trace
of me anywhere. Jim lit the fire and
prepared the supper, afterwards seeing to the horses; he could not conjecture what had become of me. In
the end he came to the conclusion
that I had gone out and been overcome by sickness and could not reach
the camp. He built a large fire and
all night he kept making short journeys from thc camp, calling me loudly
hy name. As soon as daybreak came
Jim easily picked up my trial and followed it. He found the old she bear
lying dead with two wounds in hcr;
one was at the top of thc head, which
must have been the shot I fired, the
other wound, which had proved fatal,
was in the throat. This was probably caused when the bear which
was only stunned by my shot had recovered, and whilst my back was
turned, had risen and struck me
with her paw on the shoulder. My
rifle, which was cocked at the time,
must have exploded and caused the
wound which proved fatal when the
bear struck me. I fell over a rock
about nine feet high, then rolled down
a declivity amongst some bushes. It
was there that Jim found me lying
senseless and bleeding on the following morning. Getting me on to his
back he carried me back to camp,
then after doing everything that he
could to make me comfortable,
he saddled one of the horses and
rode off to a camp that hc had passed
thc preceding day. There he found
Lascelles and his young wife, who
were spending their honeymoon.
After making known the condition
I was in, both Lascelles and his wife
accompanied Jim back to our camp.
So when I opened my eyes in the afternoon it was to find Lascelles' wife
bending over ine and bathing my
brow. After Lascelles had made a
thorough examination of my body
and found that no hones were broken
but that 1 was badly bruised and
shaken, it was agreed that we should
rest in thc camp for a couple of days,
and accompanied by Mr. Lascelles
and his wife we should make our way
to Fort George, where thc Lascelles
intended to go at any rate.
Never will I forget that journey to
Fort George���every step of the way
I suffered excruciating pain. At last
we reached our destination and as the
Lascelles had friends in South Fort
Ceorge, 1 was taken there. For weeks
I lay on a couch and as I watched
the waters of the Fraser a great contentment came over me to remain
there always. As I looked at the
mountains and river and viewed the
level plains lying at my feet, I could
see the coming of a great city in Semth
Fort George, hut it was not for mc to
see a realization  of this inspiration.
As soon as convalescence returned the same restlessness seized me
and once more I was on the way.
Gibson, Fry and a number of others
that 1 knew came in in the fall, and
when they left I went along with
them. Gibson and the Vancouver
men made up a wad of bills, which
without a word to me, they slipped
into my saddle pouch. I had been
down on my luck, but like a true
bunch they were going to help me
along without saying anything. This
is the sort of friendship that a chap
knows   how   to  appreciate;   none    of
your making a call for a fiver to the
crowd when a fellow is out, and keeping your fiver and then telling the
crowd how you like to help a fellow
out when he is down on his luck.
Some day perhaps, in the near future,
1 will take the trip back. Never will
I forget the view as you round the
curve of Ihe mighty Fraser of beautiful South Fort George. But deeper
than the beauties of nature, there will
lie enshrined within my heart that
milk iif human kindness lhat I received from those who were the early
pioneers of thc early city.
(f=
Big Alec of the H. B. C.
By R. J. FRASER
lu the second week of our journey
we were held up at York Factory,
waiting for certain supplies that had
been  delayed.    Notwithstanding  the
generous hospitality of the factor and
of his staff, time hung heavily on our
hands; there are not many amusements at York Factory, and thus it
happened that I stumbled upon an
old journal and upon this story.
The jeittrnal told very little. It was
not  one  belonging  to   York   Factory,
but     to     another   post,   Fort   R ,
which had been abandoned by the
Hudson's Hay Company the previous
spring. The entry itself was fifteen
years old. It was in a striking hand,
bold and awkward, somehow telling
of a stern will behind the hand that
wrote it���a masterful hand. It said:
"Seven of the starving wretches have
at last made a move. 11 is in the nature of a raid on Severn, and 1 believe they intend tee murder >> 1 < 1 Wa&c
teesscat, the medicine man. Good
riddance  to  the  hit   of  them."
This was the entry. I read it just
before going in to supper with the
factor. The factor saw the book lying mi top eif the other books in the
library of the post, and after supper
the hook had been taken away, but
Reiutledge, one of the senior clerks
who had spent  twenty years at Fort
R , told us the story in the mess
room of the clerks���Bachelor Hall,
they  call  it���that  evening.
"Aye," hc assented, "that was Big
Alec's writing you saw. I remember
now. I thought all the old journals
had been destroyed: there were strict
orders given, but probably the one
you saw had been overlooked, I
have not spoken of the matter for
years. The story had almost slipped
my mind. A queer case! A bad
case!
"It was a famine year at Fort R	
As,  perhaps   you   know,    that    post,
like   Trout   Lake   and   Beaver   Lake!
House, was  supplied from  Fort  Sev- i
em.    All our stock came up thc Sev- '
em River from the post there, which
place   itself   was   supplied   from   the
district   depot   here  at   York.      Each
fall,   after   the   arrival   of   the   ship,
three   or   four   coast   boats,   with   a
year's supplies, started from here for
Severn.   The trip was usually a rough
one,  especially   if   they   were  late  in
getting away from here.
"South of the Hayes River two of
the boats were lost���this season I'm
speaking of���with every ounce of
their cargo. If I remember rightly,
three Indians went wilh the cargo���
the rest were picked up by the remaining crew. So that fall there came
to us from Factor George at Severn,
not the usual flotilla of freight canoes
but a single birchbark with the news
of the disaster. 'You will have to
make out the best you can till February,' the factor wrote. 'If I can
spare anything by then I'll send in
a couple of trains to carry you over
till spring.' "
The old clerk paused to strike a
match. Dusk vvas slowly settling
about the corners of the room, and
the sudden flare, as he held the flame
to his pipe, lit up the weather-beaten
face.
"Factor George was as good as his
word," he continued. "On the first of
March, or thereabouts, two dog teams
arrived, in charge of Tommie Hlack���
we reckoned him the dirtiest breed on
the Severn. This addilion to our
meager stock helped us over the rest
of the winter. What we were most
short of was provisions. Rations had
to he cut down to a mere pittance,
and, as the supply fell, the prices to
the Indians rose. However, we figured on holding out until the latter
part of June without actual starvation. By that time we wire expecting to have gotten further relief. At
York there had wintered for the past
two seasons the little schooner
"Princess,"   and   Factor   George   had
TRY-NEW-LIFE
The whole family can use it. Every "TRY-NEW-LIFE" is
made of the very best material and by the most skilled workmen,
and if given reasonable care every one of the machines will
last a lifetime.
"TRY-NEW-LIFE" will relieve pain. No matter whether it is
a splitting headache, rheumatism, indigestion, neuralgia, or many
other ailments, "TRY-NEW-LIFE" will bring relief.
Write for particulars or call at the office of the Hamilton-Beach
Sales Co., 707-708 Bank of Ottawa Building.
Also on sale at
HAMILTON-BEACH   SALES  CO..  721   Yates  St.,  Victoria
BARBERS'   SUPPLY   CO.,  617   Robson  St.,   Vancouver
BURNS    4    CAIRNS'    DRUG    STORE,    Vancouver    Block,
Vancouver
CEDAR COTTAGE PHARMACY.  South Vancouver
NORTH   SHORE  DRUG  CO.,   North  Vancouver,   B.C.
PEOPLE'S  DRUG  STORE, 25th and Main Street
Vancouver
Hamilton-Beach Sales Company
707-708 Bank of Ottawa Building
Vancouver, B.C.
written that she would probably make
a trip down lo Severn as soon as the .
ice had left the Hayes. Then came1
blow number two. The spring rush
of ice in the river crushed the "Princess" and she sank. You have seen
what remains of the little vessel in
th.- mouth of the creek below the
church���'Schooner Creek,' they call il
mew.
"Hard times fell upon the little
community in earnest. There were
twelve or fifteen families of Crees
camped about the peest all summer,
lly July they had eaten up Iheir debt
twice over, and we could give them
ne. more. Hay afler day they hung
about the store or lay in their tents,
their only fond the few whitefish that
the squaws and children caught in the
river. The majority of them grew
as gaunt as their starving huskies."
'Hut why didn't the Indians g'i eiff
hunting after they saw there was no
fiinel to he gotten from the company?''   1   interrupted.
"If you knew Cree natutc you
wouldn't ask. The Indian is extremely superstitious���in spite of the
missionaries' teachings, the most of
them still believe in their medicine
men, as their forefathers did a hundred years before them. Here is how
they reason: 'Last fall the deer crossed the Etchtogami River during the
early part of October, near the Steep
Rock Rapids. W'e will look for them
there at lhe same time this year.
There is no use in our going bunting
before.' You see, they live mostly
on faith. The parson at York here
will tell you how difficult it is to convince these people of the folly of their
old beliefs and the faith they put in
the medicine men. They profess to
accept the missionaries' teachings,
and, as far as outward appearances
go, the most of them live up to the
creed. As long as everything is well
with them the adopted faith of the
while man is sufficient. But let there
come a scarcity of game, poor success
with their traps, or sickness break out
imong them, then back they fall on
the ancient superstitions���the medicine man and his mummeries. 'Bad
medicine' is the cause, they affirm.
The evil influence of the medicine
man eif a neighboring tribe has been
jxerted against them, and until the
spell i.s broken there can be no relief.
Most of their hard times is due to
their own ignorant folly.
"Look here, for instance. Right
here at York you have a sample of
their fool superstition. I heard a remark at the table yesterday about thc
sickly, half-dead    appearance of the
Indians on the Point. They are all
asthmatic���at present the most of
them are suffering from what looks
to me like hay fever. Their sickness
may he due to improper food���or lack
of food and insufficient clothing. This
has a great deal to do with it. But
that is not all. Where aro they
camped? In the grass on the flats
there, not two feet above tidewater���
always damp, no drainage. Unsanitary conditions prevail in their tents.
How can they expect to be otherwise
than  sick and cold?
"They are nearly all consumptives,
poor beggars," he added. A touch of
sympathetic feeling had crept into his
tone. "The disease quickly carries
them off���faster than you imagine.
Hut they have themselves to blame.
Two years ago a similar sickness was
prevalent among the Indians at Split
Lake. Last spring it broke out at
Oxford House. A party of Oxford
Indians coining to York spread the
disease among Ihe natives here. TheSS
say that the medicine man at Deer
Lake, an Oxford Indian, has passed
it on to the crowd here, in revenge
for some earlier injury done to their
tribe by had medicine,' claimed to
have come from York. That's Indian
nature  for you.
"But   about    Big    Alec    and    Fort
R .    Each succeeding day matters
grew worse and more serious, so
much so that Big Alec at last locked
the store and issued an order that not
another ounce of food would bc given
to a native. And lie kept his word���
Alec Jamieson never failed to do that
Ile was a hard man, the hardest the
company's service had ever seen. And,
mind ye, there were many on the pay
roll   at   that   lime.     So   the   less   said
] ah. nit   Big   Alec's   character   thc   bet-
���ter.
"Starvation made the Indians grow
uglier each day, and an attempt to
break into the steire resulted in one
of the culprits crawling back to his
S(|ttaw and children with a broken
arm anil a general smashing up, that
later passed him on to the land of his
fathers. Big Alec had caught him in
the dead of night half way through
the depot window.
"Man, but hc had a temper. I've
seen Jamieson, in thc height of passion, pick up a snarling httskie and,
with his bare hands, bend the body in
two until the  spine  cracked."
"I've heard that before. Tommie Le
Gare told mc something like that last
summer when we camped on the
Limestone."
"Aye, Tommie knew Big Alec,
knew him far too well. He broke
Tommic's jaw with a blow of his list
because the breed refused to take tbe
Sipewcsk trail one morning. And
Tommie never found a chance to get
back at him. But the night following the attempted raid on the store
seven of the bucks left camp and
started downstream for Severn. Their
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One Lot, Block 7, D.L.  195a, price $650.    Quarter cash, balance
6, 12 and 18 months.   Owner will accept $525 all cash.
Victoria  Road���Six-room  house, 33-foot  Lot, cleared,  Block  16,
D.L. 352.   Price $3,300.
Agreements for Sale Purchased and Money to Loan
at Current Rates
The Yorkshire Guarantee
&  Securities Corporation  Limited
440 Seymour Street
Phones: 6188 and 6189   R. Kerr Houlgate, Manager
201 off Heaters
Now's your chance to get a
heater cheap.
We want to reduce our stock.
The best place to buy Hardware is
McBRIDE'S
Corner Sixteenth Avenue and
Main Street
Corner 49th Ave. and Fraser Street
McBride's Hardware is the
Hall Mark of  QUALITY.
sudden departure for a short time
puzzled the factor.
" 'What are they up to now,
George?' Big Alex asked one of the
breeds who was better acquainted
with   the  disturbing   Indians.
" 'Dey say bad medicine come from
Severn, an' dey go for to keel de
medicine man.'
" 'Think they'll do it?'
" 'Yes, I t'ink maybe dey will. Jim
Wastisi is wit' dem���he's a bad man
alright.'
"'Fools!' cried Jamieson, pacing up
and down the floor. 'Corporal Mac-
Queen is at Severn, and they'll get a
short shrift if they fall into his hands.
Serve them well right, too, if they let
their fool beliefs lead them to murder.'
"'I'd like to be on hand when it
happened,' he added. 'If I had Mac-
Queen's authority, I'd shoot the dirty
dogs on sight.' It was after this, I
guess, that Alec made the entry in his
journal.
"Ten days passed before tbe Indians returned, their two canoes
laden with flour and pork. It was
evening, and the successful raid was
celebrated by a night of feasting
ami nig the starving families on the
Plats. They did well to make the
best of their time, for the very next
morning a canoe, bearing a corporal
of the Xor'west Mounted, hove in
sight around lhe bend of the river.
Three breeds accompanied Mac-
Queen, for it was he who wore the
uniform. Big Alec was on hand to
meet them.
"As Ihe detachment landed on the
bank we saw that each canoe man
gripped a rifle, while' the corporal's
heavy .44 hung handily in Ihe holster.
" 'Yeiur   Indians     back,   Jamieson?'
asked MacQueen.
" 'Aye, returned last night. By thc
appearance of the head they bneitght
back with them, they .mist have made
a better haul off Fort George than
they did off inc.'
"'Haul!' exclaimed the officer.
'They did that, sure. Cleaned out
half the store. But I'm here on a
case of murder as well as robbery.
They filled old William Wasteescat,
the medicine man, full of knife holes.
Shot one of his sons. Big Jack, as
well. Must be dead by this time Then
they hiked out for home here.'
"Big Alec moved his fist impatent-
ly. 'The fools! They did do the trick
after all. Well'���after a pause���'come
on, MacQueen; we'll clean out the
whole lot of   em.'
" 'Yes, come on,' answered MacQueen.   'That's what I'm up here for.
You know the fellows who did it, tin
ones who went down the river. Here's
where we make an example that the
others  won't  forget  for  some time.'
"'Give them a dose of their own
bad medicine. I've wanted to get a
fair crack at these cattle.' Big Alec
swore furiously, and strode off toward
lhe little group of tepees on the Flats
The corporal was at his side and tin
three breeds close behind him again.
Not one eef the latter were known I"
tne, but they looked like renegade
Chjppyi frum Albany���scoundrel-.
every one of them, I thought, and
they afterward proved lo he. I turned back  toward  the  house.
"Well, thc seven Indians���all wh"
had gone down to Severn���Wert
hauled out of their tents and hurried
to the rear of the depot. I remember
starting lo count the .-hots. It became a���a fusillade. I saw naught
I went straight into my quarters. I
knew Big Alec personally, and MacQueen by reptile, and any intervention on my part would have been useless. Two of them escaped, one to
bleed to death in lhe muskeg back oi
the post; the body of the other, Jim
Wastiss, the ringleader, was found a
month later near the  Big Stone."
The old man paused a moment before concluding, rising from his chair,
preparatory to leaving thc building.
"So that's part of thc history oi
Fort  R  in Alec Jamieson's time.''
"But what became of Jamieson and
MacQueen?"
"That was fifteen or sixteen years
ago. 'limes wcre mighty rough in
this district in thus.' days, and justice���I might better lay retribution -
was siern and often sudden. Big
Alec and MacQueen both disappeared. The feernier was hist on the Mackenzie River, while the last we heard
ol the corporal was a story about his
being slid in one eif the engagements
of the Hoer War."
"It is half.,iast one o'clock!" saiel
Mrs. McDermott, severely. "What
kept you from getting home until this
untimely hour?"
"I was detained at tbe office, making out statements," replied her husband.
"And that is one of the statements.
I presume?"
"Have you observed any results
from your daughter's attendance at
cooking school?"
"Yes," replied Mr. Growcher. "It
has made me appreciate the privilege
of running out at noon and getting a
ham sandwich and a cup of coffee." SATURDAY, MARCH  1, 191.3
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SEVEN
Gladstone Hotel
First Class Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
H. G. BROWN, Proprietor
CAMBIE STREET SOUTH
We have a fine subdivision bounded on the North by the C.P.R.
lands, on the West by the Point Grey boundary line and to the South
by River  Road.    Il  is within a few hundred yards eef the  Xorth Arm
of the  Fraser,    The live investor will readily appreciate these prices:
Cambie   Street   Lots  $1,625   each;   1-4  cash,  balance  6,   12,   IS.  24
months.
Ash Street Lots. 33 x 192. $75(1 each; 1-4 cash, balance 6, 12, IK,
24 months.
All inside Lots between Ash and Cambie, facing Xorth, $550 each;
lacing South, $600 each.
River Road I."i- vary in price according to size.
It will pay ye.u to investigate ihis. Call up Collingwood IX, e,r
call anil see
W. H. KENT & SON, Collingwood East
Hughes Bros'   Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET  EAST, VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone : Seymour .330
We  carry  everything  in   the  Liquor  Line
No order too small, and none too large  for this popular Liquor Store
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
leaving our Store every  Friday  morning at 9 a.m.
For Sound Investment Buy Lots in
RIVERDALE
At the corner of Boundary Koad and River Road. There is no
better located property in South Vancouver���at the price���on the
terms���with the wonderful view���the beautiful southern slope���
the perfect contour���CLEARED���the possibilities and assurance
of
DEVELOPMENT  AND   PROFIT
Price $550. Terms $15 cash, $15 per month, or with an increased cash payment we will make the deferred payments quarterly, half-yearly, or yearly, as desired by the purchaser.
P.    CHATHAM
Room 105, 25 Hastings Street East, opposite Holden Building
Phone ; Seymour 2201
BITULITHIC
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Granville   Street   South,   Before   Paving
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���I The Vancouver thoroughfares paved with
bitulithic are an impressive object-lesson in
fine paving.
Q Bitulithic has been adopted in over 200 cities
in the United States, and 15 cities in Canada.
Granville Street South, After Paving
Columbia Bitulithic Limited
433 Granville Si. Vancouver, B. C.
J
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandy has an attack o' fitba' fever this week; is staggered at hear in'
o' that G. I. at Victoria, an' gies some advice tae them
"Cocksure Englishmen"
Weel, frien'i, I wii ji>t thinkin'
there'll be a' kind* o' excitement nn
now back hame among ilu- fitba' en.
thutiaiU.    I  noticed, in a paper last
week that tlie third remnd ie' the Scottish Cup had been drawn an that the
big yins were a' in the rinnin' yel. It's
an auld sayin*, "Oot o' sight, not p'
mind." an' ir wis seem' the draw in
the paper! that brocht it back tae nie.
linn eagerly we Used tae wait nil the
"extra ipeshul" cumin' (int wi' the result o' the draw at Glefca, an' efter
we had g"l it. statin' an' difCUlii the
chances o' oor clubs, he it tlie Hearts
or the llilis. the Celtic or lhe Rangers, nn' f.irgettin' the rest. Speakin'
for mysel, I wis a devout Herts follower (they ca' them fans here) an'
there wis aye a trip or twa through
tae St. Mull go jist abeiut this time
when the competeeshutl wis gettin'
intae ii- .lie-in' stages An' what enthusiasm. Tin whole week afore it
wud he discussed iu street an' workshop, then twa or three wud be delegated tae arrange a -ah.mi carriage
tae lak us through, an' nn lhe day
ee' the match, dressed iii e.nr Sunday
e lae -. we wild invade Glesca an' spend
eieir hard-earned "bobs" in helpin' tae
cheer e���.r team on ta.- victory, Many
a guid, happy time' I had, an' I sometimes look hack an' hae mony a lauch
when I think ee' some o' the curious
predicaments some "' us n"i inta .
W'e were' a' young fellies, oot tae en
je,y oorsels, an' while some o' '��er
mair sober-minded chums looked ""
wi' -hii '.' peetyin' contempt, still I
never regret takin' pain in ii. I
learned a lot an' gained some valuable
expeerience, on the side, that stauns
a fellie in guid stead in efter life.
Somebody said:
"A hit eef nonsense, now and then,
Is relished hy the wisest men."
An' though yae dinna need tae hae
a University eddicashun tae attend a
fitba' match, it was a graun ootlet for
tlie Bportin' siele .i' a workin' man's
natur.
I wis walkin' hack tae my wnrk
wan day (iter detiner (beg paurden,
lunch I an' haen a meenit or twa tae
spare 1 steippil ill front o' wall o' the
schule pkiygi'unds an' stood watchin'
the bairns enjoyin' themsels. It
there's wan thing Vancouver deserves
every credit feer it's their excellent
system n' schules. I dinna want lae
underrate Scotlan', which is aye regarded as haen the best public schule
system, even wi' they "enck-sure Englishmen" n' Felix l'enne's. but frae
what 1 hae seen I dinna think Vancuuver has much tae learn, especially
in the big. handsome playgrunds they
hae. The contrast between thc hard
cement playgrund at hame an' the
nice, well-rolled earth o' them here
js a' in their favor. The bairns hae
mair roniii tae play here an' dinna
need sae much lookin' efter frae the
jenitttr. Gee! hoo that indeveedual
wis aye louked upnn as nor swum
enemy. Of course, puir man, he hadna
his sorrows tae seek, fur when sume
o' US started shootin' for goal, which
mair than likely wild degenerate intae
a "rough house" an' finally end up wi'
shootin' the ba' through wan o the
schule windaes, he could be excused
in his belief that they wcre the worst
brocht up bairns he ever saw. 1 min'
the time we declared a schule strike.
We issued oor ultimatum, "Ten till
two. an' nae hame lessons to du." an'
stuck up seeme copies nn the playgrund; he came ah eng an' tore them
down. We burnt his effigy that niclit.
It wis a fuleish strike, as we sune
fund nut; in the first place we wcre
badly organized, there were plenty
blacklegs, an' no haen the sympathy
n' the general public I I'll bet we had
their lamiiter) an' least nf all some
,n' eeitr mithers, whee geit efter us wi'
their iinmailed fisl. we suite capitulated. Goveydick, whal big hauns oor
mothers used lae hae. Some n' us '11
min' that quiet half-hoor in the
glnainin' we had wi' the heidinaister
a' oor lives.
Fitba' is Scotlan's premier sp.ert.
an' I hae nae doobt inaist e,' my
Scottish readers hae ine my happy re-
ciilleekshiins o' the days when they
used tae play in the juvenile teams
Gettin' lhe bawbees tae buy the ba'
wis aye the hardest pairt o the job.
We wild hae a mecthf at the street
curlier ur in some haundy close OOt
n' reach o' the ship, an' there appint
nor captin an' seecretary-treasttrer.
They wcre the inaist Important perse >tts in the show. W'e wud agree tae
pit nnr pennies in every week until we
gut the five bub. enough tae buy the
ba', then we were tae get nor jerseys,
each wan gettin' his whenever the
funds wud permit. Then, efter a
practice ur twa, we'd send a challenge
tae the team in the next street an' arrange a date. Mair than likely we'd
hae personal feuds tae settle wi' some
n' them an' every wan wud hae his
ain man tae take. We inaist always
had a successful season, an' then
when the parks closed, if there wis
i my funds in the treasury we'd hae a
niclit at Ihe "Gaff" an' maybe a
buttle e,' skeechan. THESE were the
guid auld days I
Well. Men's, I hope the Herts���tae
gie them their Sunday name. Hearts
of Midlothian���'11 mm the Cup. Guid
auld  Bobbie Walker.
Weel. weel, what dae yae ker ? 1
wis readin' an item o' news in "The
Chinook" last week. It related lion
the Sneeth Vancouver Councillors who
were on the deputashun owre tae Victoria received the news o' the passin'
o' the Harbnr Hill at Ottawa. Wan
proposed a banquet should he held,
anither yin wanted tae rin a flag up;
baith o' these were quite within the
bounds o' decorum. What followed,
hooever, near taen my brathc away.
The report said: "Five dollars ($51
wis thrown doon, nae change wis asked, everywan that wud take a dram
got it." Xoo the cat's oot the bag.
Nae Winder Commishuner Crehan
wis appinted tae investigate the
Municeepal  finances.    What extrava
gance; jist fancy, five dollar- spent ill
wan call. I imagine I eau see that
hotel bar. Hae anither yin, they'd a'
he- sayin', an' it wttdna be slnert been
at that. I've nae doobt the he.tel-
keeper wud be a tired man, dancin'
aboot tryin' tae absorb that five-spot
Weel. weel, I aye th'echt every man
had tae- -igti the pledge when he became a Cooncillor, bit I'm learnin'j
every day, I fancy I see- them airmin'
each ither doon tae the boat, singin'
in their besl bass:
"We are na fnu. we're nae lhat fou,
Hut jist a drappie in oor ee;
The cock may craw, the day may daw
And aye we'll taste the barley-bree." i
There seems tae be nae leemit tae
some leelk's extravigance. In a wey
that's what we've got tae pey Per in,
haen hotels in Sooth Vancoover. It's
jist like a man that's been teetotal fnr j
a year, when he rins up against
tempia-liun there's nae stoppin' him;
hui. gee, five dollars at wan cough!
Thai's awfu'l Lookin' al it frae
anither standpint, yae canna blame
them eii her. Wi' ihe high-price ye've
gut tae pey for dacent fruit the ii""
yae dinna wunner at them preferrin'
lhe' Kale' Mackay lae the ;i 111 i < 1.. t ��� ���. Il
michl In- a' for the guid. though, ii
Ihis adventure sh.nilel make' ilu- C.e.v-
ernment take tit> th.- question an' appint anil her commishun tae investigate the chances ������' makin' shoe
ieailie'i ��� ni '.' si,me ..' they Y.u,k e
aipples  they dump in  here.
I dinna ken whaes been gettin' roon
oor iiherwis.' worthy edit'er, Readin'
a leader in last week's paper, entitled
'The Ring fi True Patriotism," he refers lae a banquet some o' they Englishmen hail held. Talkin' ..' Vance m\ it's cumin' greatness an' ilu- necessity n' weldin' iln- different races
"' Auld Countrymen thegither, he
says, among ither things: Welcome
the wit e,' tin Irishman, the caution
u' the Sent���an' here's a peach���the
be,hi self-assertiveness an' cock-sure-
ness n' the Englishman Well, that's
jist where I jine issue. Shaili s o'
Bannockburnl Is it no had enough
tae be aye reminded lhat it's the English Navy that made the Empire, tin
English Army that has tae garrison
it, the English llnnse o' Commons
that has the guidin' liaun, the English
line se o' Lords, oh, weel. I'll nn kick
there: an' finally it's the King an'
Queen o' England? Noo, 1 think it's
jist aboot time they fellies came doon
tae mother earth. I dinna need tae
write at ony length tae show the pairt
Scotlan', Irelan' an' Wales hae played
in the makin' n' the "English" Empire; history staunds me in guid
stead. The sutler they realize that
that bunkum is better left at hame the
better. Blime Chawley, deah fellah,
lit disna sound nice, an' I'm thinkin'
ye'll jist fin' it as hard tae cairry yu're
cocksureness oot here as yae did at
hame.
If there's onything the average
Englishman suffers frae it's swelled
held. They aye pit me in min' o' that
steamboat o' Abraham Lincoln's that
had the sma' Idler an' the big whustle
Everytimc it blew it had tae Blow
due ni for fear o' hurstin' the biter. I'm
kin' o' inclined tae think it's that
fellie Felix Penne that's at the Imt.
tnm o' it a'. He says he's a Fellie
n' the Royal Historical Society, hut
I'm thinkin' he must hae been at the
cricket matches when they were dis-
cussin' Scotlan', Yae micht as weel
let them doon soft, puir things. They're
mair tae he peetied than blamed, I
think its aboot tin year age, a hill for
appintin'a commission feir the Water
e,' Leith wis up before the Hoose o'
Lords, There wis a question o' compensation attached tae it. The wit-
in--es were gien evidence before their
!Lordships, an' wan ee' them, thinkin'
lie wud tak a rise at the expense o'
lhe' Scottish doric, asked if they spelt
water wi' twa a's in Scotland, "N'aw,"
wi- ihe witness's crtlsliin' reply, "hut
they  spell  inainners  wae  twa  n's."
N'aw, naw. Felix, lhat kin' o' stuff
might be a'richt ai a banquet, there's
a suit n' excuse iur that talk ,.n sic
occasions���when the wines in the wits
nut���but the sutler yeeu fellies realize
that we're a' Jnck Tatnsan's hairns
here yae'll he mair respectit, better
liked���an' yae'll get better ml. Wan
thing yae can he share o', as fellie
Hritnns���yae hae oor sincere sympathy. Yae ken line' a mother aye
likes her weakest the best. At yaer
next banquet, ii ii wudna he eeut o'
place, ! wud suggest that yae hae
fur yuur first toast  Bums' wee' verse:
"() wud some power the giftie gie us,
T.i set rsels as iihei'S see us:
It wad frae mony a  blunder free us
And foolish notion."
While it michtna. cure yeiur "cocksureness an' hnld assertiveness" it
wild mak yae less selfish when talkin'
aboot the "English" Navy an' a' that
drivel.
Yours  through  the  Heather.
SANDY MacPHERSON.
An old Scotchwoman had a reputation far and near feer her fine fowls,
feir whieh she had often been awarded |
prizes at the neighboring sinews. During the festive season a gentleman
staying in the neighborhood, hearing
nothing bin praise nf her poultry, resolved tn give her a trial. He thereupon sent an order fur the finest turkey she cnuld produce, and after a
little delay was delighted nn receiving
as fine and plump a specimen as he
cnuld wish for.
His delight, however, was shortlived, fnr nn attempting to carve the
bird he found it su tough as to resist
all his efforts. Enraged and chagrined, he sallied forth to tind the woman
who, he believed, had swindled him.
After listening to his outburst of
righteous indignation, the old Scot
exclaimed: "Hoots, mon I Why, ye
canna tell a guid fowl when ye see it.
That turkey has ta'en the first prize
at the show for the last seven years."
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
HEAD OFFICE, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Authorized  Capital       $2,000,000
Subscribed Capital       1,169,900
Paid up   Capital           840,000
Specia' attention given to savings accounts.
Interest paid at  the highest current rates.
Your account very cordially solicited.
L. W. Skalford. General Manager W. E. Jardine. Am. General   Manager
CEDAR COTTAGE BRANCH W. H. Ron.ld. M.n.g��i
Heaters for the Winter
The cool long nights are nearly here.    We have a complete line
of heaters.
Cartridges
The shooting season is on.   You don't need to go to the City to buy
your ammunition.   5ee us.
C. B. FEARNEY For^r%^n^oba
HARDWARE, PAINTS,  OILS, STOVES, RANGES, ETC.
Joyce Street, COLLINGWOOD
LUMBER
Eburne  Saw Mills  Limited
Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of
FIR, CEDAR AND SPRUCE LUMBER
Shingles, Lath. Sash, Doors, Turnings
and House Finishings
PROMPT  DELIVERY   BY TRAM, WAGON OR SCOW
PHONE I EBURNE 14 R
EBURNE, B. C.
You Can Talk Over Our
Long Distance Lines
Three Minutes
From Fraser
To Steveston for 15 cents.
To Tort Moody for 20 cents.
To Coquitlam and Ladner fnr 25 cents.
To Cloverdale, Hammond and Milner for 30 cents.
To Abbotsford and Mission fur 40 cents.
To Chilliwack and Bellinghaui fnr 50 cents.
Tu Agassiz and Harrison Hot Springs for ^5 cents.
British Columbia Telephone
Co. Ltd.
Above rates arc subject to change without notice.
J
i
MACADAM & COMPANY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
418 Winch Building Vancouver, B.C.
Wood Block
PAVING
When a man begins to think of getting married hc never figures on a
church   wedding.
"Do you ever give advice?"
"Not unless I'm pretty sure it won't
be followed." EIGHT
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1913
Short Lesson in Household
=Economy=
Are you using carbon lamps for lighting ?
Do you know that Tungsten lamps give three times the amount
of light obtained from the carbon lamp with the same consumption
of current?
Would it not be advisable for you to secure this improved form of
lighting ?
After you have considered the above queries visit our salesrooms
and ask the lamp counter clerk to demonstrate the difference between the Tungsten lamp and the ordinary carbon lamp.
For convenience of our customers we carry a full line of Tungsten
lamps, of an improved type, in stock.
Carrall &
Hastings
Streets
1138 Granville Street
(Near Davie)
Vancouver
South Vancouver
FERRIS ROAD
Subdivision of Northeasterly Quarter of D.L. 336
Between  No.   1   Road   (46th  Avenue)  and  Ferris   Road
(51st Avenue), east of Victoria Drive.
33 ft. lots with 20 ft. lane at rear.
Price $500 and up.   Terms:    1-4 cash, balance 6, 12,
18 and 24 months.
MAIN STREET
Subdivision of Portion of Block "A" District Lot 655
Main Street frontage, 33 x 102���$2,650
Inside Lots, 33 x 122���$650
Terms:   1-4 cash, balance 6, 12 and 18 months
London & British North America Co. Limited
With which is incorporated Mahon, McFarland & Procter Ltd.
Corner Pender and Seymour Streets
Insurance Money to Loan
Agreements For  Sale  Purchased
A Better Garden
than yotl ever had before
can be had by sowing
Ritchie's Seeds
Write today for this beautifully
illustrated catalogue
Brimful with cultural directions
FREE ON REQUEST
RITCHIE BRAND & CO.
SEEDSMEN
723 ROBSON STREET
Phone Sey. 1892
MAIN STREET
33-ft., one block north of Rosenburg Road,
Cleared and graded.
���    ���" PRICE $2,900
$900 cash; balance 12 and 18 months      ,:
A few days only
J. A. KERR & CO.
Real Estate Brokers
3332 MAIN STREET       Phone: Fairmont 822
Phone : Seymour 8425-8426
Western Plate Glass &
Importing   Co.   Limited
Registered Office:
318 Water Street, Vancouver, B. C.
PLATE GLASS WINDOW GLASS
LEADED ART GLASS
Thornc  Metal  Store  Front  Bars,  Bevelling and
Silvering, Store Fronts Glazed
ALL KINDS OF GLASS
<F
NOTES OF INTEREST TO THE
LADY OF THE HOUSE
Features of Spring Blouses
Many changes distinguish the new
bleuises feir spring. Tlie new shirtwaist, now justifies its name and
"blouses," not only in front and in
back, but at thc sides. This negligee
air is delightfully becoming to thc
lull, slender girl, but it is woefully
trying to the woman with a more mature figure.
Each day, however, brings forth
new styles, not only in the fashioning
of the blouse, but in the shape of the
collars, the sleeves and the trimmings.
New materials have been designed
expressly for them; novel combinations of materials have been made,
and equally unusual combinations of
color have been conceived.
Cotton voile has a serious rival in
the new crepes, which arc decidedly
attractive. To be sure, (he voile
washes better than the crepe, which
has a most annoying habit of shrinking, although one can make allowance
for this in making thc blouse.
There is nothing smarter or more
serviceable for wear with the tailored
suit than crepe de chine. lilessed
with the stanchest of wearing qualities   crepe   conies   from   the   laundry
| baste to the long strips, one on each
large piece. Hem the other end of the
strip together and bind with tape. For
the bottom of the bag cut a square
of cretonne 6 1-2 inches wide.
To Ihis baste the sides and bind
with tape. Sew twelve ivory rings an
inch apart around the top of the bag
and through these slip heavy white
cotton cord. Sew a button in the centre of each side of the bag proper and
make a corresponding button hole in
lhe pocket. This serves to keep the
content! in place.
The Natural Figure
To be truly fashionable one must
be natural���natural in speech, in action and in figure. The art of the
corsetierre of today is to produce the
natural figure. If her customer is
blessed with a good figure, thc task
is just so much easier, and all that is
just required is a corset that will fit.
Few women, unfortunately, possess
geeeei] figures. They have been compressed here and let out there for so
many years in so many ways that
it is not surprising that the dictate of
fashion   for   the   natural  figure finds
in better condition than the average ' ���K.m ,wjsk.,l ;,|| out of shape
muslin blouses; it shakes quickly1
out of wrinkles and creases after being packed, docs not show signs of
travel, and is sufficiently dressy for
almost any occasion when a blouse
would be correct. The smartest models are severely plain, but they derive all the necessary chic from thc
cut, which is decidedly mannish in effect. They are fashioned on lino
very simple to the mannish shirts of
wash silks. The new crepe dc chine,
like thc wash silk, also comes.in
stripes, ranging from the tiny pin
stripes, to those a quarter of an inch
in width. The simplest models have
the front fastening, with small fancy
buttons continuing thc color note of
the stripes arranged in groups of
three or six, and a soft turnover collar and cuffs of lingerie or organdie,
finished with a scalloped edge, likewise repeating the color of the stripes
Thc art of the couturier is displayed in the gown, but all his genius
would go for little if thc art of the
corsetierre had not previously performed the more difficult task of
moulding the figure under the gown
into the lines demanded by the mode
of the hour. And this mode of the
hour is calling today f,>r the natural
figure. If only this figure might appeal so strongly to tlie dictators of
fashion that it would bc permitted to
remain, artists and poets would join
hands with all humanity iu a general
rejoicing. Only time will reveal the
fate of this latest dictum, but iu this
age of individuality all things are
possible.
Just how beautiful the "female form
divine" may bc is to be revealed this
coming spring by those fortunate
enough   (o  possess  the  blessing of a
Others  show the  pleats  in  front and  Sood  .''tfurc.  und   the   trailers   whose
in back, and some very chic ones dis
play thc pleated vest
corsetieres are clever enough tee make
them appear well bnill. To begin with
The blouses of white, cream or ecrue',,,,c  material  f,rf����  wllicl'  the present
day corset is fashioned is very different from that of a few years ago. Thc
heavy coutils which wcre thought so
necessary to hold a stout woman have
given  away  to  light  weight  batistes,
net are not considered as dressy as
thc lace or chiffon creations, and it
is correct to wear them with the tailored suit. They are kept delightfully
simple,   with    just  a   little     tucking,
which  may  or  may  not  be  gathered \'ir;    better    still,    the    new    knitted
into a yoke.    Thc pleated jabot lends  f-ibncs.
a becoming soft finish  to  the  front     The first etep in procuring tlie <le-
of thc blouse, conceals thc front op-  sired flexibility of tlie figure was thus
ening and matches the pleatings
which edge cither side of the cuff.
There is much to admire in the
pretty colored blouses, which arc
fashioned usually from chiffon, net
or tulle. The chic is mainly derived
from the exquisite colorings���soft,
rich blues, royal purples, deep yellows and vivid greens. A blouse radiating such warmth of coloring requires little trimming beyond tucking
and a dainty lingerie collar and cuffs
to add a pretty soft finish. The color of the blouse should bc repeated
in the trimming of the hat.
These new blouses are very simply
constructed. The majority are tucked either in clusters or all over tbe
front and back, for tucked and pleated blouses have quite superseded the
frilly type. Despite their apparent
simplicity of cut, they arc decidedly
dressy, and should only be worn with
a handsome afternoon suit of velvet
or similar material. They have one
advantage over the blouse of a material matching the skirt in that they
are lighter in weight and more comfortable.
Convenient Bags
There are many women who arc
not successful at embroidering, but
who can sew neatly and enjoy making
gifts for their friends. For the benefit of these needlewomen there are innumerable pretty bags made of cretonne and ribbon which are sure to
please anyone.
To make a bag in which lo keep
work when crocheting, purchase
seven-eighths of a yard of fancy ribbon about six inches wide. Cover a
circular cardboard foundation four
inches in diameter with the ribbon.
Hem the remaining piece of ribbon at
each end and gather one edge, sewing it evenly to the covered circle.
Crochet a covering for a brass ring
one inch in diameter, using silk to
match thc ribbon. Gather thc outer
edge of the ribbon and attach it to
the ring. To the hemmed ends of the
wide ribbon sew narrow ribbon and
tic in bows which serve to hold the
materials ill thc bag. The end of silk
or yarn is then slipped through thc
ring, and unrolls easily as the worker
needs it, without becoming soiled or
tangled.
An attractive handkerchief bag is
made of two yards of eight-inch ribbon, four yards of No. 2 ribbon, two
pieces of white cotton wadding, each
six inches square, and two pieces of
cardboard of the same dimensions.
Cover the pieces of cardboard with
wadding, and sprinkle with sachet
powder. Using the ribbon, cover
these, basting it in place and overcasting the two squares together to form
the bottom of the bag. Allowing a
heading of Wi inches wide, stitch thc
narrow ribbon along thc edge of thc
wider ribbon. Through this is run
the draw-string. Gather the lower
edge and stitch it to the covered
square. V/ork an eyelet in each side
of the bag at the top and run a narrow ribbon draw-string through it.
The bag is then completed.
A stocking bag, which is practical
and at the same time attractive, is
made of flowered cretonne. Many
lovely designs can be had in this material. Cut four strips 13 inches long
by 6 1-2 wide. Then cut four others
6 1-2 inches wide by 4 1-4 deep. These
are to form the outside pockets. Bind
the upper edge with twilled tape and
secured by fashioning the corset from
pliable and supple material; .the second was in eliminating all unnecessary bones. It is really remarkable
how many bones have been discarded, until today many styles show only
thc front lacing. The bones which
have  now  been  adopted  are  exceed
ingly flexible, giving easily with every
movement of the body.
As the hips are held in by the corsets the flesh is compelled to go
somewhere, and it now settles around
the waistline. The large waistline of
today is a joy to the admirers of
Venus and other Greek beauties, and
finally the modem realize its charm.
It is likewise one of the features of
the natural figure.
The unconfined bust is another
mark of beauty in the natural figure,
and is shown with all its charm in the
very low cut corsets, which are little
more than girdles above the waistline. With these corsets the brassieres, is a necessity, but the latest
styles of brassieres are practically
corset covers rather than bust supporters.
The distinguishing features in the
newest corset models are a slight
compression of thc diaphram and a
corresponding release of the abdomen. This new cut is developed on
the theory that the natural line in
front is not a straight one, or, more
strictly speaking, a backward one,
such as is produced by a straight
front corset. The back should be as
flat as it is possible to make it, and
in order to aid in this effect there is
no curve at the back nor pin-in at the
sides. With these changes it is promised that the corietiere can produce
the natural figure with all its alluring curves. Certainly the flexibility
of the newest corsets, the freedom of
movement which is possible while
wearing them and the grace and ease
of poise which they permit, are far
more attractive than the stiff, unbending, rigid figure of several years
ago, incased in a harness of steel.
From this viewpoint of health and
hygiene there is no comparison,
There is quite as many styles of
brassieres as there arc of corsets, anil
the knowing woman expends quite as
much time and thought in selecting
them. A practical feature of many of
them is the adjustable shoulder strap,
whieh can easily be slipped off with
a decollete geiwn. The straps of ribbon are the prettiest and have been
universally adopted as an adjustable
strap.
There arc few, if any, bones used
in the most recent models of brassieres, for unless the bones arc cleverly
placed they tend tee shove up the bust
when  the wearer is seated, thus pro-
ducing an unsightly appearance not at
all in harmony with the grace ��f Hie
natural figure. The secret of the success of a good fitting brassiere lies in
its cut and the arrangement of its
gores, the bones, if added, merely
lending additional support.
Genuine Black Diamonds
Genuine black diamonds, although
considerably more valuable than the
ordinary white diamond, arc not used
for gems, having an appearance no
more attractive than a hit of stone or
fragment of coal, being dark gray,
brownish, or black in color, and
opaque, without crystalline form.
They are somewhat harder than the
crystal or gem diamond, being, in
fact, about the hardest substance
known,     and   are   found   in   irregular
pieces, ranging in size from one-half
to five hundred carats.
The origin of the black diamond is
a subject on which science remain-
silent. They are found in but em,
spot on the earth���an area of not over
225 miles square, in Brazil. Here they
are recovered from the gravel anil
washings of the river beds. No fin,
specimens of the gem diamond have
ever been found in the black-diamond
fields. Vet���and this is the point over
which science has vainly puzzled-
both black and white or gem diamonds are simply pure carbon, bein.
practically identical composition. Thi
gem diamond is translucent and crystalline in form, while the other i
not; the black diamond is harder,
tougher, and not SO brittle, and there
the difference ends.
Practically the entire output of
black diamonds is used for tipping
diamond drills, the precious bits of
carbon being set in pieces of soft
steel or iron. These diamond-pointed drills will cut Ihrough any substance known, and have eaten their
way through the hardest known rock-
down to a depth of six thousand feet.
Ordinary gem diamonds would be
crushed under the enormous pressure
it is necessary to put upon the drills
when the bore has gone to a greal
depth. No substance is known which
could be used in place of the black
diamonds for drill points used in 1>,,r
ing for mineral deposits, and shouhl
the supply become exhausted, there'
were none before the black diamond
was discovered.
The diamond drill is a decidedly ex
pensive tool as it is usual to place
eight stones in each bit or drill point,
and fair-sized stones, of three to four
carats each, are more satisfactory and
economical in the long run than small
ones. As thc carbon is worth about
$X5 per carat, a single drill armed
with stones of medium size would
cosl in the neighborhood of $2,500.
A Useful Document
The orders ,.f Mr. J. W. Brooks, a
once celebrated American railroad
manager of Michigan wcre, it is said,
almost beyond deciphering. On a
certain occasion, when a second line
had been laid on one of the branch
roads, it was reported at headquarters
that the barn of an old farmer stood
partly upon land which the company
had bought, and dangerously near to
passing trains. Mr. Brooks, just getting ready for a trip down the Mississippi, wrote to the farmer that lie
must move his barn from tbe company's land at once. If he delayed
lie would bc liable to a suit for damages. The old farmer duly received
the letter, and was able to make out
the manager's signature, but not another word could he decipher. He
took it to the village postmaster, who,
equally unable to translate the hieroglyphics, was unwilling to acknowledge it. "Didn't you sell a strip of
land to the railroad?" he asked. "Yes."
"Well, I guess this is a free pass over
the road." And for over a year the
farmer used the manager's letter as a
pass, not one of the conductors being
able to dispute his translation of the
instrument.
DOMINION
Creosoted Wood Block
PAVING
Wood Block Pavements always attract traffic wherever they are in use.
The reduction in the noise accomplished by the use of Dominion Wood
Blocks greatly improves the value of
stores and offices, facilitates the transaction of business, frequently brings
about higher renting values and higher assessment values. It attracts pedestrian traffic as well as making the
streets a more important thoroughfare for vehicles.
Wood Block Pavement has the extreme advantage of noiselessness and
great durability under heavy traffic.
Competitive tests have repeatedly
shown it to be superior in durability
to granite block, which formerly was
the most durable pavement known. On
streets like Broadway, New York;
Dearborn Street, Chicago; Tremont
Street, Boston, and Market Street,
Philadelphia, it is now demonstrating
the superiority of its resilient resistance to the hammering of heavy
traffic.
a
Dominion Wood Blocks are Manufactured
in South Vancouver
by the
Dominion  Creosoting   Company,   Limited S \TlRi)AV, M -.ICH   1.  191.1
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
NINE
Progressive Men and Firms who are making MAIN STREET
Greater Vancouver's Big Business Thoroughfare
The  Up - to ��� date  Grocery Store
Try our Special
Blend of
40c TEA
STUDY OUR   PRICES
BEFORE GOING
ELSEWHERE
Our
40c Coffee
is Invigorating
Hit',III.A.M)   I'i >T vn n;s   	
SPRING-BROOK BUTTER 	
RANCH   EGGS   	
SKIPPER SARDINES 	
I'Wu LARGE  TIN'S ' IF SALMON
FINEST SUNKIST ORANGES....
MOTTO
 per   sack $l,()l)
....3 lbs. for    1.00
.3  dozen   for
. . .2 tins for
 2 for
 16 for
u.yn
0.25
0.25
0.25
'We Lead, the Others Limp Along"
SLOAN'S   GROCERY
��� 4493 MAIN STREET (Corner 29th Avenue)
PHONE:   FAIRMONT 1657
Main
.May
speake
Streel
Ward
week.
St. Improvement
ei Baxter was il
r   at   a  meeting  i
Lawson's Cash Grocery
Good things to eat. Best of provisions
at lowest prices
CORNER 32nd. and MAIN ST.
Between   General   Brock   School   and   the
"Chinook"  Office
D. S. McPHERSON
PRODUCE   MERCHANT
Try our Butter,  Eggs, Cheese and Provisions.
For quality,  these will  please you.
Orelcrs   Solicited
Cor.   26th   AVE.   &   MAIN.   VANCOUVER
W. J.
Real Estate,
4609  Main St.
PROWSE
Loans,  Insurance
Phone:  Fair.  783
AssociationIdeclaring  that   the  creek   "had   been
principal a stink hole long enough and it wai
the   Main  time it was removed."
Improvement    Association  of     Referring to the opposition to the
VIII  on  Friday  night of this agreement, the Mayor attacked "those
His    Worship    charged    that  so-called   public-spirited   men"    who
pre-
JOHNSON  BROS.
Genera!   Sheet   Metal   Workers
Furnaces   a   speciality���installed   by   experts.
Cornice,  skylight!   and  roofing,  electric
signs   and   all   kinds   brass   and
copper   fixtures
Cor.  27th Ave.  4  Main  St., South  Vancouver
Phone:     Fairmont  2386
THOS. J. HANRAHAN
Concrete,   Cement   and   Sewer
Contractor
Phone: Fair. 807        109 26th Ave. E,
,     R. B. LINZEY
JEWELLER
4132   MAIN   STREET
SQUARE DEAL REALTY CO.
Greater  Vancouver  Specialists
R. G. Simm, Manager
Phone: Fair. 807 4132 Main St.
WINNOTT STORE
AND   POST   OFFICE
General Merchants
Stumping  Powder  Our  Specially
i Phone:     Frasir   100 46th  Ave.   44   Main
Reeve Sc  Hareling, Props.
Always the best in Meats, Fish, Poultry,  Fruits  and  Vegetables at
PEASE'S   CASH   MARKET
MAIN  ST.  (Between  29th  Sc  30th  Ave.)
practically all the opposition i" tbe
C.N'.R. agreement is emanating from
those who have invested heavily in
loei Mann property and indirectly,
perhaps, from the C.P.R The agreement was unanimously endorsed by
the association. Besides Mayor Ibix-
tcr, Aldermen Mahon, Trimble and
Rogers spoke and each endorsed the
agreement Mr. P. \V. Trousdale
sided.
Tin' Mayor declared that he had
in, apologies lo make to the ratepayer-,, despite criticisms against him.
Liveryone knew the stand he had
taken with regard to the False Creek
preposition Iui'.re the election, but
In- confidently expected even more
criticism.
As a matter of fact, he alleged,
those opposed to the C. N. R. deal
were in, longer finding fault with it,
bul were concentrating their spleen
on the Mayor. He wanted, therefore,
to remind the ratepayers that it was
the question e,i the disposal ..( False
Creek that they were to vote on Oil
March 15, and not em the election of
a Mayer.
The Mayor then proceeded to trace
the negotiations between the City
Council and the railway company so
that the ratepayers would nol gain
any "false ideas" concerning the
agreement. In speaking of False
Creek in its pn senl state, he aroused
tin-   enthusiasm   of  his   audience   by
wanted te, influence the citizens of
Vancouver against having False
t'rerk made a large railway terminal.
"Where is that opposition coming
from?" he demanded, "Last year
there was not a single alderman in
the Council opposed to the C.X.R.
agreement, and even Alderman Hepburn was silent. .Now let ine tell you
people something. Next tee the C.P.R.,
the C.N.R. is the greatest railway
corporation in the Dominion of Canada. Vein all know what trouble the
former ceimpany have with their
grades in this province, and how-
freight rates are- high because of the
COSl   of haulage.
"Dee you know, though, thai the
C.N.R. plans to come into Vancouver on a grade for four-tenths of one
per cent.? Dee vou think, therefore,
that lhe C.P.R, rvlishes the idea of
the successful establishment e.f the
C.N.R. with terminals in Vancouver?
Yem can't blame them for wanting
tlu- olher railway to keep away from
this  cily."
Continuing, the speaker attacked
the opposition as consisting e.i a number oi persons interested in Port
Mann which was originally intended, or alleged io have been intended,
as tin  CNR. terminal.
"The
i ippi isit i-
Mayor.
CI'.R.   is
���ii.  howevi
"The    lie.
met
r."
���Pie
the principal
declared the
who   invested
not wisely but tee', well, in Port
Mann, arc- tin- ones responsible for
all tltis. opposition, Don't you remenu
her ihe double page advertisements
which appeared in the papers when
these people announced their intention i" spend money to break this
agreement? Gentlemen, tiny are doing it now.
"I ask you were- they, or an- they
now, honest in their intentions? Are
they the public-spirited men they
claim to be? When the Port Mann
ho, mi was on didn't they declare that
the C.N.R. terminal would be there
le.r certain? Can they be any more
honest now than they were then,
since their principal opposition to
this agreement is that the C.N.R.
iiui-i come, under the terms of its
franchise, to this city? They didn't
see in tee know that, however, when
they advertised Port Mann property,
.Hid in their opposition to the False
Creek deal they are not fighting for
the city's interests, hut rather for
their  own."
Much applause followed the termi-
ii.itii,n eef tin- speaker's address, and
a resolution endorsing the agreement
was unanimously passed by the meeting, tin- chairman first briefly declaring lhe great value to Ward V I II
which would accrue from the filling
up of the creek
Alderman Mahon. in speaking for
the agreement, contrasted it with
that drawn up between the city and
the Great Northern Railway. He
eulogised the Mayor for the work he
was doing to further the city's interests, and defended the vigorous campaign he was undertaking.
STREET BROS.
Builders and Auctioneers
4258   Main   Street
Phone:     Fairmont   1492
J.  R.  PEACH
Real Estate
Cor. 24th Ave. and Main St.
Phone:    Fairmont 2250
^-SPoeTiNeAReNft
M. A.  BEACH
FOR    SPRING    SHOES
26th Ave. & Main St.
HUNTER PRINTING CO.
3851 Main Street
Phone:    Fairmont   1988
For   Everything   That's   New   in
MEN'S AND  BOYS'  FURNISHINGS
Go  to
LAWSON'S
Next   door   to   Temple   Theatre
Cor. 26th Ave. &  Main St.
PEOPLE'S CARTAGE
Cor.  Bodwell and  Main
Phone:    Fairmont   1544
When   you   want   your
BOOTS   AND   SHOES   REPAIRED
Get   them   done   by   a   man   that   has.   learned
his   trade
F. SLINN
Boot   anil    Shoemaker   anei    Repairer
4524   MAIN   STREET
While the date for the official opening e.i the Vancouver bowling tournament which is to be held April 7-\2
inclusive is still fully six weeks away
the managers of the different alleys
around the city have already got a
Iin. on most of the teams in Vancouver who intend to compete, although
the entries have yel to be forwarded
lee thc executive of the tournament association. It is expected that there
will be anywhere freun twenty-five to I teams. Whil
lliirty teams competing from Van-|the bowlers ;
couver alone. At least fifteen commercial fives are expected to he in
line for the special prize which will
be hung up for the average bowler.
Messrs.  Chburn, Moe and  Morris of
the tournament as-
making a thorough
city next week in
a suitable trophy for
from
��olarwa
Pavement
IT IS PERMANENT BECAUSE IT IS CONCRETE'
the  executive of
sociation   intend
canvass   of   the
order to secure
the best five-man team entered
any of the commercial heeuses.
Three all-star teams have already
been selected I" compete in the tournament, but the managers of the different alleys will not divulge thc
names of the members of any of these
the enthusiasm among
over the coast in the
,-< .tiling tournament is exceptionally
strong, the other cities have nothing
mi the Terminal City experts in
boosting the first congress ever
staged in Vancouver.
Local tenpin smashers have not
Heen doing any big talking lately, hut
are working along in their
way fe. boost the tourney. The alley
proprietors are doing everything in
their power tee get a line on all of the
teams intending to enter from this
city and up till the present time they
have received assurances from 100
city bowlers that they will compete.
W'e.i'i is expected next week from
Jimmy Mclntyre and Al Hager, who
are "il a missionary tour Ihrough
Western   Canada   and   California.
promoters.' They run contests and
, tournaments' for the sole purpose of
making money. They match men with
names without regard to their fitness
tee meet one another; they advertise
as being i'er championships bouts that
cannot possibly have anything of a
championship character about them:
they offer big purses���on paper���and,
more often than imt. leave the poor
iightiiig man lo get what lie can; ill
short, the best part e.f their game is
io induce iln sporting public to part
with its money to see matches' that
are in  reality not  matches at  all.
This most unsatisfactory state of
affairs is due, primarily, to tin absence of a clear understanding between the four great boxing countries
���luiglancl, the L'nited States, Australia- amf jjjance.
3*        *       ���>
LITTLE   MOUNTAIN   REALTY
COMPANY
Real   Estate   and   Commission   Brokers
H. N. Hallberg, Manager
MAIN   STREET  SPECIALIST
Cor.   Main   &   29th   Ave.       South   Vancouver
J.
W. GOOSTREY
Broker
5604 Main St. (41st Ave. & Main St.)
S.   Vancouver Phone:   Fraser  64
For
Try
LIBBY'S GROCERY
Cor. 50th Ave. & Main St.
First-Class   Provisions,   Flour,
 Feed, etc.
ROSS & MACKAY
Kitchen and Builders' Hardware, etc.
Cor. 51st Ave. & Main St.
Vancouver,  B.C.
Toronto  Furniture
Company
Furnish
Houses   at   Very
Prices
Moderate
Call and See
M. H. COWAN, Proprietor
3336 MAIN STREET
Phone :    Fairmont  1660
SOUTH VANCOUVER
PRIVATE HOSPITAL
MEDICAL.    SURGICAL,    MATERNITY
Twenty-eighth  Ave.   and   Main   Street
Misses   Hall   and   Westley,   Graduated   Nursef
Terms Moderate
Phone :   Fairmont 2165
NURSES SENT OUT
IF YOU ARE SICK, CALL ON
ERNEST SHAW, D.C.
(Doctor  of  Chiropratic)
23C    22nd    Avenue    East,    close    t
Low Cost--Lowest Maintenance
Sanitary---Fine Appearance
On the Horse
P Pi S V      0fl Ae Automobile
*       On the Ratepayer
A. I-'. Beetinson, manager of the
National Sporting Club of London,
which is the most notable boxing club
of the world, came oul strongly a few
elays ae^ee in the course of a speech
delivered at a lanquet in his honor,
in favor of an nternational board tee
control ihe sport.    His remarks have
The magnificent race track at
Mexico Cily. second in the world only
tn the one at Buenos Ayres, Argen-
wii Quiet I tinai has been leasee! by iln- Mexican
Government tn a syndicate of finan.
ciers of Vancouver. Tlu- lease i- for
twenty-eight years, ami racing will
begin there under ihe new syndicate
aboul November 15. when a one-hundred-day meet will he held, The lease
iuvolves a sum of about $75,000. and
the Government is to aid in the
breeding of thoroughbred  horses.
The deal has been practically consummated, but the final details will bc |
settled within a few days, as soon as
\Y. VV. Finn, who formerly managed
a track at Vancouver, reaches thc
Mexican capital. Mr. Finn is representing the syndicate, and, in fact, it
was he who suggested the acquisition
of the course and began the movement for the forming of the syndi-
cati
Hours
Avenue    East,
Main Streel
1.30 ti
6.    Consultation free
Chiropractic succeeds where inedible fails. For all complaints, whether
acute or chronic, Chironractic is just
the thing.
Patronize the
Province Renovatory
South Vancouver's Pioneer
Dry-Cleaning and Dyeing Works
Work  and  Prices  Right
4136 Main St. Cor. of 25th Avenue
South End Cleaning Co.
First-class    Cleaners.    Pressers    and
Cleaners,
Tailors
been  generally  accepted  with    much
favor in the press and in sporting cir-      Bul1'  tu"  yea��� a8�� ���'"  a  cost   o
cles of England, and it is not ftilikely $1,250,000, the clubhouse, stands, and
that the promoters in the latt^coun- out-buildings,    situated as  they    are
try  will   soon  take  steps  to arrange within   five  minutes   walk   from   the
conferences,    such    as    the    boxing leading hotel, are- now one    ol    the
boards   of   Prance   and   the   United I raany S18ht�� P* ine Mexican capital.
States hav
The late
had.
Impossible to Buy a Better
PAVEMENT at any Price
OUR PRICE ON THE WESTMINSTER ROAD CONTRACT
IS $65,000 LOWER THAN ANY
OTHER BIDDER. DOES THIS INTEREST YOU, MR. TAXPAYER ?
We are Laying Dolarway on East
Victoria Drive, South Vancouver
-:  ,   i e=r=
=-
. IA.
South Vancouver Builders' Supply
iniiatieni has brought
lout a long article on the subject in
the "London Daily Mail," warmly endorsing tlu- plan, which seems to be,
regarded as a necessity for the preser.
vation of the sport. "Mail" agrees
I that the Xew York Athletic Commission has done good work, but charges
it with ultra-restrictiveiuss. The
writer suggests championship belts
for the various classes to correspond
with the Lord Lonsdale belts in England, thc compelling of world and national champions to defend their titles
'within certain reasonable periods, and
he makes several other suggestions
that might do much to put thc game
on a sounder basis. The ".Mail" says
in part:
"In England the control of amateur
boxing is in perfectly safe hands. It i~
on the professional side���the side
trom which the great mass of the
public derives its knowledge ane. its
appetite���that there is pr^ssinj; necessity for supervision and regulation.
"At present professional Ijoxing is
exploited' by many unscrupulous persona wltowre misnamed themselves
Now that the troubled conditions of
Mexico appear to have ended, it is
the intention 8f tlu- Mexican Government iee make Mexico City the "Paris
of America." It is the intention to
conduct the racing at Mexico City under the French system, Pari-mutuels
will be used entirely, while racing
will be conducted em but four elays
of the week.
With a population e.i 1,000,000 people, the syndicate which has secured
the concession are confident they will
be able to offer sufficiently rich stakes
ie, tempt the owners of the best
handicap horses both in America and
.ni the Ceeiitinent. tei send their
strings tn Mexico City for the winter
racing season. At the present time
the Mexican Derby is worth $19,500,
the richest stake in America, but even'
this will lie added to from year tee
year until in time it will rival the
famous Suburban Handicap Stake- of
several years ago.
One of the principal reasons for
iln- granting of the racing concession
by the Mexican Government was t. e
further encourage the breeding of
cavalry horses.
A   trial   will
convince   you.     Prices
Reasonable
Open
4375 Main Street
Evenings
-   South Vancouver
MACK'S
HORSESHOEING AND  GENERAL
BLACKSMITHING
SHOEING   A   SPECIALTY
DAVID    S.   McKAV.    MANAGER
South Hill P.O.  Box  105
Vie 11
"What    lovely    flowers I    Do
know they remind me of you?"
"They are artificial flowers."
"Yes, 1 kii.ew; but it requires clos
examination to detect, it."
Physicians advise people in keep
their mouths shut in cold weather and
breathe through their nose. It would
be well if some people followed the
advice even in warm weather.
Every rose has its thorn. And the
mean part of it is that the thorn stays
on the job when lhe rose has
wil lured
For a thing that springs mostly
lie mi badly digested misinformation,
public sentiment is amazingly often
right.
. ��� ii
��.-
Rolling Country, Salmon River Valley <-j*mm
TEN-
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, MARCH  I, '
The Salmon River Valley
By FREDERICK JAY
I ,..���, the B  C   Magazine
Tei the enterprising, the intelligent
and   lhe   energetic,     no     country     ill
ilu- world offers greater opportunities
feer the carving and satisfactory termination e.f a successful career than
does the province nf Hritish Columbia, the prosperity nf which traverses
tbe paths nf commerce, finance and
industry al a pace that is progressive
and suit- tee a degree unwonted. For
the willing and the fit there is always
Something to dee at a wage thai will
appeal, in this the premier province
of the Dominion of Canada.    Chronic
Hritish Columbia has the greatest
supply of water power iu Canada with
the exception of the province of On-
lario,   which   has  the   Niagara     Falls.
Millie,ns  of  horse-power  distributed
all over thc province arc waiting to
be harnessed up to turn the wheels
nf industry.
The foregoing is but a brief, cold
statement of fact regarding the mar.
velhius activities nf a few  more than
300,000 people, whose present-day accomplishments will down successive
generations roll as wonder tales,
A Rich Hay Meadow Near Fort Salmon
grouchers and parasites there are few.
Everyone in the province of British
Columbia is too busy courting activity and prosperity to pay the slightest attention to the indolent, all of
whom rapidly migrate in search of
sympathy elsewhere. Travel where
one will in this wonderful land, where
Nature's uses and beauties excel, no
beggars will be found, not even in the
largest city. Poverty there may be
in isolated instances, but the people
as a class are of too dignified a type
to acknowledge misfortune's transient
hold.
"No province of the Dominion of
Canada," said Sir Richard McBride,
Prime Minister of the province, at the
annual banquet of the Canadian
Manufacturers' Association at Vancouver, B.C., 22nd September, 1910,
"possesses in itself such a wealth and
diversity of natural resources as British Columbia, and all in the initial
stages of development."
British Columbia has gold, platinum, silver, copper, lead, zinc, asbestos, diamonds, anthracite and bituminous coal. Its mines have produced
since their inception $3'97,409,466 and
300.000 square miles of mineralized
ground are not yet prospected. The
production for 1911 amounted to
$23,211,816.
British Columbia has 26.000,000
acres of standing merchantable timber capable of yielding over two hundred and forty million feet without
allowing for new growth. Timber returns for 1911 were $24,823,000.
British Columbia has 30,000,000
acres of rich agricultural, grazing and
fruit lands hardly yet scratched. The
returns for 1911 amounted to $20,837,-
893, an increase of more than $6,000,-
00O e,ver the previous year.
British Columbia fisheries employ
over   twelve   thousand   men,  and   ac-
Long aeons ago, when the world
was young, the sovereignty of the
polar bear extended over the provinct
of British Columbia, and the face of
mother earth was hidden by a sleeve
of ice. On came the sun and released
the glacier's frigid hold, steeped the
land with melted snow for a thousand
years or more, then coaxed thc inland
sea away, left beautiful lakes a few,
and raging torrents that spread the
richness  of  the  mountain  sides  over
The climate is delightful, extremes
temperature not being great. Summer days are warm, nights are cool.
Diaries, religiously kept by Hudson's
Bay Company officials fnr many decades back, contain nn record of excessive rainfall nor lack nf sufficient
moisture. The almost continuous presence of the warm Chinook winds,
which blow over from the Pacific
Ocean through the Central Hritish
Columbia valleys, exert a wonderfully
moderating effect Upon what otherwise might have been a rigorous climate. The winter months are comparatively mild in comparison with
those nf the prairie province*, and the
season is much shorter. Live stock
may be wintered out in the open on
Ihe natural pasturage.
Wheat, barley, oats and a great
variety nf garden truck have been
successfully grown by  Hudson's  Hay
mit Lake, three or feiur miles tn the
northward, It is the intention to
continue operations on this line early
this spring. Several other railway
liiu-s having charters to build from
Alberta to the Pacific coast will also
pass through, as. owing tn the general contour of the country, they can
hardly do otherwise in order to secure minimum grades. One line in
particular, ihe Edmonton, Dunvegan
and British Columbia Railway, bas
about seventy-five miles 'if steel laid
nut nf Edmonton, Alberta, and will
continue its construction work with
lhe Utmost despatch during the coming seasnii.
The great valleys of British Columbia arc the great opportunities of today. Hritish Columbia everywhere
spells success. It is going ahead at
a pace that makes the whole weirld
gasp   with   wonder.     Many  of  those
A Good Trail, Salmon River Valley
Company officials and trappers for
many years back. Good building timber is plentiful and of easy access all
over the valley.
Settlers are coming into the district
in large numbers. In 1912 over three
hundred actual settlers purchased
land, the expenditure for which, with
cost of buildings and equipment added, amounted to over $700,000. It is
only a question of a very short time
who cannot grow up in this wonderful country are becoming intimately
identified with it by having their money
grow up with it. To invest money in
British Columbia today when prosperity is young, means the amazing of
great wealth in the future. The great
Astor fortune was made by investing
in New York real estate in the early
days, and the great fortunes of Canada will undoubtedly be accumulated
in   the  same  way,   in     thc    greatest,
No Difficulty in Clearing This Land
the valleys and plains below. And
that is the how and the why of the
Salmon River Valley, which extends
northward from the Necbaco and
Fraser Rivers to where the southern
slope of the Peace River country
begins.
Many years ago this beautiful and
wonderful   fertile  valley  was  devast-
when the Salmon River country will
be a thickly populated and prosperous community, adding greatly to the
wealth of the province in general.
The townsite of Fort Salmon, situated on both sides of the Salmon
River in the centre of the valley,
about twenty miles north of Fort
George, occupies the key position as
grandest province of the Dominion���
Hritish  Columbia.
Virgin Farm Land
count for over thirty per cent, of the
total catch of Canada. The value of
1911 catch was $13,677,125, being an
increase of $5,677,125 over 1910.
British Columbia manufactures for
1911 added $45,000,000 to the wealth
of the province.
British Columbia's sum total of
production in 1911, for mining, timber, agriculture, fisheries and manufactures amounted to $127,549,834, an
increase of $26,677,125 over 1910.    Its
atcd by a fire which swept the ground
of nearly all its heavy timber. Since
then light thickets of poplar, spruce,
balsam, willow and alder���very easily
cleared off���have sprung up here and
there and given to thc landscape a decided park-like appearance. The open
plains support such an amazing
growth of wild grasses, pea-vine,
vetches, wild flowers and fruits that
one needs no further proof of the
fertility  of  the  soil,  which  is  a  rich
a distributing point for the products
of the soil, not only of the Salmon
River Valley itself, but for those of
the southern portion of the great
Peace River country as well. The
location of this townsite is unique. In
fact, as a situation for a large and
pretentious city it could hardly be
duplicated in thc whole province of
British Columbia. Tbe lay of the
ground is such that the most excellent
drainage  facilities  are afforded  for  a
A   Chicken   Dinner  for  Two  Cents?
If you had lived 500 years ago you
might not have been earning just
what you are today, but think of the
difference in  the cost of living!
In England, live or six centuries
ago, you could have purchased for
your Sunday dinner a pair of the
nicest spring chickens for 2 cents. Or,
if it were around Thanksgiving or
Christmas time, and you wanted to
celebrate and be especially extravagant, you could have picked out for
yourself the choicest goose in the
market for seven cents.
On an allowance of $1, a man, if his
wife were the least bit prudent, might
plan to run his entire household for a
month, paying the rent and the grocer
and the butcher besides. Of course,
rents were not what they arc nowadays. Five dollars a year would secure for one a lake shore mansion,
and an ordinary little home could be
had for about 50 cents a year, or a
little over 4 cents a month!
If a wife wanted to be particularly
economical she ceuid buy a sheep, a
fat one, for 25 cents. Then she would
divide it up and sell it around to her
neighbors at about 3 cents a pound
and then keep enough for herself at
a considerable gain. A cow was more
expensive, as you could not g?t a
really good one for less than $1.50.
But think of e^gs, fresh country
eggs, for \'A cents a dozen, while if
you bought your bread by the loaf
you paid less than a tenth of a cent
for a generous sized loaf. Beer was
cheap, too, selling by the gallon, a
penny a gallon, while a single glass
cost about the fortieth of a cent.
Horses  weren't  much  of a  luxury,
4J4-AM0TT   ST
Assr^^Mii,
Special Rates to Municipal
Hall and other South Vancouver points.
Surveying Party in the Salmon River Valley
population of but 380,787 is most certainly enterprising and thrifty.
British Columbia already has over
two thousand miles of railways in
actual operation, and an even greater
mileage is at the present time under
actual construction and survey. Sir
Richard McBride, the Prime Minister,
recently stated in an interview that
over $100,000,000 would be spent in
British Columbia the next five years
in actual railway construction.
deposit of silt on a sub-soil of clay.
Year after year a luxuriant vegetation
has sprung up and flourished, only to
perish with the coming of winter and
bequeath its rich legacy of rotted
verdure to fatten and further renew
the fertility of the soil.
Game and wild fowl are plentiful
all over the district. The rivers, lakes
and streams of clear, cool, sparkling
waters teem with all sorts of edible
fish.
_.���,. -
\
Ik
g&
Vegetables Growing Near Fort Salmon
thoroughly efficient sanitary and sewerage system, than which nothing is
more important to a young and growing city, except abundance of pure
water. This Fort Salmon has, sufficient for all  time  to come.
Railway transportation will soon be
afforded to all settlers throughout the
whole valley surrounding Fort Salmon. Already the B. C. and Alaska
Railway has a line surveyed right
through  from  Fort George to Sum-
costing around 80 cents, and if you
had no barn to keep it in you could
rent one for about 10 cents a year.
Of course, we will have to own that
salaries were not what they are today, but even then can you imagine
expenses at any  lower rate?
Before marriage a man feels like a
bird. After marriage he feels like a
worm.
A Mild Smoke
SOLD   EVERYWHERE
CHARACTER CIRCULATION
There is a difference between
the hastily read street car paper
and the paper that is delivered
into the home; the paper that is
absolutely independent and wholesome; that the men respect and
the women admire���that is the
paper whose advertising columns
carry confidence to the reader���
that is the paper whose advertising
patronage is valuable.
Ye   Men   From   Mcrric-Mcrrie   J
land Cnnie Join Your Canadiar
lire,tlurs   in   a   Game  oi
POOL
Splendid  Room and  New Table
Cigars, Tobacco and Candy
Fairmont Pool Room
Close  Theatre���19th  Ave. and  Mi i
D. D. Denman, A.O.F., A.O.S., A.O.
Proprietor
CHIC
Table Showing the Wonderful Growth  of the
C-H-I-C in less than Twenty Months
50/
/_ Interest   at   the
/O pir   Annum.
First Loan made April 22ntl,  1911	
Loans   made   during   month   of   December,
1911     $4,000.01)
Loans   maele  during  month  of  .Tunc,   1912 $17 000 00
Loans ] made   eluring   month    of    August, $22,000.00
Loans   made   during   month   of   November, . ��� ,  -������ ���
���  ��."   $34,300.00
End   of   November,   1912,   Loans   pending s*t.w rsrs*. ~~.
(being   put   through)  $65,000.00
Loans   made   and   other   Loans   in   process ..
Ihereof   during   the   month   ol   Novem- \QQ   300 00
December   15th,   1912.     Loans   made,   anil Mtmtktst  Aft.   A-
" "ra ,o iaic $225,000.00
See Our Representative
Canadian Home Investment Co.
u    j     ~��� LIMITED
Head     Office:     2nd     Floor,     PACIFIC     BLK.,     VANCOUVER.    B.   C
BX.   Offices:     Victoria,   Prince   Rupert,   Kamloops,   Welson
and New Westminster
j OITICE OPEN EV/ENINCiS UNTIL, NINE O'CLOCK;
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train  Service  Between Vancouver and the  East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE, Gen. Pass Agent,   Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
H. G. Smith. C. P. A T. A.
Phone :   Sey.  7100
W. E. Duperow. 0. A. P. D
527 Granville Street
MONEY
CAN'T
BUY
BETTER
All Grocers
Kelly, Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C. SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
ELEVEN
Geo. B.  Howard,
Mgr.
AVENUE
THEATRE
Main  and   Harris
('hone: Sey. 7012
WEEK OF MARCH 3 MATINEES WED it SAT.
DEL. S. LAWRENCE and MMJDE LEONE
IN Till'. COMEDY TRIUMPH
The Fortune Hunter
One Year in New York���Eight Months in Chicago
PRICES:    25c, 35c, 50c
MATINEE:   25c Any Seat
For Quick Service
Many times you are in a hurry for some thing to prepare quickly
for lunch or dinner. Below we give you a list of the many handy
things we have for you. Our prompt service, too, brings them to
you when you want them.
SWEET POTATOES, 3 Ih. cans the can 25c
BOOTH'S SPINACH, 3 lb. cans the can 25c
BABY BEETS, 3 lb. cans the can 25c
AYLMER CHICKEN 1 lb. can 50c
HEINZ PORK AND BEANS 1 lb. can   20c and 15c
HEINZ TOMATO SOUP 2 tins 25c
ASPARAGUS TIPS the can 25c
LIBBY'S LUNCH TONGUE thc can 30c
HOLBROOK'S MARAFAT PEAS package 10c
LIBBY'S MINCE MEAT per lb. 20c
HOTCHKISS FRUITS per can 30c
CUSTARD POWDER two packages for 25c
Fraser & MacLean,
26th Avenue and Main
Phone:   Fairmont 784
STOP!    LOOK!    LISTEN!
ROBIN HOOD FLOUR���$1.75
BUTTER 3   lbs.   for   $1.00
EGGS 3 dozen for $1.00
AYRSHIRE BACON 30c per lb.
WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION
All  orders  receive our own  personal  attention
Quick Delivery Assured
LAING & FIDDES
28th AVENUE and  MAIN STREET
TEMPLE THEATRE
Cor. 26th AVE. AND MAIN ST.
FIRST CLASS MOTION PICTURES
PROGRAMME CHANGED DAILY
Buy Your House
Cleaning Materials
Alabastine, Hall's Distemper,
Liquid Veneer, Step Ladders,
etc., etc.
G. E. McBride & Co.
Corner Sixteenth Avenue and
Main Street
Corner 49th Ave. and Fraser Street
OUR QUALITY IS THE ESSENCE OF CHEAPNESS
5 ROOM HOUSE
On 48th Avenue, modern; only $2,800;
$200 cash, balance arranged.
Lot is 34x126.
R. J. McLauchlan
4123 Main Street
Phone: Fair. 1607
It takes a man to lliink there is
"".nietliing very fine in liis character
t" make him like steak and fried pota-
K.C�� the way he does.
"I do not think people should get
married until they are thoroughly acquainted with each other What
would you do���abolish matrimony?
H^��,. ATWttCOUVERS LEADING
-M  p^y Hooses-
^
"A   Night   Out" | her     Shell propou tee yem, then y.u
tin Tu.-elav and Wedneiday night accept her and marry her,
of next week al the Imperial Theatre, v"" Duncan accepti the above ad.
Mill Robson appear- in the delight, 'ice. Now go to the Avenue next
ful comedy "A Nighl Out." It can ",'lk and iee how all thii worka out
bc truthfully laid that no more whole-1'Thc Fortune Hunter" will require
seeme and thoroughly enjoyable play,'"1 unuaually long and powerful cast
has ever been offered to theatregoer
present owing to the fact that the
New Yeerk police are so much in the
public eye ju-t DOW. The brutal
method of administering the "third
degree" tee any one suspected of a
crime, is vividly presented in the first
act when "Captain Clinton" places
the weak "Howard Jeffrie.-," under
.... i    i:	
and  its bright, witty and snappy  di
loguei its many tide-splitting comedy
every member of the company having
a prominent r.ele. The letting! "ill
In unusually heavy and elaborate and
iee}    .seue-s],!iiiie!K   e.eeeeee-e\ .   ��� ,,   , 	
have    furnished    untold  everything will be done to make this
situations
amusement and pleasure for theatregoers. The play is full of novel situations, delightful fun and just a teeucli
of pathos that gives one a chance to
get ready for the laugh that is sure to
follow. Those who du nol see hcr
misi une of the theatrical treats nf the
vear.
"Gypsy Love"
What must be considered for many
reasons the most important musical
offering that will come to Vancouver
during the current season, is Franz
I.char's entrancing operetta "Gypsy
Love." gorgeously presented by A.
11. Woods. Much eef the success of
"Gypsy Love." which is now the acknowledged big hit at Daly's Theatre,
London, is due to the Russian tenor,
Arthur Albro, who was imported by
Manager Woods to create the role of
Jozsi, the gypsy violinist. Albro is
said to be a fine actor and one of the
must interesting tenors ever heard in
this country. Phyllis Partington, the
captivating California prima donna,
who ereateil the part of Zorika, is
une of the few prima donnas who can
sing and aet. Both Miss Partington
and Mr. Albro will go tei London in
May to participate in tlu- English performance of "Gypsy l.e eve" under the
management of A. II. Woods and
George  Edwardes.
"Gypsy I.nve" will be al the Imperial Theatre l"r three nights next
week, Thursday. Friday and Saturday.
Avenue Theatre
The record eel uninterrupted successes is still further increased by the
splendid production of this week's
bill. "Bought and Paid I'm" has
drawn capacity houses leu- the entire
week thus far and those who have not
as yet seen this great play should
promptly avail themselves of the few
remaining performances. Miss Lee me
has in the powerful role of Virginia
Blaine revealed herself as an emotional actress of high rank, and Mr.
Lawrence, Miss Corley. Mr. Layne,
Mr, Russell and Dimple Kelton All
have done splendid work. It i.s a notable production and will rank as one
of the Lawrence Company's finest
achievements.
notable   utn   amongst   Avenue   productions.
the weak Howard Jeffrie.-, under
tlii- merciless teermrc and ending up
as iu many ane.tlier nu.- case, by
wresting ��� confession oi guilt from
an innocent man This i/ery difficult
scene i- magnificently done and the
whole after effects are- rendered ex-
iiemely telling in consequence. The
entire play i- absorbing and enchains
the  audience   in   breathless   attention.
Next week will be a very important
eme at tin. playhouse. A grand spectacular   production   of   the   immortal
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EMPRESS
Uniting! & Gore    Phone Sey. 3907
BEST RESERVED SEATS 25c, 50c
To-night 8.1 5 IvUtinee S.I. 2.! 5
This  Week
The Third Degree
Next  Week
"FAUST"
PANTAGES
Unequalled       Vaudeville       Means      Pantages
Vaudeville
SHOW STAPTS--2.45. 7.15. and  9 30pm
JOHN  L.  SULLIVAN
Champion   of Champions
JULES HELD & CO.
in
"Childhood   Days"
OTHER  PANTAGES  ACTS
WEEK BEGINNING MARCH 3
ALBER'S POLAR  BEARS
A P.ig Circus Feature
Extra  Attraction
"A Christmas on the Comstock"
With   Glendower,   Manion  &  Co.
4���Other Big S. & C. Acts���4
Scene from "The Fortune Hunter," Avenue Theatre, next week
Empress Theatre
That gripping drama of present day
life in Xew York City, "The Third
Degree," is drawing crowded houses
it the Empress Theatre this week. It
seems to hold greater significance at
Scene from
"A   Night   Out,"  May  Robson's  latest  stirring  vehicle,  which
comes to the Imperial Theatre, March 4 and 5
play "Faust" will be given with some
marvellous effects. This is the ver-
sieeii used in England hy the late Sir
Henry Irving and in America by
Lewis Morrison. There are five acts
and seven beautiful scenes, presenting in contrast, allegenries of Heaven
and Hell. The weird "Brocken"
scene will illustrate all the horrors of
Dante's "Inferno," while thc transformation showing Marguerite surrounded by good spirits, will be a
beautiful contrast. This story will
always stand as the greatest creation
of one of the world's geniuses. Some
great mechanical effects will be introduced showing the supernatural
power nf Mephisto who turns wine
intii lire, causes flowers to wither and
blue em. and in the Brocken scene
calls to his aid demons and witches.
All these effects will be presented in
a weird manner and will cause a sen-
sation.    Seats  are already  selling.
Orpheum  Theatre
A big circus act is promised patrons
ni the Orpheum Theatre durin- the
ciiiniiig week, when Alber's Polar
Hears make iheir appearance on Mon-
elay next. These snow-white 111011-
archs 'ef the frozen Xorth are the
best trained bears that have ever
lii-.il presented to thc public. Their
routine e.i tricks is marvellous.
"A Christmas on the Comstock," a
Ibeautiful little playlet, will be prc-
sented by Monda Glendower ami
Raymond Manion, two well-known
. Pacific Coasl players Miss Glen-
dower's home is in Portland am! Mr.
Manion's home is in Los Angeles,
where- lieith appeared in stock fur
sunn- years.
Welch. Mealey and Montrose are a
inn e'l' singers ami chaps with a bunch
nf    curb-stone    chatter   saiel   to   be
ridiculously  funny.
Jennie Fletcher, a singer of no
mean ability, hailing frum the Windy
City of Chicago, will be another who
will become a favorite during her
stay here.
Dow and Dow present a laughable
hit    on    a    supposed  cruiser.    Their
(Continued on  Page 121
DENTISTS
Drs. Howie & Hall
Have   opened   up   new   and   up-to-date
Dental Parlors in the Williams  Block,
Comer Granville and Hastings
We have installed all the latest and
best appliances, and are prepared to
give you the best there is in the dental
profession.
A share of your patronage is
solicited.
Gas    administered    for    the    painless
extraction of teeth.
P. O   Howie, DD.S.
Wm. 8. Hall, DD.S.
Phone   Sey.   3266   for   appointment
HAMILTON BROS.
Embalmers and Funeral
Directors
Parlors and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Phone : Fraser 19
(Day or night)
Geo. Jones
HORSE   SHOER
Lame and Interfering horses will
receive special care and attention.
All kinds of hand-made shoes, running shoes, running plates, toe
plates,  etc.
All horses entrusted to me will receive  every   care  and   attention.
GOOD   WORK   GUARANTEED
571  Beatty Street
SUCCESS
Business   College
"The School ot L'ertaintiet"
COURSES IN BOOKKEEPING,
SHORTHAND     AND   TYPEWRITING,
CIVIL   SERVICE   AND   ENGLISH
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded
DAY   AN��>   EVENING   CLASSES
HARRIS   BUILDING
Corner Main St. & 10th Ave.
Phone :   Fairmont   2075
For next week starting Monday
evening, March 3, Lawrence & Sandusky announce an elaborate production of Wincliell Smith's enormously
popular comedy "The Fortune Hunter." The critics have asserted that
this is the best comedy ever produced on the American stage; be that
as it may, it has proved itself one of
the most extraordinarily successful
and has broken box office records that
had stood for years. It is clean,
pure, and wholesome, and as the Xew
York Telegram puts it, has one thousand laughs and not one blush. It
is the kind of play yuu are glad to
take your mother, your sister or
sweetheart to. full of the funniest
kind of comedy, but clean and sweet.
Here is the advice given to Nat
Duncan, the hero of the play: Mine
to a little dull town. Dress very plainly and very elegantly. Don't drink,
don't smoke, don't swear. Go to
church: board with an old widow if
you can. Have serious books and a
large bible, where everybody can see
them on your table. Don't laugh,
don't smile. Don't pay attention to
young women. Get a job, work hard.
In every little town there's one girl
at least weirth a million. You'll marry
Economy
Over 100,000 families
in Canada are enjoying
the comforts of a home
heated witli our famous
"Economy" warm air
furnace.
Heaters
"Pease" heating" systems maintain a summer atmosphere regardless of outside conditions.
Send for Booklet:
"The Question
of Heating"
"Ask the Man Who Has One"
PEASE PACIFIC FOUNDRY, LIMITED
328 DRAKE ST. Manufacturers Vancouver, B.C. TWELVE
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 191.
ABOUT MEN, WOMEN
AND BOOKS   r��>*��~
I asked last week for somebody tei
send me Tennyson's lines on Sir John
J'ranklin. I was gratified to find that
several sent me the lines, which are
on thc cenotaph in Westminster
Abbey and which run thus:
"Not here;    The white north has thy
bones;  and  thou
Heroic   sailor   soul   art   passing     on
thine happier voyage now
Toward  no  earthly  pole."
Do   you   see   how   finely     Tennyson
gives   us   the   echo   from   scripture.
"He is not here"?
* *       *
Two answers were marred by bad
spelling, one was a very beautiful
specimen of handwriting. Thc first
correct reply I opened was sent by
Alex. Cockburn, 2934 St. Catherine
Street, to whom I have posted a book
I  hope he will like.
A      A     *
At the Collingwood Parliament on
Saturday night the "Speaker" said:
"I would remind the honorable
member who has just sat down that
although he may make use of copious
notes it is not in order for a member
to  so obviously read his speech."
* *    *
The word "obviously" was well
used. In parliamentary procedure,
as in many other things in life, it is
not so much the sin that matters as
being "found out." Many M.P.s do
read their speeches when only appearing to consult notes, but by dint
of a hesitation here, an apparent loss
of "the thread of argument," and
other tricks of rhetoric they conceal
the fact. You must not "obviously"
read your speech���that's it.
* *       ele
Many members write their speeches
and then laboriously memorize them,
or "learn them by heart." I don't
know why committing something to
memory is called having it "by heart,"
but it is. Which reminds me of a
little parliamentary story. A singularly cold-blooded M.P. committed
his speeches to memory. This induced a wit to write:
They  say  Brown  has  "no  heart,"
But I deny it.
He has a heart,
And  gets  his  speeches  by  it.
* *    *
The M.P. who relies entirely upon
a "written" speech is always at the
mercy of an accident, a joke, or a
bit of malice. A member of Parliament going down to "the House"
stopped to dine at his club. He hung
his coat up, and from its pocket peeped a manuscript, obviously his speech.
This was seen by another member
with a wonderful memory. He abstracted the MSS., learned every
word of it, and a little later on delivered it, thus anticipating its author
who sat chagrined and spell bound to
think that the arguments and illustrations which cost him days of labor
another member could "get off his
chest" without apparent effort.
* *   *
"Don't believe it," I hear some
reader say. "No man could commit
a long speech to memory in a few
minutes." My dear sir, there have
been, there are, men who could do
such a tiling easily. I am now like
Othello in "the sere and yellow leaf,"
and my memory, still good, thank
God! is not what it was. Judge
Fletcher Moulton. once M. P.
for Clapham; Reginald McKcnna,
Home Secretary; John Burns, and a
half a dozen others will tell you that
1 have written three and four columns
of their speeches in a way that won
their  cieinmcnilation,  without  putting
pencil to note-book.
The cursed "system" prevalent
mew. card indexes, file cabinets, shorthand notebook*, is destroying "memories." 1 have only found one in
Vancouver. My memory, "too good"
as John Burns once told mc, once led
me into an extraordinary scene with
that wonderful genius Oscar Wilde.
Somebody must remind me to tell
lhat story at length; it is too good
to die with me, and poor Oscar can-
neit   tell  it now.
e*        *       *
Sir Harry Furniss, the well-known
artist so long associated with
"Punch," has written the "scenarios"
.el sonic "reels" for the Edison Motion Picture Company, and I have
not the least doubt that they wcre
very good, for Sir Harry can wield a
pen as deftly as a pencil, and he can
also talk.
*      *      A
And I see that Sir Harry has been
saying: "One must not lose sight of
thc fact that to write plays is essentially work for an artist rather than
an author or dramatist, for the artist
sees and thinks in picture*, and, if in
addition, he is gifted with the faculty
for construction, he is pre-eminently
the individual to cope with this particular class of work." This is repeating the old delusion George Cruick-
shank had. He imagined himself the
real author of "Oliver Twist." The
author thinks in pictures too, my
dear Sir Harry. Shakespeare as far
as we know was not an artist, but
can any stage presentation do justice
to the wonderful pageants that moved
across the discs of his "mind's eye"
and were developed in his wonderful
brain ?
* *    *
Mr. Henry Gadsby, a very clever
writer, contributes letters to "The
Sun," always worth reading, but now
and then, very often indeed, he makes
some funny blunders. In writing on
"State Dress" he says, "Henry VIII
once knighted a piece of beef, called
it Sir Loin." Sir John Gilbert must
have made an awful mistake in history when he painted his well-known
picture of "Charles the Second"
knighting the piece of beef, with
saucy Nell Gwynne at the ceremony.
But is there any truth in the story at
all? Should it be "Sir Loin of Beef"
or "Sur-loin of Beef"? Just look it
up yov curious ones and let me have
your  opinion
* *    *
I must defer until next week some
paragraphs on "Joaquin Miller,"
whose poems were published by John
Camden Holten, of Picadilly. Miller
was lionized in London. It is with
difficulty I have held the pen to write
these poor notes for I have been in
the clutches of the demon "Grippe,"
the merciless rascal who has had several victims lately. In answer to
kind enquiries I just add "Thank you,
I am better! No need, just yet, to
write the words 'No Flowers.' "
A glimpse of "the unknown" sets
us "all a thinking." God forbid that
ever "the fear of death" should take
in my mind the hope of "rest." My
attitude is now:
f   thank  with  glad  thanksgiving,
Whatever   Gods   there  be,
That no life lives for ever,
That  dead  men  rise up  never,
That even  the weariest river,
Winds somewhere out to sea."
A lovely word is "Home" and an
other lovely word is "rest."
MUSIC AND DRAMA
(Continued frum Page  11)
parodies and  chatter are  said  to be
rich in  humor.
Skates Bi Jouve are a duo of excellent roller skaters, one a man and
the other a woman, both possessing
great ability.
��" "*   *
t Pantages Theatre
One of the biggest and best bills
of the season is promised for next
week, opening with the Monday
matinee. For the special headline attraction, Manager Pantages will bring
forward to the view of the old-time
friends here John L. Sullivan, former
heavyweight champion of the world,
and conceded by fight fans to have
been the "greatest of them all" in
those little matters which arc settled
in the prize ring. Sullivan says he is
not as young as he used to be in the
way of years, but that he has not
passed the mark where he can't come
back,  at  least  on  the  stage.
The extra added feature of the
show will be one of this theatre's old
and reliable favorites, Jules Held, the
funny and irrespressiblc who, with his
organization of clever boys and girls,
will be seen in "Childhood Days," a
merry hodgepodge of mirth and
melody. Still another comedy number from which a great deal is expected will be supplied by Nat Lef-
fingwell and Louise Meyers in a little
playlet they have called "A Night at
the Lodge."
Seamon & Killian, hilled in the
Pantages literature as those "tailor-
made girls," are a pair of entertainers who are said to be able to dispense patter and song in a manner
that will captivate the audience. For
the acrobatics and things of that sort,
Prevost and Brown will be called
upon. These men are advertised as
the "Corkscrew Kids," and they are
said to be able to live up to the name.
Gaumont's Graphic of British Columbia and news of the British Isles
and Europe complete the bill.
*   *   *
"Following its usual habit, Vancouver is leading again. This time it has
the distinction of opening thc first
Kinemacolor theatre in the Dominion.
Seven other houses of its kind are in
course of construction in Canada, but
Vancouver beat  them  to it."
In the above words, Mr. E. R. Ricketts, president of the Kinemacolor
Theatre Company, acknowledged a
vociferous curtain call before the beginning of thc first film of the first
performance at the new Kinemacolor
house on the corner of Granville and
Dunsmuir streets on Monday evening. The statement was received with
enthusiasm.
And indeed thc new theatre and the
programme presented were fit subjects for enthusiasm. The interior is
beautifully decorated, and sets a new
standard of taste for such places of
amusement The seating capacity is
650 on thc main floor and 325 in the
balcony. Thc floors are laid on a
sufficient incline to give everyone a
clear view of the curtain and the
stage. Special lighting arrangements
have been installed, and the entrances
and exits were designed with special
reference to the convenience of the
public.
The opening performance started at
8 o'clock, and long before that hour
there was a long line of patrons at the
wicket, and by 8 o'clock there was not
a vacant seat on cither floor. By thc
time the performance was half over
there was another big crush outside,
but no one was admitted after the
seating capacity had been exhausted.
Lady ushers officiated.
The films presented varied from
educational and purely scenic to
comedy, and each was well received.
They included "Wild Birds of Asia,"
"The Doctor's Blind Child," "The
Note in the Shirt," "Two of a Kind,"
"Betty's Baby," and some fine views
of Niagara Falls. During the performance Mr. George T. Temple, the
well-known baritone, sang two solos,
which  were well  received,
The theatre will open daily at 12
o'clock, and performances of an hour
and a half long will be given continuously until 11 p.m.
The nominations for election of officers of the South Vancouver Conservative Association are as follows :
President. Mr. R. C Hodgson, who
will be elected by acclamation; first
vice-president, Mr. T. Houston and
Mr. j. B. Appleby: second vice-president, Mr. F. E. Elliott and Mr. A.
E. Almas; secretary, Mr. George A.
Stevens and Mr. P. V. Holland;
treasurer, M. W. E. Clarke and Mr.
W.  H. Brett.
EXCEPTION TAKEN TO
PREMIER'S STATEMENTS
Reeve  Kerr and  Municipal  Solicitor
Make Statements Regarding
Annexation
Reeve Kerr presented liis report on
the result of the trip of the Council
to Victoria in connection with annexation at a meeting of the Council
on Thursday afternoon of last week.
In making his report he said, after
expressing  his  disappointment:
"To my mind it is useless lo again
introduce annexation to the Provincial Government until such time as
the municipalities of Burnaby, Point
Grey and South Vancouver are all
agreed to unite with the City of Vancouver."
The Reeve said lhat with ail due
deference to the Premier he musl
disagree with his statements as to
the present powers of the Municipality in regard lo the vote required
before annexation could bc effected.
He said he thought the Premier was
laboring under a misapprehension
also when he said that South Vancouver could not obtain thc requisite
number of votes, because the results
of thc votes taken at different times
and the result of the recent plebiscite had been forwarded to the attorney-general.
In 1907 a vote was taken of seven
to one in favor of annexation and
later another vote was taken giving
the 51 per cent, required, stated
Councillor Dickinson. This year, hc
said, there was a vote taken and
through preparing the voters' list to
comply with the law it was the means
of disfranchising several thousands of
ratepayers, yet annexation was carried by ten to one. In each case
when a vote had been taken, he said,
the majority had been greater than on
the previous occasion. The people
had always wanted annexation and
had carried it every time.
Reeve Kerr added that the Premier
was right when he said that South
Vancouver had never obtained a vote
sufficient to fulfil the law, but he
was wrong when hc stated that the
law required a three-fifths majority.
The Reeve's report was adopted
and also the report of Councillor
Dickinson on tile recent visit to Victoria in connection with the Greater
Vancouver sewerage scheme. He
said he had to report that thc Government had met lhe delegation very
favorabij and had promised to guarantee the bonds up to $5,000,000.
Mr. H, Colin Clarke, solicitor to
South Vancouver, was interviewed in
regard to a statement of Sir Richard
McBride in connection with annexation that "there must be considered
various franchises that wcre in existence, and have been granted by these
municipalities."
Mr. Clarke said: "There is no question or difficulty in South Vancouver
and the City from a legal point of
view, although a difficulty might arise
which would be hard to adjust in the
case of part of a municipality seceding. But, with annexation to the
City, all contracts and franchises
would be assumed and carried out by
the City.
"In regard to the Premier's statement that 'there was a power whereby Vancouver and South Vancouver
might be joined together on a three-
fifths vote,' Sir Richard's statement
is incorrect, as the only provision as
to annexation is that contained in the
Municipal Incorporation Act, Section
11, which provides for obtaining the
consent of the owners of more than
one-half in value of the lands in the
proposed extension; and, further, the
act deles not apply to the annexation
of any territory which has debenture
indebtedness.
"Further, with regard to the Premier saying that it appeared impossible to get a three-fifths vote to enable South Vancouvei to come in and
that a deputation asked for an exception to be made in this case, a
perusal of the bill will show that no
Mich exception is asked for, but on
the contrary provision is made for a
three-fifths vote being taken. With
regard to the premier's statement
that it is impossible to get this vote,
the best way to form an opinion on
this matter is to look ai the result of
the plebiscite on annexation, taken iu
January last, when 2077 voted for annexation  and  206 against.
"The necessity for a special bill
arose solely on account of an omission in the Municipal Incorporation
Act, and which has been taken up
with   the   Municipal  Commission."
 A-^mSA-A
Fraser Avenue Notes
The Icelander's Ingleflur Society
gathered on Thursday evening, February 27, at Staple's Hall.
* *   *
A new confectionery store has been
opened on Fraser Street, near Fifty-
fifth Avenue. Mr. Simmonds, the
proprietor, has started a business
which will become a favorite retreat
for many during the summer season,
which   is  not  very   far  distant.
* A      A
The Presbyterian Church, Gladstone and Forty-fifth Avenue East,
one block from Victoria, will open on
Sunday, March 2. There will be
special services to mark the opening.
ei>       *      A
Fraser Avenue is watching with interest the neighboring business street,
Victoria Road. The B. C. Electric
Railway has distributed ties from the
present car terminus to Fifty-fifth
Avenue. The road-bed also has been
dug out. Progressive minds are already   running   imaginary  belt-lines.
* ��    *
The Wyn-One Club will meet Friday evening, February 28, at Timlick
Hall. The gentlemen have prepared
a surprise banquet for the ladies. The
greatest difficulty has been experienced by the committee in charge in
keeping the event a secret.
et        *       *
The few vacant business blocks on
Fraser Avenue are being rented by
various tradesmen. There is one
business which the street cannot boast
of and that is a jeweller. An energetic jeweller would find a good
trade awaiting him in this district. A
local statistician has estimated that
three out of every five families have
a clock or watch in need of repairs.
Industrial Activity in Great
Evidence in New Westminster
(Continued from  Page 1)
screens, is operated by electrical
power from Stave Lake, and the work
has been under the able superintendence eef Messrs Robinson Brothers of
New  Westminster.
This week also sees the completion
of thv new grain elevator built for the
Grain Growers' Association of the
Royal City. It is the lirst elevator
put up in New Westminster, and has
a capacity of 3(),fKX) bushels. The machinery is being installed this week
and the elevator will be ready for
business by March 1. It cannot be
compared to the immense elevators
iu the East, but it is at least a beginning and the elevator is likely to
be kepi  busy when once in operation.
All these anil other evidences of industrial activity in the Royal City of
late have had, no doubt, their due
weight in the consideration of increased transportation facilities by
the railway companies. It is now definitely assured that the Canadian
.Northern will pass right through the
city, and this company has aiso let
a contract to the Northern Construction Company for a Lulu Island
branch. These extensions are really
co-operative with the city's harbor
scheme, giving the C.N.R. access to
the future industrial centres of Lulu
and Annacis Islands, and the growing district of Queensborough. In
connection with this company's operations, the Strathspray of the Strath
line left Cape Breton some weeks ago
loaded with steel rails, and is expected lo arrive in thc Fraser River by
the end of this week. Another significant indication of progress is the
opening of three new car lines by the
B.C.E.R. during the past few months,
namely the Fraser Mills, the Queens-
borough and the Highland Park connections.
In an interview with a representative of the "Chinook" Mr. C. H.
Stuart Wade, publicity commissioner,
stated that steps were being taken to
enlarge the scope and advantages of
the New Westminster market so as
to enable it to be more extensively
utilized by other parts of the province. It is expected that when transportation facilities with the Okanagan, Kootenay and other districts are
improved that there will be a large
and early increase in the business
done in the market. Hitherto, says
Mr. Wade, the city market has catered, from the producers point of view,
too exclusively to the requirements
of the city and immediate district, and
it is sought to extend its usefulness
in   the   direction   indicated.
Building permits are generally a
very good indication of a city's progress, and comparing the past six
months with the ' corresponding
mouths of previous periods, large and
steady increases have been the rule.
Up to Wednesday of this week, the
permits amounted to $150,000 for the
month, this including $60,000 for the
construction of the new building of
the British Columbian. This week
building operations in various parts
of the Royal City arc happy signs of
approaching spring weather and general  prosperity.
LADY  MEMBERS
HOLD SOCIAL EVENING
Delightful  Evening  is  Spent  in  the
Oddfellows' Hall���Those Present
Lots   of  people  are   sure   they  are
right  without going ahead.
Queen Mary Hive, No. 2, Lady of
the Maccabees, held a delightful
dance in thc Oddfellows' Hall at
which thc following were present :
W. G. Morrison, Mrs Chester, Miss
White, T. Cullen, A. Gill, S. A. Gilbert. Mr. and Mrs. T. Sloan, H. N.
Hallberg, A. H. Brereton, Miss F. C.
Campbell. A. McMorran, L. Mullett.
Mrs. J. Pearson, J. C. Christie, Mrs.
Christie. Miss Moore, Mrs. Vincent,
W. McC. Allan, II. Stonton, E. Tre-
leaven, Miss Wolff, C. McPhce, D.
Martin, N. Peart, C. R. Misfeldt, F.
White, Miss Ruth White, D. C. Woolen, Miss A. Carlton, J. W. Dickieson,
K. Dicken, Mr. Engelman, A. J.
Blandford, E. Garlick, J. W. Garlick,
Mrs. Brooker, H. Brooker, Miss A.
Stewart, Miss E. Greig, A. G. Mitchell, C. Buchanan, Miss E. McCor-
kcll, G. W. Misfeldt, Mr. and Mrs
R. C. Hodgson, Mrs. E. M. Wickcns,
Mrs. F. Winters, E. M. Wickcns,
Mrs. J. Wharton, J. M. Stewart, M.
McQuarrie, H. M. Grimmett, Miss F.
Kent, Mrs. Seaton, F. Fairey, Mrs.
M. Fairey, M. J. Skinner, M. Won-
nacott, Mrs. Kha, F. J. Hamilton,
Mrs. B. Blake, Mrs. E. Mullett, Mr.
J. Munro, Mrs. W. Turnbull. Miss
Turnbull, Miss Maud Hill, Fred Archer, Mrs. L. Howard. Mrs. J. Kendall, M. Kindall, M. Cudworth, Mrs.
W. Pearce, Mr. W. Pearce, Mr. Williamson, Jas. Inglis. II. Edyy, Mr.
and Mrs. H. A. Dane. Mr. and Mrs.
W. A. Pound, Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Mullett, Mr. and Mrs. Langley, Mr. Hall,
Mrs. Kalenberg. Mr. and Mrs.
Kevgh, Mr. and Mrs. Badcliffc. Mrs.
Tommason,  N.  Crowder, W   Rogers,
C. Stewart, F. Quigley, J. D. Parker.
Mr. and Mrs. T. Wapshot, Mr and
Mrs. Webster, Mrs. H. Hilton,
Lester Smith, E. Gould, A. C. Dickson,   J.   Bryant,   G.   E.   Martin,   Miss
I. Harrison,  D.        McPherson,   Mrs.
D. S. Robinson, W. A. Cottll, M. Mc.
Cauley, C. H. Turner, J. R Holden,
Mrs. A. E. Burton, Mrs. C. E. Wilson, Mrs. C. B, Henrikson, Mrs. E.
V.   Bielick,   Miss   Mona   Clark,   Mr.
II, Playford, Mrs. Wickwire, Mr. and
Mrs. R. Fuss, Mr. and Mrs. Schenck,
Mr. and Mrs Bahr, Dr. W. J. Brigge,
Mr. H. Rayncr, Mrs. Proctor, Mrs.
Sawyer, J. E. Batton, Mrs. Stacker,
Mrs. F. Smith, Mrs. Coon, Dr. K.
Weiss, Mr. Runnier, Mr. and Mrs.
Slater, Dr. I. Framolen, and many
others.
Board   of   Trade
Year   Reviewed
(Continued  from   Page   11
Residents of Collingwood are being invited to assemble in Carleton
Hall on Sunday evening at 7.30
o'clock, to take part in a ceremony
commemorating the life and work of
the African explorer, Livingstone,
this year marking thc centenary of
his  birth.
The South Vancouver School
Teachers' Association held a very
successful social and dance in Lester
Hall. Commencing at 8.30 o'clock a
most enjoyable time was spent by the
teachers and their friends. Social
games, music, supper and dancing
occupied thc whole of the evening
until 12 o'clock, when the party broke
up. Marino's orchestra supplied thc
music.
to it.    My only hope is that the satn.
kindness   and   consideration   will   I
extended   to  my  successor,  and   that
the good work so ably begun by ou;
board will be  continued,  as we  bat
now reached lhat state when we -I
sec more direct results for our laboi
R. C,  HODGSON
Prcsiden
South  Vancouver,  Feb. 24,  1913.
*    ���    ��
The  Secretary's  Report
In presenting you my report I don'
dwell on the financial question as th
growth and usefulness of this boat
is not measured in dollars and cents
but by thc work accomplished for the
good of the municipality. Durin-
the year we have had fourteen net'
members join us, which is doubl
the members of the year previous.
The board has now become recoj
uized as one of the permanent coi
porations in South Vancouver. T
thc thoughtful business men, and 11i���
man who desires to see the munici
pality go forward in the path of pi
gress the work of the board appeal -
The  board  is  now  about  tei entvi
'upon  that  work  which  is best suit'
I for   it,   namely,   the   eneouragenn i,'
and   advancement   of   industries,   ami
I to sec  that  developments are Carrie i
along  useful   and   economical     Iin.
Freun the number of applications for
membership  that   are  now  out  poii
to  a   year   of  great   progress.     Gi
tlemen, the vitality and growth do ���
not   entirely   rest   upon   the   official?
eif this board, but  upon   every indivi
dual member,    Many have recognize.;
this, and  the regularity  of their  attendance   at   the   board,   along   wi:!
their promptness in   taking up whatever committee work  they were asked to perform, command our highe-t
commendation.
KENNETH LAMOND.
Secretar
The above reports were submitte..
to thc annual meeting of the Boai
of Trade on Monday night of thi-
week. The financial statement sinewed a balance of $1,355.16. A comit-
tce comprising Messrs. Elliott, Am -
strong and Prowse was appointed 1
interview the Council, asking that
when the Municipal Hall is enlarged
provision be made for a Board ..i
Trade room specially set apart foi
the work of the board and the advertising of the Municipality.
The question of arranging a banquet to Mr. J. D. Taylor, M.P., and
Mr. H. H. Stevens. MP., for their
work in connection with the North
Arm Harbor Bill was raised and the
matter was left in the hands of tin
joint municipal committee.
Board of Trade Officers of 1913
President. Mr. R. C. Hodgson: vice
president,   Mr.   F.   E.   Elliott;   secretary-treasurer, Mr. Kenneth Lamond.
executive   council,   Messrs.     C     U
Feast, J. C. McArthur, G. Greenslade-
W. H. Kent. C. M. Whelpton. W.  I
Prowse, C. T. Bailey, W. E. Gibsoi'.
C. Bruce. J. Armstrong, J. R.  Peach,
J. C. Wright, W. J. Allen, D. Burge^
and  G.  M.  Murray.
 ���  mm  i	
Mr. Hunter, of the buulding i1
spector's department is again on dm
after  a  short absence  owing  to  il
ness.
Mayor Baxter
Chief Magistrate of the Cily of Vancouver, who is using every effort lo have lhe C. N. R. agreement ratified

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