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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Jan 24, 1914

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Array Wu��� CHINOOK
Vol. II, No. 37
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA,SATURDAY. [ANUARY 24, 1914
Price 5 cents
Reeve Dickie is Now the New Pilot of the Municipal Ship���
Record Polling Returns an Almost Entirely New Council
Ex-Reeve Kerr is Swamped by a
Heavy Sea of Votes, While
Mr. J. C McArthur Sails in at the Rear-
Gold Makes Good and the Old Warrior
Thomas Reaches Harbor With the
Biggest Majority of All
With the triumphant return eef Mr.
'I'll'Unas Dickie iit ihe head of the
peell hist Saturday) the keenly eeen-
ustecl fight fur tlie reeveihip of Seeiith
Vancouver has heen settled fur another year. Mr. Dickie's decisive majority eif 866 uver Mr. J. A. Kerr was
dc-tributed eever every district Imt
eme, ex-Reeve Kerr obtaining 42 more
votes at Carleton Hall polling station
than   Mr.   Dickie.
The pulling throughout the municipality was the heaviest on record.
Never in thc history of South Vance.uver has a civic campaign excited
so great an interest, culminating as
it did in a total peell of about 5000
votes, If we consider the large ntim-
bct of ratepayers on thc voters' list
wh.. reside out of thc district, it will
he seen that the percentage of votes
polled 's an unusually high one. So
heavy a percentage eef the electorate
has probably not been polled in any
either municipality in the province
feer many a year.
All day, throughout the municipality, the liveliest interest in the voting
was manifested, and every kind of
ee ineyance was pressed into service.
There were automobiles galore, and
a special ten-minute car service from
lhe city was extensively taken advantage of, while rigs and buggies
were much in evidence. That the
ve iters from the city formed a large
percentage of thc total is evidenced
from lhe number of votes recorded
at Main Street and 25th Avenue polling station. Although it is not possible to state exactly how many of
the 2273 voters who recorded their
votes for reeve at this polling station
were from the city, the proportion
must have been large.
Owing io thc heavy voting, it was
late on Saturday night before the
final results were approximately
known. Not until after 8 o'clock was
it definitely known that Mr. Dickie
was rapidly forging ahead in thc race
feir the recveship. After that time
there was no possible doubt remaining that Mr. Dickie would be return
ed at  lhe  head  of the  peell by  a  bi,
majority.
The municipal ball was crowded on
Saturday evening. Messrs. Dickie,
Kerr and McArthur, the champions
for the reeveship, and the candidates
for the various wards were in attendance, surrounded by supporters and
ratepayers from the city and municipality. General surprise was freely expressed as to the heavy voting
and the large majority obtained by
Mr. T. Dickie. When the results
were finally declared, speeches were
briefly made by the various candi-
etaies. Mr. Dickie, in a few weinls
expressed his gratification at being
elected reeve of South Vancouver by
so substantial a majority and assured
the electors that his best endeavors
wouhl be directed towards the gemd
management of the municipality.
Ex-Reeve Kerr, who accepted his defeat in excellent spirit, thanked the
many electors who had recorded their
votes on his behalf and asked that
the united support of the ratepayers
of South Vancom er be given to the
new reeve and council. Mr. Edward
Cold and other candidates also briefly addlesicel the gathering.
The heaviest polling for councillors took place in Ward Two, in
which a total of 758 votes were recorded, the majority for Mr. G. A.
Stevens over Mr. Russell being thc
narrow one of 6.
In Ward One, Mr. W. R. Rutledge
secured the substantial majority of
175 over his nearest opponent, Mr.
John   Graham.
Mr. G. W. Thomas, "the old war
horse," had thc distinction of gaining
the largest majority of any candidate,
polling 310 more votes than Mr. A.
Mcintosh in Ward Three.
In   Ward   Eour,   Mr.   W.   Winram
polled the small majority of  17 over
I Mr. E. L. Armstrong, who thus made
.a strong bid for premier position.
,     In   Ward   Five,   Mr.   Edward   Gold
received the emphatic endorsation of
the electors of Ward Five by a  ma-
(Continued  on  Page  5)
New Reeve and Council
Make Debut at Civic Hall
Main Street  Paving  Held  up  Until  Further  Orders
Council Meetings to be Held in the Evening
New Committees are Appointed
Regular
REEVE DICKIE
While it would scarcely be fair to
say that the new reeve of South Vancouver is straight-laced, Mr. Thomas
Dickie is a reserved, matter-of-fact
gentleman of a type not usually
found in public life in British Columbia.
Mr. Dickie is one of the pioneers
of Wester-i Canada, and has always
lived a Strenuous life. He was born
near Gait, Ontario, half a century
ago. When he was twenty-one years
of age, he headed for the west. For
a time he homesteaded at Moosoniin.
Man., later taught school in the
neighborhood of Souris, Man., to
eventually enter the newspaper business.    Mr. Dickie was editor and pro-
Reeve Dickie anil the members of
ihi'  new  council,  after  being  sworn
in liy Magistrate Johnson, commenced
the session em Monday by appointing
I the following committees :
Financi���Councillor   Gold,    chairman, anel  the  whole  council.
\    Board    of    We.rk-   ���   Councillor
Thomas,   chairman,   ami     the     whole
council.
Health, Relief ami Hospital���Councillor Steven-, chairman, and Coun-
'cillors Rowlings, Thomas and Gold.
Police Committee���Councillor Rutledge, chairman, and Councillors
T.homas, Twiddy ami Winram.
Fire. Water anel Light Commute���
Councillor Winram. chairman, and
Councillors   Rowlings,   Stevens     and
Oeehl.
Parks ami Hall Grounds���Councilleir Twiddy, chairman, and Councillors Rowlings, Winram and Rutledge.
11 was resolved that the committee
meetings   he   held   on   Tuesdays   and
Thursdays,   fortnightly,  commencing
with the police committee at 9.30 a.m.
and the hoard of works at 2 p.m.
It was also decided on the motion
of Councillors Thomas and Gold,
that the regular meetings of the council be held in the evening, beginning
at 7 o'clock.
Main Street Paving
The new council lust no lime in dis-
cussing the Main Street paving contract] and mi the motion 'if Councillors Thomas and Gold, the following resolution was passed :
"That  lh-:  manager of the  Domin-
prietor of the Souris "Plaindealer.'
and from what can be learned, while,
attending  to  his  editorial responsibi-1 ion Creosoting Company be instruct-
lities. qualified for tlle Manitoba bar
For several years Mr. Dickie was
a member of the Manitoba Legislative Assembly and was a valiant supporter of that Western Canadian
statesman whose name will live for
ever in the history of tlie country,
the   lion.   Thomas   Greenway.
Mr. Dickie gave up provincial politics to practise law. With the idea
of retiring. .Mr. Dickie came to South
Vancouver suinc six years ago.
Three years ago he was induced to
oppose the then reeve, Mr. W. A.
Pound, at the annual election. He
was defeated. This year be was
brought into thc civic light very much
against his own personal desires, it
is stated. Friends of Mr. Thomas
Dickie, reeve of South Vancouver,
declare that he may bc expected to
handle the affairs of the district in a
progressive, business-like manner,
fostering the policy of economy in
all  things.
Mr. Dickie is widely travelled,
widely read, has always heen a close
student of public affairs, a successful business man whose position is
such that he will likely give all his
lime tei the affairs of the municipality.
ed to stop all work on Main Street,
and further, that he he asked to appear before this council at a date to
be fixed." In accordance with this
resolution the council issueel an order restraining the municipal engineer from fulfilling the order made by
the late council at their last meeting
instructing the contractor to proceed
with the draining, grading and curbing eef Main  Streel.
The Municipal Clerk was instructed to furnish thc council with a copy
of lhe draft agreement entered into
with  the  Dominion  Creosoting Com
pany as well as the original pre.posed
contract.
The Municipal Staffs
The clerk was alto instructed to
furnish the council with a list e.f the
names ami salaries eef all departmental heads ami the -taft* in each department, together with any written
agreements which may have heen entered into.
Commissioner Crehan's Report
it was ordered that a copy of Commissioner Crchan's repeirt. stated to
have been sent hy lion. Dr. Young,
provincial secretary, on January 5. be
laid on the council table fer inspection.
Road Inspection
It was resolved that a tin er.,ugh inspection be made by the reeve and
councillors eef all mails and sidewalks in South Vancouver, and the
lighting, waterworks ami municipal-
ly-owned machinery, a', tbe earliest
possible moment.
A communication from Mr. W.
Steers, solicitor feir Messrs. Gold ami
Hawthorne, referring to the litigation
against the late council in connection
with the Main Street paving contract, was laid over till the next
council nieeling. It was suggested
in the letter ihat as there was me
further need to proceid with the litigation, his clients were willing 1"
serve notice "i discontinuance, on
condition that each party pay their
own   costs.
Several other matter-, including
tlie appointment t.i committees t'i
.leal with sewerage, the question of
annexation ami the appointment of
license commissioners were hehl over
for a special meeting of the council.
 a   ^   ���	
Cedar Cottage Liberal Club
It was announced by Mr. 11. Kay
at last Tuesday's meeting of the
Semth Vancouver Liberal Club that
a Liberal Association has been formed in Cedar Cottage, of which the
following are the officers : J. J. Cashion, president; C. F. Broadhurst, vice-
president: J. Canning, secretary. The
meetings will bc held the lirst Wednesday m each month at Mr. C. F.
Broadhurst's 'iffice, Ceelar Cottage
Road,
A DRAMATIC FIGURE
Councillor Edward Gold
When the Reverend George D. Ireland, Presbyterian minister, refused
the right hand of Mr. Edward Gold
at the Fraser Hall meeting on the
eve of the municipal elections,
the cause of a certain section
of "moral reform" in Ward Five, received a set-hack, and the candidature of Mr. Gold's opponent, Mr
Goostrey, was made hopeless.
It took seven months of Mr. Gold's
time and much of his money to successfully conduct the most striking
municipal campaign ever carried on
possibly in Western Canada. The
man's star is today in the ascendant.
Mr. Gold possesses a forceful personality and is a platform man with few
peers in Greater Vancouver. He
seems to be a born leader of men.
Throughout the campaign, he has
been a dramatic figure, outshadowing
in this respect the more conservative
Mr.  Dickie.
Great things are expected of Mr.
Gold, and in his new role as a municipal official he will have the best
wishes of even many of bis enemies.
He promises to show the people during the year that he is a man of absolute sincerity. He will doubtless
carry out that promise, for if he does,
the future undoubtedly has a place
for Edward Gold among the big public men of the West.
Mr. Gold has achieved the reputation of being fond of fighting in the
open. He is a successful business
man with a mania for facts and figures. Like that other Teddy, he
wields with great force the big stick.
Gold is no hypocrite.
Councillor  C. W. Twiddy
School Trustee C. M. Whelpton 3ft������ CHINOOK
Vol. II, No. 37
SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA, SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 1914
Price 5 cents
Reeve Dickie is Now the New Pilot of the Municipal Ship���
Record Polling Returns an Almost Entirely New Council
Ex-Reeve Kerr is Swamped by a
Heavy Sea of Votes, While
Mr. J. C. McArthur Sails in at the Rear-
Gold Makes Good and the Old Warrior
Thomas Reaches Harbor With the
Biggest Majority of All
With the triumphant return of Mr.
Thomas Dickie at the head of the
p.ell last Saturday, the keenly contested light feer the reeveship of South
Vancouver has been settled for another year. Mr. Dickie's decisive majority of 8()6 over Mr. J. A. Kerr was
elestributed over every district but
one, ex-Reeve Kerr obtaining 42 more
votes at Carleton Hall polling station
than  Mr.   Dickie.
The polling throughout the municipality was the heaviest een recird.
Never in lhe history of South Vance .uver has a civic campaign excited
so great an interest, culminating as
it did in a total poll of about 501)1)
veetes. If we consider the large number of ratepayers on the voters' list
wlm reside out of the district, it will
he seen that the percentage of votes
polled is an unusually high one. So
heavy a percentage of the electorate
has probably not been polled in any
either municipality in the province
for  many  a  year.
Ml day, throughout the municipality, the liveliest interest in the voting
was manifested, and every kind of
ceiiiveyance was pressed into service.
There were automobiles galore, and
a special ten-minute car service from
the city was extensively taken advantage of, while rigs and buggies
were much in evidence. That the
voters from the city formed a large
percentage of the total is evidenced
from the number of votes recorded
at Main Street and 25th Avenue polling station. Although it is not possible to state exactly how many of
the 2273 voters who recorded their
votes for reeve at this polling station
were from the city, the proportion
must  have  been  large.
Owing io the heavy voting, it was
bite on Saturday night before the
final results were approximately
known. Not until after 8 o'clock was
it definitely known that Mr. Dickie-
was rapidly forging ahead in the race
feer the reeveship. After that time
there was no possible doubt remaining that Mr. Dickie would be rcturn-
the
.11  In-
big !
ed  at   llle   head
majority.
The municipal hall was crowded on
Saturday evening. Messrs. Dickie,
Kerr and McArthur, lhe champions
for the reeveship, and the candidates
for the various wards were in attendance, surrounded hy supporters and
ratepayers from the city and municipality. General surprise was freely expressed as to the heavy voting
and the large majority obtained by
Mr. T. Dickie. When the results
were finally declared, speeches were
briefly made by the various candidates. Mr. Dickie, in a few words
expressed his gratification at being
elected reeve of South Vancouver by
so substantial a majority and assured
the electors that his best endeavors
weiuld be directed towards the good
management of the municipality.
Ex-Reeve Kerr, who accepted his defeat in excellent spirit, thanked the
many electors who had recorded their
votes on his behalf and asked lhat
the united support of the ratepayers
of South Vancom er be given to the
new reeve and council. Mr. Edward
Gold anel other candidates also briefly addressed the gathering.
The heaviest polling for councillors took place in Ward Two, in
which a total of 758 votes were recorded, the majority for Mr. G. A.
Stevens over Mr. Russell being the
narrow one of 6.
In Ward One, Mr. W. R. Rutledge
secured the substantial majority of
175 over his nearest opponent, Mr.
John   Graham.
Mr. G. W. Thomas, "the old war
horse," had the distinction of gaining
the largest majority of any candidate,
polling 310 more votes than Mr. A.
Mcintosh in Ward Three.
In Ward Four, Mr. W. Winram
polled the small majority of 17 over
Mr. E. L. Armstrong, who thus made
���a strong bid for premier position.
In Ward Five, Mr. Edward Gold
received the emphatic endorsation of
the electors of Ward Five by a ma-
(Continued  on  Page  5)
New Reeve and Council
Make Debut at Civic Hall
Main Street  Paving  Held   up   Until  Further  Orders
Council Meetings to be Held in the Evening
New Committees are Appointed
Regular
Reeve Dickie- and the iiu-iiibrrs of
ih. new council, after being sworn
in by Magistrate Johnson, commenced
tin session "ii Monday by appointing
the following committees :
Finance���Councillor Gold, chairman, and  the  whole  council.
Board   e.f   W..rks   ���   Conncill
Thomas, chairman,  ami    th
council.
Health, Relief ami Hospital���Councillor Stevens, chairman, and Councillors Rowlings, Thomas and Gold,
Police Committee���Councillor Rutledge. chairman, ami Councillors
Thomas, Twiddy and Winram.
Fire. Water and  Light  Committe���  "on
Councillor   Winram.   chairman,     and
Councillors   Rowlings,   Stevens     and
Gold.
Park- and Hall Grounds���Councilleir Twiddy, chairman, and Councillors Rowlings, Winram and Rutledge.
It was resolved that the committee
meetings be hehl mi Tuesdays and
Thursdays, fortnightly, commencing
with the police committee at 9.30 a.m.
anil the board eif weirks at 2 p.m.
It was alsei decided een the motion
of Councillors Thomas and Gold,
that the regular meetings of the council be held in the evening, beginning
at 7 o'clock.
pany as well as llle original proposed
contract.
The  Municipal  Staffs
The   clerk   was   also   instructed   to
furnish the council with a list of the
names and salaries of all departmental heads ami the staff in each department,   together   with     any     written
whole  agreements which may have been en-
'tered into.
Commissioner Crehan's Report
It was ordered that a copy of Commissioner Crehan's rep'ert. stated to
have been sent by lion. Dr. Yeiung,
provincial secretary, on January 5. be
laid  een  the  council  table  feir inspec-
Road Inspection
n -"heel that a thorough in-
REEVE DICKIE
While it would scarcely be tair to
say that the new reeve of South Vancouver is straight-laced, Mr. Thomas
Dickie is a reserved, matter-of-fact
gentleman of a type not usually
found in public life in British Columbia.
Mr. Dickie is one of the pioneers
of Westen Canada, and has always
lived a strenuous life. He was born
near Gait, Ontario, half a century
ago. When he was twenty-one years
of age, be beaded for the west. For
a time he homesteaded at Moosuiuin.
Man., later taught school in the
neighborhood of Souris, Man., lo
eventually enter the newspaper business.    Mr. Dickie was editor and pro
prietor of the Souris "Plaindealer,"
and from what can be learned, while
attending to his editorial responsibilities, qualified for the Manitoba bar.
For several years Mr. Dickie was
a member of the Manitoba Legislative Assembly and was a valiant supporter of that Western Canadian
statesman whose name will live for
ever in lhe history of thc country,
the   Hon.   Thomas   Greenway.
Mr. Dickie gave up provincial politics to practise law. With the idea
of retiring, Mr. Dickie came to South
Vancouver some six years ago.
Three years ago Ile was induced to
oppose the then reeve, Mr. W. A.
Pound, at the annual election. He
was defeated. This year he was
brought into the civic tight very much
against his own personal desires, it
is stated. Friends of Mr. Thomas
Dickie, reeve of South Vancouver,
declare that he may be expected to
handle the affairs of the district in a
progressive, business-like manner,
fostering the policy of economy in
all  things.
Mr. Dickie is widely travelled,
widely read, has always been a close
student of public affairs, a successful business man whose position is
such that he will likely give all his
time to the affairs of the municipality.
Main Street Paving
The new council lost no time in dis
cussing  the   Main   Street  paving
om-
uticil-
lleiw-
tract, and em ihe motion of Ci
lors Thomas and Gold, the f
ing resolution was passed :
"That th'; manager of the Dominion Creosoting Company be instructed to stop all work on Main Street,
and further, that he be asked to appear before this council at a date to
be fixed." In accordance with this
resolution the council issued an order restraining the municipal engineer from fulfilling the order made by
the late council at their last meeting
instructing tlle contractor tee proceed
with the draining, grading and curbing of Main  Street.
The Municipal Clerk was instructed to furnish the council with a copy
of the draft agreement entered into
with the Dominion Creosoting Com-
It was
spection be made by lhe reeve and
councillors of all roads and sidewalks in South Vancouver, and the
lighting, waterworks anil municipally-, iwncd machinery, at the earliest
possible moment.
A communication from Mr. W.
Steers, solicitor for Messrs. Gold and
Hawthorne, referring to tlle litigation
against the late council in connection
with the Main Street paving contract, was laid eever till the next
council meeting. It was suggested
in the letter that as there was no
further need tei proceed with the litigation, his clients were willing to
serve notice of discontinuance, on
condition that eai i: party pay their
own  costs.
Several other matters, including
the appointment of committees t"
deal with sewerage-, the question tii
annexation ami the appointment of
license commissioners were held over
fer tt special nieeling of the council.
 s    ^    ���	
Cedar  Cottage Liberal  Club
It was announced by Mr. II. Kay
at last Tuesday's meeting of the
Seiuth Vancouver Liberal Club that
a Liberal Association has been formed in Cedar Ceittage. of which the
following are the officers : J. J. Cashion. president: C. F. Broadhurst, vice-
president; J. Canning, secretary. The
meetings will be held tlle lirst Wednesday in each month at Mr. C. F.
Broadhurst's eiffice. Cedar Ceittage
Road.
A DRAMATIC FIGURE
Councillor Edward Gold
When thc Reverend George D. Ireland. Presbyterian minister, refused
the right hand of Mr. Edward Gold
at the Fraser Hall meeting on the
eve of the municipal elections,
the cause of a certain section
of "moral reform" in Ward Five, received a set-back, and the candidature of Mr. Gold's opponent. Mr
Goostrey, was made hopeless.
It took seven months of Mr. Gold's
time and much of his money to successfully conduct the most striking
municipal campaign ever carried on
possibly in Western Canada. The
man's star is today in the ascendant.
Mr. Gold possesses a forceful personality and is a platform man with iew
peers in Greater Vancouver. Hc
seems to be a born leader oi men.
Throughout the campaign, he has
been a dramatic figure, outshadowing
in this respect the more conservative
Mr.  Dickie.
Great things are expected of Mr.
Gold, and in bis new role as a municipal official be will have the best
wishes of even many of his enemies.
He promises to show the people during the year that he is a man of absolute sincerity. He will doubtless
carry out that promise, for if he does,
the future undoubtedly has a place
for Edward Gold among the big public men of the West.
Mr. Gold has achieved the reputation of being fond of fighting in the
open. He is a successful business
man with a mania for facts and figures. Like that other Teddy, he
wields with great force the big stick.
Gold is no hypocrite.
Councillor C. W. Twiddy
School Trustee C. M. Whelpton TWO
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY    24,    1914
South Vancouver Liberals Hold Successful
:: Social Gathering ::
Despite bad weather and the counter attractions of several election
meetings, elsewhere lhe Seeuth Vancouver Liberal Club Hall in Main
Street was fillet) Thursday night
last week, when Mr. M. A. Macdonald and other speakers addressed the
gathering. It was probably thc first
time that some of the audience had
been given the opportunity of hearing Mr. Macel.iiiahl, w'ho is president
of the Liberal organizaiieui committee of British Columbia, spieak on the
political question's oft the day", t Oi
dominant and magnetic- personality,
Mr. Macdonald has an impressive delivery. His speech un Thursday was
given without any florid declaration
and iu an almost conversational tone
during the greater part of the address.
At times his denunciation of the government was intensified by the deliberate and measured form of his indictment of its record. Mr. Mac-
donald is a speaker whose restrained,
and closely reasoned methods of
speech gain in force from the sincere and convincing manner in which
his arguments arc delivered. Withal, Mr. Macdonald has a clear and
distinctive voice which arrests and
holds tbe eager attention of his audience. Sure of his facts, ready iu retort, with intellectual gifts both compelling and attractive, Mr. Macdonald promises to bc one of tbe leading
Liberal forces in the provincial, if
not  federal politics oi the  Dominion.
Mr. Maxwell Smith in addressing
the meetin,. -oiigratulatcd the large
gathering on the progress made in
Liberal organization in South Vancouver during the past year. Referring to agriculture, Mr. Smith said
no branch of industry in British Columbia had bee.n so neglected. The
best land had been given away to
speculators, while the disabilities in
land legislation had not been removed by the Victoria government. He
believed that agriculture should be
included in the curriculum of British
Columbia   schools.    Such     education
was woefully lacking Everything
possible was'donc to-attract children
to other sciences and industries and
nothing to prepare them for the pursuit _oi agriculture. The most important industry In the province re-
ceiveel the least attention by the government. If the price of but one
Dreadnought was devoted to agriculture it weiuld do much towards thc
development of the natural resources
of the country. i   ,
In regard to,urganuatiun, saifl.'Mr.
Shiitln. it Was essential and vital to
the success of���*such associations as
the South Vancouver Liberal Club,
and he would like to bespeak for it
the'cqrdial support of the'older associations in Vancouver-.^ It was important' that -dli'tVe local Orgartiza-
tions should wfjrk together in preparation  for the next election!
Mr. G. G. McGeer, president of the
South Vancouver Liberal Association,
said that nowhere in the province
were thc people more in arms against
the political misrule of the government than in South Vancouver. In
spite of numerous deputations to Victoria seeking annexation or aid in
other public matters of vital interest
to South Vancouver, thc government
had done nothing. Take the matter
of political representation. In the
Richmond constituency, in which
South Vancouver is included, there
wcre over 10,000 voters, and only
one representative, while there were
14 members with a combined voting
list of only 9000 odd voters.
There was an immediate necessity,
said Mr. McGeer, to equalize the basis
of representation. How often has
Mr. Carter-Cotton ever received a
deputation from South Vancouver or
expressed an opinion on the needs of
his constituency? The time is ripe,
said Mr. McGeer, for the people of
South Vancouver to demand representation at both Victoria and Ottawa.
Mr. M. A. Macdonald said he was
glad to see such an energetic Liberal
Association developing the fraternal
fellowship of South Vancouver, li
was the lirst effective prelude te, . .r-
ganizationJ He was particularly gla'd
to see so large a percentage of young
men present; it was a hopeful sign
of Liberalism. To his mind, between
elections was thc time for educational work, to induce the pee-pie before
the heat of an ejection to make un
their minfli as! .to iHe'w.iy thev intend to vote.
It is trite, said Mr. Macdonald, thai
the odds against thein are great, that
there was an all-powerful government at Victoria, but they should
not bc daunted. If they are prepared to go into the light with the necessary spirit and enthusiasm ihey can
depend   upon   it   that   the   banner   of
I Liberalism wilLbc carried to victo/y.
j There was a political  ste.rm brewing':
It may'be .that In the weerds'ol s'crlp-
i ture  the   wicked  flourish   like   a   bay
i tree for a time, but a reckoning is at
1 hand.
. As rcgatds representation, said Mr.
Macdpnald, the present condition calls
for ah indignant prVitesti'of the people -of Richmond constituency. It
was an intolerable condition and
there should be an insistent clamor
until proper representation was obtained. At present political power
was largely in the hands of two men,
the premier and the Attorney-General at Victoria. The olher members
of the government were mere automatons. They had also heen termed
"rubber stamps," but hc objected to
that expression. Rubber stamps at
least make some sort of a mark, but
these   members   of   the   government
CASCADE  BEER
Beat* them all���It will certainly pay you to get wise and
have a talk with ui about it.
International  Importing Company
303 PENDER WEST
Bottlers of Cascade, B. C. Exp ort  and  Bohemian
FREE DELIVERY TO YOUR DOOR IN SOUTH VANCOUVER
EVERY THURSDAY
PHONE SEYMOUR 1951
SCOTCH CLOTHING   HOUSE  LIMITED
TWO STORES
30 to 34 Cordova W., Between Abbott and Carrall
77 Hastings Street E., Corner Columbia Avenue
See Our Special $12.50, $18.50 and $22.50
Suits and Overcoats
We cater to the man who wants the best, (or the least money
Hughes Bros' Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STREET EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone : Seymour 330
We carry  everything in  the Liquor  Line
No order too small, and none too large  for this popular Liquor Store
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
leaving our Store every Friday morning at 9 a.m.
MACADAM & COMPANY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
418 Winch Building Vancouver, B.C.
Wood Block
PAVING
been neglected. During that time the
provinces of Saskatchewan and Al-
berta have been brought under t'-'.e
plemgli antl agricultural prosperity
assured. In Rrtfish Columbia, about
live million acres of the best land has
been placed under* the yoke of the
speculate er. Mr. llowser says there
are Int-. eef gnod land left.' Something like Hill millions of acrts.-he declares, are siill open fe.r the settler.
The only fault, said Mr. Macdonald,
���T can lind with his statement is that
it i��� untrue. According to the careful investigation e.f land agents in
Victoria there arc only 16 or 17 million of acres eef good agriculture land
available in the province. Hut all
aleeng thc lines of the railway, a trc-
mendous block of the best land, a
.^'paradise feir settlers," was already
Itelel by speculator/1/! All this ' was
'clone in ilagra'ut 'violation-ui the laml
laws. The spirit <ii the land liws had
been evaded. Where.'s thc law said
that one man could only hold one
square mile, there were now 50-square
miles tu one mail  in many C��S{S.
It \\fsi teen'pfoposed by tlie government, said Mr. Macdonald, to
give financial assistance tee settlers in
obtaining land. This policy would
not have been required if tlie land
bad been free. But the government,
you may be sure, will make it conditional on political support. The
government had dispersed public
monies in such a way that no man
can safely rely upon obtaining his
legitimate share In the natural wealth
and prosperity of the country unless
he supports the government. But
the government had passed the zenith
Mr. M. A. Macdonald, who addressed the recent Meeting at the South
Vancouver Liberal Club
HIGHLAND LIQUOR COMPANY
758 POWELL STREET   ::    Phou Highland 5SS
Dealers in Wines, Liquors and Cigars
Cascade Beer pints ��l doz., quarto *2 doz.
Heidtoberg      "     S1     " ��       %i   "
���   B. O. Export      "    8Sc    " "   ��1.75 "
Wt deliver to South Vancouver by motor every Friday. Phone Ut Your Orders ���
��� e      ' i   11        ii - iie
appear to exercise no impression
whatever. It behooves the people of
British Columbia to restore some
sence of representation. At present
the country was suffering from the
misreprentation of men hating that
lack of legislative capacity.
"Some seven or eight year ago,"
said Mr. Macdonald, "little attention
was focussed on the provincial government. People were largely engrossed in their own private or business affairs. Today conditions are
changing. Conditions arc uecoming
more normal, if not indeed, below
normal. When there is not that prosperity that existed a few years ago,
attention is directed to the government at Victoria. He did not say
that the government was responsible
for the financial stringency that had
prevailed in the money markets of
the world. But the government is
responsible for tlie lack of prosperity
where it can be traced to their deliberate acts.
Take two industries, continued Mr.
Macdonald, those of lumber and agrir
culture. During the past eight or
nine years the government have alienated many thousands of square miles
of the best timber land in the province to non-users. So alarmed, indeed, have the government become
at the last moment at their own
prodigality that they have or promised to place, all the remaining timber land in reserve for the needs of
the settler. But they have locked the
stable door when the horse has been
stolen. During these years, also,
when the government alienated al!
these thousands of acres of land representing many millions of dollars.
the government have net received
enough revenue from them to keep
the province going for twelve month:
In the meantime, the government
have been coquetting with the royalties they extort from the lumbermen from time to time. These lumbermen complain that there should
be more stability in administration
as this continued uncertainty militates against the prosperity of the industry.
There has been, declared Mr. Macdonald, almost criminal folly in the
administration of thc land policy of
the province. The settlement of the
land and the interests of a producing population have been ignored.
The opportunities of ten years have
of its power of coercion, and thc people of British Columbia are realizing
that they must band together in
smashing  this  political   machine.
Referring to the finances of the
province, a surplus of nine millions,
said Mr. Macdonald, had been dissipated by the government in two years,
and they were faced now with a deficit of $13,000,000. The largest item
in their balance sheet appeared to
bc under the beading of "miscellaneous," "a term," said Mr. Macdonald,
"which covers a multitude of sins."
In this connection the speaker trenchantly criticised the Songhees and
Kitsilano reserves transactions, as
well as the additional grant to Mackenzie St Mann foreshadowed in the
government's policy for the new session of parliament.
"I hope," said Mr. Macdonald in
conclusion, "that the South Vancouver Liberal Club will keep up its good
work and be able to contribute a
large part in bring about a change of
government for the good of the province."  (Cheers.)
SIX   REASONS
WHICH ACCOUNT FOR THE SUPERIORITY OF
CREOSOTED WOOD
BLOCK PAVEMENTS
ITS DURABILITY���Dots nbtf cttomble or uuly.eN
-'ige-ufld<?r tlm���ctensc'st traffic;-second only to granite'
blocks.
ITS EASE OF REPAIR���No ulifficulty being experienced in removing and replacing tbe blocks; no
expensive plant or skilled workmen required.
ITS SANITARY QUALITIES���Creosote being a
highly antiseptic and waterproofing material instantly destroys all germs, prevents the absorption of
street filth and consequent decay.
ITS NOISELESSNESS���The rattle and bang of
vehicles passing over its smooth surface absorbed
and muffled till the quiet of the dirt road is obtained.
ITS DUSTLESSNESS���Does not pulverize; the
heaviest traffic only pounding down the wood fibres
to offer the greater resistance.
ITS CLEANLINESS���Having a smooth surface and
being waterproof it does not differ in this respect
from asphalt.
We manufacture blocks of the highest possible
standard, the verv best materials onlv being used and
in the DOMINION WOOD BLOCKS we believe
we produce an article that has no equal.
DOMINION CREOSOTING
 COMPANY LIMITED	
Vancouver, B. C.
B.  C.  ELECTRIC   IRONS
THE CHEAPEST
IRON OF ITS
STANDARD ON
THE MARKET
THE BEST IRON
OFFERED ON
THE   MARKET
AT ANY PRICE
PRICE  $3.50-
Every Iron is guaranteed by the B. C. Electric for 10 years
CARRALL   AND
HASTINGS STS.
PHONE
SEYMOUR 5000
1138 GRANVILLE ST.
(Near Davie)
YOUR BUSINESS:
1. Is your business paying ?
2. Are you worried over the state of your books ?
3. Is all your capital tied up in customers' accounts?
4. Is your system of accounts all you could desire ?
5. Are your collections properly looked after ?
MY BUSINESS:
To show you whether your business is paying or not.
To put your books in proper shape.
To reduce your outstanding accounts.
To suggest a system that is best for your business.
To personally look after your collections.
Gnru   n ATCDCfiKI accountant and auditor
.   IT IH. lAlLItdUFI VANCOUVER, B.C.
Office���620 Bidwell  Street.
Residence���3715 Dock Street
Phone Seymour 9138
Phone Fairmont 2020L
During intervals, Messrs. Irving
and J. Third, Junior, contributed to
the evening's enjoyment by song and
recitation, while Mr. S. F. Henderson proved himself a genial chairman.
In Vain
Jack���"Did you tell her that she
was  necessary   to  your  happiness?"
Tom���"No; I tried to persuade her
that I was necessary to hers."
I
SPECIAL SALE
Off Men's and  Boys'  Overcoats,
Ladies'  Rain and  Overcoats.
Off all Men's and Boys' Suits, all kinds, no
reserve; all Hats and Caps, Odd Pants and
Fancy Vests, Dressing Gowns and Housecoats
1
3
1
4
CLUBB & STEWART
LIMITED
Tel. Sey. 702.
309 to 315 Hastings St. W.
K��J��.
.  '   v    i SATURDAY,   JANUARY   24,   1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
QRAND   CENTRAL   flOTEL
Fully Modern and Up-to-date
EBURNE STATION, B. C.
CORNER OF FOURTH STREET AND RIVER ROAD
THE LEADING HOTEL
EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN  PLAN
GRAUER & DUMARESQ, Proprietors
AUTO PARTIES CATERED TO
PHONE EBURNE 135
Some Special Lines of High-class Groceries
for the New Year
Gold Car Emits, 2'/' pound tins 30c
Hotchkiss Glass Jar Emits, 2Vi pound tins 35c
Peek, Frean & Co. Biscuits,.thc package 15c and 20c
Empress New Season's Jams, 1 pound glass 25c
Quaker Oats, large prize package 25c
Duerrs Pure Jams, 2 pound glass jar 40c
Fisher's Home-made Peanut Butter 15c to 45c
Fels Naptha Soap, 4 bars for 25c
Van Camps Tomatoe Catsup, pint bottles 30c
Old Tyme Maple Syrup, in tins and glass 55 and 60c
Heinz Pork and Beans and Kidney Beans 15 and 20c
Fraser & Maclean Special Blend Teas 35. 40 and 50c
Fraser & MacLean,
26th Avenue and Main
Phone :  Fairmont 784
Collingwood Pure Milk Co.
PURITY CLEANLINESS
REGULAR DAILY DELIVERIES
All our Milk and Cream is treated in the HOLDING
PASTEURIZING PLANT, in accordance with the
new PROVINCIAL ACT'S REQUIREMENT.
G. W. HAWKINS C. F. HAWKINS
EARLS ROAD, South Vancouver
BITULITHIC
PAVEMENT
Has the following attributes:
Durability; sure footing for horses; resiliency; noiselessness ; easy drainage; dustlessness; economy.
Bitulithic approaches more closely than any other the
ideal of a perfect pavement.
Its notable durability makes it more economical than any
other paving.
The thoroughfares paved with bitulithic are an impressive
object lesson in fine paving.
Bitulithic has been adopted in over two hundred cities in
the United States and fifteen cities in Canada.
See Granville Street, Fourth Street, Heather Street, Marine Drive and Magee Road in Point Grey; Georgia, Burrard
to Stanley Park; Tenth Avenue, Laurel to Granville Street;
Twelfth Avenue, Seventh Avenue, and Venables Street, in
Vancouver City.
Columbia Bitulithic Limited
Phone:   Seymour 7130
417 Dominion Tnwt Bldg. Vancouver, B. C
Dominion Equipment & Supply Co.
LIMITED
Contractor* and Municipal Machinery, Equipment and Snppliei
THE   LABOR   WORLD
R.   H.   Neelands,  Workers'   Representative on School  Bo?.rd. Heads
the   Poll
ADDRFiS   A'.L   COMMUNICATIONS   TO   THE     LABOR   EDITOR"
%i However, wc can fed secure in the |
fai - ihat she,uld by any chance tach
a tiling transpire, Bowser we.uld '
i e.nly reejuire te�� touch another
button anel mother brand of diplo-i
time >. equally effective a> thai used j
on Vance.uver Island, we,uld come;
forth.
It was particularly gratifying to
the workers in Se.uth Vancouver to
see their eme and only lalie.r representative- head the poll at the election
for  School  Trustees   last   Saturday
That the worker! arc met slow tei
appreciate merit is made evident freem
tlle result and thc pity is wc have no
man on the council beiarei who can
lent  the workers'    case    befeere    that
l)eee|y.
Now that We know '>ur strength
let us take a step forward and during
the coming year organize lo that it
will be possible when election time
ciemes again tee he able te. get repre-
lentation em the council alio. It can
be deittr���Imt unly if we organize.
That "Harry" will he particularly
gratified goes without saying. He
made a good impression at the meetings which he attended anel this without any display of fireworks or gallery
tactics which vvas so evident anel appreciated   hy   certain   sections   e,(   the
people.
*   +   *
During thc recent municipal elections considerable comment was oc-
casioned by the fact that nee clause
guaranteeing tlie work tee bc performed only ley South Vancouver workers
had appeared in the contract drawn
up between the council anil the CrPei-
suting Company. Capital was made
of the facl by certain candidates for
uffice and many working men allowed themselves tej be led intei the be-
i lief that an injustice had been worked on thein.
Let us be careful, however. The
bulk of the population of South Vancouver are working men. The in-
i dustries in the municipality at pres-
| ent can only employ a small fraction
of the number and with very little
development work in sight at present,
we should he extremely careful not
to raise any artificial barrier at 25th
Avenue. While not wishing to make
any defense of the contract, yet we
feel thc council were well advised in
not discriminating against city workers. A little diplomacy can go a far
way and some of the best laws we
have do not appear on the statute-
books
tbe   e,reler   was
eiut   saying      II
doobts."    McBrid
ty  speech  would
lecesnry  ge.es with-
wever,   "we   hae   oor
i   pocket  prosperi
ivc   tee  he
revised
and with the anxious time hc is having with the opposition 'ever at Vic-
teeria at present the extra labor involved might bring about a reduction
iu   weight
��    ���    *
They -ay Cartcr-Ceettein represents
the largest body of working men in
any constituency in Hritish Columbia. N'ee wonder be l>iuks worried.
What a hard time be must have attending te, all their wants. It is now
freely niiu.ircel that the "genial" member is to be promoted teer his inestimable services. These we irking men
make a man feel "Id before Ilis time.
What is the necessity of them and
win,  ever  invented   them  anyway?
* *    *
I..nil   Rosebery,   the   lairel   of   Dal-
me'iiy, speaking at "GUscay" recently,
said   "the   recent   announcement  that
there waa a shortage of 500,000 babies
struck  cold  te>  his  heart."    There  is
an old saying. "It's tine to hear geese
quack," anel another one "of two evils i
choose   the   least."     Hcttcr  by   far  to!
have   his gouty, over fed heart struck1
cold  than   that  the  poor,  wee  miser-1
able   tots   sheiuld   be   brought  into  a'
world  that  does  neet   give  them  the
consideration  the  animal  world  give
their  eefTspring.
If the stringercy geees on a little
while longer, baby carriages will become a elrug 'in the market and the
makers of these commodities will have
to turei their attention to the ever-ex-
panding demand for autos.
* *   *
The London police are forming a
trade union. There are over 20,000
men on tlie police force in the metro-
peelis     The trade unionists are watch-
It is to be
season for tin
grants will be
hoped   that   the   close
importation  of  immi-
furtlicr extended. That
with   considerable   In-
wondering what its ef-
ing the move
terest and are
fects  will  be.
What a time we would have if the
movement spreads. A policemen's
strike! Fancy Bowser having to call
out the miners on Vancouver Island
to resteere law and order. It is to bc
hoped the various Conservative associations will rise in their might and
crush this movement before it comes
to this peaceful province. These
'working   men   are   peculiar   animals.
The Trades  and  Labor Council  at (
their  last   meeting  elected  office!
follows   f'er   the   ensuing  term :
President, \V. foxcroft (elected), |
49 rotes; J II McVety, 41. Vice-
president���J.   II    McVety   (elected),
4H:   V.   K.   Midgley.  .IK     General   secretary and business agent���J. W. Wil-
kinseen (elected), 55; II   J   McEwen,
24.     Secretary-treasurer���jas.    Camp-,
bell  (elected)  52;  H. J   McEwen,  3K
Statistician���Miss  Brisbane (elected),'
44;    Mis,   Gutteridge.   40.     Sergeant-
at-arms���John   Sully   (elected),     51;
K.    I'.   Pettlpiece,     31.      Trustees���
Curnock, 36; II   J.  McEwen, 30;  W
K,  Treitter,  34  (three elected);   R.   P. I
Pettipiece, 27.    Alternate  delegate  to;
B.  C.  Federation of Labor���W.  Fox-j
ere,ft (elected). 37; Burroughs, 31.
*   *   *
Preparations are now well-nigh
complete for tbe meeting of the |
fourth annual convention of the Hrit-.
ish Columbia Federation of Labor,,
which convenes at N'ew Westminster j
on January 2fi. Over K0 credentials
have been received by Secretary-;
Treasurer V. K, Midgley. and e,n the
ipening day it is expected that over i
100 delegates will be seated. In this;
connection it is gratifying to find that:
more delegates arc coming from the I
outlying pans of the province than at j
any previous convention. Christian1
Sivertz. president 'ef the federation,'
will be in attendance at a meeting of j
the executive tei be hehl een January!
23. at New Westminster, when thej
reports of the officers for the past I
year will be considered before being
sent to the printers. The secretary-
treasurer's report will show both increased membership and better financial standing. Three vice-presidents
will unavoidably be absent: J. Cuthbertson (Greenwood), J. Ferris
(S'nith Vancouver), and J. J. Taylor
(Ladysmith I. thc remainder of the
eefficers will however, be in their
places. Vice-president J. W. Gray,
of Fernie, is now up country securing
affiliations from scattered unions and
will have an interesting story to tell
ot his experiences in seeme of the out-
e f-the-way places e,f Hritish Columbia. Altogether everything points to
the coming invention as being a
"bummer" and considering the industrial situation here at present
there will be work enough and to
spare for it to do.
BEST   FOR   CHILDREN
Chambers 40 per cent.
Emulsion Cod Liver Oil
Soothes, Heala and Build*
up the Lungs and System
We guarantee it
Second to None
SPECIAL PRICE 85c and 40c
CHAMBERS
DRUG  CO.
ColUngwood East
PI A NftS $30�� rich toned up"
I 17*11 Vd    right   mahogany
grand (quite new), -uaranteed, only $175. $350 beautiful walnut case,
steel plate, rich full tone, warranted (quite new), only $300. $450 upright overstrung by Mason &
Risch, only $250.
OR HANS   By a11 the best
Ua\U/\llO and leading makers, largest stock in town, lowest
prices.
THOMSON, 1127 GRANVILLE ST.
Phone   Sey.   2832. Lists   Free
LITTLE MOUNTAIN HALL
Cor. 30th Avenue and Main Street
Comfortable Hall for oublic meetings,  dances,  etc., to Let
Apply W   J. STOLLIDAY
34 32nd Avenue
The Bonnie Purple Heather
Sandy urges the eleckturs tae staund bye the new  Cooncil an' gie
them their undivided support
839 Beatty Street
Phone Seymour 7155
Vancouver
Weel, weel freens, What dae yae
know. If that wisna a rcvolushun last
Seturday I dinna ken what yae wud
ca' it. ' Maist a'beedy lookit for a
chenge in some wey or anither but
it wiul hae taen a big guess tae arrive
at the conclushun that the whole
shootin' match wud be emptied oot���
wi' the excepshun, of course, o' the
auld warhorse frae Ward 3.
Xoe). efter the excitement o' the
elecksluin ii kin' o' worn aft, we can
gether oor wits thegither an' get doon
tae calmly consider the situashun as
it appeals tae oor different weys o'
reasonin'.
In the tirst place, I may as weel
state richt here that I wisna owre
weel pleased wi' thc result. The auld
cooncil had bets o' lauts. an' on mony
questyinj I wis at complete variance
wi' them, but feir a' that I wisna prepared tae he sae drastic as the ratepeyers  saw  tit  tae  be  last  Seturday.
I micht as weel state, also, for I'm
never ashamed tae let onybody ken
wha I vote for. that the elected reeve
an' Gold, cooncillor o' the ward I'm
in (5), didna get my vote���an' yae
ken fine I'm nane o' yaer moral reformers.
By the wey, I dinna ken what we've
got tae reform in Sooth Vancoover,
ottywey���if  yae   except  the  council.
There wis wan guid reform on
Scturday. an' it wis a very Important
yin at that.
At previous eleckshuns it wis a
bard job tae get the ratepeyers tac
even tak the trouble tae record their
vote, but in my opeenyin thc maist
hopeful sign List Scturday wis thc
sense o' awakenin' the people showed
in the record vote that wis polled.
Noo, we've dune oor duty in the
votin' line���let us get deion tae work
an' forget a' the hard things said
in  thc heat o' the fecht.
For my pairt, though as I telt yae
afore, my men were defeated. I'm
quite prepared tae transfer my allegiance an' dae the utmost that lies
in my power tae help thc new reeve
an' the elected cooncillor o' thc ward.
I hae nae use for they fellies that
gaun aboot croakin' on what's gaun
tae happen an' cherishin' illwill tae
the cooncil because they dinna happen  tac bc the men they voted for.
The will o' the people maun prevail an' let the minority fa' in wi'
tbe majority���an' show a sense o' thc
spirit p' true democracy, an' an honest concepshun o' the duties o' citizenship.
What tempted mc tae vote for the
auld reeve wis owre the questyin o'
the pavin' o' Main Street. I still hold
���bad contrack an' a' as it wis���that
it wis a guid thing frae the pint o
view o' the folk tbat lived in the
surroundin' district. If the new
reeve an' cooncil can arrive at a means
o' pavin' the street ony ither wey
they'll hae my unqualified support
an' I'm share tbe support o' a' the
rest o' thc folk along Main Street
that's anxious tae see a street instead o' a muck hole as it is at
present.
Richt noo I wish tac pey the newly
elected cooncil a compliment. They
werna an hoor in session afore they
passed a resolushun declaring for the
holtlin'   o'   the    ordinary   tneetins   o'
cooncil  in  the  evenins.
Xeio this is a very important de-
ceeshun, an' wan that'll hae fattr-
reachln' consequences. A council
that holds its meeting at times when
thc general body o' the' ratepeyers hae
nae opportunity ee' listfinin tae their
deliberashuns sune get oot o' touch
wi' the common folk an' arc tempted
tac think they're the whole cheese
an'  pas>  law -  accordingly.
N    th".y   cvenin'   meetins  '11  dae
mare tier ilu- municipality than what
the  folk  may   think.
A fellie '11 be able tae go up tae
the hall at nicht efter lie's had his
supper an' get lirst-hautid informa-
shun e.n what's gaun em in the municipality. Marc than that, he'll be
able tae keep in closer touch wi' the
coonci', watch their daens an' maybe
be able t: > gie a bit advice���or get a
bit���iei regatrd tae municeepal mait-
ters generally. It should dae awa
wi' the hole an' corner meetins that
arc ov/re common in conneckshun wi'
public   bodies.
Another very important thing is
that if the workin' men like tae organize they can pit wan o' their ain
kind on the cooncil. 1 baud very decided opeenyins on the labor questyin, an' until the workin' folk pit men
on the public bodies tae look efter
their interests they'll aye hae troubles
owre wages, tutors an' condecshuns
generally. Yae canna expect wealthy
real cslaic owners an' ithers tae look
efter your interests an' their ain at
the same time. It's agin human
nature.
I wis awfu weel pleased tae see
oor only labor representative elected
at thc tap o' thc poll on Seturday in
the cleckshun for schule trustees.
Twa years o' puhlic service had convinced the ratepeyers that they had
a guid man an' despite the avalanche
t^at smothered the ithers. ihey showed their due apprcciashun by rcturnin
him at the e���p o' the poll.
Noo, jist a word afore I feenish.
Let us now, henceforth an' hereafter,
as thc preacher says, baund oorsels
thegither in wan body tae dae oor
best for '.he municipal!.v al large.
Let us forget a' oor petty quarrels
an' work thegither for the common
guid.
A municipality or a city is jist like
a big limited liability company. Thc
ratepeyers represent thc shareholders
an' tlle cooncil the board o' directors.
I'nlcss they baith pull thegither they
sune get intae a disorganized state
an' bad results ensue.
Forget that word grafter for a
while an' trust the cooncil as honest
men. By appreciating them and
helpin' them yaer mare likely tae get
guid results. If at times they dae
things at times yae dinna agree wi'
���aye mind that there's twa sides tae
a questyin���an' your side micht be
the  wrang  yin.
While we hae suffered frae owre
muckle boostin' in the past, still we're
likely tae suffer mare frae the knocker. If yae think things are wrong
get up tac yaer cooncillor, or the
reeve if need be, an' talk it owre wi'
them. If yae still think yaer richt.
then bide till the proper time an' then
empty them  oot.
An honest people 'II make an honest cooncil an' hy gien yaer councillor
yaer loyal support an' showin' him
yaer takin' an interest in his daens.
yaell make him rise tae a higher level
than what be maybe thocht be could
hae reached himsel.
Quityerkickin!
Yours through the heather,
SAXDY   MACPHERSON.
HERE and   THERE
Mr. Re.licit Kielil. of
couver, has in his posse
.ti Robert Fcrgusson's F
ieetis subjects,    It is tlu
Seeuth Van-
ision a copy
icms on var-
thiril  edition
printed by T. Ruddiman & Ce'.. Edinburgh, 1785, ane! is considered of both
bibliographical anil pecuniary value.
Ferguson was one of lhe precursors
eef Robert P,urns, who adopted the
Scotch metre and derived much of
his inspiration from the older poet.
Burns' birthday will be celebrated on
Saturday,   January   25,
Sandy Macpherson eii the "Chinook"
when shown the book of Fcrgusson's
poems declared that while it contains
poetry which few if any modern Scottish peicts could rival, the printing of
these latter days is a "lang way ahecd
o' the braw days of Fcrgusson and
Rabbic  Bums."
Make South Vancouver
Beautiful
By   planting   such   varieties   of
ROSES,   SHRUBS   AND
ORNAMENTALS
as are  furnished by the
British Columbia
Nurseries Co. Ltd.
They are THE BEST, and are
GUARANTEED TO SATISFY  THE  MOST  CRITICAL.
Write, for our 80-page descriptive   Catalogue,   IT   IS   FREE
We also grow and sell the
choicest fruit trees and small
fruit plants, in great variety.
Nothing but the best grade supplied and delivered fresh from
the  nurseries.
II. H. HOWARD, of 6425
Inverness Street, South Vancouver, is our representative,
see him, or write to 1493 7th
Avenue West.
Victorian Order of Nurses
The ladies of the South Vancouver branch of the Victoria Order of
Xurscs had a busy time on Saturday
last during the elections when they
served light lunches and teas near the
'polling booth on Main Street and
25th Avenue. They were well patronized and as a result abeiut $50 has
been handed to the treasurer of the
Relief  fund.
The ladies of thc order desire to
take this opportunity of thanking
those who kindly sent in donations
suitable for the purpose and to all
who in anyway helped in this pl,-,n
of raising money for the relief of the
needy families and the destitute of
South Vancouver.
KENT & SON
SECONDHAND   STORE
Can  tiupply  your  needs  at  right
prices
COLLINGWOOD EAST
(Right  at  Station)
Hamilton  Bros.
Embalmers and Funeral
Directors
Parlon and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Office Phone:   FRASER 19
Residence Phone:    FRASER 2S
(Day or night)
Phone : Seymour 8425-8426
Western Plate Glass &
Importing   Co. Limited
Registered Office:
318 Water Street, Vancouver, B. C.
PLATE GLASS WINDOW GLASS
LEADED ART GLASS
Thorne   Metal   Store  Front   Bars,   Bevelling   and
Silvering, Store Fronts Glazed
ALL KINDS OF GLASS SATURDAY,   JANUARY   24,   1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
Hastings
and
Gore Ave.
EMPRESS
Lawrence & Sandusky, Lessees
Phone
Sey. 3907
Week of January 26
Matinees Wed. and Sat.
The  Del.  S.  Lawrence
Stock   Company
WITH
Miss
Maude  Leone
In   the  rousing  Western  conn dy-drama
TEXAS
Prices 25c and 50c
Matinees 25c Any Seat
THEATRICAL,
���Bt
the pi
prcvi
FAIRMONT THEATRE
18th and Main Street
SATURDAY'S MATINEE, 2 till S
"The House ol Features"
Week  of   January   26
7���ADAS   FAMILY���7
Including  the   Famous  Adas  Sisters
World's most  wonderful aerial
gmynasts
EARL  GIRDELLER
And his canine comedians
CHAS. B. LAWLER AND
DAUGHTERS
In   their   character   singing   novelty
"The   Sidewalks   of   New   York"
OTHER BIG S. & C. ACTS
Prices 15c 25c, 35c, and 50c
Two Shows Nightly, 7:30 and 9.15
Matinee daily 3 p.m.
PANTAGES
Unequalled       Vaudeville       Meini       P��nUf��.
Vaudeville
E. D. GRAHAM, Resident Man.
Phone Seymour 3046
Three times daily, 245. 7.20 and 9.15
Week   of   January   26
WALTER MONTAGUE
In     his     great    sensational     playlet,
"Twenty   Minutes  in   Chinatown"���
Depicting the famous Tong wars of
San Francisco.
THE UYENO JAPS
Eight Oriental wonder workers
Prices, Matineis,  15c; Night,  15 and
25c.   Box Seats, 50 cents
TEACHER
OF THE
Mr. JIM TAIT
VIOLIN and PIANOFORTE
Is prepared to receive a limited number of pupil*
and impart instruction al their homes  or at  his
STUDIO I
COLLINGWOOD EAST,  At B. C. Electric  Station
Empress Theatre
Lawrence   it   Sandusky  take  plcas-
ie- in announcing for production it
lie   EmpreSI Theatre  next week   that
tirring    anel     intensely     interesting
ly-drama "Texas."    It  will  take
e ..f D'Arcy of the Guards" i
ly announced, but which will
be   deterred  te. a later date.    "Texas
li a powerful tale of the Southwest,
full .,t the life anel color e,f the range
and if, the' Lawrence Players have-
already fully demonstrated their worth
iu plays of this character, the patr.,n.s
eef the Empress are certain oi an..titer
dramatic Feast.    The scenic staff e,f
the Lawrence Ceimpany have feer
lome time beet) working on tlle elaborate set-, any one uf which will tax
to   Its   capacity   the    Empreil   stage.
anil it can be lately asserted that the
stage settings will mark an epoch in
local itock productions both as regards beauty and realistic touch. The
many fascinating character studies
will lit well the abilities of thc Lawrence Flayers anil these, combined
with the charming love story told
and the frequent touches of invigorating comedy and tender pathos
will serve well to please tlle palates
of Empress patrons. Maude Leone
and Del Lawrence are particularly
well suited in their respective roles
and the entire company with some
additions, will be required for the
large cast.
"Within The Law," now nearing
the end of its week's run, has set a
Standard f'er Itock productions in this
city never before attained. The play
is richly deserving ol all the goenl
things said and written of it, and
Vancouver owes a debt eif gratitude
to Lawrence & Sandusky for being
permitted tei witness the wonderful
play at popular prices. The acting
of Maude I.e.me as Mary Turner, eef
Del Lawrence as Joe Garson, e,f Alt'
Layne as Inspector Burke, and Margaret Marriott as Aggie Lynch has
been bcyemd criticism, this extending also t,, the roles so ably handled
by Howard Russell. Louis Von
WicthofT, Edward Lawrence and
others in the long cast, even the so-
called "bits" being notable for their
clever presentation and all speaking
Volumes feir the able supervision of
Mr. Del Lawrence under whose personal direction the play was staged.
For the few remaining performances
including the Saturday matinee
the house has been practically
sold   out   and  intending   patrons   are
nard ami innumerable .ither- who will $1,800 per front foot. The property
be mentioned later. il now occupied by a temporary
Don't feirget the opening elate of Structure, which will be probably re-
each house, Monday matinee, Feb- placed by a large building although
ruary 2. and the quality .,i the shows Iili purpe se is not announced.
'hat   will  be  .-ecu  at   each  theatre ���    ��    ��
���    *    * Twenty year- age, this month, Van-
Dreamland Theatre comer   formed   the   first   unit   of  lhe
In   addition   to   the   usual   motion
picture attraction! there will be- gn ell
��� .n   Saturda)   the   -in i ial   li ature   --i
Tin   Charge of the  Light  Brigade-
founded on T. nn) lon'i p i m, includ-
N'eeribw est  ' irpheum
man instrumental in
shows   hreeught   here-.
DREAMLAND
H.  H.   DEAN,   Proprietor
COR. TWENTY-SIXTH AVENUE AND MAIN STREET
We change daily with a fresh feature each day.     We have installed a New Powers 6 A, the most perfect motion picture machine
made.
Come any night and see a NEW FEATURE on our NEW WTR-
ROROIDE curtain just imported.
MATINEE SATURDAYS AT 2p.m.
Cedar  Cottage   Theatre
"THE HOUSE THAT PLEASES"
20th Avenue and Commercial Street
SATURDAY MATINEE, 2 to 5
... We show the best, cleanest, and most up to date pictures with a
complete change daily.
COME AND SEE
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
Vancouver Breweries Limited
advised
or miss
season.
to  book  their  seats  at  once
the dramatic sensation of the
Orpheum Theatre
One week from Monday, February
2, the Orpheum Circuit show will be
seen at the New Orpheum Theatre
on Granville Sireet, ami the headline
attraction for that week will be none
other than the one and only Marie-
Lloyd, the idol of thc English music
halls. On thc same date the Sullivan & Considine shows, which are
now playing at the * Irpheum will be
transferred to the Imperial Theatre
on Main Street, and the headline attraction there will be the "King of
Slang," Hert Leslie (himself), and
Co., in the sketch, "Ilogan, the Paint
ing    -eellle
Mi  John W. Considine, head -if tin- Ithown to
'.'   Sullivan  St    Considine    Circuit    and
pn tident of thi
Circuit wai the
having   the   big
and   it   i-   to   Inin   that   tlie  people-   e.i i
Vancouver 'ewe their thanks.    He has
always   been   an   ardent   booster   for
this eilv anil premise.I Vane, .iiv e rile s
that   just   as   s.ion   as   lhe   time   was
ready 'bey would get the biggest and
best ihowl obtainable. There is
every  reason  to believe that the new
venture will be- a -ni-ccss ;oiel it is up
tee  the citizens  to  patronize  it.    Twu j
���hows daily will be given, ilu- matinee  commencing  at  2.30    and    tbe;
evening performance at K.15. Previous tei that, at each performance
the   augmented     orchestra     will     be
heard   in   a   fifteen-minute    concert,
The scale eef prices feer the matinee
will be entire lower Hour, 50c, entire balcony, 25c and gallery 15c.
Night prices, lower Hour. 75c, lirst
five rows in the balcony. 75c. remainder of balcony 50c and gallery
25c. Box seats and loges will be
$1.0(1 a piece at both afternoon and
evening performances. In addition
tee Marie Lloyd, whee should pack the
house to the doors, there will be a
first-class bill eif six stellar vaudeville-
acts and tin- usual motion picture -
and other features. The advance sale
for the opening week will commence
next Monday at 10 a.m. The- biggest stars, both European anil Anieri-i
can. will be seen at the Orpheum,
anil among them are: Fritizi Scheft,
"the little devil e.f grand opera," Sam
Bernard, late of "All for the- Ladies."
Blanch Hates, Blanch Walsh. Nance
O'Neill, Prank ECeenan, Eddie l-"y
land Family. Mr. and Mrs. Vernon
| Castle, considered the greatest society tango dancers of the dav; Lily
I.e na. Keshanara. He-sie- Clayton,
George Damerel, Fatlma and innumerable others all of the highest class.
Thc   Sullivan   &-  Considine  shows
that arc now playing at tlle Orpheum
will be transferred intact to the Imperial Theatre on Main Street. Here
three shows daily will be given. The
matinee will commence at 2.45 and
the night performances at 7.30 and
9.15. Thc prices will be 10 and 15c
for the matinees, and 15. 25 and 50c
feer the two night performances. The
"King of Slang," Hert Leslie, supported by his own company will headline in his latest sketch "Ilogan the
Painter," and he will be supported by
bill
the   finest   picture-
public.
Greater Vancouver News Items
Volunteer imeo destined tee eonsti-
iiit- tin- future Vancouver garr ion.
This crps was the pioneer of the
present   splendid   array   of   local   de-
. .     l". .r.'e s
*    *    *
lhe marriage of Mr Stephen Hurt
Johnson, oi Vancouver, t.. .Miss Edith
Margaret McRae of Newcastle, Eng,
t',..p  place  recently  at  tbe   Presby-
Mr I' I. McNeill, chartered accountant 'et Vancouvei hai been appointed auditor for the N'e.rth Arm
Fraser Commission A large num-
iber of applicants for the position .ef
I engineer has been received by the
I commis-i.mer, ami the .me selected
] will be announced at an early date.
��� ��    ��
Tlie Seeding Section e.f tlie Dominion Department of Agriculture announces that "now is the time for
farmers to consider the question of
a good seed grain supply for next
spring." As seed of stn.ng vitality
makes a good start, every farmer who
suspects the quality of his ieed, ii
invited to lend a sample to the 1J<.-
minion Government Seed Lavatory
for a germination test.
* *   *
At the  Hurnaby municipal elections
..ii Saturday last Mr. II. M. Eraser
polled 1087 ve.tes. Keevj D. C. Mc-j
Gregor 722. and Mr. A. V. C. Macpherson 417. Mr. Fraser vvas thus i
elected reeve for 1914 by a majority!
eef 365 votes. Only two members of,
last year's council were re-elected on
Saturday. Councillors FauVel and A.
Macdonald being the successful candidates,
*        e(.        *
The- Vancouver Musical Society is
now making arrangements feir the
great musical festival to be held in
���\pril.     Persons   in   South  Vancouver
School   Trustee   R.   H.   Neelands
terian manse. Nanaimo. 'llie bride
was attendeel by Miss McLennan,
while the groom was supported by
Mr. James Strachan, of Vancouver.
Mr   Stephen Johnson is a brother of
desiring  to become  members  will bc j \,it   (ja|es Johnson, of the "Chinook,"
welcomed.   The list will close at the South  Vancouver.
end of the month anil applicants must i
be prepared tei submit to a vocal test
which  is  held  at   thc  practice   room,
Aberdeen   School.      Burrard      Street.
Vancouver, on  Tuesday  evening.
The   secretary  of    the    Vancouver
Board of Trade has received two enquiries this week which may result in
new   industries  being  established   in
Greater Vancouver.    One is stated to
be from a  silk manufacturer and the
other   from   a   garment  manufacturer
in  Toronto.    It   is  understood    that
both firms would be likely to employ
a   large  number  of  hands     Th
quirics   are   now
from   Mr.   W.   A
the board.
South Vancouver Liberal  Club
The- Se.uth Van
members   held   a
a   first-clasi   bill.     At   the     Imperial.
Theatre some very iin,- bills will also I    in a garden in Shaughnessy Heights Liberal  gatherings   will  be   heli
he   seen   this   sea's,,,,   and   the   house!,his  week,  pansies.  daisies,  crocuses  South Vancouver when^ Mr.    H.
should be  full at  every  performance,  and snowdrops were to be seen, while
Among the acts    that    will    appear [some "i tbe hardier varieties of roses
were in bloom. This seems to promise an early spring in Greater Vancouver if we are to believe our eyes
and if, peradventure, the shrubs mentioned wcre not transplanted from a
greenhouse.
there in the near future arc : Tim
McMahon and Edythe Chapelb- in
"Why Hubby Miss id the Train." "The
Top of tlie World Dancers," a big
musical comedy with tlle famous collie dig ballet "I've Got It." "Fve-ry-
boily's Doinc It." The Evelyn Nes-
bitt Thaw Tango dancers, who will
give free tango bsse,is every morning; the Re ss iw Midgets. "A Romance of thc Underworld," Dick Ber-
ntver Liberal Club
meeting   in    their
rooms  at  4.V.2  Main  Street  <>n  Tttes-
elay evening, when Mr. G. G. McGeer
presided      Several   mailer-   came   up
for consideration, NKssrs S.  F.  Henderson,   II.   Kay.   A.   F.   Chamberlain,
II   Dolan, Mr  Fredrickson and others;
taking   part   '.a   the   discussion.     The
matter e.f the incorporation    of    the
club  uneler   the  bei,eve,lent   societies
act   was   left   over   two   months,   the
receivini     attention   presi,but   stating  that  it  might  he  as
Blair,   secretary   of I well   to   incorporate   under   the   stock
companies act.
*   * It  was announced that  a series ',f
1.1   in
C.
Brewster,  Mr. M. A, Macdonald ami
other   Liberal   leaelers   have   returned
from   the   Upper   Country.
It was decided to continue the
monthly smoking concerts, and on
Friday evening. January 23. a checker
tournament will be held in the club
re,i.iiis. The nexl smoking concert
will be hehl ,-n February 19. Arrangements for a picnic were left in
the ham's of a committee which will
arrange with other clubs in Richmond
municipality ior tin- charter of a boat.
It vva- decided also to have a irec
family concert at an early date, which
will bc dulv announced.
A fifty-foot frontage on Main Sireet
near Harris Street. Vancouver, was
sold last week for $90,000 to Mr. Geo.
H.   Harris.    The  price  works   out  at
Municipal Meetings
The elates of South Vancouver
municipal committee and council
meetings have been  fixed as follows :
Committee meeting,���February 3
and 17. March 3 an,', 17. April 1 and
15. Mav 5 ami 1?. June 2 and 16, July
1 and 15. i ictober 2 ami 16. November 3 and 17. December 1 anil 15.
Januarj 5. 1015. Police committee
meets at 9.30 a.m. wiih health committee following. Board of works
meets ai 2 o'clock, followed by lire,
w.iH-r and light committee.
Council meetings���February 5 and
!<'. March 5 and lo. April 3 and 17,
May 7 and IS. June 4 ami 18. July 3
and 17. August o and 2o. September
3 and 17. Oct.,ber 5 and 19, November 5 and i'i. December 3 an,I 17,
January 7. 1915, Finance committee
meets al 030 o'clock oNi mornings of
the council. Regular meetings of the
council will be hehl at 7 p'clock in thc
evening.
REEVE DICKIE NOW PILOT
l Continued from  Page 11
Daisy D'Avra, at the Empress Theatre
jority eef 92. In the curse of the
evening Mr. Gold made a characteristic speech to an interested audience
in which lie outlined the policy he
would pursue in the council in the
best interests e.f the ratepayers of
South   Vancouver.
In Ward Six. Mr. J. W., Rowling
won out by a margin of 15 over his
competitor. ex-Councillor Millar. It
will be seen that Mr. Millar made a
good fight for a renewal of confidence
of the ratepayers. In Ward Seven
Mr. W. Twiddy obtained a majority
eif 38 over Mr. W. J. Allen, who was
somewhat handicapped by entering
the field late in the day.
While the interest in the election
of school trustees was not so apparent as in the municipal contest, voting was heavy, Mr. R. H. Neelands
heading the poll with the total of
2626. Mr. C. M. Whelpton and Mr.
J. C. Hudson were the other two candidates elected, the former being an
old and experienced trustee and the
latter a late arrival in the scholastic
arena.
NUNN, THOMSON & CLEGG
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS   AND
EMBALMERS
Day  or   Night  Phone,   Sey.  7653
520 Richards St., Vancouver, B.C. FOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   24,    1914
^Puve.CHINOCXC
P'JSLISHSD
Every  S.lurel.y  by  the  Greater  V��nceu��er  PuhlUkeu  Limited
HEAD  OFFICE :
Corner Thirtieth   Atciujc   and   Main   Street,   Soeath  Vaucuoer,   B. C
Q-or��e   M    Murray.   Preiiden      nd   Managing   Director.
Herbert A.  Stein.  Viee-Preaid   .i and  Managing Editor.
John Jackaon,  Buatncea Manager.
TELEPHONE : Ail   department. Fairmont   II7<
NIOHT   CALLS    Fairmont   1948L
COLLINGWOOD   OFFICE Collingwood   S5L
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
To aii  pointi  in  Canada.  United   Kir.ijiiom,   Nmieiandland,   Nee>
Zealand, and other Britiak Poaaaaaiou :
One    It ear     H.H
Six  Montha     l.M
Three   Montha    51
Poatage to American. European and other Foreign Cuakriei, ft.lu
peer year extra.
"The truth at all times firmly stands
And   shall  from  age to age endure."
THE NEW COUNCIL
BY the election of Mr. Thomas Dickie as reeve of
the new council by a majority of 866, the voters
of South Vancouver endorsed in no uncertain voice his
candidature for the office. In every polling station
except one Mr. Dickie secured a majority over Mr.
J. A. Kerr, the runner-up. Mr. J. C. McArthur, although at the bottom of the poll made a respectable
showing, beating both of the other candidates in the
Collingwood station.
In Reeve Dickie, the ratepayers of South Vancouver have secured a man of acknowledged probity and
business capacity. In accepting the position he has
been unquestionably influenced by high motives of
public duty alone. He will be at the head of a council largely in expressed sympathy with his views on
municipal conditions, and the ratepayers of South
Vancouver will unite in hoping that the municipality
will steadily progress under the new regime.
Perhaps thc most outstanding feature in the whole
elections was the increased and earnest interest taken
in the campaign by the ratepayers of South Vancouver. Never in thc history of the municipality has so
wide and intelligent an interest been shown by all
classes in civic affairs. The ratepayers have been
aroused from the apathy or indifference of past years.
The result on Saturday was the heaviest polling that
has ever been recorded in South Vancouver, if not
in any other municipality of Greater Vancouver.
This is highly creditable to the electors of so large
and scattered a district and is of good augury for thc
future good government of the municipality.
There is a widespread feeling in South Vancouver
that private feeling of rancor or disappointment should
now be buried, and the new reeve and councillors accorded the good will of ratepayers in the future management of civic business. It remains for the new
council to justify the confidence of the electors.
THE TEMPERING OF JUSTICE
IN New York and other states of the Union, in Great
Britain as well as other countries, juvenile courts
have been established with the approval of the majority of law abiding citizens. All over the English
speaking world there is a growing disposition to
temper justice with mercy, especially to young offenders.
It is not creditable to the humanity of British Columbia as a country of advanced civilization, that this
spirit of enlightened consideration of first offences, or
of youthful culprits, does not seem to have yet entered into the administration of the law in provincial
courts.
Here is the case of Ernest Morris, the 17-year-old
youth, recently accused at Xew Westminster
of rioting, intimidation and unlawful assembly,
during the Nanaimo strike. All the powerful machinery of the crown prosecution was brought to bear
iu the attempt to find the boy guilty of these heinous
crimes. For he is only a boy. Asked by counsel if
he knew "the two men" who were with him during
the riots, Morris replied, "Yes, I know the name of
one of them���a boy like myself, about 16 years of
age."
After the case had dragged along for weeks. After
the boy had been put to the most trying and exhaustive examination and cross-examination by eminent
members of the bar of British Columbia. After
crowded courts had daily gazed upon the sufferings
or unfortunate position of the b'oy. And after a high
impeachment of attempted murder, rioting and intimidation, the jury finally found him guilty on the
lesser count of the indictment���"unlawful assembly."
It is not necessary here to go into the merits or
justice of the prosecution. But in the name of all that
is humane and sympathetic in the higher administration of the law, was not this a case for a juvenile
court? All the ends of justice, if tempered with the
toleration or consideration that the wrong-doing of
boys should enlist, could have been met without all
this parade of public persecution.
e rss\^4���
NON-REPRESENTA TION
THE rumor is abroad that Mr. Carter-Cotton, provincial member for Richmond constituency is
likely to be appointed minister of finance in the Mc-
Bride-Bowser government. The statement made to
that effect recently has not been officially confirmed,
nor has it been denied at the time of writing.
As one of the leading lights of the "conspiracy of
silence" which the premier and the attorney-general
has evidently enforced among the "automatons" of
their polished brigade, Mr. Carter-Cotton may be ai-
deserving as any other member of the reward the
promotion indicates. In financial ability it is also
quite possible that he is the most fitting man available
for the job.
Smith Vancouver, however, will be chiefly inter-
?sted in the political contest that will be necessary in
Richmond constituency should its representative sttc-
oeed the present minister of finance. South Vancouver will have considerable voice in Mr. Carter-Cotton's re-election or rejection. And it may well be
doubted whether the electors of this district will mark
its approval of his persistent neglect of the best interests of South Vancouver,
Whether the proposed change in finance administration takes place or not, it is high time that this
municipality was adequately represented at Victoria.
On this point, Mr. M. A. Macdonald spoke at the
recent South Vancouver Liberal Club meeting with
particular emphasis. It was an intolerable condition,
said Mr. Macdonald, that South Vancouver should
have no representation, and he asked that an "insistent clamour" should be made by its residents until
its just demands are conceded.
MAIL    CARRIERS    AND     THE    OFFICIAL
ECONOMISTS
IT may be confidently stated that the sympathy of
the public in Greater Vancouver is entirely with
the mail-carriers in the "walking stunt" forced upon
them. At the best of times it is always a diff-
matter for the ordinary pe- 1 U work up any sympathy with governments or corporations. It is not the
Irishman alone who is so often "agin the government," we are all too prone to blame the political or
civic body or the corporation when we don't know
precisely whom to slate.
Both the Dominion government and the B. C. E. R.
are, therefore, more or less impartially criticised for
the predicament that has recently faced the mail-carriers. This predicament moreover, has touched the
public upon a sore and personal point, lieing, also
more or less, selfish in their outlook, the public sympathy with the letter-carriers is intensified by the delay caused in delivery through the forced walking
exercise imposed upon these necessary servants of
the state.
In this particular case, however, there appears to
be quite reasonable grounds for blaming our Dominion government. These high and mighty officials at
Ottawa appear to have entered upon a great campaign of retrenchment and reform���in little things.
A grant of 35 or 50 millions for Dreadnoughts or railway exploiters is lightly considered. But the saving
of a few hundreds or thousands of dollars in a public
service is considered a high stroke of financial economy.
Coming down to brass tacks, the facts appear to
be that about ten years ago the Dominion government entered into a contract with the B. C. E. R. to
pay $35 a year for each mail carrier using the company's cars. Since then the extent of the lineage of
thc B. C. E. R .has immensely increased, population
has grown, new districts have been opened up, so that
the mail-carriers are conveyed greatly increased distances. The company, therefore, demanded $50 a head
for the service, the same rate that apparently is now
paid by the government to similar street railways in
eastern cities such as Toronto, Hamilton and Ottawa.
The government, intent upon their great policy of retrenchment have endeavored to split the difference and
offered the B. C. E. R. $40 per carrier.
So the matter stands at the time of writing, although there are rumors of an early adjustment of
the difficulty. It appears to us, however, that considering the higher cost of operating street railways in
B. C. than in the "cent region," it is not unreasonable
for the II. C, E. R. to ask for as much for the Vancouver mail-carrier as is paid in Ontario.
The Canadian branch of thc bull moose family
is in the saddle in Smith I 'ancouver.
D
BY THE WAY
M
NOW THAT THE council meetings will be held at
seven in the evening, it will soon be found necessary
to make extensive additions to the municipal chamber.
Iti
VOL' CAN LEAD a horse to water, but he'll vote
as he darn pleases.
* ��   ��
IT WAS A GAME of fox-and-the-goose in Ward
Five.
* *    ��
IT MAY BE TAKEN that the 1190 votes secured
by Mr. J. C. McArthur was the expression of confidence of Mr. McArthur's personal friends and acquaintances. Mr. McArthur may, therefore, congratulate himself. During the campaign he suffered a
breakdown in health, in spite of which he made a remarkable showing. Mr. McArthur led the fight
against incorporation. He will see many of his policies carried out by the new administration without
having to suffer the viccissitttdes of fortune which
he would meet, had he himself to preside over the
council of 1914.
w   ��   ��
MR. ROBERT McBRIDE has a new    idea.      lie
would incorporate Ebume as a city annexed to which
would be all of South Vancouver's waterfrontage.
��    I    ��
HAD MR. GOLD RUN for the School Board, Mr.
Robert McBride says he would not have supported
him.
* *    *
THOUGH DEFEATED, Col. F. Way will still have
one solace. He is still a member of the executive of
the Voters' League.
I   *>   at
WHERE DID COLONEL RAYNER    escape   to?
"The paths of glory lead but to the grave."
Ill
AT A MEETING of outside paving promoters on the
morning after the election, a resolution of a renewal
of confidence in South Vancouver was unanimously
passed.
��    *    ��
EX-COUNCILLOR MILLAR stated on the hustings that he supported the Sunday closing bylaw with
a view of driving the Greek merchants in South Vancouver out of competition with the Canadian store
keepers. "Beware of the Greeks when they approach
you bearing gifts."
��    *    *
THH VOTERS' LEAGUE members are planning
the coronation of the man from Ward Five. Edward
\ III will be the title.
��� *    ��
"M'AED BY COUNCILLOR GOLD, seconded by
Councillor Thomas, and resolved that all municipal
automobiles be adorned with the name of the municipality of South Vancouver, letters to be four inches
long."���Thc third resolution to be passed by the council for 1914.
Ill
COUNCILLOR WINRAM likes to see a ballot marked with a good big black X. The delicate little feminine cross doesn't look good to thc No. 1 hard element
of the new council.
I   s   ���
OVERHEARD-AT THE Municipal Hall���"A-h-h.
there is nae true (loot aboot it, but the people of South
Vancouver were sair tired and discouraged and disgusted wi the way Reeve Kerr and his councillors
handled the affairs during the past year. And Councillor  , we will have good government the noo."
Ill
"BLESSED IS HE who has found his work."
��� *   ��
EVERY LITTLE VOTER has a mind all his own.
Ill
IX BURNABYi it was a sort of a three-cornered
fight of the clans. The Laird of Glen Lyon fell before the Chief of the Frasers. "The" Macpherson
still lurks in his native glens.
|ll
MR. MAXWELL SMITH at the recent South Vancouver Liberal Club meeting told a story which if not
new to some, may appear true to others. He related
that a temperance lecturer in Ontario desiring to demonstrate the evil effects of alcohol, produced a bottle
of whiskey into which hc dropped an angle worm
which immediately curled up and died. "What brand
of whiskey is that?" enquired an old Scotsman in the
audience. "John Jamieson," replied the lecturer.
"Och, that would suit mc fine," said the Scotsman;
"I'm terribly bothered with worms myself."
Ill
AS MR. G. G. McGEER said at thc recent Libera!
Club social, notwithstanding the "great gladitorial
civic contest" going on that night elsewhere, the hall
was crowded. Many preferred the eloquence and harmony likely to prevail there than characterized some
of the other gatherings referred to.
��� ��    ��
MR. M. A. MACDONALD is apt at metaphor and
humorous allusion. But he did not think that the
compari-son someone made of certain obsequious members of thc McBride government to "rubber stamps"
was quite appropriate. A rubber stamp makes at
least some mark, wdiile the members referred to make
none at all.
nil
A CABLE FROM the Old Country this week says
that at a John Burns' meeting in London, three male
champions of the cause, strapped to seats, tried to
howl down the Liberal speaker. This is a new method
of heckling which was fortunately only discovered
after the South Vancouver civic elections were over.
THE HIGH-GRADER'S CORNER
"BOOSTING" AND "KNOCKING"
MR. M. A. MACDONALD. who is president of,
the British Columbia Liberal Association, made
a suggestive reference to the popular misuse of the
terms "boosting and knocking," in his recent speech
at South Vancouver Liberal Club. He expressed the
opinion that he did not care for cither term and that
their misapplication was a common mistake.
He pointed out, in effect, that while the "boosting"
spirit was dominant a few years ago, the government
at Victoria was quietly placing itself in an almost impregnable position of autocratic power. And he suggested that it was better to face conditions, study the
political problems of the day and work for the recovery of prosperity.
* ne common mistake made when any criticism is
offered in the interests of progress is that it is indis-
-riminately branded as "knocking." There seems to
be to many people have no alternative to "knocking"
Hut "boosting." The optimists are the "boosters"
md the pessimists are the "knockers."
While optimism is a fine spirit, it is not always best
expressed in ill-considered "boosting," nor is "boosting" the wisest condition of mind for the consideration of public affairs. As Mr. Macdonald remarked
at the meeting referred to, while nearly every one was
loudly "boosting" the immense resources of the province a few years ago, little or no attention was paid
to the political government of the province.
The Thaw Case Still Going Strong
Pittsburg Gazette-Times
Judge Aldrich, at Concord, N.M., has decided that
the mental condition of Harry Thaw must be determined in the Federal courts.    Maybe this won't be
such a hard winter for alienists, after all.
*    I    *
One  Difficulty   With   An   Automobile
Lethbridge 1 lerald
A chaffeur who tried to embrace a girl and run
his car at the same time wrecked his car.    You must
pardon old Dobbin if he indulges in a horse laugh.
��   W   I
One Sort of Equal Suffrage
Edmonton  Journal
Equal suffrage prevails in Mexico to a large extent.
The women are not permitted to vote and the men art-
afraid to.
Ill
A Baby and thc Furniture
Boston Transcript
Says the Aatchison Globe:   "A baby is about the
only new thing a man can get in his house that will
not make the rest of his furniture look shabby."    It
is very clear that the man who wrote this never had
a good, healthy baby in his house.
I    ��    I
The Divorce Question
Dttluth Herald
Eighty-three  divorces  were  granted  in  Christmas
week in Kansas City.   It would be kind of interesting
to know who did the part of Santa Claus for the
children involved.
Ill
They Say
Monetary Times
If we write of quiet times, they say we are pessimistic, and if a bright picture is painted we "do not
see the dark spots."   If we criticise a Tory government, we are hopeless Grits, and if a Grit government
gets a critical word they say we are dyed-in-the-wool
Tories.   When we support the banks they say we are
"an organ," but when the banks are asked to effect a
reform they say we are the "friend of the people."
*    ��    *
Ilallcy's Comet Queered the Business
Victoria Colonist
Another  comet   is  reported  headed  this  way,  but
somehow that Hailey thing's failure to put the world
���en the blink seems to have taken away thc bulk of Unpopular interest in such affairs.
1*1
An Expensive Welsh Rabbit
Toronto Star
A cheese factory has been burned near Perth.    It
seems an extravagant way to make a Welsh rabbit.
II*
Harry Lauder for the Pulpit
Hamilton Times
The invitations to Harry Lauder to occupy pulpits
in United States and Canadian cities are interesting
in  the possibilities they  suggest.    The tendency  towards sensationalism in preaching may extend until
demands are made for sermons from actors and actresses who have reached the stage througii notoriety,
to thc disgust of the genuine footlight folks.   What a
fine story of life could be told from the pulpit by a
principal in a celebrated murder case, for example!
What a lesson it would be for a congregation of worshippers!   There would be enough slush and mush to
fill a whole page of a newspaper.
Ill
Canada Produces No Lemons
Calgary Herald
California boasts of its sun-kissed oranges and Canada of its son-kissed peaches.
Ill
Domestic Troubles of Operatic Stars
Chicago Tribune
Another famous opera singer is seeking a divorce.
If opera singers didn't have to practise so much at
home they would enjoy more of married bliss than
is their customary portion.
���H SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   24,    1914
THERE IS A CERTAIN  SERVICE THAT EVERYONE  IS
ENTITLED TO
WE   RENDER  THE   BEST
There are certain methodi tome undertakers have eef doing business, hut our methods are different. We believe that everyone ihould
ku'iw ai te' li-ew Inexpensively ii funeral can be famished and for that
reason we don'l hesitate to tell ymi
FROM S55.00 UP
We guarantee tbe service and tf""iK
Mt. Pleasant Undertaking Company
Corner Eighth Avenue and Main. Phone Fairmont  185
COMMODIOUS CHAPEL FREE
Owing tu thc mistake of the Telephone Company in nut getting
our name changed it will be found as Centre & Hanna, Mount
Pleasant Branch.
MILK THAT STANDS THE TEST
Vint are not getting the best  Milk if you arc not securing yuur
supply from the
SOUTH VANCOUVER MILK CO.
29th and FRASER STREET
REFERENCES:
Vancouver City Milk Inspector.
Dr. Giles Murphy, South Vancouver Medical Health Inspector.
Phone Fairmont 1602 L
29th Ave. and Fraser St.
TABLE AND WHIPPING
CREAM
BUY YOUR
BUILDING LUMBER
FROM
South Vancouver Lumber Co.
(Manufacturers).
ALL KINDS OF KILN DRIED LUMBER, MOULDINGS AND
FINISH.
Mill and Office : Foot of Ontario Street, on Fraser River
Phone Fraser 94 W. R. Dick, Proprietor
B. C. EQUIPMENT CO.
MACHINERY DEALERS
CONCRETE MIXERS. STEEL CARS, ROCK CRUSHERS, ELECTRIC, STEAM,
AND   GASOLINE   HOISTS.        WHEELBARROWS,   TRANSMISSION
MACHINERY,   GASOLINE   ENGINES,   PUMPS,   AND
ROAD MACHINERY
Offices:  606-607  Bank of Ottawa Bide.    Phone Sey. 9040 (Exchmje to ill Departmer.li)
We make and guarantee all our typewriter ribbons. "MAPLE
LEAF" ribbons are manufactured from the finest texture ami best
grade ink procurable. We have a complete stock of ribbons for all
makes of typewriters.
$1.00 each,  delivered and  correctly placed on  machine.
$4.50 iii books of hall dozen coupons.
Try a "MAPLE LEAF" next time. Phones Sey. 6714 or 6715.
United Typewriter Company Ltd.
UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITERS
579 RICHARDS STREET VANCOUVER,  B.C.
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
1949 ALBERT ST. PHONE :  HIGHLAND  530R
ENGINEERS. MACHINISTS AND  FOUNDERS
IRON AND  BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND  SPECIALS
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
What Book is More Used Than The
Telephone  Directory ?
Advertising space is valuable, because the book is in use
by everybody, on duty constantly, every day in the year.
It ia the only medium that cannot be read at one sitting
and then laid aside and forgotten.
The Telephone and the Directory never part company.
Side by side with the means of advertising, it is the means
of making the sale.
Do you not think it should have your careful consideration?
For Rates and Information Telephone
ADVERTISING  DEPARTMENT
Seymour 6070
British Columbia Telephone
COMPANY, LIMITED
^THIJ IS AN010 ONE BUT-
Better Way
"If I had a gun I'd tell that big
mutt what I think oi him. I'm a
littb man. hut a revolver is an equalizer."
"Tell him on the telephone. That's
just as goeed as an equalizer."
* ���    ��
Still on Guard
"The agricultural department now
say* the creiw is the fanner's friend."
"Uin," grunted  Partner WhifTIetree.
"Won't that alter your attitude toward  him?"
"Neit a bit. I've got a lot of friends
that  I'm suspicious of."
* *    *
His  Little  Joke
Wife (with newspaper^���What
next! Here's a woman mate of a
ship.    Fancy a  woman  sailor.
Hub���That's nothing. Wasn't Lot's
wife a female salt?
* *    *
Smile for Every Cackle
The Brahma. Say, ain't you overdoing this business a little? Mere
yem keep right on laying as if your
life depended on it. Can't you take
a  rest?
The Plymouth Rock, coquettishly:
I guess you never had a man smile
on you the way my boss smiles
every  time  I  cackle!
et        ���        *
Giving Him a Hint
"John, did you read about this Denver millionaire giving his wife a diamond  tiara?"
"No."
"It's in all the papers. Why don't
you keep posted on  current  events?"
* *    *
Temperament
"Why did the great pianist refuse
to  play?"
"Temperament. He got mad because his name was printed in smaller
type on the programme than the
name of the piano on which hc was
to  perform."
* *        He
Captured
"Isn't that a beautiful island in the
foreground?"
"Entrancing! . That's called the
Isle of  Yew."
"Why, .Mr. Montague? This is so
sudden!"
* *    *
Dad is the Goat
"Everybody in our family's some
kind of an animal," said Hobby to the
amazed lady visitor. "What nonsense!" she exclaimed. "Well," replied Hobby, "mother's a dear, my
baby sister is mother's little lamb,
I'm the kid, and dad's the goat."
Works Two Ways
My wife has a calendar of menus
for   1914."
"I've seen them. They are (|tiit(
useful. Save a woman the trouble
nf thinking what to cook every day '
"Yes; and a man ean look ahead
over   the   schedule   and   pick   out   thi
Keiod  days to dine downtown."
��� ��    ���
The Child in the House
"Tell   me,  dear,   is   it   became  you
think  mc very  pretty  that  you  look
at me all the time?"
"Oh,   no,   it   isn't   that;   but   papa
says you arc a two-faced woman, and
so I am searching for thc other one!"
��� *    *
Moving V.?rse
"Only the other day I read a poem
that tnoved me to tears."
"How did it move you so?"
I   wept  because   I   couldn't  get  at
the author."
��    *    ��
Where He Obtained Knowledge
"I  don't sec any sense in referring
to the wisdom of Solomon," said the
man  smartly.    "He had  1,000 wives,"
"Yes," answered the woman tartly,
"he learned  his wisdom  from  them."
* *    ��
Innocent Bystander
"What's the matter with your eye,
Mike?"
"Sure, it is black!"
"It  certainly is black."
"Well,   1   saw   an   altercation   between  man  and  wife  yesterday,"
"And did you mix up in it?"
"I did not.    I vvas only an innocent
bystander."
* e(r        *
Popularity  Explained
"What is your boy's favorite branch
of study?"
"I asked him yesterday. He said
"anthropology," replied the patient
parent."
"Why, they don't teach that in his
school."
"Well, maybe the reason he likes
it is that isn't bothered by it."
ef        *        *
Art of Driving
Son (a golf enthusiast)���You must
acknowledge, father, that it requires
a great deal of skill to drive a ball
a  hundred  yards.
Old farmer���Shucks! It don't re-
i|ttirc half as much skill as it does to
drive a pig 50 feet.
Sr    *     *
Exigency
"What  are  you   rummaging    over
there?"
"Some old cook books and tlie like."
"What are' you  hunting  for?"
"I'm trying to find some recipe for
tnaking  eggneeg out  of  grape  juice."
NOTES OF INTEREST TO THE
LADY OF THE HOUSE
Fashion and Tablecloths
Once upon a lime tlle briele came
tee her new home with a chest of no
mean size fully stocked with linen
leer her table. This linen was supposed to last not only i'm bride's time
Imt that of her children. The extravagant fashion of changing table
linen so radically that what was in
good taste and style a year or two
ago is no longer so today, had not
then entered into the head of the
yelling housekeeper. Hut tlle housekeeper is not to blame���business and
trade are at the back of all these
changes quite as much as they are
the ca.use of all the rapidly changing
fashions in dress. But it will bc a
combination of housekeepers that will
stop the riot of fashion and the wholly needless expenditure of money that
these foolish and ridiculous changes
of fashion necessitate. There will
surely come a time when women will
cease to heed the ephemeral fashion's
demands, and calmly go on their way,
serving their dining table with its
line damask cloth and napkins to
match���and their luncheon anil breakfast tables wilh Iheir daintily embroidered linen doillies and centrepieces. They will only smile when
fashion lays it down that point de
Venise lace and Venetian embroidery are essential decorations of the
tablecloth that adorns the dining
table. Their one care will be to have
their own tablecloths, doillies, etc.,
immaculately laundered, and their
china, glass and silver, of a goodly
lustre and sheen, and then with a
few flowers, they will have a table
tit for a king to sit down to.
Hut the woman who is adept at her
needle may furnish her table with
many of the new fashions without
extravagance and folly. For example,
there is a fad today of embroidering
breakfast and luncheon cloths to
match the china used for these meals.
Some of thc bright flowered English
or Copenhagen porcelain sets suggest an appropriate embroidery design, while china decorated in prim
geometrical fashion will serve as a
model for the w*oman who knews how
to do her own drawing and standing.
An expert needle woman is not required for this type of embroidery,
and an amateur will have no trouble
in working either a square or a round
cloth, and small napkins to match, as
the design is usually so big and showy
that the embroidery grows with encouraging rapidity.
*    ��    *
Pouch Bags the Thing
If you see a fashionably dressed
woman on the streets today you see
a moire pouch bag hanging by a strap
and swish a tassel on the end. It is
ubiquitous and seems for a time to
have banished from the face of fash
ion the former leather bag. Most of
these bags' contain a pocket for the
tiny hand glass, and you see all manner of fancies for livening up the outside. One exquisite little thing seen
the other day had a dainty watch inset in  the  centre of the outside, and
still others have medallions placed
right beneath the strap. Although
these punch bags are generally si-i-n
in black moire there are sune examples in white and ecru.
For matinees and those times when
fashion demands elaborate afternoon
costumes there are beautiful bags
made of rare bits of brocade and
mounted  on  antique  gold   frames.
For use with the trotter ci.stumc
there are square leather bags which
resemble the pouch bag iu their general lines, although they arc as flat
as the envelope purse. The best of
these bags arc made up in pin seal
and in the lower right-hand corner
have a small watch set iu the leather. A severely plain monogram is
the only decoration used on these
bags. The handles are flexible
stitched leather.
Today the fashionably dressed woman requires several bags. Even if
she does not attempt to match them
to her costumes, she must have an
entirely different type of bag for
for morning, afternoon and evening.
*     Sr     *
Eggs a la Quebec���Cut an onion
into fine dice, fry lightly in a tablespoon of butter, then dash in a teaspoon of vinegar. Butter a shallow
dish and strew thc onion in it. Break
five eggs into it, being careful not to
break the yolks. Bake in a hot oven
until thc whites are set. Dust on
salt and white pepper and sprinkle
with coarse bread crumbs fried brown
in butter. Garnish with parsley and
serve in sauce dish.
ITEMS OF LOCAL INTEREST
The last official meeting of the old
council of South Vancouver was held
last Friday when there was a general  winding up of business.
��� *   *
Among other business transacted
by the South Vancouver Council last
Friday week the municipal engineer
was instructed to order the Dominion
Creosoting Company to proceed
with the grading required on sections
one and two of the Main Street paving contract and thc draining, grading and curbing on sections three and
four.
��    *    *
On Sunday evening, January 18,
and during the week evangelistic services have been held in the South Hill
Baptist Church, South Vancouver.
Among those who addressed the
meetings were Rev. Declaybrook, a
converted Maori prince; Rev. A. A.
McLeod, a missionary in India, and
Rev. F. G. West, of London, a missionary to Africa.
* *    ��
A series of public lectures have
been arranged to be given in St.
Mark's Hall, corner of Larch Street
and Second Avenue, Vancouver, under the auspices of the Women's
Guild,  on  the  following  dates:    On
LOT NEAR CAR
$550���Easy Terms
This lot is situated on 56th Avenue,
close to Victoria Road, which now
has a HI minute car service. This it
the best buy in this district. Let us
show you it at your convenience. We
can arrange very  easy  terms.
The  Yorkshire  Guarantee
&  Securities Corporation Limited
440 Seymour Street
Phones: 6188 and 6189   R. Kerr Houlgate, Manager
Bulbs-Bulbs-Bulbs
We have just received three car loads of Bulbs. Now
is your time to buy your Bulbs for fall planting or
Christmas bloom. The best selection in town to choose
from.    Prices the lowest.
BROWN BROS. & CO. LTD.
FLOWSTS, NURSERYMEN AND SEEDSMEN
THREE STORES :
48 Hastinga Street E., Phone Seymour 988
401 Granville Street, Phone Seymour 5727
782 Granville Street, Phone Seymour 9513
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to date Train Service  Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
M
J. MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MlLLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE,  Gen. Pass Agent,  Vancouver.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Linea
H. G. Smith, C. P. ft T. A.
Phone :   Sty.     134
W. E. Duperow, O. A. P. D
127 Granville Street
HOCKEY
At Vancouver
Victoria vs. Vancouver
JANUARY 27, at 8.30 p.m.
Entire  Gallery, 50 cents.    Reserve  scats,  $1.00.    Promenade,  $1.25
Box Seats, $1.50
Gladstone Hotel
First Class Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
H. G. BROWN, Proprietor
January 31, Mr. William Burns, B.A.,
will lecture on "The Influence of Literature on Life." On February 14
Professor Hill-Tout, M.A., will give
an address on "Modern World Conditions." Judge Howay will speak
on "The Oregon Dispute," on February 28. "Pioneer Explorers in B.
C." will be the subject on March 14
by   Rev.   Principal   Seagcr,   M.A.
In connection with the Gamwell
fire alarm system which has been ordered to be installed in South Vancouver, the old council at its" last
feieeting  authorized   the    fixing    of
wires for a police telephone call system.
��� *    *
Mr. Robert McBride, an old Eburne
resident, is now advocating the incorporation of Eburne and district
as a city, separate from the municipality of Point Grey. He also proposes that the adjacent waterfront
district in South Vancouver "be taken in," so as to facilitate harbor development.
* *    *
The Provincial Progress Club will
give a concert and dafice at the Pender Hall, Vancouver on Monday
evening, January 26, at 8 p.m. SATURDAY,   JANUARY   24,   1914
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SEVEN
IT WILL PAY YOU TO SEE OUR SHOWING FOR FALL
PRICES THAT CANNOT BE BEATEN
OR REPEATED IN THE CITY    -.:     :;
Family Shoe Store
(No. 2)
CEDAR COTTAGE
Grandview Car Tertpinue
vANNESS AVENUE
Store No. 1
at   823 GRANVILLE STREET
Vancouver. B. C.
FRANK NEWTON
South Vancouver Builders' Supply Company
Dealers in Sar.-i, Gravel, Fibre, Cement, Lime, Plaster, Vitrified
Pipe, Tile, Fire-clay, Lath, and Brick of all kinds.
Offices :  51st Avenue and Fraser Street.    Phone : Fraser 36.
Main and 29th Avenue.    Thone :  Fairmont 1940.
Fraser Street and North Arm of Fraser River.   Phone : Fraaer 84.
Collingwood   East,   Phone :   Collingwood 33.
Coal orders taken at all offices and delivered to all parts of South
Vancouver.
Phone Collingwood 24
P. O. Box 32
W. H. BRETT & CO.
Successors to Fletcher Sc Brett
REAL ESTATE
LOANS,  INSURANCE, ETC.
Notary Public
Dominion Express Money  Orders Issued
JOYCE ROAD, COLLINGWOOD EAST
VITRIFIED SEWER  PIPE AND
ALL FITTINGS
C. Gardiner - Johnson & Company
Johnson's Wharf
Phone : Sey. 914S
"Snow is Coming"���Buy Your
STOVE WOOD
$3.00 Per Load
WE SELL VANCOUVER ISLAND CO A.L
COAST LUMBER & FUEL
COMPANY  LIMITED
4905 Ontario Street, Cor. Bodwell (34th Avenue)
Phone :   Fraser 41 Phone: Highland 226
OUR   SATURDAY   SHORT   STORY
A TRAGEDY DEFERRED
By Francis Perrj  Elliott
i.
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
SOLE AGENTS FOR B. C.
Tlie- girlish figure seemed to shrink.
"Is this the end?" she whispered fal-
leringly.
11 i ^ glance swept her coldly, "The
end," he laid .-lie.nly . "Be glad it is
lie,     WOI
"Worse!" Her eyes widened. "Oh,
j Hurry, my liiis'e;iii<l, could anything
I be   worse   than   t'e   have  yeeu   cast   me
out of your Ufe?" Her hands reach-
id toward him with a gesture timid,
. pathetic.
The man Crowned, turning from
I hcr with S slirujj. "It might hc worse,
I tell you!" hc cut sharply over his
shoulder. Then lie halted In his
I stride, and though hc did not turn,
ihis voice came incisively, deliberate-
ly:
"Il yoo are wise, Agnes, you will
go."
In the pause hcr hands lifted toward his back and fell. She seemed
to he struggling for words. His
brow darkened as though be sensed
thc depth of her unvoiced protest,
Ilis tunc when lie spoke again seem-
cel  hardened  tee  the  temper  of  steel.
"Ye,u tee.ik yejttr own path, and it
lies ���there!"
And in the pointing arm there was
not a quiver.
"Oh, Harry!" And the girl dropped upon a chair, her head falling
upon the arm thrown athwart thc
table. Her body quivered, but no
sound  came.
The man had wheeled, a scowl
darkening his face. Now lie strode
swiftly toward hcr, his list striking
with sharp, metallic impact upon thc
palm.
"I've had enough of this, Agnes,"
hc greewled���-"about all I care to
stand!" He towered aggressively
above hcr prostrate shoulders. Then
his voice rasped sharply: "Arc you
geeing or not?"
A moan answered him and the
little   black   figure   contracted  pitiful-
ly.
He leaned over her. "Do yru want
mc to call the servants to put you
ov.tr"
She straightened with an air of
pride, thc tiny cambric in her hand
touching   hcr   eyes   the   lightest.
"I'll go," she said, and rose.
She faced him reproachfully. "I
sheiuld have thought, though. Harry,
that you would have at least remembered   that���"
She hesitated, but lie angled toward
her  menacingly.
"Remembered  what?    Say   it!"
i ���!. are you - afraid ������! > i 111 bl -
loved husband?"
II' i   cyei   �� ��� ie  widi ned,  but    Iter
bead moved a  ilou  negation
"I love j"���'.  Ilarry "
rl, and  hi-  fist  liftjd.    "St 'p'
Steele    \    I>J|     !,'.],   id 1 \ V    I'll���"
II' eyes field liim -o idiTJ ^ 1..w ly
liis arm came down. lie nodded.
"Well, I diel it once, you know!"
Tlu- words rune- sullenly a- fi" eyed
her   -I'Uv. i-e.   -e owlingly,
"I know," gently. "It wa- why I ���
I leii ye.ii. Harry. Colonel Morton
laid 1 must."   Her bosom heaved,
Hi- e\, s nafrowed. "Oh. Colonel
M.,rte,:i laid you must, cli?" He-
speeke tensely through Iii- teeth. "Said
you must leave your dear husband
you loved -������! Am! you obeyed liim,
of course. It wasn't any <>f your
duty i" obey your dear husband, was
it?"   Then quickening sharply: "Well.
why didn'l >'���!! stay with liim' What
de, you come sniveling and whining
here feer?" Then liis face lighted with
a grin���derisive and malevolent, but
fearsome. "Ila- he thrown you out
- -��� h. i- that it? A meentli of your
prett) arts nuil blandishments was
enough fe.r him, cli?" The question
was assured, triumphant.
"lie ilen- nol kne,w I am here. He
wenild not have consented. The family insist upon my taking my morn-
ling  drive,  and���"
"Drive!"    Another  mocking    bow
and arm sweep. "My laely lias her
carriage   now���I s  is  it  a   car?"
She went 'en evenly: "And I came
l.e iee yem. Leila, his sister, tines not
know I am here���no eene knows. I
dismissed the carriage at the park
and came up here, slipping intn the
house through tbe area. I was afraid
tee ring, afraid you bad given orders���"
"Yeeii   were   wise,   my   lady!"
suave  sneer   was  brutal.
She  pursued:    "I  got  in    and
here.    No une saw mc."
".\'e> nnc saw you!" Thc words
came musingly as lie looked eeff. Then
his glance came back. He studied
Her thoughtfully. "Well?" be growl-
���d.
The sad little face brightened wist-
ully.
"There wa- something 1 wanted tej
ell you, Harry, something I tlieitight
ou might tn kneew���something I was
. i happv ever, dear, myself when I
new. It seemed tn mc that maybe
f yuu  knew,  you���"
Hi<
up
think 1   >\    il< divori '   ) ���::? Tiial
I     never
('.ought of it an   i
"You didn'l ?"   Disappointhie
i  ���.���       iccei n his face, bi
leaned abi ���. t
him "I li n't thinl, - i nn���auh _"i me,
dear That if sotnf .iimg. . u i.- id
never fi I
ami in>    .i.e. I in bi' ause now���"
necked herself ai tlie.ugfi re-
im mbi ring and lier lip draggi d
thre,iinh her teeth She 1" nl
and in the stillness her wordi ������one
se.iily, impressively: It wai for better or for worse, my husband���thc
bond i- fori ver!" Anel lu-r hand dri ip-
pe d lightly Upon Iii- hair.
For  a  momi nl   he  diel  not  move,
jusl   -laving   dull)    bei,,re     him,     bis
lips moving inaudlbly. Then slowly
liis hand came up until i: rested upon
lier-    An expression Of joy touched
her face. Willi deliberation, his lingers slipped to lier wrist, grasped it,
and with an evidence of viciousnesi
and hatred, thing it frmn him.
"Oh!" It was less a cry of pain
than a lob .':- -lie recoiled.
lie gave- no sign of hearing her;
he was looking straight ahead, bis
brow contracted in a frown, his lips
moving as tlneugli tee the accompaniment eif some dark, internal mulling
His fingers worked, contracting slowly into a clenched list. Tfie girl had
moved away and was staring at him
with   wistful,   frightened  eyes.
"A liiuiil forever!" The words came
in a hissing aside, low but clearly
audible. "Forever���and she means
it!" He struck a downward blow
hard upon bis knee; but the staring
eyes never changed. From "tit oi
his mutter fov.r wordi breathed tensely,  i.hisperingly:
"Then,  what   about   Celeste?"
From the girl came an intake of
breath���a sharp and poignant cry, instantly suppressed. It seemed to
bring bis attention back to her and
he turned her way. A shrug and he
got to his feet, moving slowly toward
hcr with  head advanced.
"See vnu heard? You understand,
eb?"
A nod as she looked at him. Hcr
hand came up and lay upon hcr lips
as though tee study them.
"And ymi wont divorce me���it's
forever?"
No reply, but she retreated as he
advanced. She seemed scarcely cein-
scioui of hei own motion, but hcr
eyes were steadily widening as under tbe suggestion of some waxing
terror���something fremi which ber
senses recoiled, some dark horror
with which her very soul was battling,
crying its unbelief. Ami suddenly
she   screamed.
The     man's     she udders      hunched
sharply; into his eyes came a sinister
. gleam;   freem   his   throat    rattled     a
laugh���gurgling,   satirical.
"Scream away, my lady!" He moved steadily nearer. "There's none to
hear behind these walls and doors.
j I was bluffing just now about the
servants, All were sent away yesterday when 1 moved over to tfie club.
Scream once more, if you like: there's
lime  for  just  once  more!"
But tlie' power "f expression secm-
e-el in have passed from her ami pe ewer of motion as well, -aw as she
swayed pantingly againsl the table
\i;if so he lie drew to within a yard,
his elbows doubling, his long, tensile
lingers shaping like llie claws of ;:
bird of prey. Then with a lightning
elan, tliey swept to lier slioillde'rs,
shifting upward toward the white
,neck.
Rut the tmich seemed t" break  '.lie
spell that apparently find held her ill
; thrall.
"No, ii". no!" gaspingly. Her
hands, clinging to his arm-, seemed
to check their progress.    Then wbisp
"Mr.  Tompkins,  I   haven't  tin. lines
���1  nti The girl
o i  the  Boor  spoki   ���.. ith  bare it'   be-
���   I he adjusted Ki i
hair.     "Shall   I
A  grunt, a- nt,    and    tin
Voii e cami ned  with a
��� i   -area- n:     "And   Mr.   Mai-
��� ii . }"U ai.   ii���.t       -.  ug a delicate
necklace I    wis!     Cheat-
ilirol-
tli   ilu- life "in See?"    Then
"Jusl try to fori ���'. il happens
���    be  Mi--  Cheatham'i   in ck I"
The uni'- brow- lifted archly as bei
lithe ipring brought ber to her feet
The man'i  eyei ed  her "ith i
���mile.
Tluy we re i and kind.
"Second act," snapped the Voice.
"t ��nee more'
Beaver Transfer Co.
LIMITED
112 WATER STREET
Furniture. Piano Moving and
all sorts or teaming done.
Calls from any part of Vancouver or South Vancouver
will receive our closest attention.
All orders promptly attended
to.
JCS. H. BOWMAN
ARCHITECT
910-11    YORKSHIRE    BLDG.
SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER
C. M. WHELPTON
BUILDING CONTRACTOR
ESTIMATES GIVEN
Pbooe i Fraser 34 - 46th Ave. and Fr����er
R. B. LINZEY
JEWELLER
4132   MAIN   STREET
HARRY KAY
PAINTER   AND   DECORATOR
Phone:  Fair. 326       4518 Main St.
anng
ly:
The  Arena  Skating  Rink,  where  the  Vancouver  Hockey  Club  exhibit
their prowess
She waited an instant, looking him
.iver fremi beael tee foot, Her little
chin  lifted.
"Thai yem were a gentleman, Harry." quietly.
His b.nd laugh, coarse and harsh,
exploded in her face.
"Gentleman!" jeeringly. "Think
you can rub it in, eh? Gentleman!
You never thought me a gentleman
��� know you never diel. Don't lie���
you know it!"
She shook her head slowly.
"Hut I loved ynu, Harry," It was
said softly. "1 always loved you. my
husband���I do now. But you were
so cold, so harsh, no���so rough with
me. I had never been used to it. I
suppose that was it���I don't know."
She took a step toward him. "And
I was so young���a girl bereft of
father and mother. I���I knew so
little. And when my aunt and those
at home turned their backs upon me
because I married you, I thought
them cruel���but oh, Harry. I never
knew how cruel  they were!''
His bow was a gesture of smiling
mockery. He sneered: "And so you
went with  a gentleman!'
Her head lifted. "I went with my
dead father's friend."
His chest heaved and his voice
waxed blusteringly. "You went because ymt loved him!"
She dropped back, leaning against
the heavy library table, her hand
above her heart.
"Oh,  Harry!"
"Oh, Harry!" his voice mimicked.
His lips worked and he struck his
hand down hard upon the chair back.
"Bah! Dou you think I am a fool?"
The^sudden swing of his foot kicked
the chair aside. He advanced upon
her. hands raised, fingers curved and
trembling.
The slight figure shrank far back
across the table, and something like
terror came into her face.
He  laughed  bitterly.
Ilis finger-snap checked her. "Well,
ymi can keep it!" The speech crackled rudely. "There's nothing, my
lady .yem can till nu I want to hear
���you understand that- Nothing, I
lell you!" And lie strode frum lier,
dropping heavily int" a distant chair.
"Hut.   Harry,   I���"
"Neet a word!" Ile bellowed, as I" a
dog; and ihe gesture accompanying
was imperative, final. Ile bit savagely at the cigar withdrawn from a
pocket, eyeing her with a baleful side-
glance   as   he   lighted   it.
Her lingers worked tremulously with
the tiny handkerchief. She turned
from him abruptly and lie could see
her shoulders move.
He laughed shortly, indifferently.
"That's right: turn em the weirks.
Thought it was abeiut due next."
He threw one leg over tlle chair
arm and Studied her between puffs.
"1 say, Agnes, there is one thing you
can  ihe,  though."
She turned quickly, inquiry in her
eyes, her face lighting hopefully. He
was drawing a freshening blaze to
his cigar, his eyes half closed, bis
face  twisted iu an  ugly  leer.
"Yes?" she whispered, and moved
toward  him,  slowly, faltcringly.
He chuckled, shifted back into the
chair's depths, and grinned into space.
"Yes. Harry?" tier hand hovered
above his shoulders now.
He crossed his legs, flickered the
ash lightly to a tray, but never turned.
"I would like t.i know when you
are going to divorce mc."
"Divorce you?"
"Divorce me���yes, divorcel" impatiently. "Don't repeat me like a
parrot. You heard what I said,"
His eyes glared up at her, then settled sullenly.
Shc laughed faintly. "Is ihat
thought troubling you. you foolish
boy? Why. Harry, dear"���tender
smile   touched   her     lips���"did     you
'Mercy!    Nol  for my sake.
Harry���it  isn't   that���but  for���"
A growl for response, and thc slender figure yielded backward above
thi' table'- eelge before '.is straightening arms���yielded, bin for an instant
only. Then as though struggling under tlu impulse m I >me new-found
strength, she    swayed   against    tfie
movement, ber anus twisting, tearing,  curving  about  '��� - own
With a snarl, he reached his right
hand suddenly behind her to the
table- surface. His arm came up. his
fingers clutching dagger-wise a heavy
steel paper cutter oi tne poniard kind.
There was a icream, a writhing twist
that seemed t>. break the clutch of
ihi' -ingle arin anil she darted from
him. But ten feet away. Ilis hand
ici! upon ber again, cat-like, whirling
ber abe.ut s" that she lay back
against bis chest, her white face and
heaving bosom from him, and upturned.
Standing thus, his dagger arm went
back, as for the advantage of a long
and powerful sweep. One instant the
man's teeth gleamed behind ber dark
shoulder ere they wcre eclipsed by
bis arm. swinging the silvery circle-
that flashed toward her breast. But
in tbat instant she seemed to throw
her weight downward. slipping
through his arm and falling to her
kiues free and clear, while the blade,
under the impulse of what seemed
an unchanging drive and powerful inertia, came on. rocket-like, toward the
peeint   that  bad  been  its  mark.
"That'll   do!"
The voice, abrupt, incisive with
command, cleft the darkness of the
"house." semtewhere there beyond the
line of the canvas-shrouded boxes.
The man's dagger arm dropped to
his side limp and harmless. The girl
on the floor relaxed composedly, her
face alert, expectant.
"To far up stage, Mr. Malcolm."
said the Voice.
The man nodded, advancing with his
arm crooked horizontally as a shield
against the blinding line of footlights.
He tried to glimpse, battingly, into
the shadowy gulf cross-sectioned with
sheeted  orchestra  rows.
The Voice went on: "A little too
light   there  at  the  last,   Miss  Cheat-
ffm."
Phrenology and Palmistry
Mrs. YOUNG
(Porractly  of  Montreel)
OIVES   PRACTICAL   ADVICE   ON   BUSINESS  ADAPTATION.   HEALTH
AND   MARRIAGE
105   Granville   Street,   Corn*.-   tool**
Hoetre     10  ��� rr.    t# t  p.a
0��
ENGRAVING-
ETCHINGS AND HALFTONES
ARE NOW BEING MADE IN
WESTERN CANADA BY THE
MOST SATISFACTORY PROCESS KNOWN to the WORLD
THE "AGIO BLAST" PROCESS
MAKES VOUR  ILLUSTRATIONS
 LITERALLY TALK	
SUUrevCTURED IN WESTERS CANADA
BythiCuiahoDibbieEncOt
\nt   TLOOR   WORLD   BLDC.
VANCOUVER        II     C    ���
Notice of Removal
I'he Misses Hall and Westley
of Seiuth Vancouver Private
Hospital, Twenty-eighth and
Main Street, have moved to
more commodious premises at
the ceimer of Willow and
I'reiadway.
THE WILLOW HOSPITAL
778 BROADWAY WEST
VANCOUVER
Owing to stress of work will
friends kindly accept this notice.
tmam EICHT
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   24,   1914
CANDIDATES   EXPRESS   THANKS   TO   THE   ELECTORATE
To the Electors of Ward VI
Having been the successful candidate in Ward 6, I take
this opportunity of thanking tlie voters for their hearty support. I will endeavor to live up to my pre-election platform
to the best of my abilitv.
W. J. ROWLINGS
Councillor-elect feir Ward 6.
To the Electors of Ward I
1 greatly appreciate the honor conferred upon me by the
electors of Ward 1 last Saturday, and will serve the municipality to the best of my ability.
W. R. RUTLEDGE
Councillor-elect for Ward 1.
To the Electors of South Vancouver
To the many friends who voted for mc and worked hard
for my election I wish to express my most sincere thanks.
I wish the new administration success in their conduct of
our affairs in 1914.
J. A. KERR
To the Electors of South Vancouver
I wish to take this opportunity of expressing my thanks
and appreciation to those who so loyally supported me during
the late campaign. Reeve-elect Dickie and the new council
have my best wishes for success and any support I can lend
them in carrying on the work will be gratefully given.
J. C. McARTHUR, J.P.
��
HIS is to convey tti the ratepayers of South
Vancouver, men and women, and in especial, to the 5000 electors, more or less, who
polled their votes on Saturday, my appreciation of the great honor and the great responsibility which they have conferred upon me hy
electing me Reeve of this great community. I
wish to thank not only those whose loyal work
and support made my election sure, but also
those others, opponents as well as friends, who
took a public spirited interest in the contest on
behalf of any candidate and by their active interest made the total vote more than twice
larger than on any former occasion.
I wish to thank the electors for the confidence they have reposed in me and to say that
I will endeavor to deal as prudently and carefully with the affairs of the Municipality and
do my duty by the Council, the ratepayers
and the public generally, as well as my ability
will permit.
T. DICKIE
To the Ratepayers
In thanking you for your endorsement of my candidature
in Ward V, I wish to state that I will at all times endeavor to
carry out to the best of my ability the trust you have placed
in mc.
EDWARD GOLD
To the Electors of Ward II
I wish to assure my friends that I appreciate the assistance given me during the campaign and will work for the best
interests of South Vancouver in 1914.
GEO. A. STEVENS
Councillot-elect for Ward 2.
To the Electors of South Vancouver
I wish to return my thanks for the splendid vote with
which you returned me at the head of the poll in last Saturday's election of School Trustees.
I will do all in my power to merit the confidence thus
shown in me, which I take also as an appreciation of my two
years' past services.
Sincerely yours,
R. H. NEELANDS
School Trustee.
To the Electors of South Vancouver
I wish to express my thanks and appreciation for the
splendid vote that you gave me on thc 17th.
In return, I will strive to give you a clean, economical and
efficient administration so far as my powers lie.
J. C. HUDSON
School Trustee.
To the Ratepayers of Ward III
Having been elected by an overwhelming majority to
represent your ward for 1914, I will devote the whole of my
time to the interests of thc municipality. Honesty and economy will be my motto.
I wish to assure my many friends that I appreciate the
honor conferred upon me.
*.. IUA
f'    K '.   \
V4J     ���'./
G. W. THOMAS
Councillor-elect for Ward 3.
To the Electors of Ward VII
r * Mia I
i, it*
. I take this opportunity of thanking the voters and committee who supported me so loyally in Ward 7. I will serve
the municipality to the besl of my ability.
.'���"   -   '   ' ,
C W. TWIDDY
Councillor-elect for Ward 7.
���

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