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The Greater Vancouver Chinook Jan 18, 1913

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Array VGm^ CHINOOK
I A Half Million in 1917
Vol. L, No. 36
SOUTH VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  CANADA, SATURDAY, fANUARY is. 1913
Price 5 cents
Prosperous, Progressive Vancouver  Pushes  Out
Towards the Banks of the North Arm
of the Fraser
CORNER OF YUKON ST. AND ELEVENTH AVE.
Vancouver's choicest residential, while possibly not
the most fashionable, district, is south of Broadway���
between Broadwr.y and the great North Arm, the
heights above which offer the most superb view in all
directions.
AT    TWENTY-FIFTH    AVE.    AND    MAIN    ST.
The Walden Block is the first of many Urge business
blocks to be built in thc Twenty-fifth Avenue district.
Twenty-fifth Avenue and Main is said to be th* busiest
point   in   South   Vancouver
MOUNT    STEPHEN    APARTMENTS
���Situated at 101, Seventh Avenue East, a few blocks
from Main Street, this magnificent apartment building
dominates  the  neighborhood.
A   BROADWAY   STORE
BOTTOM VIEW: Great Northern Railway Yards, False Creek���Here will be the industrial
heart of Greater Vancouver. In the foreground is the beginning of a big steel industry. At the head
of False Creek will be located the terminals of the Canadian Northern Railway, a development that will
mean much to South-eastern Vancouver. MIDDLE VIEW is that of the General Hospital buildingr,���
one of the largest and best equipped institutions of its kind in America. TOP PICTURE is that of the
new office building, corner of Broadway and Main Street, the building of which was one of the boldest
and most successful pieces of financing in the history of the city.
GENERAL   BROCK   SCHOOL
CORNER   OF   ELEVENTH   AVE.   AND   MAIN   ST.
|^IIIllI^lf-^ -   i
/#g|ipi ii
���
Of the many new permanent buildings in the Broadway district, many are being built for the retail merchants whose prosperity is usually a guage of the fortunes  of  the city.
: ;.via3. ...Ij-Hy.J. '
.
This is one of the twelve or more public schools in
South Vancouver. The General Brock School is situated
on   Main  Street,  near  the  office  of  "The   Chinook."
The Harris Building is one of several million dollars'
worth of buildings erected on Main Street during the
year 1912. The Success Business College occupies the
top floor of this block and is on* of Western Canada's
leading   commercial   schools.
A  DISTRICT  OF   HOMES
Coming east and south from the centre of the city
hundreds of palatial homes are being built. The accompanying engrauno is that of a photograph taken near
Bridge  Street   Park.
HILLCREST   PHARMACY   BUILDING
This block is at the corner of Seventeenth Avenue and
Main Street, and is one of many new structures in *!)*-
Hillcrest district on a street that is likely to become;
Greater   Vancouver's   leading   business   thoroughfare.
ROYAL   BANK   BUILDING
Situated at the corner of Bridge Street and Broadway.
Is a costly structure which cost $42,000. A similar
building will soon be erected by the Royal Bank at the
corner   of   Seventeenth   Avenue   and   Main   Street.
NEW   BUILDING  OF   B.   C.   TELEPHONE   CO.
Located in this splendid edifice is the Fairmont Exchange of the B. C. Telephone Company. It is one of
many new buildings being built in East and South Vancouver by that progressive and efficient public service
corporation. SATURDAY,   JANUARY   18,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
THREE
Short Lesson in Household
=Economy���
Are you using carbon lamps for lighting i
Do yen know that Tungsten lumps give three times the amount
of light obtained fre,m the carbon lamp wiih the same consumption
of currentr
WutiUl it not be advisable for you tee secure this improved fe.rni e.f
lighting ?
After you have considered lhe' above queries visit our salesrooms
and ask the lamp counter clerk I.. demonstrate the difference between the Tungsten lamp ami the ordinary carbon lamp.
1'or convenience of eeur customers we carry a full line of Tungsten
lamps, of an improved type, in steeck.
Carrall &
Hastings
Streets
1138 Granville Street
(Near Davie)
Vancouver
-S^sTHe LAOY of-me HOUSE
 ��� NOTICE	
The undersigned having severed all connection with the firm of
Simmons & Senecal, at 4140 Main Street, I beg to announce to my
numerous friends and patrons that I have opened Dressmaking
Parlors at Findlay Block, Suite A, Main Street, where I will be
pleased to welcome old and new customers.
MRS. M.  C. SENECAL
Findlay Block, Suite A, Main Street, South Vancouver.
South Vancouver
Subdivision of Portion Block 15, D. L. 330 and 331
Frontinp; on River Road and Sixty-ninth Avenue. Pries
$450 each lot and up. Terms, fifth cash, balance 6, 12 and 18
months.
FRASER RIVER FRONTAGE
River and II. C. Electric Railway frontage, 89.57; Victoria
Drive frontage, 187.84. Price $9,000. Terms, $1,000 cash, balance over ihree and a half years.
London & British North America Co. Limited
With which is incorporated Mahon, McFarland & Procter Ltd.
Corner Pender and Seymour Streets
Insurance Money to Loan
Agreements  For  Sale  Purchased
A PRACTICAL SOLUTION FOR THE
High Cost of Living
One step in the right direction is to equip
your home with a Pease "Economy" Furnace. The furnace without a rival. If your
heating plant needs overhauling, ring us up
Hodgson Plumbing & Heating Co.
Limited
1136 HOMER ST.
PHONE : SEY. 2412
Flowers for New Year
CHRYSANTHEMUMS,   CARNATIONS,   NARCISSUS,   VIOLETS,   ETC.
Jardinieres, Plants in Pols, Bulbs in Bowls
A large assortment lo select from
HOLLY���Extra  Well  Berried���75c  per lb.
MISTLETOE���Finest English���$1.50 per lb.
RITCHIE BRAND CO.
The Art Florists
723 ROBSON  STREET
Phone   Sev.   1892 -:- Vancouver, B. C.
"A South Vancouver Industry"
W. L. GOODWIN
SUCCESSOR TO ROBERT N1SBET
LUMBER,     SASH,     DOORS,     MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  LATH,  AND  A   COMPLETE
LINE OF BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
Campbell Road Station
On the Eburne-Westminster Tram
(Foot of Inverness Street)
Phone Fraser  109 R P-O. Box  16
Let me figure your bills. Open Evenings.
Menus For a Wedding Breakfast
The refreshments served at a home
wedding are- wry limple, bin everything must lei- a- dainty a- possible
China, silver, anel napery i- expected
I., be ')f tlu- very finest description,
hut a "heavy" menu i- not in geeoei
i.-i-ti-.
Bouillon, chicken lalad, sandwiches,
cakes, iee- dream, and coffee, includi -
a dainty and substantial repast. Chocolate may he- added if liked, anil, e,f
course, the bride's cake. This oc-
cupies  ihe-  centre  "i  the  long  table
freun    which    till-   gtlcsl-   are     -irv < <1,
who will stand, -it around iln- room,
e.r ai small tablet according t<> prc-
vieeus arrangement. Candles shaded
will decorate this table, also Rowers
ami ioliage.
Ai each end plate-s should he- piled
up ��iih napkins between. Tin.- dishes
containing sandwiches may be placed
at tin- ends "f the table, bul the salad
may he prepared on small plates in
lhe lite-hen all ready feir serving.
If the  salael  is sen-eel  fremi a  large
Ih'eul the individual plates cannot be
made as attractive as when dished up
[separately.
The bouillon, coffee, ami chocolate,
too, are serveel from the kitchen eer
pantry.   In   catering   for  fifty guests,
I the usual respective quantities re-epiir-
1 eel are- twee pe,uuels eef e,itfci. three
pounds e,f cube sugar, three pints of
cream, ten loaves of bread, two and
one-half pounds of butter, eight
pounds nf ham weighed after boiling,
three moulds 'ef jelly, two quarts 'if
olives, live- large- loaves of cake, three
pounds eif nuts before salting, four
good-sized chickens, ten heads eif eel- i
e-ry. a quart 'if mayonnaise, ami twee
gallon-  of ice  cream.
'Im- quarl 'if chopped meal will
make  fifty  sandwiches, ami  one  pinl
'������f caviare will do the- s-llm- The salad
anel loaf cakes sh.,ulei i���- made at
home. Tin-re will In- a saving in <le>_
ing this, ami the food will taste nicer
Small   fancy   cakes   may     he   bought.
|This will save trouble, ami more
variety will lu- obtained in this way.
The- aim. mils can he blanched ami
salleil at he.me. Buy the Inst olive
"il anil fresh eggs for the mayonnaise.
Gel the French sandwich bread for
making ihe sandwiches. Spread very
lightly with butter that has been softened hy heating with a fork, Do mil
melt lhe butter to make it soft, he-
cause it will sink into the bread ami
taste like "fat" while ilu- beaten butter will be tmne like- cream Crisp
lettuce leaves can he placed with other
filling between the slices of bread ami
butter. The crusl is trimmed off ami
the sandwiches cut into any desired
shape.     It   is  a  good  plan   to  cut   the
sandwiches Into different shapes according tei their tilling. For instance,
the- caviare sandwiches could be
cut in round shape with a small cookie
cutter. Other sandwiches ceenld he
seiuare, triangle, and linger shapes. In
threading sandwiches take care to keep
lhe tilling freim the edges. SO us not
to soil the gloves. A little chopped
olive and celery will be an agreeable
addition to the caviare sandwiches.
Others like a dash of lemon juice,
while some think a little paprica is
the best possible addition.
*    id    ele
Cult of Paper Fan
It was at Ascot this year that Queen
Mary set the cull nf the paper fan.
Today, every woman eif the smart
world puis her twee-cent paper fan
into her gorgeously jeweled handbag
as surely as she places in it her handkerchief. Queen Mary it is universally acknowledged possesses the- most
varied, interesting, and valuable col-
lection e.f fans in the world, and it is
in the irony of things that she of all
people shouhl elect to use a paper
fan. It was her intense love of hygiene which caused her to see the advantages in any article whieh could
he   thrown   away   when   used,
Some of the besl shops are making!
a feature of these iriiles. Produced
hi fantastic but always dainty coloring, they can be purchased in every
conceivable tint anil ladies eerder them
by the dozen. The story goes that a
guest staying at York Lodge eluring
the recent visit e,f the King ami Queen
to their Norfolk seal brought with her
a large box which contained nothing
| but these penny fan:,, ami proudly exhibited them, saying hers beat
those of her royal hostess,
land arrange- irregularly in a baking
dish. Well washed currants are -prink.
led  aiming  ihe  slice-,  ami   iln    whole
i-  Cove-reel  \\ i 11|  a  mixture- of egg,  milk,
sugar, am! cinnamon, the quantity depending upon the size of the pudding
Hake to a delicate brown in the oven,
Scalloped    Turkey���Brown    bread
crumbs  in  butter ami  line  ramequin
ili-ln- wilh them. Over thi- pin ill
B   layer  eii chopped  turkey   from   one
to two inches deep, moistened  with
a little 'ef il- own gravy, Cover with
tin- crumbs ami bake until a deep
brown, Tiee--e- little individual dishes
always appeal to iln- appetite when a
large dish 'ef the same contents is apt
lo  pass  unappreciated.
The Scenic Highway Across the Continent
THROUGH TICKETS ISSUED
FROM VANCOUVER TO
ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD
The Popular Route to the���
OLD COUNTRY
HAWAII
AUSTRALIA
ALASKA
CHINA AND
JAPAN
Up-to-date Train Service Between Vancouver and the East.
All trains equipped with Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
MOE, C. P. A., 434 Hastings St., Vancouver.
C. MILLARD, D. T. A., Vancouver.
H. W. BRODIE,  Gen. Pass Agent,  Vancouver.
Veal With Almonds���line cupful
ot cold chopped veal i- mixed with a
dozen chopped almonds, pepper and
sail to ta-te, ami bound together with
a well-beaten egg. Add a e|a���h of
paprika. Xext reell into small balls
ami -������! in a baking pan. Pour over
Ihe whole a generous cup of tomato
���auce anil ceiok ill a fairly hoi ovet!
feer twenty minutes. Garnish with
watercress before serving.
RAIL TICKETS TO ALL POINTS
General Agency Transatlantic Steamship Lines
H. G. Smith, C. P. & T
Phone ������  Sey.  7100
W. E. Duperow, O. A. P. D
527  Granville  Street
Creamed Corn Beef���This dish is
an agreeable change from the usual I
corn beef hash. Vein cut a bunch of
celery into inch lengths anil slice an
onion. These are put into a double
boiler with a pint of milk After boiling fifteen minutes, strain and stir
into tin- milk two tabiespoonfuls each
eif flour and butter. When this thickens add two cupfuls of cohl corn beef,
anel a dash 'if pepper. Pour the whole
into a leaking dish, cover with buttered cracker crumbs, ami brown in
the oven.
A Happy New Year
TO ALL  OUR MANY
CUSTOMERS   :   :   :
Start the Xew Year in proper style   by coming and investigating
our prices.
We guarantee all goods.
"FIRST  QUALITY���QUICK  SERVICE" Satisfaction Guaranteed.
LAING &  FIDDES
GROCERS
28th AVENUE and  MAIN  STREET
Telephone :  Fairmont 979
Fish Left Over���Mix om- cupful of
cold salmon with half a teaspoonful
���-1 lemon juice-, a little parsley, a
couple of elrop- of Worcestershin or
any good hoi -ance, a tablespoonful
ot gelatine dissolved in a little water
ami enough salad dressing to moisten
the whole. Wet small molds ami till
with lhe mixture, keeping the top-
level. When cold, turn out een le-t-
lue-r leaves ami serve witli a mayonnaise.
Boys are not alone in their spirit
of bragging aboul tin- distinguished
liialilies of "Dad " A number ..[ little
girls were boasting of the rank of
their respective Families. They had
passed from clothes to personal appearance, then te. interior furnishing-,
|and finally came t.i paternal dignity.
The minister's little girl boasted:
"Every package  thai conns  for my
1 papa is marked  D.  D."
"Ami every package that comes feer
my papa is marked M. D.." retort eel
the daughter of the physician.
This was followed by a look of con.
tempt from the youngest of the party,
i "I lull!" she exclaimed with nice disdain, "Every package that comes to
lenir house is marked C. O. D.!"
BULBS! BULBS! BULBS!
For Flowers in the  house, plant  the  following
Bulbs now:
Roman Hyacinths, 35c per doz.; $2.65 per 100.
Paper White Narcissus, 25c per do
)0.
Freesias, 10c per doz.; 75c per 100.
Paper White Narcissus, 25c per doz.; $1.75 per
100.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
FLORISTS AND NURSERYMEN
Phone Sey. 988 and 5727
di
Dainty Made-Over Dishes
Ham   Tout���This   is   a   very   nice-
way of using up stale bread and any
scraps  of  ham left  over:
Chop cold cooked ham and mix one
cupful with one well beaten egg, one-
quarter cup of cream, a liny pinch of
mustard, and  a dash  of pepper.
Heat the mixture, but do not let it
boil. Then spread on slices of hot
buttered toast.
Tomatoes and Onions���If there arc
any left-over boiled onions they can
be re-served in a scallop with
tomatoes.
Cut a couple of large teunatoes into
thin slices and chop the onions rather
line. Butter a baking pan and put in
a layer of sliced tomatoes, seasoning
with pepper and salt. Cover with a
sprinkling of bread crumbs and till the
dish with onions and tomatoes, alternating. Top off with bread crumbs,
dotted with butter, and bake in the
oven from thirty to forty-five minutes.
Brown Bread Fudding���Stale brown
bread is apt to be thrown away as
useless, but it can be made into a very
tempting  dessert   wilh   apples.
The bread is cut into thin slices and
buttered. All the crusts arc removed,
and then a baking dish is lined wilh
lhe slices ami filled wilh apples cut
into small pieces, mixed with sugar,
cinnamon, and a pinch of salt. Add
water to cover, and lastly the bread,
buttered side up.  Rake iu a moderate
oven.
For using up stale white bread a
bread and butter pudding is suggested.
Children will cat this with relish when
they  refuse  the  usual bread  pudding.
The bread is cut into thin slices and
buttered. Then cut into small squares
DOMINION
Creosoted Wood  Block
PAVING
Wood Block Pavemeiys always attract traffic wherever they arc in use.
The reduction in the noise accomplished by the use of Dominion Wood
Blocks greatly improves the value of
stores and offices, facilitates the transaction of business, frequently brings
about higher renting values and higher assessment values. It attracts pedestrian traffic as well as making the
streets a more important thoroughfare for vehicles.
Wood Block Pavement has the extreme advantage of noiselessness and
great durability under heavy traffic.
Competitive tests have repeatedly
shown it to be superior in durability
to granite block, which formerly was
the most durable pavement known. On
streets like Broadway, New York;
Dearborn Street, Chicago; Tremont
Street, Boston, and Market Street,
Philadelphia, it is now demonstrating
the superiority of its resilient resistance to the hammering of heavy
traffic.
a
Dominion Wood Blocks are Manufactured
in South Vancouver
by the
Dominion  Creosoting   Company,   Limited TWO
HPF.ATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   18,   1913
Battle of Ballots
is Heard Today
office men who are incapable, it
cost us tent much in the past,
intelligent   Councilhi
has
_-^��-     An
^^^^^^^^^^^       has   nearly   as
, .inch   influence   as  ihe   Reeve.    We
^  cannot affeird te> keep an auditor and
~~.     __       .     -,      .  | lawyer   ill   addition   to   an   expensive
Elections  for   Civic   Office J"   S��uth ; ,,ali there all the time to teach men
"      on"     I who  don'l   kneiw,   the  rudiments    of
business   ami   municipal   government.
This  seirt  of  thing in  the  past   has
kept   municipal   government   in   South
Vancouver in  the experimental stage.
kept out industries and depredated tlie
value of property.
R. McBRIDE.
Sieuih  Vancouver. Jan.  15.  1913.
Sections   ior   vi>��
Vancouver   Being   Keenly   Contested���The      Candidates
After one of thc keenest fought
lights iii the history of South Vancouver, the Municipal elections will
he held today, There will be a contest in every Ward. Few surprises
were sprung at the nominations which
were made on Monday last. Reeve
Kerr and ex-Reeve Pound are the
Contestants feer the Reeve's chair,
while there is a two-man light in each
"i  the  seven Wards.    There are  four
candidates offering for School Trustees, two "1 whom will be elected.
The complete list oi nominations
follow:
For  Reeve.���Reeve Janus A.  Kerr,
ex-Reeve   William  A.   Pound,
For the Council
Ward 1, Councillor Spencer Robinson, J. J. Wilbers: Ward II. ex-Coun.
iii
mth.    It i
cillor    W.    J.     Dickinson,     George
Stevens; Ward 111, Peter McXeish,
Ralph Humphries; Ward IV, Councilleir John Third, William Winram;
Warel V, Councillor Gordon W.
Thomas; G. L. Greeolay: Ward VI,
J. U. Millar, Robert McBride; Ward
VII, Councillor Stuart Campbell,
George Roden.
For Hoard .ef School Trustees: J.
R. W. Shanks, William Me.rris, W.
W.   Hilton, James  C.  Campbell.
The peelling booths, which will bc
open from 9 a.m, t" 7 p.m., follow:
Ward   I���Carleton   Hall,   Ceilling-
wood.
War.l     II���Lord     Selkirk     School,
Ceelar  Cottage.
Wanl   III���Tecumseh   School.
Ward   IV���Tent, east  side of  Main
Street,     between   Twenty-fifth     and
Twenty-sixth  avenues   [general  polling booth  for all Wards).
Ward   V���Municipal   Hall   (P.elling
Booth fen- Wards V. VI and VII).
Ward VI���Sexsmith School, corner
Sixty-first Avenue ami Ontario Street.
Ward VII���North Arm School,
corner Fraser Street and River Ave.
All electors who wish to vote for
Reeve only can vote at the most convenient polling booth, but for Councilleir they must vote either in the
Ward in which they have a vote or at
side   of   Main   Street,   between
A  Test  of Popularity
This  is  a   true   story,  and   has   to
do with the genial head of the C.P.R,
Publicity  Department, a train official,
and some ceimmon people.
The   Exhibition  was  on   at   Saska-
loon. and our train drew into a crowded   station.    Some  confusion   ensued,
more   people   boarding   the   Pullman
than could possibly find accommodation.    An   hour  or  so    later,    when
things had about settled down to normal, some of us began to take an interest in a heated argument going on
I between a portly, prosperous-looking
man and a meek-faced little chap in
a seedy suit of grey-
It   was  all    about    a    reservation.
Each held a slip of paper which was
supposed  to read his title  clear  (but | nized names,
elidn't) to lower 9, and each held fast  "���""     r.re:
to  Ilis  claim.    The affable  conductor
tried his hand on  them, said he was
sorry   that   someone  had    blundered,
advised     them   to   settle   the   matter
amicably between themselves, etc., all
iu  vain.    "1   reserved  that  berth    by
wire," vociferated the portly one. "So
did I," urged the other, meek and persistent to the last.
The conductor, being a man of
peace, melted from the arena. Then
the big mail began to assert himself,1
also lo show his worldly wisdom. He
called our model porter, George, and
ordered lower 9 made up. Ile also
complained of the heat, and George,
sympathetic on the instant, opened
the window, that the night air might
sweep    in,
New Fire Chief
is Appointed
Mr. James A. Lester Succeeds Chief
Wand in South Vancouver
The- appointment c��� I a new fire chief
was the principal business of the
-pecial meeting of the Council held
en Saturday afternoon, There were
ten applicants for the position and lhe
Council unanimously selected Mr.
James A, Lester, whee was feir eight
years iu lhe Vancouver fire department and captain of No. 1 Fireball,
before leaving feir Dawson City,
where for ten years Ile held the position of chief of the fire department.
Mr. Lester, who was recommended by lhe Mainland F'ire Underwriters'
Association, will take up his duties
on February 1. at a salary of $150 -
Bounteous Burnaby'a Bonnie
Banks and Braes
ea-l
ami
Twenty-fifth
avenues.
Electors of Wards
vi etc   either   al   their    , ...
ing booths or at Twenty-fifth Avenue
and Main Street, or at thc Municipal
Mr. G. L. Greenlay in Ward V
Mr. Greenlay is perhaps not so well
known as some who are seeking election, but he has done much useful
work in various channels. Hc has
resided in South Vancouver live years,
having come to Vancouver a year before that, and he owns considerable
property, all in the Ward which he
hopes to represent.
He stands as a strong'advocate for
Temperance Reform, for Progress,
and for Annexation. Although Mr.
Greenlay has not hitherto undertaken
Municipal work he has had a large
experience in executive work of all
kinds, especially in School Board lines.
As a building contractor Mr. Greenlay employs at various, times a-number of men, and on all grounds appeals  to the electors of Ward V.
water, pocketed a fat tip in a manner
peculiarly his own, but when the
"gcmnian" said, "I'm going back to
smoke a cigar, George; have lower 9
ready for mc when 1 return," George
hesitated.
.���"         .     "Yes, sab, yes, sah, but does 1  un-
Twenty - sixth   derstand you to say you secured dat
berth befoab dat odder gemmaii did?"
YI and VII may   he asked.   "Vou see, sah, de rule ob
respective  poll-1 djs  road  is  dat no partiality  can  bc
showed, sah.    If dat berth  am you's
fob suah and suttin, why "
"Take my bag to lower 9 and
hold your tongue," bellowed the big
man wrathiully. "And hark you,
George, it won't bc good for you if 1
have to report any lack of attention,
ember,   I   represent   a   firm   that
_ lining year a bylaw will be passed
providing  proper  equipment  for  the
fire department and the chief will be
required to advise the Council as to
the purchase of apparatus, etc.
The solicitor was authorized to prepare a bylaw for changing the names
of certain streets in Wards I and
IV and for naming about 75 streets
which have previously had no rccog-
Anioiig the new street
names are: Robinson, Campbell,
Pound, Wilber, Rae and many others
well-known in the Municipality, Including a l'.ursill Street.
The Reeve announced lhat ilie numbering of lhe houses ill the Municipality is now practically completed and
that the official numbers can be obtained from the office of Building Inspector  Young.
i     1 )r. G. B. Murphy was re-appointed
I medical  health  officer at a salary of
$150 per month.
Burns'  Anniversary  Scottish  Concert
\ grand Scottish Concert, to .corn-
that the nigiit air raigni i memoratc the birth of Robbie M���*<
brought him a  glass of Scotland's national poet, will be neia
.       . .   .,_   ���     _  _. -   .     ..      r-..i.ir..it....._���' l-i      \Muni   Lle-.l-
Closing Meetings of Campaign
Last week might be timed Ceiun-
cilleers' Week as nearly every night
senile candidate or candidate for
Councillor held meetings, leaving the
last and final week for the gladiators
for the Recveship. They, however,
have mil been idle as Mr. I'aterson
has been attending the meetings called by others, and  speaking whenever
the opportunity afforded. The election gives promise of being eme of the
keenest   ever   fought   in   Burnaby.
��    ��    *
Contract   Let   for   School
The School  Hoard met on Thursday afternoon  last  and opened  the
tenders for the new school at Gillcy.
^^^^^^^ There  wire  live  tenders  put  in   and
f 1, at a ��""7 "' f- -ithe   contract   was   let   to  the   lowest,
s expecled lhat during the   Mr.  John  Anderson,  for $7,800.    The
eii   k,.  i-.rtnr.in   n��  soon  ns   the
Electors of Burnaby
Your Vote and Influence it Respectfully Solicited (or
B. G. WALKER
FOR THE POSITION OF
REEVE FOR 1913
as   the
rushed
Mr. W. Winram in Ward IV
Mr. Winram, who comes before the
electors of Ward IV, has been some
thirty-seven years in Canada, of which
nearly four have been spent in South
Vancouver. He has carried out extensive building operations in the district where he also owns considerable property.
In seeking election, Mr. Winram
stands for Annexation, for improving
the financial condition of the Municipality, and for temperance reform.
He is very emphatic irj desiring the
incoming Council to take up the matter of assisting tha'people whose titles
are clouded by illegal tax sales, his
suggestion being to ask the Government tei apply thc Quieting Act.
Mr. Winram promises to use bis
inlluence to secure thc development
of the Xorth Arm, the paving of Main
Sireet at the quickest possible time,
and to generally legislate for the
moral and social betterment of tbe
people. In his view the first things
to he secured arc the necessities of
thc people, other things to follow in
due   course.
Politics in South Vancouver
To the Editor of "The Chinook":
Sir,���As thc press is the only means
by which we can reach the electors of
South Vancouver, and as the administration of Municipal affairs have been
before the public for some time past,
will you allow me to point out some
of the causes which have led to those
unfortunate results.
First, nearly all the settlers of South
Vancouver are strangers to each other,
and a great majority reside outside
the Municipality, and therefore do not
know how their money is spent, and
become an easy prey to the clique or
party who want to get an individual
into office to serve their own purpose..
As a taxpayer, I have been closely
���watching for a number of years the
way Municipal matters were conducted, and although many things
have been done which wcre not in the
best interests of the Municipality,
yet I don't know of one instance of
what I would call personal graft. In
every case it is lack of knowledge or
experience that causes the chief waste
of public money, and no doubt being
under obligations to a clique or faction for election support has a good
deal to do with it.
We have got a number of capable
men, of ample means in the Municipality, who would conduct Municipal matters in order and decency, if
we could get Uiem into office.
My advice to the ratepayers is:
Don't vote the "Bunch Ticket," weigh
every candidate on his individual
merits. We cannot afford to put into
Remember, I represent a firm ..
does a lot of business over this line-
besides I'm a warm personal friend
of a couple of C.P.R. directors. That's
right," as George, much impressed,
reached for the bag, "you know which
side your bread's buttered on, eh?
Open both windows, and put a screen
in each, George." He swaggered out,
leaving his poor little opponent worsted in the fray.
But  he   laughs  best    who    laughs
last.   It might have been an hour later when the peaceful slumbers of several passengers wcre broken in upon
by the thrcatenings and thunders of a
very angry big man whom George was
elevating    into   an   upper   berth    by
rrieans  of a  creaking  stepladder  and
many   deferential  explanations.    "Do
you dare to tell nie it is that no-account  fellow  who's  snoring away  in
lower 9?"  came in  vindictive accent.
Then George's bland tones: "Yes, sah,
yes, sah. I turned my back on him fob
a few moments and he jes' naturally
took hisself and his possessions into
lower 9, sah. Befoh I could git 'round,
Sih, hc was so soun' asleep he wouldn't
wink���not    if    Gabriel    blowcd    his
horn faih and squah in his car. Pow-
crfules' sleeper I mos' eber saw, sah,"
George is consigned to a very bad-
place.    "Yes,  sah,  yes,  sah,  suttinly,
sahV.���then   a   "whew-wl"   of   weariness.    "Anything t' 'blige you, sah."
"It   was   splendid,   but   how   dared
you do it?" wc said to George next'
morning.
George, who was looking at peace
with all the world, chuckled: "He
couldn't qualify fob no Alpine Club,
he couldn't. Climbing to dat upper
berth nigh gib him fits."
"But a warm persona! friend of
two directors���weren't you afraid?"
we questioned.
George rolled his eyes and dropped
his  voice   to  a  confidential   whisper:
in the OddfeYlows'' Hail',' Mount Plea
sant  I Main  Slreel. between Sixth and
Seventh  ^venues}  on  Saturday evening. January 25, 191.., al 8.15 p.m. The
concert is under lhe direction of Mr.
W. W. Robertson, solo violinist, who
has  conducted  a  number  of  successful   Scottish    concerts   in   Vancouver
and suburbs during the past five years,
and  he  will  be  assisted  on   this  occasion  ley  some  of  the  best  concert
artists  in  the  city.    The  programme
will include Bums' famous songs, re-
1 citations,  violin   solos,  also   thc  ever
popular  Highland  Dancing and  Bagpipes so dear tA the heart of all Scotsmen.    AH'lovers of Scottish    music
should take this opportunity of being
present on January 25 at the above
hall and  enjoying a TTrst class  Scottish programme.    Tickets can'be had
at thc Independent Drug Store, cor���
ner Seventh Avenue and Main Street,
also ill drug stores in the vicinity of
Twenty-fifth Avenue and Main Street,
alio Fraser Avenue.
work will be begun as soon
weather permits and will hi
ahead  as  fast  as  possible.
*    ��    ��
Burnaby  Briefs
A Burns Society was organized at
a meeting held in Cowherd's store,
Alta Vista, last Friday evening. A
goodly number of Burns' followers
were present, several coming from
Jubilee. Arrangements were made
for the due celebration of Burns'
birthday,
*      St      *
Thc district foremen for the Municipality are tee be commended for their
prompt action in clearing the snow
from the sidewalks during the unusually heavy fall of snow during the
past week.
e|e        A        *
The   B.   C.   Electric   Railway   have I
made   arrangements   wilh   Mr.   J.   G. j
Jackman   to   hick   and     unlock     the
freight sheds at Edmonds.
* * *
Gordon Presbyterian Church will
be officially opened next Saturday,
Rev. J. S. Henderson, M.A., of Xew
Westminster, will preach the dedicatory sermon at 11 a.m. Rev. J. C.
Madill will preach al 3 p.m., ami
Principal McKay, of Westminster
Hall, will be the preacher in the evening. Oh Monday night a banquet will
be held in the basement,
A. McFEE
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Phone 1038 : Edmonds, B. C.
I have the exclusive sale of large lots on Salisbury Avenue, close
to station.   $1,000 each; on good terms.   Sec me about them.
PATTERSON   &   FISHER
REAL ESTATE AND  INSURANCE
be j   acres  in   Edmonds   district,   near   Power   House  and  facing   on  Vancouver
Road.     All   cleared.     Price   $16.000.CO.   $5,000.00   cash:   balance   6,   12,   18,   and   24
months.
POST OFFICE BUILDING.  EDMONDS
Phone :  No. 664
WARNER, BANGS & CO.
REAL ESTATE AND COMMERCIAL AGENTS LOANS AND INSURANCE
PHONE  1024
COLDICUTT BLOCK,  EAST  BURNABY
SEND US YOUR LISTINGS
Hallifax-Coleman Nuptials
^  very  pretty  wedding took  place
at lhe home of the bridegroom's uncle,
Mr.  Xew man, 4796 Quebec Street, in
which  Miss Edith .Coleman, of Hertford. England, and Harry Shrimpton
Hallifax, son of Charles Temple Halli-
fax, London, England, were united In'
matrimony  in   the   presence of  their
immediate     relatives   who  reside    in
Vancouver,  qijj. Tuesday  evening  the
7th inst., aV seven o'clock,    -he Rev.
George   D.   Ireland,   of   Westminster
Church performed the ceremony. The
bride was given  away by her uncle,
Mr. Walker, Main Street and Thirty-
second Avenue, and was attended by
her    cousin,  Miss  Evelyn    Newman.
The    bridegroom  was  supported    by
Mff'"Arthur Newman.   After the ceremony was over the guests sat down
to ,a wedding supper.    Mr. and Mrs.
Hallifax,   who   very   recently   arrived
in   Vancouver  from  England,  intend
making   their   future   home  in   South
Vancouver, and will take up their residence at "1607 Main Street.
Exit   1913   Council
The 1912 Council held iheir last
meeting on Monday morning and
wound up the  business of the year.
The contract was let for the paving of Kingsway through llurnaby to
the Canadian Mineral Rubiicr Co., for
the sum of $334,000. The concrete
work is to be begun immediately
after the estimates arc passed by the
Council, subject to the ratification by
the Government and grant appropriated by the Government.
The matter of appealing against the
decision of Mr. Justice Murphy's decision re B. C. Electric franchise was
left' to the incoming Conned.
Mr. B! ,S: Walker, who' is one of
the candidates for Reeve, tendered
his resignation as Stipendiary Magistrate.
As the result of a letter read from
Mayor Lee of New Westminster, it
was decided that Burnaby would withdraw from the Joint Harbor Commission scheme if that would in any
manner interfere with the passing
of New Westminster's bill for a Harbor Commission.
H. SWORDER
EDMUNDS   RELIABLE REAL ESTATE MAN
SPECIALIST IN BURNABY PROPERTY INSURANCE
One acre dose to Cut Off. $2000.    Easy terms
Opposite Power House : Lots 50x120. 14 cash; 6, 12, 18, 24 mths. $525
Another $450.   $100 cash; $10 per month
HOUSES AND LOTS TO SUIT ALL
BRING ME YOUR LISTINGS
Highland   Park   Acreage
We have a number of SMALL ACREAGE PARCELS on and
near the new cut-off line of the B. C. Electric Railway.
1 acre, just off Railway, $2100; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
months.
134 acres, on Railway, $3500; quarter cash, balance 6, 12, and 18
months.
E.  W.  MacLEAN   LTD.
Exchange Building 142 Hastings West
"Directors am big guns all right, but
dat odder gemman had suffin better
elan directors up his sleeve. Does you
know who hc am a friend ob? Wall
dat gemman is a friend of Mr. George
I lam, and," swelling out his chest,
"and friend of Mr. George Ham am
friend ob mine, see?"
And we saw.���Jean Blewett.
jj , Nominations
There Was scurrying to and fro in
the Municipal Hall on Monday as the
time for the closing of nominations
drew near. ' Those nominated for
Reeve were Messrs. D. C. McGregor
and Mr. B. G. Walker,
For School Trustees are Messrs.
F. T. Cliff, W. J. Holdom, D. Ross
and F. Russell.
For Councillors: Ward I, Messrs.
E. Stride and W. fievan; Ward II,
Mr. A. V. C. Macpherson, elected by
acclamation; Ward III, Messrs. T. D.
Coldicutt, G. H. Leaf and W. H.
Madill; Ward IV, Messrs. P. Fau Vel
and M. Greenley; Ward V, Messrs.
J. McDonald and A. E. Yorston; Ward
VI, Messrs. T. Mayne, J. Murray and
E. A. Winch.
T.   D.   COLDICUTT
REAL  ESTATE. LOANS  AND   INSURANCE
Coldicutt Block, 4th  Ave. and 6th  St.
Telephone 719
If it is in East Burnaby, we can sell it for you
East   Burnaby,   B.   C.
Heaters for the Winter
The cool long nights are nearly here.   We have a complete line
of heaters.
Cartridges
I
.    The shooting season is on.   You don't need to go to the City to buy
your ammunition.   See us.
CD      CCADMCV    Formerly Manitoba
��� ; Da    r CAI\llC T Hardware Oo.
HARDWARE, PAINTS, OILS, STOVES, RANGES, ETC.
Joyce Street, COLLINGWOOD
A Pleasant Surprise
One of these little, happy events
that make life pleasant and takes us
out of the humdrum affairs of everyday life was enacted in thc home of
CharleS Hodgson, President of thc
South Vancuuver Board of Trade, on
the evening of Wednesday last. Mrs.
Gale, mother of Mrs. Hodgson, attained her seventy-sixth birthday, and
to commemorate the event a large
number of friends made a surprise
visit to Mrs. Hodgsein's house. Mr.
Hodgson was just on the eve of going out to a meeting when the door
bell rung. In a minute a group of
happy, smiling faces greeted the
Hodgson's. The visitors had many
nice bouquets and handsome presents
for Mrs. Gales. The unexpected visit
did not find Mrs. Hodgson lacking
with hcr usual hospitality. After the
embarassment of the visit had passed
off thc guests wcre entertained and
refreshments provided, and a most
happy and enjoyable evening was
spent.
It is hoped that Mrs. Gale will bc
a   participant   in   many   such   happy
occasions.
 ��� <s>  <	
BUILDING GROWTH
OF SOUTH VANCOUVER
be pleased tp know that the Council   y
appreciated thc work both of himself
and his staff:
Mr.  Young's report follows:
Number of permits issued, 2,600.
Value   of  building  op'tions $2,600,000
Average  value  of  all  permits issued 	
Greatest     value     for     one
month, August, 1912-...
nir walls,
once remarked a p
7.076
362.310
Greatest    number     issued     for
month, April ���  304
Average    number     issued     per 217
month     217
Total  number of dwellings  1929
Total  number of stores  129
Total  number of apartments  28
Total number of alterations  273
Total    number  of   schools   and
additions   10
Total number of churches  6
Miscellaneous    225
Total-
2,600
by.    "Ay, ay," rejoined Rhodius. "out
there are still more who pass this way
and look  at  them."    He was  s 'lie-
thing of the opinion of Schupp us  "
Hamburg,  who used to remark  that
in this world the fools outnumber the
men;   and   the   Emperor    Maximilian
II.    delicately    expressed    a    siniilst
sentiment     when   he   observed    tIiat
every   young   fellow   must  bc  pulled
by fool's strings for seven year*. Sid
that  if,  during  that   time,  he forgot
himself for an instant, he had to te-
commence   his   seven   years'   service.
This potentate distinguished the 'hill-
est of his counsellors by the till'' <���'
the   King   of   Fools.     On   once   addressing a prosy adviser by this title,
thc gentleman neatly enough replied!
"I   wish,  with  all  my heart,  1  were
King of Fools; I should have a glorious kingdom of it, and your Imperial
Majesty   would   be   among  my  subjects."���Doran's "Court Fools."
Louis Ancker, at the Avenue Theatre
Substantial    Progress  as  Shown   by
Building Inspector's Figures I
Mr. A. E. Young, Building Inspector, must have felt a glow of pride
as he made out bis final figures for
the Council. They show a growth
and expansion that none had dreamt
of. It was well known that the Municipality was progressing, but even the
most optimistic - would scarcely have
dared during the spring to have forecasted such a phenomenal increase as
has been made. That the work of thc
Building Inspector and his staff must
have often been taxed to the utmost
no one will deny. Mr. Young is to
be congratulated on his very satisfactory work and all ratepayers will
The  Fool by Right of Office
When Erasmus praised Folly, it was
only making Folly advocate her own
cause. After all, her pleading neither
recommends her cause, nor says much
for the wit of the pleader. Folly, in
the abstract, has been denounced
alike by Scripture and ancient heathen
sages. "All men arc fools," was once
a received text. Over the text, some
have laughed, some have cried, and
upon it, or its equivalent, divines
have preached sermons now mirthful, now melancholy. "If I wish to
look at a fool," says Seneca modestly,
"I have not far to go. I have only
to look in a mirror." A sharper saying still was uttered by Rhodius, a
physician of Marburg, who had adorn.
ed the front of his house with full-
length portraits of all the lawyers and
doctors in the city, himself in the centre, and all in the dress of thc professional buffoon. "You have a large
number of thorough fools painted on
Lord Macaulay, passing one '��
Ihrough the Seven Dials, bought ���
handful of ballads from some strut
folks who were bawling out their contents to a gaping audience. Proccci ���
ing on his way home he was alien -
ished to find himself followed by ha"
a score of urchins, their faces beaming with expectation. "Now tin '
my lads, what is it?" said he.
"Oh, that's a good '1111," replied one
of the boys, "after we've come all tn
'"lint   what   arc   you   waiting   f��r,
said  thc  historian,  astonished  at
lad's  familiarity. ���   -
"Waiting fori   Why am t you going
to sing, guv'ner?"
"I understand you have jusl bi
an automobile?"
"Yes.    1 saw seven of them clone pedestrian  the other  day,  and
decided that I vvas on the wrong eM
of the sport." SATURDAY,   JANUARY   18,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
FIVE
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
HEAD OFFICE, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Authorized Capital      $2,000,000
Subscribed Capital       1,169,900
Paid-up   Capital           840,000
Specia' attention given to savings accounts.
Interest paid at lhe highest current rates.
Your account very cordially solicited.
L   W. Shatford. Onrnl M.naicr W. E. Jardinr. Ant   Ourei   Manatri
CEDAR COTTAGE BRANCH W. H. Ronald "Manage!
From a Grizzly's Standpoint
HEATERS
The cold weather is coming and you will
require some
Stoves and  Heaters
to keep your home warm.   We have heaters
from
$2.00 up
They are of the best quality, and we will put
them up for you.
Don't forget our line of RANGES.   We
have a few P'oneers left.
FOX'S PIONEER HARDWARE
Fraser and Kerris Roads T. Fox, Prop.
Phone : Fraser 87
Jeihn Hear had ne. use feer blasting
iinel railroad builder���not by fifty
miles I The- activities of ihe- men whom
the- Grand Trunk Pacific hael employed   I"   cleave    a     way     through     the
Rockies to the Coasl disconcerted the
grave grizzly. The doingl nf the day
gang anil lhe Strange thing-, which
wren) forward ai nighl in ihe shaehew
eii ihe Velhew Head Pats had met his
.i!,; -oval.    Ile was imt Informed of
Iheir significance, lie suspected lhat
their   relations   lo   himself   were   met
iln- relations of a respectful domain
to its overlord. Ile rclircd te> a eon.
ve-tne nt   beighti   where   hi-   could   look
down upon  the blasting with  easier
feelings.
lie ami liis family hail known this
rcpton for more generations than there
are sicds on a whole raspberry bush.
Ile himself vvas beim mil ten feet
freem where the: division engineer had
raised his shack. In all his time in
iiie--e- parts, ami since his race began,
there had not been such strange
neei.es in the valley. Years ago, by
ih-- memory of his mother's stories,
two or three travel-weary, river-
stained parties of men passed through
track-laying crachine, and the- Bo-
bunks. They filled in marshes where
Jeelm Bear's family hael picked berries
fe.r lime- immemorial. They mi
eruele- bruise- where he- 111 il to lie in
wait i"r the ii-h. They built a log
house ei.ese- t., hi-, i,r~i playground
As they advanced he retreated, not
becausi he- was afraid, but in oreh-r ������
make observations undisturbed. He-
had about concluded thai tiny were
only niael. ,-tnil was beginning to
lorl of .in Interest in the work, when
ihere- ��� :iiii.- a tremendous explosion
one morning, 111 ^ bones turned to
water, hn nerves Bared up in a panic
nf fe:ir. The mountains p.ekeei, the
far bide ���'! tin- valley -'in back the
echo 'ef the blast, and I....-..m-.i boulders that had nol me,\i-��i for
centuries came rolling down ihe sidi l
eef the mountain. He wanted to run
He weeiibl have run, but he was weak
with fright. He hail a vague- longing f'er his meether. lie was sick with I
terror. Finally he gathered up his
feel .-mil lumbered eiff.    For tw
"*,.et  him,  boys," said  the  chief.
"By '     Congratulations,   chief;
that  was good ibooting!"
Down below there was a sudden re-.
newing of tin  noises that hael marred
'he day.   Lights were- moving. S'eiig-
drifted   up.   and   the   meis,    ol
-inking rock.
"It's ih. night gang going on, b
muttered  one    '-i   the   men,    "We'll
have iee come up fof the hide in the
ni'.rem
"She p," .1 dog belonging to .
- in Taeoma, Washington,
was awakined by tne- - <p|i lion of
a lamp, ami. although he ihould have
um away wiih hit tail bi twei n hit
I -��� i,  he   ����� m   upstairs,  barked  ir.nn
one  ei -  to  ih,   other,  aroused  the
sleeping  inmates,   ��le.   succeeded   in I
saving  themselt i -.  ..-.A  then  him-' If
perished  miserably and  i ntinently
i-i tin   flames
What .-. singular way for a eie,j> i.,
act, especially as Ih- aparently, .-
a- we can barn  from hi- past, hael im
actual knowledge 'ef the real value -
human life-. He conducted in. In I,, .r.-i -
leery experiments upon human beings,
nor  upeeii  any  of his own  -pee;
'irder  lei  prepctu.atc  the  lace of 'I- igl
,eer  men.   He   hail  given   im  lectures,
days  nor hail taken no fees feer weirk done
Your
Best
Chance
he did not stop his retreat, but hurried in connection wiih the laving of
fast through the underbrush, farther humanity. He occupied no important
sway from Ins native valley than lie  acicntific post of honor,   lie hael  en-
the region.   They were explorers, and I had ever been before.    Even twenty Igage(j
research   labeir.  ami
spent  months  in  search of the easy i miles away  he met deer, rabbit, and faC|  lu-  had  no  knowledge  whateve
LUMBER
Eburne  Saw Mills  Limited
Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of
FIR, CEDAR AND SPRUCE LUMBER
Shingles, Lath, Sash, Doors, Turnings
and House Finishings
PROMPT  DELIVERY   BY TRAM, WAGON OR SCOW
PHONE l EBURNE 14 R
EBURNE, B. C.
waj through the fastnesses. They left
tin- pass unhurt, save for a few lesser
animals ami some eef the fishes missing. But those down there in the
valley were a different sort, part of
an organized effort against the peace
of the  mountains.
First tin-re came the right-of-way
scent, a little dried man at the head
of a small parly with pack horses and
tents. These were the lirst men John
Hear had seen. His mother had warned him of them even then. Long
afler the scout came survey parties
and great engineers. Occasionally
the engineers had the audacity to trail
John Hear, as though Jeelm Hear
wauled any converse with such puny
upstarts-
mountain  sheep  hurrying    lre,m  the ,,,���   the   scientific  necessity  of  sacn-
.ilel   valley.     It   was   their   Might   thai   fjcjng  ���,������,.  |jveI  ,,,  Bave others
Saved him from himself. Ile was
ashamed In be running with them
II.   -ie.,,,1   still.
In ih.- end In- returned i" iln- ������!'!
valley. Hit by bit he mustered up his
old-time courage, point by point convinced himself that he wa- nothing
worse than the booming of frosl in
the mountain crevices. Moreover,
i""el was scarce in lhe strange valley- he had passed through, and he
carried in his mind's eye ilu picture
��� ef a certain nest of bees he- hael
winded just the moment before the
sound, ihe fear, ami the flight. Re-
. membering his fear made him only
and  he,  having a  mind  to the  fiercer.    He stalked back  t'e the
And yet in efpite e.f this, In- seemed
I'e have the- true scientific spirit, ami.
although but a dug. in- was willing
i" sacrifice himself for others. This
shows   the   great   p over   eef   instinct.
"Shep" e.ught In be awarded a
nobe! prize.
���"Life."
To get doors cheap. Make your
openings to suit th��e doors and
save money. A few odd sizes; like
2 ft. by 6 ft. 8 inches, and 2 ft. by
6 fl. 6 inches. Regular price $2.40.
While They Last $1.25
or we will give one free with every
$20 order.
*   ��
McGibbon Hodgson
Lumber Company
20th Avenue
CEDAR COTTAGE, B. C.
Phone :  Fair.   1659
self-denial  benefits  us  in
run."  said   the  ready-made
preserve his privacy, had taken pains
t" conceal his trail so that he could
enjoy his favorite feeding ground undisturbed. Recently, when he had
been taking a bit of sun em a warm
ledge two thousand feet above the
valley, one of these engineers, from a
vantage point lower down, had directed a missile toward him���semic-
ihing about the size of a small pebble
which traveled through thc air at a
high rate of speed and broke the skin
��� en John Bears foreshoulder. At the
time he had felt annoyed because.-, for
one thing, the pebble, or whatever it
was, caused some pain in the sh, milder; and Ile had risen up "ii his great
hind feel with the intention of descending the mountain and showing
the intruder his error. Hut hc had
changed his mind and let lhe matter
pass. For, after all. what was a
scratch   on   the   shoulder?
Following the right-of-way scout
and Ihe survey parlies had come the
grading gangs, the bridge builders, the
��olarwa
Pavemear
" IT IS PERMANENT BECAUSE IT IS CONCRETE "
^ Dolarway Paving is being laid in South
Vancouver on East Victoria Drive.
^ Dolarway is good enough for City Streets
and cheap enough for Country Roads.
Gloversville, N. Y.���Street paved with Dolarway showing the adaptability
of this form of construction for paving between and adjoining street car tracks, as
it is unaffected by the vibration due to the action of the heavy cars passing over
the rails.
A Dolarway paved street with car tracks produces a handsome, uniform,
permanent pavement at a great saving in cost.
South Vancouver Builders' Supply
valley ami lay down i'e watch.
There, below, was a great  hole in
tllC   Side  (ei   lhe   mOUntain.   Illlge'   t>l< 'et -
eef granite seemed tn have been torn
'���in of the side 'if lhe cliff a- though
the cliff had been maele uf nothing
better than moss. It made him shudder. Ami up lu this scar the Bohunks
had made a wide, smooth trail. As lie-
he looked down he could see hundreds of men working along this
trail. In the sear itself were sum-
with drills, working small holes deep
into the ruck: farther back gangs
were nu-y distributing sandy gravel.
which, was being swept from the leep
uf a train uf flat car--, along which
ran a greal steel plow e.n a steel
cable-, drawn freem the far end uf the
train by a donkey engine. John Hear
considered  these  things  deeply.
"I'm taking two days off," said tilling engineer tej his first assistant.
'Tin- old fellow has come back. Even
lhe big blast couldn't scare him away
for long.   I'll get him this time, sure."
"Good luck," returned the lirst assistant, and lhe big man passed cut
tti the camp, beyond the section reserved fe.r ihe bunk houses of the 11"-
liunks, ami into the woods, when- the
rest uf his parly were already as-
sembled. The woods swallowed them
Up. They picked up the warm trail
nf the grizzly nol half a mile from
camp. It led up ilu- mountain till the
men were puffed. On a second wind
hey came tu the bed nf a small stream.
Beyond it there were no more tracks.
The   men   scattered  in   search.
Wilh the fall of the lir-l dusk there
blew ti whistle. The laborers straightened their backs, shouldered their
implements, ami moved off toward
the bunk houses; a siring oi pack
mules filed back tu stable with "empties" un their backs. There came ii"
lunger up to the ledge the incessant
din and roll of industry, the rumbling
-I dump cars, the puffing of the dun-
key locomotives, the -inking of --eel
hammer on steel drill, ihe rattling of
shovels and picks, thc groaning "i
great stones being moved from their
foundations by a steam derrick. The
wall eif the drill gang's sung faded
into the blue haze thai hung over the
bunk houses. There was stillness ie
the valley once mure. The star-, blossomed high over lhe valley ami lights
answered from the windows of ilu
camp,
The great bear lay on his ledge, 'n-
huge muzzle ai rest between two
urry cushions lined wilh steely sinew-,
lie- fell ilu- change. Peace had re-
tui ind he In- valley. John Hear was
��� nice in..re master 'if hi- valley, ami
as he looked out through the thickening blue air In lhe opposite wall,
twu miles away, he forgot lhe shame
of his flight. Hc sighed with lhe fullness nf content and lifted his great
bulk, preparatory tei making his even
round of the nail.
Hut as he turned e.n tin- ledge the
, wind gave his tlu man smell, a fresh
hot scent from close al hand. As he
sniffed he ruse tu his hind feel, and
as he did so beheld tin- man. the engineer, who had grazed him from below, who had dared to trail him. With
the calm deliberation uf one who
clearly- sees a duty that can no longer
be put eeff. he moved toward lhe man.
H was a small distance���only aboul
thirty feet. The ledge ai thai point
was narrow and the drop to one side
seven hundred feet sheer. There was
no animosity, no hale in the grizzly's
mind, lie felt that it was better to
get this matter disposed nf at once,
and he moved to do it. As lie moved,
the engineer dropped tei his knees
and leveled his rifle. There came a
flash and a burning pain along one
side of the grizzly's head, lie was
puzzled and annoyed, but moved on
again with lifted forepaws, prepared
to terminate the matter without delay.
But there was another flash���a sickening pause���and the great bruin fell
forward and lay quiet, save for a little
twitching of the great soft  paws.
Shouts from behind the hunter,
lights flashed out through the darkness, carried by hurrying men. Murmurs and the bable of questions and
wonderment as they almost stumbled
over hunter and grizzly.
"A liil
ih,- long
philosopher.
"Yes," replied Mr. Growcher,
'Every year about this time I have
tee e|uii smoking in avoid receiving
cigar- frum  my  wife on  Christmas."
For a  pretty  girl  t.i fix her lips
whistle   i-   a   waste   of  pucker.
t"
Toronto   Furniture
Company
Furnish   Houses   at   Very   Moderate
Prices
Call and See
M. H. COWAN, Proprietor
3336 MAIN STREET
Phone :    Fairmont 1660
Hilton & Webster's
BILLIARD AND
POOL PARLORS
j Headquarters    for    the    South    Hill
Football   Club.
An ideal place to spend a social hour.
Fraser Street, between 46th and 47th.
C. M. WHELPTON
BUILDING CONTRACTOR
ESTIMATES GIVEN
Fra��er 34 - 46th Ave. and Fraier
DR.   A.   J.   BRETT
DENTIST
S.-E.   Cor.  25th  Avenue  and   Main  Street
Phone:     FAIRMONT   2056
SOUTH VANCOUVER
PRIVATE HOSPITAL
MEDICAL,    SURGICAL,    MATERNITY
Twcn'y-eighth   Ave.   and   Main   Street
Misses   Hall   and   Westley,   Graduated   Nurses
Terms Moderate
Phone :   Fairmont 2165
GREENE & MERKLEY
UNDERTAKERS
SOUTH   VANCOUVER   OFFICE
AND CHAPEL.  16th AND  MAiN
STREET
DOWN        TOWN       PARLORS :
305    PENDER    STREET    WEST
Phnr._ :   S:v.  340.  Day  or  Night
IF YOU ARE SICK, CALL ON
Ernest Shaw, D.C.
(Doctor  of  Chiropratic)
25C    22nd    Avenue    East,    close    to
Main Street
Hours :  1.30 till 6.    Consultation free
Chiropractic succeeds where medi
ine fails. For all complaints, whether
acute or chronic, Chiropractic is just
the thing.
Melrose Nursing Home
Special  attention  given  to  Maternity
cases.   Terms moderate.
Mrs. Edgerton
: S25 25th Ave.  East���Phone : Fair. 987
Public Notices
CORPORATION   OF   SOUTH
VANCOUVER
NOTICE    TO    THE    RATEPAYERS    OR
OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE IN THE
MUNICIPALITY    OF    SOUTH
VANCOUVER
Patronize the
Province Renovatory
South Vancouver's Pioneer
Dry-Cleaning and  Dyeing Works
Work  and  Prices  Right
4136 Main St. Coi. of 25th Avenue
The Government A.ditiitfj Commissioner ol
the above-named Municipality will have his
office open from 10 to 11 in the forenoon of
tach day (except days on which the Pttblfo
Inquiry is being held) lor the purpose of
passing accounts; and any Ratepayer or
Owner may be present and may make any
objection to such accounts as are bciore the
Auditor.
JAS. B. SPRINGFORD,
C. M. C
SOUTH END CLEANING CO.
First-class    Cleaners,    Prcssers    and
Tailors
A   trial   will     convince   yon.     Prices
Reasonable
Open   Evenings
���1375 Main Street   _   South Vancouver
TANKS
Wood water-tanks, wire wound wood pipe
and continuous stave pipe made in all size*.
Municipal Construction Co. Ltd., 319 Pender
Sfrcet,   Vancouver,   P.   C.
MACK'S
HORSESHOEING  AND   GENERAL
BLACKSMITHING
SHOEING  A   SPECIALTY
DAVID    S.    McKAY,   MANAGER
South Hill P.O.  Box 10S
CHARACTER CIRCULATION
There is a difference between
the hastily read street car paper
and the paper that is delivered
into the home; the paper that is
absolutely independent and wholesome; that the men respect and
the women admire���that is the
paper whose advertising columns
carry confidence to the reader���
that is the paper whose advertising
patronage is valuable.
Phrenology Md Palmistry
Mrs. YOUNG
(Formerly of Montreal)
GIVES   PRACTICAL  ADVICE   ON   BUSINESS ADAPTATION.  HEALTH
AND   MARRIAGE
80S  Granville   Street,  Corner  Robioa
Hours: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. tOUR
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   18,   1913-
..CHINOOK
PUBLISHED
Every Saturday by the Greater Vancourer Publiihera Limited
HEAD OFFICE :
Corner Thirtieth Avnue and  Main  Street,  South Vancouver,   B.C.
Georte M. Murray. President and ManaEinC Director
Herbert A.  Stein.  Vice-Preaident and  Manajinj  Editor.
John   Jackaon.   Buiineia   Manager.
TELEPHONE:   All departments  Fairmont 187f
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
To all points in Canada.  United  Kingdom.  Newfoundland,  New
.eaiand. and other BrltUh Poeaesslons :
On.   Year     **��������
Sia Months    '��?
Three   Months    "
Postage to American, European and other Foreign Countries. 11.00
per year esttra.
TO CORRESPONDENTS I We will not print anonymous letters
though inviting communication on current events, to be published
over the writer's signature.  ^^
MARK YOUR BALLOTS
IT is the duty of every ratepayer holding the franchise in
South Vancouver to record his vote at the Municipal
elections which will be held today. The greatest safeguard towards purity in civic government is a liberal and
unrestrained use of the ballot Apathy and disinterestedness on the part of voters are probably in a greater
measure responsible for undesirable conditions than any
other feature of civic government. It would bc in the best
interests of all were all the candidates to gracefully accept victory and defeat on a poll which left no doubt as
to the feelings and desires of the electors.
Considerable criticism has been aimed at the present
voters' list on the ground that many ratepayers deserving
of the ballot have been deprived of thc privilege of voting. While the present list fulfils all legal requirements
and was compiled in strict accordance with the Provincial
act, it is an open question if more latitude should not be
shown in adding names to the list. In other municipalities
it is the custom to accept and place on the list names of
applicants for registration in the registry office. The
South Vancouver list, however, merely embraces the names
of those whose applications have been registered at thc
registry office.
While it is possibly in the best interests to have a voters'
list which meets all the demands of the act, still the fact
that the registry office is nearly a year behind in its registrations lends itself to many serious objections. If
the voters' list in South Vancouver, therefore, is open to
criticism, the registry office in Vancouver should share its
full portion of the responsibility.
The fact should not be overlooked that it is thc duty
of every man and woman whose name appears on the list
to exercise their right and privilege of the ballot. Let all
voters mark their ballots today.
PROGRESSIVE BURNABY
THROUGHOUT Canada there is not a better governed
municipality than that of the District of Burnaby,
and the reason is that Burnaby, from its inception, has
had at its head real business men who were above applying other than business methods to the handling of the
affairs of the public.
Retiring this year from the Burnaby Municipal Coun-
' cil is Reeve Weart. Probably no other one man has done
more for Burnaby than has Mr. Weart in the several
years spent by him on the Council Board. Mr. Weart
is one of the leading citizens of Greater Vancouver, is
is financier of marked ability, and is a bright light at the
British Columbia bar.
In the contest for the Reeveship of Burnaby this year
is Mr. D. C. MacGregor, a pioneer of the Municipality,
and one of Vancouver's leading business men, who has
spent several years on thc Burnaby Council Board. Mr.
��� MacGregor has told the Burnaby people that, apart from
���a desire to continue to run Hurnaby along business lines,
he has no platform. He believes that in Burnaby or any
ether similar district there are a certain number of departments of the I'll' lie service to be given attention. Mr.
MscGregor, from a broad experience as a Councillor,
knows these various departments, and if he handles them
ns well as he does his private business, it will be all right
with Burnaby,
Mr. MacGregor is a public man more of the Old Country rather than American type, is dignified, wealthy and
reliable according to the demands of the best Scottish
standards.
If hc is elected Reeve of Burnaby and finds that the
district between South Vancouver and New Westminster
docs not continue to lead all British Columbia, as far
as civic management is concerned, Mr. D. C. MacGregor's
pride will be sorely injured.
reckless  driving,  to  which  many  residents  along  Westminster  Road  and other  main   thoroughfares  can  attest.
The question is now an acute one in Vancouver, and nonc-
he-less to be guarded against in South Vancouver.
THE DIME NOVELS
THERE are many novels nowadays, costing more than
a dime, that are pernicious in their effects.
The term "dime novel" is a convenient, rather than an
accurate one, for designating a certain class of reading
matter that is popular and pernicious.
Nobody nowadays understands the term in its literal
sense.
There are doubtless dime novels that do not poison
he minds of their readers, and there arc high-priced novels
that are as corrupting as the worst that can be bought for
ten cents.
Thc moral worth of the books is not to be gauged by
the price.
For all who desire to feed their minds on trash there
are novels of the lowest grade, obtainable at prices to
suit the purse of the reader.
If lhe reader is a young person of unformed mind and
scant means, the dime novel or something cheaper
can be had.
If the reader has plenty of money, he or she can gratify
the lowest literary tastes at higher prices.
Too many of our people are reading thc rubbish loosely
described as "dime novels."
Of those readers not a few are old enough to know
better, and at heart are ashamed of their liking for the stuff.
If all who are addicted to the habit would now throw
their stock of dime novels into the fire, and set a firm
resolution to read no more such debilitating literature, thc
keeping of their pledge would prove of great benefit
to them.
Numbers of people who nourish their minds on such
trash, and expose themselves to no other cultural influ-
nces, become spoiled in almost every way.
They make themselves ridiculous by shaping their behavior and posing after the manner of some of the absurd
haractcrs they have read about.
Young people become time-wasters, and when they ought
to be thinking about what they arc doing their thoughts
re far away in that world of unreality into which cheap
fiction has introduced them.
Canada has a deluge of this stuff poured into it every
year.
Germany proposes to legislate against the "dime novel."
It all depends on what you mean by the dime novel.
In these days of cheap books many a masterpiece of
literature may be obtained for a dime, while at the same
time there is, as already noted, an abundance of trash
that commands ten or fifteen times that price.
If the idea behind the German legislation could be followed out, many a "best seller" would never reach the
public, to the public's benefit.
VAGARIES OF THE SUFFRAGETTE
IV/lATTHF.W ARNOLD says bis countrymen are very
*** impervious to ideas because they have always succeeded so well without them. He may have exaggerated
a habit of mind which has given Britain, through habits
of delay, the benefit of the experience of other nations.
The suffragettes, in their freakish departures, their Window-smashing, letter-destroying, and wire-cutting, are
taking an equally exaggerated view of what they regard
as imperviousness. They hold that any institution, policy
or system, no matter how illogical or how far at variance
with accepted views, will be tolerated as long as it serves
its purpose reasonably well and does not give trouble.
They hold also that if an institution or practice becomes
innoying or troublesome it is likely to bc abolished, no
matter how sound thc logic may be in support of it.
Carrying these ideas to extremes, the suffragettes are
devoting their energies not to logically convincing the
people that the present restriction on a primary public
service is unwise, unreasonable, or unjust, but to making
it troublesome. They think that to make the restricted
franchise system a nuisance will be a more certain method
f effffecting a change than to argue that it is unjust or
wasteful. They think that an appeal to the public love
of ease and comfort is more likely to prove effective than
an appeal to popular intelligence.
RECKLESS AUTO DRIVING
RECKLESS drivers of high-powered automobiles are
one of thc gravest menaces oi modern civilization.
In conjunction with efforts on the part of manufacturers
to bring thc self-propelled cars to a closer state of perfection, arise problems of equal importance for legislative
bodies in the shape of framing laws to curb the desire of
men to operate autos at a speed endangering life and
limb. With some men to drive a car at high speed be
comes a mania, and regardless of time or conditions, the
wonder :---, that more accidents do not occur.
Vancouver is not free from the reckless auto driver.
Every now and then the daily papers record details of
accidents caused by excesses of the speed limits. In
car capable of high speed, the limits of safe driving arc
easily broken, and what are often frolics are converted
into tragedies. The fatality on the Granville Street bridge
thc other night in which one city workman was killed and
another severely injured adds but another chapter to a
long  list  of  casualities.
'.here will be general satisfaction with the action of
Mayor Baxter in issuing instructions to the police department to use every effort to bring the man responsible for
the accident to account, and also to impress upon members of the force the necessity of stopping any indication
of recklessness in driving. As the first man of the city,
Mayor Baxter's first official order as Police Commissioner
"will be a popular one with thc masses. There will be
considerable gratification too in the fact that the officers
of the Automobile Club are anxious to co-operate with
His Worship in seeing that the regulations are carried
out to the letter.
In South Vancouver there is not thc same danger from
the reckless driver as in the more congested city, where
traffic is greater. Necessarily the regulations governing
"the drivers of cars in the city must be more stringent than
in a less thickly populated district. But in the more sparsely populated localities the desire for "speeding" becomes
more pronounced, and with it greater danger to pedestrians.   South Vancouver has not been entirely free from
Militarists and the Schools
("Toronto   Globe")
It is worth while knowing at first
hand and through official channels
precisely what is the aim of the militarists in Canada. The school trustees
in London seem to have oeen in some
doubt. They were perplexed by thc
confusion, designed or otherwise, on
the part of the advocates of incipient
militarism in their use of the terms
"physical training," which is one
thing, and "military training," which
is an entirely different thing. What
the militarists themselves mean is told
editorially in thc "official journal of
the Canadian Defence League." Hire
it is:���
"What the Canadian Defence League has in mind as the utmost required is that the Permanent Corps
of Canada shall bc recruited as now
by voluntary enlistment Then, that
Canada should have Universal Military Training feir thc whole of the
male population. The first step is
physical and military training for all
boys while at school as a part of the
school system. The second step is
after school a continuation of this
training up to the age of 18 in cadet
corps and similar institutions under
State supervision. The third step is
that all youths, physically fit, beginning at the age of 18, should have in
the first year, say, four months' continuous recruit training under canvas,
and during the next three years an
annual camp for, say 16 days. If with
this is coupled manoeuvres once in
three years there will be no question
of the efficiency of the Canadian
militia for home defence."
"For home defence!" Defence
against what? Certainly not against
attack or invasion from the Atlantic,
the Arctic, or the Pacific. That were
a task not for the Canadian militia,
but for the Canadian Naval Service���
which the present Government of
Canada has decided not to construct
or at most indefinitely to defer. Of
what then arc Canadians to be afraid
that they must at this date adopt
"Universal Military Training for the
whole  of  the  male  population"?
"Physical and military training feir
all boys while at school as a part of
thc school system!" "Physical?" Yes.
All the calisthenics and thc gymnasium exercises and drilling together
required for physical and mental development and for esprit de corps.
But why "military training"? Why
military uniforms and military weapons and military ideals and military
motives? All these are calculated,
directly and indirectly, by insistent
appeal and by more insidious sug-
gestiveness, to arouse and make
dominant in a boy the slumbering
warlike and half-barbaric instincts of
outgrown tribal life. In a civilized
nation there is no more justification
for "universal" training for war than
there is for "universal" training for
duelling; and in Canada there is far
less justification for universal military
training than for "universal" training
lor agriculture or for industrial service or for honest and progressive
everyday citizenship. If parents desire their sons trained for the Canadian militia or for the British army
their desire should be respected and
their purpose facilitated! But to talk
of rearing in Canada a whole generation of boys trained in school and for
years afterwards in military motions
and movements, all uniformed to
stimulate their vanity, and rifle-armed to strengthen the war spirit���one
wonders if these militarist gentlemen
expect thoughtful and intelligent
Canadians to take them seriously.
When the thing is faced openly and
its significance made plain the public
may make short work of some of the
'Universal Military Training" features
already made prominent in some
public schools.
Correspondence
TIPS TO TOURISTS
A DVICE is easily given. If it is easy to give, in many
���** cases it is hard to take. Few recipients thank the
giver for advice, no matter what value may attach to il.
There may be some exceptions, but they arc few. Good
advice, however; is not to be disregarded when it is given;
it is too rare. A Western traveler hands out the following which is worthy of more than passing notice:���
"This is the season of tourist travel when thc whole
accessible world is being scanned and snapshotted from
trains, steamboats, yachts, automobiles and summer
hotels.
"A word of advice just here.
"Let there be as much sight doing as sight-seeing.
"When you are so jaded with scenery that you can
swallow a mountain with your breakfast egg and never
look up at it���the mountain, wc mean, not the egg���why,
just step over a train and climb a mountain and you'll
take more interest in them thereafter.
"Don't linger in the dining-car too long nor seek it
too often.
"Twice a day is about enough for long journeys where
you get no exercise.
"Some people explain that they eat on the train to put
in an hour, but they put in a meal at thc same time, and
that meal may be one too many.
"People who gorge don't get much out of their holiday
except a varied assortment of toothpicks.
"When you stop at a hotel in the mountains don't sit
about on the veranda and swap troubles with your neighbor or wish you were back again with your worries.
"Don't talk in a loud tone of voice about the factories
that arc opening up in the wonderful home town you
left behind you.
"You are away from home to forget that and to let
other people forget, it.
"Get out and stretch your legs.
"Fill your lungs.
"If there is driving, drive.
"If there is bathing, bathe.
"If there is climbing, climb, even if it's only half-way
up the hill.
"If there is riding, ride.
"It's better to be saddle sore than bored to death.
"You are taking a rest and the best rest will be found
in new forms of motion."
This traveler has no doubt experienced all the thrills
and disappointments of the seeker after pleasure. His
tips are worth considering.
Defence of Councillor Thomas
To thc Editor of "The Chinook":
Sir,���In your issue of last week
there appeared a letter from Edward
Gold. One's first sensation on reading the letter was as if he had touched some loathcsome reptile. Who is
this Edward Gold that hc should
write in such language? Surely his
education has been sadly neglected,
that hc has no veneration for age. The
coarseness, the brutality of thc expression "Aulideluvian Fossil" to use
against a public man, because that
public man had the courage to thwart
the plans of Edward Gold last year
is enough to raise the bile in any
man. Has Mr. Gold no veneration
cither for his father or his mother?
The probability is that the man who
could use such an expression knows
not filial affection or has no veneration for age. Edward Gold, would
you not be a proud man today if you
thought that you would live to the
age of 76 and have the same vitality
in you as Councillor Thomas has
today?���Yours, etc.,
EBENEZER WHYTE.
e*       *       *
Edward Gold and Past Councils
Sir,���Many of your readers would
imagine last week that Edward Gold
was a paragon of virtue, and that the
moral safeguarding of South Vancouver was his only object in life. Mr.
Gold should remember the saying:
"Take the beam from thine own eye
before you seek to remove the_ mote
from others." Is it disinterestedness that makes Mr. Gold seek after
the Municipality's welfare? Had the
Council followed out Mr. Gold's demands last year there would have
been no outcry against their unfitness
by him this year. Because the Council had the courage to stand pat
against laying his property with sidewalks and all the latest improvements
he considers them unfit to conduct
Municipal Government.���Yours, etc.,
JOHN  BLACK.
South Vancouver, Jan. 15, 1913.
A women doesn't have to wait
until she celebrates her wooden wedding to realize that she is married to
a  blockhead.
The People's Trust Co.
LIMITED
49th AND FRASER STREET
(South Hill Post Office, South Vancouver, E.C.)
BANKING DEPARTMENT
We conduct a regular Banking Business.   4 per cent, paid on all
deposits
Encourage the children to save their pennies in one of our
Savings Banks.  One Dollar starts them on the way to wealth.
Money Orders Issued and Cashed
Drafts       Collections
Checks on the Corporation of South Vancouver cashed.
Business hours : 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
(the hours that suit the working-man).
REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT
Fraser Street, close to Forty-ninth Avenue, 33 feet; $2,600 cash.
Cleared Lots, 33 feet, high and dry, $550.   $50 cash, balance easy
payments.
One Cleared Lot, close to Fraser, facing south, 33 feet; $850.   $100
cash, balance easy payments.
Page Road, high location,   facing south; $800.    $100 cash, balance
easy.
INSURANCE DEPARTMENT
Let us insure your buildings in the strongest Board Companies. We can also insure your Life, your Automobile, Plate
Glass, etc.   All kinds of Indemnity Insurance.
Get one of our Accident, Health, and Sickness Policies, and
draw a revenue while yor are In any way incapacitated.
If you want an Indemnity or Surety Bond, see us.
Bring your Conveyancing to us.
Z   PROMPT ATTENTION QUICK SERVICE
We will make your Will
Estates Managed Money Loaned Rents Collected
South Vancouver Builders' Supply Company
Dealers in Sand, Gravel, Fibre, Cement, Lime, Plaster, Vitrified
Pipe, Tile, Fire-clay, Lath, and Brick of all kinds.
Offices :  51st Avenue and Fraser Street.    Phone : Fraser 36.
Main and 29th Avenue.   Phone :   Fairmont 1940.
Fraser Street and North Arm of Fraser River.   Phone : Fraser 84.
Coal orders taken at all offices and delivered to all parts of South
Vancouver.
ROOFING TILE
���
California Mission' Roll
Spanish Roll Plain Square
In Colors Red and Green
EVANS,C0LEMAN&EVANS
Phone 2988
Limited        Ft. of Columbia Ave.
VITRIFIED SEWER  PIPE AND
ALL FITTINGS
C. Gardiner - Johnson & Company
Johnson's Wharf Phone : Sey. 914S
B.C.   EQUIPMENT   CO.
MACHINERY   DEALERS
CONCRETE MIXERS, STEEL CARS, ROCK CRUSHERS, ELECTRIC, STEAM,
AND   GASOLINE    HOISTS.      WHEELBARROWS,    TRANSMISSION
MACHINERY,   GASOLINE   ENGINES,  PUMPS.  AND
ROAD  MACHINERY
Phone. :  Seymour 7056-7818 Offices : 606-607 Sink of Ottawa Bldg.
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
SOLE AGENTS FOR B. C.
���I SATURDAY,   JANUARY   18,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SEVEN
Name anel Atlelrcss
)..   K.   llulltr,   (A-.lar  Cottage   	
]���;.   K.   llejller,  Cedar  Cottage   	
R   K.  lluller. Cedar Cottage  	
li!  It. Ituller. Cedar Cottage  	
Joseph Curry,  Gtaditonc  ile,tei   	
"Mr..  M. J-  Uyele. tare ('..   I'.   I'aterson, 32   Inns uf Court  1.1 Itili*.
Mrs.  M. J-  Hyde, cart- <l.   V.   I'aterson, 32  Itins of Ceiurt  ltlllilg.
i.   i    Patterson, Room 32 I nee- e.f Court Ul'lg	
A   1<- Hanaoine, Keee,m 32  liens of Court  lllelg	
\V.   Milby,  ell'  Water Street   	
S.  Oyatna,   Ml   Dufferin  Street   	
\lex Cltisleolm. 2(1', Carre,II   Street, VaneOUVCT   	
Richard   M.   Spratt,   141   DufTerin   Sireet   	
II.  S.   Murray,   17J:   Westminster   Road   	
<',-ngll   Singh.    141    llufferiet   Street    	
I'r.mklin   Smith,   Collingwood   Bast   	
II    (',.   Weilfe-Merlon    	
Mrs. C,  W,   I...mli. 2218  York  Sireet   	
Thos.  V.  Leitch,   Boa   136  l raser Ave.  I'. <t	
W.    1.    Ryan,    Cedar   Cottage    	
Kohcrt w. Neave. General   Delivery, Vancouver  	
Lllen M. Arnutrong, 12H6 Coinox Street  	
Klieu  M-   Armstrong,   12S6  Comox   Sireet   	
Miss Kelgington, 1046 Granville Street	
M,., Bdglngton, 1046 Granville Street  	
t.ee.rgc McAlfee.  care C.   1'.   l.umher  Co.,  Winch   lUelg	
tieeerge McAlfee, care C,   1'.   Lumber Co..  Wieiclt   lltelg	
M   rallowAeld,   Kensington,  via  Cloveroale   	
v��� nan  Mcl.coel,  care  Goddard  &  Son   	
\i ..nan   Mcl.ee,el.   care   Goddard   it   Son   	
It,   I'.,   Wolfc-Mcrteeu,   Bos   287,   Vancouver   	
|:.   I'..   Wnlle Mertien,   Hox   2H7,   Vancouver   	
\orman   McLeod,  care   Goddard   .V   Son   	
elis,   llaire.  care   Karris  ,V   Muntsct i at   	
Thos. Frost, care  l-\   Denlsem, 531   Richards direct  	
Albert  Carlyle,   l/ielar   Cottage   	
Miss Alice Whatmore, Cedar Cottage   ������������
Mr-.  II    G.   Ilawes,  Ceelar  Cottage   	
Annie   E.   Millard,   Knight   Inlet   	
Richard   C.   Sprakeley,   Hox   381   Vancouver   	
J.   S.   Mcrseen,   Ceelar   Colt.'ige    	
J.   S.   Merson,   Ce-ilar   Cottage	
Chas.   Jeffrey.   Ceelar   Cottage    	
Chas.   Jeffrey,   Ceelar   Cottage    	
Chas.   Jeffrey,   Ceelar   Cottage   	
Chas.   Jeffrey.   Ceelar   Cottage   	
Chas   Jeffrey,    Cellar   Cottage    	
Chai   Jeffrey,   Ceelar   Cottage   	
Chai   leffrey,   Ceelar   Cot,age    	
Mrs.   ��5,  j.   Livealey, 247   17th  Ave.  West   	
las.   Squires,   Collingwood   ICast   	
Jas.   Squires.   Collingwood    ICast    	
Geo.    Mayall,   t'eilar   Cottage	
lohn    IC.    Magee,   Ceelar   Ceittage    	
J. Vernon, 386  11th Avenue  ICast   	
toieph   I'reent.   I'e.lar  Cottage   	
I. Saul  I'roiit, 1733 Westminster Keiael 	
Mri.  Mary  Carroll,  Britcola   l*.  (>	
Mrs.   Mary   Carroll,   Britcola   I'.   11	
Mrs,  I'.  I..  Ebbage, 633 Granville Street  	
Mrs.  1'.  I..  Ebbage, ',32 Granville Street  	
Mrs. P.  I..   Ebbage, 632 Granville Street   	
Mrs.  P.  1..   Ebbage, 632 Granville  Street   	
Mrs.  P.  I..  Ebbage, 632 Granville Sireet   	
Mrs. 1'.  I,.  Ebbage, 632 Granville Street  	
ICxors. of late Tbeemas McCaffney, care Union  Hank   	
IC.se.rs,  e.f late Thomas McCaffney.  care Union   Hank   	
ICsors. eif late Thomai McCaffney, care Union Hank 	
Angus  McGillivray, Cedar  Ce.ttagc   	
Angus  McGillivray, e. e.lar Cottage   	
Angus  McGillivray, Cedar  Ceittage   	
Angus McGillivray, Ceelar Cottage   	
Angus  McGillivray, Cedar Cottage-   	
Blita  Hunter,  care  Maitland  &   Humber   	
Eliza  Hunter, care Maitland &  Humber  	
Rdwln   C.   Robinson.   City    ���	
A.   Chisholm,  206 Carre.ll  Street   	
Allen  Avres,   llritcola   I'.  tl	
Clem   Mills,   lanes   Road   	
Thomas   H.   Hamber.   1-in   Alexander  Street   	
lolm  Houghton, 45'' ton Avenue ICast   .,	
W. C. George &  II.  M. J.  Houie, Ce-elar Cottage  	
Herbert   Kitchen   et   al.  care   I'.ir.lelar.l   .V   S'	
Herbert   Kitchen et al, care Goddard & Son   	
Herbert Kitchen et al. can  Goddard & Son  	
!���'.  W.   I.an.l.   1976   Napier   Sireet   	
II. Wolfe   Merton.  care  Goddard  ,\-   Son   	
K.   Hanada,   siin   Powell   Street   	
I.   A.   Vein    3St,   11th   Avenue'    East   	
J,   A.   Slater,   2e.42   Main   Sireet    	
I.   A.   Slater.   2642   Main   Street   	
Thomai   Harvey,   22"   13th   Avenue   	
George Shapland,   Britcola   I'-   <>	
George Shapland.  Britcola  1'.  <> ��� ������������	
\   I'   lllack .si  W.   I.  McDonnell. 60 Hastings Street  Last  	
IC.   I'.   W.   Merton. '119   1'eneler   Street   	
August   Hoffmeister,  436   Keefer   Street   	
Leverette   McElklnney,   Cedar   Ceittage	
W. Kce Kit, care Kwong Loo Lung, 13 Pender Street 	
Thomas  Harris.  Langley,   B.   C ���	
Mn,   Alice   lacks,   llritcola   1'.   tl	
Mrs.   Alice   Jacks,   Hiitcola   1'.   II	
Mrs.   1..   Dow.   313   Georgia   Street   	
Maude   miliar,   1649   Haro   Street   	
Win,   I.   Brewer.   Ceelar   Ceittage    	
Chas.   (',.   I,.   Reid,  Central   I'ark   	
Chas.   C.   L.   Reid,   Central   I'ark   	
Chas.   (',.   I..   Reid,   Central   I'ark   	
Chas.   (*,.   I..   Reid,   Central   I'ark   	
Chas.  (',.   I,.  Reid, Central   I'ark   	
South   Vancouver   l'uinl'   Station    	
R.  J.  Craig  &   R.   Everett,   72   Water  Street   	
Chas  C.   I..   Reiel.  Central   I'ark   	
A.   Matheson.   3004   St.   Catharines  Street   	
Win.   V.   Campbell,  275   Prior  Street   	
Harry Goddard, care Dow  Fraser & Co	
Harry Goddard, care Dow Fraser & Ce,   ...... ���������������	
G   J   e\;   R.   I.  Hold  &  W.  J.   Hughes.   Helungham.  Wash	
Tain Quan, care Man (In  Tong Co.,.8'.   Pender Street  	
A.  J.  Michelmore,  Collingwood   	
Mrs.   L.   Dow.   313   Georgia   Street   	
Mis   M. A. Gllleipie, Mission City  	
Mr.   Slater,   2642   Main   Street     ,	
Mrs.   M.   McKinnon.   Pender   Street   West   	
Mrs. Jane A. (',. Rae. 1033 Seymour Street  	
Henry  ICarle,  Collingwood   ICast   	
George   Rae,    Hritceila    	
George   Rae,   llritcola    ���	
Ceorgt   Rae,   llritcola    ��� ��� ��� ���,	
Geo.   H.   Ilaskuis, care Tupper J.   l.eiffin   	
Ceo. II. Haskins. care Tupper & Griffin  	
George Rae.   Britcola   	
George  Rae.   llritcola   	
George Roden, Janes  Road   1'.  O.   ������������	
George   Roelen,  Janes   Roael   1*.   0.   ��� ��� ;���;,���':	
thin  Yee Vou, care  R. C.  Fierce. Collingwood  Last   	
Chin Yee Yon, care R. C.   Fierce. Collingwood  East   	
Chin  Yee Von. care R. C.  Fierce, Collingwood  East   	
Chin Yee Yon, care R. C. Fierce Collingwood East 	
Chin Yee Yon, care, R. C.   Fierce. Collingwood Last   	
Chin Yee  Yon,  care  R,  C,   Fierce.  Collingwood   Last   	
Chin Yee  Yon, care  It. C.   Fierce, Collingwood  Last   	
Yee-   Yon,  care   U.   C.   Fierce, Collingwood   Fast   	
Chin Yee Y  care R. C.   Fierce, Collingwoo.l Last   	
Chin Yee You, care R. C.   Fierce, Collingwood  F.ast   	
Chin Yee Yon, can   R. C. Fierce. Collingwood  Last   	
Chin Yee Yon, care R. C. Fierce, Collingwood Bast 	
Chas   Dummerling,   Collingwood   Last   	
(has   Dummerling.   Collingwood   Last   	
Chas   Dummerling,   Collingwood   East   	
Chas  Dummerling,   Collingwood   Kasl   	
Chas    Dummcrlin"     Collingwood    ICast    	
Mart-  lane Cameron,  1604 Semline Drive  	
Mary  lane Cameron,  1604  Semline  Drive  	
W.   IL  Wilson, hii   Fen,l.e   Streel   Last	
lohn Clean, cue   Franklin Smith. Collingwood Fast   	
I. C. Thorn & Co., Metropolitan  Building  	
W.   11.    lames,   IHJI  4th   Avenue   Last    	
l.ilin   Cleave,   lanes   Roael   F.   II	
John Gleavc,  lanes  Road  P. <>	
John  Cleave'. Janes  Road   P.  D	
le.lin   Cleave-,   lanes   Ke.a.l   F.   (' ���������.;���������,���:.	
Estate of 1).   !'.   F.   Reills. can-   Hailey   I elf.ird Co	
Estate of  1). J.   !���'.   Rolls, ear,-   Ha.ley  Telford   to	
ICstale of 11. J.  L. Rolls, care   Hailey Telford  to	
Lstate of D. .1.  F.  Rolls, care Hailey Te ford Co	
Estate e>f  I).   1.   F.   R'ells, care  Hailey   I elf.er.    Co	
Estate of 11.  1. I'.  R'elis. care Hailey Telford tee	
Estate of I). T. F. Redls. care Hailey Telford Co	
Estate of T). J. F. Re.lis. cae-e Hailey Telford Co	
Lstate of D. 1. F. Rolls, care Baley Telford Co	
Lstate of D.   I.   F.  Roll-, care  Ha.ley Telford  Co	
Estate ..( D. 1. F. R"b-. care Bailey lelfor.l Co	
Arthur   Fuinell.   71   Hastings   Street.   City   	
Arthur  Ilawbolt.   852   Heinarel   Street   	
Kijojc   Sityama.   118   Maui   Sheet	
Mary  lane Cameron.  16114  Semline  Drive   	
Mary  lane Cameron,  1604 Semline Drive  	
Spencer   Robinson.   Collingwoeid   Last   	
Stephen   Hull.   Collingwoeid   F.ast	
Mrs.   Mary   lane  Cameron.   l"'>->   Semline   Drive   	
Mrs.  Mary lane Cameron,  1604 Semline Drive   	
A. C. Gray, care Corbold 8c Grant, New Westminster 	
Ceorge  Shapland.   llritcola   F.   d	
Ceorge   Shapland.   llritcola   P.   0	
George Shanland, llritcola 1'. <> ������:������������,"���.;���-',	
Francis   .V   Wm.   Hampson  &   W.   Itowater,   Edmonds,    ������  C.   ...
Francis iv Wm. Hampson .x.  W.  Bowater, Edmonds, II. c.   ...
Mrs. K.  I. Hamilton, Granville  Mansions   	
Mrs,   K.   I.   Hamilton,   Granville   Mansions   	
Mrs.   K.   T.   Hamilton,   Granville   Mansions   	
Mrs.   K.   T.   Hamilton,   Granville  Mansions   	
Mrs.   K.   j.   Hamilton,   Granville  Mansions	
A.  C.  Cray, caie Corbohl &  Grant, New  Westminster  	
W.   W.   Ford.  Sidney,  Manitoba   	
J.   Slingerland.  Ceelar   Cottage   	
J.   Slingerland.  Ceelar   Ceittage   	
.lames   Fatcrson.   1327   Cranville   Street   	
C..  J.   Palmer   	
ti.   1.   Palmer   	
Dick    	
Dick     	
CoiMard    	
Wallia    	
Harris    	
I".  II.   Cloiville &  Ralph  Latta. Collingwoo.l  Last   	
Sarah W. Ituller, Cedar Cottage 	
Sarah VV. Buller. Cedar Cottage 	
Sarah W. Ituller, Ceelar Cottage  	
Sarah W.   Huller. Cedar Cottage  	
Franklin   Smith.   Collingwood   Last   	
School   Site,  South  Vancouver School   Hoard   	
School   Site,  South   Vancouver   School   Hoard   	
1   T. Simpson. Central  Park   	
Miss   I.   A,   Simpson.   Hox   2!'.6,   North  Vancouver   	
James Patterson, 1327 Cranville Street  	
Mrs.  C.  Scotl. Central   Park   	
South  Vancouver  School   Hoard   	
South   Vancouver   School   Hoard	
Mr,.   C.   Scott,  Central   Park   	
District Lot Block
Subdii
191
B. & re-
sub, 9-10
11
392
1-2
1-2
3-4
52 1-2
1-2
6
1-2-3-4
5
1-2-3-4
A pt.
A
U
5
6-7
8-9
S.W. pt.
S. pt.
8-9-10
14
15
,     16 W. V.
37 16 E. i/,
17
18-19-22
A
B
20
21
23
24-25
Lot
26
27
2��
29
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
2U
21
22
23
24
8
9
lie
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
1
2
3
4
6
7
12
13
14
15
16
17
1
2
3
4
5
f
7
8
9
1(1
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
A
P.
c
D
E
F
44
45
46
47
48
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
23
24
25
26
7.1
74
19
20
21
22
23
1
3
���I
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
C
7
8
9
12
13
14
15
16
17
9
in
11
12
1
2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
12
13
14
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
12
3
14
1
2
3
Frontage Peel Flankage  Feet
Lxe-npt        Asaesaed Exempt Assessed Assessment
33. 388.87
33. 38��.87
33. 3HX.H7
33. 388.87
620. 7.UI6.II"
33. 38K.X7
33. 388.87
33. 388.8?
33. 3HH.H7
33. 3SX.K7
33. 38K.X7
33. 388.87
33. JWK K7
33. .IKH.X7
33. 388.87
33. 3XS.87
33. 388.87
18.30        103.70 1222.00
33. 38X87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
3 1. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 3XX.X7
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 3KX.87
33. 388.87
33. 3XK.K7
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
-J                 33. 388.87
33. JHK.K7
33. 388.87
37.4 44H.72
33.                                 . 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 38KX7
33. 388.87
I                        33. .188.87
:              33.                    .  ��� 388 B7
31.8 374.73
32.85 387.10
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
32 8!                ,    ��� '   ��� 387.10
132, 1555.48
'   ' "               132. 1555.48
50.4 , 593.91
33.                               I 3SS.X7
I                 33. 388.87
33. 388.H7
33. 3X��.87
33. V           " 388.87
75. 883.80
33. 388.87
31. 388.87
31. 388.87
33. .1S.S.X7
33. ���                    388.87
;                   33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33, 388.87
33. 3S8.X7
1                     31. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 38,8.87
33. i                        388.87
(                 33. 388.87
3.1. 11                    388.87
33. 388.87
'                33. ���                       3,8,8.87
57. 671.68
51.5 606.88
388.87
38S.87
.is, s7
388.87
���    ' 388.87
2333.23
"   - " "   ' 388.87
.188,87
388.87
"_ '     . 388.87
388.87
381.80
1597.43
388.87
��� _        : 388.87
388.87
388.87
""'���       ' 398.29
1249.10
398.29
388.87
38,8.87
"     ' 388.87
I 388.37
SERVIA'S JOAN OF ARC
30
31
32
33
34
132
132
33.
3.1.
33.
33.
35:
198
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
32.4
135.56
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.8
106.
33.8
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
66.
132.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
38.6
28...
38.6
38.6
3'1.2
39.3
39.3
39.66
42.
42.
42.
43.
31...15
36.35
36.35
36.35
36.35
32 6
3_'.e,7
32.59
32. e. 7
33.1.3
51.87
140.6
49.
36.3
36.3
36.3
36.3
36 .1
4S.4
48.4
48.7
34.6
34.6
34.6
34.6
.14.,,
216.81
4".
40.
31.88
31.88
73.
70.
37.85
37.85
141.44
38.99
35.46
35.46
35.46
33.20
33.37
33.06
33.06
33.06
33.06
134.11
133.26
33.
33.
33.
30.
31.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.05
33.05
33.05
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
133.5.1
132.39
166.38
133.55
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
388.87
777.74
1555.48
388.87
38,8.,87
388.87
3.88.87
388,87
.18
388.87
38,8.87
388,87
454.36
454.86
454.86
454.86
41,1.'1.1
463.11
4l,.l. 11
4. 7..1-
4'e4."J
494.".
494.92
4"4,'iJ
428.35
42,8..ti
42,8 .15
428.3 5
-:s,.;;
384 16
384.'IS
334."4
384 -'
.:8.| 51
611.23
1656.83
577.41
427.75
427.75
427.75
427 75
427.75
57U.34
570.34
57.1,8.1
4117.72
4H7.72
4l<7.72
407.72
4H7.72
25M.88
471.36
471.5.-
375.67
375.67
860 23
.824.88
441..1.2
440.112
1666.72
459.46
417.86
417.86
417.86
391.22
393.23
33" 5.8
3Si',5.8
389.58
389.58
1530.35
1558 55
388.87
338 87
388.87
353.52
365.311
333.87
388.87
388.87
3.83.37
388.87
389.46
3.89.46
389.46
383.87
3.88,37
388.87
5.88.87
-.8, 87
388.87
1575.16
Se-rvia lias given ilu- tvnrld another
Jeeau oi Arc, Meelly J'itclieT. eer liar-
Lara Frietcbie; ane,tb<r ���rdman whose
e.:m.e perhaps will ring through the
|>i-e,try ami patriotism of all time- when
ill.- war thai now i, rending Europe
i- ended.
Her name is Sophia YeivaiiKvitsch,
and when '"tne- Serb historian rises
i.i tell ilu- story ..i tlie straggle of tbe
little kingdom against the Turk ihe
name nf Sophia will become a Imuse.
In,hi word in the Balkans.
Behind the Story of lhe bravery and
self-sacrifice 'ei" the girl there is a
romance, almost overlooked during the
rush etf the threat event- in eastern
Europe. It is a story of love, patriotism, and heroism seldeem equalled in
the history eif the women who have
become the heroines of the nations,
and when the war is over there is to
ne a wedding in which a noble name
will figure.
The tale has been told simply, tiricf-
ly, in the official rcpe.rt- and in the
despatches of Prince Alexis Karogeor-
rovitch, cousin of the king, from
Vranje.
Sophia Yovanovitsch lived in Bel-
uraelc. Her father was a man of con-
sielerable fortune, a physician and of
good birth. Her mother was of noble
blood and in her day was one of the
beauties nf Belgrade. .1 is said that
eluring the reign eif Drags she was one
of tin- favorites of lhat ill-fated queen.
Sophia was tenderly raised, educated
in a convent, anel a little more than
ii year ago, befure she was 18. she returned to Belgrade and was introduced into society. Although barred from
royal circles, she was admired everywhere and it is saiel that one of the
princes of the reigning house of Serbia was madly infatuated with her.
-ie much see that lie .ought again and
again i" meet her.
Hut there was another a youth named Dmitri, his other name being ignored in the brief dispatches, Dmitri
was Russian, or rather his father was
Russian and his mother a Bulgarian,
whi 1 resided in Belgrade. From what
can be learned Dmitri was not the
iele;il hero. In fact, it i- intimated that
but feir the urging of the girl hc never
would have entered the army but
would have Bought t" escape the dangers by claiming citizenship with
Russia.
When the war cloud that has hovered for twenty years over the Balkans broke and little Scrvia sprang
to arms Sophia was one of the most
ardent patriots. There were three
young men avowedly suitors for her
hand, and to each of them she gave
the same order���tint to ask her to
marry them or to seek her love until
thev had volunteered and proved their
worthiness hy serving the country.
Two, both Serbs, at once rushed t'i
the colors, but it is related in Belgrade
that Dmitri hesitated and finally was
ordered by the girl either to enlist at
eeiice or tee renounce forever all
thought of marriage with her. Also
it was evident that Dmitri loved
Sophia more than he loved Servia,
for he enlisted.
Sophia Yovanovitsch's friends say-
that Dmitri did not want to enlist, but
that the girl taunted him with being
a coward, scorned him, and sent him
from her, and that he ,angry and determined, went at once to the first
station, enlisted, and asked to go to
the front. The recruiting officer
smiled  grimly and  promised, saying:
"Take your choice. They all go to
the   front   :.r,t���and at   once."
Theese of us in America have little
Conception "I war scenes in Servia. A
ce.utitry with a few 'ever 2,000/100 people, with perhaps 4ixi,ik>i men 'ef military  age.  put  an army e,f nieire  than
2iio.inKi men into the field in a fe.n-
night.
Sophia Yeivaii'ivit-th eliel ne.t know
thai iJmiiri bad enlisted, Stirred by
he-r patriotism, she decided upem a
plan That night in her boudoir idle
called her maid, and, ignoring the
pr. .tests of the maid, she dipped slp.rt
in r great mass of black hair, her
crowning beauty, and, attiring herself in a suit eef clothes belonging to
her younger brother, she went te.
Mederi, outside of Belgrade, and enlisted as a private,
Among the raw recruits she shone,
and neeiie suspected that the slender.
lithe, bright-eyed soldier was one of
the beauties of Belgrade in disguise.
(in the elay that lhe brigade marched
eeut eif Mederi te, go t" lhe front
Sophia saw Dmitri, lie was in another detachment of the same regiment. She recognized him, but he
knew in,thing of her nearness. It
developed afterward that he had call-
iil to see her after enlisting unly tee
find the household in an upr.ear because of her disappearance.
Her father was an officer in ihe regiment, her brother a petty officer,
and her sweetheart a private, 'lite.' of
the ..titer men who sought hcr hand
in marriage also was a petty officer,
and the girl, surrounded by friends,
was  compelled to hide her identity.
X. it a suspicion of her sex was
raised. She bore the hardships of the
journey through Bulgaria and the
hard work of the regiment when it
joined the allied fe.irces.
The brigade to which belonged the
regimenl in which Sophia was serving was hurried tee the Bulgarian border and went with the tirst detach.
ment of Serb infantry that joined the
Bulgarians under Gen. Savoff. The
battalion, forming the right wing with
two battalions of Bulgarians, support-
d  three  batteries  of  Serb artillery.
There were a dozen skirmishes, lhe
advances of the allies against the
Turks being rapid, and the lighting
fur nine days was almost constant,
with scarcely a cessation, as the Bulgarians pressed forward, eager tn engage in a decisive struggle tee thpiw
ihe Turk back upon his capital.
What happened to Sophia Yovanovitsch during those days of hard
marches, rough camps, and steady
fighting no one knows. But at senile
time she met in the ranks a prince
whose name, according to the dispatches, is Stephano and whose
identity is not revealed save that he
is closely related to the reigning
house of Servia. Whether the prince
discovered that Sophia Yovanovitsch
was a woman or not is not revealed.
Probably not. but it is said that he
was attracted to the lithe, bright-
faced -'rivate and that he secured a
promotion  anel  a  tent  for her.
stabl
Willie���"I'aw . what is a
eminent?"
I'aw���"   When   lhe   parly   in
displays horse sense, my son."
 111	
When the average man due,
an In .nest  confession, he makes it in
sirie'. confidence to himself .
e  guv.
power
make
GEO. SNIDER & BRETHOUR
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
909   Dominion   Trust   Building,,   Vancouver,   B. C.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
Telephones I    Office 8497.    Works 620.1.      Works 9328.    Works  9179
The Gurney-Oxford  Chancellor
The Gurney-Oxford Chancelot in yout
home will mean thc best "i good things "ii
your table, im domestic difficulties, and a
low fuel bill. We can give this splendid
range our iimst unqualified recommendation, and wc stand behind it. as do the
makers,
The flue arrangements insure an oven as
hot at the front as at the back; splendid
. akihg results are absolutely certain. The
broiling top is a convenience thai every
housekeeper will appreciate who likes to
serve well-broiled meats and crisp, brown
toast.
The Economizer, Gurney's great controlling device, is placed on every Chancellor without extra charge. This means
fuel economy, perfect case of control, and
a well-ventilated kitchen.
W'e have a Chancellor that will just
fit y.iur kitchen. All Chancellor ovens
are 20;j inches deep by 133/J inches high,
and are made in 14, 16, 18 and 20-inch
widths, and with high shelf or high closet
���as desired���with or without thermometer.
CHRISTMAS GIFT WINNERS
Ladies : Mrs. W. A. Woods, 2417 Scott St.
Gentlemen : J. W. Sasl.aw, 6410 Windsor
Street.
G. E. McBride & Co.
Corner Sixteenth Avenue and Main Street
Phone :    Fairmont 899
Corner 49th Ave. and Fraaer Street SIX
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   18,   1913
R(^^,9fe!sfel08t    Corporation of the District of South Vancouver
,
Many are the stories of romance
anel adventure that are woven around
the early history oi the establishment
eif the fur iraeling post, iu Hritish Columbia anel Kamloops in particular,
inn in tu- are s>. ihrillingly Interesting as those described by Jmlge- !���'. W.
I leeway, of New Westminster, wine is
perhaps .ine of the ablest historians
in lhe  West  and has as large a  fund
of information about  British Colutn-
bia as any man living, says the Vancuuver News-Advertiser. The feel-
lowing is a contribution by the judge
relative tee the Centenary e.f Kamloops. which arrives em September
17, and establishment eif fur trading
posts at this point which heralded the
"coming of tlie White Man."
Many of our present towns and
cities owe their existence to the fur
trade, such as thc capital itself,
Kamloops, Hazelton, Langley, Yale,
and Hope. This is neet merely fortuitous; neir is it simply a manifestation of the gregarious nature eif man.
It is not simply that new comers,
finding a trading peist established,
settled around il as a centre. These
trading peests were not set down at
haphazard. Some commanding pee-
sitiem was invariably chosen. Strategic points, like the junctions of rivers
or the head of navigation, naturally
suggested themselves to the fur-trader
as suitable spots, lor he, like the merchant eif today, was anxious to select
an accessible sile. Where the natural
situation did nut point out the location
much care and examination were spent
before a site was finally selected. Thus
ill the case of Fort Langley three
years intervened between the preliminary exploration and the construction, lint il was in 1827, when the
struggles of forty years were over
and more deliberations could be used.
After the long and hitler struggle
between the Pacific Fur Company and
the Hudson's Kay and North-West
companies for the possession of the
monopoly of the fur trade of the
Northwest, a light which Anally ended in the absorption of her two opponents by the Hudson's Hay Company, Mr. Jeihn McLeod, of the Hudson's Kay Company, took command
of Fort Kamloops, remaining freim
1822  until   1826.
During his time si-ven tribes frequented this post feir trade. He
gives their names as thc Shert-
shappe, the Con-la-mine, the Si-mi-
lac-ca-meachs, the Okanagan, the-
Stat-lam-cher, the Spa-chil-quah, the
Shin-poo. It is difficult to recognize
our present Indian names in this
orthography. During this period
the Hudson's Bay Company, which in
1824 had amalgamated with its old
opponent, the North West Company,
explored a route from the I'raser
near Alexandria lo the Okanagan by
way of Kamloops and the day of
the picturesque brigade���the annual
means of communication���arrived.
Three or four hundred horses were
kept in the vicinity for the transport
of "goods in" and "returns out." A
most beautiful sight was that horse
brigade as in single tile under the
bright skies of the interior it set out
on its long journey to the Columbia
River.
From 1826 to 1828, Mr. Archibald
McDonald, fcrrr.cly a clerk in the
Thompson River District, was chief
trader at Kamloops. He accompanied Governor Simpson on his famous overland voyage in 1828. Freim
Alexandria the governor and his
party followed the brigade trail to
the North Thompson, crossed and
followed the east bank to the fort,
where they arrived about dusk on
Saturday, the 4th *i October, 1828.
Fond of pomp am1 ceremony, the
party formed a procession and with
Hags dying, pipes playing and a general salute, the governor of the Honorable Hudson's Hay Company's Territories entered Port Kamhiops. Mr.
Francis Ematinger, who had succeeded McDonald, welcomed tin-
party. The natives, duly notified of
the intended arrival, were present in
number to be impressed wilh the
show, to be lectured by the governor
ami to rec.ivc a sob.ion of a foot of
tobacco each, wilh a more liberal
g'ant to Court DepolU- (Court de
partes)   and   the   other   chiefs.
Mr.   l'.tiiatlnger's tenure of office at
Kamloops continued from 1828 until
about 1832, when he was succeeded
by Samuel Black. This man was
formerly of the Northwest Company
and on Ihe coalition iu 1821 was
presented with a ring engraved "To
the most worthy of the worthy
Northwesters." Though a successful fur trader hc was also an educated man, especially interested in
geologv and geography. During his
regime Kamloops was favored in
1833 with a visit from Mr. David
Douglas, the renowned botanist,
after whom the Douglas pine and tir
is named. Tradition says that at
Kamloops Mr. Douglas and Mr. Black
had an altercation, which reached
such a point that thc irate trailer
challenged   the   botanist   to
make of themselves a small volume.
But we must pass on.
Mr. Paul Fraser, a son of the ccK-_
bratcd Simon, succeeded Mr. Tod in
1850.      He   had   been   for   years   cein-
nected with the Northern department, but left il under a cloud eewing
to habits of intemperance and ill-
temper, A man of great native ability
and accurate knowledge of the fur
trade, his over-bearing manner yet
rendered him the detested of all under his command. While in Kamloops he gave a servant named I'lar-
dean such a beating that he died, and
aehling insult lo crime, he found fault
with a servant who was preparing
the boards lor Ilis coffin. The rcieeri
was made lhat perhaps he (Mr.
Fraser) might not have a coffin. The
remark was prophetic. A few months
later while his own men were felling
a tree on Deer mountain it fell upon
his tent, killing him instantly and
burying him beneath ils bulk. This
was in 1854.
Chief 'frailer Donald McLean followed Fraser, holding control of the
old line of fur traders, for during
this periotl came the great gold excitement and the wondrous transformation of the fur trader's preserve
into the colonist's home. The necessity of changing the feirt lo the
south side of the Thompson to meet
altered conditions became apparent,
though it was not actually undertaken until after hc retired. It is common knowledge that he was killed
by the Chilcotin Indians in 1864
while assisting the government to
secure the arrest of Tellot and the
oilier murderers of Waddinorton's
Bute Inlet party.
The last chief trader at Kamloops,
of' whom T intend to make mention,
is Mr. J. W. McKay, who succeeded
Mr.McLean. He removed the fort
to the site, well known to all, a few
hundred yards below the junction of
the northern with lhe southern
branch. He had the pleasure of entertaining at the fort in September,
1H63, Viscount Milton and Dr. Cheadlc,
the well known travellers, who reached
that spot after suffering great hardships and starvation along the course
of the North Thompson. How these
gentlemen fared at Kamloops let
themselves tell. "Talk not to us of
intellectual raptures; lhe mouth and
Stomach are the doors hy which enter
true delight. Mutton chops, potatoes,
bread, butter, milk, rice pudding, tea
and sugar; contrast dried horseflesh
and water, or martens, or nothing at
all with these luxuries. The ordinary
bountiful meals of the fort wcre tpiite
inadequate for our satisfaction, ami
wc managed to interpolate three more
by rising early in the morning, before
the good people of the fort wcre up
and breakfasting with Mr. and Mrs.
Assinihoine, who dwelt in the tent
hard by, secretly visiting them again
between breakfast and dinner and
dinner and supper. We rested from
eating only from a sense of repletion,
not from any decrease of appetite.
Under this active treatment our
meagre bodies rapidly waxed gross,
and three weeks afterwards Cheadlc
made the astonishing discovery that
he had gained forty-one pounds since
his arrival at Kamloops."
My sketch now reaches the time
when Lort Kamloops vanishes from
the stage and the City of Kamloops
appears. Let others speak of that
phase. But before I conclude let me
beg that in this centennial year, when
historical interest is aroused and while
the evidence of the locations of the
old forts is' yet existing some steps
be taken to mark with inexpensive but
appropriate monuments their sites.
Kamloops has a past of which she
may well bc proud. Let her preserve
to future generations the evidences eif
that interesting period. And these
stones shall bc for a memorial unto
her children  forever.
Japanese Proverbs
Though Japan is the youngest uf
the world powers, it is second to none
in national spirit and commercial
enterprise nor in courteous conduct,
personal cleanliness, or love of home
and country are ils indomitable people   excelled   by   Ihose   of   any   other
nation,  These characteristics  of  the
Mikado indicate that they are a
people of high ideals, and it is iu a
nation's proverbs that its ideals frequently  find expression.
Many of the national proverbs of
Japan were collected and translated
several years ago by Ota Masayoshi,
and were published under the title
of "Japanese Proverbs." It is from this
entertaining little volume that lhe
following are  taken ;
Patience is the rope of advancement   in   all  lines  of  life,
The ignorant are never defeated in
any argument.
It is more easy to evade lhe
trouble Heaven sends us than that
which  we  bring upon  euirselves.
It the water be too pure, fish cannot live in it; if people be too ex-
duel, acting, fellow beings cannot stand
However, the storm blew over and beside them
Black was foully murdered by a Where there arc no birds, the bat
young  Indian   at  the  instigation    of will bc king.
his mother, who claimed that the If the mind is clear, even in a dark
trader had worked "bad medicine" I room there will be radiance; if the
on her husband. It is said that Mr. thought is dark, at noonday there will
Blaak's   estate   was   valued   at   over  be  demons.
SJWO.OOO. His body is buried near Be not lenient to your own faults-,
Ducks. keep your pardon  for others.
From 1842 to  1850 Mr. John Tod,      Wl.cn  the  sense of shame  is lost,
one of the best known names in our  advancement ceases,
history, was in charge of Kamloops. I    Genius   hears   one   individual   and
It is probable that the change in the then comprehends ten
location of Fort Kamloops occurred
soon after he assumed control. The
new fort was built on the west side
Of the North River. It contained
about seven houses���stores, dwellings and shops���enclosed by thc
usual palisade fifteen feet high with
bastions at t.vo opposite angles. Tradition tells that the murder of Mr.
Black was a factor in the change.
Mr. Tod was a remarkable man, tall,
bony and wiry���but not handsome.
Amongst the Indians he bore or
seemed to bear an enchanted life. The
incidents of. his life at Kamloops. his
adventures  by  sea  and  land    would
Negligence looks at thc battlefield,
then makes it; arrows.
Seeking information is a moment's
shame; but not to learn is surely a
lasting  shame.
A women without jealously is like
a  ball  without  elasticity.
Unless blind and deaf, one cannot
be impartial.
In trying to straighten her hor.is.
the cov; was killed.
MUNICIPAL HALL
Corner Fraser Street and 43rd Avenue
Postal Address:
DRAWER 1224, SOUTH HILL P. O., B. C.
TAKE NOTICE that the Cemncil of the Corporation of South Vancouver intends as a Local Improvement to proceed with the construction of a
Creosoted Wood Block Pavement, 42 feet wide, on 6-inch concrete foundation, with concrete and stone curbs, and the necessary drains, manholes, and
street gullevs for carrying off the surface water, on Westminster Road, from the centre of Knight Street to thc centre of I'ark Street, in this Muni-
cipaluy, and intends to assess a portion of the final cost thereof upon the real property described in the schedule hereto, which property is benefited
thereby, and fronts ami abtitts upon said Westminster Road.
'flic estimated cost per foot is $11.78, and the estimated annual rate per foot on said property is $0,589, the number of annual payments will bc 20.
The estimated cost of said improvements is $579,418.60, of which $70,000 is to be contributed by thc Provincial Government, $216,072.60 out of thc
funds to be provided by the Municipality, and $293,346 by thc property holders assessed as shown in this schedule.
A Court of Revision will be held on Friday, February 21st, at 10 a.m., at the Municipal Hall, South Vancouver, Ii. C., for the purpose of hearing
complaints against the proposed assessment or the accuracy of frontage measurements.
S. H. WEST,
January 8th, 1913, Municipal Hall, South Vancouver, B. C. Assessor
7-9-11
"She worries every time he takes
the  car  out."
"Yes; I don't blame her. They had
to save a long time to get that car."
Name and Address District Lot Block
James McGeer, Hillcrest  P,  O  352 2 & 4
James  McGeer,  Hillcrest   1'.  O	
James  McGeer,  Hillcrest   P.  0	
Chas.   W.   Marritigton,   Ceelar   Cottage   	
Nareisse Murine, 411)  12th  Avenue	
John   11.   Malabar,   Kerriselale   	
K.  A.  Rally, 254 Hasting! Street  Last   	
It. A. Jackson, care Cancoliver Club  	
Sam   Angel,   Cellar   Cottage     ,
Edgar John Goddard, 123 Lender Street West 	
I. Siimim-rskill    	
W,  II.  McKnight,  1025 Cranville St	
John  I>.  McKinnon, 204 Carrall Street	
Lelgar. J. Goddard, 12.1 Pender Street West	
Lelgar. J. Goddard,  12.1 Pender Street West	
J.  Benson, Hox 264, Vancouver   1 8cl
.1    Benton,   Hox 264,  Vancouver   	
Gertrude M. Robertson, llox 926, Vancouver 	
Gertrude M. Robertson, Heix '.26, Vancouver   *%
Gertrude M. Robertson, lleex 926, Vancouver  ,  """s.
C.  H. Townley, 6.111  Hastings Street	
C. H. Townley, 6.10 Hastings Street   *--j        y-
C.  K. Townley, 6.10  Hastings Street	
C. R. Townley, 630 Hastings Street 	
C. K. Townley, 630 Hastings Street 	
C. R. Townley, 6.10 Hastings Street 	
Benjamin  Blackwood, 3115 Georgia Street   	
John Tulpln, 5()8 Richards Street    j
.I11I111   W.   t'nicumc,  45   Kllli   Avenue   West   	
Jas. IL & Ida May Field, Sunnydene I'. 0  352 5
Jas. II. & Ida May Field, Sunnydene I'. O	
S. Llack, 28 Flack Bldg., Hastings Street 	
S.  l-'lack, 28  Llack  Hldg., Hastings Street   	
S.  Llack, 28 Flack  Hl.lg., Hastings Street  	
S.  Llack, ���>H Llack  ltblg,,  Hastings Street  	
S.  Llack. 28  Llack  Hldg., Hastings Street  	
S.   Llack. 2S  Llack  Hl.lg.,   Hastings   Street   	
S.   Llack. 28  l-'lack   Hl.lg..  Halting! Street   	
Mrs.   A.   L.   Fowler,  lOth &   Main  Street     j
Mrs.   A.   M.   Whatmore,   Ceelar   Cottage    ..,,
Mrs.   A.   M.   Whatmore,   Ceelar   Cottage     '' '
Mrs.   A.   M.  Whatmore,   Cedar  Cottage    ,,
Mrs.  A.   M.  Whatmore,  Ceelar  Cottage   	
Mrs.  A.   M.   Whatmore,  Ceelar  Cottage	
II. C, J. Watson, New Westminster  	
Miss Catherine  IC.   Kirton,  care  Mrs.   W'arrander,  281   18th Ave.   L...
L.'lkoinatsii (Idda, 43.1 Alexander Street  	
Basalne L-amarche, Hillcrest  P. o	
Basaine Lainarche, City Height! 1'. (J  *""' "
L. w. White, 36 liavis Chambers   .
L. W. While, 36 Davis Chambers ,,
F.  A.  Whittaker,  Cellar Cottaage     *
L. A.  Whittaker,  Ceelar Cottaage	
P..  A. (fe D.  Hester,  Aelela  P.  ()	
L.   A.   Whittaker,   Cedar  Cottage   	
A.  M.  Harper, 539  Lender Street   	
Mrs.   Hamilton   Brown,  Carman,   Manitoba   	
Win,   Hamilton   llrown,  Carman,  Manitoba	
Thos.  IC. Wilson 8c . ice.  Mcintosh, 543 Cranville Street  	
Thos. IC. Wilson 8c Alec, Mcintosh, 543 Cranville Street  	
Alt.  Steigeuberge,   1004  16th Avenue  Least   	
Alf.  Steigeuberge,  1004  16th  Avenue  Least   	
Alex.   Mcintosh,   543   Cranville  Street     352 7-9-11
Alex.   Mcintosh,   543   Cranville  Street   	
W.  IL  Gallagher, 448   Lender Street	
L.  W.  Carroll,  2240  Main  Street   	
S.  R.   Neat,  448  Lender  Street  West   ,	
S.  R.   Neat,  448  Lender Street West   	
Chong  Lee  Laundry,  Cedar  Cottage	
Allot   (fe   MeCready,  Ceelar  Cottage	
J.   Russell,  Cedar  Cottage   	
J.   Russell,  Cedar Cottage          ' '   'T' *S?
J.  Russell,  Cedar  Cottage     '. _^<
I'airley (fe Stinson, 308 Loo lluilding     8
L.  (1.   Hrook,  Sunnyelcenc   	
James  Kerr,  218 Winch  Building   	
J. W. Harris, care C. L. Moriatt, 410 Homer Street    ""-'
). W. Harris, care C.  L.  Moriatt, 410 Homer Street	
National   Finance   Corp.,   Vancouver       firr''~'~?-5 |
National   Finance  Corp.,   Vancouver   	
James  Kerr. 218 Winch  lluilding   	
A. N. Dakin, 559 Granville Street	
Gospel   Hall   	
cospd Han   ~     it    verr
I'. J.  Kechan,  321   Vernon  Street   	
P. J.  Kechan,  321   Vernon   Street	
Mrs.  Carrie  Nelson,  2230   Cornwall   St	
Mrs.   Carrie  Nelson,  2230  Cornwall   St	
Mrs.   Kathleen  Joy,  Cedar  Cottage   	
Mrs.   Kathleen  Joy,   Ceelar  Cottage   	
J.   Itradiiicr,  care   Marriott  &   Fellows   	
I. Hradnier,  care   Marriott   (fe   Lcllows   	
R. C, Anderson,  1057 Melville Street       "     ,a
Benjamin   lllackwood, 3115 Humphries Streect  	
H.   McKensie,   505   Richard   Street   	
II. MeKenzie,   505   Richard   Street   	
John  ICgmundsnn,  1611   12th  Avenue ICast     352
John  Lgninndson,  1611   12th  Avenue  ICast	
II.   MeKenzie,   505Richards   Street	
C.   R.  Simpson,   1100  Salsbury   Drive	
C.   R.   Simpson,   1100  Salsbury  Drive   	
Llizahetb   Mills,   Ceelar   Cottage     .,
Elisabeth   Mills,   Cedar   Cottage   	
Clement  Mills, Cedar Cottage  '"' "
Clement Mills, Cellar Cottage   ,	
M.   Mawhinncy,  Ceelar Cottage	
M.   Mawhinncy,   Cellar   Collage   	
The Scotch Investment Co., care J. t're, 698 Hastings Street	
The Scotch Invcstnent Co., care J. t're, 6'18 Hastings Street	
Mrs. Annie Stelanoski. Cedar Cottage  	
Kahan   Singh,   1866  2nd   Avenue   West    , ,,,
L.   Richmond,   Heather   P.   O ,
Phillip!   Lesser  (t   R.   Raphael,   Hox   1191   Vancouver..    !..!!!!.
James  W.   Thomson,  619   liaastiugs  Street   West     1st
James   W.   Thomson,   619   liaastiugs   Street  West    ,
Ralph  C,  Clark,  rare  Imperiaal   Really  Co.,  307   I.oo   Hnileling	
Ralph   C.   Clark,   rare   thiperlaal   Realty   Co..   307   I.oo   lluilding     t*
Ralph  C.  Clark, care Imperiaal   Realty  Co.,  307  Loo  lluilding     /'
Kumataro  Tamquchi,   370   Powell   Street   	
J.  Vernon, 386  1 Ith  Avenue   	
L.  W.  Tyrell,  221   Hastings  Street   Last   	
Ralph S.  Clark, care Imp.  Realty  Co.,  307  I.oo  Hl.lg      '
Rail*  S. Clark, care   imp.   Realty   Co.,  307   Loo   Hldg	
WO  Viiy  S ig et  al,  care  Sang  Hang,  22  Canton  Street	
Wo  Yoy  Soong et  al,  care  Sang   Hang,  22  Canton  Street	
Marriott   (fe   Fellows,   Ceelar   Cottage  16
R.   Hestwitherick,   Janes   Roael     '
J. R.  Michie. Janes Roael  	
Mrs.  A.  L. Robinson, Cedar Cottaage       ". **-.'
Mrs. 8, T. Sterling, Vernon, II. C ., 393 2
Allan   tiros.,   Pender   Street   West     l'ti.. A. Hk 1
Allan  Hros,  Pender Street  West     Lots 5, 6 7
,.    ,    r. _, **������ 3 & 4, Ilk. 2
1-.  J.   Goodacre,  care Dow  Fraser &  Co    ^T-��7
Jas.   Bateman, care Dow  Fraser & Co	
Jas.  Bateman, care Dow Fraser &  Co ,,
M.   Sbillington,  care  Dow   Leaser  8:  Co	
John  C.  lllingsworth.  care  Lorbes Sr Co	
J.  T.  Kirkwooel, care Dow   Fraser Co	
Mrs.  Heath, care  Dow  Fraser &  Co ,,,
Chas.   Spooncr.   care   Dow   Fraser  &   Co !..!!!!!!!
Chas.   Stockwell,  care  Dow   I'raser  &  Co	
W, W. Manuel, care Dow Fraser 8c Co	
Agnes  Smith,  Royal  Oak Rd.,  Central   Tark v...
James  A.  Wright,  care   Dow   Fraser &  Co	
James  A.  Wright,  care Dow  Fraser 8c  Co	
Clara L. McDougal, cave Dow  Fraser 8c Co .!. 3
Clara  L. McDougal, care Dow  Fraser & Co	
Tela  I.  M.  Bennett, care Dow   Lrascr  8c  Co	
Tela J.  M.   lleunett,  care  Dow  Fraser & Co.     *"" ~U
Mrs,   M.  K.  Caldwell,   La   Mesa,   San   Diego,   Cal	
Allan   B.  McDougall,  Hillcrest   I'.  O	
Win. Rathie. Cedar Cottage	
David P. McCannon, 981  Hornby   ,	
David P. McCannon, 981  Hornby  .....' !.!!!!!!
Percy Smith, care J.  Urc Rank of Commerce Hldg  j.,
A. Price, care T. E. Ringrose, City Heights   ���"
Mrs.  S.   Hennelt.  Cedar  Cottage     f*
M. A. Muir & Mrs. Thompson, care N. Thompson 847 Beatty St.
M. A. Muir & Mrs. Thompson, care N. Thompson 847 Reatty St.
M. A. Muir ft Mrs. Thompson, care N. Thompson 847 Realty St.
M. A. Muir (fe Mrs. Thompson, care N. Thompson 847 Reatty St.
J. It. Spurr, corner 12th (t Ontario Street	
J.  A.  Salter,  City Heights  V.  O  . 393 3
Elizabeth   McArthur,   390   10th   Avenue  East    ,....
An.  is   McGillvray,   Cedar   Cottage    '..,.
Annus  McGillvray,   Cedar   Cottage	
Lnbert   Curry,   Gladstone   Hotel       ' " 7
Joseph  Curry,  Gladstone  Hotel	
Toseph Cttrry, Gladstone Hotel    ,.,.,,...
"homos Currv. Gladstone Hotel  	
Mr?    IC.  E.  Rarwick (fe O.  W. Thomas, 837 Hastings Street".!!'.!!!'.
"��� -     L.  E.   R_rwick (fe O.  W.  Thomas, 837  Hastings Street   	
1 -elTtefine   Johnson.   3248   Quebec   Street   	
Kargaret Goddard, P. O. Rox 674 Vancouver '
���",,-g.--ct  Goddard. V. O.  Rox 674 Vancouver	
Mrs.  M.  Armstrong,  1904 Westminster Roael   	
Mrs.  M.  Armstrong,  1904  Westminster Road       '!   ,.
Nathan  Sherman,   1019  Robson  Street    '.	
E.   R.   Puller,  Cedar Cottage   	
E.   K.   Ruller,  Cedar  Cottage   	
IC.   R.   Ruller,   Cedar Cottage    !,.!..	
E.   R.   Ruller,  Cedar Cottage    ' ,	
E. R. Ruller, Cedar Cottage  1   ���    -  ���    ���
1
12
12
1)
14
15
Subdivision
Lot         Exempt         Assess
1
A
63.46
II
63.46
C
63.46
2
HI.
3
61.00
4
D
36.10
IC
36.10
5
64.
6
1
31.
.
29.75
3
29.75
4
29.75
5
29.75
6
29.75
7
23.85
.
1
268.
6
49.6
7
49.6
8
49.6
9
49.6
10
49.6
11
49.6
12
49.6
13
49.6
14
15
1
49.6
33.
34.14
22
2
34.14
3
34.14
22
4
34.14
5
34.14
A
30.
19 (fe 20
It
30.
25 & 2f
C
30.
D
30,
30.
L
32.3
C,
32.3
237.
31.
S. pt. 1 2 & 3
2
33.
3
33.
4
33.
33.
1-5
1
31.8
2
31.8
3
31.8
4
31.8
5
31.8
6
3186
7
31.86
8
31.86
9
30.45
1-5 A
1
J8.65
42.
10
37.45
11
37.45
12
37.45
6-7
1
34.05
2
34.05
3
34.05
4
34.05
6-7
5
34.05
6
34.05
10
1
32.75
2
32.75
3
32.75
4
t                  32.75
11
1
32.
2
31.
3
31.
4
37.2
5
39.7
S. Tort.
1
32.76
2
32.76
3
.12.76
4
32.76
5
32.76
15
31.8
16
31.8
17
31.8
18
31.8
I8A
3.
-?!
S. pt. 11.
9.9
2!
41.8
28
41.5
29
41.5
30
41.5
31
40,45
32
40.45
33
40.45
34
40.45
' ,                         -   '���
20
35.02
21
35.02
22
35.02
23
35.02
24
36.55
25
36.55
26
36.55
27
36.55
28
1
S6.55
39,8
2
39.8
3
39.8
4
39.8
5
39.8
6
39.8
7
39.8
1-2-1
8
1
39.8
73.6
2
36.9
3
36.9
23
68.
24
36.5
25
1
36.5
31.7
2v
31.7
3
31.7
4
.11.7
5
31.7
6
31.7
7
31.7
8
31.7
9
31.7
1-2-3
111
1
31.7
48.3
2
48.3
3
48.3
1 & 2 Re. S.
13
148.8
380,
pt.3, 41 to 68
108
33.
10?
J               33.
110
33.
111
33.
112              .4
.               33.
113
33.
114
33.
115
33.
116
33.
117
<               33.
118
r                33.
119
33.
120
33.
121
33.
121.\
33.
1-2
1                1
70.5
���  2
13.
3
33.
4
13.
5
33.
6
33.
7
33.
>
33.
9
33.
3-4-S
1
45.38
2
43.39
3
45.38
4
45.38
5
45.38
6
45.38
7
45..18
8
���   '            45.38
6a bc
1
33.
2
33.
3
33.
4
33.2
1   W.   V,
66.
1 E 1/
66.
2
.
132.
3
132.
4-5-6-7-S
1
36.
.
36.
3
36.
4
35.
5
35.
6
36.
7
36
20
46.85
21
33.
22
1   33.
23
33.
24
33.
25
33.
Frontage Feet i-laukage   Feet
Assessed ICxemut V*esscd Assessment
$747.81
747.81
747 8|
1308.02
718.82
425.4H
425.46
754.17
365..1H
350.57
350.57
350.57
330.57
350.37
281.04
3158.11
584.is
584.48
584.48
584.48
I 584.4S
584.4
584.4s
584.4s
5K4.-I'
38Ks
402..1H
402.3 '
402
1 402..lu
402.31'
35.1 52
35.1
35.1   J
�����" 35.1   2
35.1 1
380
1 38le .,.'
276. -1
365.30
.is 7
38s ���:
388 :
.1-
374.7,1
.1: 1
374.7 3
374.71
374.7.1
37> 11
375 41
375.4.1
3
45! is
4"4.'.J
441.31
441.31
441..11
4111..4
401.24
41 '    1
.1     'i
401.24
101.24
.185.'12
385. ')2
; 385.92
385.92
I    , 377.08
365.3"
365..1H
, 438 I-
! 467 .
38. "I
." 38(5.04
386 -.1
-,' 386.04
31
374 7,1
. '   ���       I
.1." '
374 7.1
492.=7
48'
48
48'. > '
476.66
47-.
476.66
476.I.I.
412.1
412-
412 ���
41.'.' '
430.7"
430.7
430.7
430.7.
4.1"
469
469
469." -
469 "
4.,"
469
41,"
469.""
81,7
4.11
4.1'
801    I
1 I
4 6
17.
37J
.17
.1,
3 7
37
a
3
1
5"   II
5 '17
..17
1 Ut
4 .77 M wm
SATURU JANUARY   18,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
NINE
AlENA
;ating
Band eCvcning and Satur-
Afternoon
Three
Sessions
Daily
10  a.m  25c
3 p.m  35c
8:15 p.m  50c
Children 15c
All Routes Lead to Main Street
South-eastern Vancouver includes manufacturing area, handsome residential sections and many business streets���expansion
has been rapid and substantial.
This article, also the cuts on our front page, is printed through the courtesy of Mr.
Bennett, editor of "Telephone Talk." the interesting magazine published
monthly by the British Columbia Telephone Co-
Foound Investment Buy Lots in
IVERDALE
At the 6 of Boundary Road and River Road. There is no
better lolproperty in South Vancouver���at the price���on the
terms���ihe wonderful view���the beautiful southern slope���
the perfehtour���CLEARED���the possibilities and assurance
of
DELOPMENT and  profit
Prich. Terms $15 cash, $15 per month, or with an increased ctyment we will make the deferred payments quarterly, hallly, or yearly, as desired by tlie purchaser.
P.    CHATHAM
Room 101 Hastings Street East, opposite Holdcn Building
Phone : Seymour 2201
Gustone Hotel
First Class Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
H. BROWN, Proprietor
S4ES AND DOORS
We have jtation for supplying Sashes and Doors of the
finest   quality (the shortest notice, at Prices that are right.
We have e}iced men who can supply any need in the line
of Sashes and i
It will be idour while to get our prices before placing your
order.   It will (u nothing, and will save you money.
Collingd Sash and Door Factory
Clements & Tufnah
DealerS5l.es, Doors, Frames, Sheet Glass, etc.
ollingwood West Station
HughtBros'   Big Liquor Store
105 HASTHsTRftT  EAST, VANCOUVER, B. C.
IPhon: Seymour 330
We tjeverydng in the Liquor Line
No order too small noneb large for this popular Liquor Store
Free Delivcrio alparts South Vancouver
leaving cr Are evq Friday morning at 9 a.m.
H
A RESTIN PLACE <^THE MOST BEAUTIFUL M<tOR ROU1 ON THE PACIFIC
Special alntion givenblic and privite banquets.
Beautiful located, rest surroundings, unexcelled dining-rm. We willihonored by South Vancouver pataage.
^. G. Hstead
EBURNl C.
Hotel Hi quarters, Vani^er Automobile Club
Five-ijm  House, fully Bern,  on  Thirty-
sixth A'ue, one block froilictoria Road car.
Price ,500; balance on nthly terms.
1
ThijSnap will ndast long!
J A KERR^ CO.
Real Estate Brok
3332 UN STREET       Pho Fairmont 822
Neit many years ago Ninth Avenue
(Broadway) marked tbe southern
he,miliary of the active portion uf the
city. Between that thoroughfare and
Sixteenth Avenue houses were few in
Mount Pleasant, while in Fairview no
streets whatever in lhat district were
opened. In Mount Pleasant, many
hoUflCl were located along Imih sides
of Wesl minster Avenue (Main Street)
and teer a few blocks on cither side.
South e,f where Fairmont exchange is
located there was neet enough activity
to arouse a flurry in real estate, which
Imeans much in a place like Vancouver.
In  1902, a single track was extended
i freun Ninth ahmg Westminster Avenue to Sixteenth to give a car service to the people in that district.
Vcilding to thc demand for tram communication to South Vancouver, in
1904 the B. C. F.lectric constructed the
line from the Sixteenth Avenue extension. Farmers then held sway even
this side of the Bodwell Road, on
which the cemetery is located, and a
few pioneers had gone beyond the
city boundary (Sixteenth Avenue)
because taxes were low and land was
cheap.
Today there is nearing completion
at the corner of Broadway anil Main
a skyscraper as tall as any on Cranville Sireet wilh  lhe exception of the
j Vancuuver block and the Rogers
building. This is the block erected
by Mr. II. O. Lee, the first of its kind
in any of thc outlying dislricts. Today. $4,800 is asked feir a tWO-Storey
dwelling in the 4.50(1 block mi Quebec
Street, which runs parallel to Main,
..ne block west. Counting fifteen
hi.irk- le, the mile, thai location is
three miles frmn th'- Burrard Inlet
waterfront.
Main Street, six miles long, running
Ihrinigh In the Fraser River, is very
busy ai the corner of Broadway, with
its banks and stores. Onl at Six-
teentll Avenue, lhe boundary of the
city before annexation "i D.L. 301.
there is a fair-sized business community, and away out at Twenty-fifth
Avenue, where main line cars tcrmin-
ate Iheir run, there is still another,
while all along Main, and east and
wesi e.n Broadway, are lo be found
excellent nlen-ks nf imposing architecture.
It is becaus: of this expansion that
property owners throughout that district are sanguine regarding future
Drospects. They appear in be right
in iheir statement thai the growth of
lhe past is indicative of future expansion.
Even lifter one has taken a casual
link over lhe ground, it is difficult to
believe that 755 telephone wires are
needed !o provide service lo business
places in that district. When the
Fairmont exchange was cttl over in
June. 1911. fifteen positions with a
capacity nf 2.000 wires, were installed
It was thought hy the B. C. Telephone
Company's engineers thai that equipment would be sufficient tee lake care
of subscribers ill lhat district feir two
years. In less than eighteen months
these wires wcre all in use. Provision
was made fur expansion, bul this was
so rapid that the estimate nf the company, always allowing fur a little more
than is expected, fell short. Today
the service from the Fairmont exchange comprises 755 business and
1,584 residence telephones, with a
total service tti 2,339 stations. Nine
mure positions have been installed in
the expectation that this will be provision enough for the next two years.
There are now .1,600 lines available
with  a  capacity  of 4,500 telephones.
Occupation of lhe outlying districts
has been rapidly effected during recent years and to meet the demand
of residents, the B. C. Electric Railway  Company   extended  its   lines,   so
that now the whole south-eastern
portion nf the city has ample and
rapid transportation facilities. In 1907.
.in extension reached mil along
Broadway to Scott Street: in 1910, it
was continued on a douhle track In
Commercial Drive. In 1909. another
line lefl tin' corner nf Broadway anel
Eighth and went OUl Westminster
Road, wilh branches down the North
Arm Rnad (Fraser Avenue., half a
dozen blocks further east. This year,
the Broadway belt line was paralleled
on Sixteenth Avenue, a double track-
being laid frmn Main Sireet to Oak
Street, over which a service is given.
This vear. too, previous extensions
were further extended, so that street
cars now run right through to Ihe
Fraser River. The 11. C. F.lectric
realized that development was permanent, and in track-laying more
than met existing demands that they
might be thoroughly etpiipped for the
future.
These arc what might be called the
inner-district facilities for the transportation and distribution of the resident population. The great double
track trunk lines come in freim each
side direct from the city proper. Main
Street cars go to the southern boundary of thc city proper and also follow the double track route to where
the Broadway line again joins the
main system on Commercial Drive.
The belt line cars run cast and west
on Broadway and also arc quick connection with down town, and a few
months ago service was begun on the
Cambie-Bridge Street track which will
be a very convenient short-cut for a
wide district.
isperous   and   thriving
grown into existence,
Adequate communication by wire
and rail is necessary in any growing
community, and expansion has been
greatly assisted by the large utility
corporations. That is why all through
the Mount Pleasant district and contiguous territory beyond, beautiful residences have been erected and hundreds of fine homes established. With
electric railway and telephone, this
section is always closely in touch with
any other portion of the city. Business
places  follow   the  erection  of dwell
ings,   ami   a   pr
community hai ,
almost  a   small   city   within   the  big
city's confine!.
Much business muf< be transacted,
for within the radius nt the Fairmont
exchange, including practically Wards
Five anil Eight, cily banks have established   eleven   branches.     These   are:
Canadian Bank nf Commerce, corner
Eighth Avenue and Main Street:
Northern Crown, 2505 Main Street;
Royal Bank, four branches, 2.101 Main.
Comer   Bridge   Street  and   Broadway,
corner Seventeenth Avenue tind Main
Street, and 758 Broadway East; Union Bank. 2415 Main Sireet. and curlier of Twenty-fifth and Main; Bank
of Vancouver, 577 Broadway West,
and Cedar Cottage; Bank of Hamilton,
Cedar Cottage.
There are none too many bank-.
for there is a busy factory and warehouse section west of Main Street
along False Creek and em Front Street
with trackage on ihe Great Northern
Railway. Little, has been heard of the
big steel plant lieing erected along
the Great Northern tracks, and which
will he another large industry for the
Fairmont district. This i��� h< in^r established by the Canadian Northwest
Steel Company, and will involve an
expenditure nf $300,000. This company is the Canadian branch nf the
Northwest Steel Company, which has
a $500,000 plant at Portland, a very
sin.nu concern.
Broadway is business almost its full
length. There is a space away tn the
east, but with busy Commercial Drive
at that end the overflow will seenn In
running along Broadway. Out Main
Strict there i- a succession rn' busy
centres one after another to Ihe 4000
block, and even beyond that business
places arc lint absent.
The southern slime of False Creek
has many industries, and a large number of these are tn he found east 'if
Bridge Street. The sectiem along
Fraser Street, ju-t west of Main, is
��� iui of the line of beaten iraffic and
is an excellent location for the many
industries operating there. East of
Main Streel facilities are l.e be prn-
vided that will mean ihe establishment
nf new plants. Development at the
head nf False Creek, such as i> pn..
posed, will do much l.e heighten the
tone eef prosperity and expansion in
ihis part nf the' city, Mount Pleasant
expecti in reap much advantage frmn
thc construction there of the modern
am! commodious depots eef lhe Great
Northern and the Canadian Northern
Pacific railways.    That is why $100,-
000 was recently paid fur frontage on
Main Slreel al  Sixth Avenue.
Excellent schools are scattered
throughout ihe district. Progressive
though the- policy of the Seine,,1 Board
lis. il has been kept busy supplying
school accommodation, and the latest
buildings to he creeled are as far mit
as the 4800 block mi Main Streel and
on  East  Broadway.
Fine churches are indicative eef the
welfare e.f a community, and through.
out the district served by the Fairnie.nl
exchange edifices for sacred worship
are many in number and Imposing in
appearance. Brick and stone struc-
tures predominate, any every denomination is represented. Many nf the
churches are not on the original sites.
The Methodist church was formerly
located mi the site where the Lee
building has been erected, am! the
Presbyterian church was close by the
junction nf Main Street anel Westminster Road. They found it Letter
j to move a block or twu back, when
business forced its way in, and their
congregational buildings now are excellent example nf church architecture.
Though comparatively remote from
downtown Vancouver, the district is
ml .suburban in its ambitions, Metropolitan improvements abound
Cement sidewalks are tn lie found
further nut eacli year, and each sea-
sun additional permanent pavement is
[aid. Uroadway is pawl its entire
length, Seventh Avenue mi in Main
has pavement. Tenth and Twelfth
avenues have pavement also, while-
north and smith Main Street ie, amply
provided feer in this respect. Arrangements are now in hand to continue the pavement on Westminster
Road   through   to   New   Westminster
1 ermancniy is the feature in all the
substantial improvements.
According to the city census, the
population nf this district was 20291
almost a year ago. Each summer
many new residents take up homes
for in this sectinn nf the city building
has been brisk.
Land values are placed by the city
assessor at $1.1,937,130. Since property in Vancouver is not assessed
anywhere near the market price, the
real value of the land is therefe.re
much srcaU.r. Improvements arc
totalled at $22,082,330. an exceeding
ly  creditable  showing.
Permits issued for buildings in this
district tor the present vear up to
November 26th numbered 252 the
amount being $1,142,440. These figures
��� UXJ.UOO structure, the permit for
which was taken out in 1911 Two fine
buildings, for which permits were
taken out this year and which are
nearing completion, are those of the
Koyal Bank, corner of Eighth Avenue
l^Aon ' a, "Me "tnjeture costing
$42,000, and of Mr. J. B. Mather
whose new building at the comer of
Eleventh Avenue and Main Street
handsome with its facing of pressed
yellow brick, will be occupied shortly.
Little wonder they have a busy time
at the Fairmont exchange, where the
staff comprises twenty-four A and
seven B operators, five chief operators
and supervisors, and a switchboard
clerk. In October, 18,775 calls orgin-
ated in the district, while 10,671 calls
were received from other exchanges.
The future holds promise of busier
times and in the meantime prepara-
tie.n is being made.
A Mild Smoke
Mr and Mrs. Justbinwed occupied
the  -ame armchair.
"Darling." suddenly whispered be
int.. her little pink ear, "1 shall never
really be happy until I've te.Nl yen
something."
"Thin,  tell  me,  love."
"Vou remember the reas ��n you
married me. don't you?" resumed her
reminiscent  hubby.    "You gave- your-
-.-li ie, nu- in gratitude for my having
saved your life frmn drowning at
Margati���isn't   that  sor"
"Yes, sweetheart." Little Mrs. J.'s
voice   was   sweetly  tremulous.
"Well, dearest, her better-half continued, with set face and tragic calm,
"I deceived you. The water was but
waisl   deep."
.-. deathly silence, broken only by
lhe deep breathing of the self-confessed culprit. Then nut of nowhere
came a meek, small voice, which said:
"Don't worry, dear; I knew, because I'd got my foot on the sand all
th j  time I"
l-'i ind Mamma: "Now, Charley,
don't you admire my new dress?"
Charley: "Yes, mamma; it's beautiful."
Fmid Mamma: "And, Charley, all
the silk is provided for us By a poor
worm."
Charley:    "Do you mean  dad?"
Some nf lhe blames fur the lies we
tell might In be charged up tn people
who ask our candid opinion.
SOLD   EVERYWHERE
SPEND : : : : :
A PLEASANT EVENING AT THE
Fairmont  Pool  Room
(Bryant   Block)
20th AND  MAIN ST.
The best tables in South Vancouver. Everything new. Personal attention by the proprietor, D. D. Den-
man.
Cigars, Tobacco and Candy
ROBERT
McBRIDE
FOR
WARD  VI
Those in favor of clean and
efficient Municipal Government in
South Vancouver, vote for Robert
McBride, J. P., as Councillor.
Special Rales to Municipal
Hall and other South Vancouver points.
Cambie Street will eventually become the leading thoroughfare between the North
Arm and Burrard Inlet, and today there is no better investment on the market. A
briei study of the map should convince you that our statement is correct. We have
a few choice lots on  Cambie  Street facing West.
Price $1625 each;   J cash;   balance 6-12-18-24 months
These are between Sixty-sixth Avenue and River Road. We have also a few
choice homesites  from  $500  each,  that  are worth  investigating.
Wm. H. KENT & SON
COLLINGWOOD   EAST
Phone : Coll. 18 Branch : Cor. River  Rd. and Ash St.
BITUUTHIx
PAVEMENT
Granville   Street   South,   Before   Paving
This has the following attributes :
*I Durability; sure footing for horses; resiliency ; noiselessness; easy drainage; dustless-
ness; economy.
<J Bitulithic approaches more closely than any
other the ideal of a perfect pavement.
<I Its notable durability makes it more economical than any other paving.
���I The Vancouver thoroughfares paved with
bitulithic are an impressive object-lesson in
fine paving.
CJ Bitulithic has been adopted in over 200 cities
in the United States, and 15 cities in Canada.
Granville Street South, After Paving
Columbia Bitulithic Limited
433 Granville Si. Vancouver, B. C
b EIGHT
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   18,   1913
>$gv> THIS IS AN 010 ONE BUT-
ri!
Le Fanu, in his "Seventy Years of
Irish Life," tells of a peasant who said
t,e a gentleman;
"My poor father died last night,
>������ itir  honor."
"I'm surry for that, DOW," answers
the either, "and what doctor attended
him ?"
"Ah! my pour father wouldn't have
a doctor; he always said he'd like to
die  a  natural  death."
* *   *
There is a story of a fool at a continental ceiurt, in early days, who
stirred up all the wrath that could he
contained in the heart of the lord
chamberlain by so exact an imitation
of his voice and so sarcastic a description of his character as to excite roars
oi laughter in every soul in the banqueting room, from thc sovereign beneath thc dais to the scullion at the
door, waiting for the dirty plates. The
angry chamberlain encountered Sir
Fool an hour afterwards, when he
communicated to the later his intention, at fitting opportunity, to sec if
a few inches of his poniard could not
stop the loquacious folly of the other
forever. The Merry-Andrew flew to
his princely matter and sought protection for his life.
"Be of good heart, merry cock!"
said lhe prince. "If the chamberlain
dares run his dagger into your throat
his throat shall bc in a halter the day
afler. 1 will hang him as high as
llaman."
"Ah, father!" cried the jester, "the
day after has but promise of sorry
consolation in it. He may thrust his
knife between my ribs tomorrow���
and couldn't you hang him the day
before?''
en    *    *
A colored woman was on trial before a magistrate, charged with inhuman  treatment of her child.
Evidence was clear that thc woman
had severely beaten the youngster,
aged some nine years, who was in
court to exhibit his battered condition.
Before imposing sentence his honor
asked the woman whether she had
anything to say.
"Kin 1 ask yo' honah a question?"
inquired  the prisoner.
"Go ahead," said the judge, and the
court room listened.
"Well, then, yo' honah, I'd like to
ask yo' whether yo' was ever the
parient of a puffectly v/uthlcss culled
chile?"
* *      ele
The late Richard Mansfield possessed a very concise and penetrating
wit, of which only those who knew
him intimately saw thc best flashes.
One day in his dressing room he
chanced to read a prize offer of fifty
dollars to be given for the best story
about an umbrella, lie scribbled
something quickly on a scrap of paper
and turned tn an English friend who
was with him and said:
"I have a good one. Here it is. Wc
will send it in."
The friend took it and read it and
read these words: "Once I bought
an umbrella."
The Englishman in 'telling of it
aflerward added, "And Mansfield
really thought lhat blooming thing
was funny, but we did not send it in."
* He       *
An artist who spent a great part of
his life in the Latin Quarter tells of
the frugality of a Frenchman who
lived em a pension of five francs a
week, involving a curious system,
which the Frenchman thus explained:
"Eet  is  simple,  vaire  simple!  Sunday   1   go   to   Z2   house   of   a   good
friend, and zere I dine so extraordinaire and eat so vaire much  I  need no
more  till   Vednesilay.    On  zat  day  1
have   at   my   restauront     one     large,
vaire  largo,   dish  of  tripe  and   some,
onion.    I abhor ze tripe, yes, and ze i
onion   also,   and   together   zey   make j
nie so ill as I have no more any appetite    till    Sunday.      Eet    is    vaire j
simple!"
At     At     *
The reigning bore at one time iu
Edinburgh was Professor L������; his
favorite subject the North Pule. One
day the arch torinentcr met Jeffrey in
a narrow lane, and began instantly nu
the North Pole. Jeffrey, in despair,
and out of all patience, darted past
him, exclaiming, "Hang lhe North
Pole!"    Sydney Smith met  Professor
L  shortly after, boiling over with
indignation at Jeffrey's contempt of
the North Pole. "Oh, my dear fellow." said Sydney, "never mind; no
One minds whal Jeffrey says, you
know; he is a privileged person���hc
respects nothing, absolutely nothing.
Why, you will scarcely credit it, but
it is not mure than a week ago that
I heard him speak disrespectfully of
the  Equator."
* *    *
The Duke tie Koquelaure was told
that two ladies uf the court had a
r.uarrel and had cast all kinds of invectives at each other. "Did they call
each other homely?" asked the Duke.
"X... my lord!''
"All right; then I will see that they
become  reconciled."
* ��    *
A little slum child was enjoying his
first glimpse of pastoral life.
The setting sun was gilding the
grass and roses of lhe old-fashioned
garden, and on a little stool he sat
beside the farmer's wife, who was
plucking  a   chicken.
He watched the operation gravely
for  some  tint".    Then  he spoke:
"Do v. r take off their clothes every
night, !a:Iv?"
* lie       *
A very ;.rominent man recently died
and shortly after a friend of the
family called to condole with the
widow.
Thc caller had been a very warm
friend of the deceased, and as he was
about  to  de.iart  he asked:
"Did  Will  leave you much?"
"Oh, yes, indeed," responded the
widow, "near! ��� every night."
���J.      et       *
"Oh, I just love cake, and it's awfully nice!" cried title Dorothy, rc-
gardin.!. her ehoci late-frosted dessert
with  high  approval. ��� ,
"You should not say you 'love
cake,'" reproved her mother; "say
you 'like' it; and don't say 'awfully';
say 'very.' Don't say 'nice,' but 'good.'
And, by the way, the word 'just'
should be omitted, and also the 'oh.'
Now, my dear, repeat the sentence
correctly."
"I like cake; it is very good," repeated Dorothy.
"That is much better," said her
mother.
But Dorothy was far from being
satisfied. "It sounds as if I was
speaking of bread," she said, with an
air of disgust.
* *    *
A man, driven home on a very wet
night, wished to give thc cab-driver
something to keep the cold out. _��� hiding nothing at hand but a liquor-stand
with its tiny glasses, hc filled up one
and handed it to Jehu, remarking:
"You'll think none the worse of this
because it was made by the holy
monks."
"God bless thc holy monks!" exclaimed the driver as he drained the
glass. "It's thimselves that can make
good liquor, but the man that blew
that glass was very short of breath."
* +       *
"I hope yuu arc following my instructions carefully, Sandy���the pills
three times a day. and a drop of
whiskey at bedtime."
"Weel, sir, I may be a wee bit behind wi' the pills, but I'm aboot six
weeks  in  front wi' the whusky."
* *    *
A small boy wilh a rather lost and
lonesome appearance walked into the
c unity clerk's office at the court house.
Hc gazed about him for a time and
finally approached Deputy Henry
Smiley. "Please, sir," the lad said
timidly, "have you seen anything of
:i lady around here?"
"Why, yes, sonny," answered Smiley, "I've seen several."
"Well, have you seen any without
a little boy?" the lad asked anxiously.
"Yes,"   replied   Smiley.
"Well." said the li tie chap, as a re-,
lieved look crossed Ilis face. "I'm the
little boy.    Where's the lady?"
* *   *
Sir Archibald Oeikie tells a story of
a Scotchman who, much against his
uwii will, was persuaded to take a
holiday. He went in Egypt and visited the pyramids. After gazing for
senile time at the Greal Pyramid he
muttered! "Man, what a lot of mason
wurk not  to he bringin' in any rent!"
Del. S. Lawrence, at the Avenue Th eatre
Name and Adelrcss
Win.   J.   Johnston,   Collingwooel   East    	
Mr,.  M.   M.  Golelsmiel,   11-".   Pacific Street   	
Omar   Giilney,   Collingwood   East   	
Walter    Ci aililiui.    Collingwooel    East    	
Evelyn   Michelmore,   CotUfljfwood   Ea_t   	
A.   E.   Almas,   Collingwood   East   	
W.    I'.   Ki-.lmonel.   Egerton,   Alta	
VV.   E.   Redmond,   Egerton,   Alta	
Mrs.   Annie   P.   Ilrown,   Collingwood   East   	
Caroline   E.   Whatmough,   Collingwood   East   	
Methodist   Church   	
Ralph   I.atta & Jno.   II.  Glanville,  Collingwooel   East   	
Ralph  I.atta & Jno.  II. Glanville, Collingwooel  East   	
Jeihu   Taylor,   Collingwood   ICast   	
A. A.  McRae,  Davis Chatnhcrs, 615  Hastings Street   	
Wm.  H.  Michelmore, Collingwooel  ICast   	
Win.   II.   Michelmore,   Collingwooel   ICast   	
Thos.  E. Wright, C.  Newel!  &  IC.  IC. Cane. Collingwood   ICast
Frank Gray, Collingwood  ICast  	
John   II. Thompson, Central  Park  	
John  II. Thompson, Central  I'ark   ._	
Evelyn   Michelmore.  Collingwood   East   	
Mrs.   I.ighthody,   Collingwood   East   	
II.  Coael,  ICelen,  Manitoba _	
Alex   Eord,   Collingwood   East	
I..   II     Seller,   Rcgina,   Sask     	
I..   II.   Seller,   Regieia.   Sask	
Ralph   I.alta 8: Jno.   II.  C.lanvillc, Collingwood   Rut   	
Herbert   C.   Carley,   Collingwoo.l   ICast    	
Hugh   McDcrmid,  44li   Pender  Street  West   	
Hugh   McDcrmid.  446  I'eneler Street West   	
Alex   Ilrown, Collingwood   East       	
W. A.  McKay, General  Delivery  	
A.   I..   Nicholson.   General   Delivery       .
A.   I..   Nicholson,   General   Delivery   	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwooel    ICast	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwooel    ICast	
Gar  Way,   101/,  Canton  Street,  Vancouver   	
Gar  Way,   KU/,   Canton  Street.  Vancouver   	
Daniel    McKinnon,   Collingwood   East    	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwooel   ICast    	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwood   East    	
Alexaneler McKinnon,   1617  3rd  Avenue  East   .,	
Chas C.  Gow,  I.adysmith,   It.  C _...	
Chas  C   Gow,   I.aelysmith,   II.   C	
Chas  C.   Gow,   I.aelysmith,   It.   C	
Chas  C.   Gow,   I.adysmith,   II.   C	
Annie   Walker,   Central   Park	
Ernest   Tomelson,   Nanaimo,   11.   C	
Elizabeth   II.   McMahon,   Collingwooel   East   	
S.   K.   (Ino.   Collingwood   ICast   	
Ge   rgc   Horning,  Central   Park   	
J.   H.   Foster  &   Sarah   Flack,   Central   Park   	
Vernon   J.   Nicholson,   Collingwood   ICast    	
Andrew   Hlack,   Collingwooel   East   	
Walker J.  Trott,  Collingwooel   ICast   	
Arthur J.   Michelmore,  Collingwood   East   	
Wm.   J.   Brewer,   Cedar  Cottage   	
Agnes   Nicholl,    llritcola   	
John   Nicholl,  Britcola	
C.  IC.   Hanks, Cedar Cottage   ,	
Hanks, Cedar Cottage    -	
Hanks, Cedar Cottage      	
Hanks, Ceelar Cottage    	
Hanks, Cedar Cottage  	
Thos.  R.  Morrow, care J.  J.   Miller ,	
W.  Nicholson,  llritcola     	
S.   W.   Keith,  2471   Westminster   Roael  	
S.   W.   Keith,  2471   Westminster   Roael	
Franklin   Smith,   Collingwood   ICast   	
Mrs.   Mary J.  Cameron,   16(14  Semline   Drive   	
Dougal   Harris,   Gibson's    l.aneling    	
James  Wright,  4523   Quebec  Street   	
Arjohu,   Ceelar   Streel,    Heaconsfielel    	
Maria   Fiedler,   1834   5th   Avenue   West   	
A.   Cotton,   1133   Pacific   Street   	
Philip  Oben,  Central   Park   	
Bowman,   Central   Park   	
Howman,   Central   Park   	
Bowman, Central  Park  	
Ilownmii,   Central   Park   	
jas.  II. Toelrick,  Central   Park   	
John   M.   Robertson,   Central   Park   	
J.   J.   Wilbers,   Collmfrwood   ICast   	
J. J. Wilbers, Ceillingwood ICast
J. J. Wilbers. Collingwood ICast
J.  J.   Wilhers,  Collingwood   ICast
F. II. Dili rant, Central I'ark P.
J.  J.   Wilbers,  Collingwoeid   ICast
J. J. Wilbers, Collingwood ICast
W.   G.  Aleock,  Collingwooel   East   	
Aleock,  Collingwood   ICast   	
Aleock,  Collingwood   ICast   	
Aleock, Collingwood   ICast   	
Aleock, Collingwood   ICast   	
Frederick  T.   Aleock,  Collingwoetil   ICast   	
L.  R.  -i'  F. T.  Aleock,  Collingwooel  ICast   	
1..  R.  K   F.  T.  Aleock,  Collingwooel  ICast	
W,   G.   Aleock, Collingwood   East   	
ilans  Es|icland,  Collingwood   ICast   	
Philip   Oben,   Central    Park    	
Philip   Oben,   Central    Park    	
W. J.   Hattison,  Collingwood   ICast   	
W. G. Connon, care J.  D.  Stuart. 320 Seymour Street
John McGatty, Collingwood ICast  	
Mrs.   Louisa   Major,   Collingwooel   ICast    	
G. H.   Cole.   Collingwooel   ICast    	
G.   H.   Cole,   Collingwood   ICast   	
Dr. J.  It.  Blngay, Guadalajara, Mexico  	
Dr.  J.   B.   Hingay,  Guadalajara,  Mexico   	
Dr.  J.   B.   Hingay,  Guadalajara,  Mexico   	
Chas.   J.   Hell,   Collingwooel   ICast   	
Chas.  .1.   Hell,  Collingwooel   ICast   	
Alex   McDonald,  Central   Park   	
G. E.
C. E.
G. E.
G. E.
J. II.
J. H.
J. II.
J. H.
O.
W. G.
W. G.
W. G.
W. G.
District
Lot            Block
Subdivision
I.nt          Exempt          Assess
37
���f    35 38
S. i/,
8
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
36
N. pt.
132.99
37
N. pt
132.99
39
132.9'.
40 41
B
12
13
14
1.
16
11'
31.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1-
42
;.
'.1
���1
33 t
33.1
33.1
33.1
43
1
i
1
4
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
37
4445
46
A
11
12
13
14
15
16
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
33.1
132.99
47-50-51
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.7
32.8
33.05
33.05
33.05
33.05
48
N. l/,
132.99
49
1
2
3
4
33.2
33.2
33.2
33.2
52
2
3
4
33.25
33.25
33.25
33.25
53
2
3
43.4
43.4
33.3
54
1
2
3
33.55
.'3.35
58.3
50
5
A.
250.
5
B. E. pt.
W. pt.
���
216.
211.
6
W. pt.
22
23
24
25
26
27
47.4
47.3
47.3
47.3
47.3
47.3
6
A. N.E. pt.
440.6
13
N.W. pt.
7
8
9
18
19
20
21
22
39,2
39.2
53.2
32.11
30.76
26.0,"
31.
31.
36-49
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
264.66
264.61
33.
3.1.
33.
33.
3.1.
34.4
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
36-49
/
7
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
34.15
33.
33.
33.
33.
33.
.     33.
33.
55.
7
Pt.
130.1
��
16
17
18
73.2
74.2
74.2
9
N. pt.
168.
10
330.90
11
330.90
12
N. pt.
330.90
13
W. pt.
1
39.5
39.5
13
N.E. pt.
1
2
.1
4
5
34.06
50.09
33.06
33.06
35.46
14
N. pt. A
298.9
Frontage Feet Flankage Feet
Assessed Exempt Assessed Assessment
391.22
391.22
J9l
191.22
391 _ ���
391...
191
1567.1
1567.)
39n
3'.'i
390 i
390 i
390
391.
3'��
39n
390
190
.I'd i
3'��i
.l'li!
.I'll!      .
390.ii.
.Vii i
390.1:;
190.0!
390.01
39li.li.
1567.U
391.2.'
391
191
191.2
397.1.'
386.1
���      . .We  .
3R'e .
38') :
189.41
1567.1-
391.22
391. :
.I'H
391.:.:
191.81
191.81
391.ee!
191.81
511.42
511 4.
392.4!
392 '
.19.'. ' ���
687.011
294i, m
2545. '.4
24864.'
SS8
557 IE
557. .1,1
S57. ���
J57
557..1.1
1192
461.9J
461   -:
, 621    i
3!
36247
307. .'1
36= .">
36 30
31H 75
3118.75
3i<- 17
3^
38H.X7
388."7
3ss <7
405..17
388.S7
388.R7
3s,s.<
3KK.-7
.W 87
.ISS 87
402.42
388.87
388.87
.Ih- -7
388.87
388.87
388.87
648.12
1533.09
C74..17
874.37
1979.71
3899.32
3899.32
3899.32
465.46
465.46
401.36
590.2'.
389. 57
389.-7
417.86
3522   I
MONEY
CANT
BUY
BETTER
All Grocers
Kelly, Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Stove Wood
BUY "AT HOME"
Stove Wood���14 inch Lengths
$3.50 per Load
COAST LUMBER & FUEL
COMPANY  LIMITED
Corner Bodwell Road and Ontario Street
Phone : Fraser No. 41 Mail Address, Box 22, City Heights
Donaldson   &   McDonald
Dealers in
HAY, GRAIN, AND FEED
All Kinds of Chicken Feed
4213 Main Street
Phone : Fairmont 1514
The Robertson-Godson Co. Ltd.
Wholesale Plumbers' Supplies, Water Works
Supplies, Corporation Brass Goods.
572 Beatty Street
Vancouver
Two   Propositions
No. 1. You rent a house at $25 per month. In one year you have
paid out $300, for which you can show no results. 7 per cent, interest
on $300 is $21.   So in the year you practically throw away $321.
No. 2. You bring me in $100, for which I give you a 6-room
Modern House, on Lot 33x125ft. House has fireplace, etc. Balance
is $25 per month.   Total price is $2,600.   No loan.
In one year you have an equity of $400 in your own home.
Compare proposition No. 1 with No. 2, then call at my office and
see this house.
R. J. McLauchlan
4123 Main Street
Phone : Fair. 1607
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
1949 ALBERT ST. PHONE t  HIGHLAND  530R
ENGINEERS, MACHINISTS  AND  FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND  SPECIALS
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
THE BEER WITHOUT A PEER
CASCADE
THE VANCOUVER BREWERIES Limited
PHONE:   Fairmont 429
rA^*^^s,ls^st*ssstsr*sl^^t**^s^Sst'>ssl^sl^sfs^sssSss^Sssn SATURD/
.JANUARY   18,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
NINE
;ating
Band ever) -Evening and Saturday lAfternoon
Three
Sessions
Daily
10  a.m  25c
3 p.m  35c
8:15 p.m  50c
Children 15c
For Sbund Investment Buy Lots
= R|VERDALE
At the coital of I'oundary Road and Kiver Road. There is no
better locaKllproperty in South Vancouver���at the price���on the
terms���will tlie wonderful view���the beautiful southern slope���
the perfecqco^itour���CLEARED���the possibilities and assurance
of
DEVELOPMENT   AND   PROFIT
Price S.rll). Terms $15 cash, $15 per month, or with an increased casr l'kymcnt we will make the deferred payments quarterly, half-jjparjly, or yearly, as desired by the purchaser.
.    CHATHAM
Room 105, ^Hastings Street East, opposite Holden Building
Phone : Seymour 2201
All Routes Lead to Main Street
South-eastern Vancouver includes manufacturing area, handsome re-
sidential sections and many business streets���expansion
has been rapid and substantial.
This article, also thc cuts on our front page, is printed through the courtesy of Mr.
Bennett, editor of "Telephone Talk." the interesting magazine published
monthly by the British Columbia Telephone Co.
Gladstone Hotel
First Class Wines,
(Liquors and Cigars
H. ft BROWN, Proprietor
[ES AND DOORS
We have a St;i|tation for supplying Sashes and Doors of the
finest   quality ani v the shortest notice, at Prices that are right.
We have cxti-nced men who can supply any need in the line
of Sashes and D��>!<1
It will be wd|t;\rour while to get our prices before placing your
order.    It will coil; u nothing, and will save you money.
Collingwood Sash and Door Factory
Clements & Tufnah
Dealers iii Sadies, Doors, Frames, Sheet Glass, etc.
"'Collingwood West Station
Hughes Bros'   Big Liquor Store
105 HASTINGS STRICT  EAST, VANCOUVER, B.C.
\    Photti: Seymour 330
We carfy everything in the Liquor  Line
No order too small, and none Ipo large for this popular Liquor Store
Free Delivery to all parts South Vancouver
leaving our Store every Friday morning at 9 a.m.
HOTEL EBURNE
A RESTING PLACE ON THE MOST BEAUTIFUL MOfrOR ROUTE ON THE PACIFIC
Special attention given nublic and privite banquets.
Beautifully located, restftil surroundings, unexcelled dining-ro(oni. We will l^e honored by South Vancouver patronage.
A. G. Halstead
EBURNEIB. C.
Hotel Headquarters, Vancouver Automobile Club
FOR SALE
Five-rc om  House, fully mbdern,  on  Thirty-
sixth A vi nue, one block from Victoria Road car.
Price |2,500; balance on mkthly terms.
This Snap will not last long!
J.
A. KERR fe CO.
Real Estate Brokeri
3332 MAIN STREET       Phonfc; Fairmont 822
N'eet  many years ;ii_;<��  Ninth  Avenue
(Broadway; marked the southern
boundary <>f the active portion of the
city. Between that thoroughfare anel
Sixteenth Avenue houiei were few in
Mount Pleasant, while in Falrview no
itreeta whatever in thai district were
opened,    In   Mount   Pleasant,  many
he,uses were located along both sides
of Westminster Avenue (Main Street)
anel  leer  B   few  lilocks  em   either side.
Seeuih e.f where Pairmont exchange is
located there was not enough activity
to arouse a flurry in real estaie, which I
means much in a place like Vancouver.
In 1902, a tingle track was extended
frum Ninth along Westminster Avenue tee Sixteenth to give a car service tn the people in lhat district.
Yeilding to lhe demand fur tram communication lee South Vancouver, in
1904 the B. C. Electric constructed the
line from the Sixteenth Avenue extension. Farmer! then held sway even
this side of the Bodwell Reiad, on
which the cemetery is located, and a
few pioneers had gone beyond the
city boundary (Sixteenth Avenue I
because taxes were low and land was
cheap.
Today there is nearing completion
at the corner of Broadway and Main
a skyscraper as tall as any on Granville Street with the exception of the
Vancuuver block and the Rogers
building. This is the block erected
by Mr. II. O, l.ee, the lirst of its kind
in any of the outlying districts. To-
elay. $4,800 is askeel fe.r a tWO-storey
dwelling in thc 4.500 block em Quebec
Street, which runs parallel to Main.
one block west, Counting fifteen
blocks to the mile, that location is
three miles fremi the Burrard Inlet
waterfront.
Main Streel. six miles long, running
through to the Fraser Kiver, is very
busy at the corner e.f Broadway, with
its 'banks and si,,res. Out at Six-
teenth Avenue, the boundary of the
city before annexalieen eel" D.L. 301,
there is a fair-sized business com-
inu.iiiy. and away eiut at Twenty-fifth
Avenue, where main line cars terminate their run. there la still another,
while   all   along   Main,   and   east   and
wesl ��� >ii Broadway, are to be found
excellent nlocks of Imposing architecture.
It is because of this expansion that
property owners throughout thai district are sanguine regarding future
Droapects. They appear to be right
in their estatemenl thai the growth of
the past is indicative <��� f future expansion.
Even after one has taken a casual
look over the ground, it is difficult i >
believe' lhat 755 telephone wires are
needed to provide service to buaincas
nlaccs in that district. When the
Fairmonl exchange was cut over in
June. 1911. fifteen positions with a
capacity of 2.000 wires, were install^'
It was thought by the B, C, Telephone
Company's engineers that thai equipment would be Sufficient t<> lake care'
of subscribers in that district feer two
years, Tu less than eighteen months
these wires were all in use. Provision
was made for expansion, but this was
se, rapiel that the estimate of the company, always allowing for a little more
than is expected, fell sluert. Today
the service from the Fairmont exchange comprises 755 business anel
1,584 residence telephones, with a
teilal service of 2,339 stations. Nine
mure positions have been installed in
the expectation that this will he precision enough for the next two years.
There are u��ew ,..o00 lines available-
with a capacity <>f 4.50(1 telephones.
Occupation of the outlying districts
has been rapidly effected during recent years and to meet the demand
eif residents, the B. C. Electric Railway Company extended its lines, so
that now the whole south-eastern
portion of the city has ample and
rapid transportation facilities. In 1907.
an    extension    reached    out    along
Broadwav to Scott Street: in 1910, it
was continued on a double track to
Commercial Drive. In 1909. another
line left the' coiner of Broadwav and
Eighth and went mil Westminster
Roael. with branches down the North
Arm Reiad (Fraser Avenue., half a
elo/e'ii blocks further east. This year,
the Broadway belt line was paralleled
on Sixteenth Avenue, a double track
being laid from Main Street to Oak
Streel, over whieh a service is given.
This vear. too, previous extensions
were further extended, so that street
cars now run right through to the
Fraser River. The B. C. Electric
realized that development was permanent, and in track-laying more
than met existing demands that they
might be thoroughly equipped for the
future.
These are what might be called the
inner-district facilities feir the transportation and distribution of the resident population. The great double
track trunk lines come in from each
side direct from the city proper. Main
Street cars go to the southern boundary of the city proper and also follow the double track route to where
the Broadway line again joins the
main system on Commercial Drive.
The belt line cars run east and west
on Broadway and also are quick connection with down town, and a few
months ago service was begun on the
Cambie-Bridge Street track which will
be a very convenient short-cut for a
wide district.
Adequate communication by wire
and rail is necessary in any growing
community, and expansion has been
greatly assisted by the large utility
corporations. That is why all through
the Mount Pleasant district and contiguous territory beyond, beautiful residences have been erected and hundreds of fine homes established. With
electric railway and telephone, this
section is always closely in touch with
any other portion of the city. Business
places  follow  the  erection  of  dwell
ings, anil a prosperous ami thriving
community has grown into existence,
almeest a small city within the lug
city's confines.
Much business must be transacted,
for within the raelius of lhe Fairmont
exchange, including practically Wards
Five anil Eight, city banks have- established   eleven   [.ranches.     These   are:
Canadian Bank of Commerce, corner
Eighth Avenue and Main Street;
Northern   Crown.   2505   Main   Slreel;
Royal Bank, four branches, 2301 Main.
corner Bridge Slreel anil Broadway,
corner Seventeenth Avenue and Main
Street, and 75K Broadway East; Un.
ion Bank, 2415 Main Street, and corner eef Twenty-fifth and Main; Hank
of Vancouver, 577 Broadway West,
and Cedar Cottage; Bank of Hamilton,
Cedar Cottage.
There are none too many banks,
for there is a busy factory ami warehouse section west of Main Street
along False Creek and on Fremt Sireet
with trackage een the Great Northern
Railway. Little has been heard i if tin
big steel plant being erected along
tin- Great Northern tracks, ami which
will be another large industry fe.r the
Fairmont district. This js being established by tin- Canadian Northwest
Steel Company, and will involve an
expenditure of $300,000. This company i-. the Canadian branch eef the
Northwest Steel Company, which has
a $500,000 plant at Portland, a very
strong concern.
Broadway is business alme-st its full
length. There is a space away tee the
cast, but with busy Commercial Drive
at that end the overflow will soon be
running along Broadway. 'Hit Main
Street there is a succession of busy
centres one after another t" lhe 40110
block, and even beyond thai business
placet  are not absent
The southern shore- of False Creek
has many industries, ami a large number e,f these arc te, be found east of
Bridge Street. The see-tie,n along
Fraser Street, just west t.i Main, i-
oui eef the line of beaten traffic ami
is an excellent location t"r ihe many
industries operating there. East "i
Main Slreel facilities are to be- provided that will mean the establishment
of new- plants. Development at the
head of False Creek, such as i* proposed, will do much tee heighten the
tone of prosperity ami expansion in
ilii-. part of the cily. Mount Pleasant
expects to nap much advantage from
���li.- construction there of the modern
and commodious eh-pe.t- of tin Greal
I Northern and the Canadian Northern
'Pacific railways. Thai is why $100,-
000 was recently paid tier frontage "il
Main Streel  at  Sixth  Avenue.
Excellent Bchools are scattered
throughout the district. Progressive
though the policy of ilu- Se-ho-.l Board
is. il has been kept busy supplying
sche.ee] accommodation, ami tin latesi
liuililiiiKs t.e In- erected are as far out
as the 4800 block on  Main  Sire. ���  am!
on F.ast Broadway.
Fine churches are indicative oi the
welfare- of a community, and throughout lhe district served by the Fairmonl
exchange edifices for sacred worship
are many in number and imposing in
appearance. Brick ami stone structures predominate, any every eleme-
mination is represented. Many .if the
churches are not on lhe original sues
The Methodist church was formerly
located em the site where the l.ee
building litis been erected, ami the
Presbyterian church was close by the
junction of Main Street ami Westminster Road. They found it better
tee move a block or two back, when
business forced its way in, and Iheir
congregational buildings now tire excellent example of church architecture.
Though comparatively remote from
downtown Vancouver, the district is
not suburban in Its ambitions. Me-
tropolitan improvements abound
Cement sidewalks are t.e be found
further out each year, and each sca-
sein additional permanent pavement is
laid, e'.toadway is paved ils entire
length, Seventh Avenue on to Main
lias pavement, Tenth ami Twelfth
avenues have pavement also, while
north and s.eutli Main Sticet is amply
provided for in this respect. Arrangements are now in hand te. cem_
timie the pavement on Westminster
Road through to Xew Westminster.
Permanency is the feature in till the
substantial improvements.
According to the city census, the
population of this district was 20.293
almost a year ago. Each summer
many new residents take up homes,
for in this section of the city building
has been brisk.
Land values are placed by the city
assessor at $13,937,130. Since property in Vancouver is neet assessed
anywhere near the market price, the
real value of the land is therefore
much greater. Improvements are
totalled at $22,082,330. an exceeding.
ly creditable  showing.
Permits issued for buildings in this
district for the present vear up to
November 26th numbered 252 the
amount being $1,142,440. These figures
tliin'ori. "lcu,tIe the Lee b����ding, a
$100,000 structure, the permit for
which was taken out in 1911 Two fine
buildings, for which permits were
taken out this year and which are
nearing completion, are those of the
Royal Bank, corner of Eighth Avenue
21.4,���1""' a, stonc structure c.sting
$42,000, and of Mr. J. B. Mather!
whose new building at the corner of
Eleventh Avenue and Main Street
handsome with its facing of pressed
yellow brick, will be occupied shortly.
Little wonder they have a busy time
at the Fairmont exchange, where the
staff comprises twenty-four A and
seven B operators, five chief operators
and supervisors, and a switchboard
clerk. In October, 18,775 calls orgin-
ated in the district, while 10,671 calls
were received from other  exchanges.
The future holds promise of busier
times and in the meantime prepara-
li'.n is being made.
A Mild Smoke
Mr and Mrs. Justbinwed occupied
the    same  armchair.
"Darling." suddenly whispered he
into her little pink ear, "I shall'never
really be happy until I've told you
something."
"Then,   tell   me.   hue- "
"You remember the reason you
married me, eh,n't y.,uv" resumed her
reminiscent hubby. "You gave ye.ur-
self lee me in gratitude l"r my having
saved your life from drowning at
Margate���isn't   thai   see?"
"Ye-, sweetheart" Little Mrs. J.'s
voice  was   sweetly  tremulous.
"Well, dearest, her better-half con-
tinued, with set face and tragic calm,
"I deceives yem. The water was but
waist   eleep."
A deathly silence, broken only by
the deep breathing of the self-con-
feised culprit. Then out e.f n.ewhere
came a meek, small voice, which saiel:
"Don't worry, dear; I knew, because- I'd got my foot on the sand ail
th.-  time!"
SOLD   EVERYWHERE
Fond Mamma: "Xow. Charley,
don't you admire my new dress?"
Charley: "Yes, mamma; it's beautiful."
Fond Mamma: "And, Charley, all
the silk is provided for us uy a poeer
worm."
Charley:    "Do you mean dad?"
 ��� ^ ���	
Senile e,f tbe blames feer the lies we
tell ought te, be charged up Pi people
who ask  our candid eepinieui.
SPEND : : : ::
A PLEASANT EVENING AT THE
Fairmont  Pool Room
(Bryant   Block)
20th AND  MAIN ST.
The best tables in South Vancouver. Everything new. Personal attention by thc proprietor, D. D. Den-
man.
Cigars, Tobacco and Candy
ROBERT
McBRIDE
FOR
WARD  VI
Those in favor of clean and
efficient Municipal Government in
Seeuth Vancouver, vote for Robert
McBride, J. 1'., as Councillor.
���cfrv
4388
Special Rates to Municipal
Hall and other South Vancouver points.
Cambie Street will eventually become the leading thoroughfare between the North
Arm and Burrard Inlet, and today there is no better investment on the market. A
brief study ot the map should convince you that our statement is correct. We have
a few choice lots on  Cambie  Street facing West.
Price $1625 each;   i cash;   balance 6-12-18-24 months
These are between Sixty-sixth Avenue and River Road. We have also a few
choice  homesites  from  $500  each,  that  are  worth  investigating.
Wm. H. KENT & SON
COLUNGWOOD  EAST
Phone : Coll. 18 Branch : Cor. River  Rd. and Ash St.
BITULITHIC
PAVEMENT
Granville   Street   South,   Before   Paving
This has the following attributes :
fl Durability; sure footing for horses; resiliency ; noiselessness; easy drainage; dustless-
ness; economy.
I| Bitulithic approaches more closely than any
other the ideal of a perfect pavement.
*& Its notable durability makes it more economical than any other paving.
fl The Vancouver thoroughfares paved with
bitulithic are an impressive object-lesson in
fine paving.
<J Bitulithic has been adopted in over 200 cities
in the United States, and 15 cities in Canada.
:   '--: '
��. i "
'.* -1;1
r^fl*,��"K.
��W   ^^i.
j .
1                               "�����
��, j^M
ej^e^^
'"'A
'. '   "
���'"'.
|HH|
Granville Street South, After Paving
Columbia Bitulithic Limited
433 Granville Si. Vancouver, B. C.
1 EIGHT
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   18,   19U
���
^sTHIJ IS AN010 ONE BUT-
Le Fanu, in his "Seventy Years of
Irish Life," tells of a^pcasant who said
to a gentleman:    '
'-My poor father died last night,
yeeur  honor,"
"I'm sorry for that, now," answers
the other, "and what doctor attended
him?"
"AhI my poor father wouldn't have
a doctor; he always said he'd like to
die a  natural  death."
A/      *      4
There is a story of a fool at a continental court, in early days, who
stirred up al! thc wrath that could he
contained in the heart of the lord
chamberlain hy so exact an imitation
of his voice and so sarcastic a description of his character as to excite re ears
of laughter in every soul in the banqueting room, from the sovereign beneath the dais to thc scullion at the
door, waiting for the dirty plates. The
angry chamberlain encountered Sir
Fool an luetir afterwards, when he
communicated to the later his intention, at fitting opportunity, to see if
a few inches of his poniard could not
stop thc loquacious (oily of the other
forever, The Merry-Andrew flew to
liis princely master and sought protection for his life.
"Be of good heart, merry cock!"
said the prince. "If the chamberlain
dares run his dagger into your throat
his throat shall be in a halter the day
after. I will hang him as high as
Haitian."
"Ah, father!" cried the jester, "the
day after has but promise of sorry
conseelation in it. He may thrust his
knife between my ribs tomorrow���
and couldn't you hang him the day
before?"
* *    *
A colored woman was on trial before a magistrate, charged with inhuman   treatment of her  child.
Evidence was clear that the woman
had severely beaten the youngster,
aged some nine years, who was in
court to exhibit his battered condition.
Before imposing sentence his honor
asked the woman whether she had
anything to say.
"Kin I ask yo' honah a question?"
inquired the prisoner.
"Go ahead," said the judge, and the
court room listened.
"Well, then, yo' honah, I'd like to
ask yo' whether yo' was ever the
paricnt of a puffectly wuthless culled
chile?"
* At      *
The late Richard Manifold possessed a very concise and penetrating
wit, of which only those who knew
him intimately saw the best flashes.
One day in his dressing room hc
chanced to read a prize offer of fifty
dollars te> be given for the best story
about an umbrella. Me scribbled
something quickly on a scrap of paper
and turned te> an English friend who
was with him and said:
"I have a good eme Here it is. We
will  send it in."
The friend took it and read it and
read these weirds: "Once I bought
an umbrella."
The Englishman in 'telling of it
afterward added, "And Mansfield
really thought that blooming thing
was funny, lint we did neet send it in."
+       A       A
An artist who spent a great part of
his life in lhe Latin Quarter tells of
the frugality of a Frenchman who
lived em a pension of five francs a
week, involving a curious system,
which the Frenchman thus explained:
"Eet is simple, vaire simple! Sunday I ge) to v.; house of a good
friend, anel zere I dine so extraordinaire and cat so vaire much I need im
more till Vcdnesday. On eat day I
have at my restaureuit one large,
vaire largo, dish eif tripe anil some
onion. I abhor ze tripe, yes, ami ze
onion also, and together eey make
nie f-o ill as I have no more any tip. I
petite till Sunday. Eet is vaire |
simple!"
At       At       At
The  reigning  beire  at   one   time  in I
Edinburgh   was   Professor   L ;  his
favorite subject the N'orth P. ele. One
day tbe arch tormenter met Jeffrey in
a narrow lane, and began instantly on
the Xorth Pole. Jeffrey, in despair,
and out of all patience, darted past
him. exclaiming, "Hang lhe' North
Pole!"    Sydney Smith  met   Professor
L  shortly after, boiling over with
indignation at Jeffrey's contempt of
the N'eirlb Pole. "Oh, my dear fellow," said Sydney, "never mind; no
one minds what Jeffrey says, you
know; he is a privileged person���he
respects nothing, absolutely nothing.
Why, yem will scarcely credit it, but
it is not more than a week ago that
I heard him speak disrespectfully of
the Equator."
* *       e��
The Duke de Roquelaure was told
that two ladies of the court had a
(.uarrel and had cast all kinds of invectives at each other. "Did they call
each other homely?" asked the Duke.
"No, my herd!"
"All right; then I will see that they
become  reconciled."
* e��        *
A little slum child was enjoying his
first  glimpse  of  pastoral  life.
The setting sun was gilding the
grass and roses of the old-fashieetied
garden, and on a little stool he sat
beside thc farmer's wife, who was
plucking a  chicken.
He watched the operation gravely
for  some rims.    Then  he spoke:
"Do y<r take off their clothes every
night, la.lv?"
* *    *
A very prominent man recently died
and shortly after a friend of the
family called to condole with the
widow.
The caller had been a very warm
friend of the deceased, and as .he was
about  to de.iart  he asked:
"Did Will leave you much?"
"Oh, yes, indeed," responded the
widow, "near! ' every night."
-���        1 *
"Oh, I just love cake, and it's awfully nice!" cried Ii tie Dorothy, regarding her cliocclate-frosted dessert
with high approval.
"You should not say you 'love
cake,'" reproved her mother; "say
you 'like' it; and don't say 'awfully':
say 'very.' Don't say 'nice,' but 'good.'
And, by the way, thc word 'just'
should bc omitted, and also the 'oh.'
Now, my dear, repeat the sentence
correctly."
"I like cake; it is very good," repeated Dorothy.
"That is much better," said her
mother.
But Dorothy was far from being
satisfied. "It sounds as if I was
speaking of bread," she said, with an
air of disgust.
* *    *
A man, driven home on a very wet
night, wished to give thc cab-driver
something to keep the cold out, 1-hiding nothing at hand but a liquor-Stand
with its tiny glasses, he filled up one
and handed it to Jehu, remarking:
"You'll think none the worse of this
because it was made by the holy
monks."
"God bless the holy monks!" exclaimed the driver as he drained the
glass. "It's thimselves that can make
good liquor, but the man that blew
that glass was very short of breath."
* *    *
"I hope you are following my instructions carefully, Sandy���the pills
three times a day, and a drop of
whiskey at bedtime."
"Weel, sir, I may be a wee bit behind wi' the pills, but I'm aboot six
weeks in  front wi' the wlnisky."
* *    *
A small boy with a rather lost and
lonesome appearance walked into the
county clerk's office at the court house.
Ile gazed about him for a time and
finally approached Deputy Henry
Smiley. "Please, sir." the lad said
timidly, "have you seen anything of
ti lady around here?"
"Why, yes, sonny," answered Smiley, "I've s;en several."
"Well, have you seen any without
a little boy?" the lad asked anxiously.
"Yes."  replied   Smiley.
"Well," said (he title chap, as a relieved look crossed his face. "I'm the
little beiy.    Where's  the lady?"
* *    *
Sir Archibald Geikie tells a story of
a Scotchman who. much against his
own will, was persuaded to take a
holiday. He went to Egypt and visited the pyramids. After gazing for
Bome lime al the Great Pyramid he
muttered: "Man, what a lot of mason
work not  tee be bringin' in any rent!"
Name and Adelress District
Win.   J.  Johnston,   Collingwooel   East          s). 37
Mrs.  M.   If.  Goldsmid,   1129  l'acinc Street   	
Omar  Gidney,   Collingwood   East   	
Walter   Graddon,   Collingwood   Hast    	
Evelyn   Michelmore,  Collingwood   East   	
A.   E.   Almas,   Collingwood   East   	
W.   V.   Keeimonel,   Egerton,   Alta.   ^	
W.   E.   Rc(.mond,   Egerton.   Alta.    T	
Mrs.   Annie   V.   Ilrown,   Collingwood   East   	
Caroline   E.   Whatmough,   Collingwood   East   	
Methodist   Church   	
Ralph I.atta tic Jno.  H. Glanville, Collingwooel Bait  	
Ralph  I.atta 8c Jno. II. Glanville, Co!lingue.e>el ICast   	
John   Taylor,   Collingwood   East   	
A. A.  McRae,  Davis Chambers, 615  Hastings Street   	
Wm.  II.  Michelmore, Collingwooel  ICast	
Wm.  II.  Michelmore, Collingwooel  East   	
Thos.  IC,  Wright, C.  Newell 8c  E.  IC.  Cane. Collingwood  ICast  	
Frank Gray, Collingwooel  ICast  	
John  II. Thompson, Central  I'ark  	
John II. Thompson, Central  I'ark  .^ ,
Evelyn   Michelmore,  Collingwood   ICast   	
Mrs.   I.ighthody,  Collingwood   East       	
II.  Coael,  Eden,  Manitoba t	
Alex   l-'orel,   Collingwood   East   	
I..   II.   Seller,   Regina,   Sask      37
I..   11.   Seller,   Regina,   Sask	
Ralph  I.atta & Jno.   II.  Glanville. Collingwood   ICast   	
Herbert   C.   Carley,   Collingwooel   ICast   	
Hugh  Mcl)ermiel,'4,6  Pender Street  West   	
Hugh   McDcrmid,  446  l'cneler  Street  West   	
Alex   Ilrown. Collingwooel   fast   	
W. A. McKay, General  Delivery  	
A.   L.   Nicholson,  Geteeral   Delivery   	
A.   L.   Nicholson,  General   Delivery   	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwooel   ICast    	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwooel   East    	
Gar  Way,   101/$  Canton   Street,   Vancouver   	
Gar  Way,   10!/,  Canton   Street.  Vancouver   	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwooel   East	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwooel   East	
Daniel   McKinnon,   Collingwood   ICast	
Alexander McKinnon,  1617  3rd  Avenue  East   	
Chas  C.   Gow,   Eaelysmith,   11.   C	
Chas  C.   Gow,   Laelysmith,   It.   C,	
Chas  C.   Gow,   I.aelysmith,   II.   C	
Chas  C.   Gow,   I.adysmith,   II.   C	
Annie  Walker,  Central   Park   	
Ernest   Tomelson,   Nanaimo,   11.   C	
Elizabeth   II.   McMahon,   Collingwooel   East   	
S.   R.   Ono,   Collingwood   ICast   	
George   Horning,  Central   Park	
J.   H.   Foster  &   Sarah   Flack,   Central   Park   	
Vernon   J.   Nicholson,   Collingwooel   ICast   	
Andrew   Black,   Collingwooel   ICast
Del. S. Lawrence, at the Avenue Theatre
��f    35-38
36
37
39
40-41
Subdivision
S. Vs
N. pt.
N. pt
Lot
42
43
44-4S
46
47-50-51
Walker J.  Trott,  Collingwooel   East
Arthur J.  Michelmore, Collingwooel  East
Wm. J.  Brewer, Ceelar Cotta
Agnes   Nicholl,   llritcola
lohn   Nicholl,   llritcola
G.	
G.
C.
G.
G.
50
:f:
U
IC.   Hanks, Cedar Cottage    ...
IC.   Banks, Cedar Cottage   	
E.  Hanks, Cedar Cottage  	
IC  Hanks, Cedar Cottage  	
IC   Hanks, Cedar Cottage   	
Thos.  R.  Morrow,  care J.  ,1.  Miller ��,.
W.  Nicholson,  Britcola  	
S.   W.   Keith,   2471   Westminster   Koad	
S.   W.   Keith,  2471   Westminster   Road	
Franklin   Smith,   Collingwood   Kast    ,
Mrs.   Mary J.  Cameron,   U>U4  Semline  Drive
Dotlgal   Harris,   Gibson's   Landing   	
James   Wright,   4523   Quebec   Street   	
Arjohn,   Cedar   Street,   Beaconsfield    	
Maria   Fiedler,   18.14   5th   Avenue   West   	
A.   Cotton,   1133   Pacific   Street   	
Philip  Oben,  Central   I'ark   	
J.   II.   Bowman,   Central    Bark   	
J.   IT.   Bowman,  Central   Bark   	
J.   II.   Bowman,  Central   Park   	
J.   H.   Bowman,   Central   Park    	
Jas.   B,  Todrick,  Central   I'ark   	
John   M.   Robertson,   Central   Park   	
Wilbers,   Collingwood   ICast    	
Wilhers,   Collingwood   Kast   	
Wilbers,   Collingwood   ICast   	
Wilbers,   Collingwood   ICast   	
F. II.   Duirant,  Central   Park   P.
J.  J.   Wilbers,   Collingwood   Kast
J.   J.   Wilbers,  Collingwood   ICast   	
W,  C.  Aleock,  Collingwood   ICast   	
W.   G.  Aleock, Collingwood   ICast	
W.   G.  Aleock, Collingwood   ICast   	
W.   G.  Aleock, Collingwood   ICast   	
W.  G.  Aleock, Collingwood   ICast   	
Frederick   T.   Aleock,   Collingwood   ICast   	
L.  R.  Ix  I'\ T.  Aleock,  Collingwood  Kast   	
I_.  R.  &  1\ T. Aleock,  Collingwood  Kast   ...   	
W.   G.   Aleock,  Collingwood   ICast       ,	
/Ians  ICspeland,  Collingwood   ICast   	
Philip   Oben,   Central    I'ark    	
Philip   Obetl|   Central    Park         ,.    ,,	
W. J.   Battison,  Collingwood   ICast	
WC G. Connon, care J.  D.  Stuart, 320 Seymour Street
John McGatty, Collingwood ICast  	
Mrs.   Louisa  Major,  Collingwood   Kast   	
G. II.   Cole,  Collingwood   ICast   	
G.   H.   Cole,   Collingwood   ICast   	
Dr. _J.  B.   Bingay,  Guadalajara,  Mexico   	
B.   Bingay,  Guadalajara,  Mexico   	
B.   Bingay.   Guadalajara,   Mexico   	
...   Bell, Collingwood   ICast   	
J.   Hell,   Collingwood   (Cast   	
McDonald,  Central   Park   	
O.
36-49
Dr. J.
Dr. j.
Chas.
Chas.
Ale
MONEY
CAN'T
BUY
BETTER
All Grocers
Kelly, Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Stove Wood
BUY "AT HOME"
Stove Wood���14 inch Lengths
$3.50 per Load
COAST LUMBER & FUEL
COMPANY  LIMITED
Corner  Bodwell  Road  and Ontario Street
Phone : Fraser No. 41 Mail Address, Box 22, City Heights
48
49
52
S3
54
N.i/,
A.
B. E.pt.
W. pt.
W. pt.
A. N.E. pt.
N.W. pt.
9
10
11
12
1.1
N. pt.
N. pt.
W. pt.
N.E. pt.
N. pt. A
12
13
14
15
id
i/
.i
4
1
2
3
4
II
12
li
14
IS
16
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
1
2
3
22
23
24
25
26
27
9
18
19
20
21
22
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
.1
4
S
6
7
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
16
17
18
Frontage Feet Ftankage  Feet
Exempt Assessed Exempt Assessed Assessment
33.2 391.2.'
33.2 3'el 22
33.2 391._>_>
33.2 391.22
33.2 391.2.'
33.2 391.22
33.2 391.__���
33.2 391J.'
132.99 1567. li
132.99 s 1567.1'
132.99
31.1 390.11".
33.1 390.0i
33.1 39(l.ii
33.1 390.ii
33.1 390.05
33.1- 390.eii
33 \ 390.1)5
35.1 390.05
33.1 390.lir
33.1 J90.05
33.1 390.05
33.1 390.05
33.1 390.05
33.1 390.05
33.1 390.05
33.1 390.05
33.1 390.0S
33.1 390.05
33.1 390.05
33.1 390.05
132.99 1567.15
33.2 391.22
33.2 391.22
33.2 391.22
33.2 391.22
33.7 397.12
32.8 386.fl
33.05 389.4'.
33.05 389.41.
33.05 389.4'.
33.05 389.46
132.99 1567.H
33.2 391.2.'
33.2 391.22
33.2 391.22
,                         33.2 391.22
33.25 391.81
33.25 391.81
33.25 391.81
33.25 391.81
43.4 511.4.:
43.4 511.42
33.3 392.41
33.55 392.9'
33.3S 392.9'i
58.3 687.00
250. 2940.'".
> 216. 2545..U
211. .1486.42
47.4 558.5'.
47.3 557.3*
47.3 557..1K
47.3 557.3s
47.3 557.3-
47.3 557..K
440.6 5192.liI
39.2 4612''
39.2 461.9.1
53.2 , 626.90
32.11 378.3"!
30.76 362.47
26.0.- 307.21
31. 365.30
31. 365.30
I       264.66 3118.75
264.6^ 3118.75
53. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
3.1. 388.87
34.4 405.37
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. ", 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
34.15 402.42
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
33. 388.87
55. 64S.I2
130.1 1333.09
73.2
74.2 87437
74.2 -,"4.37
168. ln/9.71
330.90 .WJ9.32
330.90 3899.32
330.90 3899.32
39.5 465.46
39.5 465.46
34.06 401..''.
50.09 590.2'
33.06 389.'7
33.06 389. ~7
35.46 417.
298.9 3522.. I
Donaldson   &   McDonald
Dealers in
HAY, GRAIN, AND FEED
All Kinds of Chicken Feed
4213 Main Street
Phone : Fairmont 1514
The Robertson-Godson Co. Ltd.
Wholesale Plumbers' Supplies, Water Works
Supplies, Corporation Brass Goods.
572 Beatty Street
Vancouver
Two   Propositions
No. 1. You rent a house at $25 per month. In one year you have
paid out $300, for which you can show no results. 7 per cent, interest
on $300 is $21.    So in the year you practically throw away $321.
No. 2. You bring mc in $100, for which I give you a 6-room
Modern House, on Lot 33x125ft. House has fireplace, etc. Balance
is $25 per month.   Total price is $2,600.    No loan.
In one year you have an equity of $400 in your own home.
Compare proposition No. 1 with No. 2, then call at my office and
see this house.
R. J. McLauchlan
4123 Main Street
Phone : Fair. 1607
TERMINAL   CITY   IRON    WORKS
1949 ALBERT ST. PHONE :   HIGHLAND  530R
ENGINEERS, MACHINISTS AND  FOUNDERS
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS
FIRE HYDRANTS AND  SPECIALS
REPAIRS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS
THE BEER WITHOUT A PEER
CASCADE
THE VANCOUVER BREWERIES Limited
PHONE:   Fairmont 429 ���
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   18,   1913
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
ELEVEN
ARMSTRONG'S
People's Providers
Armstrong's, Corner Fraser Street and
River Avenue
South Vancouver Post Office
For Fine Groceries, Provisions, &c.
DRUGGISTS SUNDRIES
dive us a trial order and see what we can
do towards cutting down the high cost of
living.
Yours truly,
PEOPLE'S PROVIDERS
J. Armstrong W. H. Armstrong
Geo. B. Howard,     \\/ K |\JI   JK     Main  and  Harris
Mgr. **���  T   *-" ' w Mm4   l'hone : Sey. 7012
-      THEATRE
WEEK  OF JANUARY 20 MATINEES WED. & SAT.
SIR GILBERT PARKER'S DRAMATIZED NOVEL
The Right of Way
PRICES : :5c, 33c, and 5Cc
MATINEES 25c any seat
PIANOS-GREAT ALTERATION
AND
XMAS SALE
We positively must get our floors cleared. The
tradesmen are in, and carloads are coming in, for
speedy clearance.   No reasonahle offer refused. Cash
or terms.
WILLIAM THOMSON
1127  GRANVILLE STREET
Phone: Seymour 2832. Near Davie.
QUALITY=SERVICE
These two words express our highest ideals in the selling of
groceries.
QUALITY'���We offer you only the very best of every line it, is
possible to get. Some places you may get more quantity, but here
we will have only the best.
SERVICE���With our efficient Delivery Service we will be in the
front rank to give you prompt deliveries "WHEN you want il."
Stephens' Pickles, all kinds lhe biettle 25c and 35c
Krinkle  Corn   Flakes    3  packages  for   25c
Oatmeal  Toilet  Soap    8  large  cakes   25c
Japanese  Crab  Meats    large  tins    35c
Marshall's   Herrings    the  tin    15c
Head   Cheese the   beiwl    15c
Oliver's  Lemon  Curd    the jar   40c
Blue Point Oysters   the tin   25c
Special   Blend   Tea 3   pounds   $1.00
Coffee. "As Yem Like It"... ,. the pound 40c ;.'nd 50c
Oliver's   Bramble  Jelly  ......'!���. the jar   35c
Maggi    Soups, nil kinds  ., the package     5c
Fraser & MacLean, "tfzifi*
Municipal Electors
of South Vancouver
To the Electors of Ward II
^ Your vote and influence is
respectfully solicited for George A.
Stevens as Councillor, a supporter
of annexation and whose "Motto"
is economy and efficiency.
^ Election will tat\e Place January} 18 from 9a. m.
until 6p.m. The polling booth for Ward II will
be at the Cedar Cottage School.
AT VANttUVEGS LEADING
PLAY HOOSES-
the
of preserving Stanley Park and of
getting a good civic administratie>n
met with great appreciation. Mr. Per-
cival Graves, the well-known Vancouver lolicitor, author e.f an admirable paper in the New University
Magazine,   on   "A   Brighter   Sunday,"
congratulated Vancouvw on inugurat.
ing meetings which he felt sure would
augmented   cast, including   all
favorites     Del   Lawrence   will    win Ibe'much appreciated.
new admiren in ihe- pari of Charlie      Everybody   will   be   welcome  to  a
Steele, and Marion Ruckert will make-  ,;���,j|,.ir gathering j��� Franklin Hall on
a charming Roaalie.    Iln- lupporting Sunday night
ca��t   will   l,i'   a   sire,tig   one,   and   ihe
EMPRESS
H��tin;i & Gore    Phone Sey. 3907
BEST RESERVED SEATS 25c, 50
To-night 8.15 Matinee Sot. 2.! 5
This Week
piece beautifully siage-el and mounted.
*   *   *
Empress Theatre
Theatre'  geecr-. are   being   treated  to
a   iplendid   production   r>f  a   very  iti ���
teretting  drama  thii  week    at    the
Empresi     Theatre.     Thii     is     "The
White  Squadron" ami it is being re-
eeiveel   wilh   raplureeiis  applaute.
The-    play    for    the    coming  week
wiil be a very itupendoui production
eef tbe "Great Ruby" that notable
Drury Lane Theatre success. It is in
fi.ur acta and fourteen scenes, anel ii
is away beyond the ability of the
average dramatic company te, produce,
as il contain! e.ne of the hardest ami
miesl startling mechanical effects
eveT seen on any stage. This is shown
in ihe- third act at the Military Encampment. Nearly all the characters
belong I" the "smart set" of London
society. The company will be largely
augmented and a very large number
of extra people will be employed. This
will be a production worthy eef the
highest prices and no doubt the theatre    will  be   packed.
Th,
Orpheum Theatre
best  show   lhat  has  traversed
Social Gatherings at Collingwood
11 i- with much pleasure that announcement ii maele ihat 'en Wednesday, January 29. there will be another enjoyable social al ihe Collingwood Institute under the direction e.f
he committee of ladies, which includes
Mr.. James Price, Mr- Mm to, Mill
Sutherland, lhe Mi����el Hague and
others. It will be difficult indeed te,
eclipse the enjoyment e,f the gathering held January 15, but there is every
promise of a delightful programme.
The people of Collingwood, Earls
Reeael and Central I'aark are heartily
welcome.
On New Year's night there were
no less than 160 present. A grand
march was led by Mr. and Mrs. Price,
and il, the ball, which was profusely
j decorated, the throng was very bright
and cheerful. The musical pro-
' gramme was of a very high order
��� The Pierce family provided orches-
' tral music, and the vocal numbers included old English glees and fpiar-
tettei.
On Wednesday night last the ladies
gave a children's party, when in spite
of the snejw there was a large gathering, a gigantic Xmas tree, and Mr. J
The White Squadron
Next  Week
The Great Ruby
PANTAGES
Unequalled       Vaudeville       Means
Vaudeville
Pantigea
SHOW STARTS.--2.45. 7.15. and 9.10 pm
First vaudeville appearance of
DR. FREDERICK A. COOK
In   his   ihrilling   narrative
"The Attainment of the Pole"
THE GREAT RUSSIAN GOLDEN
TROUPE
12��� People���12
Singers,  instrumentalists,  and  whirlwind dancers
5 other big acts  5
ih.- Sullivan and Considine Circuit in Francis Bursill as Santa Claus dis-
nany years will be offered during the tnbuted guts which bad been very
coming week at the Orpheum, judg- generously provided. The Colling-
ire.m   the  manager's   reports  .,n,w��.<d Institute is taking its. place as
ing
ALEXANDER  CLARK
In Mort H. Singer's Musical Success
"A   Modern  Eve,"  at  the  Imperial
Theatre, Wednesday and Thursday,
January 22 and 23.
"The Rosary"
The success of Ro*vland and Clif-
fenil's play. "The Rosary" doesn't
even approach an i'ii<l. Six companies
more of this play have 1 ><-en organized
and contrary to traditions, "The
Rosary" is repeating its lasl year's
success. The unequalled character
of tlu- Catholic priest in "The Rosary"
leads the way to success for Edward
K. Reese's ideas, and the intense
human interest settled in the body of
the play formulates the heart interest
thai will bring success to such ideas
as Mr. Reese has collected to tell the
story of "The Rosary." "The Rosary"
with the cast consisting of Harrison
ij. Terry, Jean Ward, Allelic Dougherty,
Helen McCabe. Dan McGuire, L Andrew Castle, George Tripp and others
will bc seen at the Imperial Theatre
next  Monday  and  Tuesday.
AAA
"A Modern Eve."
The season's greatest musical
comedy triumph, "A Modern Eve,"
which Mori II. Singer and Martin
Beck imported from Berlin, wher
it has been the reigning success for
more than two years, will be lhe
attraction at lhe Imperial Theatre
Wednesday and Thursday, January
22 and 23. The spontaneous success
of "A Modern Eve" has only heen
equalled in the [past decade by "The
Merry Widow." Because of the
many clever numbers requiring girl
ensembles, the large beauty chorus
attracts more than ordinary interest
in "A Modern Eve." They are par
ticularly effective in the several
snappy dunce numbers. The raging
tune of the year. "Goodbye Every
body," a waltz song by Jean Gilbert,
was collaborated with Victor. Hol-
laender on the music of "A Modern
Eve," heads the list of song hits,
among the others being "Rita, My
Margarita;" "Hello Sweetheart;" "Is
the Girl You Married. Still the Girl
You Love," aand "You're Such a
Lonesome Moon Tonight." The
company numbers sixty people, and a
special  orchestra  is  carried.
.      ef        A        A
Avenue  Theatre
One of thc very best plays of the
so-called Far West type ever written
is the general verdict een "Wyoming,"
which is the attraction at the Avenue
all this week, closing Saturday Iti.
Il is a spirited, strong presenlali'
of life in the open, e.n the gre.it cattle
ranges of the state from which the
play takes its title, yet there is neit
a gun shot lired in the entire piece,
and Ihe vulgarity and profanity generally deemed necessary in the construction of such plays is wholly
missing.
For next week, starting Monday
20, Lawrence and Sandusky take great
pleasure in announcing the best Canadian play ever written, Sir Gilbert
Parker's dramatized novel "The Right
Of Way."
This powerful play of sensation and
emotion is one continuous thrill from
start to finish, and the "greatest of
Canadian authors is seen here at his
best. It will be a superb production
in every way and will he given with an
ihe Eastern end of the circuit, the
headline attraction being none other
than Frances Clare and Guy Rawson
and iheir eight little girl friends, in
a picturesque musical idyll, entitled
"Jusl   Kiel-."
The Four I,likens, one of tlu- great,
esl casting acts in the world, will be
he ailih-el attraction.
A musical act lhat has received high
praise is thai offered by the De
Michelle brothers.
Lawrence ami Edwards will present
The Xew Alderman," a laughable
hi: .if lri-.li characterization,
Artie Nelson and Miss Floye will
ti"t-r fifteen minutes "i singing, dancing and other specialties.
Richard Burton, a vocalist, will ren-
eler sume old-time favorite songs.
the
ocial centre of tlu- eli-irie-t.
Central Park Jottings
Seldom have the residents of Central
I'ark had more re-ase.n tu be proud of
ii- beauties than now when a white
mantle e.f loveliness lie- over all. Perfect look the' woods, glorious the
snowy dazzling mountains. If there
are some who would prefer lhe clear-
eel pathways there are others win,
rejoice in the hard sinewy walk-,
! guiltless of city  slush.
* *        ef
Cential I'ark is making good. Christ-
mas week saw  tli,' opening of a much
lleelle-el elrug Sleil'e'.    1,;',-1  wi-e-k  while --_
eel the transfer nf tile Post Office t"
new and larger premises, jusl beyond
ihe railway crossing. Central Park
now he easts a money order office and
I we i mails daily.
* *    *
The numereeiis friends of Mr. J   li.
Bowman have learned with regret of
his indisposition during the week-end.
It  is  satisfactory  te,  kiie,w  that     Mr.
Bowman has now  recovered    health
and strength.
->=    *    *
Under the capable leadership of Mr.
Win. Kirkland, ably assisted by Mr.
R. Glen as secretary, some seventy
friends are making a determined effort
Week   Beginning  January   J!|
"The   Darling   .ii"   Vaudeville"
FRANCES  CLARE
Assisted   ley   Guj    R \\VS< IN   and
eight  little  girls  friends
offering
"JUST KIDS"
Added Attraction
THE   FOUR   LUKENS
European  Casting   Experts  in
Startling  Exploits
4���Other  Big  S.  &  C.  Act���4
. Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Clark Entertain
Among the New Year festivities of
note was the reception given by Mr.
R.   C.  Clark   I.'  a    coterie     e.f    their
friends al "Hun Accord," their pretty
Inniie   on   22nd   Avenue   West.    The
guests were received  hy  the  hostess,
wini wore a charming imported gown
eef   white   charmeuse   with   rich  blue
chrysanthemum    design    and    yoke.
sleeves  and  rcss  fissure  of  old  lace,
the mountings and trimming being of
blue  silk.   She  was  assisted    in    the,
drawing  room  by  thc  host  and  Mr. | \c> secure the rc-opening ol the Pres
W   Henderson, their house guest. The j 'V"-���" Church.   The old church ha:
ibeeu ihe pioneer of the denomination,
and represents thc faith and zeal of
thc early settlers for the uplift of the
district.
If wise counsels prevail its best days
SUCCESS
Business  College
"The School of Certainties"
COURSES IN BOOKKEEPING.
SHORTHAND     AND   TYPEWRITING.
CIVIL   SERVICE   AND   ENGLISH
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded
DAY   AN..   EVENING   CLASSES
HARRIS   BUILDING
Corner Main St. & 10th Ave.
Phone :   Fairmont  2075
gll
floral decorataions in the drawing
room comprised an excellent setting
of paper white narcissus, mixed with
yellow narcissus. Seasonable greens
intermingled with holly and mistleto
also formed an important part in the
heme   of  decoration.     The    dinner i steadily growing.   The Mother Coun
was arranged for sixteen, and th
floral decorations which were here
carried out made the dining room at
once inviting, which consisted of red
and pink carnations with asparagus
ferns and clematis, while evergreens
also lent a pleasing effect to the
scene. The dinner guests were Mr.
R. C. Clark and Mrs. A. Crofts. Mr
A. Crofts and Mrs. Campbell, Mr. J.
Burnett and Miss A. Crofts, Mr. W.
E. Baird and Miss A. Campbell, Mr.
W. F. Fiddes and Miss S. Crofts, Mr.
T. Crighton and Miss Reid, Mr. P.
Reid and Miss H. Crofls, Mr. W. Henderson and Miss B. Campbell, Mrs,
R. C. Clark presided over the table
assisted by Miss E. Crofts. A Bplen-
diel evening of singing and music was
provided by several ol the guests with
fascinating parlor games at intervals.
Mr. A. 1'inlayson, Mr. D. Meiir and
Mr, II. Fiddes then partook of supper,
whin Mrs. Clark and Misses S. and
E. Crofts cut the Ices, after which
the remainder of lhe1 evening was
spent in dancing, which was kept up,
and much enjoyed by all, until the
ceimpany dispersed about two o'clock.
may  be  renewed,  for  the  district  is
er i steadily growing.   The Mother Coun-
(,(, I try   cherishes -its   old   churches,   and
1 those in authority here may well follow-so good an example.
"Sensible Sundays"
The meeting at Franklin Hall,
Granville Streel, corner of Reibsein
Street, on Sunday night was a magnificent success. Over 300 people attended in spite of the bad weather,
and the program of orchestral music
given by an orchestra numbering 20
included selections from Meyerbeer
Haydn, Gounod and others. Mr. N'e.el
Robinson recited, Mr. Thomas, the
fine Welsh baritone, sang, and Mr.
J. Francis Bursill. in a brief review
of 1912. paid a tribute to the memories
of great men who had departed during the year, including M. W. T. Stead
and WhitelaW Reid. An illusion
which  the speaker made to the duty
Not a few Central Park residents
are to be seen Sunday by Sunday in
the Collingwood Methodist Church,
drawn, thither by the inspiring and
eldquent sermons of thc Rev. E. W.
Morgan, B.D. Mr. Morgan is destined to become a force in the district;
he is a man of exceptional power, and
his preaching shows an attractive
broadmindedness that is equalled by
his   spiritual   fervor.
DENTISTS
Drs. Howie & Hall
Have   opened   up   new   and   up-to-date
Dental Parlors in the Williams Block,
Comer Granville and Hastings
We have installed all the latest and
best appliances, and are prepared to
give you the best there is in the dental
profession.
A share of your patronage is
solicited.
Gas    administered    for    the    painless
extraction  of  teeth.
R. O  Howie, DD.a
Wm. S.  Hall,  DD.a.
Phone   Sey.   3266   for   appointment
The insti.net of self-preserve!in
in disappointment It is success that
makes hint feel safe and tempts him
to act foolish.
���THE  MUNICIPAL ACT"
Corporation   of   the   District   of   South   Van- i
.  ���..������c-i     January   1913
REFERENDUM
WHEREAS, the Council has passed a
By-law to obtain the opinion of THOSE EN- \
TITLED TO VOTE ON MONEY BY-'
LAWS, as to the desirability of THE MUNICIPALITY OF SOUTH VANCOUVER
BEING ANNEXED TO THE CITY OF
VANCOUVER.
NOTICE IS HERERY GIVEN that a;
poll of such voters with reference thereto, j
will be held at the time of holding the Muni- j
cipal Elections, namely, on the Eighteenth
day of January. 1913. between the hours oi |
nine   (9)  a.m.  and seven  (7)  p.m.
The Polling places will be the same as those
for  Election of  Reeve  and  Councillors.
A notice of these Polling places is published   and   placarded  in  the   Municipality.
OF WHICH all persons are required to
take notice and to govern themselves accordingly.
Given under my hand at South Vancouver,
this 4th day  of January,   1913.
JAS.  B.  SPRINGFORD,
Returning   Officer.
Geo. Jones
HORSE    SHOER
Lame and Interfering horses will
receive special care and attention.
All kinds of hand-made shoes, running shoes, running plates, toe
plates,  etc.
All horses entrusted to me will receive  every  care  and attention.
GOOD   WORK   GUARANTEED
571  Beatty Street
IN announcing myself as a candidate for School Trustee I do
it with a feeling that good work has been done byour School
Trustees, but that the good start that has been made must be
maintained, and more attention paid to the efficiency of our
system. We have made vast strides in building our school-houses
and now we must see that a high state of efficiency is reached
in our teachings. It is on these principles that I am seeking
election on the Board for 1913.
Respectfully,
WM.
MORRIS,
Central Park.
WM. MORRIS
Candidate for School Trustee
HAMILTON BROS.
Embalmers and Funeral
Directors
Parlors and Chapel:
6271 FRASER STREET
Phone : Fraser 19
(Day or night)
Ernest D. L. Maxwell
EXPERT PIANO TUNER
Specialties :   Player    Pianos,    Repairs,    Ton;
Regulating
164 BROADWAY WEST. VANCOUVER
Phone :    Fairmont 1125
"Sei you bought a gold brick and
let the news get all over town'." said
the irate friend. "Honestly, I thought
you knew better."
"I'll tell you the truth," whispered
the barber. "Business was bad and
I only paid four dollars for that
brick. Now people come from all
��� ever town to kid me, and business
looks goods for a month or more. By
that time I hope to have another
little scheme."
"What did the audience do when
you told them you had never paid a
dollar for a vote?"
"A few cheered, but most of them,
seemed to lose interest."
I Ri
TEN
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY.   JAXi:.*~RV   18,   191.t
16 for 25c
We have purchased a Special Lot of
SUNKIST
ORANGES
and will place them on the Market, while they last,
at the exceptionally low price of   16 for 25c.
SUNKIST ORANGES are known the world over
as the Best, and this is the policy of SLOAN & ALLEN--
to Handle only The Best. (Save the Wrappers).
THE WORKERS' PAGE
Edited by J.  \V.  Wilkinson, to whom all communications should
Ih'   addressed,   Room   210,   Labor Temple,  Vancouver,  H. C.
SLOAN & ALLEN
Handle Only The Best
29th & MAIN STREET
From reports to hand tbe convention "( the British Columbia Federation oi Labor promises to be an Im-
portant one. Amongst the resolutions that will be introduced ��iil he-
the resolution from the-Vancouver
Union ut the Brotherhood e>f Carpenters, calling upeiit the convention
iee take steps leewards the formation
of a political parly em a platform acceptable to all social reformers, and
all other persons opposed lo corporate   rule,   "selfish   interests,"   special
privilege and monopoly.   It is abemt
time semic of the alleged working-
class movements were getting down
In business and do some real work
along  organization  lines.
*       *       *
At the next meeting of the District
Council of the United Brotherhood of
Carpenters and Joiners of Vancouver. Xew Westminster, North and
South Vancouver, plans will be dis-
cussed for the continuance of the organization wurk as it was last year.
Ai   the  annual  elections    Financial-
I Secretary lUirnham was dot a candidate  for office, and  Mr. G. W. Wil.
j liams is now financial-secretary and
also business agent; there only being
two in the field at present, Brother
Simmons eef New Westminster being
the other. All indications point lee a
successful season in organization
work, and the only thing that is required is a lot more activity on the
job among the unionists themselves,
bia Federation 'ef Labor, which will
have concluded its deliberations by
the time this appears in prim, will be
a plan feer taking over the administration e>f the Workmen's Compensation
Act. "ii behalf e,f :a 11 affiliated unions
with a view to securing meere prompt
adjustment of all cases where compensation is due. besides preventing
settlements" being made at liberal
discounts to Ihe members of the
"legal"  fraternity.
*      A      *
It is the intention of the Vancouver Union of Ihe Brotherhood of Carpenters lo introduce a resolution at
the Federation of Labor convention
at Victoria, calling upon the assembled
delegates to devise ways and means
towards the formation of a political |
party on a platform acceptable to all
social reformers, and all olher persons interested in opposing the present
corporation  rule.
*        ek        *
The   Sheet   Metal   Workers  had   a
very interesting meeting in lhe Labor
Temple last week, and they elected
a man for one week whose duties will
be the hunting out of all members in
arrears, and also collecting Initiation
fees from a number of sheet metal
workers who are willing to join the
union.
Phone : Seymour 8425-8426
Western Plate Glass &
Importing   Co.   Limited
Registered Office:
318 Water Street, Vancouver, B. C.
PLATE GLASS WINDOW GLASS
LEADED ART GLASS
Thome   Metal   Store   Front  Bars,   Bevelling  and
Silvering, Store Fronts Glazed
ALL KINDS OF GLASS
li is the intention of the Carpenters' Joint Committee to hold another
whist "drive" in the large hall in the
Labor Temple. The last "drive" was
a greal success, and there is no doubt
that these functions will semii be a
feature of Ihe social side of trade
unionism in this city, if all the members jump  in and  help.    Now  is  the
lime.
*    *    +
It is alleged that the men employed
I by the city in cleaning snow from lhe
gutters are paid the magnificent sum
of SJ.(K) per day of eight hours. That
is 2. cents per hour. This is a direct
vio'ei'.lioii of the city's wage scale of
the past three years. Xo excuse on
lhe' plen t.i charity has yet been made
by those responsible for ihis reduction. 11 is hoped lhat none will be
made. The move lei provide work
for lhe unemployed this year is a
saner method of dealing wilh this
problem, ami is an advance on the
methods  employed  a  year  ago.
AAA
The last meeting of the Vancouver
Painters' Union was fairly well attended, and a large amount of important business was transacted during
the even ng. Owing to the extensive
organization work to be carried out
early this year, Local 138 decided not
to send a delegate to the third annual
'convention of tbe B. C. Federation
of Labor. They also decided that in
the event of the Industrial Commission meeting in Vancouver, that the
business agent. Mr. W. J. Nagle,
would be their representative to its
meeting. Owing to the inclement
weather, a large number of members
are idle, but the amount of work in
sight  ensures  a  good  spring  season.
Al  the regular monthly meeting of
Branch  12, Federated Association e.f
Letter Carriers, Brothers Squires anel
Cass were elected delegates to the
Letter Carrier's Convention, which
will be held in Winnipeg some time
next August. A me est interesting
event took place during the meeting
when Brother G. I'. Carr was presented with a purse of geild and an illumin.
atcd address, in recognition of long
and faithful service ml behalf eif
Branch 12 as secretary-treasurer. They
also appointed a committee of three
lo interview the building Inspectors
of Vancouver, North and South Vancouver, with a view to having a clause
inserted in the building bylaws of
these places, compelling property
owners to provide receptacles in doors
which will tend lo facilitate the delivery of all mail matter. The next
meeting will be held the firsl Friday
in February.
Fraser Bros. & Co.
We carry Special Lines of the finest
GROCERIES AND FLOUR
We also carry Hay and all kinds of Feed
Phone our store (Collingwood 25), or call.   Our delivery
service is prompt.
COLLINGWOOD EAST
The next conference of the North-
West   Painters   and   Decorators   and
Paperhangers will be held in the city
of Sacramento on some date in April
or  March.    At  that  conference plans
will  be laid for the amalgamating of
all unions of the brotherhood on thc
Pacific   Coast   into   one   central   organization,  in   order   that  steps   may
be   taken   to   cope   with   lhe   influx  of
workers lhat is prophesied by emigration bureaus em the completion of the
Panama  Canal.    Thc  painters  of  the
Pacific   Slope   know   that   there   will
be some members of their trade among
this Influx, and they are determined
thai they are not going to allow their
present   working   conditions,   or   their
present  standard of living lo be lowered   without  making  some  effort  to
organize, nol only those who are here
and are not members of the union of
iheir  craft, but  alsei  those  who  may
have lied  from  the intensified industrial cities of  Europe,
Local 97 of the Bridge and Structural Ironworkers despite the recent
"judgments" against members of their
International, still continue to do
business at the Labor Temple every
lirst and third Friday. The inclement
weather is responsible for a number
of their members being out of work.
Member "Eddy" Fitch, who was working the greater part of the summer
oil bridge work along the line of the
C.N.R., reports that after six weeks
.strike on all work of the Canadian
Bridge Company, the men returned to
work, all their demands being conceded to them by thc Bridge Company. Secretary-Treasurer Oakley
reports 97 in good shape and the
members are very punctual in their
attendance at the bi-monthly meetings.
e|<        *        *
The Civic Employees and General
Laborers' Union of Vancouver and
vicinity continues the good work of
organizing all laborers who show the
slightest interest in trade unionism.
Despite weather conditions, whieh
militate against the employment of
men for outdoor work, a few members are initiated at their meetings,
and prospects for the coming year are
fairly bright. Every effort will be
made to further organization work
during the coming season, and there
is no reason why this union should
not be the strongest, both numerically and in morale, in Ihe Province of
British Columbia.
IMPORTANT
To MARKET GARDENERS, POULTRYMEN
FRUIT GROWERS, AND HOMESEEKERS GENERALLY
Choice lands near cities of Vancouver and New Westminster, in
British Columbia Electric Railway Belt, suitable for market gardening, poultry raising and fruit-growing purposes. For sale in any size
lots. Many of these properties possess the great advantages of good
open roads, accessibility to markets, postoffice, school and transportation.
We have instructions to offer these lands at greatly below present market value, and  special inducements will be made to actual
settlers.
For further particulars call at our offices and ask for Mr. Shayer.
Agreements for Sale Purchased and Money to Loan
at Current Rates
The Yorkshire Guarantee
& Securities Corporation Limited
440 Seymour Street
Phones:  6188 and 6189     R. Kerr Houlgate, Manager
Last   call   for   the   next   meeting   of
the   Vancouver    I rades    and     Labor
Council  which will bc held in  Room
.107.   Labeir   Temple,     on     Thursday,
January 23.   The meeting will be called   to order  at 8 p.m., and it is  ex-1
pected that President Kavanagh, Tile-
layers'   L'nieen,   will   be  in   thc   chair.
Hc  has  been   on  the  sick  list   for  a
few weeks, but we are pleased to see
that  he is  well  enough  to  represent
his  union   at   the   convention   of   the
B, C. Federation of Labor.   There is,
so far, only  twenty-two nominations
for   the   nine   positions   on   Ihe   executive committee.    As there is about
eighty   or   ninety     delegates   to   the
council, an opportunity will be given
those who wish to be come aspirants
to office at this meeting when nominations  will  be  re-opened.
As lhe result of a snowslide at
Dunedin mine at Sandon last Sun-
da}-, which carried away tlie black-
Smith simp in which he was working, Levi K. .Mclnnes, the well-known
Socialist speaker, was killed. Levi is
a brother of John Mclnnes, ex-M.L.A.
for Grand Feirks, and was well known
throughout the province for the active
work he done and Interest he showed
in the working class movement At
the convention eef District 6 of ilu
Western Federation of Miners, which
was held recently at Nelson, a re-
solution ef sympathy wilh the relatives of the deceased was unanimously
adopted.
It is the intention of Baker
No. 46 of Vancouver to hold
Local
:i smoker
CHI
Authorized Capital    -    $1,100,0001   >0
Assets       ....   $  350,000.(   >0
cr repayment .    :��n be m��de
loan
50 / cr repayment . :��n be i
/ ��ny   month  of       whole
/q or  any  part  v 'ithout  <
' cott or bonua
Money Loaned at 5 per
cent, simple interest.   Ten
years six months to repay
.^--^^^^^^^^^^ PER ANNUM  ^	
THE   LARGEST  AND   OLDEST   CONTRACT      LOANING
COMPANY IN CANADA
Business written to date in ex ess of $12,500,    000.00
Officers   and   Directors :
J. R. Seymour, Prcs., A. McKechnic, 1st Viee.-Pres.    and Gen. Mgr.
F.  A.  Iirodie,  Secretary
Hon. R, E.   McKechnic, 3rd Viee.-Pres.    J. J    ���  Banfield
Canadian Home Investnu xnt Co.
LIMITED
Second Floor, Pacific Building,   Vancouvi ;r> B. C.
B.C. OFFICES:
Victoria,  NewWestminster,  Nelson,  Kamloops,      Prince   Rupert
going; opi.n evenings until nine o'ci ^ck
"IT   IS  THE  MAN   IN   THE  0\ 'ERALLS
WHO   IS   BUILDING  UP   VANC LOUVER"
Support Home
Induitry
Every Clothier
Sells Them
We Buil. J Overalls
WHALE
EiRAND
SIZE���STRENGTH���ENDUR ANCE
Made in Vancouver in a UNION   shop.    Every
working man in Greater Vancouver sho old equip himself with Whale Brand garments.   The y are built for
wear and tear.
A. WADDINGTON -:- 22, Water Street
F. J.  Rolston ��-   H-   BatChd"
Good Old-fashioned Meals for Hungry Men
��� :      :.,  .1,.  -i��.���-.i   daintiest dining-room
Prompt, courteous service m thc cleanest, a) &
you could imagine. _.���.������-,   oTT5t?t?T
HARD BY THE MUNICIPAL  HALL,   ON   FRASER  STRhLI
Special   attention  paid  the  palates of civic off.*^" and employees.
UNIQUE CAFE
G.  H.   Batcheler,  Manager
Corner   Forty-Ninth   Avenue  and Fraser Street.
SNAP, KNIGHT ROAD
Full-sized  Lot,  north of  Home  Road, $1200.    One-third  cash;
balance 6, 12 and 18 months.
$100 cash handles  Building Lots close to Knight Road.
THOS. Y. LEITCH
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Cor. Knight and Westminster Rds. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone : Fairmont 1653
"Do you know anything l 7ibo.it
machinery?"
"Only ene.tiglt to. ask. foolish questions of my neighbor when bis automobile  stalls."
If the truth could'be discovered,
probably it would bc found that the
kind of man who cm wear, J top hai
without being self-conscious is abnor
mal  in  other ways  also.
The  International Union  of  Steam
.engineers   which   meets     in     Labor
i Temple every Wednesday evening at
18 pm   are initiating new members at
I every, meeting, and are all thc time
seeking to add  to their membership.
Great    credit   is  due   to   President
lllumberg for the voluntary assistance
rendered   tei   ibis   organization    ever
since be joined it in December, mi.
Despite   the   lack   (ef   assistance   ot
their International, and the opposition
e,f Ihe B   C  Association of Stationary
[Engineers,    Local  397  is  determined
lhat   every   engineer   een   the   Lower
Mainland is going to have an PPPor-
tttnity   of   becoming  acquainted  with
the aim  and object e,f Trade Unionism, and with  this end in view they
contemplate    renewing    the    weekly
educational   meetings,   of  which   further  mention   will  be  made  m  these
cbluntns.
AAA
on the twenty-fifth of January in the
Labor Temple. All those wdio are in
any way interested in the doing of
the bakers and would like to have a
nice, quiet, and enjoyable evening are
invited to purchase tickets, which will
be on sale at the Labor Temple Cigar
Store, at  fifty cents each.
*       *       _(_
The Convention of District 6 of the
Western Federation of Miners, which
j concluded its deliberations at Nelson,
on January 10th, has resulted in the
some   very   important
MACADAM & COMPANY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
418 Winch Building Vancouver, B. C.
Wood Block
PAVING
advocation of ..^^^^^^^^^^
amendments being adopted, with
view to their enactment, regarding
the Workmen's Compensation Act
and the Light Hour Law. Legislation providing that workers acquiring miner's plitisis and other diseases
resulting frum employment under
healthful conditions may secure compensation as under the Workmen's
Compensation Act, and that thc B. C.
Workmen's Compensation Act. The
extension of the Eight Hour Law to
cover carpenters, machinists, boiler
makers, helpers and chain gang workers working around smelters was submitted  by  Trail.
Amongst thc matters which will be
thoroughly discussed at the third annual convention of the British Colum.
Farmer John: "This is the New
York Slock Exchange, my dear. All
those men running about on the floor
are brokers."
Mrs. fohrtl "My! 1 should think
they would get tired. Don't they
ever   >it  down?"
Farmer John- "I guess not. Seats
here cost about $70,000 apiece."
1
SOUTH VANCOUVER'S  POPULATION HAS
INCREASED 35,000 IN SEVEN YEARS
It contains the choicest Residential and Business
Property on the Peninsula
COLLINGWOOD
Is the heart of this thriving Municipality. We have
been established here since 1905, and invite correspondence regarding investments. We .can place
money on first mortgage at 8 per cent., and transact
all financial business.
References :    Royal Bank of Canada, Vancouver, B. C.
Bank of Vancouver,, Collingwood, B. C.
BAILEY, TELFQRD & CO. LTD.
 1    T  -.-...a
Financial and Estate Agents
317 Pender St. W., Vancouver, B.C.
Fire, Insurance and Loans
Collingwood East, B. C. TWELVE
GREATER VANCOUVER CHINOOK
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   18,   1913
MEN OF THE MOMENT IN SOUTH VANCOUVER
LIVE, PROGRESSIVE CANDIDATES FOR MUNICIPAL HONOURS FOR 1913
i
To the
Electors  of  South Vancouver
Ladies and Gentlemen:
Having felt last year that the strain of office was
telling on me physically, and at the same time that the introduction of new men into the Council might be advantageous to
the Municipality, I am again offering myself as a candidate in
the forthcoming election for the year 1913, believing that with
my seven years' experience in Council work in South Vancouver, I can be of service to our Municipality when she needs
it most. The time has arrived when it is necessary to put all
the vim and energy into our administration that is offering, on
account of the large and troublesome questions that are to be
dealt with. Among the most important are sewerage, permanent pavement of all the main trunk roads and business lt.'��eta
of the Municipality, the development of the North Arm of ihe
Fraser River as a shipping port, the encouraging of manufacturers to locate within our district, the introduction of modern
fire-fighting equipment, reservation of park sites, establishing
of modern hospitals and at the earliest possible moment to arrange an agreement with the City of Vancouver for the formation of a Greater Vancouver, which I hope will be satisfactory
to all reasonable ratepayers in the Municipality. I am now in a
position that I can devote the whole of my time to the interests
of the Municipality, and if elected I will use the same progressive measures that I did while Reeve, and endeavor to
place the Municipality in its just position. Wishing the Ratepayers and residents a happy and prosperous New Year.
I am, yours truly,
W. A. POUND, Piogrcuive Annexation Candidate
W. A. POUND,
Ex-Reeoe
M
i
VOTE FOR
W. J.
DICKINSON
The Aggressive Annexation
Candidate for
WARD II
Every Ratepayer in South Vancouver knows
that Mr. Dickinson stands for Annexation
first, last and all the time.
<I If elected as Councillor for Ward II, for the
year 1913, Mr. Dickinson will continue the
fight in the same untiring manner that has
marked his work in the past.
^ DICKINSON wants more Sewers and less
Hospitals.
L
A  Birthday Cake
Take equal portions of good taste,
wisdom, justice, freedom from prejudice and a friendly attitude toward
the world in general.
Beat into this mixture a square deal
and moisten with the milk of human
kindness. Stir this batter to a light
foam with the flail of satire, but do
not let it froth over or grow flat.
Shake in some raisins of wit and
plums of verse, with peaches of prose
here and there. Spice with humor
and the sparkling wine of criticism.
Flavor with joy and a few crushed
Jove blossoms to impart sweetness to
the wnole. Let this stand for a while
m a ccwy place, so that it may not
#et stale or dry.
As a structure for thc cake, which
will set as a cornerstone for the
somewhat light ingredients recommended, build a graceful and well
balanced foundation of art, beauty
and light, touching the corners here
and there with the citron of good
judgment.
Meit in a golden bowl consistency,
conslai.t effort for perfection, fine
quality and detestation of the ordinary.    Pow der over this lightly a dis
like of s! am, pretense, flippancy and
the obvious.
Dash 111 liberally a hatred of all
forms of cruelty, oppression and
abuse of power, tinctured with a good
fighting altitude toward evil.
Blen>! 'n the honey of a playful
spirit and e/rate over all some avoid-
am-e of t.ie smug or commonplace.
Bake in a quick, bright oven of
warm-hearted ness.
Cover completely with sugar, decorate wi.h fresh roses of cheerfulness ami goexl faith, bonbons of happiness an ' candles of increasing prosperity.���Kate  Masterson,  in  "Life."
To the
Electors of
South  Vancouver
I am announcing myself as the
people's candidate for Ward Five.
I will stand for progress and
economy in Municipal expenditures, with a fair deal to all.
-Ward Five has not been represented by a resident in the past
year, and we could not expect a
fair deal from an outsider.
G. L. GREENLAY
5418 Main Street
Vote for
JOHN THIRD
and Progressive
Government
TO THE ELECTORS
OF WARD FOUR
Ladies and Gentlemen:
Ward Four was the first
to get water, arc lights, permanent sewers and pavement on account of my initiative.
Ward Fo.tr commenced the plan
of widening streets through my
efforts.
I have started many of the public-
spirted movements in South Vancouver.
I have always used, and will
always put forth my best efforts
to secure the annexation of South
Vancouver by the City of Vancouver.
On this record I seek your support in the election of January 18.
Don't Stop Progress
To the Electors of
WARD VII
SOUTH VANCOUVER
Ladies and Gentlemen :
At the earnest solicitation of a
large body of Ratepayers, I have consented, after due consideration, to offer
myself again as Candidate for Ward
VII.
Charles Stuart Campbell
WARD I
a
REASONS WHY
Spencer Robinson
Should be re-elected with a goeid. h\s majority in Ward I
a
1912
20 miles of roads cleared and graded; 10 miles of side
walks; $90,000 passed through the "payroll" of his Ward
in 1912 in excess of 1911, which means that additional improvements to that extent have benefited the ward in
general, also that the various businesses have felt the additional benefit, and finally the resident workmen with
their families have been fully employed and protected
against contracts and alien labor.
Over 400 ratepayers in open public meeting unanimously endorsed thc present Councillor, in addition to the
unanimous endorsation of Ward I Ratepayers' Association.
Robinson Stands for Progress
One of those stop, look and listen
political orators was holding forth in
a local hall. His theme was "The
Danger lhat Confronts Us," and the
handbills announced that his revelations would "strike terror to the soul
of every patriot." A young couple,
evidently lost or strayed from Berea,
stopped in front of the hall, read the
announcement, found out that no admission fee was charged and timidly
entered.
The spellbinder talked loud and
fast. He recited strings of figures,
used words six feet long, and glibly
chattered about unearned increment,
economic    determination   and   things
like that. Finally the rural stranger
leaned over and whispered to his
companion.
"Mary, are you a-payin' attention
to  this  here  lecture?"
"As good as I kin," she answered
meekly.
"Are  you  skeered?"
"I'm skeered as much as I kin understand."
"Can't I induce you to join the
Society for the Prevention of Useless Giving?"
"What would be the advantage?
Useful gifts cost just as much as any
others."

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