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The Greenwood Miner Aug 18, 1899

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 THE GREENWOOD MINER.
v>
Vol 1, No. 29.
GREENWOOD, B. C, FRIDAY, AUG. 18,1899.
$200 Per Year.
THE $150,000 MARK
The Present Building Operations About Reach It.
Some Large and Substantial Blocks Included in the List���More Buildings
in Prospect, and No Boom.
It is not blazed abroad, with trumpets,
nor chronicled in every paper in the
land, nevertheless Greenwood is quietly
sawing wood. Building is steadily going
on and a review of the buildings under
way reveals the fact that the aggregate
of the operations almost equals $150,-
000. This is in face of the fact that during the summer months business has
been, comparatively speaking, quiet,
and no speculative movement on foot.
In order that a total might be arrived at
the Miner has endeavored briefly to
enumerate the principle buildings that
are under way, or for which contracts
have been let.   They are as follows:
Two-story brick block on corner of
Copper and Centre streets owned by
Wallace & Miller, Nelson; 75 ft. by
95 ft.; three stores on Copper street,
one on Centre, 20 offices up stairs;
contractor, W. F. Travis; cost f20,000.
The Leland Hotel, corner of Government and Deadwood streets, owned
by J- Powell; three stores and full
sized basement, 68 ft. by98ft.; 78
rooms, Including 50 bedrooms; J. A.
Coulson, contractor; L. L. Rand,
architect; cost  25 000.
A. B. Campbell, architect, has the following list:
Fletcher block, corner of Copper and
Deadwood, three-story frame; contractor. J. A. Coulson; cost complete about  18 000
Wood block, corner of Government
and Deadwood, two-story frame,
with large stone basement; contractors, Oliver 4 Bunting    6 000.
Mayor Hardy's residence in Fisher's
addition, frame cottage    2 500.
Russell's residence, Fisher's addition,
frame cottage    1 600.
F. W. Smith, of Smith & McRae, on
Kimberley street, two-story frame..   1200.
Mr. Phalen, of Olson & Phalen, frame
cottage on Summit street    1 000.
Repairs and addition to the old school
house    1 000.
Remodelling of the old store of Rendell & Co's. en Greenwood street,
moving to the rear, new front consisting of ofHce and store    8 000.
New Presbyterian church    2 000.
Elkin's building on Government street
two-story frame, 25 x 05 feet    1 800.
Fischer's building on  Government
,reet, two-story frame, 26x50 feet...   1 400.
W. E. Medill's residence, two-story
frame, south Greenwood    2 000.
C. II. \V. Sansome has supplied the
plans for Guess Bros.' brick block on
Copper street next to the Windsor
hotel, two stories and full basement;
fire proof; basement for laboratory
and sampling works; ground floor,
offices and store; second story, of-
ces and rooms    5 000.
John Robertson, architect, has the
following in hand:
Residence for Mr. Johns, supt. of the
Sunset mine    1 500,
Residence of Elmer Miller, frame cottage.    1 250.
Theatre for W. S. Fletcher at the rear
of his new frame block    5 000.
The Masons are building a fine new
frame block by day labor on Government near Deadwood; two-story
frame-; first floor to contain  stores
and hall on second floor    5 000.
James Sutherland is building a hotel
next to the Ottawa, two stories       800.
Mr. Kirkwood, two frame cottages on
Church street    2 000.
F. W. Hart, two frame cottages on
Long Lake street    1 200.
Methodist church on Long Lake
street, Knox & Miller, contractors..   1 800.
Star Bakery, Comer & Picthall, next
to the Wood block on Government
street, two-story frame    1500.
Residence of J. H. Macfarlane, manager of the Sunset mine, two-story
frame on Fisher's addition    2 000.
Residence, I. H. Hallett, frame cottage, Long Lake street.
The foregoing are the principal buildings about which the Mimer representative could get definite particulars in a
hasty summary of the building situation. There are, however, about a dozen buildings in south Greenwood .and
Anaconda, a number of smaller ones
scattered throughout the town, on Gold
street, and in the north end, which are
not included, the estimated value of
which is $25,000. In addition to those,
although definite plans have not been
decided upon, it is almost certain that
the Windsor and Pacific will be rebuilt,
and Mr. Hallett is talking of a brick
block on his two lots next thereto. The
aggregate almost equals, without including the latter, the sum of $150,000.
Back from Copper Creek.
W. S. Keith, of Keith & Ketchum,
returned Wednesday night from Copper
creek, with J. Edwards Leckie and
Ronald Harris, M. E��� who went up to
see the Lottie F. group, and reports the
property looking well. A large num-4
ber of prospectors are on the trail going
up the river to the new strike. They
passed eight prospectors camped at the
mouth of Slate creek waiting for the
rain to stop. A large number of claims
have atready been located on Copper
creek and across the river to the southwest.
At West Bridge where a large number
of prospectors camped, some were going
up the main river and some up the
West Fork. While there they heard of
a big strike of quartz, carrying copper
pyrites, on Cranberry creek, and another on Boomerang creek on the West
Fork, the last being a bluish white
quartz carrying iron pyrites and galena.
Both the West Fork and main river
appear to be experiencing somewhat of
a boom, and another year will put those
regions among the rich mineral districts
of the province.
PERSONAL  MENTION.
TO BUILD A SMELTER
Representatives of Mother Lode
Capitalists in Greenwood.
Paul Johnson Says a 250-Ton Copper
Furnace Will be Erected to be Increased to Indefinite Capacity.
Among the arrivals this week were:
R. G. Bedlington, Hamilton; H. Bed-
lington, Toronto; J. W. Dore, Hamilton ; M. Archibald, Nelson ; Ed. Davis,
O. McDougall, and W. T. Askew, Grand
Forks; M. F. Donaghue, Denver, Col.;
R. L. Cawston, Keremeos; J. R. Miller,
owner of the Miller Block, and W. H.
VaaB, Montreal; Chas. Early, North-
port; F. Steele, photographer, Winnipeg ; Ed. Cronyn, Rossland, and A. Do-
bell, Quebec.
D. C. McRae, of Smith & McRae, has
returned after a week's trip to Spokane.
W. S. Fletcher is installing an electric light plant in his mill on Eholt
creek, and intends putting on a night
force. This will be the pioneer electric
light plant in this section.
Thos. McDonnell returned from
Spokane yesterday and reports Morrison
stock in demand as a result of the recent strike.
Elsewhere is printed an article from
the Nelson Tribune with reference to
the proposed Mother Lode smelter. As
Paul Johnson was in Nelson at the time
the article in question appeared, it was
to be presumed that the information
was correct; but while it contains a certain amount of information with a basis
of fact, it was copied from the United
States papers and is somewhat exaggerated.
Paul Johnson and John O. Norbom,
San Francisco, arrived in Greenwood on
Wednesday at noon, and registered at
the Imperial. They were seen shoitly
afterwards by a Mines representative,
who obtained as much information as
Mr. Johnson had to impart for the present. Upon being shown the article
from the Tribune, he said the capital
represented was American and not English, and that no contracts had been let,
and nothing decided upon except that
there was going to be a smelter erected.
His mission here was to select a site,
make all preliminary arrangements, prepare plans, and to supervise the erection and operation thereafter. Nothing
had been done yet.
Mr. Johnson says he does not know
where the site will be selected. It depends upon a number of local conditions, which it will be his business
to thoroughly enquire into. One thing,
however, he said he was certain that the
smelter would be as close to the mines
as possible, as the shorter the haul on
these low grade ores the greater the
profit would be. As it is the intention
to smelt all the ores that are available
in the camps surrounding Greenwood,
as well as those of the Mother Lode, a
place will undoubtedly be chosen to
which there will be natural gravitation.
It would be a month, probably, before
anything definite could be done, and
construction would not begin in any
event before the railway was into Greenwood, which would be about the first of
November so far as he could ascertain.
So far as water power and water were
concerned, they were only details of
minor importance, comparatively speaking. The cost of power in the operation
of a smelter per ton was a very small
item, and if water power could not be
obtained easily steam power would be
used. It is proposed to erect a copper
smelter with a daily capacity of 250 tons,
so arranged as to increase the capacity
to any extent, to 2,500 tons daily if necessary. The initial cost will be about
$100,000. That is about all there is to
tell in connection with the matter.
Paul Johnson is an experienced Bmel-
ter man, and is well known in British
Columbia. He had charge of the erection of the Hall Smelter in Nelson, and
operated it for some time. He then
went to Mexico, where he had charge of
the largest smelter in America. Subsequently he was in California, where
ho prepared plans for another large
smelter. In fact, he came from there
direct here, leaving the plans to be carried out by others. Mr. Johnson says
the big smelters of the continent will be
right here in the Boundary country,
with its great ore bodies. He will remain here for an indefinite period.
OFF  FOR  PARIS.
Mineral Exhibit from Boundary for the Exposition Gone Forward.
This week the committee in charge of
the exhibits for the Paris exposition se-
secured the final lot of samples, which
have been boxed up and forwarded to
the Provincial mineralogist, six large
boxes, containing in all about half a ton
of ore.
The specimens are as varied and representative as was possible to secure.
Only properties upon which sufficient
work had been done to demonstrate
their values to some extent are represented. Exoin one or two of these the
committee were unable to secure samples, but it is understood that the Grand
Forks committee have specimens so it is
not likely that any of the camps have
been overlooked.
As was explained in a former issue,
the specimens are of the minimum size
of an eight inch cube, though some are
larger and some smaller than that. All
the specimens will be assayed at Ottawa
before going to Paris, and in order that
the exhibit might be thoroughly representative, good average samples in each
case were secured. In some cases two
specimens from a mine were sent.
In White's camp the properties represented are: Lexington, Lincoln and
City of Paris; Deadwood camp, Mother
Lode, Morrison, Buckhorn and Gold
Bug; Greenwood camp, Knob Hill,
Ironsides, Brooklyn, Stem winder and
War Eagle; Wellington camp, Winnipeg and Golden Crown; Long Lake
camp, Jewel, Enterprise and Lakeside;
Copper camp, King Solomon and Big
Copper; Summit camp, B. C.; Camp
McKinney, Cariboo, Amelia, Minnehaha, Waterloo, Fontenoy and Sailor.
STRIKE   ON    THE    MORRISON.
A Rich Vein Entered at the 170-Foot Level,
Last Week.
On Friday after the Miner had gone
to press, news was received of a strike
that had been made on the Morrison in
Deadwood camp. The same day F. H.
Oliver, manager of the mine, Spokane,
came in having received word at Grand
Forks over the telephone.
A crosscut of 95 feet was made from
the main tunnel into the lead, which
dips at an angle of 45 degrees. Here a
rich body of ore was struck, carrying
values as high as $45 and $50 in gold,
but averaging from $8 to $10, and going
from 7 to 14 per cent in copper. The
lead was crosscut for 20 feet all in ore,
without reaching the wall, and at that
point Supt. Peterson began to drift.
The strike was made at the 170-foot
level.
Mr. Oliver brought some of the ore
down to take to Spokane, whither he
went last week again. This important
strike means that the Morrison stock,
which has slumped somewhat, will take
a jump again. The indications for a
permanent ore chute of values are very
good, indeed, and Mr. Oliver was very
much pleased withthe prospects. THE  GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Aug, 18,1899.
THE  ALDERMANIC   BOARD.
Proceedings on Monday night Principally
Consisted of Consideration of Requirements
of the Fire Department-A Paid Chief Appointed, and a FnU line of Apparatus Decided Tjpon-Electric Light Franchise.
The only alderman absent on Monday
night was Robert Wood.
Messrs. Pringle & Whiteside, solicitors for Miller Bros , wrote re damages
by lowering the grade on Copper street.
They were instructed to ask the Council
to place the building upon a proper level at the corporation's expense. Referred to the City Solicitor.
D. A. Mackenzie, secretary of the Fire
Department, wrote conveying the suggestions of the Fire Department made
at their last meeting.
A letter was received from Geo. A.
Sterling, secretary of the Manufacturers'
Life Insurance Co., re debentures.
Recommendations re W. E. Henton's
qualifications as a firemen were received.
W. E. Leonard, manufacturers' agent,
wrote re linen hose and other fire apparatus.
The Spokesman-Review acknowledged
letter re advertising contract, and hoped
for further consideration later on.
Crane & Co., Portland, acdnowledged
receipt of order for water works material, and stated goods would be forwarded
quickly as possible.
David Beith and A. Fisher, newly appointed aldermen for the North and
South wards, respectively, took the oath
of office and their seats.
The report of the Committee on Finance was adopted.
A. S. Black, on behalf of the Greenwood Water Works Co., appeared before
the Council and asked for an extension
of time re franchise for electric lights
granted April 24, 1899 until January 1st.
He was accompanied by W. E. Campbell and J. McGregor, who it is understood, have acquired the rights for
Boundary Falls water power. Mr.
Campbell also spoke. The matter was
laid over for one week.
The council then went into a committee of the whole to consider the requests
of the firemen for fire apparatus, etc.,
Aid. Galloway in the chair.
The Mayor took the matter in hand,
and moved the appointment of a paid
chief to be taken from the list recommended by the department, the salary
to be agreed upon later. All agreed
with this and it passed.
It was decided to purchase 1500 feet of
1% inch linen hose, the selection to be
made by the chief and a committee of
firemen. The purchase of a hook and
ladder truck was laid over one week.
The matter of extra hydrants was left
to the superintendant of water works
and the street committee. Single hydrant gates were laid over for further
consideration. In respect to a fire hall
the mayor said that as plans of a city
hall were under consideration it would
be better to lay it over for the present.
All other items, enumerated elsewhere,
were ordered as recommended.
The committee rose and reported and
the report was adopted.
The Mayor proposed that the firemen
should be paid for their time at fires.
It was only right. In some towns they
were paid so much a fire; he was in favor of a rate per hour, and he suggested
$1 an hour. This was generally agreed
to, and Aid. Galloway, who favored the
suggestion, made a motion to that effect
which was carried. Aid. Galloway further spoke in favor of the firemen being
recognized by private parties, whose
properties were saved, giving them
cheques.
The appointment of a chief was then
taken up, and election was made by
ballott.   There were four  names sub
mitted as recommended by the firemen:
Capt. Hallett, W. E. Henton, R. H.
Palmer, and F. Wilson.
On the first ballott Henton was elected, receiving four out of five votes cast.
The question was then considered as
to the time to be devoted by the chief to
his duties���all or only a part of it. It
was considered that there was plenty to
do under the by-law regulating his duties to employ all his time and it was so
ordered.
The salary was fixed at $100 a month,
to include two rooms in the fire hall
when built.
After several other matters were informally discussed, au adjournment was
moved.
ROSSLAND   WEEKLY    REVIEW
Miners' Hotel,
COPPER STREET.
(Special Correspondence Miner.)
The Associated Boards of Trade of
Eastern British Columbia have concluded their work and have adjourned
sine die. It ia usual in this part of the
world to praise everything, good, bad
indifferent; to "taffy" everything to
please all and displease none; to set at
defiance the fable of the man and the
ass. Not to do this is considered bad
policy and is to subject the non-conformist to the pain and penalties.of ostracism ; still I am prepared to undergo
this punishment rather than to extol
that which should be condemned, because there is a good J3al to condemn
rather to praise. It was stated that the
convention "has undoubtedly been very
successfull."   Of this I know nothing.
There are, it seems, two branches to
this Associated Boards of Trade���the
trading and the mining. Perhaps the
trading part may be well enough understood, but it is only experienced mining
men that ought to guide the destinies of
the other branch. The manner in which
the mining laws of this Province have
been bungled justifies the impression
that there is not a superfluity of experience, and that altogether there is too
much "monkeying" especially on the
part of men who have not so far made a
success of their mining operations.
The Association evidently intends to
make itself felt politically and otherwise. Its future success depends upon
the motives of its engineers.
So far it is evident that the lawyer intends to take a hand in the game and to
steer this new craft the way it should
go. I am afraid, however, that when
the next general elections, or even provincial elections occur there will be such
difference of opinion, so many comers
to town, that confusion will be worse
confounded. Mr. Bostock must now
look to his laurels. His rival is slowly
emerging from the nebulous mist of the
Kootenays!
The ore shipments are now well beyond the 81,000 tons figures and before
the present month ends the figures will
approximate 100,000 tons. If everything
else here was as gratifying as ore production there could be little else to complain of.
Letters from England, however, show
the provincial situation has not materially improved British Columbia's prospects. The knowing ones have begun to
enquire what kind of a race inhabits
British Columbia, and why are they so
favorably impressed with the potency of
English capital and so very much pred-
diced against Englishmen themselves?
Perhaps Mr. Carter-Cotton can explain
this. Mr. Carter-Cotton is, I understand, not an Englishman as we understand it. A long residence in Lousitahia
has it seems embued him with many of
the Castilian fancies, amongst which is
the belief that he should have been a financier instead of an editor. Some, indeed, uncharitably think that he is the
"missing claimant." * * *
WALTER WATERLAND, Prop.
A Finely Equipped Bar,
Board by Day or Week.
TELEPHONE CONNECTION.
Best of Cusine Service. Rooms
neat   and   Well   Furnished.
ROSSLAND HOTEL.
Alf. Cameron, Prop.
Everything Brand New and First
Class. Elegant Bar Room, Best
Liquors and Cigars.
House Heated and Lighted
Throughout. Dining Room under Management of
AK EXPERIENCED CHEF.
Copper St., Greenwood, B. C.
The Best INVESTMENT
In REPUBLIC CAMP in 1896 was the Republic Gold Mining Co
We were then selling this stock at 8 and 10 cents per share; today
this same stock is worth $3.75 PER SHARE. A thousand shares
in 1896 sold for $80 to $100; TODAY IT IS WORTH $3,750. THE
BEST INVESTMENT in Republic Camp today is the ADMIRAL
DEWEY GOLD MINING COMPANY. This company owns
four claims, located west of the Republic properties. We are
now sinking a shaft to the depth of 50 feet on the surface and it
ASSAYS FROM $1.60 to $31 IN GOLD. This stock is now selling at 7 cents per share, and we predict that inside of six months
this same stock will sell 75 CENTS TO ONE DOLLAR PER
SHARE.   For further particulars call on or address,
W       M       TV I CHOI    S     MWIHG BROKER, BUTTE, MONTANA., U. S. A.
������ ���    ��� ������    l^IVn^I^O) No. 1, West Broadway.   P. O. Box 455.
���        ���
S   <&>  P* Burns & Co*  S  *��
Ring
No. 2
FOR ANYTHING IN THE LINE OF
Fresh or Cured Meats,
Fish or Poultry.
| MARKETS LOCATED AT
| Cascade, Grand Forks, Green-
| wood, Midway, Camp McKinney.
)000000<>0000000000<>00000000<>00<)0000000006
LIME! LIMEH LIME!!!
The only first class WHITE LIME in the Boundary. The SNOW FLAKE LIME COMPANY
is now prepared to furnish lime on short notice in
ANY QUANTITY. SSSS^I
W. E. MEDILL, Mgr.
Cunliffe & Ablett,
ENGINEERS, BOILERMAKERS
and MACHINISTS.
Our machine shops are now complete and we are prepared to do the heaviest class of work-
Ore cars, Ore buckets, shafting, hangers and pulleys. Pipe work a specialty. Estimates givea
on all classes of work.   Pumps always fn stock.
ovn/VKT-n TTAVTI    ManUTTTPTIV'     1-25-H. P., horizontal engine, 9x12; 1���35-H. P.;
SECOND-HAND MACHINERY. Locomotive type, boiler and skids complete.
1���No. 3 Little Giant drill, hose column arms and bars complete; 1���5-foot Pelton wheel, with
600 feet special welded pipe from 16 ins. to 8 ins.; 1 rip-saw with iron table. W
THE   GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Aug, 18, 1899.
PICKED  SPECIMENS.
Teacher���"Johnny, can you name the
the chief products of the Philippine islands?" Johnny���"Yes'm. Trouble."
���Life.
Prosperity is not when some people
are malting all the money, but when all
the people are making some money.���
Chicago Record.
Landlady���"Isn't this a good chicken?" Boarder���"It may have been a
good chicken morally, but physically it
was a wreck."���Judge.
Captain Dreyfus should be grateful for
one thing. He has heard nothing about
the Dreyfus affair during all the time he
has been away from France.���The Free
Press, Detroit.
The late Duke of Beaufort was somewhat formidable in repartee. When
Yoltigeur, the French horse, won the
Derby, a French noble came up to the
duke, who had bet heavily on the race,
said: "Ah, my dear duke, Waterloo is
at last avenged!" "Yes, my dear
count," was the reply, "the French also
rau well at Waterloo! "
A funny incident happened during a
performance of "Macbeth" in Berlin.
In the sleep-walking scene, when the
nurse and doctor appeared on the stage
together and confabulated with one
another, a loud voice suddenly called
out from the gallery, causing a roar of
laughter in the middle of a most serious
scene: "Well, doctor! Is it a boy or a
girl?���Tid-BitS.
In an interview with a representative
of the London Daily Chronicle, Mr.
Dunne told a story about the evening
paper in which Mr. Dooley first made
liia appearance���an ill-fated sheet which
the gods loved. One day, just before
the end, a funeral passed tlie office with
a band playing the "Dead March" from
"Saul.'' The editor and Mr. Dunne
watched it with emotion and fear. "Can
it be," they whispered, "our subscriber?"
At Lamarque's funeral in Paris the
crowd took out General Lafayette's
horses, as the famous soldier was returning home from the service, and
drew his carriage to his hotel with evidences of enthusiastic love and admiration. The scene was a stirring one, and
a friend, in referring to it some weeks
afterward, said: "You must have been
very much pleased." Lafayette looked
at him for a moment in silence and then
said, with a whimsical smile:
"Yes, I was very much pleased���very
much pleased, indeed. But I never saw
anything more of my horses, my dear
friend."
Govenor Roosevelt attended the recent
commencement at Cornell, and while
there was entertained at one of the fraternity houses. When he was about to
leave, one of his staff said to him, "Governor, tlie boys have an excellent library
in the house, and I think they would appreciate its enlargement by a copy of
your 'Rough Riders.' " "Teddy." in an
outburst of good-fellowship, exclaimed;
"All right, boys, I'll be glad to send you
a copy with my compliments; the book
would be a very small return for your
hospitality." Whereupon one of the
boys replied, excitedly: "That's so,
Governor, I've read it."
Major Marchand, whom rival factions
are combining to exalt into the hero of
the hour in France, was born at Thois-
sey, a village in the edge of the district
where the Macon wine is grown, says
the London Chronicle. Hie father, a
grizzled, bony little man of sixty-five,
still plies his humble trade as a carpenter, and makes a decent living, for the
country around is fairly prosperous.
The major is the eldest of four sons, all
of whom have left home to seek their
fortunes abroad. One died as a noncommissioned officer in the Soudan, and
another is employed as a civilian in
Africa, while the youngest hopes to become an engineer in the navy.
David B. Henderson, who will probably be the Speaker of the next House
of Representatives, once fired a rather
hot shot, according to The Argonaut, at
Holman of Indiana, whose savage opposition to any and.all appropriation measures earned the title of "watch-dog of
the Treasury." Some years ago, when
an appropriation for Holman's own district was up for consderation, the latter
arose, and, departing from his usual
custom, made a warm speech in its
favor. The instant he sat down Henderson was on his feet. "Mr. Speaker,"
he said, " the member's address brings
to mind Byron's lines:      ,   ���   ,
' '"Tis sweet to hear the honest "watch-dog's"
bark
Bay deep-mouthed welcome as we draw near
home.' "
In Justin McCarthy's "Reminiscences," recently published, there is a good
story about Thomas Carlyle and his
friend Allingham, the poet arid essayist,
whom Mr. McCarthy describes as the
gentlest of men. One thing that would
never have occured to any of, his friends
as possible was the chance of taking on
himself to dispute with Carlyle. But
once when Carlyle was denouncing an
English statesman, he gently urged
that something might be said on the
other side. "Eh, William Allingham,"
Carlyle broke forth, "you're just about
the most disputatious man I ever met.
Eh! man, when you're in one of your
humors, you'd just dispute about anything." It was the fable of the wolf and
the lamb over again.
The delegates to the Women's International Council, having expressed a desire to pay their respects to the queen,
Lady Aberdeen arranged a trip to Windsor! Her Majesty consented to drive
slowly through the guadrangle of the
caBtle and receive a few of the more
prominent delegates. Miss Susan B.
Anthony, in speaking of her meeting
with the queen, said: "I had never
seen the queen before, and could not but
feel a thrill when, looking in her wonderful face, I saw her, as her life is going
out, welcoming the women's movement,
which is the precursor of the twentieth
century. What pleased me most was
when Her Majesty said: 'Now, I cannot
have these ladies who are visiting me
return without giving them a cup of
tea.' Sir Arthur John Bigge.'the queen's
private secretary, replied: 'But, Your
MajeBty, they are here in hundreds.' 'I
do not care,' said the queen, 'if they are
here in thousands. They must all have
a cup of tea when they come to see me.'"
Turner, Beeton fc Co., Ltd.
The prospectus of Turner, Beeton &
Co., Ltd. has just been issued in London with a capital of ��140,000. The firm
will secure the control of the business
carried on in this Province and London
by Turner Beeton and Company and
C. H. Beeton & Co., and also that carried on in Victoria by Lenz & Leiser.
The business of Turner Beeton & Co.
dates back from 1863, Lenz & Leiser being of somewhat later date.
Ex-Premier J. H. Turner and G. A.
Kirk are the managing directors for
British Columbia.
PRINGLE & WHITESIDE,
Barristers & Solicitors,
Notaries Public Etc.
Barrett block, Copper Street, Greenwood, B. 0.
ANDREW LEAMY,
Barrister,
Solicitor,   etc
Greenwood. B. C.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
and NOTARY PUBLIC.
NADEN -FLOOD BLK.
Greenwood, B. C.
J. S.'M. Morrison, L. L. B., J. Ri Brown,
Alfred Hall, L. L. .B
Hall, Brown & florrison,
BARRISTERS and
SOLICITORS. '
FLOOD  BLOCK........	
GREENWOOD, B. C!" .   .'
BAUER&
ASHCROFT
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYORS
A    F    Aehrrrtft        Resident
f\.   E.   S\��>ni>roil, Representative.
FLOOD-NADEN BLOCK.
Q. M. HILLARY, B. Sc.
Assayer and Chemist.
m'gill  graduate  in
mining engineering.
GREENWOOD,  B.   C.
I. H. HALLETT. H. C. SHAW.
HALLETT & SHAW
GREENWOOD, B. C.
Barristers, Solicitors,   cable Address
& Notaries Public. "hallet."
Codes:    Bedford McNeill's, Broom-
halls, Moreing & Neal's, Leiber's.
A. C GAL/T,
Barrister,  Etc., Rossland.
Fostofficc Building:    -    -    -    Telephone 47.
Seasonable groceries at Law & Co.'s. *
Cabin  for   rent.     Apply  at  Miner
office. *
First shipment of J. A. T. Bell's boots
and shoes just arrived at Law & Co's.   *
Lion
Bottling
Works.
JAS. M'CREATH, Prop.
All Kinds Aerated Water.    Wines
Specialty.
SOLE   AGENTS   FOR
LION BREWING CO.,
Rossland, B. C.
The Largest Brewery in the Province.
Families Suppled at their Residence.
R. H. PARKINSON,
CIVIL ENGINEER and
DRAUGHTSMAN.
THE   CANADIAN
Financial,
Insurance and
Mining
Agent.
Notary Public.
FAIRVIEW TOWNSITE AGENT.
R* F. Coates & Ca7
General Contractors
and Builders.
HOUSE   MOVING   A    SPECIALTY.
GOV'T. 8T., GREENWOOD, B.  C.
Bank of Commerce.
Head Office, TORONTO.
Established 1867.
PAID-UP CAPITAL, $6,000,000.
[Six Million Dollars.]
rest. $1,000,000
President. Hon. Geo. A. Cox.
General Manager .B. E. Walker.
Ass't. Gen'l. Manager.. .J. H. Plchmer.
This bank has the largest number of
branches of any bank in Canada, with
agencies at New York, Chicago, New
Orleans, Skagway and Dawson City.
Accounts of Corporations, Merchants
and Individuals received on favorable
terms.
Drafts, Commercial Credits, Travelers' Credits and Circular Notes issued
available in any part of the world.       '
Approved Notes Discounted; Collections made.
A general Banking business transacted.
GREENWOOD  BRANCH.
D. A. CAMERON,
��� Manager
.BANK of MONTREAL
Capital, all paid up, $12,000,000.
Rest $6,000,000.
President:
Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal.
Vice-President:
Hon. George A. Drummond.
General Manager. E. S. Clocstoii
Branches in London, Eng., New
York, Chicago,
And in the principal cities in Canada,
���o���
Buy and sell Sterling Exchange and
Cable Transfers; Grant Commercial and
Travelers', Credits, available in any part
of the world.
Drafts   issued,   Collections made, etc.
Branch.
F. J. FINUCANE, Manager.
Greenwood
THE  BANK  OF
British North America.
Established in  1836.   Incorporated by Royal
Charter.
PAID-UP    CAPITAL $4,866,666
RESERVE   FUND $1,460,000
LONDON   OFFICE:
8 Clement's Lane, Lombard St., E. C.
COURT  OF   DIRECTORS:
J. H. Brod'.s, John James Ce.ier, Ga^pard Far-
ror, Riobsid H. Gl/n, Henr> L. R. Farrer, Ed.
Arthur Won re, H. J. B. Kendall, J. J. Kings-
ford, iTed Lubbock, Geo. D. Whatman.
A. G. WALLI8, Secretary.
Head Office in Canada: St. James St. Montreal.   II. Stlkeman, Gen, Mgr., J. Elmsley, lnsp
BRANCHES   IN   CANADA:
London, Brantford, Hamilton, Toronto. Montreal, Ottawa, Kingston, Midland, Quebec, St.
John, N. B. Brandon, Winnipeg, Fredericton,
Halifax, Victoria, Vancouver, Rossland, Kaslo,
Trail, Ashcroft, Greenwood, Atlin, Bennett B.
C. amlDawson City.
AGENTS   IN   THE   UNITED   STATES:
Spokane���Traders' National Bank and Old
National Bank. New York (til Wall St.) W.
Lawson and J. C. Welsh, agents. San Franciti-
co���124SansomeSt., H. J. McMichacl and J. R.
Ambrose, agents.
LONDON   BANKER8:
Bank of England and Messrs. Glyn & Co.
FOREIGN   AGENTS:
Liverpool���Bank of Liverpool. Australia-
Union Bank of Australia. New Zealand���Union Bank of Australia, Bank of New Zealand,
indla, China, Japan���Chartered Mercantile
Bank of India, London and China, Agra Bank,
West Indies���Colonial Bank. Paris���Marcuard
Krauss & Co.   Lyons���Credit Lyonnais.
7.  T.  SHORT  Manager,
Greenwood, B. C.
QEORGE HILL,-
Merchant Tailor,
Fine Stock of Goods Always on Hand. Across
from WINDSOR Betel.
GREENWOOD,
B. C. THE  GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Aug, 18,1899.
THE    GREENWOOD    MINER.
Published Every Friday at Greenwood, B. C.
BY
THE GREENWOOD MINER PRINTING COMPANY.
R.   X.  GOSNELL, Editor and Manarer.
SUBSCRIPTION  RATES.
Domestic, One Year 12.00
Six Months ��1.26
Foreign, One Year 13.00
Payable Invariably in Advance.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
No patent medicine ads taken except at full
rates.
Legal notices 10 and 5 cents per line.
"Certificate of Improvement" notices, $5.00
and $10.00 for legal life of notice.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month's
advertising.
The Miner is on sale at. the following places:
Greenwood.
King & Co., Smith & McRae, Monroe & Co., P.
O. News Room.
Cascade: Cascade City News Co. Rossland:
P. O. News Room. Anaconda. B. C: P. O.
News Room.   Spokane;  The Shaw-Borden Co.
Entered at the Greenwood, B. C, post office
as second class mail matter.
Friday, Aug. 18,1899.
MORE OR LESS PERSONAL.
Elsewhere is reproduced an editorial
from the Nelson Tribune with reference
to the Miner. The Miner would hesitate to refer to any of its contemporaries after the fashion of the Tribune,
for the simple reason, if for no other,
that such arguments fail to prove anything either true or untrue, aud are
harmless in the way of attack. Although the Tribune intends to be particularly crushing when it speaks of the
editor of this paper being "kicked out of
office" by the present Government, there
is no reason to be ashamed of any circumstance in connection with that episode ; nor are we aware that the Government has ever taken, or that it has
ever been accorded, especial credit on
that account. It may be further premised that if the editor of the Tribune has
nohing more serious to his discredit than
the offence he has attributed to ourselves
he has reason to be well satisfied.
Moreover, if it were not for the personal
inconvenience and loss consequent upon
dismissal, it might reasonably be regarded as an honor to come under the displeasure of men with as little sense of
decency and honesty as the record has
shown to be possessed by some of those
responsible for that and similar acts.
Despite the nastiness of the remarks of
the Tribune, which are wholly uncalled
for and gratuitous, the Miner is Christian enough not to retaliate in kind.
We can forgive, not because our contemporary does not know better, but because no hurt has or can come from in-
uendo of that character.
So far as the Miner's position is concerned, it has already been defined. It
disclaims the role of "howling dervish"
in politics; it is not allied with any combination against the Government; it has
not referred to the members of the present administration as, nor does it believe
them to be "a set of incapables." In
its generalizations respecting public
men and their acts, it aims higher than
the species of argumentation with which
some at least of its contemporaries favor
their readers. Nor does the editor
"claim to know all about how governments should be run;" but even in that
respect has had as good an apportuni-
ty of judging as the editor of the Tribune, and is equally entitled to express
an opinion without being subjected to
approbrium therefor.
Reverting to the Government, it is
scarcely necesssary for us to condemn.
The feud which has been going on for
some time has sufficiently exposed its
weakness without probing too deeply.
We have had the spectacle of its leading
members accusing each other of high
political crimes, incompetence, and neglect of duty. Mr. Higgins one of its most
prominent supporters, is in open rebellion. Perhaps no stronger evidence of
weakness could be adduced than the fact
that the office of Attorney-General was
offered to a member of the Opposition,
a most unheard of thing in politics, and
was met with the ignominy of refusal.
The Columbian newspaper, the chief of
the Government organs, has only withdrawn its opposition to the appointment
of Henderson, to whom it was bitterly
opposed, and who was only selected by
the Government as the very last resort
to save itself from defeat, on the ground
of political expediency. A tree is judged
by its fruits. We do not look for figs
from thistles. The present embroglio,
which every right-minded man deplores,
is tendered all the more conspicuous
from the amount of abuse that was
heaped upon the old Government, which
had laid at its door every kind of charge
from that of sheer incompetence to high
treason. Judged by results so far, it is
little wonder that the Tribune is uneasy
and irritable in contemplating the political situation; and'it would be cruel to
be less than charitable and forgiving in
witnessing its dilemma.
What the Miner wants to see, whether it be made up of the elements of the
present administration, or a new party
altogether, is a strong Government���one
strong enough to inaugurate and carry
out a vigorous policy of development,
and one that would not be influenced in
its internal relations by ambitious
schemes of political advancement, rather
than the best interests of a Province of
such wide and varied resources and conditions as this is.
A   MISTAKEN   VIEW.
Regarding the Alaskan boundary
there appears to be an alarming amount
of misconception among the United
States journals as to the origin of the
present difficulties iu the way of settlement. Even the San Francisco Argonaut, which is certainly one of the best informed and the least prejudiced of them
all, falls into a common error.   It says:
The question of the Alaskan boundary, at
least with its present tinge of bitterness, would
never have arisen but for the richness of gold
fields the existence of which was not more than
suspected when with such precision as the
statesmen of the day could command they defined the dividing line.
It may be news to a great majority of
our American contemporaries to know
that as far back as 1872, shortly after the
acquisition of the Alaskan territory by
the United States, the Canadian Government began to agitate for a settlement
of the question, and it was put off year
after year at Washington, largely on the
ground that Congress could not be induced to vote the necessary expenses for
the delimitation of the boundary line.
It was not the discovery of gold in the
Yukon that first gave the question prominence, but the discovery of gold in the
Cassiar country in British Columbia.
At that time the only practicable route
into Cassiar was up the Stickine, and as
a matter of fact trouble arose very early
in the seventies over the uncertainty as
to the limits of Alaska; and as the result
of a preliminary survey made by Joseph
Hunter, C. E., ex-M. P. P., a provisional boundary was established about 25
miles from the mouth of the Stickine
River.   It has been in that very unsatis
factory condition ever since, despite the
fact that numerous representations were
made by the British Columbia Government through Ottawa, and by the Ottawa authorities, as reference to the state
documents will show. It has occured to
the press of the United States to say almost as a unit now that it is all on account of the Yukon which has given
rise to the demand of Canada for a settlement by arbitration. If that is an
honest statement of their convictions on
the question, it simply makes manifest
their ignorance of the whole subject.
Concerning what is now practically a
matter of history, such ignorance might
even be excusable on the part of busy
journalists, but when the Argonaut
trenching upon events that belong to
the present makes such statements as
the following it is difficult to refrain
from harsh comment:
To give the Canadians credit for honesty in
their contentions is only fraternally fair. Possibly were conditions reversed the people of the
United States would be as aggressive as the
Canadians are, and with similar legal acumen
make use of every technical point. The Can
adians, however, have not seemed inclined to
abide by peaceful methods, and from the time
of the Klondike excitement have heaped upon
the American prospector every hardship, making terms for him even more onerous than Oom
Paul for the Uitlander.
Since the opening of the Yukon coun
try the Argonaut cannot point to a sin
gle instance where the American prospector has been subject to any restrictions not imposed on British subjects
On the other hand, Canada had every
justification for complaint on account of
the bonding regulations at Skagway and
Dyea, which led to no end of hardship
and inconvenience to Canadians and
Britishers going in that way���until such
regulations were repealed, or modified,
by mutual arrangement. Such misrep
resentation of fact are responsible for
the great amount of misunderstanding
that exists at the present time. It
would be an easy matter to settle if the
people were left alone, and the question
were submitted to arbitration. The Argonaut admits that it is only a just
boundary that is desired. Why then
object to resorting to the only method
whereby that end may be accomplished?
CHINESE   UNDER   GROUND.
As was announced in the Miner, the
Privy Council of England has decided
that the act of the British Columbia
Legislature prohibiting the employment
of Chinese under ground is unconstitutional. In the face of that the Coast
papers inform us that a delegation from
Nanaimo, consisting of Dr. McKechnie
and Ralph Smith, M. P. P., have been
to Victoria to interview the Provincial
Government for the purpose of having
the legislation so uullified re-enacted.
It is possible that there is some mistake
about the nature of the request, but if it
be true as reported, it reveals an extraordinary state of feeling in and around
Nanaimo. The Miner has a very high
regard for both the gentlemen in question, but it seems incredible that they
should seek to have the Government do(
what has been declared by the highest
court in the realm to be ultra vires. In
a mild way it would be an attempt at
revolution. It is not as though the
Dominion Government had vetoed the
bill. Then it would have partaken of a
political complexion, and the local Legislature might have been justified in entering a protest in that way. It is not
conceivable that the courts could be
treated thus. It is not a question
of whether we sympathize with the objects of such legislation or not. It is a
matter of competent jurisdiction. The
Provinces have clearly no right to deal
with aliens. The Dominion Government alone can do that.    Henceforth
for all remedial legislation of the character referred to, we must look to Ottawa. No one wants to see Chinamen
work in our mines in competition with
our oWn people, at least no one who has
the best interests of the country at heart;
but to talk of inducing the Legislative
Assembly of the Province to undertake
to prevent it in the face of the clearest
evidence of its constitutional inability is
sheer nonsense.
GEO. F. WILLIAMS,
Dry Goods,
Clothing,        $
Furnishings and
Millinery.        ^
CALL  ON US.
Copper Street,
GREENWOOD. B. C.
BEFORE ORDERING YOUR
Groceries
It would   be well for you to call on
A. H. SPERRY
& CO.,
JiBjAAaflatiaUi
Who have the most
complete stock of
Staple and Fancy
Groceries to be found
in the City.
&Co.,
Opp. International Hot'l
COPPER STREET.
"LIVE AND LET LIVE."
STAR BAKERY.
Bread guaranteed free
from adulteration.
SINOW FLAKB
E��i~>E2�� a ���?*     Pastry of all kinds
DrCEJ</\.LJm Bride's cake to order
We have the Only brick oven in Greenwood.
GOVERNMENT STREET.
Furnished Rooms.
NEAT, QUIET, COMFORTABLE. READING, and COOL
STALL ROOMS, FIRST FLOOR.
PRICES MODERATE.
SWAYNE HOUSE, SILVER SI. 1/
V
THE  GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Aug, 18, 1899.
THEIR   NIGHT   OUT.
The  Firemen  Have  Their Annual Meeting,
Elect Officers, Etc.
On Friday evening the firemen held
their annual meeting in the court house.
There was a full attendance and an enthusiastic gathering. The best of spirits prevailed and any lingering feeling
of irritation that might have existed as
a result of the previous Monday evening's contact with the aldermen was
completely swept away in the infectious
good feeling that permeated the meeting.
Among other things decided upon
were the requirements of the firemen,
properly scheduled for presentation to
the council. These in order were: A
paid chief; 2.000 feet of linen hose, rubber lined; one hose cart; a ladder truck
complete; a proper fire alarm ; a fire
hall, with sleeping apartments for 10 or
12 men; extra dydrants; three brass
nozzles, 3ft. pipe, controlling tips; duty
trumpet; two extra controlling tops for
nozzles now in use; three single hydrant gates, to fit hydrants; six hose
and ladder; eighteen fire helmets;
eighteen extra heavy mackinaw coats
lined.
The election of officers was proceeded
with with the following results: President, W. S. Keith ��� vice-president, J. C.
Goupil; secretary, J. Early; treasurer,
E. II. Mortimer.
In regard to the appointment of a
chief by the council, the following rec-
nmmendations were made, leaving an
ample discretion as to choice: A. Hallett, W. E. Henton, F. N. Wilson, R.
H. Palmer and D. A. McKenzie.
After the meeting was over atalargely
attended gathering of citizens in different parts of the town, the firemen were
unanimously granted the freedom of the
city for one night, this in recognition of
their services during the recent fires.
It is understood the offer was unanimously accepted.
LARGEST SMELTER IN CANADA.
To Be Built By English Capitalists in the Vicinity of Greenwood.
Paul Johnson, well known as the designer of the Hall Mines smelter, is in
the city on a business visit. He will
leave for Greenwood in a day or two
where, as the representative of an English syndicate with $3,000,000 capital,
he will superintend the construction of
largest smelter in Canada. The work
will be begun at once, and with ordinary fortune Mr. Johnson says that it
will be completed by the 1st of November. The company erecting the new
plant is the British Columbia Copper
Smelting Company, with headquarters
in London, Eng. The plant will be of
the most modern pattern, and will be
devoted to the treatment of copper ores
exclusively. Those of the Greenwood
district are well known to contain just
about the proper quantities of lime and
iron and other fluxes to make them
self-fuxing. Up to the present time the
Hall Mines smelter has the largest copper stack in the world, capable of treating about 250 tons of ore per day, and
it was constructed by Mr. Johnson. He
is now going to build a still larger plant,
which will be the second largest stack
in existence. The intention of the new
company is to enter the field in competition with both American and Canadian smelters, and as the Canadian smelters at the present time do not attempt
to treat all kinds of copper ore, the new
plant expects to get a fair share of the
work of the district.
Accompanying Mr. Johnson is John
O. Norbon, of the Union Iron Works of
San Francisco, to whom the contract for
all the iron work has been let. Mr.
Norbon will also look after the matter
of supplying power to the plant. At
the present they are considering the
proposition from the Cascade Power
Company, who agree to transmit the
amount of power required a distance of
twenty-nine miles, the whole plant to
be run by electricity. If this does not
prove satisfactory the smelter will likely
erect a steam power plant in connection
with its own works.���Nelson Tribune.
The Presbyterian Congregation.
A meeting of the Presbyterian congregation was held on Monday evening.
There was a good attendance. The following trustees were elected: T. A.
Garland, A. Mowat and W. Graham.
The managers holding office for three
years are: Geo. Naden, A. Whiteside;
two years, F. McLean, L. Smith; one
year, D. A. Cameron, C.'F. Alston.
The members of the building committee appointed are C. F. Alston, A.
Whiteside, Geo. McKenzie, A. Campbell, D. Ross, H. B. Munro and Thos.
Gully.
Plans for a church building were considered, and a meeting of the congregation has been called for Monday evening next, when the matter will be more
fully discussed.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENT
Silver King and Iron Cap mineral claims,
situate in the Kettle River Mining Division of
Yale District.
Where located:  In 8kylark camp.
Take notice that we, the Silver King Gold
Mining Company, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B 6560, Intend, sixty days from the date hereof,
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And turther take notice that action, under
section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 12th day of August, 1899.
NOTICE.
In the matter of the Estate of Josephus Stanton,  late   of   Greenwood,   District of Yale,
Boarding House Keeper, Deceased, intestate.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all creditors and others having claims against the estate of the said Josephus Stanton, who died on
or about the 28d day of June, 1899, are required,
on or before the 6th day of September, 1899, to
send to the undersign ed, solicitors for Mary A.
Stanton, administratrix of   the goods of the
sale'  deceased,  the full  particulars of their
claims, and the nature of the securities, if any
held by them.
And further take notice that after such last
mentioned date the said administratrix will
proceed to distribute the assets of the deceased
among the parties entitled thereto, having re-
frard only to the claims of which she shall then
lave notice, and that the sa,id administratrix
will not be liable for the said assets or any part
thereof to any person or persons of whose
claims notice shall not have been received by
her at the time of such-distribution.
Leam y a Gray.
Solicitors for the said Administratrix.
Greenwood, B. C, August 4th, 1899.       28-4.
Why Be In Darkness?
When H. KEMP can clean your
Windows; also OFFICES and
STORES.
PRIVATE     NURSING     FOR     GENTLEMEN.
Leave Orders at
WHITE FRONT STORE. GOV'T STREET.
Rates Moderate.
Greenwood  Assay Office,
JOE C. LUCKENBEL, Prop.
Mines Examined & Reported On.
GREENWOOD, B. C.
t
t
THE PIONEER  HOTEL.
GrcenWOOd Qtyt   Boundary Creek, B. C.
We are prepared to welcome guests and provide best accommodations.
HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
The   Best of Wines,   Liquors   and   Cigars.    The most comfortable
SAMPLE ROOM
In Greenwood.   Heated by Hot Air.
}. W* Nelson, Proprietor*
Palace
Livery
Stables.
CHOICE DRIVING TEAMS,
Crackerjack Saddle Horses.
Distance Cuts no Ice.
We Never Fail to Get There.
Robblns Bros., Prop's.,
Greenwood, B. C.
Ottawa HoUSe,   H. P. Tompkins, Prop.
ALWAYS OPEN.
tmct������s>
New rooms; well heated; first class dining room; choice wines, liquors   and   cigars.
GREENWOOD, B. C.
GREENWOOD
Flour, Feed, Produce and
Commission Co*    S    S    at
DEALERS IN HAY, GRAIN, POTATOES, BUTTER, EGGS, ETC.
HEAVY   WAGON   SCALES   IN   CONNECTION   WITH   OUR
BUSINESS. -
Silver Street,     <��     <��     Greenwood, B, C
THE   BEST   BEER   IN   TOWN   IS   MADE   BY   THE
Elkhorn Brewery,
HARTINGER   &  PORTHANH,   Props.
ASK   FOR ,
iH IrillUl II ���  Iff .   \     "n!^^  ger  Beer   contains
*^ VXa \       /   J      lllj    on'y Pure ^a^an<*
I X^-ofo       a    q        Jw Hops.   Try it!
P'Pr raTO^M, Draught or in Bot-
��� jtSSSa tles by a11 the Lead"
PATRONISE tSSkW ing Hotels in  thi8
INDUSTRY. ^H*W Dlstnct-
B THE   GREENWOOD  MUSTER.
Friday, Aug, 18, 1899.
A RED LETTER DAT.
In Cascade On the Arrival of the C. F. R.
There.
The Cascade Record published on the
12th inst. is printed in red, significant
of the arrival of the first train in the
Gateway City. Its account of the event
in part is as follows;
At exactly 27 minutes past 10 this
morning the first locomotive to enter
the Boundary country crossed the 1600-
foot long, 135-foot high Kettle river
bridge at Cascade, and is now busy laying the heavy 73-pound Carnegie steel
rails in the Cascade yards.
�� * * # �� #
Last night the engine was decorated
with bunting and presented a gay appearance today, as it pushed the track-
laying machine before it, which was
putting down the heavy steel at the
rate of one rail, 30 feet, every two minutes.
The track was laid to the other end of
the bridge last Monday, but has been delayed for want of the 30-foot bridge
stringers which were en route from the
coast. However, Superintendent Stewart and Chief Engineer Tye set the wires
at work, a special steamer was sent up
Arrow lakes, and the result of their unremitting energy is seen in presence of
the snorting iron horse in the Gateway
City today.
Word was passed around this morning in town, that after long months of
anticipation and waiting, the first C. P.
R. train would run into Cascade before
noon. The effect was magical, and
there was soon a string of people wending their way to the bridge.
* ��� # * # *
Last Thursday morning's train brought
in Piter Huckerby, the new station
agent for Cascade, who will have charge
of the freight, express and passenger
business at this point. With him also
came D. B. McFarlane and 0. McFar-
lane his assistants, all three having
formerly been located at Brooklyn.
Mr. Huckerby says that he expects to
begin his freight business bright and
early Monday morning, if he has to use
a box car for his office��� which is probable. It is not expected that passenger
and express business will be accepted
for two or three weeks yet, when things
will be in better running order, and the
track aligned and ballasted. The telegraph line, however, will be here almost immediately.
A car of hogs and sheep for P. Burns
& Co., was brought down to the bridge
yesterday, but had to be taken back to
the siding at Sutherland creek. This
will be brought in this afternoon with
seven other cars of merchandise. Or
ders were sent out yesterday to rush all
Boundary freight via Robson to Cascade. 	
OUR  ROSSLAND   LETTER.
Rossland, B. C, August 13.
The most gratifying feature in connection with the mineral industry of
this division is that of production,
which shows a marked increase since
the War Eagle hoist has commenced
working the way in which Superintendent Balfour intends to go. About 87,000
tons of ore have been shipped from the
Rossland mines from January 1 to August 12 of the present year. Of this tonnage the Le Roi has contributed about
51,000, the War Eagle 28,000, the Center Star about 5,600, the Iron Mask
about 2,000, and the remainder by one
or two small companies, occasional shippers.   As a commercial factor this out
turn of ore accentuates the progress of the
mining industry at this point, and it
may be said that it directly measures
the legitimate side of this trade. Smelter returns are of course so far more or
less incomplete, but we shall have the
annual report of the War Eagle in October, when some idea of the values
maintained will be given. According to
the values given in a gross form, these
87,000 tons of ore amount to $1,566,000.
The War Eagle company pays its
monthly dividend regularly the 15th of
every month. So far this year this company has paid in dividends $183,750, and
up to July 15 a grand total of $361,500.
In a day or two these figures will probably be augmented to $210,250 and $388-,
000 respectively. The Le Roi has paid
no dividends Bince April, 1898, when it
paid $825,000. Its capital has been for
some months $5,000,000. The capital of
the War Eagle is two-fifths of this or
$2,000,000. Its monthly dividend of
$26,500 amounts to $318,000, or 15 9 per
cent, on nominal capital. At the same
rate the Le Roi ought to pay $795,000 to
its shareholders, but I hear that it will
be some time yet before a beginning is
made. The effects of over-capitalization are likely to show themselves in
this way, though if you talk to any one
here about over-capitalization you will
be regarded as an enemy to the commonwealth ; and yet it is such mistakes
as over-capitalization that scare thf; intending investor. Younger mining communities will find it to their interests to
avoid the mistakes of their predecessors.
I cannot report much improvement in
the local stock market, though the bulls
are busy vigorously holding on to their
boot straps. A boom is always in order
here if. wind and paper can make it go.
There are complaints that the money
is going largely to the Boundary, where
everything from a prospect to a prospect
hole is called a mine. So far I can find but
one divdend payer out there���the Cariboo of Camp McKinney, which has paid
to date $311,965, or upwards of three-
eights of its capital; a very creditable
showing, and one well worthy of emulation by many of the aspiring companies,
the names of which are being continually mentioned in the newspapers. [Our
correspondent forgets that Boundary
cannot pay dividends until it can ship,
and the railway is still at Cascade.���Ed.]
I do not look for any marked activity
in the mining business until September,
when no doubt there will be a great improvement. #*#
GREENWOOD    STOCK    MARKET.
There have been inquiries for Morrison, Boundary Creek Mining & Milling,
Winnipeg, and a few for Rathmullen.
Morrison is in strong demand and has
jumped from 12 to 17^, as a result of
the recent strike. A number of sales
have been made in Spokane.
Old Ironsides 1 .10
Knob Hill 95
Morrison 17)4
Winnipeg 29
Brandon 29
Camp McK. G. M. & M. Co 05
Highland Queen 05
Pathfinder 16
Mammoth 05
B. C. M. &M. Co 09
Waterloo 08>��
Little Cariboo 01)��
Oro Denero 05
Helen 05
Rathmullen 08
Minnehaha      26
For fine, commercial job work the
Miner office can meet your requirements. Anything and everything in the
job printing line we can do.
J.   RUSSELL.
T.   HARDY.
Russell Hardware Co.,
DEALERS IN
Almost all kinds of Hardware, Glassware, Crock-
eryware, Woodenware, Tinware, Graniteware,
Silver and plated wares, Lamp goods, Stoves of
all kinds; all stock sizes of glass windows and
doors; Belting and Packing of all kinds.
BRASS GOODS A SPECIAL/TY.
Lubricating and Illuminating oils, guns, rifles
and Ammunition; Iron all sizes and shapes; all
kinds of drill and tool steel; black and gal. pipe
up to 3 in.   All kinds pipe fittings up to 6 in.
Agts. for CAINTOIN STBBU.
-- ��
Sherwin & Williams' S���?E^dLea*theyare
Pedlar, Steel and Metal Roofing and Shingles.
BEST TINNING AND PLUMBING SHOP IN THE INTERIOR.
Grand Mid
summer
NowOnA
Every Article Reduced
AT
W. M. Law 8 Co's,
BARRETT - - BLOCK.
Copper Street.
The Attention of
Contractors, Builders and Property Owners
ARE  CALLED  TO  THE  FACT  THAT   THE
GREENWOOD LUMBER CO.
Have opened an Office on the corner of KIMBERLY and MINERAL
streets and can furnish Everything in line of
Rough and Dressed Lumber, Flooring
Lath, Moulding, Rustic, Ceiling, Etc.
ORDERS RECEIVED AT OFFICE. <J>
Friday, Aug. 18, 1899.
THE GREENWOOD   MINER.
INTERIOR   TOPICS.
J. Butchart, of Victoria, has been appointed to succeed Westly A. Blair as
as principal of the Rossland public
school.
Nelson mining Record office had receipts amounting to $4,000 in the month
pf July.
Voting on the gas franchise applied
for by Dr. Doolittle and associates in
Rossland resulted in 100 votes' to nothing in favor.
A poor chap named Thomas Goffat
committed suicide at Fernie by shooting
himself. He was for twenty years postmaster at Orillia, Out, and was down in
his luck.
W. J. Snodgrass, of Okanagan Falls,
has been to the coast looking for a teacher for the school there.
The south belt at Rossland about
which there has been a good deal of
doubt in the past has taken a move as a
result of the development in the Home-
stake. Tlie Red Eagle and Red Pole,
for $50,000, the Summit for $10,000, and
tlie Warspite for $12,500 are deals that
have been consummated there.
The Nelson Miner of Friday says:
W. F. Anderson, the travelling passenger agent of the C. P. R. leaves for Trail
where he hopes to make definite arrangements for passenger traffic on the Columbia & Western to Cascade, and also
arrangements for stages from Cascade to
the other towns in the Bonndary.
McCuaig & Rykert, of Montreal, have
recently purchased an interest in the
Gelena Farm. Mr. Rykert of this firm
is at present in the Province, and has
been to Republic as well.
A. B. Clabon, Rossland, has bonded
and Btarted development on the Strawberry and Orphan Boy, North Fork.
Quebec capitalists are principally interested.
Police Magistrate Johnson, of Grand
Forks, suspended by the Hon. Joseph
Martin, has been reinstated.
Hon. T. Mayne Daly and John S.
Clute, Rossland, one day last week
raised $510 for the city band there, for
the purpose of purchasing uniforms.
Hon. C. 11. Makcintosh has severed his
connection with the B. A. Corporation
and will devote himself to the business
Of the Macintosh syndicate. He is still
connected with the B. A. C. in an advisory capacity. Ho has purchased a residence and will transact his business in
his new quarters. D. J. McDonald, late
superintendent of the Columbia and
Kootenay, is his chief mining expert.
Thos. Gray, lately connected with A.
Heiuze issuperintendentof development
work. It is said to be Mr. Macintosh's
intention to erect on his Columbia avenue property a brick building of large
proportions. The lower portion of the
building will bo devoted to a mining
exchange and general rendezvous for
mining men. The upper stories will be
divided off into offices for mining men
and brokers.
Hon. F. G. Vernon, late agent-general
tor the Province in London, has gone
to Cariboo to look after hydraulic mining there. He recently formed an English company with $250,000 to prosecute
hydraulicing there.
T. H. Norris, formerly teacher at
Lumby, has returned to the Okanagan
from Atlin thoioughly disappointed
ed with his luck.
The excursion of the Canadian Press
Association, consisting of about one
hundred and filty editors of the leading
eastern Canadian newspapers, will arrive in Nelson on the morning of August 26th and will proceed from there to
the coast. The party is in charge of A.
E. Lalonde, travelling passenger agent
of the Canadian Pacific Railway at
Montreal. They will not visit Boundary.
BOUNDARY   CREEK   WANTS.
Mr. Shsw Presents Our Case  to Coast Readers for Consideration.
H. C. Shaw, of the firm of Hallett &
Shaw, who is at the Coast on business,
was interviewed by the News-Advertiser, Vancouver, on his arrival there.
After giving the reporter a general idea
of the condition of things here, he referred at length to his special mission in
connection with securing, if possible,
the surface rights of mineral claims for
certain of the mine owners, and it is
added:
Now that Ihe political situation has cleared
somewhat, the people of the Boundary district
are hopeful that certain of the mutters affecting the mining, and their interests generally,
the consideration of which has apparently
been held in abeyance, will have attention.
They are, I may say, greatly pleased with the
new turn of affairs no far.
There are many things we want up in the
Boundary district which would give general
satisfaction, if their necessity were conceded.
We need a local Supreme and County Court
Registrar, preferably in Greenwood; we want a
local Mining Recorder with the powers of a
Gold Commissioner; we want a definite decision as to the right of claim owners to secure
suiface rights, as would appear to be the intention of the law as it exists; we require greater
expedition in the recording of title deeds, and
the issuance of Crown grants; and we want
more justices of the peace and County constables. Down here you cannot be expected to
appreciate the inconvenience, delay and uncertainty that are caused sometimes by the
lack of such facilities. Of course the people up
there are not unreasonable as a class, nor are
they "kickers." Moreover, they do not in a
new district expect to get everything in a day,
and it is, too, generally understood that the
Government, as a whole, is largely guided in
such matters by the legal adviser of the Crown;
but as the situation has changed they see no
reason why these grievances���and they are
grievances���should not be remedied, and as I
said before, they are hopeful that their representation will have full and fair consideration.
Mr. Shaw speaks of the solidity of the
business men of Greenwood, and their
sound business methods, and concludes
by stating that it is
A striking feature of the Boundary that
there has not been, so far as 1 know, a single
wild-cat proposition put on the market, and
every property so far developed has improved
iu values with depth, and promise success.
That speaks volumes for the people who have
come into the district, and we wish to maintain that reputation if we can, and to obtain
conditions as favorable as possible for carrying
on the industry so successfully inaugurated.
The Bonndary Creek Mall Service.
Hewitt Bostock, M. P. has written to
the Cascade Record in reference to some
complaints about the mail service in the
Boundary district which appeared in
that paper and asks for information
as to matters which are not satisfactory,
in order that they may be put right. It
is very pleasing to know that Mr. Bostock has taken the mail service in hand.
Complaints have been heard here as to
the service, and at the Boards of Trade
conference in Rossland a long resolution
was passed respecting it. It now is in
order for the committee which had in
charge the resolution in question to
formulate the grievances complained of,
and preseut them pro forma. That
would be an excellent method of demonstrating the practical utility of the
Southern British Columbia Board o
Trade, and at the same time afford an
opportunity of substantiating the complaints made.
Mrs. Foreman and Mrs. Nichols,
teachers of dancing and physical culture. Office hours, 11 a. m. to 1 p. m.
at residence in school house. 27-4
Have your sewing machine repaired
at the "O. I. C." 28-3w
S HELLO BOYS! S
FOR   UP-TO-DATE
CLOTHING, HATS, CAPS,
NECKTIES, SHIRTS,
UNDERWEAR,   BRACES,
CALL   ON
J.   F. RODGERS,
OLD STAND BANK OF MONTREAL.
COPPER   ST.,
THE  FASHION  LIVERY  STABLE.
Cameron Bros., Prop's.
Livery, Feed and Sale Stables.   Good Single and Double Drivers.   Gentle Saddle
and Pack Horses.   All Kinds of Teaming and Heavy Hauling Done
on the Shortest Notice.   Stock Well Looked After.
OFFICE OF GREENWOOD CITY TRANSFER COMPANY,
GREEITWOOD.   B.   C.
W. 8. Keith, M. E.
F. F. Ketchum,
eith &
etchum,
Mining,
REAL ESTATE  and
Insurance Brokers.
Lots in all Parts of the City.
Mining Stocks
In Greenwood & Camp McKinney
A Specialty.
Mining   Properties   Examined   and   Reported   on.
GREENWOOD,   B.   C.
H. M. KEEFER'S LIST.
HS.1 Cn Cash, balance on easy terras, buys
%pIOVi one of the best lots for a residence in the city.
4�� ^% (g��*~* Cash, balance on terms to suit,
%P\jOVJ buys a fine lot on Government
near Deadwood street.
t&��LCZ.r%  Cash, balance on terms to suit,
*pOO\-Fbuys a splendid d      "
Government street, fiOxlOS feet.
"buys a splendid double corner on
$1
Af\f\  Cash buys the best, unsold
9*+VJKJ  business corner on Govern
ment street.
SUMMER   CLASSES   AND
SUMMER  PRICES.
To those who desire to prepare for the
series of winter danceB, Mrs. Foreman
will give instruction in round dancing
and the dancers on Tuesday and Saturday evenings. Wednesday evenings-
new figures of the German Cotillion.
Admission, each class gentleman, fifty
cents; ladies complimentary.       27-4.
Hall, Rice & Co.,
Mining, Stock and
Real Estate uchm*..
Temporary Offices gJ^ffiSSSt
Have for sale several
snaps; among others
the following:
A nice comfortable cot- <r> 4 ^f\f\
tnge, 5o-foot, corner lot on j\ 1 ..3IJU
Greenwood street X 'y^^-'^
Also a 50-foot lot on Sli- <f> 4 4 r\r\
ver street, best locality, on east J) J,   | [J\J
Also 2 corner lots on Government    $1 7QQ
Fine Building Site
ON
Long Lake St*
Also other properties.  Get particulars
at office.
WANTED:
Copper Qaims.
Lithographed plan of Greenwood in
colours.  Price 50c.  Mailed free
B. C. Pottery Company, Ltd.,
Victoria.
MANUFACTURERS   OF
Sewer Pipe, Chimney Pipe, Fire
Bricks, Pressed Bricks. Flower Pots,
and Fire Proofing Tube.
Real Estate
Mines  and Mining.
THE MART
GAUNCE  &  WICKWIRE.
GREENWOOD, B. C.
Notice to Advertisers.
All changes of ads must be handed in
to The Miner office by Tuesday noon
for that week's issue; also orders for ex
tra copies of paper. THE   GREENWOOD  MINER,
Friday, Aug, 18, 1899.
COMMENTS OF CONTEMPORARIES
A DEEP   SEATED INJUSTICE.
In Siberia during winter the ground
is generally frozen to a depth of fifty or
sixty feet. This is why so much is
heard about the convict's hard lot.���
Nelson Economist.
TIME MAKES  STRANGE BEDFELLOWS.
On the evening of Alex Henderson's
election last year, he sat in his committee room with Mr. McBride and joined
in the cheers that went up for Mr. Turner. Mr. Henderson is now running in
the interests of a Government that succeeded that of Mr. Turner, which only
goes to show what the climate of British
Columbia will' accomplish in one year.
���Nelson Economist.
A  STUDY IN OHNITHOLOGY.
The Martin is a bird. There are three
types: House martins, Sand Martins,
and Joe Martins. The last and least
variety is of the swift species, hard to
swallow, and very indigestible. Unlike the Sand martin, it is opposed to
mining operations. It is short-lived,
presto maduro, presto podrida. It has
bright eyes, and arhooked beak, a black
coat, and a snow white breast. Sometimes over-feeds and becomes ferocious
after meals. It soars like an eagle and
falls like a sand bag. Has even been
known to attain great altitude, but cannot survive the elevation, and descends
abruptly to its normal level. Of inferior craniological development, but presents a bill oi abnormal dimensions.
Its soul is in its feet. Will work only
eight hours daily. Is migratory in its
habits, an occasional visitor of British
Columbia; of no known utilitarian value,
and likely to disappear as autumn approaches .���Cascade Record.
THE AGUMENTUM  AD HOMINEM.
The newspapers that oppose the Semlin government are becoming hysterical.
The appointment to and acceptance of
the attorney-generalship by Alekander
Henderson, M. P. P., of New Westminster, and his certain re-election are not
in accordance with the predictions of
the howling dervishes tnat control the
Victoria Globe, Vancouver World, Kam-
loops Standard, Vernon News, and, last
and least, the Miner of this town. These
.howlers have had an accession to their
ranks in the person of the editor of the.
Greenwood Miner. He claims to know
all about how governments should be
run, for he for a time filled the office of
provincial librarian. He says that the
men now ih office are a lot of incapables.
This may be a statement of fact, but we
liuve a contrary statement from a man
who was not kicked out of office when
the present government took charge of
affairs, and we prefer to take his opinion,
for no other man in the Province is in a
better position to actually know how the
business of the Province is conducted.
His statement is that the business of
the Province is well conducted���much
better than when Messrs. Turner, Martin, Baker and Eberts had the direction
of affairs. Other testimoney comes from
Victoria, and it is that the lands and
works department is in better shape today than at any time since the department was created. None of this testimony comes from active politicians.���
Nelson Tribune.
For fine, commercial job work the
Miner office can meet your requirements. Anything and everything in the
job printing line we can do.
No Flies On Us!
FLY
Protect Yourself and
Your Horses by Using Our
OINTMENT.
SOHETHING
NEW and
VALUABLE.
1 rv^Y  II ��
Miller Bros.,
DRUGGISTS   AND
JEWELERS-	
DR. R. MATHISON
DENTIST   :    :    :
NADEN BLOCK:
GREENWOOD    :
Graduate Pennsylvania
College of Dental - -
Surgery -----
Philadelphia, Pa.-   -
A Licentiate of British
Columbia-  -  -  -   -
M. B. FRAZEE,
GROCERY and BAKERY.
Rye and Graham Bread.
White Bread, 16 Mb. loaves...   $1.00
A Choipe Stock of Groceries.
As Fine as in the City...:	
Hamill   -
-   Block,
GREENWOOD. B. C.
Saddles and
Harness*    <&    *g
Turf Goods,
BOOT AND SHOE FINDINGS.
REPAIRING   A   SPECIALTY.
M. S. Butler,      &
GREENWOOD,   B.   C.
Fishing Tackle*
A COMPLETE LINE IN
HOOKS,    FLIES,    LINES,    RODS,
REELS,   ETC.,   AT
Smith   &  McRae's.
Books, and Stationary,   Office Supplies
and  Maps.
CARPENTER & CO.,
Photographers.
LATEST DESIGNS   IN   PLATINUM   CABINETS   AND
MANTELLOS.    ..
Views of Greenwood
and Boundary Creek Mines.
Prices Reasonable.
Studio 0pp. WINDSOR Hotel.
H A. WRIGHT,-
Boot and shoe
Maker.......
Repairing  neatly done.    Shop  across  from
WINDSOR Hotel.
GREENWOOD,
B. C.
To the Citizens
of Greenwood.
AND PEOPLE IN GENERAL.
I wish to inform you that it is worth
��� your while tq call on me In my new
stand
On Copper Street,
OPP.   H.   A.   KING  &  GO'S.,
Where I carry a full line of
Cigars, Tobaccos,
Fancy goods, Jewelry, Etc.   Also a full
line of fruit always on hand.
HENRY SAUVE.
WHEN YOU WANT
THE BEST IMPORTED CIGAR'S and TOBACCOS, CONFECTIONARY, MAGAZINES,
PERIODICALS, STATIONARY
and HOUSE PLANTS GOTO
Mu
W.   M.    SPROTT,
NEXT DOOR TO TEL. OFFICE.
Fashionable
Dressmaker,
MRS. J. A. CARPENTER.
GOVERNMENT STREET,
Two Doors Below the old MINER Office.
HORSESHOEING     *
mi BLACKSMITHING.
Buckboards and Buggies made to Order.
WORK   GUARANTEED.
Shop   on   Copper   Street,  Greenwood,  B.  C.
A. B. JENSEN.
nros,
COPPER STREET.
Next Door to
BANNERMAN'S.
1 Arlington
T T    ,    |    COPPER STREET,
jnOtClf     GREENWOOD.
Hooper & Co.,
Proprietors.
IMPORTED & DOMESTIC
CIGARS,
WINES and LIQUORS.
Headquarters for Mining Men.
McElmon
THE WATCHMAKER
Is now located on Greenwood street
OPPOSITE THE NEW
RENDELL BLOCK.
35
YEARS
EXPERIENCE.
Full assortment of--material and tools to
"do correct, work.
Anaconda Hotel,
M'LEOD & CO. Props.
GOOD   DINING   ROOM  ACCOMMODATIONS.
ALL CLASSES OF WINES.
FINE LIQUORS and CIGARS.
ANACONDA, B. B.
Palace Hotel,
Snodsrass  &
*�� ANACONDA,
Kelly, Props., B. c
Free Baths for Patrons.
One-half   Mile From Greenwo6d City.
Rates Reasonable.
Nash & Co.,
PAINTERS and
PAPER HANGERS.
SIGN WORK A
SPECIALTY.
Quick   Work   Guaranteed.
SHOP OPP. FISHER SAW MILL. Ifriday, Aug. 18, 1899.
TEE GREENWOOD  MINER.
MYERS CREEK MINING DISTRICT
Will be a Second Republic
The leading mines are the Crystal Butte, with mill now building, and Review, owned by
% Canadians, King Solomon and War Eagle. & j> & j�� j>
Adjoining and Parallel to
the War Eagle is the
U
WISCONSIN GROUP
��
***** WISCONSIN and BLACK HAWK.
>oooooooooooooo<
These are two good prospects with large surface mineral showings.    Fred M. Cum-
mings, n. E., obtained the following values in gold and silver: ** jt jt
><XKKKK>0-0<><X>00<K>00<><><><KXK>0<><^^
$13-26   $57.89   $4-1-55
for the promoters, from the ore body at a depth of lOfeet. A
Company is being formed to acquire this Group, particulars of
which may be obtained from the following brokers:
M'ENTIRE M'DONNELL & COMPANY and
HOLBROOK, KEAN & COMPANY.
v
i THE   GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Aug, 18,1899.
LOCAL  JOTTINGS.
C. Scott Galloway, A. S. Black and
J. H. McFarlane, of Greenwood, apply
in the last issue of tbe B. C. Gazette for
the incorporation of Greenwood Lodge
No. 28, A. F. & F- M.
Rev. B. H. Balderston will preach in
Rendell's hall on Sunday morning at
11 o'clock.
James Wilkes, organizer for the Western Federation of Miners, arrived in
Greenwood yesterday, and will visit the
surrounding mining camps for the purpose of organization.
J. R. Reavis has made bis bow to the
people of Grand Forks as editor of the
Miner in that town. His facile hand
was scene clearly in the first issue under
his direction, and indicates to those who
are acquainted with the editor the
course that will be pursued. He will
operate the news engine with a full head
of steam on, and when the railway gets
in promises a power press and plant
that will correspond to the energy in
.store. The Miner is to be "free and independent," and its policy is outlined
thus indefinitely: "It will enter the
field without restriction or restraint, except those imposed by prudence and enterprise."
J. H. Todd, one of the old residents of
British Columbia, and probably, with
the exception of the Dunsmuirs, the
wealthiest man in the Province, died on
Thursday last at Victoria of cancer, at
the age of 72. He was the head of the
firm of Todd & Son, grocers and canners.
The excursion to Chesaw on Sunday
did not materialize owing to the rain.
A number went down the previous evening. They report Chesaw and the
mines as all right. The residents are
waiting for lumber for building operations to go ahead.
A number of one dollar counterfeit
bills are reported to be in circulation in
the east and the Miner is requested to
make a note of the fact.
The oldest inhabitant of the Boundary Creek district has not seen such
weather as we have been having In
conversation with an old-timer in the
nterior, he said that about once in ten
years there are excessive rains throughout the southern or dry belt of British
Columbia. The effect of the wet spell
was certainly depressing on business,
and practically stopped travel for a few
days.
Wm. Douglas, Q. C, of Chatham,
Ont.,, arrived in Greenwood on 8unday
last from the east on a visit to his son,
and will remain for about a week here.
Mr. Douglas, speaking of this country,
says it seems to afford an outlet for the
young men of eastern Canada, where al,
the professions are filled to overflowing
He is delighted with the prospects in
this district, and thinks we are bound to
have a great development and very good
times before the inevitable relapse
comes. The boom is not confined to
British Columbia alone, but is throughout Canada the same. Times have not
been so good for many years, and all the
industrial establishments are filled
with orders. Wm. Douglas, although
no relation, is an old friend of John
Douglas of Midway. They were fellow
townsmen years ago, and members of
the same profession.
A resident of Camp McKinney came
to Greenwood this week and got on a
spree. Early the other morning, about
three o'clock, he began to flourish a revolver, and was locked up. He was let
off on Wednesday morning with a fine
of $10, and has gone back to McKinney
well satisfied with not having shot any
person.
Grand concert at Barrett's ball next
Tuesday evening with a program of unusual interest. Solos and trios by
young gentlemen of Greenwood who
have not been heard here before. Photographic model posing���a late fad.
Classical and character dancing, and a
short talk on physical culture by Mrs.
Foreman.   Albert Uhls, Pianist.
Robt. Donegan, a prospector living
near the lime kiln towards Boundary
Falls, got into a row the other evening
with some Italians who are camped
there. Donegan shot at a dog that had
attacked him. The Italians got very
much excited and surrounded him, so
he says, and threatened all kinds of
things. Both sides saw the authorities,
but nothing is likely to come of it, as it
was evidently the result of misunderstanding.
Another party of Knob Hill capitalists
arrived in Phoenix yesterday. They
consist of J. P. Graves, general manager;
J. P. Whitney, president of the Whitney Glass works of Pennsylvania; W.
B. Rulon, representative of A. L. White
& Co., Pa.; Clyde Graves, son of the
general manager, and Rev. Brian C.
Roberts, his tutor. They leave tomorrow on their return trip. Clyde Graves
and his tutor are en route for a two
year's trip around the world.
Mrs. Foreman and Mrs. Nichols have
arranged to repeat Tuesday night's concert in Grand Forks next week.
The sympathies of his friends will be
with G. C Hodge, of the Vernon & Nelson Telephone Co., in the loss of his infant daughter at Nelson recently.
Arrangements are being made for a
regular Church of England service in
Greenwood, and a clergyman is expected from England early in September.
The latest news from the coast is to
the effect that D. J. Munn has retired
in New Westminster in favor of R. L,
Reid, barrister. The ex-Attorney-General will speak in Reid's behalf. It is
stated that the Government will make
the eight-hour law an issue.
H. M. Keefer, mining broker, has returned from an extended trip to the
south. During his absence he spent
some time in San Francisco.
At a meeting of the Barbers' Association this week, it was decided to close
the shops on Saturday evening at 10
o'clock, on other nights of the week^at
8 p.m., and on Sundays at 1:20 p. m.
Union prices are: haircut, 60 cents;
shave, 25 cents; seafoam, 25 cents;
shampoo, 50 cents; hair singe, 25 cents;
children's haircut, 25 cents; baths, 50
cents.        	
News From the Coast.
Private advices from Victoria are to
the effect that tbe surface rights for a
number of mining claims in connection
with which C. H. Shaw went to Victoria to interview the government will be
granted without delay. It is also understood that a two-roomed school
house will be erected at once. So far
as a registrar of the supreme court is
concerned Grand Forks and Midway are
rivals in the field and no action will be
taken at the present time. It is understood that tbe chief commissioner of
lands and works will visit this section of
the country this fall and acqvaint himself with the local situation.
Suspended toy the taw Society.
Ex-Attorney-General Martin before
the benchers of the Law Society Monday, admitted the facts alleged in the
case of champerty charged against him
by the defendant in the suit of Canessa
vs. Nichol, in which Martin took the
case for half the money to be recovered
and a lease of the quarry involved. The
benchers suspended him until the first
week in October, and in the meantime
he will appeal to the full court as to
whether champerty is an offence in this
Province.
SUPERIOR LINE  OF CIGARS.
MORENA,
Brands: i INTERIOR and
MINER.
Made by INLAND CIGAR MFG. CO. of Kamloops, B. C.
CLEAR HAVANA  FILLER.
Nothing but B. C. Union Labor Employed.
-FOR SALE AT���
Arlington, Pioneer, International, Pacific, Rossland, Ottawa
and Commercial Hotels, H. A. King & Co.
PROTECT HOME INDUSTRY.
DISSOLUTION NOTICE
��������*�����.���
T^OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the partnership here-
* J tofore existing between us, the undersigned, as brokers
and general agents in the City of Greenwood, in the Province of'
British Columbia, has been this day dissolved by mutual consent.
All debts owing to the said partnership are to be paid to Arthur
Mowat, at the City of Greenwood aforesaid, and all claims against
the said partnership are to be presented to the said Arthur Mowat,
by whom the same will be settled. The business of the firm of
Mowat & Palmer will hereafter be conducted by Arthur Mowat.
ARTHUR   MOWAT.
ROBT.   PALMER.
Witness:   P.   P.   THORPE.
Dated at Greenwood this 21st day of July, A. D. 1899.
An Ounce of Fact is Worth
A   1 On Ol r lCtlOn* here are facts that the
WHITE FRONT STORE
have to offer you. Read���Mark���Learn, and inwardly digest. That
we carry a full line of clothing, boots and shoes. Heavy shoes from
$2.00 pr. Underclothing from $1.50 suit; pants from $2 pair, etc. Our
Leader overalls, riveted, $1.00 pr.   THIS WILL INTEREST YOU:���
Our Rock Creek and Rendell cwest fork)
Stores carry a full line prospectors boots, shoes, clothing, hats, caps,
groceries, hardware, picks, shovels, powder, steel, etc., etc.   Just call at
White Front Store Government Street,
Next Door to the
Postofflce,
FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS.
WE BEG TO INTRODUCE TO THE
PUBLIC THE FAMOUS
"La Fama" c
igar.
Made   from a   CLEAR HAVANA FILLER, with a FINE DELHI
WRAPPER, and CUBAN HAND MADE. .TRY IT.
H. A. King & Co.,
COPPER STREET, GREENWOOD.
New and Second-Hand
Goods*
"0.1. C."
Sewing Machines, Locks, Guns Repaired,  Keys Fitted.
A. L. WHITE & CO., OFPOSITE   HUFHOHF,    OFFICE.

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