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The Greenwood Miner Oct 13, 1899

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THE GREENWOOD MINER.
Vol. 1, No. 37.
GREENWOOD, B. C, FRIDAY, OCT. J 3, 1899.
.00 Per Tear
THE EDITOR'S TRIP
Gives His Impressions of the
C. & W. Railway.
So Crooked a Dog Would Break His
Hind Legs Following It���Era of
Dust and Stage Fare at an End.
The editor of the Miner left last week
for the coast, and took a ride for the
first time over the C. & W. to Bobson
He writes some impressions of his trip
as follows:
On arriving at Grand Forks the first
sensation one gets is the Yale hotel.
Now the Yale is the chief attraction of
the city of the Forks, and one can get a
very good idea of the influence of a good
hotel on the destiny of a town from
what happens in the Yale. It is
crowded, and having all the airs of a
cosmopolitan resort, gives an impression
of city life, which bas a strong effect on
the mind of the ordinary traveller.
Columbia has a very good restaurant
and hotel, run by Escalet, but it is not
the Yale, and everybody heads for the
latter. I do not know of any better
hotel between Vancouver and Toronto.
I got no concessions frdm the proprietary
in the way of free board or drinks, so
am speaking unprejudiced. It is a big
lift to Grand Forks. A good story is told
illustrating the rivalry between Grand
Forks and Columbia. A. W'. Ross, the
chief pusher of the latter place, is an
old friend of Hugh Sutherland, who
called him. up by telephone, when a conversation something like this occurred,
somewhat abbreviated, of course:
"Hello, Ross, is that you?"
"Yes, who are you?"
"Hugh Sutherland."
"Where are you?"
"At the Yale."
A long pause at the other end���"I'd
like awfully well to go up and see you,
old man, if you weren't so far out of
town."
Both of these places are busy and both
are enjoying the advantages of railway
communication denied to Greenwood for
a few days longer. I had not time,
however, to go about and see what was
going on, so cannot speak more defi-
r'.^ily.
It.was very pleasing to hear the railway whistle and to see the cars so near
home> and W. S. Keith, a long time
removed from such sights and sounds,
threw up his hat in a most energetic
manner, exclaiming in a very dramatic
manner, "At last!" A manager of a
theatrical company who happened to be
along immediately offered him an engagement, which was, of course declined.
It was really a relief to think that the
era of dust and other incidentals of
stage fare was about to be at an end.
The road from Grand Forks to Robson
is, aB stated by all who have travelled it,
very substantially and well built, but so
crooked that a dog would break his hind
legs turning the corners. One can have
but little idea of the difficulties of construction of this portion of the line until
one rides over it. For a greater part of
the way it in in the air with innumerable trestles, which are as a rule as
crooked as the other portions of the lino.
The scenery, however, is panoramic and
picturesque in the extreme. Going over
Bull Dog mountain is one of tbe feats of
engineering that is worthy of note. The
tunnel through it is in course of construction and about half completed.
From Grand Eorks to Cascade the
view is decidedly pastime, and a beautiful stretch of country it is���a relief to the
monotony of endless mountains. After
Cascade is reached, which appears to be
quietly resting on the laurels already
achieved, the scenery becomes more interesting and winding about Christina
Lake a real vision of beauty is opened to
view. Some day or other this lake will
become a popular resort. It suggests
regettas and other aquatic diversions
and when the people of Greenwood become more affluent than they are and
have a little time left for summer outings this will be the summering spot for
them.
I was just writing about getttng over
Bull Dog mountain. By a series of
switchbacks the train finally reaches the
summit and lowers itself down on the
other side in the same way. Of course,
the same thing has been done on other
lines of railway, but it is nevertheless
very interesting and novel.
AVhen the Columbia river is reached
by the tortuous windings already referred to the road takes the side of the
hills above it and finally getB down to
the river level at West Robson. Brooklyn itself, only about a year old, is just
below the point where the railway
emerges from ths mountains and is now
a deserted village with glories ond possibilities departed, one of the incidents
of western pioneering. West Robson iB
mainly remarkable for being opposite
East Robson, to which a ferry carries
you safely. East Robson began life
about 1892, with a hotel and one or two
houses, and had hopes then of becoming
one of the many metropolises of the interior, but so far as my computation
went there was not a single addition to
the population or the number of structures since it began. You get into West
Robson at 1 o'clock from Grand Forks.
If you want to go to Nelson or Robson
wait until 5 o'clock, and to revelstoke
until the next morning. There are
places I would sooner stay all night, but
that is merely an incident of western
life. It will all be changed shortly.
The man who would grumble after the
privilege of riding out of Boundary on
the cars after riding in on the stage
would be ungrateful indeed. The new
line is well patronized. There is more
travel on it than to any other local point
on the C. P. R.
While at Robson news came of the
yacht race. The first was that the
Shamrock had won: then the Columbia
was the winner, but after a close race;
and finally the race was declared off.
All had wires to say so. The last man
assayed the information that the reason
the race was declared off: "The
Yankees couldn't raise the wind. They
had blown everything in on Dewey."
It   was   a   good  joke   and    altogether
original.     '
A Lucky Find.
While out looking for horses one day
lately, W. E. Kennedy and D. McLean
ran across an outcrop only a short distance from tlie city limits. They staked
it and sunk a shaft for about eight or ten
feet. At this point assays were obtained
which went $11.50 in copper and gold.
They named the claim the Rob Roy.
CARPENTERS UNITE.
Formed a Local Union Thursday Evening.
Forty of Them Met in Miners' Hall-
Bousing Meeting Held���Application
to be Made for a Charter at Once.
There was a large and enthusiastic attendance at the meetiug of the carpenters and joiners of the city, held yesterday evening. A local union was formed
and it was decided that up to the first of
next month they would work for $4 per
day of the present ten hours, but on and
after the first of November nine hours is
to constitute a day's labor and $4 the
compensation. Heretofore the carpenters have been receiving $3.50 for ten
hours' work and there has been much
complaint. Contractors will be notified
in writing of the action taken. It is the
wish of the union to work in harmony
with the contractors. Next Thursday
another meeting will be held when they
will apply for a charter. It is not
thought any trouble will result from this
action.
STDBBS  CAUGHT.
Wanted for Burning: the Hotel at Colombia
In July Last.
Eugene Stubbs, well known in Greenwood, and who is wanted in Columbia
in connection with the burning of the
hotel at that place, was captured by
Night Policeman Lawder at Eholt early
Tuesday morning. Some time ago it
was given.out.that -one James Stubbs
had been arrested as the incendiarist.
This is now said to have been only a
ruse to encourage the man they wanted
to return to British Columbia. Thisap-
parantly succeeded as .Gene Stubbs,
whom the officers wanted, returned to
the city about two days before his cap'
ture. Shortly after his arrival he went
up to Phoenix and Policeman Lawder
followed him. From there he returned
to Greenwood, and thence to Eholt,
where he waa H'rrtmted. He offered no
resistance, iipp.amntly expecting it.
Tuesday afternoon Constable Dinsmore
took him to Grand forks for the prelim
inary hearing.
Used a Gun.
Chief McLaren went to Phoenix Wednesday afternoon and again Wednesday
night, and brought back Edward Shears,
the Phoenix schoolmastor, who recently
dismissed his school with a gun. When
the chief went for him the first time he
was in hiding. That night the chief
took another trip, and this time got his
man. Shears was a little backward
about riding with the chief at first, but
McLaren soon cured him by putting the
country schoolmaster into the buggy
and sitting on him. He was brought
here, and yesterday morning tried before
Magistrate Hallett. His honor for the
sake of the man's wife and children suspended sentence, and he was turned
loose once more:
Electricity Freely Used.
The Engineering Magazine says that
Cripple Creek, Colorado, is perhape the
only gold mining district where a miner
can go to his work in an electric
street car, decend the mine in an electric
hoist, keep his mine dry by an electric
pump, do his work by an electric light,
run drills operated by electric air compressor (possibly, in time, to be succeeded by direct electric drills), and fire his
shots by electricity from a switch-board
remote from the point of explosion.
Great Specialty Artist.
Prof. Ferguson, greatest of all specialty artists upon the violin, will appear here next Monday evening The
performance will be held in the spacious
room in the new George Cbrick) block
specially selected on account of its superior acoustic properties, no pains being spared to have this arrangement at-
isfactory to all who attend. Prices 50
and 25 cents. Reserved seats 75 (at the
door only.)
A Good Joke.
One of the jolly commercial travellers
who visited the town this week, has a
new joke. He hands a fellow an innocent looking piece of writing paper and
at the same time asks him "If he knows
that fellow." The recipient of course
commences opening the said innocent
looking piece of paper whereupon, buzz!
goes the "joke" and the man at the
"jokey" end goes into the air. It is
nething but a rubber band round a piece
of cardboard, but it has the same effect
as a bumble bee.
Something Meritorious.
Prof.   Ferguson's   performance upon
the violin, next Monday evening,  Kith.
You   have never   yet heard anything
worthy of any comparison whatever.
Change ot Time.
Hereafter the C. P. R. passenger
trains will leave Columbia at 12:20 p.
m. instead of 7:30 as before. Trains
leave every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.       	
Supt. F. E. Michaels, of the Spokane
and Northern Telegraph Co., arrived in
town Sunday and left on the following
Tuesday for Grand Forks a nd Republic.
Go to the Gem  restaurant for a goo 1
square meal.   Oyster parlor  in connection.   Eastern and Olympia oysters s>iid
fresh ranch eggs always on hand.     2t
A musical attraction somewhat out of
the common order will be presented next
Monday evening, 16th inst. See notices
elsewhere in this column,
No gi ou can come to the individual
nor the mining camp which he represents from the exaggerated reports of
rich finds that are so much iu virue
at this time, says the Denver Mining
Record. From the new districts and
the old ones now being revived the
daily newspaper reports are bewildering with statements of ores being
found which run into the hundreds
and thousands of dollars to the ton.
Experienced miners understand that
in a new property a very rich assay usually represents a very small find, both.
as to the assay test and the ore in view,
whereas the statements are so contrived as to convey the idea to the uninitiated that the ore is both rich and
abundant. For the good of the State
and the industry as a whole, such reports should not be made. The truth is
good enough, and will always prove
more profitable, ... THE  GREENWOOD  MINEB.
Friday, Oct 13,1899
THE   BOUNDABT  COUNTRY.
A Couple of Editors Give a Resume of the
Situation.
W. S. Keith, of the Greenwood Miner,
and E. Jacobs of the Midway Advance,
are in the city. The former is en route
for the Spokane Industrial Exposition,
and the latter is a delegate to the Liberal-Conservative convention which convenes in New Westminster on the 5th
inst. From these gentlemen the following resume of the mining situation
in the Boundary Creek country was
obtained:
"The Boundary Creek section has received quite an impetus in consequence
of the decision of the British Columbia
Copper company, limited, of Ne* York,
to at once proceed with the erection of
the smelter near Greenwood. Work on
the smelter site has already been commenced under the direction of Paul
Johnson, formerly of the Hall Mines
smelter at Nelson. The smelter will be
ready for operation late in the spring or
early in the summer, by which time
there will be plenty of ore from the adjoining mines to keep it in operation.
The British Columbia Copper company
owns the well known Mother Lode
group, situated in Deadwood camp,
within three milss of the smelter site.
The Mother Lode has an enormous body
of copper ore, and will furnish a large
supply to the smelter. The main shaft
of the Mother Lode is now down to a
depth of 265 feet, at which depth, last
week, they opened up a deposit of ore
which runs thirty per cent, in copper.
"The other mines in the district which
are now preparing to ship are the Old
Ironsides, the Knob Hill and the Victoria, owned by companies organized by
Jay P. Graves. On this group a very
large amount of development work has
been done, and there is an enormous
quantity of ore in sight. The Brooklyn
and Stemwinder, also in Greenwood
camp, which are owned by the Dominion Copper company, will also be shippers after the railway is opened.
"The Winnipeg and the Golden Crown
in Wellington camp, the latter owned
by a company which has its head office
in Rossland, are opening up well. The
Winnipeg has now been proved to the
300-foot level, where it has pay ore. The
shaft of the Golden Crown has reached
a depth of 320 feet, and soon drifting
north and south on a promising ore body
will be commenced.
"In Summit camp tbe B. C. and the
Oro Denero, the latter owned by the
King Mining company of Rossland, are
both doing a lot of development work,
The B. C. is inviting tenders for sinking
its main shaft 100 feet deeper than its
present depth of 160 feet. When this
work has been started the working force
is to be increased to about forty men.
In this mine about 1,000 feet of work
was done on the 50-foot level. It has
already on the dump 3,000 tons of first-
class ore which, it is estimated, will run
in all values about $60 to the ton. In
addition to this there are 8,000 tons of
second-class ore that will run from $20
to $25 to the ton. The existence of three
large and distinct ore shoots have been
proven on this mine and there is a large
quantity of ore blocked out ready for
extraction. The owners have contracted
to ship ore for one year to the Trail
smelter, and will commence doing so as
Boon as the spur line, now in course of
construction, is completed to the mine,
which will be in a few weeks hence.
"The Oro Denero is getting ready to
crosscut from the bottom of the shaft,
which has now reached a depth of 200
feet, for the purpose of crosscutting,
within 200 feet from the shaft, two
ledges which have already been opened
up on the surface.
"The Jewel, in Long Lake camp, is
another property which is developing
very satisfactorily, having large quantities of gold-bearing quartz already
blocked out. The plant of this mine is
being added to in order to facilitate
further development and it is expected
that reduction appliances will be installed before very long. The mine is
under the management of Mr. Gilbert
Mahon, formerly of Rossland.
"The Enterprise and Anchor mines,
limited, whose claims adjoin the Jewel
group, have this week decided to inaugurate a vigorous policy of development.
"There are a number of other properties, notably the City of Paris group, on
which a large amount of work is being
done, and altogether the district bids
fair to show substantial results within
the next few months. The development
of so many mines, the establishment of
the smelters at Greenwood and Grand
Forks, and the opening of the railway,
which will reach Boundary Creek during the current month, are causing a
large amount of activity, and are certain
to produce a permanent prosperity in
the district.
"The completion of tlie Columbia and
Western railway to Midway will, it is
confidently expected, cause that town
to show much improvement during the
coming winter, as it will be for some
time to come the terminus of the railway, and consequently there will be a
large amount of freighting from it to the
mining camps of the mam Kettle river,
Camp McKinney and Meyers Creek."���
Rossland Miner.
Our stock of drug store
goods is not only large in
quantity, and variety, but the
Quality is the Highest
obtainable in all the drug
markets. Our prices are
right. Large selling keeps
the stock moving, and hence
ALWAYS FRESH.
IF YOU GET IT AT
MILLER BROS.
IT IS CERTAINLY GOOD.
%mmffm^HWffMwm^mmm/fw^
A  N.   Whitknidk. Clivb  Pringle.
PRINGLE & WHITESIDE,
BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, NOTARIES PUBLIC, ETC.
Offices:  Over Bank of Montreal.
ANDREW l.KAMY. I. P. MEYERS GRAY
��� ��� LEAMY & 0RAY - -
Barristers, Solicitors and Notaries
Public.
Offices:���George Block,
Copper Street
R. B. KERR,
BABBISTEB, SOLICITOR
and NOTARY PUBLIC.
1UDIR FLOOD BIX. Greenwood, B. C.
J. R. BROWN,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
and NOTARY PUBLIC.
FLOOD BLK., GREENWOOD.
BAUER &
ASHCROFT
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYORS
A.   E.   Ashcroft, Bepre"ntitive.
FLOOD-NADEN BLOCK.
d. M. HILLARY,  B. Sc
rer and Chemist.
m'gill graduate: in
mining kngineeming.
GREENWOOD,  B.   C.
I. H. HALLETT. H. C. HHAW.
HALLETT & SHAW
GREENWOOD, B. C.
Barristers, Solicitors,   cable' Address
& Votaries Public.        "hallett."
Codks:     Bedford McNeill's, Broom-
halls, Moreing & Neal's, Leiber's.
A. C OAJUT,
Barrister,  Etc., Rossland.
Postoffice Building    -    -    -    Telephone 47.
R. H. PARKINSON,
Fairview, B. C
CIVIL ENGINEER and
DRAUGHTSMAN.
MAPS AND PLANS OF MINES
AND MINERAL CLAIMS PREPARED TO ORDER. MINERAL
TITLES INVESTIGATED, AND
ASSESSMENT WORK ATTENDED TO.     :	
THE   CANADIAN
Furnished Rooms.
Financial,
Insurance and
Mining
Agent.
Neat, Quiet and first-class. _
Betted by
Office and Reading   Room        Furnace
first floor  Tanmrlioat.
SWAYNE HOUSE, SILVER ST.
SOCIETIES
WESTERN FEDERATION OF MINERS���
The Greenwood Branch of the Eederation
meets hereafter corner Gov't, aud Centre streets
at 7:30 p. m. every Saturday evening.
WALTER LONG. Secretary.
Notary Public
FAIRVIEW TOWNSITE AGENT.
R* F* Coates & Co.,
General Contractors
and Builders.
HOUSE   MOVING   A   SPECIALTY.
GOV'T. ST., GREENWOOD, B.  C.
Dank of Commerce.
Bead Office, TORONTO.
Established 1867.
PAID-UP CAPITAL, $6,000,000.
[Six Million Dollars.]
rkst    $1,000,000
President Hon. Geo. A. Cox.
General Manager B. E. Walker.
Ass't. Gen'l. Manager.. .J. H. Plommkr.
This bank has the largest number of
branches of any bank in Canada, with
agencies at New York, Chicago, New
Orleans, Skagway and Dawson City.
Accounts of Corporations, Merchants
and Individuals received on favorable
terms.
Drafts, Commercial Credits, Travelers' Credits and Circular Notes issued
available in any part of the world.
Approved Notes Discounted; Collections made.
A general Banking business transacted.
GBEENW00D   BRANCH.
D. A. CAMERON,
Maaarer
BANK of MONTREAL
Capital, all paid np, $12,000,000.
Best $4,000,000.
President:
Lord Stbathcona and Mount Royal.
Vice-President:
Hon. Gkobob A. Dbummond.
General Manager E. 8. CLOtKTon
Branches in London, Eng., New
York, Chicago,
And in the principal cities in Canada.
Buy and sell Sterling Exchange and
Cable Transfers; Grant Commercial and
Travelers' Credits, available in any part
of the world.
Drafts   issued,   Collections made, etc.
Greenwood ��� Branch.
T. J. FnrUCAHE, Manager.
THE  BANK  OF
British North America.
Established in  1886.    Incorporated by Royal
Charter.
fAID-UP   CAPITAL $4,8M,��6
RESERVE    FUND $1,4*0,000
LONDON   OFFICE:
3 Clement's Lane, Lombard St., E. C.
COURT   OF   DIRECTORS:
J. H. Brod'.i. John James Cp.ier, Ga.��pard Far-
rer.Richs.d H. Gl.-n, Henry L. R. Farrer, Ed.
Arthur it mire, H. J. R. Kendall, J. J. Kings-
ford, I'red Lubbock, Geo. D. Whatman.
A. G. WALLI8, Secretary.
Head Office in Canada: St. James St. Montreal.   H. Stikeman, Uen. Mgr., J. Elmsley, Insp
BRANCHES   IN   CANADA:
London, Braptford, Hamilton, Toronto, Moii>
real, Ottawa, Kingston, Midland, Quebec, 6*.
John, N. II. Brandon, Winnipeg, Fredericton,
iliilifax, Victoria, Vancouver, Rossland, Kaslo,
Trail, Ashcroft, Greenwood, Atlin, Bennett B.
C. andDawson City.
AGENTS   IH   THE   UNITED   STATES:
Spokane���Traders' National Bank and Old
Nafional Bank. New York-(52 Wall St.) W.
Lawson and J. C. Welsh, agents. San Francisco���124 Sansome St., H. J. McMichael and J. R
Ambrose, agents.
LONDON   BANKERS:
Bank of England and Messrs. Glyn & Co.
FOREIGN AGENTS:
Liverpool���Bank of Liverpool. Australia-
Union Bank of Australia. New Zealand���Union Bank of Australia, Bank of New Zealand,
india, China, Japan���Chartered Mercantile
Bank of India, London and China, Agra Bank,
West Indies���Colonial Bank. Paris���Marcuard
Krauss & Co.   Lyons���Credit Lyonnais.
P.  T.  SH0BT  Manager,
Greenwood, B. C.
QEORGE HILL-
Merchant Tailor.
Fine Stock of Goods Always oa Baad.  Across
from WINDSOR Betel.
GREENWOOD,        -        -        B. C' Friday, Oct. 13 1899
THE   GREENWOOD   MINER.
(,<>
KEREMEOS!
T*    Ti      ii.M      IT
The Centre of the Similkameen District
A Mining and Agricultural Center.....
*a&   ��sS*   ��=*��
LOTS ARE NOW ON THE MARKET.
The Business Street,
��c��     ��e��     *OM
Third Avenue���100 Feet Wide, Lots 30x150;
Corner Lots, $150; Inside Lots, $100.
Other Streets,
Corner   Lots   $IOO;.
.Inside Lots $75.00.
TERMS: 1-3 Cash* Balance in Three and Six Months*
For Further Particulars Apply to: |    gg^LEY INVESTMENT & TRUST CO.,
R. H. PARKINSON, Fairview; | limited. '
**. ^ **E. BULLOCK WEBSTER, Keremeos.   * o��"��"' *'�����*���> Qreenwobd. B. C.
COTTAGES BUILDING.
The Married Miners of Phoenix to Bave Free
Bomes and Schools.
Mr. Hugh Sutherland, managing director of the Dominion Copper Company, whose property is located at
Phoenix, is in the city for a few days.
In conversation with a Miner representative last night, Mr. Sutherland said:
i.. VThe company's new compressor at
���the mines is now running smoothly.
We are running four drills. We no not
intend to put in anymore machinery,
not for some time at least. We will not
put up a concentrator or mill. We
have been developing the Brooklyn and
Stemwinder properties for two years,
and will continue development work for
at least another year. We could, if
necessary, mine 500 tons of ore per day
at the present time, but our intention is
to let the ore stand and keep tunnelling
away at development. The policy of our
company toward our employees will always be based upon fairness and equity.
We have already given orders for the
erection of a number of cottages for the
married men in our employ, and will
build 40 more if needed, so that any self-
respecting man of a family, in our employ can have a real comfortable home
and a permanent one. The cottages will
have five roffms and will be finished in a
superior manner. We will also take
care of other matters besides homes.
We will erect school buildings and open
schools so that the children of our employees will be enabled to lay the foundation for an education."
In speaking of the progress of the
Boundary country, Mr. Sutherland said
it was remarkable. "Why, if I had not
known where I was going when I arrived at Phoenix, I would have been
lost. It bore no resemblance to the
place I left last January. It has built
up surprisingly. The townsite company
have sold every lot they had. Greenwood has improved wonderfully ; so also,
has Grand Forks. The Yale hotel at
Grand Forks is the finest hotel in the
Kootenay country. It is a credit to
British Columbia "
When asked about the difficulties
arising from the eight-hour law, Mr.
Sutherland was reticent in a degree, but
said he did not think there would be any
considerable improvement among the
mines until a change in the right direction had been effected.   He said:
'���We are employing our miners at the
rate of $3.50 per day of eight hours for
machine men, and $3 per day of eight
hours for hamniersmen. This is dry
work. In wet work the wages are 50
ceiitd extra. In shaft work our ham-
mersmen   are   getting $3.50 per  day of
eight hours. This has been the prevailing wages in these mines for 18 months
before the present company was formed,
and the same in the Evening Star at
Slocan City. I have always paid $3.50
to machine men for eight hours work in
wet ground. For instance, in the
Evening Star, at Slocan City, I have
paid for the past 18 months $3.50 to
hammersinen and $4 to machine men
for sinking in eight-hour shifts. In dry
work I have paid in proportion for 10
hour shifts."���Nelson Miner.
GOLD A BASE METAL.
What May Resnlt   from   Edison's   Minlnc
Operations.
The next question is whether gold is
not to be declared a base metal pretty
soon, says the Salt Lake Tribune. If
Edison can pick up $800,000,000 from a
ranch in New Mexico, the same process
worked along Snake river and on the
sands between Cape Mendocino and the
mouth of the Yukon, will make gold
more common than copper. We do not
advise our bankers just yet to change
their gold for lead or brass or family
groceries to any great extent, but if a
ranch in New Mexico will supply $800,-
000,000 of the metal, we do not see why
gold will not be more plentiful than
blackberries in another year. Edison is
modest.    He is only going to start with
a product of $10,000 worth of gold daily,
but it is a clear case that by getting nine
more machines he could make $100,000
and by multiplying those by ten he
would have $1,000,000. And New Mexico
is not a famous place for gold. It is no
better than Arizona, or Neveda or Utah,
or Idaho or Montana. We are anxious
to hear the real character of the process.
In the old days the miner started out
with his donkey, his pan, his pick and
shovel, a little sour flour and riirty
bacon. If EdiBon's machine can be reduced to portable form the miner of tlie
future can add that machine to his outfit, gather in his gold every morning
and when the claim gets a little reduced
move the machine along. There are
2,000 miles of black sands on the American shore of the Pacific that are known
to contain from $2 to $5 a ton in gold.
If Edison's machine can work the gravel
in New Mexico, it certainly ought to
work the pure sand upon the coast, and
if it is a fact, why, in three years more
there will be no precious metal, in the
world except silver.
Butler & McCormick, the harness,
have made a fine set of harness for Mr.
E. Frazee's delivery wagon. It is undoubtedly the finest harness in the
country and is nickle trimmed and
otherwise highly finished THE   GREENWOOD   MINER.
Friday, Oct. 13,1899
THE    GREENWOOD    MINER.
Published Every Friday at Greenwood, B. C.
BY
THE GREENWOOD MINER  PRINTING COMPANY.
R.  E.  GOSNELL, Editor and Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION   RATES.
Domestic, One Year 12.00
"       Six Months $1.26
Foreign, One Year 13.00
Payable Invariably in Advance.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
No patent medicine ads taken except at full
rates.
Legal notices 10 and 5 cents per line.
"Certificate of Improvement" notices, |5.00
and $10.00 for legal life of notice.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month's
advertising.
The Minei: Is on sale at the following places:
Greenwood.
King & Co., Smith & McRae, Monroe & Co., P.
O. News Room.
Cascade: Cascade City News Co. Rossland:
P. O. News Room. Anaconda. B. C: P. O.
News Room.   Spokane:  The Shaw-Borden Co.
Entered at the Greenwood, B. C, post office
as second class mail matter.
Friday,......������ ��� ���   ..'. Oct, 13,1899.
DEPARTMENTAL   STORES.
In another column is published an
extract from the Victoria Colonist which
is well worthy of perusal. The departmental store with its sweating attachments and concentration of business are
practically killing the retail business in
eastern Canada, and is being rapidly extended to British Columbia. What the
Colonist says in regard to the general
principle involved is well worthy of consideration, but exception should be
taken to the statement that it is the
families of wage-earners that are to
blame in this matter. As a matter of
fact, the patronage of these stores extends to nearly all classes, many of the
worst sinners being those who can afford to buy and pay for their goods at
home. It is a well-known fact that in
Victoria the Chinese and Japanese tailor shops are patronized most largely by
the wealthier classes, and by those in
the enjoyment of good salaries. The
principle involved is the the same���that
of purchasing goods at a price less than
the regular home dealers can afford to
sell for. It is a practice prevailing
more every year, and the great success
of the departmental stores and the immense sums received by them from all
parts of Canada are proof of its extent.
The system depends upon its cheapness, which means a maximum of labor
at a minimum of wage.
A CONGRESS ON MINES.
There is a movement on foot to secure
a representative assembly of mining
engineers, and manufacturers of the
world for the Paris exposition This
international congress is to be held June
18th to 23d, 1900. The public sessions
will be held each afternoon with questions of mines and metallurgy alternating.
Reports on questions presented for
discussion will be prepared and presented beforehand to members of the congress ; and each morning the members,
under the guidance of engineers and
manufacturers specially chosen, will
study in detail the most notable of the
mining and metallurgical exhibits of
different countries. There is no doubt
but what the congress will be a notable
one  and  of  great  interest to those to
whom these subjects appeal. Not only
tliis but it will broaden the field and
view as regards mines and their latest
up-to-date methods and appliances.
The following are a few of the subjects it
is intended to discuss:
"Use of Explosives in Mines," "Use
of Electricity," "Means of Reducing
Manual Labor in Mines," "Working
Conditions at Great Depth," "Recent
Improvements in the Mechanical Preparations of Ores," "Progress of Gold
Metallurgy."
POLITICS   ON   PARTY   LINES
The Liberal-Conservatives have met
in convention at New Westminster and
declared for the introduction of straight
party lines in Provincial politics. In
this connection they have formulated a
definite platform for Provincial purposes, and will elect a leader. As was
stated by the Miner some time ago,
while there is no logical relation between
Provincial and Dominion affairs, it is
the only practical solution of the tangle
into which politics has gotten at Victoria. People generally will welcome an
opportunity to ally themselves on one
side or the other, with some party responsible as a whole for the acts of the
Government. Either Liberals or Conservatives would prefer to see their political opponents in power to such a
nondescript combination as at present
exists, with personal aspirations as the
main line of cleavage. Naturally, as
this is a new departure in this Province,
there will be some opposition to it; and
it is possible that it may not be wholly
successful if an election is forced on
soon ; but sooner or later it must come.
It is the experience of all the Provinces
but one. We may now look forward to
the Liberals following suit, now that the
gauntlet has been thrown down. It
will be interesting to watch the developments of the next few months.
ANOTHER SMELTER
Will Be Erected at Grand Porks in a Short
Time.
Harry Gager, the American mining
engineer, who purposes establishing a
smelter at Grand Forks for the treatment of ores by the Loder pyritic system, has gone to Spokane to interview
Jay P. Graves in regard to securing a
site adjacent to the (i ran by smelter. It
is believed that he will have no difficulty
in making a deal iiichi ling arrangements
for water supply. The Granby company
has an available j >ver equivalent to
1,500 horse power, an amount far in excess of its present requirements. The
'projected plant will be in operation in
March and will have a preliminary capacity of 200 tons.
The Loder, or Ward system, according
to Professor Sad tier, M. E., a Colorado
expert, is designed to obtain the values
in ores consisting of quartz, iron and
copper pyrites carrying gold and silver
and other minerals in lesser quantity,
into concentrated form as copper matte,
high grade in gold and silver. It differs
from other systems of smelting in three
important respects: The first being
that the burning of the sulphur in the
blast furnace adds to the heat of the
furnace to such a degree that it becomes
possible to g.t along with
5 per cent lees coke, as over against
the 15 per cent used in other smelting
works, an well as the roasting or removal
of the sulphur, being done in the blast
furnace instead of being a separate and
expensive operation.
The second is the use of a hot blast,
which in this case, is heated by an ingenious arrangement by the waste heat
of the furnace itself,
The third point is the natural sequence
of the first two, being the production of
a higher degree of heat than is usual in
other smelting works extracting the
other precious metals, and consequently
the use of a slag or charge running
higher in silica than could be readily
fused by ordinary furnaces.
Associated with Mr. Gager in the
project are John Macdonough and Ed.
T. Bradford, president and general manager respectively of the Southern Smelting company, of Denver, Col.
The system is in operation at Ward
and Leadville, Col., and Atlanta, Ga.,
and, it is said, gives the utmost satisfaction. The merit claimed for it is that
the very lowest grade ore can be treated
at a profit. Three dollar ore is not the
minimum limit by any means. The
dimensions of the furnace are 36x146
inches. The proposed smelter here will
be enlarged to a capaeity of 1,000 tons
daily after the successful treatment of
Boundary ores has been demonstrated.
Methodist Church Entertainment.
Next Wednesday, Oct. 18, there will
be an entertainment given in the Methodist church. Some good selections of
music will be rendered by local talent,
and Miss Isabel T. Kerr, a well known
humorous and dramatic reader, will
make her first appearance in the city
The Vernon News says: "Miss Isabel
T. Kerr, of Toronto, a talented elocutionist, gave great satisfaction to the
large audience, many pronouncing her
to be the most clever entertainer in this
line who had ever visited the valley."
Badly Bart.
Last Monday a man named Larson
received guite a painful wound, a candle
stick being run into his side about four
inches. It occurred on one of the Rathmullen properties. He was coming up
the shaft in a bucket at the time. Dr.
Oppenheimer was called and fixed him
up. We are glad to say, though the
wound is painful, it is not considered
serious.
H. M. KEEFER,
MINING and REAL
ESTATE BB0KER.
 GREENWOOD, B   C...
Real Estate
Mines   and Mining.
THE MART
GAUNCE   &  WICKWIRE.
GREENWOOD, B. C.
Porter & Cunningham,
REAL ESTATE MINES AND
MINING. FIRE INSURANCE MINING AND ABSTRACTING A SPECIALTY.
Corner Government and Deadwood Streets,
GREENWOOD, B. C.
ARTHUR MOWAT,
MINING,   REAL   ESTATE and
INSURANCE  AGENT.
Operating in British Columbia and
Republic Camps.
OLOUGH'S   CODE.
GREENWOOD, B. C.
B. C. Pottery Company, Ltd.,
Victoria.
MANUFACTURERS   OF
Sewer Pipe, Chimney Pipe, Fire
Bricks, Pressed Bricks, Flower Pots,
and Fire Proofing Tile.
GEO. F. WILLIAMS,
Dry Goods,
Clothing,        ^e
Furnishings and
Millinery.        ^
CALL  ON US.
Copper Street,
GREENWOOD. B. C.
BEFORE ORDERING YOUR
Groceries
It would   be well for you to call on
A. H. SPEEKY
& CO.,
Who have the most
complete stock of
Staple and Fancy
Groceries to be found
in the City.
SperrY
&Co.,
COPPER STREET.
THE LION-
Bottling Works.
GREENWOOD and GRAND FORKS.
Manufactnrers of all kinds of   Aerated Beverages.
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE
LION BREWING CO.,
Rossland, B. C.
The largest brewery in British Columbia.
JAS. M'CREATH & CO.,
Proprietors.
The    Minbr ��� the  best advertising
medium in tbe Boundary, u
Friday, Oct. 13 1899
THE   GREENWOOD   MINER.
CITY   ALDERMEN
Met in Council Monday Right-Contract for
Municipal Buildings Let.
Mayor Hardy, Aldermen Sutherland,
Cameron and Wood were present at the
regular meeting held on the 9th.
Clerk Taylor read minutes of previous
meeting; moved and carried that they
be adopted.
Clerk read letters from F, E. Michaels,
C. A. Shaw, and Mr. Pettindrow. Aid.
Cameron moved that Mr. Shaw's letter
be received and filed; seconded by Aid.
Sutherland and carried. Moved by
Aid. Wood, seconded by Aid. Cameron
that application of Mr. Michaels be
laid over to next meeting.   Carried.
Finance committee read a list of bills
against the city, which were ordered
paid.
Account of Caulfleld & Lamont for
sidewalks was placed on file on motion
of Aid. Sutherland, seconded by Aid.
Cameron.
The by-laws were then taken up on
motion of Aid. Cameron by-law 31 be
read first time. This motion was seconded by Aid. Sutherland and carried.
Then it was moved that by-law 32 be
read first time. This motion carried,
and was followed by motions that by-
lows 31 and 32 be read second time; carried.
The building committee reported they
had let the contract for the erection of
the municipal buildings to Smith Bros.
& Travis.
The meeting then adjourned.
Bad An Opening.
The B. C. hotel was formally opened
to the public for inspection last Monday
night. The hotel was crowded all the
time and everyone seemed to be making the best of the situation. Good
music was furnished, and about 10
o'clock the dining room, where a dainty
lunch was spread, was thrown open.
This hotel is undoubtedly one of the best
appointed in the Boundary. Everything is new, neat and clean. The
rooms are elegantly furnished and one
of the features of the place is a first-class
sample room for commercial travelers.
Mr. McLennan has already attained
quite a reputation in his line, which is
well deserved, judging by the B. C.
hotel. He has a good force of assistants
and the best possible accommodations
for visitors.
From  McKinney.
With a five-stamp mill the clean-up
on the Granite in Camp McKinney last
week was a gold brick valued at $585.
This is the best record made since the
plant was installed. The ore lately has
b"en averaging $17 per ton. Prof. Newman, of Vancouver, expressed himself
as very well stisfied with the progress of
development work. The winze in the
tunnel hns been sunk eighteen feet and
will be continued to a point thirty feet
further down, when crosscutting will be
commenced. The hanging wall has not
yet been encountered. Superintendent
Hayes has recommended the purchase
of fifteen additional stamps, making
twenty in all.
Another Railroad.
L. A. Manly, mayor of Grand Forks,
and others are applying to the Dominion Parliament for a charter authorizing
the building of a railway from or near
Cascade, B. C, on the international
boundary line, in a westerly direction to
Carson, B. C, with a branch from
Grand rorks to a point fifty miles up
the north fork of tlie Kettle river, and
a branch via Greenwood to Midway on
the boundary.
A   FINE   SHOWING.
Strike on Rambler in West Fork District-
News ol Other Properties.
J. M. Connick, Bob Pitcher and Jack
Marshall came in from West Fork Tuesday and brought news of a big strike on
the Rambler. It consists of a lead seven
feet wide with a 3-foot pay streak carrying values running $28 in gold 12 oz.
silver aud 20 per cent lead. This claim
is about 1,500 feet from the big showing
on the Washington, and belongs to the
group of claims recently bonded by
"African" Brown for $100,000. De-
velbpment work is progressing rapidly
in a 5x7 foot shaft all in solid ore. It is
showing up better with every foot of
work. These claims are regarded by experts as among the best in the country.
Jack Empey, manager for R. E. L.
Brown, has a force of 16 men at work on
the Idaho and Washington group, which
includes the Rambler. Ten men are
working on the Idaho and six on the
Rambler, and it is the intention to work
these properties all winter, and an office,
boarding house, and bunk house are
being erected.
Robt. Wood has returned from a ten
days' trip to the West Fork, where he
put a force of ten men to work on the
Sally. He also has a force on the Rob
Roy, which adjoins the Sally. Both
these claims, it has been ascertained,
have the big lead of the. Washington
and Idaho, and Mr. Wood is sinking a
shaft midway between the Rob Roy and
Sally for the purpose of intercepting
this lead.
Owing to the enormous showings on
these properties, and others in the vicinity, the C. P. R. will soon have to build
a branch line into the district. Everyone predicts a great future for the West
Fork.	
One at Phoenix.
The Phoenix News made its first appearance yesterday. It is a bright,
newsy sheet, and is well deserving of
the patronage of the people of the town
it represents. Jas. Grier is at its head,
and says that as the Greenwood Miner
and the Midway Advance will probably
handle Tupperite explosives, the Boundary Creek Times the Laurier thunder,
the Columbia Review the Semlin racket, and the Grand Forks Miner various
other noises, no room will be left in the
political field for his paper, so he will
have to devote himself to local and mining work.
Only a Mile A way.
The C. P. R. track laying machine is
only about a mile north of the city as
the Minkk goes to press. It is intended
to cross the trestle and push into town
.with all possible speed, and it is expected
that freight will be hauled immediately,
as tiiere is only nine miles more of the
track to lay between here and Midway,
thus relieving part of the train that has
been handling ties, rails, etc. Last year
at tliis time Greenwood was entirely out
of civilization. Now there are towns to
the right of us, towns to the left of us,
towns all around us���and the railroad
only a mile away!
More Newspapers.
Eber ('. Smith, formerly of the Rossland Record, will soon start a daily-
paper at Grand Forks. It is to be called
the Daily Gazette. Jas. Grier, of the
Boundary Creek Times, has started the
News at Phoenix, and another enterprising news rustler, it is said, will
soon start doing business at Chesaw.
Besides these it is expected that
Phcenix will soon have another paper.
f^ ^S ^y^% w^ ^r* m^ 9^ ���"��� *^m *^m ^l ��^m *w v
j?THE  PIONEER  HOTEL.
GreenWOod  City,   Boundary Creek, B. C.
We are prepared to welcome guests and provide best accommodations.
1 HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
The    Best of Wines,   Liquors   and   Cigars.    The most comfortable
SAMPLE KOOM
i      In Greenwood.   Heated by Hot Air.
��� f ���
J* W* Nelson, Proprietor.
h...
CHOICE DRIVING TEAMS,
Crackerjack Saddle Horses.
Distance Cuts no Ice.
We Never Fail to Get There.
Robbins <Sr Harvey, Prop's.,
Greenwood, B. C.
Ottawa HoUSe,   H. q.Tompkins,.Prop.
New Rooms; well Heated; First-class
Dining Boom; choice Wines, Liquors
and Cigars.	
ALWAYS QPE:N>rcoco
GREENWOOD, B. C.
GREENWOOD
Flour, Feed, Produce and
Commission Co*    S    S
DEALERS IN HAY, GRAIN, POTATOES, BUTTER, EGGS, KTC.
HEAVY WAGON SCALES IN CONNECTION WITH OIK
BUSINESS. -
Silver Street,     ����     <��     Greenwood, B* C.
THE   BEST   I5EKR   IN   TOWN   IS   .MADE   BY   TilK
Elkhorn Brewery,
HARTINGER   &   PORTMANN,   Props.
Mr. Race of the C. P. R., came in  on
Wednesday.
ASK   FOR
Elkhorn
eer.
PATRONISE
HOME
INDUSTRY.
.������'     '   '���   ���'���,;
:   "  ' "���\
i ���      .    '
\ The Elkhorn Lager Reer contains
only pure Malt and
Hops.   Try it!
It Is kept on
Draught or in Rot-
ties by all the Lead
ing Hotels in this
District. THE   GREENWOOD   MINER.
Friday, Oct. 13, 1899.
CONSERVATIVE CONVENTION.
The Convention Renews Its Pledges of Fealty
to Sir Charles Tnpper, the Dominion Leader
of the Party.
New Wkstminstbr, B. C, Oct. (>.���
The Conservative convention of British
Columbia unanimously adopted the following British Columbia platform tonight in effect It approved the principle of the eight-hour law; the state ownership of railways; the revision of the
voter's lists; aid in construction of trails;
the official inspection of hoisting gear;
to improve the administration of justice;
to provide an effective system for the settlement of disputes between capital and
labor; to actively aid in agricultural
development; to have the fisheries controlled by the Province; to make the
London agency of British Columbia effective ; that indigent laborers be discouraged from seeking work in British
Columbia ; that servant girls be encouraged to immigrate to British Columbia;
that mining be actively aided ; that medical men and hospitals be aided in the
interior; that the system of education
be improved.
A resolution was passed regretting
that the Government had not seen fit to
raise a Canadian regiment for the
Transvaal, Sir Hibbert Tupper and Colonel Prior speaking strongly to the motion.
The convention also wired to Sir
Charles Tupper congratulating him on
his attitude at the last session and expressed a continuance of loyalty to the
leader. The resolution was passed with
deafening applause, the entire convention standing. The convention will
have decided on a leader in British Columbia tonight, besides appointing its
officers.	
~ PBESS DAYT
Editors Have a Red Hot Time at the Exposition and Don't Get Home Till Morning.
Spokane, Oct. 8, 1899.
Sixty newspaper men from Washington and British Columbia took charge of
Spokane yesterday as guests of the
Spokane Press club, who treated them
royally. In the morning they were
shown over the city and unanimously
expressed their delight at its beauty and
stable appearance. In the afternoon the
exposition grounds were taken possession of, and at 8 p. m. ink slingers of
every description met at the press headquarters and proceeded to the Auditorium to listen to "Yon Yonson."
At 10 o'clock they were escorted to
Danvenport's and had such a banquet as
even Paul Johnson never dreamed of,
and surpassed the memorable days of the
Greenwood "Flowing Bowl Club."
The banquet over the knights of the
paste pot and scissors were taken to
Eagle hall where a high jinks was in full
blast, as well as the liquid refreshments,
and in the wee sma' hours of the morning the subsidized night watch men saw
struggling home, arm in arm, the be-
whiskered Palouser and the fish eater
from the Sound, the city reporter and
the Idaho Bushwacker, and all in a
mood pregnant with joy and spirits.
The visiting press now does, and will
always, speak in the highest terms of
the reception given them by the Spokane
Press club, and of the welcome extended
by the exposition committee through
Dr. Olmsted and Mr. Bolster, who are
today tlie most popular men in Spokane.
Compressor for the Morrison
A 4-drill compressor was received at
the Morrison mine this week. They expect to have it up and in running order
before the end of next week. This
property is now working a large force of
men and development work will continue all winter,
EXPOSITION NOTES.
The stock yards would delight a denizen of Bruce County.
The manufacturing pavilion is a monument to the energy and enterprise of
capitalists of that class.
The success of the Exposition is greatly due to the untiring efforts of Manager Bolster, who is always on hand to
welcome visitors, and whose genial smile
and hearty hand clasp make every one
perfectly at home and at ease.
Spokane's 1898 Exposition surpasses
any yet held in any city in the Pacific
Northwest. All exhibits are of the
highest grade. The agricultural hall
contains a beautiful display of all kinds
of grain, roots, indicative of a rich
farming region, and fruits that would
please the eye of a Californian.
All the great industries of the Inland
Empire are represented, but what attracts the eye of a Boundary Creek visitor is the magnificent display in mineral hall. At the entrance of the hall
on the left are the ores of Boundary
Creek in charge of W. T. Smith and
Thos. McDonnell. No better exhibit
exists in the building, even though some
of its best properties such as the Golden
Crown, City of Paris, etc., are not represented. Many congregate and listen
with amazement to the caretakers tales
of ledges hundreds of feet in width and
of good values, in the Boundary camps ;
but many will be doubting Thomases
until they visit that great country. The
chief properties represented are the Ironsides, Knob Hill, B. C, R. Bell, Golden Eagle, Jewel, Winnipeg, Mother
Lode, Buckhorn, Brooklyn, Stemwinder,
B. C. M. & M. Co's. properties, King
Solomon, Big Copper, Gold Drop, Sunset, and Adriondack. Rossland'o exhibit is small in comparison, but of an excellent grade. The Sumpter country,
Oregon, comes next to the Bonndary,
followed closely by the Buffalo Hump,
Ymir, Republic, Slocan, and Myers
Creek.
BOLSTEB.
Mr. Shafer opened his new sal oon on
the iith.
Next week will see two new restaurs ��� Is and a hotel opened.
The Western Star property owned by
y.. Fosbender is showing up good.
On the Independence they intend
sinking 25 feet more on their 50-foot
shaft. Assays have been obtained from
this property averaging $11 in gold and
silver.
The Homestake, owned by Ditmer
Bros., is but a short distance from the
Buckhorn. On it they have a 16-foot
shaft all in ore. It is not known how
large a vein they have, but it covers the
bottom of the shaft. It is a copper pyrites and assays $35.
Around this camp are a great many
prospects, and all are rushing work and
report good showings. The camp promises to be pretty lively this winter. The
properties surrounding this camp are
all within from a half to two miles distant.
On the Buckhorn they are working
five men with Pat Welsh superintending. Assays have been obtained averaging $30 in copper, gold and silver.
This ore very much resembles that of
the B. C. mine in Summit camp. They
are getting in their winter's supplies,
putting up buildings, etc. The shaft is
down 40 feet and is well timbered. It
is intended to work two shifts all winter,
SUPERIOR   LINE   OF   CIGABS.
MORENA,
Brands: \ INTERIOR and
MINER.
Made by INLAND CIGAR MFG. CO. of Kamloops, B. C.
CLEAR HAVANA  FILLER.
Nothing but B. C. Union Labor Employed.
-FOR SALE AT���
Arlington, Pioneer, International, Pacific, Rossland, Ottawa
and Commercial Hotels, H. A. King & Co.
PROTECT HOME INDUSTRY.
S HELLO BOYS! &
FOR   UP-TO-DATE
CLOTHING,  HATS, CAPS,
NECKTIES, SHIRTS,
UNDERWEAR,   BRACES,
CALL    ON
J.   F. RODGERS,
OLD STAND BANK OF  MONTREAL.
COPPER   ST.,
THE  FASHION  LIVERY   STABLE.
Cameron Bros., Prop's.
Livery, Feed and Sale Stables.   Good Single and Double Drivers.   Gentle Saddle
and Pack Horses.   All Kinds of Teaming and Heavy Hauling Done
on the Shortest Notice.   Stock Well Looked After.
OFFICE OF GREENWOOD CITY TRANSFER COMPANY,
GREENWOOD.   B.   C.
THE YALE LUMBER CO.,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS
IN ALL KINDS OF	
RoUgh  and     \
Dressed    i
LUMBER,
Shingles, Laths, and
Mouldings. ���r->
OFFICE:    CORNER  COPPER   AND   DUNDEE  STREETS
GREENWOOD, B. C.   TELEPHONE 36.
wmmmmm
New and Second-Hand
Goods*
"0.1. C."
Sewing Machines, Locks, Guns Bepaired,  Keys Fitted.
A.  L.  WHITE &   CO., OPPOSITE    TELEPHONE     OFFICE.
Subscribe for the MINER. fefr
Friday, Oct 13, 1899-
THE   GREENWOOD   MINER.
A B��d Policy.
The Trail Creek News complains that
two-thirds of the large amount of money
paid in that town for wages finds its
way to the great department stores of the
east, and it  asks why men, who come
west that they may get better wages,
can justify to themselves their conduct
in contributing to the sweat shops of
Montreal and Toronto.   Commenting on
this  the Revelstoke Herald says that
While the home morchant pays taxes
and subscribes to nearly every fund for
local improvements, the wives of the
working men send east for their bonnets
and  frocks,   and their husbands  talk
socialism  and other isms for the improvement of the condition of workers.
One has  c "y to look  at the great
baskets of parcels which are brought to
British Columbia by every mail to appreciate the vast amount of money which
is sent out of the province for what
ought to be bought from our own merchants.   But some will ask:   Why should
we not buy where we can buy most
cheaply?   There  are two  answers  to
this.   One of them is that it is a very
great question if because a thing costs
a smaller sum it is cheaper to buy it
elsewhere than at home.   On a single
transaction the person who spends a sum
of money with an eastern department
store may save something, but in the
long run he loses, for every dollar diverted from the legitimate trade of the
community in which he lives renders the
cost of living in that community greater.
It is a case of saving at the spigot and
spilling at the bung.   Another answer
is that, if the rule applies to one class of
expenditure, there is no reason why it
should not apply to others.   If it is right
for the wage-earner in British Columbia
to purchase goods produced by the underpaid labor of the east, why is it not right
for the employer in the province to import this underpaid labor to compete
with the eastern sweat shops?   Let us
take the case of a milliner.   She starts
a place of business in a mining town,
but finds herself unable to get along because she has to compete with millinery
produced in Montreal at half the cost.
To keep her business going she employs
a number of deft-fingered Chinamen to
work for her. They will work as cheaply
as eastern girls and she can then afford
to sell her millinery as cheap as eastern
houses,   Will any one say that a chorus
of indignation would not go up from the
miners' union against the employment
of Chinamen in such work?   But can
any one tell wherein such a cry would
be reasonable?   The great offenders in
this matter are the families of the men
who are the greatest sticklers for union
prices.   We see  the streets   placarded
With advice to people to smoke only such
cigars as have the union label on them.
When  will  we  see placards  advising
people not to buy the products of eastern
sweat shops?   The answer rests largely
with  the  wage-earners, for  the  other
classes of the community do not follow
the practice complained of to any great
extent.
This policy of purchasing goods at retail elsewhere than at home is very bad,
for its tendency among other things is to
keep prices up. If local producers had
all the local business they could afford
to sell at lower prices. We urge the importance of dealing with our own merchants upon the attention of Colonist
readers as strongly as we know how.���
Victoria Colonist.
The Bine Jay.
Mr. Edwards was in from Skylark
camp last Sunday and says the Blue
Jay is one of the coming mines of this
district. Two shifts of men are working
on a contract under Mr. Edwards, who
ownes the largest share in the property
MAIL   SERVICE.
Office Hours:   8 a. m. to 6:15 p. m.
Mails close for Grand Forks 11:30 a. m. daily,
Mails close for Penticton, Camp McKinney,
Midway, etc., 7 a. m., Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday.
Mails due from Grand Forks, 1 p. m., daily.
Mails due from Penticton, 2 p. m., Sunday,
Wednesday, aud Friday.
Spokane palls
& Northern,
Nelson & Ft.   Sheppard,
Red iTountain Ry's.
The only all-rail Route, without change
of cars, between Spokane, Rossland and Nelson.
J.   RUSSELL.
T.   HARDY
Russell Hardware Co.,
DEALERS IN
Almost all kinds of Hardware, Glassware, Crock-
eryware, Woodenware, Tinware, Graniteware,
Silver and plated wares, Lamp goods, Stoves of
all kinds; all stock sizes of glass windows and
doors; Belting and Packing of all kinds.
BRASS GOODS A SPECIAL/TY.
Lubricating and Illuminating oils, guns, rifles
and Ammunition; Iron all sizes and shapes; all
kinds of drill and tool steel; black and gal. pipe
up to 3 in.    All kinds pipe fittings up to 6 in.
Agts. for CANTON STEEL.
Sherwin & Williams' ^2l^L^theyare
Pedlar, Steel and Metal Roofing and Shingles.
BEST TINNING AND PLUMBING SHOP IN THE INTERIOR.
DAILY   SERVICE.
Going North.                                 Going Couth.
12:27 a. m MARCl'S 11:13 a. m.
Train leaving Marcus at 11:18 a. m. makes
close connections at Spokane for all
PACIFIC   COAST   POINTS.
Close connections at Nelson with steamboat
for Kaslo and all Kootenay Lake points.
Passengers for Kettle ltivcr and Boundary
creek connect at Marcus withstnge daily.
C.   H.   DIXON,   G.   P.   &   T.   A.
Spokane, Wash.
W. S. Keith, M. E.
F. F. Ketchum,
K
eith &
etchum,
Mining,
REAL ESTATE   and
Insurance Brokers.
Lots in all Parts of the City.
Mining Stocks
In Greenwood & Camp McKinney
A Specialty.
Mining   Properties   Examined    and    Reported   on.
GREENWOOD,   B.   C.
First Shipment of
CLOTHING,
HATS, CAPS
NECKWEAR,
For Fall, Just Arrived.-^*s>
W. ft!, law & Co.
Why Be In Darkness?
When Kemp A Holmes can clean your windows, offices and stores; carpets sewn, cleaned,
and laid.
PBIVATE NURSING FOB GENTLEMEN.
LEAVE ORDERS AT WHITE FRONT STORE.   RATES MODERATE.
WE BEG TO INTRODUCE TO THE
PUBLIC THE FAMOUS
"La Fama"
Cigar.
Made   from a    CLEAR HAVANA FILLER, with  a  FINE DELHI
WRAPPER, and CUBAN HAND MADE.    TRY IT.
H, A* King & Co.,
COPPER STREET, GREENWOOD. ���
THE   GREENWOOD   MINER.
Friday, Oct. 13,1899.
MINING  PICK-UPS.
News comes from Dawson of a rich
strike on Great Slave lake. A party of
men slipped away quietly a short time
ago to Great Slave lake, N. W. T. These
men had come in by the Edmonton
route, and on the way hither they had
become aware of the quartz strike on
the Great Slave lake, but not of its immense richness. A guide made the
firct strike, and since then many locations have been made. The sworn
statement of the assays shows that the
richest ore went $5,800 to the ton.
It is the opinion that Pine creek-in
the Atlin district offers the best inducements to the placer miner. The upper
and lower portions are not producing to
any extent, but there is about a mile
and a half of splendid property, which
will inevitably bring the owners wealth.
A very good property at Chesaw is
owned by the Bartholomew brothers of
Greenwood. It is the extention of the
Independence on which the big lead
was found a short time ago. Their
property is called the Diadem, and has
the Independence lead.
Messrs. Dale, Olson and Kerr are
busy working on their property, the
Great Hopes, in the Beaverton district.
Quite a number of prospectors are
now coming into Greenwood from the
higher ranges, where they have spent
the past summer. The present cold
snap has forewarned them of the coming winter, and many of them have
come in to stay. Nearly all report success in some degree; also much travel
between here and the West Fork.
A Chicago syndicate has just paid $40,-
000 in cash for a well known Lardeau
property, the Towser. It is the next
location to the famous Silver Cup mine.
Notioe to Advertisers.
All changes of ads must be handed in
to The Miner office by Tuesday noon
for that week's issue; also orders for ex
tra copies of paper.
Seasonable groceriesat Law & Co.'s.   *
First shipment of J. A. T. Bell's boots
and shoes just arrived at Law & Co's.  *
Subscribe for the Miner.
MINEBBL ACT, 1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
"Bald Eagle" mineral claim situate in the
Kettle River Mining Division of Yale District.
Where located:   In Greenwood Camp.
Take notice that I, Isaac H. Hallett as agent
for George R. Naden, free miner's certificate
Vo. 14367 A, intend sixty days from the date
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
certificate of improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action under
section 37 must be commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 7th day of October 1899.
I. H. HALLETT.
MINERAL ACT, 1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
"Boston" mineral claim situate in the Kettle
River Mining Division of Yale District.
Where located:   In Greenwood camp.
Take notice that I, Isaac H. Hallett, as agent
for Sydney H. Johnson, free miner's certificate
No, I9574A intend sixty days from the date
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
certificate of improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining a Crown Grant for the above claim.
And further take notice that action under
section 37, must be commenced before the
issuance of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 7th day of October 1899.
I. H. HALLETT,
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that we intend to
apply to the Board of License Commissioners,
of the City of Greenwood, at their first meeting
after the expiration of thirty days, for a license
to sell liquor by retail on the premises to
be known as the Hotel Norden, to be erected on
lot six, block 14, map 21, City of Greenwood.
CARL NELSON.
ANDREW SATER.
Greenwood, Sept. 21,1899. 30d.
MINERAL   ACT,   1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
Golconda, Gold Bed, Cleveland, Laocoon,
York and Wildrose Fraction mineral claims
situate in the Kettle River mining division of
Yale district.
Where located:   Smith's camp.
Take notice that I, Isaac H. Hallett as agent
for J. 0, Haas, free miner's certificate No. 18340
A, and George E. Foster,free miner's certificate
No. B 13208, Intend, 60 days from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for Certificate of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining Crown Grants of the above claims.
And further take notice that action under
section 87 must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 17th day of August, 1899.   8-25-2m.
I. H. HALLETT.
MINEBAL   ACT,   1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
Sycamore mineral claim situate in the Kettle
River mining division, Yale district.
Where located:   In Copper camp.
Take notice that we, George Riter, free
miner's certificate No. 6585 B, and Frank Beeu-
chene, free miner's certificate No. B 5970,intend
sixty days from the date hereof, to apply to the
Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown
Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 24th day of August, 1899.   8-2.r,-2m
MINEBAL   ACT,   1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
St.' Genevieve mineral claim, situate in the
Kettle River mining division, of Yale district.
Where located:   In Providence camp.
Take notice that I, Albert E. Ashcroft, agent
for George T. Crane, free miner's certificate No.
34626 A, intend, sixty days from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder, for a certificate of Improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 26th day of August, 1899.
9-l-2m A. E. ASHCROFT, P. L. S-
MINEBAL   ACT,   1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
Hercules mineral claim situate in the Kettle
River mining division, Yale district.
Where located:   In Copper camp.
Take notice that I, Isaac H. Hallett as agent
for Ed ward L. Tate, free miner's certificate No.
84408, intend, sixty days from the date hereof,
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And anther take notice that action, under
section V, must be commenced before the issuance o: ^uch certificate of improvements.
Datu. this first day of August, 1899.   8-25-2m
I. H. HALLETT.
MINEBAL   ACT,   1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
Copper King mineral claim, situate in the
Kettle River mining division, Yale district.
Where located:   In Copper camp.
Take notice that I, Isaac H. Hallett as agent
for John Moran, free miner's certificate No.
19680 A, and Austin Hammer, free miner's certificate No. 19037 A, intend sixty days from the
date hereof to apply to the Mining Recorder for
a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose
of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 23rd day of August. 1899.   8-25-2m
I. H. HALLETT.
MINERL   ACT,   1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
Silver King and Iron Cap mineral claims,
situate in the Kettle River Mining Division of
Yale District.
Where located:   In Skylark camp.
Take notice that we, the Silver King Gold
Mining Company, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B 6560, intend, sixty days from the date hereof,
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for tlie purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 12th day of August, 1899.  8-ll-2m
ROSSLAND HOTEL.
Alf. Cameron, Prop.
'
Everything Brand New and First
Class. Elegant Bar Room, Best
Liquors and Cigars.
House Heated and Lighted
Throughout. Dining Room under Management of
AN EXPERIENCED CHEF.
Copper St., Greenwood, B. C.
BELTING.
Users of this article would do well to examine our stock in this line. We
carry a larger assortment than any other dealer in the Province. The Electric
Brand of Rubber Belting we stock is not excelled by any other make. It is used
by all the large mills in the Province. We carry it in stock up to 22 inches, and
Leather Belting up to 16 inches in width.
LcLennan, McFeeley & Co., Ltd.   |
Vancouver, B. C.  Wholesale Hardware.
Agents for the Giant Powder Co., San Francisco,  and  for the  Majestic  Steel
Range, St. Louis, Mo.
Branch Stores at Dawson, Atlin, and Bennett Cities.
Miners' Hotel,
COPPER STREET.
WALTER WATERLAND, Prop.
A Finely Equipped Bar,
Board by Day or Week.
TELEPHONE CONNECTION.
Best of Cusine Service. Rooms
neat   and   Well   Furnished.
���
i
m
>oo<
<��>    To the Public:    *&
We are now in a position to fill orders for all kinds of sausages, pickled, Cured and smoked meats. We are using
the latest machinery for making sausages, and our kitchen is in charge of an expert sausage maker. The following are
fresh made and always in stock:
Pork Sausage, Blood Pudding, Frankfurter, Wienerwurst,
Liver Pudding, Pressed Corn Beef, Dried Smoked Beef. We
are headquarters for Fish, Oysters, Live and Dressed Poultry.
S    P* Burns & Co*    *��
LIME! LIME!! LIMES!
i
1
���rf
ANY
The only first class WHITE LIME in the Boundr
ary. The SNOW FLAKE LIME COMPANY
is now prepared to furnish lime on short notice in
QUANTITY.  15925*5!
W. E. MEDILL, Mgl
Cunliffe & AWett,
SECOND-HAND   MACHINERY:
ENGINEEBS, B0ILEBMAKEBS
and MACHINISTS.
Our machine shops are now complete and we are prepared to do the heaviest class of work;
Ore cars, Ore buckets, shafting, hangers and pulleys. Pipe work a specialty. Estimates gives
on all classes of work.   Pumps always fn stock.
fn
1���25-H. P., horizontal engine, 9x12; 1���35-H. P^-
Locomotive type, boiler and skids complett
1���No. 3 Little Giant drill, hose column arms and bars complete; 1���5-foot Pelton wheel, wifa
600 feet special welded pipe from 16 ins. to 8 ins.; 1 rip-saw with iron table.
Rossland, Tm.^.-?���-.��>���-��*_��"��� ^
Friday, Oct. 13, 1899-
THE   GREENWOOD   MINEB.
PICKED  SPECIMENS.
"That son-in-law of yours is a cool
one," remarked one Griswold street
banker to another, "and has got a long
head for business. Does he ever get
rattled?" "Oh, he has his limit like the
rest of us. When he asked me for my
daughter be was so confuddled that he
kissed me and shook hands with the
girl."���Detroit Free Press.
"Mister, do ye remember thot ye said
one dose av yer pills wud make another
mon of me father?" "Yes, sir; and did
yon find my words true?" Thrue to th'
word, sor. Whin me father started takin
them he was a live mon, an faith whin
he had finished he was a dead mon."���
Chicago News.
It is stated in a British exchange that
at tbe rebuilding and enlargement of
Skibo Castle, being carried on by Mr.
Andrew Carnegie, a great number of
workmen are now empleyed. Steel
girders to the weight of 176 tons have
been brought from Pittsburg, U, S. A.,
taken north by rail, and conveyed by a
traction engine from Bonar-Bridge
Station to the castle. It is strange that
Mr. Carnegie should allow any innovation as modern as a steel girder.
Tho latest triumph over the atmosphere is the prevention of all storms
by the discharge of mortars in the air,
the sound being increased by great iron
cones resembling the bells of speaking
trumpets. The forming hall is made to
fall to the earth in rain. The making
of rain is already a success, aud some
day our weather bureau may simply announce the kind of weather the department has decided to produce for the
next twenty-four hours.
At a recent exhibition in Richmond,
England, held by an automobile club, a
military autocrat was shown under' the
name of a'-motor scout." It consisted
of a quadricycle fitted with a 1.5 horse
power petroleum motor. It is convertible, carrying either two persons or one
person and a light Maxim gun. The
gun is mounted in front over the leading wheels, and it is arranged so that it
can be fired with the vehicle going at
full speed. Below there is a tray sufficient to store 1,000 rounds of ammunition.
While on one of the crowded Isle of
Man boats an Oldham man, who suffered severely from sea-sickness, was overheard to say to his son: "Jimmy,
I've gotten a stick, wi' a silver knob
on't a-whoam ; that can have it. There's
two or three quid i' t'bank, and it's far
t' buryin.' An' Jimmy, bury me in the
Isle o' Mon. I can't stand this trip
again���aloive or dead."
A clever contemporary, says the Herald and Presbyter, iu referring to the
Methodist Council on Long Island,
which, after investigating the charges
against a minister, returned the somewhat novel verdict," Not guilty, but
unfit for the ministry," adds this comment: "A man need not be a knave to
disqualify him for the work of the ministry. It is enough that he be proved a
fool."
Stevenson's works have taken a great
"slump" in the market, according to
the London correspondent of the New
York Times. He attributes it to over-
puffing, and especially to the policy followed by bis publishers of printing every schoolboy scrap and piece of nonsense verse they could obtain until the
public, between expensive editions and
cheap editions, became "satiated and
nauseated."
W. L, Alden writes from London that
"David Harum" has reached a second
edition there, but can hardly be called
popular. He says (in the New York
York Times): "People apparently buy
it to find why the book had such a run
in America. The dialect and the people of 'David Harum' are too foreign to
be appreciated by the English reader.
You might as well expect an American
to appreciate a story written exclusively in the dialect of Someretshire."
A story comes from Oklahoma which
shows that a clergyman may have a
pretty wit, and yet be a little lacking in
tact. In the course of his sermon, the
Rev. Mr. Newby, new pastor of the
Christian church at Guthrie, interjected
the question: "How many of you. have
read the Bible?" Fifty hands went up.
"Good!" said the preacher., "Now
how many of you have read the second
chapter of Jude?" Twenty-five hands
were raised. A wan smile overspread
the minister's face. "That's good; but
when you go home read that chapter
again; you will doubtless learn something to your interest." Of course,
they found that there is no second chapter of Jude, and, of course, no matter
how they may attempt to laugh it off,
the victims of the clerical pleasantry are
not likely to love their pastors any more
because of the "rise" he took out of
them at that time.
DR. R. MATHISON
DENTIST   :   :   :
NADEN BLOCK :
GREENWOOD    :
Graduate Pennsylvania
College of Dental -  -
Surgery
Philadelphia,
A Licentiate of
Columbia -  -
Pa.-  -
British
Saddles and
Harness*
Admiral Dewey, while at Manila,
wrote to some of his old friends in Vermont, this story about his colored cabin
boy, Jim: When a war-ship goes out
for target practice, it is the custom to
place all glass, chinaware, and other fragile articles in the hold of the ship���as
close down to the keel as possible���in
order to prevent their breakage by the
concussion that follows the .firing of the
guns. This led to an amusing incident
at Manila, after the destruction of the
Spanish fleet. Life on board the Olymr
pia was gradually settling down to its
accustomed routine and dullness, when
one day at luncheon Commodore Dewey
asked Jim where some dish that he
missed from the table had gone. "I
ain't had no chance to git it yit," was
Jim's answer, "since I put it in de hoi'
jnst befo' dat target practice you had de
udder day, Commodore."
Turf Goods,
BOOT AND SHOE FINDINGS.
REPAIRING  A   SPECIALTY.
M. S. Butler,      jt
GREENWOOD,   B.   C.
WHEN YOU WANT
THE BEST IMPORTED CIGARS and TOBACCOS, CONFECTIONARY, MAGAZINES,
PERIODICALS, STATIONARY
and HOUSE PLANTS GOTO
Munro's,
Next Door to
BANNERMAN'8.
COPPER STREET.
0. P. Nickle. P. Archor.
PALACE SALOON,
Nickle * Archer.
CHESAW, WASHINGTON.
To Work the Sailor.
At a meeting of the directors of the
Sailor, Camp McKinney, held in Toronto, it was decided to have the necessary
machinery installed and work the mine
all win'er. Mr. Ross, the superintendent, reports that the shaft is down 83
feet all in quartz carrying good values.
They are working eight men, and are at
at present putting in a steam hoist.
GREENWOOD ASSAY OFFICE,
JOE   C.   LUCXEHBEL,
Assayer and Metallurgist,
Arlington
Hotel,
Hooper & Co.,
COPPER STREET,
GREENWOOD.
PROPRIETOR.
Mines Examined and
Reported on.
GREENWOOD.
P. L. BARCLAY'S STAGE
Leaves Imperial Hotel daily for Midway at 3:30 p. M. and leaves Midaway
at 8 a. m.
First-Class Accommodations.
Parties desiring to visit Midway on
Sunday can return the same evening.
Coming Home.
It is rumored that D. D. Mann, who
recently wont to China to look into the
possihilties of contracting to build (MM)
miles of railroad, has looked carefully
into tho whole matter and into the condition of the labor market, and he does
not think there wouid be any money in
the proposed deal for his firm. He will
return in the course of a few weeks.
Proprietors.
IMPORTED dc DOMESTIC
CIGARS,
WINES and LIQUOBS.
^    Headquarters for Mining Men.
McElmon
THE WATCHMAKER
Is now located on Greenwood street
OPPOSITE THE NEW
RENDELL BLOCK.
35
YEARS
EXPERIENCE.
Full assortment of material and tools to
do correct work.
Nash & Co.,
FAIITEKSaae
PAPER EAIGtlS.
Road to Central Camp.
Work nn the road to Central camp is
going on rapidly. Fifteen men are at
work and are about half way to the
camp. It is a perfect road and is one of
the best in the country tributary to
Greenwood. The road will get through
with only about four per cent of a grade.
It is a great credit to the citizens of
Greenwood and shows enterprise and
faith in the future. Work on the road
was started some time ago by private
subscription and since then has progressed in a most satisfactory manner.
W.   M.    SPROTT,
NEXT DOOR TO TEL. OFFICE.
HORSESHOEING *
,u BLACKSMITHINO.
Buckboards and Buggies made to Order.
WORK   GUARANTEED.
Shop   on   Copper   Street,  Greenwood,  B.  C.
A. B. JENSEN.
WRIGHT & GBAY,
BOOT AND SHOE MAKERS.
Prospectors   shoes   a specialty.    Repairing
neatly done.   Satisfaction quaiaiiteed.
NEXT DOOR TO COMMERCIAL HOTEL.
SIGN WORK A
SPECIALTY.
Quick   Work   Guaranteed.
SHOP OPP. FISHER SAW  Mi I.J .
WHEN IN PfHENIX
GO TO
W. TWIST & CO.
for Fine Cigars, Tobaccos, Confectionary, Soft Drinks, etc. We also handle
all the leading papers.
W. TWIST & CO.
Phoenix, B. C.
BILLIARDS   AIND
POOL ROOM,
CIGARS and TOBACCOS.
Oat Door South of Star Bakery.
Gov't. Street.
J. W. WOLFE, Proprietor, THE** GREENWOOD   MINER,
Friday, Oct. 13, 1899
LOCAL   JOTTINGS.
Dr. G. S Gordon has located at
Phcenix.
Henry Sauve is having the rear of his
building fixed up.
W. L. Hogg, Montreal, of the Sunset
company, is in the city.
Several loads of freight have been unloaded at Eholt this week.
Messrs. McCauley and Richards,
Midway, drove in on Tuesday.
Jack Empey left last Saturday for
Victoria on a.short business trip.
Mr. Parker, the Chesaw hotel man,
was here this week getting a few fittings,
etc.
D. A. Holbrook returned from Spokane
Monday, where he had spent the past
week.
Fred Munn and George Leyson of
Rossland are among the Elks at Spokane.
The sawmill men who have been on
strike at Rossland, have went back to
work.
Every Friday evening���the series of
parties at Mrs. Foreman's school, near
postoffice.
The Rossland Record notifies the
people of that town that it is a strictly
union paper.
For the past two days the wires of the
Spokane and Northern Telegraph Co.
have been down.
Robbins & Harvey, the popular liverymen, have received several low dray
wagons at Eholt.
Charles Hinkley, who escaped extradition at Rossland, has left that town
for parts unknown.
Mrs. Johns, wife of Mr. JohnB, superintendent of the Sunset mine, has gone
to California for the winter.
The Gem restaurant's new sign and
blackboard looms up like a full moon
these days to the inner man.
P. Burns & Co. will soon have a branch
meat market at Phoenix. Miller Bros,
will also open a drug store   at Phcenix.
J. M. Connick, Bob Pitcher and Jack
Marshall, who came in from West Fork
on Tuesday, went out again on Wednesday.
Harry Nash, proprietor of the Phcenix
hotel, was in the city yesterday and says
Phoenix is the only town in British
Columbia.
Madden & Dallas has moved their bar
across the street into their new building
which will be completed by the end of
next week.
The Phcenix Miners' Union had a
ball last Monday evening and did very
well. It was held in Weeks & Hogan's
new building.
D. D. McPhail, of the firm of Bongard
& McPhail, Bolster, was in town this
week, and says things are very lively
down his way.
Henry Sauve was up to Phoenix  last
Sunday and bought a lot in  the Ne
York townsite.   Henry says it is if/&
good location.
It is the general opinion in town that
with the arrival of the railroad in our
city comes all kinds of prosperity. Everything seems to be getting livelier.
There will be a large attendance to
hear Professor Ferguson next Monday
evening, providing the people are led to
properly understand or apprehend the
nature and worth of the attraction.
C. M. Shaw finished the survey of the
Hope, owned by Bob Donegan, in Sky-
c
1
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A Fortunate Purchase
Made us possessors of our Woolen Goods, Blankets, Flannels,
Mens' Underwear, Soxs, Clothing, etc., before the rise in prices*
Some People Call it Luck
We call it business; watching the market and taking advantage when
3
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 __^^_^^^__^^^^^^^__^^^^^^^_^   JI
the prices are lowest.   We are willing to divide the spoils; come right ��j!
in and demand your share at      &       j*      .**      j>      j*      j*.      &        $j}
RENDELL'S ARCADE.
ooooooooo<h>oo^oooooo^ooo^oo^oooo
^ ~~" '""~'"" '" "*"' '99&99999QX&Q999&9999**
lark camp. They have two ledges on
the property, one 30 feet and the other
50 feet. Good assays have been obtained.
The Leland house, Greenwood's largest hotel, will soon be opened. They
are busy cleaning up the place preparatory to moving in the furniture and
fittings.
Keith & Ketchum, brokers, sold a fine
residential lot Monday morning. They
also received an order from the east for
a thousand shares of stock in one of the
leading properties.
There was a general stampede last
Sunday to the scene of the present
track laying apparatus. It was then at
the meadows. Many were greatly disappointed at not finding the machine at
work.
Boy Wanted...
A smart, intelligent lad not less
than fifteeu years of age is wanted at
the Miner Job Room.
W. F. Robertson, provincial mineral' "_'ihi. who has been engaged in the
Slocan all summer, will spend the remain.'.', r of the season in the Boundary
country engaged in field work. His
forthcoming annual report will include
illustrations of the workings of the
North Fork and Phcenix camp.
Mr. James, of the Western Federation
of Miners, reports the prospects of that
organization as most brilliant. Everything is going along smoothly and they
now have quite a substantia] bank account. They will meet hereafter at the
corner of Government and Centre
streets.
M. E-.' Frazee received his new delivery ^agon, Monday, and it's a beanty.
With his new delivery outfit he intends
, 4o give his patrons the best of service;
and at the same time save them a great
many steps. In connection with his
grocery business he has the finest bakery in the Boundary, and has a first-
class baker. Taken altogether his Htore
has as good accommodation for the family trade as any store in the city.
G. S. GORDON, M. D.
Phoenix     -    ���   -    -     B. C.
Telephone,
BOUNDARY   CREEK  LOAN  AND  MERCANTILE
<��      <��      AGENCY. THOMAS   MILLEB, Manager....	
Real Estate, nines, Insurance.
OFFICE:     Corner   Copper   and   Deadwood   Streets
JULJLJLOJLSL-JLiUUUUUUULUUlJ
ALBERTA
HOTEL,
SILVER   STREET.
A. ARCHAMBEAULT & CO.
T. F. GAINE,   Mgx.
Imported and  Domestic   Wines,  Liquors and
Cigars.   Headquarters for Railroad
and Mining Men.
GREENWOOD, B. C.
DISSOLUTION   NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that the partnership hitherto existing between Leut-
fried Portmann, Anton Portmann, aud
Frank Hartinger, brewers, Greenwood,
trading under the firm name of Elkhorn
Brewery Co , is this day dissolved by
mutual consent, Frank Hartinger retiring from the firm, and L. and A. Portmann continuing the business. Debts
due by the firm will be assumed by L.
and A. Portmann, and debts due the
firm are to be paid to them.
Leutfried Portmann.
Anton Portmann.
Frank Hartinger.
Witness:   D. A. Cameron.
Dated Oct. 4,1899. 30d.
I CHESAW TRADING    |
I   COflPANY,  DEALERS IN 1
*
General Mdse, Groceries,
  <b
A Furnishing Goods, Heavy {;
i \ and Shelf Hardware. i 't
(\ it
J! PROSPECTORS' and MINERS' jj
\\     SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY. j(
\\ CHESAW,   WASH. \',
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<r> it
ft Keep   Your   Eye   on    Chesaw. \i>
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'$������������������������������������������������������*��<
NEW BOOKS.
David Harum, When Knighthood
was in Flower, No. 10 John St., Richard
Carrel, etc., are among the latest books
received at
Smith & McRae's,
Books, Olllce Supples and Wall Paper.
GREENWOOD, B. C.
THE EMPIRE
TYPEWRITER.
Cheapest and Best.
WRITING always in sight���simple.
For full particulars apply at
THE MINER OFFICE ���
Subscribe for the Miner; only $2.00
per year,

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