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The Greenwood Miner Sep 8, 1899

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 THE GREENWOOD MINER.
Vol. 1, No. 32.
GREENWOOD, B. C, FRIDAY, SEPT. 8, J 899.
$2 00 Per Year.
CONSPIRACY MOST FOUL.
Evidence of an Actrocious Crime Perpetrated at Columbia by Hired  Incendiarists���Startling
Disclosures Made.
Very keen interest has been felt in
Greenwood in the proceedings in connection with the preliminary trial of
the two men charged with the burning of the hotel at Columbia. Very
little news of a reliable character could
be obtained and the Miner is indebted
to the Colnmbia Review for a report,
which it has every reason to believe is
substantially correct.
Very painful rumors, too, have
come from Grand Forks, involving
others than the men themselves.
These have been of such a contradictory character as to be unjust to the
parties whose names have been mentioned to say anything at the present
time. With regard to the statement
that John Manly was missing as a
consequence, the latest information is
that he has returned to Grand Forks,
having gone out on urgent business
which a possible arrest would have
prevented his attending to.
Mr. McLeod of Midway, who is conducting the prosecution for the Crown,
passed through Greenwood yesterday to
attend the adjourned hearing. He had
nothing to say.
THE EVIDENCE.
The evidence presented on Saturday
at the preliminary inquiry into the
change against Mullen and Cameron of
having set tire to the Hotel Columbia,
at one o'clock in the morning, ou 17th
of July last, causing a loss of $16,000,
and endangering tho lives of a dozen
guests, was of a most astounding character. It came with a shock of surprise,
indignation, and horror to the people of
Columbia, and Grand Forks. If it is
true, there has never been a more foul,
villaneous, and cold-blooded crime in
Canada���one more devilishly planned or
more murderously executed.
[Here the Review account refers to the
jealousy which has existed between
Grand Forks and Columbia, the ill-feeling over the stage lines, and the trouble
connected with the seizure of furniture
in the Hotel Columbfa. It is alleged
threats were made that it would never
open.���Ed.]
The witness Royce swore that Mullen
met him in Greenwood, and afterwards
in Grand Forks shortly before the fire,
when Royce was in very hard luck.
They had known each other two years
before iu Rossland, and Mullen told
Royce in Grand Forks that he was under large pecuniary obligations to John
Manly, ex-Mayor of Grand Forks, and
manager of the Yale hotel there.
Mullen said to Royce: "You're in
bad circumstances. I know a way you
can make a few hundred dollars���by
burning a building, the Hotel Columbia.
I am under obligations to these people.
I expect to be under more, and they
want it done. Perhaps you are desperate enough to do it." The names of the
people to whom Mullen was under obligations  were not mentioned at that
time; but Royce says they were clearly
indicated; he thought it would be quite
idle to ask. The proposition shocked
him, but he decided, after talking the
matter over with Cameron, to try and
get hold of the money without doing
the job. On the Friday before the fire
Mullen procur.d a fuse and a gallon of
alcohol, and left them behind the clerk's
desk in the Yale. They remain )d there
all day. At 7 p. m. Royce said to Mullen: "What about the money?" Mullen went backwards and forwards several times between the Yale and Victoria,
and came back to Royce with $130,
which Royce took, and afterwards returned, promising, however, that the
job would be done that night. Mullen
said that by the time it was done, he
would have the full amount, $250.
Royce then took the alcohol and the
fuse from the clerk's desk.
"Were there many in the office when
you took them out?"
"No."
"Wasanybod. there?"
"Yes���one person."
"Who was that person?"
"The proprietor of the- hotel, John
Manly!'  He was sitting in the office."
Royce found Cameron, hired a team,
and drove to the woods a mile above
Columbia. There one of them experimented with the fuse and alcohol, and
found them a failure. He threw the
fuse away, and they drove back with
the alcohoLto G rand Forks. That night
Royce saw Mullen, and told him the
thing was impossible���the building was
full of people.
Mullen said the building should be
burned from the inside. The proper
way was to take a room, saturate it with
alcohol, place some alcohol in a basin,
and let a short candle burn down to it!
Saturday morning Cameron and Royce
agreed to demand $500, and payment in
advance. Mullen said he did not think
his principals would "stand for more"
than $250, but he would see them. In
the afternoon he said he had seen them,
and $250 was all they would go. Royce
told the whole circumstances to John
Wattson, bartender at the Yale, warned
him of what was contemplated, and left
Grand Forks on the Saturday evening
24 hours before the fire.
Royce saw Mullen two weeks later,
when Mullen said to him:
"The big fellow" (meaning Cameron)
"did the job all right, after you left. I
only gave him $210; they didn't come up
with the other."
Boyce asked him, "when do you expect to get opened your gambling and
variety show in Grand Forks." "Mullen said it was two weeks now and they
hadn't started on the building yet!"
WATSON CORROBORATES.
John Wattson, day bartender at the
Yale, said it had been intimated to him
before the fire that the fire would occur. He was not allowed to go into details, as the evidence was treated as
hearsay. His most important testimony was that on the Tuesday after the
fire Cameron appeared to be "broke"
and stood him off for a drink.
In the afternoon Cameron was at the
bar and in the wine room with Charles
Mullen and John A. Manley, and then
he displayed a roll of fully $200 to $250
from which he spent freely. All three
parties bought drinks and paid for
them. They were having a good time
together.
Cameron's appalling confession.
The most intense interest attaches to
tbe statement made in writing and
signed by Robert Cameron, one of the
accused, which will be tendered in evidence next Friday. He corroborates
Royce up to the time Royce left Grand
Forks. He had never been introduced
to Mullen until Royce left, but afterwards he approached him and Mullen
hired him to do the job. He arranged
with a third party to do the actual burning and on Sunday night the work was
done in the most effectual way. On the
Tuesday following, 19th July, Mullen
paid him $200 for the work. Of this he
gave one half to the man he had hired.
He corroborates Wattson as to the "Occurrences with Mullen and John Manly
in the Yale hotel on the Tuesday afternoon. The money he then displayed
was the reward paid him by Mullen for
this atrocious crime.
OTHER EVIDENCE.
Mr. Escalet, lessee of the hotel, said
that a day or two before the fire, Mullen
had told him he was a fool to start his
hotel in Columbia, and threatened that
he would leave it in his bare feet. There
is in possession of the prosecution much
further proof, which will tend in the
most practical way to strengthen the
story told on Saturday. This will be
forthcoming after the adjournment.
CLEVER  DETECTIVE  WORK.
The simultaneous arrest of Mullen
and Cameron, in such a way that neither had any opportunity to hear of the
other's capture before he was himself in
custody, shows how exact was the work
done on the caBe. As a matter of fact,
Mullen had been shadowed for three
weeks before his arrest. He left during
that time for Spokane and was not interfered with in any way. The prosecution knew exactly when he went, where
he lodged, what he did in Spokane and
when he returned. At the same time
four others were under close surveillance. The tracing of Cameron from
Grand Forks to Greenwood, from Greenwood back to Grand Forks, then to Spokane and then to Rosalia, was one of the
quickest and neatest pieces of detective
work oh record.
A special correspondent says:
Interest in the matter has been intensified by the issuance of an order by the
authorities that Mr. Manly was not to
leave town and by his disappearance on
Saturday. While the investigation was
going on the ex-Mayor took a horse and
rode across the line, forstalling the officers who had him under surveillance.
His friends, while admitting his departure at this jnncture has a most suspicious look, say that he had important
business to attend to, and fearing that
were he taken in charge bail would not
be granted, he left town for a few days
in order that his business would not be
interfered with. They assert, however,
that he will return in the course of a few
days, and has nothing to fear from a full
investigation of the charge against him,
which is one of conspiracy.   One or two
others of some prominence in the town
are under surveillance.
MIDWAY  MEMOS.
F. W. Groves is engaged in platting
the Lamb ranch for the C. P. R.
It is understood that Mr. McAuley
has purchased Mr. Keightley's interest
in the Boundary hotel.
A gang of men have been repairing
the road from Rock Creek through
Midway and up Boundary creek.
The sum of $350 will be spent in repairing the Midway public school.
F. Lamb and F. Roberts have left
Midway for Vancouver Island, where
Capt. Lamb has reoently purchased a
ranch near Duncan. They went out by
way of Keremeos and Hope, and took
some stock with them. The Lamb
brothers will reside there in future.
BUILDING  OPERATIONS.
A Number More Hew Structures In Contemplation.
Since the last report on building operations, there have been several important developments in that line.
Madden & Dallas will rebuild on the
site of the old Pacific Hotel. The new
hotel will have fifty feet frontage, and be
two stories high. The new building will
be wholly occupied as a hotel and cafe,
and will have first class appointments
throughout.   Cost about $5,000.
Sig. Diesheimer, Colville, has started
excavations for a building next to Rendell block, to be 24x80, two stories
high. It will be occupied throughout by
H. A. King & Co., as a cigar and stationery store, etc.   Cost about $4,000.
Mr. Parry, late of the Imperial, is
calling for tenders for a hotel on Copper street, opposite Hunter & Ken-
drick's. It will be 50x80, three stories
high, and be occupied as a hotel with
one store.   Probable cost, $8,000.
Under its new management the Imperial Hotel will be thoroughly remodelled throughout, at a cost of several
thousand dollars; and when the improvements are completed, it will contain a fine cafe, cigar store, new bar furnishings, and extended bedroom accommodation. It is the intention to make
it a strictly up-to-date house in every
respect. In the meantime the dining
room has been closed, while the alterations are under way.
A. H. Sperry & Co., Ltd., contemplate a building next door to their
present premises, 25x110 feet, two
stories high. The excavation has already
been made and the building may be
of brick.
Thos. Walsh of the Clarendon, will
build on his old site. The hotel will
be frame, 48x80, two stories high.
Work of clearing the site is already
under way.
Louis Boshart will build on the site
of the old International. He is talking of a brick structure.
The Board of Trade will meet on Friday evening in Rendell's hall at eight
o'clock. Every member has been notified, by the secretary to attend, and a
special request is made for a full attendance. Several matters will be
brought forward for consideration in addition to the passing of by-laws, and
other preliminary work.
A. Fisher has moved the machinery in
the mill in Greenwood to Rock Creek,
where he is starting up in order to supply the mining camps now growing into
prominence on both sides of the line. THE   GREENWOOD   MINER.
Friday, Sept. 8, 1899.
PICKED   SPECIMENS.
"The Man with the Hoe," is no doubt
all right, but we think The Man with
the Dough would be more popular with
the majority of the dwellers on this
American continent. ��� New Denver
Ledge.
Amateur actor (to friend)���"What
did you think of my Hamlet, Charley?"
Dear friend���"Immense! In one part
you are equal to Irving." Amateur actor���"In what part was that, Charley?"
Dear friend���"Where Polonious gives
his parting advice to Laertes." Amateur actor���"I was behind the scenes
then." Dear friend.���"So was Irving."���Tid Bits.
Eminent statesman. ��� "Put these
memoranda into the form of an interview, and send it to all the papers. If it
is well received, I will interview myself
again, and say that I am glad to see the
public agrees with me." Private Secretary.���"But suppose it is not well received?" Eminent statesman,���"Then
I will say that I haven't 6een a reporter
for six months."���Boston Transcript,
The youngest royal grandmother in
Europe at the present time is the Grand
Duchess of Anaetasie of Mecklenberg-
Schwerin, whose eldest daughter was
married a little more than a year ago to
Prince Christian of Denmark, and who
is now the proud mother of a son. The
grand duchess was thirty-eight at the
time of her grandson's birth, and on the
twenty-eighth inst. she will complete
her thirty-ninth birthday.
Henry Guy Carleton, the play-writer,
when living near Madison Square, New
York, used to pass daily the New York
Club, of which he is a member. One
day one of the young and frivolous members said to him: "I saw you this
morning, Carleton, carrying your poodle through the square. Good exercise,
isn't it? But I'd rather let somebody
else do it for me." Und���doubtedly,"
replied Carleton, grimly," if haltingly;
"when any one sees m���me carrying
m���my d���d���dog, thev say, 'There g���
g���goes Henry G���Guy Carleton with
his d���dog. But if they should see y���
3'ou the'd ask, 'W���w���who's that iu���
infernal i���idiot c���c���carrying a p���p���
poodle?' "
Roy Bean, at one time justice of the
peace in Langtry, Texas, administered
the law according to his own lights. He
held court in his saloon, and it was his
custom in minor cases to fine the defendant "drinks for the crowd," and adjourn court until the fine had been collected. One day he acted as coroner in
the case of an unknown man found
dead on the outskirts of the town.
Nothing was brought out by examination beyond the fact that a revolver and
two twenty-dollar pieces were found on
the corpse, whereupon Bean pocketed
both weapon and money, declaring that
deceased came to his death through some
unknown means, and, inasmuch as it
was guilty of carrying concealed weapons, against the dignity and peace of
the State of Texas, and this community
the court fines it forty dollars."
An accomplished young Russian,
Annie Evremoff, is now in this country.
She was at first an editor in her own
country, but committing the fatal mistake of having original opinions, her
paper was suppressed, and she betook
herself to the University of Heidelberg,
and was the first woman ever granted a
diploma   in law at Leipsic.   The story
of her degree is that she was refused for
the sufficient reason that she was a
woman. One day the King of Saxony
visited the university, and noticing this
one woman among the many men, accosted her, and finding that she was a
Russian, asked her if she was happy in
this country, on which she told her story
with the effect that the King ordered
that she immediately have her examination ; she was able to prove her right
to a diploma and received it.
Maitre Labori, who almost lost his
life at the hands of an assassin at Ren-
nes, was until recently the editor of the
professional newspaper La Gazette du
Palais. He is compiling and editing a
comprehensive treatise on French jurisprudence entitled "The Encyclopedia of
French Law," of which nine solid quarto
volumes have already appeared. He
made his reputation as a remarkably
clever criminal lawyer in the case of the
anarchist, Duval, and in the defense of
the Niort brothers, accused of parricide.
Among the best known cases with which
he has been connected may be cited that
of M. Prieu against the minister of foreign affairs; the eccentric case of the
actor Chirac; several law suits against.
Gil Bias: and the Vaillant anarchist
trial in 1894. His pleadings in the Zola
trial have since greatly enhanced his
professional reputation, not only for
forensic eloquence, but for adroit and
skillful handling of his case.
ODE   ROSSLAND   LETTER.
Rossland, B. C, Sept. 2.
As ore production marks the progress
of the mineral industry, though it does
not always indicate the prosperity of the
trade, the statistics in connection with
this industry are increasing in interest
and importance.
Thursday last ended the first eight
months of the present year, and according to the best statistics available,
the output of ore from Rossland mines
amounted, at least, to 100,000 tons. For
the first eight months of 1898, the output of ore from Rossland mines amounted to 58,000 tons. There is, therefore,
an increase of 42,000 tons for the eight
months of the present year. Now this
increase is equal to 72.43 per cent, over
the output for the corresponding period
of 1898, and is unquestionably a marked
advance in production. As to the value
of this ore, the question is a debatable
one. The value, it is stated by dependable authority, is about $17 per ton,
which gives, at least, $1,700,000 as the
value of the output from Rossland
mines, for the eight months ended August 31. These facts and figures are of
the utmost importance to mining men
of all classes. The week ending to-day
also records the highest record of the
shipments for any week since shipment
commenced. The figures are a little
over 5,000 tons. At such a rate oneday's
shipment of ore is an important portion
of the total.
Eleven cars a day from the Le Roi are
now the average. The Black Bear tunnel is now being utilized as a means of
exit, and for carrying timbers into the
mine, hence the Le Roi's main shaft
has been relieved from a considerable
portion of the traffic, and an increased
output per day has been made possible.
The War Eagle management is working only one side of the hoist, but notwithstanding this, it is now "nip and
tuck" with the Le Roi in daily production.
I learn that the War Eagle will soon
be shipping 500 tons per day.
Several strikes of shipping ore are reported lately iu this division, but, of
Brands:
SUPERIOR  LINE   OF   CIGARS.
MORENA,
INTERIOR and
MINER.
Made by INLAND CIGAR MFG. CO. of Kamloops, B. C.
CLEAR HAVANA  FILLER.
Nothing but B. C. Union Labor Employed.
-FOR SALE AT-
Arlington, Pioneer, International, Pacific, Rossland, Ottawa
and Commercial Hotels, H. A. King & Co.
PROTECT HOME INDUSTRY.
I ARTHUR MOWAT,
MINING, REAL ESTATE and
INSURANCE AGENTS.
Operating in British Columbia
and Republic Camps.
Greenwood, B. C.
CLOUGH'S   CODE.
THE YALE LUMBER CO.,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS
IN ALL KINDS OF
course, on investigation these strikes
are found to be more or less exaggerated
by the local statistician. The latest
strike is ons reported on the Mascot of
which William Y. Willians is superintendent. This property is located on
Columbia and Kootenay mountain. An
ore shoot has been found at a lower level than any heretofore in the workings.
The ore gives good assays but the extent
of the pay streak has not yet been determined.
It is a fitting period for genuine
strikes and it is earnestly to be hoped
that they will materialize into tangible
realities.
The mining market has improved a
point or two since the date of my last
report, though I hear that one or two
companies which have been extensively
boomed on the "eminent director" plan
are now undergoing an investigation by
those whose business it is to know. 'J
Taken altogether the outlook is a decided improvement since the last report was sent. September is opening
more auspiciously than August. Building improvements are steadily going on,
A police scandal which is baing investigated is likely to result in favor of the
civic guardians, who, I understand, at
the instigation of the chief of police demanded the investigation. So far the
accusations seem to be founded more on
spite than truth. The witnesses for the
most part appear to be ,characters who
have offended justice, and naturally the
minions of the law have not escaped
from charges which are likely to fail because they do not appear to have any
substantial evidence to support them.
A $20,000 fire has occurred at Fort
Steele. The Hotel International and
several other buildings were destroyed. ^��
Friday, Sept. 8, 1899-
THE GREENWOOD  MINER.
Most Like Us.
Editorial excursions to British Columbia are becoming a fad. Not long ago
Father Crome, of Winnipeg, piloted a
band of hay editors through the hills
without losing any of them. Then several bands of quill-drivers from the land
of canned beef broke away from the
swish of the starry flag and camped
around B. C. for a few days. Some of
these have since had indigestion, caused
by the six-bit attachment to the menu
at Kamloops and other places. It must
be remembered that editors in agricultural districts live principally upon
ozone, carboniferous vegetables and eat
their pi off a boiler plate, with patent
medicine and salad, consequently when
they strike a country where it costs six-
bits for a jag of ordinary grub, their
amazement at seeing their savings for
years disappear in a day or two's gastro-
nomical pleasure is a sight too sad for
ordinary mortals to witness with dry
eyes.
The last literary wave to sweep
through the sea of mountains was the
Canadian Press Association, composed
of eastern editors and their wives. As
far as we can learn they are very respectable people and have kept sober
while in the hills. It is reported that
they all can read and some of them can
write. Their intelligence is not of the
highest grade, or else they would have
wa'ndered as far as New Denver and
loaded upon the grand, intoxicating and
ideal scenery that surrounds the Lucern
of America. It is a lunch for the soul
that they have missed. The only member who got away from the crowd to
gaze at the beauties of Slocan lakewas D.
F. Burke, and his visit was about as
long as a flash of lightniug. We had
just time enough to shake graspers with
him and then the boat steamed on.
Burke is a noted newspaper man. He
once owned a bank, one of the rarest
articles in the profession.
Over at Nelson the people used the editors white, and gave them a take so
phat that everyone regretted the coming
of "30." The reception was double-
leaded, and resulted in a clean proof of
the hospitality of Kootenay's old town.
We notice that Alex Pirie was along
with the literary avalanche. We remember Alex when he was writing
"skits" in the Toronto Sun. His humor
made that sheet readable. Of late years
Pirie became married and has buried
himself in Dundas, where he is content
to print the Banner, and attend church
regularly.
While talking about editors we will
just say that that in a few days the
Slocan-Press Association will make a
tour of Kootenay and Boundary. The
people in the various camps are requested to have their boqnets, banquets and
bank rolls ready. The association will
not stop long in any one place, but will
receive ad���dresses on the fly with monetary attachments. There will be only
us in the association as the other Slocan
editors cannot get away until they can
afford a change of shirts.���New Denver
Ledge. ���
A Great District.
Major Pellett, of Toronto, on his return home gave an interview to the
Globe respecting his trip to British Columbia. It will be remembered that he
came in company wtth Messrs. Jaffray
and Cox, of the Dominion Copper Company.   About this section he Baid:
"We returned to Midway and proceeded to Greenwood, visiting quite a number of its celebrated properties. The
width and extent of its ledges astonished
everyone, and nothing can better demonstrate the value of the properties than
the great outlay of the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company, which is undertaking not only to build the main line, but
four spur lines into the different camps
around Greenwood.
"We visited a number of the properties, such as the Mother Lode, Big Copper, King Solomon, and others in this
group. The B. C. is being well developed and has large quantities of ore ready
for shipment when the spur line, which
is being energetically pushed forward to
the mine, is finished.
"We then rode across the mountains
to Summit Camp. Here we examined
the Stemwinder, Brooklyn, Idaho, Rawhide���very valuable properties of the
Dominion Copper Company. The B. C.
and Stemwinder are well develeped and
ready to ship. The spur line to the
camp is being rapidly built, and those
mines, with the Ironsides, Knob Hill,
Virginia and others, will provide abundant freight. There are other camps and
properties around this wonderful mineral belt, which were seen or pointed out
to us. The great question to me was
where all the ore was to be smelted.
Great smelting facilities must be provided at once to give development to the
many wonderful copper and coal properties of this district."
 v	
Seasonable groceries at Law & Co.'s. *
Cabin  for   rent.     Apply  at  Miner
office. *
First shipment of J. A. T. Bell's boots
and shoes just arrived at Law & Co's.  *
Notice to Advertisers.
All changes of ads must be handed in
to The Miner office by Tuesday noon
for that week's issue; also orders for ex
tra copies of paper.
Lion
Bottling
Works.
JAS. M'CREATH, Prop.
All Kinds Aerated Water.    Wines   a
Specialty.
80LE   AGENTS  FOR
LION BREWING CO.,
. Rossland, B. C.
The Largest Brewery in the Province.
Families Suppled at their Residence.
W. S. Keith, M. E.
F. F. Ketchum,
eith &
etchum,
Mining,
REAL ESTATE   and
Insurance Brokers.
Lots in all Parts of the City.
Mining Stocks
In Greenwood & Camp McKinney
A Specialty.
Mining   Properties  Examined   and    Reported  on.
GREENWOOD,   B.   C.
J.   RUSSELL.
T.   HARDY.
Russell Hardware Co.,
DEALERS EST
Almost all kinds of Hardware, Glassware, Crock-
eryware, Woodenware, Tinware, Graniteware,
Silver and plated wares, Lamp goods, Stoves of
all kinds; all stock sizes of glass windows and
doors; Belting and Packing of all kinds.
BRASS GOODS A SPECIALTY.
Lubricating and Illuminating oils, guns, rifles
and Ammunition; Iron all sizes and shapes; all
kinds of drill and tool steel; black and gal. pipe
up to 3 in.   All kinds pipe fittings up to 6 in.
Agts. for CAINTOIN STEEU,
Sherwin & Williams' L1S^SdLea*,heyare
Pedlar, Steel and Metal Roofing and Shingles.
BEST TINNING AND PLUMBING SHOP IN THE INTERIOR.
\���UMMMMMuMW^
First Shipment of
CLOTHING,
HATS, CAPS
NECKWEAR,
For Fall, Just Arrived._-*s^
W. M. Law & Co.
(WWWWWWM^^
Why Be In Darkness?
When Kemp & Holmes can clean your windows, offices and stores; carpets sewn, cleaned,
and laid.
PRIVATE NURSING FOR GENTLEMEN.
LEAVE ORDERS AT WHITE FRONT STORE.   RATES MODERATE.
WE BEG TO INTRODUCE TO THE
PUBLIC THE FAMOUS
"La Fama" (*��.
Made   from a   CLEAR HAVANA FILLER, with a FINE DELHI
WRAPPER, and CUBAN HAND MADE.   TRY IT.
H. A. King & Co.,
COPPER STREET, GREENWOOD. THE   GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Sept. 8, 1899.
THE    GREENWOOD    MINER.
Published Every Friday at Greenwood, B. C.
BY
THE GREENWOOD MINER PRINTING COMPANY.
R.  E.  GOSRELL, Editor and Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION  RATES.
Domestic, One Year *2.00
"       Six Months ��1.25
Foreign, One Year *3.00
Payable Invariably in Advance.
Advertising rates iurnlshed on application.
No patent medicine ads taken except at full
rates.
Legal notices 10 and 5 cents per line.
"Certificate of Improvement" notices, $5.00
and 110.00 for legal life of notice.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month's
advertising.
The Miner is on sale at the following places:
Greenwood.
King & Co., Smith & McRae, Monroe & Co., P.
O. News Room.
Cascade: Cascade City News Co. Rossland:
P. O. News Room. Anaconda. B. C: P. O.
News Room.   Spokane :   The Shaw-Borden Co.
Entered at the Greenwood, B. C, post office
as second class mail matter.
Friday,   Sept, 8,   1899.
THE   POLITICAL   SITUATION.
Since our last issue there have been
no more developments of consequence.
Mr. Henderson, having been elected in
New Westminster, and confirmed in his
appointment as attorney-general, business in Victoria has settled down to a
regular routine, and is not likely to be
disturbed until the house meets. Then
the strength of the Government will be
accurately determined and not before.
Messrs. Cotton and Semlin are in hopes
of settling all difficulties in the meantime, and bringing the discordant elements into line, As a preliminary to
this Mr. Cotton is making a trip through
the country, and, by the way, will come
into the Boundary to see the people of
this district. He is, in fact, expected
very shortly. The Finance Minister is
a shrewd, far-seeing politician, and may
succeed in winning over a sufficient majority to carry him through, but we
must not forget that the late Attorney-
General is camping on his .trail, and
no redman of the bush was ever more
vengeful and implacable in warfare than
he is politically. If it be possible to stir
up trouble for the present administration, and more particularly for his ancient enemy Mr. Cotton, he will leave
no stone unturned.
The only thing new in the political
arena is the proposal to hold an opposition convention at Kamloops. It has
been generally and heartily supported
in the opposition press; but so far as
appears there has nothing developed to
cause the Mineb to alter the views expressed last week. Until something
more definite has been published as to
the leader and the policy proposed for
the new combination it would be in)possible to intelligently discuss the proposal. It may be that something definite
and satisfactory will be evolved at the
convention if it meets.
A   SERIOUS   CRIME.
Painful rumors have been coming
from Grand Forks respecting the parties
now on trial for arson, a charge made in
connection with the burning of the hotel at Columbia. Two men are under
arrest and on trial, and, although tbe
evidence has been taken behind closed
doors, it is understood some confession
has been made, involving others as well
as themselves. Sensational developments are being looked for daily, and if
the public anticipations are realized, one
of the greatest scandals British Columbia has experienced in years will be the
result. The Miner refers to this matter
because Greenwood as well as Columbia
has suffered by the fire bug, and everything at present points to the probability of the burning of the hotels 1 ere
and at Columbia as being a part of the
same plot, and perpetrated by the same
parties.
Assuming that the theory of incendiarism as propounded is a correct one, it
is difficult to sufficiently express the
feeling of indignation that such conduct
arouses. It is unequaled by anything
that has occurred in the Province before.
It is a crime far greater than murder,
and the parties who could thus conspire
against the welfare of a community,
and for such a purpose, deserve the only
consideration which the law can allow.
It is to be hoped that no effort to shield
the guilty parties will in the smallest
degree be permitted. It is the duty of
the proper authorities to see that
nothing is omitted necessary to fully
ventilate the whole case. We have
faith enough in the purity of the administration of justice in this Province
to believe that the utmost in the interests of justice will be done.
FORGING   AHEAD.
Now that the matter of the smelter
site has been settled, and the citizens
have settled down to consider the possibilities of the near future in the way of
mining and commercial development,
there has been a very steadily stronger
tone to business generally, and in no
respect is this more evident than in the
extent and character of building operations. As will be seen elsewhere, there
are indications in the building line of
greatly increased activity. Several
hotels of first-class character will be
opened up, and with the street work in
progress, the completion of the water
works, the inauguration of the electric
lighting system, the possibility of a
tramway to Phoenix and a road to
White's camp, and the incoming of several more large mercantile establishments, not to refer to the advent of the
railway at an early date, and the construction of a smelter by the B. C. Copper Co., there seems to be every prospect of good times ahead. Tbe general
verdict on the part of those who have
given the business situation careful consideration, is that Greenwood is "all
right."      	
C. B. Sword, a twice defeated candidate in the Provincial elections, once in
Dewdney, and once in Cowichan; and
private secretary to Mr. Semlin since
the latter's accession to the Premiership,
has been appointed Inspector of Fisheries for the Province in the stead of John
McNab, resigned. The Mines is very
pleased to record the fact. Mr. Sword
was one of the ablest and shrewdest of
our Provincial politicians, and a man of
integrity as well. He was jockeyed out
of the nomination for Dewdney last general election, and his retirement was a
decided loss to his party; and personally
was thus cheated out of the rewards of
years hard work in the Opposition
ranks. He would, or should have been
the Finance Minister of the present administration.
Brother Reavis of the Grand Forks
Miner has this to say: "Naturally the
effect of the location of the Mother Lode
smelter at Greenwood has had an inspiring effect on that ambitious and enterprising young city, as the people now
feel that the future of the place is assured. Grand Forks is in the nature of
things a rival of Greenwood, though the
two places are differently situated and
will depend upon somewhat different
elements for future growth and prosperity. The Boundary country is big
enough for both, and the day is not far
distant when the Province of British
Columbia, and the whole Dominion of
Canada, will have cause to be proud of
each."
Cascade Water Fewer Company.
Supt. William Anderson, of the Cascade Water, Power and Light Company,
owning the Power on the Kettle river
at this place, has received orders by cable from the head offce in London to let
a contract at once for clearing the right
of way for the pole line from Phoenix,
in Greenwood camp, to Cascade, a distance of about 25 miles. A large part
of the distance is open country, but
about five miles is quite heavily timbered. He has now called for tenders to
clear this.
Mr. Anderson has also benn arranging
to begin work at once on the several
parts of the big plant to be put in for
utilizing the energy of the Cascades.
This will include finishing the 300-foot
dam, work on which was started last
fall, building the flume, 600 feet of
which is to be a tunnel through solid
rockf building the power house, and
putting in the pole line. The latter
will cost about $3,000 per mile.
Annual  Meeting  Liberal*
Conservative Union.
The Annual Meeting of the Liberal Conservative Union for British Columbia will be held at the
Assembly Hall, New Westminster,
on the 5th day of October next,
commencing at 10 a. m. All Liberal Conservatives will be welcome;
the right to vote is confined to delegates chosen by Liberal Conservative Associations, or District meetings regularly convened for this
purpose. One delegate for every
twenty members of such Association or District meeting. Proxies
can only be used by members of
the Union. Advantage may be
taken of the railway rates to and
from the Exhibition, which is being held at the same time.
Geo. H. Cowan, Secretary.
D. H. Wilson, President.
H. M. KEEFER'S LIST.
tiif Kf} Cash, balance on easy terms, buys
*l'*0*-' one of the best lots for a residence in the city.
d! "3 JEf^l Cash, balance on terms to suit,
^OOU buys a fine lot on Government
near Deadwood street.
tiS^jKffc Cash, balance on terms to suit,
*pVf*JVJDuys a splendid doable corner on
Government street, 50x105 feet.
<ftl AjT\T\ ('"sn bu>'a tne De8t> unsold
���pi^'TVTV/ business corner on Government street.
We are the Largest Dealers in
PLATE iu SHEET
GLASS ���^
in British Columbia
And take a back seat to no other firm
in Canada in regard to prices.
J.  W.  MELLOR   & COMPANY.
VICTORIA, B. C.
For full particulars write W. F. Askew, Boundary Representative, Grand Forks, B. C.
B. C. Pottery Company, Ltd.,
Victoria.
MANUFACTURERS   OF
Sewer Pipe, Chimney Pipe, Fire
Bricks, Pressed Bricks. Flower Pots,
and Fire Proofing Tile.
GEO. F. WILLIAMS,
Dry Goods,
Clothing,
Furnishings and
Millinery..
CALL  ON US.
d��
^
Copper Street,
GREENWOOD, B. C.
BEFORE ORDERING YOUR
Groceries
It would   be well for you to call on
A. H. SPERRY
& CO.,
Who have the most
complete stock of
Staple and Fancy
Groceries to be found
in the City.
��-jia *A A aCf ��tMt
SperrY
&Co.,
COPPER STREET.
"LIVE AND LET LIVE."
STAR BAKERY.
Bread guaranteed free .
from adulteration.
SNOW FUAKE
01113 A ���">    Pastry of all kinds
%JT<.t^tJ\XJm Bride's cake to order
We have the Only brick oven in Greenwood.
GOVERNMENT STREET.
Furnished Rooms*
NEAT, QUIET, COMFORTABLE. READING, and COOL
STALL ROOMS, FIRST FLOOR.
PRICES MODERATE.
SWAYNE HOUSE, SILVER ST.
MgtmmmBBMmmauutmamm
���ntfHMHaSMMMMMMSSBB /
Friday, Sept. 8, 1899-
THE GREENWOOD   MINER.
%1
KILLED   IN   KIMBERLY   CAMP.
Death of David Condon by Falling Down a
Shaft.
A terrible accident, with immediately
fatal results, occured at Kimbefly Camp
last Saturday evening, just as the men
on the Vancouver owned by James
Sutherland and J. W. Nelson, were going off shift. A miner named David
Condon had lighted the fuse for five
shots in the bottom of the shaft, some
thirty feet deep, and climbed the ladder
to the top, when he missed a rung of
the ladder, or slipped, and fell to the
bottom. Half a minute later the five
shots went off, and needless to relate
death was instantaneous. When found
his neck was broken, probably by the
fall, his jaw broken, and other injuries
of a slighter nature had been sustained.
It is wonderful that he was not shattered to pieces by the rock explosion.
On Sunday Messrs. Sutherland and
Nelson, accompanied by a deputy of Mc-
Mynn, of Midway, went up to the camp
to investigate. No inquest has been
deemed necessary, and the body was
brought to the city to the undertaking
parlors, from whence interment was
was made.
The deceased was 42 years old and single, and has worked for sometime in the
camps about here. He was in the Last
Chance for quite a while, and came
here from Rossland. It is understood
that he worked in Butte, Montana. He
had stated that he belonged to the
Miners' Union, but he had no card on
him, nor was there anything to show his
connection with that association. It is
supposed that his relatives live in Omaha, Neb.
A 2,500-Foot Shaft.
The Le Roi mine is about to enter an
era of the most extensive development
work in its history. The plant is to be
largely increased, and a 2,500-foot shaft
started. The management ot the Le
Roi has notified the representatives of
the various machinery manufacturers
that tenders will be received forthwith
for a complete new power plant, with
capacity for 60 drills, to be installed as
soon as possible. This move on the
part of the Le Roi people means that the
development of the mine along the
lines proposed by Superintendent Carlyle, and accepted by the directors, will
begin without much delay. The new
plan provides for a vertical shaft 2,500
feet deep. This shaft, which will cut
the main vein at a depth of about 1,000
feet, will be the largest and deepest
shaft in Canada. The present air compressor on the mine provides air for 40
drills.        	
The Millmen's Combino.
A meeting of the sawmill men was
held in the Phair hotel Friday evening,
when the proposed combine of all the
mills in the interior of southern British
Columbia was further discussed. The
following mills were represented: G.
G. Buchanan, Nelson Saw and Planing
Mills, W. P. Sayward, P. Genelle & Co.,
while Louis Blue of Rossland, represented the Trail, Rossland and Boundary mills. Statements as to the value
of the plants and timber limits of the
several mills were then submitted and
discussed. The details of the several
valuations were withheld, but it is said
that in the aggregate they would amount
to at least $1,500,000.���Nelson Tribune.
Labor Day in Greenwood.
Labor Day to some extent was
observed in Greenwood. The
rain, however, prevented anything special in the way of sport or recreation.
The principal event was the Firemen's
Ball, which was held in one of the stores
of the George block. There were
over 100 present, and the event was in
every way successful.
The FoweU Hotel Leased.
For several days Major Armstrong
and wife, of Spokane, were in town before it transpired that their visit had resulted in the leasing of the Powell hotel, which is now approaching completion. Major Armstrong is an old hotel
man, and has been engaged in the wholesale liquor business as well. He has
leased the Leland, as it is known now,
for a term of five years, and expects to
open up on or about the first of November. It is his intention to go east in the
near future to procure the furnishings,
which will be the very best in character, and to appoint it thoroughly in every respect. The cost of the Leland
ready for furnishing is given at $25,000,
and when ready for occupation will be
one of the finest in British Columbia.
TO  LET.
A five-room cottage in Anaconda. A
stream of good water passes back door.
Apply at Russell Hardware Co.
SOCIELIES.
Western    Federation    of
Miners.
The Greenwood Brunch of the Federation
meets hereafter in Barrett's Hall at 7:30 p. m.
every Saturday evening.    WALTER LONG.
Secretary.
NEW AND-
POPULAR BOOKS.
David Harum, The Habitant, Fortune's My
Foe, Hugh Gwyeth, Postle Farm, A Pauper
Millionaire, etc.
FOR   SALE   BT
Smith & McRae,
Books,  Papers and
Office Supplies  GREENWOOD, B. C.
DR. R. MATHISON
DENTIST   :    :
NADEN BLOCK
GREENWOOD
Graduate Pennsylvania
College of Dental -  -
Surgery    -  -  -  -  -
Philadelphia, Pa.-  -
A Licentiate of British
Columbia- -  -  - -
Saddles and
Harness*    *&    *��
.  Turf Goods,
BOOT AND SHOE FINDINGS.
REPAIRING  A   SPECIALTY.
M. S. Butler,      j*
GREENWOOD,   B.   C.
To the Citizens
of Greenwood,
AND PEOPLE IN GENERAL.
I wish to inform you that it is worth
your while to call on me in my new
stand
On Copper Street,
OPP.  H.   A.  KING  &  CO'S.,
Where I carry a full line of
Cigars, Tobaccos,
Fancy goods, Jewelry, Etc.   Also a full
line of fruit always on hand.
HENRY SAUVE.
W.   M.    SPROTT,
NEXT DOOR TO TEL. OFFICE.
HORSESHOEING     j*
m BLACKSMITHING.
Buckboards and Buggies made to Order.
WORK  GUARANTEED.
Shop   on  Copper   Street, Greenwood,  B. C.
A. 3. JENSEN.
H A. WRIGHT,-
Boot and shoe
Maker.......
Repairing  neatly done.    Shop  across  from
WINDSOR Hotel.
WHEN YOU WANT
THE BEST IMPORTED CIGARS and TOBACCOS, CONFECTIONARY, MAGAZINES,
PERIODICALS, STATIONARY
and HOUSE PLANTS GOTO
Munro's,
Next Door to
BANNERMAN'S.
COPPER STREET.
Arlington I
T T    t    1    COPPER STREET, |
FlOtClf     GREENWOOD.    |
Hooper & Co.,        |
Proprietors. g
IMPORTED & DOMESTIC |
CIGARS, ��
WINES and LIQUORS. |
Headquarters for Mining Men.     ��
McElmon
THE WATCHMAKER
Is now located on Greenwood street
OPPOSITE THE NEW
RENDELL BLOCK.
35
YEARS
EXPERIENCE.
Full assortment of material and tools to
do correct work.
Anaconda Hotel,
M'LEOD & CO. Props.
GOOD   DINING  ROOM  ACCOMMODATIONS.
ALL CLASSES OF WINES.
FINE LIQUORS and CIGARS.
ANACONDA, B. C.
Palace Hotel,
Snodgrass  &      ANAC0NDA,
Kelly, Props., b. c.
Free Baths for Patrons.
One-half Mile From Greenwood City.
Rates Reasonable.
Nash & Co.,
PAINTERS and
PAPER BANGERS.
GREENWOOD.
B. C.
SIGN WORK A
SPECIALTY.
Quick   Work   Guaranteed.
SHOP OPP. FISHER SAW MILL. THE   GREENWOOD   MINER.
Friday, Sept. 8, 1899.
Promoting as it is.
An eastern editor is responsible for
the following advertisement^ which
shows up in a clever manner, the foolishness of some of the claim promoters
of wildcat mining companies:
THE ADVERTISEMENT.
PROSPECTUS.
GALWAY
GOLD
GULCH
MINING   COMPANY.
Head Offices���Bobcaygeon.
Capital ��10,000,000.   Divided into Ten
Million Shares of ��1 Each.
Officers:
Adophe Smiff, Esq., president,
Mr. Smyff, vice-president,
A. Smith, secretary-treasurer.
The following gentlemen are in no way
connected with the company:
Marquis of Salisbury, Rt. Hon. Jos.
Chamberlain, Earl Rosebery, Hon."
Mr. Laurier, DcAlton McCarthy,
Q. C, E. E.  Sheppard,
but their names give a tone and silk
fringe effect to the prospectus, highly
desirable in the interests of the promoter.
The Galway Gold Gulch Mining Company is the only pure Ontarian product
in the market.
The enormous production of gold in
tbe last two years in Africa and the
United States, has aroused the self greed
of the world, extending into the remotest parts of this vast Dominion.
Gold is the most universally diffused
metal in existence. Indeed, scientists
are agreed that the weight of the earth
compared to its size is a certain indication that the whole center of the globe
is a mass of pure gold.
Consequently there is no experimenting needed; no surface croppings necessary ; all that has to be done is to go
down deep enough.
The company proposes to go down.    ���
Your subscription for shares is invited, as development of a most spirited
character is intended. There should be
no hesitation, no questioning no doubt
as to when it will pay. In tbe bright
lexicon of Bobcaygeon there is no such
word as "when." It is merely a matter of development���the sinking of a
hole to the fabulous wealth beneath.
The more rapidly the shares are subscribed, the deeper will be the hole.
Five millions of stock have been placed
to the private account of the officers of
the company. This is merely as a guarantee of good faith.
Five million of ��1 shares, par value,
are now offered at lc per share, in
blocks of not less than 25..
The shares will be fully paid, and nonassessable, and dividends are positively
uncollectable.
*A*W-
*        The C. P. R. in Bonndary.
The Cascade Record of Saturday says:
Chief Engineer and Superintendent
W. F. Tye came over from Trail on a
special train yesterday afternoon and
was in consultation with the contractors. He informed the Record that the
new railway line would not be taken
over by the operating department of the
C. P. R. till the road was completed to
Midway. He expected, however, that
passenger service would begin in a
couple of weeks.
It is Mr. Tye's intention to arrange, if
possible, to put on fast passenger trains,
wbicb will leave Rossland at 7 a. m.,
make close connection at Robson, and
reach Midway by noon. The return
trip will be made the same day. The
road bed is in such excellent condition
that the best of time can be made with
but little if any difficulty.
Bring your Job printing to the Miner
offie.   Best class of work fn Boundary.
THE   CITY   FATHERS.
Meeting of the Aldermanlc Board- Preliminary
Survey for Tramway to Phoenix���A Break
in the Lumber Combine Probable.
All the members of the council were
present except Aid. Beath.
Among the communications was a
tender from A. R. Tillman to supply the
city with lumber at $16.40 per M. Upon
motion to accept it, all voted "yea" except Aid. Fisher. An alderman remarked that Mr. Fisher could not tender, and the latter said if he could he
would go cheaper. Some one added that
it looked like the breaking up of the lumber combine.
The manager of the Standard Publishing Co.. Rossland, wrote that he
had furnished 25 copies of his July an-
annual, and enclosed a bill for (25. It
was hoped that the council would accept
the books and pay.
L. S. M. Barrett, on behalf of F. S.
Barnard, wrote requesting some discount on taxes paid on the Windsor
hotel.
L. Morris, government agent, Vernon,
wrote re assignments of water rights by
Robert Wood to the city of Greenwood.
These documents had been referred to
the water commissioner, Victoria.
The managing director of the Manufacturers' Life wrote re debentures that
cheque would issue when debentures were
received and examined by their solicitor.
Another letter was received from the
solicitors, stating that they had advised
their legality.
W. S. Fletcher asked for permission
to build over the alley between his two
buildings he is erecting on Deadwood
street between Copper and Silver
streets.   Laid over one week.
The question of the tramway to Phoenix was brought up by Aid. Wood. He
thought an estimate should be obtained
as to cost. Aid. Galloway said unless
the city took the first step, nothing
would be done. He had been informed
on good authority that if the council
guaranteed the cost at 5 per cent the
money could be obtained within two
weeks.
Aid. Fisher said the sooner the matter
was taken up the better, as Phoenix was
getting the start of us.
Aid. Sutherland���It is certainly the
thing we want.
Aid. Galloway, seconded by Aid Sutherland, moved that a committee be appointed to wait on a qualified engineer,
re a preliminary survey of lines pf tramway to Phoenix from Greenwood and
engage him.   Carried, i
The Mayor appointed Aid. Galloway,
Sutherland and Fisher.
Rev. B. H. Balderston asked permis-:
sion to place a sign in a central spot
pointing to the whereabouts of the
Methodist church. There were no objections.
W. J. Nelson appeared before their
honorable body with reference to an account for excavation, amounting to
something over $500. The Mayor informed him that as soon as the city was
in funds the matter would be attended to.
Plans for the new city and fire hall
were submitted by Messrs. Robinson,
Sansome, and Campbell, architects.
The city solicitor was instructed to defend the suits against the city on account of the grade. In this connection
Mayor Hardy reported on the street
work under way, and incidentally stated
that he had taken the best legal advice
he could get on the subject, and he was
informed that the city could not have
done otherwise legally than stuck to tne
grade.
Adjournment was made at an early
hour
A.   M.   Whiteside. Clive  Pringle.
PRINGLE & WHITESIDE,
BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, NOTARIES PUBLIC, ETC.
Offices:   Oyer Bank of Montreal.
ANDREW LEAMY,
Barrister,
Solicitor,  etc.
Greenwood, B. C.
R. H3. KERR,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
and NOTARY PUBLIC.
NADEN FLOOD BLK.
Greenwood, B. C.
J. S. M. Morrison, L. L. B., J. R. Brown,
Alfred Hall, L. L. .B
Hall, Brown & florrison,
BARRISTERS and
SOLICITORS.
FLOOD  BLOCK	
GREENWOOD, B. C.
BAUER <&
ASHCROFT
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYORS
A.   E.  Ashcroft, Kepraentative.
FLOOD-NADEN BLOCK.
Q. M. HILLARY,  B. Sc.
Assayer and Chemist.
M'GILL   GRADUATE    IN
MINING    ENGINEERING.
GREENWOOD,  B.   C.
I. H. HALLETT.
H. C. SHAW.
HALLETT & SHAW
#
GREENWOOD, B. C.
Barristers, Solicitors,   cable Address
& Notaries Public. "hallet."
Codes:     Bedford McNeill's, Broom-
halls, Moreing & Neal's, Leiber's.
A. C. GAL,T,
Barrister,  Etc., Rossland.
Postofflce Building    -    -    -    Telephone 4?.
R. H. PARKINSON,
Fairview, B. C
CIVIL ENGINEER and
DRAUGHTSMAN.
MAPS AND PLANS OF MINES
AND MINERAL CLAIMS PREPARED TO ORDER. MINERAL
TITLES INVESTIGATED, AND
ASSESSMENT WORK ATTENDED TO.       -       -       -       -      -
Financial,
Insurance and
Mining
Agent.
Notary Public.
FAIRVIEW TOWNSITE AGENT.
R* F* Coates & Go*T
General Contractors
and Builders.
HOUSE   MOVING   A    SPECIALTY.
GOV'T. ST., GREENWOOD, B.  C.
THE   CANADIAN
Bank of Commerce.
Bead Office, TORONTO.
Established 1867.
PAID-UP CAPITAL, $6,000,000.
[Six Million Dollars.]
rest fl,000,000
President Hon. Geo. A. Cox.
General Manager B. E. Walker.
Ase't. Gen'l. Manager.. .J. H. Pldmmer.
This bank has the largest number of
branches of any bank in Canada, with
agencies at New York, Chicago, New
Orleans, Skagway and Dawson City.
Accounts of Corporations, Merchants
and Individuals received on favorable
terms.
Drafts, Commercial Credits, Travelers' Credits and Circular Notes issued
available in any part of the world.
Approved Notes Discounted; Collections made.
A general Banking business transacted.
GREENWOOD  BRANCH.
D. A. CAMERON,
Manager
...BANK of MONTREAL..
Capital, all paid np, $12,000,000.
Rest $6,000,000.
President:
Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal.
Vice-President:
Hon. George A. Drummond.
General Manager E. 8. Cloustou
Branches in London, Eng., New
York, Chicago,
And in the principal cities In Canada.
���O���
Buy and sell Sterling Exchange and
Cable Transfers; Grant Commercial and
Travelers' Credits, available in any part
of the world.
Drafts   issued,   Collections made, etc.
Greenwood ��� Branch.
F. J. FINUCANE, Manager.
THE  BANE  OF
British North America.
Established in  1886.   Incorporated by Royal
Charter.
PATD-UP   CAPITAL $4,866,666
RESERVE   FOND $1,460,000
LONDON   OFFICE:
3 Clement's Lane, Lombard St., E. C.
COURT   OF   DIRECTORS:
J. H. Brod'3, John James Cfiier, Ga?pard Far-
rer, Richeid H. Giro, Henry L. R. Farrer, Ed.
Arthur Hoare, H. J. B. Kendall, J. J. Kings-
ford, I-red Lubbock, Geo. D. Whatman.
A. G. WALLI8, Secretary.
Head Office In Canada: St. James St. Montreal.   H. Stikeman, Gen. Mgr., J. Elmsley, Insp
BRANCHES   IN   CANADA:
London, Brantford, Hamilton, Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Kingston, Midland, Quebec, St.
John, N. B. Brandon, Winnipeg, Fredericton,
Halifax, Victoria, Vancouver, Rossland, Kaslo,
Trail, Ashcroft, Greenwood, Atlin, Bennett B.
C. andDawson City.
AGENTS   IN   THE   UNITED   STATES:
Spokane���Traders' National Bank and Old
National Bank. New York-<8G Wall St.) W.
Lawson and J. C. Welsh, agents. San Francisco��� 124 Sansome St., H. J. McMichael and J. R.
Ambrose, agents.
LONDON   BANKERS:
Bank of England and Messrs. Glyn & Co.
FOREIGN   AGENTS:
Liverpool���Bank of Liverpool. Australia-
Union Bank of Australia. New Zealand���Union Bank of Australia, Bank of New Zealand,
india, China, Japan���Chartered Mercantile
Bank of India, London and China, Agra Bank,
West Indies���Colonial Bank. Paris���Marcuard
Krauss & Co.   Lyons���Credit Lyonnais.
7.  T.   SHORT  Manager,
Greenwood, B. C.
QEORGE HILL,-
Merchant Tailor.
Fine Stock of Goods Always on Hand.  Across
from WINDSOR Hotel.
A:
GREENWOOD,
B. C.
T %i
Friday, Sept. 8, 1899.
THE GREENWOOD  MINER.
THE   METHODISTS
Open the First Protestant church in Greenwood on Sunday.
The opening services of the Methodist
church on Sunday were successful
throughout. They would have been
still more successful had it not been for
the rain, which prevented a number
from attending the morning and afternoon services, who otherwise would
have been there. Rev. J. A. Wood,
president of the Kootenay branch of the
B. C. conference, preached the dedication sermon at 11 o'clock a.m. His
text was "The Word of God is Tried."
His discourse dealt wi h the evidences
of the authenticity of the word of God,
to which be applied three tests: those
of prophesy, miracles and experiment,
or experience. He showed in a number
of ways that science instead of opposing
the truths of science confirmed them.
The hostility to the word of God arose,
he said, usually from the lack of moral
sympathy with its teachings.
In the afternoon there were addresses
by Revs. R. W. Trotter, D. A. Stewart
of Eholt, and Mr. Wood. Mr. Trotter
spoke in his usual vigorous and interesting way, pointing out the number of
things that entered into the making of
the church. Mr. Wood's address was
full of good thoughts and was especially
reminiscent, making comparisons between the present advanced stage of
church building and the little log buildings they used to worship in in the old
days in Canada. In a careful and serious effort Mr. Stewart likened the clearing away and making of roadways into a
country or new district to the work of
the church in preparing the minds of
the people for the reception of truth.
In the evening there was a very large
attendance, which may be evident from
the fact that the collections amounted
to $117. The sermon was preached by
Rev. R. W. Trotter, Baptist, who at the
outset referred to the harmonious relations which existed between himself and
the Rev. Mr. Balderston, their pastor,
and which he hoped would always continue. His subject was the mission of
the church, which he defined as distinctly humanitarian���the betterment of man
in this life as well as hereafter. This
was to be accomplished in two ways, by
the individual and responsible efforts of
the Christian community; and the cooperation of Christians in the work of
improving conditions. Co-operation
was the rule of the day and the principle
upon which success in business was possible. Trusts, syndicates, joint stock
companies and labor unions were all
forms of co-operation to which people
had been forced by modern conditions,
and to succeed the church had to adopt
similar methods. He did not advocate
church union, because he wanted to remain a Baptist always, and all had a
right to their individual belief; but he
liked to think of the various branches of
the Church as parts of the great common
system of defence���the Presbyterians as
infantry, the Methodists as artillery, the
Episcopalians as the dashing cavalry,
the Congregationalists as the sappers
and miners, and the Baptists as the
navy. This provoked a general smile.
The reverend gentleman then outlined
a plan of social organization in which
the members of the church themselves
had to take a prominent part, and
promised to take the matter up and
elaborate it on future occasions. The
sermon was a very effective one and
earnestly listened to.
The musical part of the opening program was really very good. The hymns
were printed for the use of the congregation.   The special parts were:
Solo and chorus���"Throw out the Life
Line," Mrs. R. Mathison and the choir.
Chorus���"Seeking the Lost," choir.
AFTERNOON.
Chorus���"Master the Tempest is Raging," choir.
Duet and chorus���"The Door of God's
Mercy is Open," Messrs. Bennest and
McKenzie, and Mrs. Travis and Miss
Mclntyre.
evening.
Solo���"Holy City," Mrs. Travis.
Trio���Messrs. A. W. Bennest, Geo.
McKenzie and Frank Mills.
In connection with the dedication it
may be remarked that the usual formalities were carried out. Rev. Mr. Balderston, the pastor, at the close referred to
the financial condition of the church,
which from the statement presented was
quite satisfactory.
PROM THE SIMILKAMEEN.
Special Correspondence.
There is quite a little development being done on Copper and Kennedy mountains, mostly by the prospectors themselves. Now that the deal for the Sunset, Sunrise, Copper Farm -and Helen
H. Gardner has been consummated, it is
certain that work will be started on
those claims very shortly. I understand that Dr. Deeks, Gov. Mackintosh,
and the B. A. C. Syndicate have pooled
their interests and a strong company
will be formed which will own all of the
above mentioned claims with the addition of the Princess May and one or two
other properties. D. J. McDonald arrived at Princeton last week', having
with him Mr. Collins who is jrjbably
one of the best known engineers in England. He represents Mr. Whittaker
Wright, the famous promoter, and the
companies controlled by him. These
gentlemen spent a day on Copper
mountain examining the properties on
Sunset Peak. Mr. McDonald has always spoken very favorably of the showings and has great faith in the future of
the camp. Other claims are showing up
well. The Morgan syndicate who are
very heavily interested have several fine
properties, notably the Comstock group.
The McRae boys have recently found
very rich ore on the property they are
developing.
Ex-Governor Dewdney spent a week
in the district lately. While there he
made trips to most of the camps in the
vicinity of Princeton and was greatly
pleased with what he saw. The syndicate which he represents will probably
acquire some property in the near future. At 20-mile creek between Princeton and Keremeos new discoveries are
being made. Marcus Daly's company,
who control the Nickel Plate group, are
preparing for the winter's work. Contracts have been let for cabins, blacksmith shops, etc. Some of the later discoveries between Keremeos creek and
20-mile creek show wonderfully rich surface croppings. The ore is principally
a fine arsenical iron, which carries free
gold in quantities. The wagon road between Keremeos and Princeton will be
completed shortly and will be of great
benefit fq the community. Princeton
is building"up quickly. A. E. Howe's
store and the Jackson hotel are now
completed and both are a credit to the
town. There is a good demand for real
estate, inside business property bringing
good prices. A very fine collection of
specimens from the different mines has
been shipped tofhe Spokane exposition
which will help very materially to advertise the wonderful mineral resources
of the Similkameen valley.
The contract has been let for the
building of a new school house in Columbia at a cost of $1,495.
4 HELLO BOYS! S
FOR   UP-TO-DATE
CLOTHING,  HATS, CAPS,
NECKTIES, SHIRTS,
UNDERWEAR,   BRACES,
CALL   ON
J.   F. RODGERS,
OLD STAND BANK OF MONTREAL.
COPPER   ST.,
THE  FASHION  LIVERY  STABLE.
Cameron Bros., Prop's.
Livery, Feed and Sale Stables.   Good Single and Double Drivers.   Gentle Saddle
and Pack Horses.   All Kinds of Teaming and Heavy Hauling Done
on the Shortest Notice.   Stock Well Looked After.
OFFICE OF GREENWOOD CITY TRANSFER COMPANY,
GREENWOOD,   B.  C
An Ounce of Fact is Worth
A   1 On Ot Jr ICtlOn* here are facts that the
WHITE FRONT STORE
have to offer you. Read���Mark���Learn, and inwardly digest. That
we carry a full line of clothing, boots and shoes. Heavy shoes from
$2.00 pr. Underclothing from $1.50 suit; pants from $2 pair, etc. Our
Leader overalls, riveted, $1.00 pr.   THIS WILL INTEREST YOU:���
Our Rock Creek and Rendell (west fork)
Stores carry a full line prospectors boots, shoes, clothing, hats, caps,
groceries, hardware, picks, shovels, powder, steel, etc., etc.   Just call at
White Front Store Government Street,
FOR  FURTHER PARTICULARS.
Next Door to the
Postoffice,
New and Second-Hand
Goods*
"0.1. C."
Sewing Machines, Locks, Guns Repaired,  Keys Fitted.
A.  L. WHITE &   CO., OPPOSITE    TELEPHONE    OFFICE.
Real Estate
Mines  and Mining.
THE MART
GADNCE   ft   WICKWIRE.
GREENWOOD, B. C.
O. A. OUES8, M. A.
H. A. GUESS, M. A.
GUESS BROS.
Chemists and Mining
gineers.
GREENWOOD,  B. C.
www
En-
j   CHESAW TRADING    1
| j  COHPANY, DEALERS IN f
< > z
General Mdse, Groceries, Jg
�� Furnishing Goods, Heavy
( i and Shelf Hardware.
!
j | PROSPECTORS' and MINERS'
) j     SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY.
CHESAW,   WASH.
I
il I        Keep   Your   Eye   on    Chesaw.
\��3������������������C���������������������C������<:C������<
Subscribe for the Miner.
Hall, Rice & Co.,
Mining, Stock and
KCm  CStHt6   Exchange.
Temporary Offices g^^tofflfe:
Have for sale several.
snaps; among others
the following:
A    nice   comfortable    cot- <h 4   Of\f\
tare,  50-foot, comer lot oh j) 1.31111
Greenwood street x- 7*^
Alao  a 50-foot lot  on Sil- &> 4   4 f\f\
ver street, best locality, oa east j) J,   \ \J\J
AIM 2 corner lots on Government    j j JQA
Fine Building Site
ON
Long Lake St
Also other properties.   Get particulars
at office.
WANTED:
Copper Qaims.
Lithographed plan of Greenwood in
colours.  Price 50c.  Mailed free THE  GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Sept. 8,1899.
CHESAW  PICE-UPS.
A fine strike was made on the Jim
Hill claim last Saturday night. At a
depth of 58 feet they crosscut the ledge
all in ore and out of three assays taken
from the last four feet they have obtained values running $31.37, $38.60 and
$45.08 in gold. This property is but a
short distance from the center of the
town and the strike has caused some
excitement. Lots are going with a rush
on the strength of it and the men working on the Jim Hill are among the
buyers.
Holbrook & Kean have just completed
their new office. They recently bought
the Reno claim upon which the old
town is located, and work of proving up
for the obtaining of patent will be commenced at once.
The Chesaw Improvement Co. are
putting up a fine office and have six
four-horse teams hauling lumber to be
used for the new town. They now have
a stock of ten or twelve thousand feet of
lumber on band. While the Miner representative was in town two six-horse
teams drove in with lumber for Holbrook & Kean. Building will now progress more rapidly.
Josh Clary will soon move into his
new residence on Myers avenue.
The Chesaw Trading Co. will soon begin work on their new store. They will
occupy the first floor with a store and
postoffice and the second with offices.
Kelsey brothers are putting up a
building which they will use for a blacksmith shop.
All the mines about Chesaw are showing up well and the Crystal Butte, concentrator is running at full capacity.
Work on the Review has temporarily
stopped while the shaft is being timbered.
The Owl saloon owned by Weisberger
Bros., is being fixed up in first-class
style, and a new front is being put on.
Work will be commenced this week on
Clark & Harold's new tin shop, and a
first class outfit will be put in as soon
as completed.
E. E. Stowell, general merchant,
moved into his new store building on
Myers avenue last week ank has put in
a big stock of goods.
Dan McDonald, who runs the Chesaw-
Rock Creek stage, is putting up a large
stable at Chesaw which will be completed in about two weeks.
The Gold But Ore.
The Spokane Stock Report says:
We were to-day shown some extremely
fine ore from the Gold Bug property in
Greenwood camp. The quartz where it
had been broken was in places fairly in-
crusted with native silver and some free
gold,both being freely scattered throughout the rock, which carried also a small
per cent of copper. The property is yet
in the early stage of development, 60 feet
being the greatest debth yet obtained.
It is said that $20,000 worth of high
grade ore has already been sacked. Being only one mile from Greenwood, and
the Providence mine the C. P. R. will
cross, the question of transportation is
one which will not trouble them.
Gone to Index.
J. W. Cheer, of Greenwood, is going
over to Index to take charge of the development of the Anaconda group, the
copper properties which have lately
been bonded by Seattle, Everett and
Spokand parties. Mr. Cheer is a practical mining man, who has had years of
experience in his vocation. He is interested in several valuable properties in
the Greenwood district, among them being tbe Homestake in Summit camp.���
Spokane Stock report.
THE BEST WORKMEN,
THE BEST OUTFIT,
For Turning Ont the Neatest and
Most TJP--TODATE
JOB WORK
In The
THE
BOUNDARY
DISTRICT.
GREENWOOD - MINER
PRINTING CO.
Whenever you
Want any
LETTER
HEADS,
BILLHEADS,
ENVELOPES
STATEMENTS,
CALLING
CARDS,
t
THE PIONEER  HOTEL.
Greenwood City,   Boundary Creek, B. C.
��� ��� ���
We are prepared to welcome guests and provide best accommodations.
HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
The   Best of Wines,   Liquors   and   Cigars.    The most comfortable
SAMPLE ROOM
In Greenwood.   Heated by Hot Air.
��� ��� ���
J* W* Nelson, Proprietor*
CHOICE DRIVING TEAMS,
Crackerjack Saddle Horses.
Distance Cuts no Ice.
We Never Fail to Get There.
Robbins Bros., Prop's.,
Greenwood, B. C.
Ottawa HoUSe,   H. P. Tompkins, Prop.
******** flfcsfcdjjfc
WW WW
*x*oc��ALWAYS  OPEX.**xxsa
*��*��*��*i^^^^
WW WW
GREENWOOD, B. C.
New Rooms; well Heated; First-class
Dining Room; choice Wines, Liquors
and Cigars.	
In Fact, Anything You Call for
in the Job Printing Line, We
can Accommodate You.
UNDER BK. COMMERCE,
FLOOD BLOCK.
GREENWOOD
Flour, Feed, Produce and
Commission Co*    S    *��
DEALERS IN HAY, GRAIN, POTATOES, BUTTER, EGGS, ETC.
HEAVY WAGON SCALES IN CONNECTION WITH OUR
BUSINESS. -
Silver Street,    *��     ����     Greenwood, B, Co
'
THE   BEST   BEER   IN   TOWN   IS   MADE   BY   THE
Elkhorn Brewery,
HARTINGEtf: &   PORTMANN,   Props.
ASK   FOR ��� v ���;,,
f V,     \     The Elkhorn La-
jfll i  iff y   V        >*��&*/  8er  Beer   contains
only pure Malt and
Hops.   Try it 1
flkho
Lager
Deer.
PATRONISE
HOME
INDUSTRY.
It Is kept on
Draught or in Bottles by all the Leading Hotels in this
District.
? y?
Friday, Sept. 8, 1899.
THE GREENWOOD   MINER.
Tne Lumber Combine.
It having been reported on the
street that the lumber combine recently formed here, known as the
Yale Lumber Co., had been broken,
the Miner yesterday enquired at
the head office, and found that the
rumor was incorrect so far as the
gentleman in charge had any
knowledge. It was also freely stated on the street, that the price of
lumber had been again advanced,
and a good deal of indignation was
expressed as a consequence. Enquiry was also made as to that, and
the following quotations were furnished: Rough lumber, $18; ship-
lap, $22; rustic, $25; 6-inch flooring, $27; 4-inch flooring, $30. The
bookkeeper said that no recent advance had been made.
Tne Railway to Greenwood.
For some time there have been persistent statements on the part of interested parties to the effect that the railway
would not run into Greenwood this winter, that the terminus would remain
for an indefinite period at Columbia, or
at Eholt. So frequent and persistent
have been these rumors that not a few
have been influenced by them. In the
Toronto World, the Spokesman-Review
and other papers the correspondence
from Columbia, which quite discounts
anything that is being done in Grand
Forks in that way, states most positively and with an air of authenticity that
'���Difficulties of construction to the
north and west of this point, including
the building of numerous trestles, for
which the timbers have to bo imported,
will greatly delay the progress of the
line beyond Columbia, and it is now
definitely announced that this will of
necessity be the terminus for a long
time. As a result this town will be the
base of supplies for construction work
beyond, and the point of transhipment
from train to freight wagon of all machinery and goods of every description
required by the mines and mining towns
of the whole district, including all the
west Boundary camps, Greenwood,
Phoenix, Eholt, Summit, Boundary
Falls, Midway, Camp McKinney and
Republic."
As a matter of fact the track is laid
for five or six miles this side of Columbia, and the work is being rushed with
all possible speed. A letter received by
the Miner from a reliable source of information yesterday says positively:
"The rails will be laid to your city before Sept. 20th."
So far in its. history the people of
Greenwood have pursued a strict policy
of minding their own business. There
has been no jealousy regarding other
towns, and no effort to either hurt the
feelings of their citizens or retard their
progress. Nothing so far as the Minsk
is aware of has appeared in the press of
this town reflecting in any way on other
towns in the district. It would appear,
however, that the same rule has not
been followed elsewhere respecting this
city.
There is no objection to the people or
press of any town doing what they can
to keep themselves prominently before
the public, not even to elevating themselves, if possible, by the boot straps;
but they should at least be fair and
reasonably honest towards others.
MINERAL  ACT,  1896.
It is understood that the differences
between the C. P. R., aud the townsite
of Grand Forks have been amicably settled. The station is to be called Grand
Forks for three years, and a main avenue is to be opened so as to give access
to it. It promised at one time to develop into a lively legal fight.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
Oolconda, Gold Bed, Cleveland, Laocoon,
York and Wildrose Fraction mineral claims
situate In the Kettle River mining division of
Yale district.
Where located:  Smith's camp.
Take notice that I, Isaac H. Hallett as agent
for J. C. Haas, free miner's certificate No. 18840
A, and George E. Foster, free miner's certificate
No. B 13208, Intend, 60 days from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining Crown Grants of the above claims.
And further take notice that action under
section 87 must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements,
Bated this 17th day of August, 1899.   8-25-2m.
I. H. HALLETT.
MINERAL   ACT,  1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
Sycamore mineral claim situate in the Kettle
River mining division, Yale district.
Where located:   In Copper camp.
Take notice that we, George Rlter, free
miner's certificate No. 6685 B, and Frank Beau-
chene, free miner's certificate No. B 5970,intend
sixty days from the date hereof, to apply to the
Mining Recorder for a Certificate ot Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown
Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section 87, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 24th day of August, 1899.   8-25-2m
MINERAL   ACT,  1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
St. Genevieve mineral claim, situate in the
Kettle River mining division, of Yale district.
Where located:   in Providence camp.
Take notice that I, Albert E. Ashcroft, agent
for George T. Crane, free miner's certificate No.
84626 A, intend, sixty days from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder, for a certificate of Improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section S7, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 26th day of August, 1899.
9-I-2m A. E. ASHCROFT, P. L. 6-
MINERAL   ACT,  1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
Hercules mineral claim situate in the Kettle
River mining division, Yale district.
Where located:   In Copper camp.
Take notice that I, Isaac H. Hallett as agent
for Edward L. Tate, free miner's certificate No.
84408, intend, sixty days from the date hereof,
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section 87, must be commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this first day of August, 1899.   8-25-2m
I. H. HALLETT.
the
MINERAL   ACT,   1896.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
Copper King mineral claim, situate In
Kettle River mining division, Yale district.
Where located:   In Copper camp.
Take notice that I, Isaac H. Hallett as agent
for John Moran, free miner's certificate No.
19680 A, and Austin Hammer, free miner's certificate No. 19087 A, intend sixty days from the
date hereof to apply to the Mining Recorder for
a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose
of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section 87, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 28rd day of August. 1899.  8-25-2m
I. H. HALLETT.
MINERL   ACT,   1296.
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
Silver King and Iron Cap mineral claims,
situate In the Kettle River Mining Division of
Yale District.
Where located:   In Skylark camp.
Take notice that we, the Silver King Gold
Mining Company, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B 6560, intend, sixty days from the date hereof,
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 12th day of August, 1899.   8-ll-2m
Miners' Hotel,
COPPER STREET.
WALTER WATERLAND, Prop.
A Finely Equipped Bar,
Board by Day or Week.
TELEPHONE CONNECTION.
Best of Cusine Service. Rooms
neat   and    Well   Furnished.
ROSSLAND HOTEL.
Alf. Cameron, Prop.
Everything Brand New and First
Class. Elegant Bar Room, Best
Liquors and Cigars.
House Heated and Lighted
Throughout. Dining Room under Management of
AN EXPERIENCED CHEF.
Copper St., Greenwood, B. C.
The Best INVESTMENT
In REPUBLIC CAMP in 1896 was the Republic Gold Mining Co
We were then selling this stock at 8 and 10 cents per share; today
this same stock is worth $3.75 PER SHARE. A thousand shares
in 1896 sold for $80 to $100; TODAY IT IS WORTH $3,750. THE
BEST INVESTMENT in Republic Camp today is the ADMIRAL
DEWEY GOLD MINING COMPANY. This company owns
four claims, located west of the Republic properties. We are
now sinking a shaft to the depth of 50 feet on the surface and it
ASSAYS FROM $1.60 to $31 IN GOLD. This stock is now selling at 7 cents per share, and we predict that inside of six months
this same stock will sell 75 CENTS TO ONE DOLLAR PER
SHARE.   For further particulars call on or address,
W"       H       N1CHOI    A     WDWIHG BROKER, BUTTE, M0HTAKA., TJ. S. A.
��� 7 ���    ���>������*���    l^lWl 1V^L��0) No. 1, West Broadway.   P. O. Box 455.
S  P* Burns & Co*  S   *��
Ring
* FOR ANYTHING IN THE LINE OF
Fresh or Cured Meats,
Fish or Poultry.
; l MARKETS LOCATED AT
Cascade, Grand Forks, Green-
J \ wood, Midway, Camp McKinney.
LIME! LIMES LIME!!!
The only first class WHITE LIME in the Boundary. The SNOW FLAKE LIME COMPANY
is now prepared to furnish lime on short notice in
ANY QUANTITY. SSS1��*
W. E. MEDILL, Mgr.
Cunliffe & Ablett,
ENGINEERS, BOILERMAKERS
and MACHINISTS.
Our machine shops are now complete and we are prepared to do the heaviest class of work-
Ore cars, Ore buckets, shafting, hangers and pulleys. Pipe work a specialty. Estimates given
on all classes of work.   Pumps always fn stock.
atrnnvn waVU   M A C VTRV ��������     1-26-H. P., horizontal engine, 9x12; 1-35-H. P.
SECOND-HAND MACHINERY, ^emotive type, boiler and skids complete;
l_No. 8 Little Giant drill, hose column arms and bars complete; 1���5-foot Pelton wheel, with
600 feet special welded pipe from 16 ins. to 8 ins.; 1 rip-saw with iron table.
Rossland, ���si*���^2zJi*��j*2: THE  GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Sept. 8, 1899.
INTERIOR   TOPICS.
Nelson is to have a new club. It is
being incorporated as the Exchange
Club Co., with a capital stock of $25,000.
It will be made up of merchants and business men.
The Jenckes Machine Company,
through F. R. Mendenhall, has sold to
Messrs. Foley Bros. & Larsen, a seven-
drill Rand compressor and two 50-horse
power boilers. The plant is to be used
on the 3,000-foot tunnel, which is being
bored on the line of the Columbia &
Western railway, a few miles from
Brooklyn. The new compressor had to
be purchased because the old one
had met with a bad accident.
Seventeen hundred feet have been finished, leaving 1,300 feet to be completed. The work of driving the tunnel is
making progress at the rate of 400 feet
per month. It will, therefore, take three
months and a week yet to finish the
task.
A Spokane paper says: The number
of miners employed in the Boundary
country today reaches about 3,290. The
figures, of course, are only approximate.
This small army of toilers is earning in
wages monthly an amount exceeding
$315,000.
John A. Turner, gold commissioner
and government agent, Nelson, has resigned. The move on his part is quite
unexpected and it is thought he intends
to enter politics. Messrs. Jowett and
Gibson are talked of as possible successors.
T. G. Proctor, after a visit to East
Kootenay, told the Nelson Miner that
185 new coke ovens had been put up at
Fernie, making 230 in all, the average
daily output being 250 tons per day.
On the reservation a strike is reported
on the Horseshoe, a property on Toroda
creek, in the same neighborhood as the
Zala M. The new find is a big ledge of
high grade ore, which assays up in the
hundreds.
John F. Lansing is in Republic for
the purpose of putting up a customs
mill on the north end of the belt.
Isaac A. Dinsmore, of Grand Forks,
has been appointed a notary public in
and for the Mainland of British Columbia.
It is definitely and officially announced
that the Great Northern will build into
Republic. The route will probably bo
from Wilbur up Hawk Creek, on via
the San Poil to Republic. Construction is to commence within 30 days.
H. P. McCraney, of Rossland, broth-
erinlaw of Hon. A. Henderson, Attorney-General, and son of Wm. McCraney, ex-M. P., Vancouver, has been appointed Collector of Internal Revenue
at Rossland.
A new postoffice is to be opened at the
boundary line, at Sheep Creek, to be
called Paterson, after the collector of
customs there.
Geo. Clark, of Port Hope, has come
to Columbia, B. C, to join tlie firm
of Clark & Son there.
R. S. Hall, proprietor of the Pentic-
ton-Fairview stage line, and Miss Annie
Manery, of Okanogan Mission, were
married at Vernon last week, and went
to the Coast on their wedding trip.
The Okanogan mine at Penticton, under the superintendence of C. Vacher, is
said to be looking well, and it is stated
that shipments will commence to be
made to the Trail smelter at once.
It is reported that W. A. Carlyle, general superintendent of the B. A. C, has
been offered the snperintendency of the
Rio Tinto copper mines in Spain at a
salary of $25,000 per annum, aud is con-
We Have the Pick
of the fiarket in
A LARGE STOCK
OF BLANKETS a���d
COMFORTERS for
^ APPROACHING
COLD WEATHER
Lace   Curtains,   Portieres,   Draperies,
Table Covers,
Carpers, Art Squares etc.
Also a very complete line in General $
Staples.
RENDELL'S ARCADE.
'000<KK>0<X>00<>0<>00<>00<><><>0^ '
sidering the advisability of accepting it.
It is also an open secret that he has
been promoted to be the resident director of the B. A. Corporation at Rossland.
The discovery of coal at Grand Forks
by Robert Clark on the Laurier claim is
reported by tho "correspondent" of that
place. J. P. Graves is said to have a
half interest.
LOCAL   JOTTINGS.
Mr. 01au8 Jeldness, formerly of Roes-
land, is operating the R. Bell, one of the
Keough group in Summit camp. He
has 16 men at work.
The shaft on the Boundary Creek
Mining & Milling company's property
has now reached a depth of 75 feet, and
the intention is to go to the 100-foot
level before crosscutting is commenced.
Rev. R. W. Trotter has gone out as
far as Revelstoke to meet Mrs. Trotter,
who is coming from a visit east to reside iu Boundary.
T. Gully & Co. are opening a branch
of their furniture business in Columbia.
Hewitt Bostock, M. P , is daily expected in Greenwood.
It will be learned with general. regret
that A. K. Stuart, having resigned his
office as collector of inland revenue at
this point will retire this week. His
snccessor, H. McCutcheou, also an old
newspaper man, is expected any day in
Greenwood. It is understood that Mr.
McCutcheon will combine the collector-
ship of customs here as well as inland
revenue Mr. Stewart will devote himself to mining business.
J. M. Buxton, a mining man of Vancouver, known to a great many in the
interior of B. C, died suddenly of apoplexy at Sicamous the other day.
The Rossland Record, under the management of W. K. Esling of the Trail
Creek News, comes to hand greatly improved. His predecessor is going to run
a daily at Grand Forks.
C. W. Hobson, Vancouver, secretary
of the B. C. Board of Underwriters, is
in the interior of the Province and is expected to arrive here shortly. He is revising insurance rates.
A. J. McMillan, A. McNish, Smith
Curtis, T. R. Morrow and John McKane
of Rossland, have left that city for a trip
into the Boundary, and are here this
week in connection with their mining
interests. It iB only a matter of time
when all the wide awake Rosslanders
will move to Greenwood in order to keep
up with the procession.
Methodist church service next Sunday at 11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Sunday
school at 2:30 p. m. Social service 8 p.
m. Wednesnay. Everybody welcome.
H. B. Balderston, B. A., pastor.
"Charlie the Trader" has sold out his
business to the "0.1. C." second hand
store.
The members of the firm of Oliver &
Bunting, contractors, were before the
police magistrate yesterday morning for
non-payment of license. They were ordered to pay with costs of the prosecution added. It is the intention of the
City Collector to push all similar cases.
Information has been received to the
effect that J. C. Haas, M. E., has disposed of the Golconda group of claims in
Smith's camp while in Montreal. The
group includes the Golconda, Laocoon,
York, Cleveland, Wild Rose Fraction
and the Gold Bed. Good surface showings have been exposed on all of these
claims. They were owned by lion. Geo.
Foster aud J. C. Haas, and it is understood a strong company is being formed
with Rufus Pope at its head for the purpose of acquiring and working these
claims
R. E. Brown, more familiarly known
as "African Brown," lias been in Greenwood this week, in connection with his
many mining interests. It is understood that he has lately disposed of the
Sunset on Copper mountain to the Mackintosh Syndicate for $40,000.
Ralph Smailes has returned from a
business visit to Winnipeg, where he
was for about ten days.
Ohlson & Phelan will move from their
present stand near the postoffice to the
Miller block on Copper street as soon as
the repairs are completed.
Tho Jenckes Machine Company has
shipped a hoist and sinking pump from
Rossland to the Knob Hill Mining Co.,
Phoenix.
W. L. McMillan and Wm. Crowhurst,
who wore in Greenwood lately looking
for a site for a foundry and machine
shop, and a bonus of $5,000 in cash,
have located in Columbia. In this connection the Columbia Review says:
"The artificial inducements offered by
Greenwood were much greater than
they could obtain here. But the advantages from the point of view of location,
access to the mines, and transportation
facilities were so obvious that they chose
Columbia as the best point at which to
erect their works." The advantages
which Columbia could afford, more especially "access to the mines," are so
naively described in the above, that the
Minek has no objection to repeating it
for the benefit of Columbia
As will be seen by an advertisement
in another column, the annual meeting
of the Liberal-Conservative Association
of British Columbia/is called to meet in
New Westminster in the first week of
October. Three prominent Conservatives from the east are expected to be
present, and a mass meeting will be
held in the opera house there on the
evening of the 6th of October.
An Opposition convention in connection with Provincial affairs, is called te
meet at an early date at Kamloops.
Particulars as to date, etc., are not yet
to hand,
The Ottawa House has made an addition of 24x28 to its quarters, which will
be utilized as a beer and lunch room.
A large specimen of rich ore from
the Sunset, intended for the Spokane
exposition, is on view in the Miner office. It is taken from the crosscut.
There is a large ore body.
There is a 3401b. block of ore from the
Gold Bug on exhibition at tbe office
Holbrook and Kean. It will go to the
Spokane exposition.
A Hi? Strlko at West Fork.
Howard Boss, just from Beaver-
ton, reports that R. Pitcher has
made the biggest strike there
that has been made in the country,
opening up on the Idaho and
Washington a vein of solid iron
and galena ore eight feet wide for
a distance of 1500 feet, assaying
from $50 to $80 in gold, silver, copper and lead. It lies in diorite,
showing true fissure vein. A rich
strike was also made on the Columbia, an adjoining claim to the
Washington, assaying $128 in gold
and copper, four feet in width. Mr.
Boss says he has seen nothing in
the country like it and that is the
general feeling there.
C. P. R. Passenger Trains.
J. T. Wilgress, C. P. R. land
agent, has just returned from Rossland. He says passenger trains
will be running into Columbia between the 11th and 15th of this
month.

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