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The Greenwood Miner Aug 11, 1899

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 /
. IP
L'"1
THE
MINER.
Vol. 1, No. 28.
GREENWOOD, B. C, FRIDAY, AUG. II, 1899.
$2 00 Per Tear.
down to his mm
A Fatal Accident in the Mother Lode Shaft.
A Frightened Miner Jumped From
the Bucket, and Fell Over 200 Feet
Down the Shaft and Met Instant
Death���A Wrong Signal the Cause.
Warren, barrister,. Camp McKinney;
E. Boisgevain, Trali; G. Wadsworth,
Montreal, and T: C. Gray, Nelson, travellers; A B. Clabon. Rossland, and
Gaspard Leblanc, Quebec, capitalists^
VISIT  OF  CAPITALISTS.
The first accident to be recorded in
the operation of the Mother Lode mine
took place at midnight Monday. Three
miners at the bottom of the shaft got
into the bucket to be raised to the top.
The man in the station thinking that
the three signals for "slow" had been
already given by the men in the bucket
gave the single signal, but only one had
sounded in the engine room and the engineer put on the steam for raising ore,
with the result that the men were
hoisted with breathless rapidity.
Two of the men became very much excited and as they reached the top
jumped. One landed safely, or at least
without receiving serious injuries, but
the other fell backwards and descended
to an awful death at the bottom of the
Bhaft, where his bruised and lifeless remains were found. Dominick Mantello,
an Italian, was the name of the unfortunate man. He had recently been
working on the railway construction,
and welcomed his position in the mine
on account of the much better wages received. He was the only Italian working in the mine and was well liked by
his companions. The deceased was
about forty years old, and had a cousin
working in Summit camp; who, however could not be found in time to give
any further information.
Mr. Johns, the late superintendent of
the mine, was sent for, and immediately went down the shaft and brought the
body up. The force of the fall had been
very great and the greater part of the
head was gone. One shoulder was also
badly mangled. The body was brought
to Greenwood and placed in the undertaking department of Gully & Co., from
which place the interment was made.
An inquest was not considered necessary
from the facts presented to Dr. Jakes,
coroner, and a certificate of accidental
,*v death was given. No blame is attached
v     to any one connected with the mine.
Greenwood Visitors.
There have been a large number of
prominent visitors in the city this week,
and hotel accommodation has not
been quite equal to the demands.
Among these in town or who have been
registered this week and not elsewhere
referred to an: Geo. McAuley, Spokane, who is interested in the Cariboo,
Camp McKinney, and the Big Copper,
Copper camp, and E. D. Cowen, Spokane; Geo. Townsend, mining broker,
Rossland, who is here on pleasure; A.
E. Bailey, Seattle, and B. D. Small,
Spokane, fire adjusters; Thos. Hemmer
Anaconda; J. T. Thorley, wholesale dry
goods, Montreal; J. W. Schubert, liveryman, Penticton; Percy Godenrath,
Spokesman-Review,   Spokane;   E.   G.
HENDERSON HAS IT
Representing large Interests, Wfco Confer
With tlie Board of Trade*.
Robert Jaffray, Ernest Cox and Major
Pellett, all of Toronto, and representing
large interests in B. C, arrived in the
city Tuesday evening from Camp McKinney by way of Republic. They visited Copper camp during the following
day,and thatevening met adeputation of
the Greenwood Board of Trade. At the
meeting in question important matters
were discussed in a conference which
lasted several hours. Negotiations were
of such a nature that nothing definite
can be stated at the present time, but
the interview was of a most satisfactory
nature, and will probably result in important developments at an early date.
The gentlemen in question are most
favorably inclined to view the prospects
in and about Greenwood, and their cooperation, as among the very largest
factors in the mining industry in Boundary, is of far-reaching consequence.
They left yesterday morning for Greenwood and Summit camps on their way
out, and owing to advices from the coast
return to Vancouver before going east.
The members of the party have had an
extensive tour through the Province
from Crow's Nest Pass all along the
southern boundary line, and down to
the coast, including Nelson, Rossland,
Trail, Greenwood and Camp McKinney,
taking in Republic on the south. They
had intended staying some time in the
, mining camps around Greenwood, but
important business has caused them to
cut short their stay here. They are
largely interested with Mackenzie and
Mann in the Dominion Copper Co., the
properties of which are located here,
and also properties in Camp McKinney
and elsewhere. Their business on the
coast is understood to be in connection
with the contract with the navy for the
supplying of Crow's Nest coal. It was
regretted that Mr. Mackenzie and Senator Cox could not have accompanied
them as intended, but they were unavoidably detained on the coast. They
leave like all others with the most favorable impressions of the Boundary
country.
Robt Jaffray is associated with a number of the largest enterprises in Canada,
and has for years been a director of the
Toronto Globe. He spoke freely to the
Miner representative about the prospects of the Boundary District, and the
possibilities of British Columbia generally. The fact that he is with his associates so largely interested in mining and
other investments in this Province is
proof of his faith in its future. He, or
the gentleman with him, had very little
to say about their trip, except to express satisfaction at the progress they
observed on every hand, and the continued successful development of so
many mining properties.
They were enthusiastic over the enterprise displayed by the C. P. R. in entering the country, and building so many
branch lines into the mines. Major
Pellett is president of the Electric Light
and Power Co., of Toronto, and Ernest
Cox is a brother of the Senator, and
both are closely associated in the Mackenzie and Mann, and Cox and Jaffray
terests.
Offered the Attorney-Generalship, and Accepted It.
He Will he Opposed by Both Parties-
Rumors of a New Deal in Which
Hon. Fred Peters Will be Premier.
The latest news from the coast in regard to the political situation is to the
effect that Alex. Henderson, Q. C, M.
P. P., has been offered and accepted the
portfolio of Attorney-General in succession to the Hon. Jos. Martin. It is
understood that he will resign his seat
in New" Westminster next week to go
before the electors for confirmation in
his new office.
It is understood also on good authority that he will be opposed by D. J.
Munn, a prominent Liberal and supporter of the present government who
will come out under the wing of J. C.
Brown, who opposed Henderson at the
last election, and a committee of that
gentleman's supporters, including the
Columbian newspaper. Mr. Munn is a
prominent canneryman, and was the
promoter and president of the Kaslo-
Slocan Railway Co. He has been a
leading spirit in New Westminster for
some years and is a specially capable
man. It rs also thought that there will
bo a regular opposition candidate, although that is by no mi-ans certain.
There promises to be a very hot fight,
as there are no quarrels like family
feuds to promote healthy rivalry. Under the circumstances, therefore, it is
highly probable that Henderson will be
defeated, and that a general election
will take place.
The very latest is that in the event of
Semlin's retirement, Fred Peters, ex-
Premier of Prince Edward Island, but
now a resident of Victoria, and member
of the firm of Tupper, Peters & Potts,
will succeed him. He is now visiting
Vancouver, and taking active part in a
political conference in progress there
and at New Westminster.
LOCAL  JOTTINGS.
Albert Uhls, pianist, Spokane, has arrived in the city and will take charge of
the music of Mrs. Foreman's summer
entertainments and parties.
A great many persons have wondered
where the Greenwood street preacher
has gone to. It is not absolutely certain
that he is the man, hut the Province of
Vancouver reports the appearance of a
man on the streets who in all respects
resembles the eccentric individual who
tried to reform Greenwood, and gave it
up. The Province devotes over a col-
nmn of space to him. It would appear
that he is a great novelty on the coast,
especially his singing.
Methodist services will be held on
Sunday in Barrett's hall at 11 o'clock
a. m. and 7 p. m.
On Sunday evening an elderly man
was sitting with a friend on a bench near
the open cut of the water main on Copper and Greenwood streets. His friend
unexpectedly rose up, and he was tilted
back, head downwards, into the bottom
of the excavation. His head struck the
exposed pipe, but fortunately it was
found that beyond slight scalp wounds
and a severe shock no injury was received. It was, however, a greater surprise to him than a birthday party
would have been.
Rev. T. W. Stackhouse, President of
the Baptist Convention, preached last
Sunday in Barrett's hall, morning and
evening. He also assisted in the laying
of the corner stone on Monday evening.
He is greatly impressed with the potentialities of Boundary District.
Presbyterian services will be held in
Rendell's hall next Sunday evening at 7
o'clock.
Have your sewing machine repaired
at the "0.1. C." 28-3w
The Greenwood* policemen have been
patrolling with a decidedly more important air. They have donned their uniforms, but as the Miner is not given to
flattery no reference is made to appearances.
As the ore specimens for the Paris exposition must leave Greenwood on the
15th inst., those mine owners who bave
been requested to supply samples are
desired to send them in this week if possible. A very good representation has
been secured from most of the leading
properties and one that will do credit to the district. They are not numerous but select.
Rev. W. G. W. Fortune, of Alvinston,
Ont., has been in Greenwood for some
days and is impressed with the possibilities of Boundary. He announced at
the cornerstone laying of the Baptist
church that the Presbyterians would
have a church built in Greenwood before the snow flies.
At Monday evening's meeting of the
council the aldermanic vacancies were
filled by the appointment of David
Beith to the north ward, and A. Fisher
to the south ward.
Large range for sale at the "O. I. C."
As will be observed by the advertisement on another page the Wisconsin
group of claims next to the War Eagle,
Myers creek, has been stocked, and
shares are now on the market, a num-
of which have been taken in Greenwood.
It it definitely stated that the railway
has reached Cascade and that construction trains are now running to that
point. Peter Larson told the Record
representative there that the rails will
be laid into Midway by the end of September. The long tunnel through Bull
Dog mountain is half done, and is progressing rapidly,
C. E. L. Porteous, Montreal, who is
associated with James Ross and other
capitalists in the B. C. mine and other
properties in the Boundary district, was
here last week on a flying visit, returning almost directly to the east.
The Jewel Gold Mines, Ltd., has been
registered in England with a capital of
��90,000 in ��1 shares. This company
has been formed to acquire from the
Jewel Development Syndicate, Ltd., the
Jewel, Gold Drop and other claims in
Long Lake Camp.
W. S. Keith, of Keith & Ketchum,
leaves to-day for another trip to the
Copper creek tributary of Kettle river.
Since his return to Greenwood a second
large strike has been made there.
I. H. Hallett, P. M., has tendered his
resignation as schoel trustee.
A stage line to Phoenix has been
established.
Greenwood is practically without a
school board at the present time.
L. A. Ferguson, Victoria, representing the Great West Assurance Co., Winnipeg, has been in the city in the interests of life insurance. His company
contemplates making loans in Greenwood. THE  GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Aug. 11,1899.
CHESAW  IS  COMING.
Ifotes About  the Myers Creek Camp and Its
Townsite.
A. M. Rice, who has been to Myers
creek for some days, returned on Monday and has furnished the Miner with
the following notes:
Chesaw is situated six and a half miles
from Rock Creek, on the west side of
Myers creek at the junction of the Mary
Ann creek. The mineral belt passes
through this camp, following a direct
line from Republic through Toroda on
to Camp Mckinney, all showing a similar formation in ore. It practically
forms a watershed, with Toroda creek
east, Okanogan river south, Myers
creek north a*nd Mary Ann creek west.
The place at present is alive with
prospectors, claim owners and promoters. Republic is leaning that way. It
can practically only be reached from ihe
Canadian side, and its development
means the benefitting of the people of
this district, as all transportation will
be by way of the C. P. R. at Rock Creek
when completed. Two large ranches of
about 100 acres each lying in the neighborhood of the town were leased on
Monday and will be utilized for garden
purposes in supplying the camp.
The Crystal Butte Co , Canton, 0.,
has a 10-stamp mill which will be in operation in one week's time. There is
sufficient ore on the dump to keep the
mill running one year at its full capacity. Seventy-five men are employed at
present. The average assay from the
workings is $41.50 per ton.
The Review claim, three-quarters of a
mile north, has had a great deal of surface work done on it, and the company
has driven a tunnel 200 feet, following
thefootwall the whole distance with ore
from grassroots, and are continuing.
Two hundred feet in they crosscutted to
the hanging wall, showing up a ledge of
solid ore of over $40 of assay values, 46
feet wide. At this level the hanging
wall has an angle of 45 degrees, indicating the possibility of the ledge widening out to hundreds of feet with depth.
The War Eagle, one mile west, owned
by a Chicago company, has opened up a
47-foot ledge of pure white quartz, free
milling, with an average assay of $132.
The Yakima group, adjoining the
townsite, is working a full force of men
three shifts on a six-foot ledge well defined, average values of $60. They also
show a vein 11 inches wide of refractory
ore of an average value of $200.
The U. S. & B. C. Mining Co. show all
their properties well developed. On
one claim is a stringer of 17 inches of
the finest specimen ore carrying values
of $1070.
The Poland-China group, situated on
Anarchist mountain to the west, is a
free milling property, with 200 feet of
work done. A 20 foot-ledge has been disclosed as far as opened. The encouraging values of from $100 to $1,000 have
been had in assays.
Without going into further details it
may be stated that over 30 properties
were visited showing good, strong ledges
well defined, principally free milling
ore, assaying from $10 to $11,000 per
ton. The Canadians have a good hold
in this camp, 26 miles from Greenwood,
which is the banking town. Chesaw
was born on Dominion Day of this year.
Twenty-nine buildiugs are already erected and a telephone line is about to be
put in from B.ock Creek to connect the
camp with Greenwood. The U. S. government expects to make an allotment
to the Indians in the fall when the agricultural land will be thrown on the
market.
The Republic people are taking hold
of Chesaw trade, and are cutting a road
by way of Toroda, upon which a daily
stage line will be established as soon as
the road is completed. A petition is being circulated for a mail service over the
above line. Another daily stage will be
put on between Chesaw and the
boat landings on the Columbia and
Okanogan rivers by way of Oro, over
which a mail route has been already established. A daily stage is also projected between Chesaw and Rock Creek to
be begun next week, to connect daily
with the Snodgrass line to Greenwood,
which for the present must be the principal point of supply.
A Great Fntmre.
As the Miner anticipated, the result
of Patrick A. O'Farrell's visit to the mining camps around Greenwood, has resulted in a two-column article in the
syndicate of papers represented by that
gentleman. Mr. O'Farrell is imbued
with that rich Irish eloquence of imagination that throwB a halo of literary interest about all he writes concerning,
whether it be of a banquet and Joe
Martin at Rossland, or a crosscut at the
200-foot level. He is quite enthusiastic
about the entrance of the railway into
the Boundary country, and regards its
accomplishment as one of the feats in
railway building. He remarks that
"Greenwood is on the eve of great
things," and concludes by saying:
"It is the development of the mines,
the building of railroads, and the influx
of experts and capital from all parts of
the world that make merry times in
Greenwood. I find no pessimists here.
The folks believe that the mountains
surrounding Greenwood are storehouses
of mineral wealth, surpassing anything
ever yet discovered, snd they expect to
share in the golden harvest of the morrow. That morrow will bring many and
varied disappointments, for human life
is a life of vicissitudes; but yet this
country will enable multitudes to live
in happiness and comfort, and will confer wealth and affluence, if not renown
and fame, on some of the soldiers of fortune whom chance or fate have wafted
to these glorious mountain regions #of
the west."
The Lumber Trust.
A- Fisher and W. S. Fletcher, who
went to Rossland last week to attend
the meeting of millmen from Kootenay
and Boundary, returned on Tuesday.
They report that there were about seventeen firms represented at the meeting, which was called to consider the
proposed amalgamation of all the mills
within the districts referred to, and several others sent in letters agreeing to be
bound by the decision of the meeting.
It waB decided to go ahead, and a committee was appointed to make a valuation of the various mills represented,
and to arrange other details. It was
thought for a time that the trust as proposed would fall through, but Mr. Fisher says that it will likely be an accomplished fact. The general effect will be
to render prices more uniform, and regulate conditions. In some places where
competition has been keen, prices will
be raised, and in others, as in Greenwood, prices will probably be reduced.
As all mill stuff will be sold for cash,
and the cost of management will be reduced, it will be possible to produce
more cheaply, and to sell at a greater
profit without raising prices.
StTl Another Compressor.
The management of the Rathmullen
mine in Summit camp has given E. M.
Aldrich, the well known mechanical engineer an order for a five-drill compressor. Mr. Aldrich recently installed on
the property a boiler, hoist and sinking
pump.
Miners' Hotel
���    COPPER STREET.
WALTER WATERLAND, Prop.
A Finely Equipped Bar,
Board by Day or Week.
TELEPHONE CONNECTION.
Best of Cusine Service.  Rooms
neat   and   Well   Furnished.
ROSSLAND HOTEL.
Alf. Cameron, Prop.
Everything Brand New and First
Class. Elegant Bar Room, Best
Liquors and Cigars.
House Heated and Lighted
Throughout. Dining Room under Management of
AX EXPERIENCED CHEF.
Copper St., Greenwood, B. C.
The Best INVESTMENT
In REPUBLIC CAMP in 1896 was the Republic Gold Mining Co
We were then Belling this stock at 8 and 10 cents per share; today
this same stock is worth $3.75 PER SHARE. A thousand shares
in 1896 sold for $80 to $100; TODAY IT IS WORTH $3,750. THE
BEST INVESTMENT in Republic Camp today is the ADMIRAL
��������� DEWEY GOLD MINING COMPANY.    This company  owns
**p four claims, located west of the Republic propertfes.   WTe are
���      ��� now sinking a shaft to the depth of 50 feet on the surface and it
ASSAYS FROM $1.60 to $31 IN GOLD. This stock is now selling at 7 cents per share, and we predict that inside of six months
this same stock will sell 75 CENTS TO ONE DOLLAR PER
SHARE.   For further particulars call on or address,
\\/    i-i     TVICHOI   <i   Mnrarc broker, Bum, mortara.. v. s. a.
��� ��� ���    ���-������    i^ll^^* IV^i-��^5 No. 1, West Broadway.   P.O. Box455.
<��  S  P* Burns & Co* S  <&
Ring
FOR ANYTHING IN THE LINE OF
Fresh or Cured Meats,
Fish or Poultry*
MARKETS LOCATED AT
l^J p^     /-^ | Cascade, Grand Forks, Green-
1 p "* W. % wood, Midway, Camp McKinney.
yo<X>0<X>0<><>00<>0<>0<X><>00<K><>00<X><><>00<>0<><>0<H><
LIME! LIME!! LIME!!!
The only first class WHITE LIME in the Boundary. The SNOW FLAKE LIME COMPANY
is now prepared to furnish lime on short notice in
ANY QUANTITY. 5��SHgU*
W. E. MEDILL, Mgr.
Cunliffe & Ablett,
ENGINEERS BOILERMAKERS
and MACHINISTS.
ORE CARS, BUCKETS, SHAFTING, HANGERS,
PULLEYS and COLLARS. REPAIRS A SPECIALTY. ESTIMATES GIVEN ON ALL CLASSES OF
WORK.
Roosland Engineering Works,
ROSSLAND,   B.   C. Friday, Aug. 11, 1899.
THE   GREENWOOD  MINER.
if-
MINOR    MEDITATIONS.
The Miner has not heretofore referred
to the fact that that noted journalist of the Economist, Nelson, has decided that it is not well for even a newspaper man to be alone, and has crowned
hiB successful career as a moulder of
public opinion by getting married. D.
M. Carley, more familiarly known as
"Dave" and sometimes as "King David,"
has the bes,t. wishes of a wide circle of
friends outside as well as inside of the
profession, who Jiope this social departure of his will tend^tq.rgrider still more
mellifluous the notes of the "sweet singer" of the Kootenays.
o   o
ti ,t
Knocking about among townspeople
one hears of a good many things that
aro not much discussed in the newspapers.   Among the prominent topics of
conversation is that of the Fire Department.   At the present stage of urban existence, protection from fires is uppermost in the minds of most people, especially business men.   Two big fires
within two months have emphasised the
necessity of greater vigilance, better appliances, more brick buildings and greater encouragement to the firemen.   Suggestions of all kinds are made, but the
most practical are  the appointment of
a paid chief, mora hose, a chemical engine, helmets and coats for the firemen,
a fire hall, a ladder truck, and a proper
fire alarm.   The council will in all probability supply most of tuese as soon as
possible, and  all of them eventually.
There are a good many of our citizens
who would like to show  their appreciation of the efforts of the firemen in some
popular and substantial way.   A public
dinner has been suggested by some; others think uniforms for parade would be
most appropriate; while still others are
in favor of purchasing a chemical engine or other useful apparatus and presenting   it   to   the  Department.    Of
course, any of these things would come
as a voluntary contribution from the citizens, simply as a recognition of services
voluntarily rendered.   A movement is
already on foot towards that end, and
will have cordial endorsation.
o   o
There is a peculiar mix-up in politics at
Victoria.   This time last year the people
of Boundary district were practically a
unit against the old Government and
hailed any change as desirable.   So far
as the interests of this section of the
country are concerned it would be difficult to truthfully say that the people
are enthusiastically in favor of change
for change sake.    It   has not proved
an unmixed blessing.   When we come
to consider the action of governments,
of any Government, if it is not one thing
it is another.   However, if  the experiment has not been a success it will probably lead to better things.   At the last
election politics was on   the point of
"breaking up."   One party practically
had been in power for a good many years,
and the   changed conditions   brought
about a new state of feeling which was
not fully recognized.   The new party in
power  really represented a transition
state  in  potitics,  and  good or bad is
bound to be transitionary in its character.   No permanent combination has yet
been formed; everything is unsettled,
uncertain and unsatisfactory. It is not so
much the quality of the members of the
Government.    It is the indefiniteness
of public opinion.   The element of success and permanency is absent���the element of cohesion.   Party lines are not
consolidated, and possibly will not be
until straight Dominion party lines are
declared.    Logically or properly  that
should not  occur,  but   practically  it
seems the only solution.   Men cannot
go on forever fighting on one side in one
election and then on another in another
election. It is contrary to "human
natur." Political sympathies and affinities cannot be changed like hats and
boots. On the face of it Dominion poli-
itics may not enter, but with two parties,
Liberals and Conservatives, jealously
watching each other, any predominancy of either one side or the other in
Provincial affairs is resented. The present
difficulty in choosing an Attorney General
���which apparently ought to be a simple thing���is proof of how unsatisfactory
is the present condition of affairs. The
Government is really tied down to Alex.
Henderson of New Westminster, who
being a Liberal and a representative of
the Royal City should fill the bill so
far as politics ,and geography are concerned, but haying "deserted the party
he was elected to represent is distasteful to both sides in his own constituency and could not be elected. Harry
Helmcken of Victoria, beiiig a loyal
member pf the Opposition will'' not accept, and unless a, seat can be obtained
for some outside lawyer'of standing the
Government must go to" the country.
A general election is .riiore iitimine'nt
than ever. In a new election the issues
would be as badly involved as" the political situation itself. What with t!he
Deadman's Island in Vancouver, t'he
eight-hour law, the Straight Oppbsitiin,
and the fend between Martin and Cotton the Lord only knows where we are
at or where we would come out. The
situation would be greatly simplified
with one or two strong representatives
from the Interior, but away from the
Coast there is not a single commanding
man in the political arena. Politics is
evidently not all "bear and skittles."
SUMMER  CLASSES  AND
SUMMER  PRICES.
To those who desire to prepare for the
series of winter dances, Mrs. Foreman
will give instruction in round dancing
and the dancers on Tuesday and Saturday evenings. Wednesday evenings���
new figures of the German Cotillion.
Admission, each class gentleman, fifty
cents; ladies complimentary.       27-4.
Lrion
Bottling
Works.
JAS. M'CREATH, Prop.
All Kinds Aerated Water.    Wines   a
Specialty.
SOLE   AGENTS   FOR
LION BREWING CO.,
Rossland, B. C.
The Largest Brewery in the Province.
Families Suppled at their Residence.
MP^1<
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IP fill
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����� SvJJ^.^*^;-,-;,:
#*. .   ���'
PRINGLE & WHITESIDE,
Barristers & Solicitors,
Notaries Public Etc...
Barrett block, Copper Street, Greent
wood, B. C.
THE   CANADIAN
ANDREW LEAMY,
Barrister,
Solicitor,  etc.
Greenwood, B. C.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
and NOTARY PUBLIC.
NADEN *LOOD BLK.
Greenwood, B. C.
J. S. M. Morrison, L. L. B., J. R. Brown,
Alfred Hall, L. L. .B
Hall, Brown & riorrison,
BARRISTERS and
SOLICITORS.
FLOOD  BLOCK	
GREENWOOD, B. C.
BAILJBR <Sfe
ASHCROFT
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYORS
A*   Ev  AshCrOft,. Representative.
FLOGD-NADEN BLOCK.
0. M. HILLARY, B. Sc.
Assayer and Chemist.
m'gill graduate in
mining engineering.
GREENWOOD,  B.   C
I. H. HALLETT.
H. C. 8HAW.
HALLETT & SHAW
GREENWOOD, B. C.
Barristers, Solicitors,   cable Address
& Notaries Pnblic. "hallet."
Codes:     Bedford McNeill's,  Broom-
halls, Moreing & Neal's, Leiber's.
A. C. GALT,
Barrister, Etc., Rossland.
Postoffice Building    -    -    -    Telephone 4?.
R. H. PARKINSON,
CIVIL ENGINEER and
DRAUGHTSMAN.
Greenwood  Assay  Office,
JOE C. LUCKENBEL, Prop.
Mines Examined & Reported On.
GREENWOOD, B. C.
Financial,
Insurance and
Mining
Agent.
Notary Public.
FAIRVIEW TOWNSITE AGENT.
R* F* Coatcs & Co*,
General Contractors
and Builders.
HOUSE   MOVING   A    SPECIALTY.
GOV'T. 8T., GREENWOOD, B.  C.
Dank of Commerce.
Head office, TORONTO.
Established 1867.
PAID-UP CAPITAL, $6,000,000.
[Six Million Dollars.]
rest *1,000,000
President Hon, Geo. A..Cox.
General Manager B. E. Walker.
Ass't. Gen'l. Manager.. .J. H. Plcmmkr.
This bank has the largest number of
branches of any bank in Canada, with
agencies at New York, Chicago, New
Orleans, Skagway and Dawson City.
Accounts of Corporations, Merchants
and Individuals received on favorable
terms.
Drafts, Commercial Credits, Travelers' Credits and Circular Notes issued
available in"any part of the world.
Approved Notes Discounted; Collections made.
A general Banking business transacted.
GREENWOOD  BRANCH.
D. A. CAMERON,
Manager
....BANK of MONTREAL.
Capital, all paid np, $12,000,000.
Rest $4,000,000.
President:
Lord Stbathcona and Mount Royal.
Vice-President:
Hon. George a. Drommond.
General Manager E. S. Clodstoii
Branches in London, Eng., New
York, Chicago,
And in the principal cities in Canada.
���0���
Buy and sell Sterling Exchange and
Cable Transfers; Grant Commercial and
Travelers' Credits, available in any part
of the world.
Drafts   issued,   Collections made, etc.
Greenwood - Branch.
F. J. JfTNUCANE, Manager.
THE  BANK  OF
British North America.
Established in  1886.    Incorporated by Royal
Charter.
PAID-UP   CAPITAL $4,B66,6��6
RESERVE   FTJBT).. .'.7,      $1,460,000
LONDON   OFFICE:'
3 Clement's Lane, Lombard St., E. C.
COURT   OF   DIRECTORS:
J. H. Brod'.i. John James Cuier, Ga.-'pard Far-
rer, Rlch��;d H. Gl/n, Henri L. R. Farrer, Ed.
Arthur Hoare, H. J. B. Kendall, J. J. Kings-
ford, T-red Lubbock, Geo. D. Whatman."'
A.G. WALLI8, Secretary.
Head Office in Canada: St. James St. Montreal.   H. Stikeman, Gen. Mgr., J. Elmsley, Insp
BRANCHES   IN   CANADA:
London, Brantford, Hamiltdn, Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Kingston, Midland, Quebec, St.
John, N. B. Brandon, Winnipeg, Frcdeticton,
Halifax, Victoria, Vancouver, Rossland, Kaslo,
Trail, Ashcroft, Greenwood, Atlin, Bennett B.
C. and Dawson City.
AGENTS   IN   THE  UNITED  STATES:
Spokane���Traders' National Bank and Old
National Bank. New York-(62 Wall St.) W.
Lawson and J. C. Welsh, agents. San Francis-
co���124SansomeSt., H. J. MeMlrHael and J. R.
Ambrose, agents.
LONDON   BANKERS:
Bank of England and Messrs. Olyn & Co.
FOREIGN   AGENTS:
Liverpool���Bank of Liverpool. Australia-
Union Bank of Australia. New Zealand���Union Bank of Australia, Bank of New Zealand,
india, China, Japan���Chartered Mercantile
Bank of India, London and China, Agra Bank,
West Indies���Colonial Bank. Paris���Marcuard
Krauss & Co.   LyonB��� Credit Lyonnals.
P.  T.  8H0RT   Manager,
Greenwood, B. C.
QEORGE HILL,-
Merchant Tailor,
Fine Stock of Goods Always on Hand.  Across
from WINDSOR Hotel.
GREENWOOD,        -        -        B. C. THE   GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Aug, 4 1899.
THE    GREENWOOD    MINER.
Published Every Friday at Greenwood, B. C.
BY
THE GREENWOOD MINER PRINTING COMPANY.
R.  E.  GOSNELL, Editor and Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION  RATES.
Domestic, One Year *2.00
Six Months $1.25
Foreign, One Year $8.00
Payable Invariably in Advance.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
No patent medicine ads taken except at full
rates.
Legal notices 10 and 5 cents per line.
"Certificate of Improvement" notices, $5.00
and $10.00 for legal life of notice.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month's
advertising.
The Miner is on sale at the following places:
Greenwood.
King & Co., Smith & McRae, Monroe & Co., P.
O. News Room.
Cascade: Cascade City News Co. Rossland:
P. O. News Room. Anaconda. B. C: P. O.
News Room.   Spokane:   The Shaw-Borden Co.
Entered at the Greenwood, B. C, post office
as second class mail matter.
Friday, Aug. 11.1899.
SUBJECTS OF IMPORTANCE.
At a largely attended meeting of the
Board of Trade on Thursday evening of
last week, several important subjects
were discussed. One or two of these it
is unnecessary to refer to at the present
time. Among the most important was
a meeting with Messrs. Mackenzie, Jaffray and Cox in order to present the
views of the Board and business men
generally on certain matters affecting
interests which are mutual as between
Greenwood and gentlemen so largely interested in the welfare of the district of
which Greenwood is the center, and ascertain, if possible, their views in return. The subject was fully discussed
and a course of action decided on, to the
outcome of which reference is made elsewhere.
Another matter was tho road to
White's camp. The offer made by the
Government through Mayor Hardy, the
letter to whom was published last week,
was discussed, and the views expressed
by the Miner were practically endorsed.
That the citizens of Greenwood should
be asked to contribute an amount equal
to that by the Government, and the
money expended under Government supervision was not considered to
be a fair one, in view of the public utility of the work proposed. The citizens
of Greenwood having done so much already in the way of private enterprise
building roads and trails and thus assisting in the development of the surrounding camps, it does not seem reasonable that they should be asked to
continue such a system. The burden
falls on a few men, while the benefits
are general and business men bave so
many calls on their purse for public and
semi-public purposes that it becomes a
serious tax on their resources. However, the matter is of such importance
that steps will be taken to see what can
be done.
With reference to the appointment of
a local Registrar of the Supreme Court,
there was but one view expressed and
resolutions were adopted accordingly.
Hewitt Bostock, M. P., is expected
here shortly, and a special meeting of
the Board will be called to disucss with
that gentlemen the reqirements of the
district so far as the Dominion Government is concerned.   Among these will
be a custom house for Greenwood.
A school house for Greenwood was seriously considered, and while the course
of the Government in preparing plans
for a $5,000 building and expecting local
contractors to tender for them on the
basis of a $3,000 appropriation, was not
criticised in a Bpirit of hostility, it was
not approved of. There will be 100 children of school age when the school term
begins again to be housed and taught,
and no accommodation for them whatsoever. It was considered only reasonable that plans for a building costing
$3,000 should be prepared, and made
capable of extension when required, or
otherwise that the money be handed
over to the school trustees to deal with
in the most practical and expeditious
way. Representations were made accordingly, and it is hoped that the Government will see it in the light of such
representations.
BOARDS OF TRADE CONFERENCE.
The Monetary Times in its last issue
notes with some degree of satisfaction
the proposed formation of a Southern
British Columbia Board of Trade, and
states that one similarly constituted in
the maritime provinces has done very
useful work.
In another column appears a condensed report of the proceedings of last
week's convention at Rossland, and
while there is not sufficient to judge of
the whole character of the meeting there
is sufficient to indicate that very useful
work was done and that the foundation
was laid for future meetings even more
important in effect, boundary was well
represented, and the delegates seemed
to have been a unit on all matteis affecting the interests of the district as a
whole. The resolutions proposed and
carried had the unanimous support of
the convention.
One thing that could not but impress
the readers of the more elaborate report
published in the Rossland Miner is the
ability that was represented there, and
the grasp of practical questions that was
manifested by the delegates. Under the
circumstances it seems an anomaly that
with such material to choose from that
the whole of Southern British Columbia
should be so indifferently represented in
the Legislative Assembly. If another
election should be sprung upon us surely some of these men, or men of equal
ability���for the woods are full of them
in British Columbia���could not be selected and entitled to a place in the
cabinet by virtue of intrinsic merit as
public men, instead of on the accidental
basis of geography and political bias.
Mrs. Foreman and Mrs. Nichols,
teachers of dancing and physical culture. Office hours, 11 a. in. to 1 p. m.
at residence in school house. 27-4
B. C. Pottery Company, Ltd.,
Victoria.
MANUFACTURERS   OF
Sewer Pipe, Chimney Pipe, Fire
Bricks, Pressed Bricks. Flower Pots,
and Fire Proofing Tube.
H. M. KEEFER'S LIST.
<fc | GEO Casni balance on easy terms, buys
NJlOVJ one of the best lots for a residence in the city.
���KAKO Cash, balance on terms to suit,
tpucrw DUyg a fine iot on Government
near Deadwood street.
$fSRO Cash, balance on terms to suit,
*K,~'*-"-'buys a splendid double corner on
Government street, 60x105 feet.
$1,400
ment street.
Cash buys the best, unsold
business corner on Govern-
Hall, Rice & Co.,
Mining, Stock and
KCal  CSIStC   Exchange.
Temporary Offices 8K3SSS2:
Have for sale several
snaps; among others
the following:
A    nice   comfortable    cot- &> 4   Ortft
tage,  50-foot, comer lot  on j\ 1.3IJU
Greenwood street Tj'-T'f^f'T
Also   a 50-foot lot   on SU- <�� 4   4 r\c\
ver street, best locality, on east J) \   \ \J\J
Also 2 corner lots on Government    $1 7QQ
Fine Building Site
ON
Long Lake St
Also other properties.   Get particulars
at office.
WANTED:
Copper Claims.
Lithographed plan of Greenwood in
colours.  Price 50c.   Mailed free
W. S. Keith, M. E.
F. F. Ketchum,
eith &
etchum,
Mining,
REAL ESTATE   and
Insurance Brokers.
Lots in all Parts of the City.
Mining: Stocks
In Greenwood & Camp McKinney
A Specialty.
Mining   Properties   Examined   and    Reported  on.
GREENWOOD,   B.   C.
*���   O. A. GUESS, M. A. II. A. Ol'KSS, M. A
GUESS BROS.
Chemists and Mining Engineers.
GREENWOOD.  B. C.
Real Estate
Mines  and Mining.
THE MAW
GAUNCE   &  WICKWIRE.
GREENWOOD, B. C.
GEO. F. WILLIAMS,
Dry Goods,
Clothing,        g}
Furnishings and
Millinery.        ^j
CALL  ON  US.
Copper Street,
GREENWOOD. B. C.
BEFORE ORDERING YOUR
Groceries
It would   be well for you to call on
A. H. SPERRY
& CO.,
Who bave the most
complete stock of
Staple and Fancy
Groceries to be found
in the City.
SperrY
&Co.,
Opp. International Hot'I
COPPER STREET.
"LIVE AND LET LIVE."
STAR BAKERY.
Bread guaranteed free
from adulteration.
SINOW FLAKE    ��
ry of till kin
3'HCHfco to order
OrjC1 A I"~*     Pastry of till kinds
We have the Only brick oven in Greenwood .
GOVERNMENT STREET.
Furnished Rooms.
NEAT, QUIET, COMFORTABLE. BEADING, and COOL
STALL BOOMS, FIRST FLOOR.
PRICES MODERATE.
SWATNE HOUSE, SILVER ST.
. Seasonable groceries at Law & Co.'s. *
Cabin  for   rent.     Apply  at   Miner
office. *
First shipment of J. A. T. Bell's boots
and shoes just arrived at Law & Co's.  * Friday, Aug. 11, 1899.
THE   GREENWOOD   MINER.
i1
iZ
THE  FASHION  LIVERY   STABLE.
Cameron Bros., Prop's.
Livery, Feed and Sale Stables.   Good Single and Double Drivers.   Gentle Saddle
and Pack Horses.   All Kinds of Teaming and Heavy Hauling Done
on the Shortest Notice.   Stock Well Looked After.
OFFICE OF GREENWOOD CITY TRANSFER COMPANY,
GREEHWOOD,   B.   C.
THE   ALDERMANIC   BOARD.
A Delegation of the Firemen Interview the
Council���A Free Interchange of Ideas on the
Organization of the Fire Brigade, and Their
Requirements.
After officiating at the ceremonies in
connection with the laying of the corner
stone of the Baptist church, the Mayor
on entering the council chamber on
Monday night found a delegation of fire"
men waiting to interview the honorable
body on matters relating to the fire department. The minutes having been
read the deputation was introduced, and
Messrs. Keith and Law acted as spokesmen for tbe firemen and presented very
clearly what they had decided were the
requirements of the department in order to bring it up to the highest mark
of efficiency.
In brief, the requests of the firemen
as presented were: A paid chief, a fire
hall with bunks for from six to seven
men, 2,000 feet of cotton or linen hose,
t wo sh ut off three-q uarter-metal nozzl es,
a proper tire alarm, a ladder truck, helmets and rubber coats. The speakers
referred to their efforts to do all in their
power to give the citizens proper fire
protection and to bring the department
up to the highest state of efficiency.
What they asked was not in their own
interests, but that they might be able
to fight tire better, and from what they
had done in the past they thought they
were entitled to a favorable consideration. They never asked for anything
that was not necessary.
The Mayor referred to a paragraph in
last week's paper in which there was
some intimation of the firemen resigning
if their requests were not acceded to.
He rather took umbrage at what he considered to be their attitude. He said the
council had all along been a unit on
what they considered to be in the interests of the firemen and tire protection,
and if they had not done more than had
already been accomplished it was because they had not had the funds available. The desire of the council was to
make the tire department as efficient as
possible in every respect, and he had no
doubt that had Jie tiremen not come to
present their views at all they would
have been quite as liberally dealt with.
Here he dropped a remark that he considered it in the interests of the fire department that there should be as many
married men as possible in it in order
that it would assure as far as possible
their permanent residence in town.
This rather put the fat in the fire, as
W. S. Keith immediately rose to his
feet and informed His Worship that if
the council did not appreciate the^ser-
vices of single men, or preferred married men, the former would get out with
pleasure. He then went on at some
length to justify the position the firemen had taken, and in his remarks was
backed up by fireman Hallett. Their
only desire was the better protection of
the city. They had done their best in
the past, and they wanted to do the
same in the future.
Ths Mayor said he was misunderstood. His position was simply that in
filling the vacancies in the Fire Department reference should be had to the
permanency of citizens of those who are
recommended, and married men were
more likely to fill the bill than single men
in that respect. He had no desire to
reflect in the least on any member of
the department. Alderman Galloway
also supported the view taken by the
Mayor that he had been misunderstood,
and after a few more mutual explanations and assurances the firemen left,
and everything appeared to be lovely.
In all probability the firemen will get
ever} thing they have asked for, which
is another proof of the old adage that
you can catch more flies with molasses
and sugar than vinegar, although in
this instance it pretty nearly turned to
vinepar.   Business then proceeded.
Letters were then read from W. L.
Leonard, tendering to supply 2,000 feet
of the right kind of hose; from the Wave
Publishing Co., notifying the aldermen
that the number of the Wave with the
special write up of Greenwood had been
published and mailed, and intimating
that a draft for $200 might make its appearance any day on account thereof;
from the Deputy Attorney-General acknowledging resolution re appointment
of a local Registrar of the Supreme
Court, and assuring the Council that the
communication would be laid before the
Attorney-General, but whether he referred to the late or the prospective A.-
G., it was not clear.
A water notice of the Old Ironsides
respecting a water record on Twin
Creek was read and referred to the City
Solicitor with instructions to protest
against the record being allowed.
The Finance Committee reported on a
number of accounts, which were ordered
paid.
���>��With respect to the vacancies at the
Council Board, the Mayor recommended the appointment of David Beith for
the North Ward, and A. Fisher for the
South, which recommendations were
duly confirmed ; after which the aldermen adjourned.
A Good Man Gone.
On Monday F. T. Short, for some time
manager of the Bank of B. N. A., and
family, took their departure for Midland, Ont., where Mr. Short will be for
the future, stationed as manager. Midland is an importantt shipping point on
Georgian Bay, and has a large lumber
trade. Mr. Short's successor has not
yet been appointed, and in the meantime the Greenwood branch will be in the
very capable hands of the accountant,
Mr. Smith. All the citizens of Greenwood, who have had the pleasure of Mr.
Short's acquaintance, regret his going
away, and wish him well in his new
home. He was a man of entertaining
social qualities and literary tastes.
Going With a Rush.
Chesaw townsite has struck Greenwood
with a rush. Holbrook & Kean, who
are handling the property for Mr.
Schroder, on Wednesday had sold 36
lots; and all the lots on Myers street, the
leading avenue, are disposed of. Mr.
Schroder left on Wednesday again for
Chesaw.
On Sunday morning at 6 o'clock an
excursion will leave Bobbins' stables for
Myers creek when an opportunity will
be afforded for an examination of the
townsite and the adjoining mines.
Bring your job printing to the Miner
office.
J.   RUSSELL.
T.   HARDY.
Russell Hardware Co.,
j
DEALERS IN    :i
Almost all kinds of Hardware, Glassware, Crock-
eryware, Woodenware, Tinware, Graniteware,
Silver and plated wares, Lamp goods, Stoves of
all kinds; all stock sizes of glass windows and
doors; Belting and Packing of all kinds.
BRASS qOODS A SPBCIAUTY.
Lubricating and Illuminating oils, guns, rifles
and Ammunition; Iron all sizes and shapes; all
kinds of drill and tool steel; black and gal. pipe
up to 3 in.   All kinds pipe fittings up to 6 in.
Agts. for CAINTOIN STEEU.
Sherwin & Williams' ffiXs*Lea* *"are
Pedlar, Steel and Metal Roofing and Shingles.
BEST TINNING AND PLUMBING SHOP IN THE INTERIOR.
tttftwwiwywwjw
Grand Mid-
i ���
summer
���������I
Now On.
Every Article Reduced
AT
W. M. Law & Co's,
BARRETT
BLOCK.
y.
Copper Street.
fmmmwmmmmwmwmiwiwf,
The Attention of
Contractors, Builders and Property Owners
ARE CALLED TO THE FACT THAT THE
GREENWOOD LUMBER CO.
Have opened an Office on the corner of KIMBERLY and MINERAL
streets and can famish Everything in line of
Rough and Dressed Lumber, Flooring
Lath, Moulding, Rustic, Ceiling, Etc.
ORDERS RECEIVED AT OFFICE. THE  GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Aug, 11,1899.
A Iy ical Ladder.
Mr. James J.  Martin,  a member of
the composing room staff of the Courier-
Journal,   Louisville,  Ky., submits the
following.
At in
making olden
rhymes
times
(
Old Homer ('aught the masses,           )
Likewise                                   well
was                                          up the
Pope                                          slope
1
1
That   led    to    famed   Parnassus. ���     )
1 That                                            long
fellow                                   held the
1 Moore                                         floor
In    writing   rhymed   romances;
)
1 And                                           was
Byron                                       of the
' too,                                             crew
Of    1'oesy's   free   lances.        )
Each                                               was
in his                                          very
line                                             fine;
And made his own times gladder;
, 1
But                                           try as
they never                                 they
oould                                     would
Compose     a     rhyming    ladder.        )
Mr. Biggins' Position.
A Globe reporter called oh Mr. Hig-
gins, member for Esquimalt, yesterday
morning, and questioned him as to the
correctness of a statement in yesterday's
Colonist to the effect that he had strayed
from the Government fold.
Mr. Higgins replied that so far from
hie having left the Government fold, it
seemed as if the Government fold had
left him. He felt like the Indian who,
when he could not find his way out of
the forest, declared that it was the wigwam that was lost, not the Indian. As
the Government had offered Mr. Helmcken a portfolio, passing oyer Mr. Henderson, without first consulting their
supporters, their position is a most un-
eviable one.
"Were you not a consenting party to
the offer?"
"Certainly not. I never heard of it
until it reached me as a street rumor,
and I have not found a Government supporter who was consulted. I do not
know it as a fact, but I am strongly of
the opinion that at least two members
of the executive were not consulted."
"Do you think that Mr. Cotton's offer
involved a sacrifice of principle?"
"How else can it be regarded? Look
at it for a moment. If Mr. Helmcken
had accepted he would have sacrificed
his friends and his principles. This he
very properly refused to do. In making
the offer without the knowledge and
consent of their party, Mr. Cotton and
Mr. Semlin manifested an intention to
throw overboard their friends. With
their party out of the way and a new
combination formed, principle would be
cast to the winds, and there would be
an entirely new policy framed, presumably on Opposition lines."
. "You may then be regarded as no
longer a Government supporter?"
"Not unless this extraordinary business can be explained away. It seems
to savor very much of an offer to sell the
Government to the Opposition at a price
that they would not pay. In making
the offer Messrs. Semlin and Cotton
have shown a disposition to hold on to
office at all hazards and at the sacrifice
of their personal and political friends
and the principles which they have advocated for years."
".You entertain no doubt as to the offer having been made?"
",Not the slightest. The offer was
made, was referred to an Opposition
caucus and unanimously rejected without thanks and with ignominy."
"What do you think will be the effect
on the Government?"
"Ruin, sudden and complete; if not
today or to-morrow, as soon as the house
shall have met," said the ex-Speaker as
he  closed    the   interview.
Globe.
Victoria
Sock Creek Richness.
After many months of hard work and
weeks of anxious expectancy, Ben Perkins has sold his half interest in the
Commonwealth, Big Eddy and Brooklyn
claims. The properties are situated
about three and a half miles up 20-mile
creek and about 40 miles west of here.
The purchase price for the half interest
was $8,000 cash and the purchasing parties are from Cannonbankport, near
Portland, Me. Hugh Reed retains his
original half interest. To the three
claims already mentioned has been added the H. R. recently located by Mr.
Reed. The four claims will be known
as the Commonwealth Consolidated and
a joint stock company will soon be
formed to operate (he property.���Columbia Review.
Will Start From Cascade.
Supt. Rogers, Of the Columbia Stage
Co. was in town Thursday, and ordered
some changes in the running of stages.
Heretofore, three four-borse rigs have
run through each way daily, to and
from Bossburg. By the new arrangement one pf these is taken off, and instead a atrtge will be started to run from
here to the Tories. Ttus is in anticipation that even before the railway track
is accepted by the C. P. R. as far as Cascade, there will be more or less travel
over the new line to arid through Cascade. The new schedule goes into effect today.���Cascade Record.
'     Puttint in Machinery.
The Buckhorn and War Eagle Mining
Companies have each ordered complete
mining plants for development purposes, which are < identical" in character.
These consist of a 10-drill, duplex compressor from the Rand Drill Company,
Sherbrooke, Que., and hoisting engines,
punips, etc.
Three eight-hour shifts are being
worked on the War Eagle, and the Buck-
horn will shortly have a similar force at
work,	
Notice.
In the Matter of the Kootenay Development
Company, Limited.
NQTlCt Is hereby given that the creditors of
the above named company are required on or
before the 80th dayvof September, 1899, to send
their names and addresses and particulars of
their "debts or claims and the names and addresses of their solicitors, if any, to Arthur
Thomas Kennedy, of 22 Fenchurch street in the
city of London, the liquidator of the said company, and if so required by notice in writing
iront the said liquidator are by their solicitors
to come in and prove their said debts or claims
at such time and place, as shall be specified in
shell nbtice or in default thereof they will be
excluded from any benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.
Dated this 24th day of July 1899.
ERNE8T H. SAUNDERS,
63 and 64 New Broad street,
London, E. (T. (England)
Solicitor for Liquidator.
NOTICE.
|
t
THE PIONEER  HOTEL.
GreenWOOd City,   Boundary Creek, B. C.
���   i   ���
We are prepared to welcome guests and provide best accommodations.
HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
The    Best of Wines,   Liquors   arid   Cigars.    The most comfortable
SAMPLE ROOM
In Greenwood.   Heated by Hot Air.
��� ��� ���
j* W* Nelson, Proprietor*
CHOICE DRIVING TEAMS,
Crackerjack Saddle Horses.
Distance Cuts no Ice.
We Never Fail to Get There.
Palace
Livery
Stables.
Robbing* Bros., Prop's.,
������ Greenwood, B. >B.
Ottawa HoUSe, H D- Tompkins, Prop.
ALWAYS OPEK
New rooms; well heated; first class dining room; choice wines, liq-
,   uors   and  cigars.
WW9999
GREENWOOD. B. C.
JS.
* I ������-
In the matter of the Estate of Josephus Stanton,  late   of   Greenwood,   District of Yale,
Boarding House Keeper, Deceased, intestate.
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that all creditors and others having claims against the estate of the said Josephus Stanton, who died on
or about the 23d day of June, 1899, are required,
on or before the 6th day of September, 1899, to
send to the undersign ea, solicitors for Mary A.
Stanton, administratrix of   the goods of the
said  deceased,  the  full particulars of their
claims, and the nature of the securities, if any
held by them.
And farther take notice that after such last
mentioned date the said administratrix will
proceed to distribute the assets of the deceased
amongthe parties entitled thereto, having regard only to the claims of which she shall then
nave notice, and that the said administratrix
will not be liable for the said assets or any part
(hereof to any person or persons of whose
claims notice shall not have been received by
her at the time of such distribution.
Lkamy a Gray.
Solicitors for the said Administratrix'.
Greenwood, R. C, August 4th, 1899.       20-4.
GREENWOOD
Flour,. Feed, Produce and
Commission Co/   *&     <&     *&
DEALERS IN HAY, GRAIN, POTATOES, BUTTER, EGGS, ETC.
HEAVY WAGON SCALES IN CONNECTION WITH OUR
BUSINESS. - -
Silver Street,    *��     #    Greenwood, B* C
Why ]?e In Darkness?
When H. KEMP can clean your
Windows; also OFFICES and
STORES.
PRIVATE      KURSIHG      FOB     GERTLEMEH.
,_/ Leave Orders at
WHITE FR0HT STORE. GOV'T STREET.
Rates Moderate.
THE   BEST   BEER   IN   TOWN   18   MADE   BY   THE
Elkhorn Brewery,
HARTINGER   ft  P0RTMANN,  Props.
ASK   FOR
gkhorn
Lager
Jeer.
PATRONISE
HOME
INDUSTRY.
The Elkhorn Lager Beer contains
only pure Malt and
Hops.   Try it!
It Is kept on
Draught or in Bottles by all the Leading Hotels in this
District. Friday, Aug. 11, 1899-
THE   GREENWOOD  MUTER.
i$
A SPLENDID MEETING
The Convention of Southern
B. C. Boards of Trade.
A Success in Every Sense���A Condensed Report of the Proceedings-
Important  Resolutions Considered.
After having been entertained at a
Smoker, in. the Miners' Union hall by
the members of the Rossiand Board of
Trade tlie previous evening, the joint
convention of the Boards of Trade of
Kootenay. and the Boundary country
met at ten.o'clock in Mr. Eraser's room
ever the Bank of Montreal, Rossland.
An adjournment was made until noon
when the regular business was taken up.
The delegates present at the opening of
tlie proceedings were as follows:
Moyie, X. P. Farrell; Grand Forks, W.
B. Cochrane and Smith Curtis; Fort
Steele, J. A. Harvey; Cascade, Stanley
Mayall; Revelstoke, T. L. Haig and J.
T..Brewster; Trail, Col. E. S. Topping
and W..H.Aldridge; Greenwood, A. J,
McMillan and Duncan Ross, and Rossland, Han.T. Mayne Daly and J. S. C.
Eraser. Subsequently, during the afternoon session, Messsrs, Roderick Robertson and Frank Fletcher, and Messrs. G.
0. Buchanan and H. Giegerich, repre-
sentating Nelson and Kaslo respectively,
arrived and took part in the proceedings..
Mr. Duncan Ross was appointed vice
chairman of the meeting, and Mr.
H. W. C. Jackson was appointed secretary of tlie organization.
A committee was appointed to prepare
a report on organization and procedure,
and at three o'clock it was received.
The report recommended that an association be formed to be known as the
Associated Boards of Trade of Eastern
British Columbia, the membership to be
composed of two delegates from each
of the boards of trade now existing or
hereafter organized in the mining districts of Yale, East and West Kootenay
and Cariboo.. That the annual meeting
be held on the first Thursday in August,
the place of next meeting to be decided
by a majority vote at each annual meeting, emergency meetings to be called by
the executive committee, who will decide time and place.
That the purpose of this organization
shall be to discuss and take action upon
all questions affecting the general welfare of the people residing within the
jurisdiction of the association, and more
particularly all matters affecting the
mining industry, the officers of the
board to consist of a president, two vice-
presidents, secretary and an executive
committee of six members, "epresenting
the various mining districts, each board
to pay an annual fee of $15 for general
expenses, each delegate present to have
a vote.
The order of business and regulations
for discussion was also provided. The
report finally concluded with the following list of questions for the consideration of the present convention.
1. County or district organization as
opposed to the present system. 2. The
silver-lead question. 3. Railway matters. 4. The relation of the public to
railways. 5. The postal service in the
Province. 6. Dominion and Provincial
Parliamentary legislation. 7. Theeight-
hour law. 8. The appointment of government officials in new districts and
sittings of courts. 9. Educational facilities. 10. Contribution by Provincial
government to municipalities of a percentage of royalty on mineral output to
assist in maintenance and construction
of roads to mines within city limits.
11. The question of royalty on timber
cut on mineral claims by owners for
mining purposes. Surface rights of
mineral claims and hasty changes in
mining legislation. 12. Concerted action by Parliamentary representatives
in securing appropriations from Provincial government. 13. The necessity of
additional Land Registry offices. 14.
Official recognition of the term Boundary
district. 15. Proper representation of
the Province in London. 16. Quarterly
Provincial government bulletins on mineral industry. 17. Technical training
in mining to be provided for by the government. 18. The establishment of a
department of mines by the Dominion
government. The report was read clause
by clause and adopted without amendment after some discussion.
A. J. McMillan urged the quarterly issuing of mining returns by the Minister
of Mines, and a resolution to that effect
was unanimously passed. It was also
decided that improved mail facilities
were necessary, and a committee was
appointed to draft a resolution embodying the views of the convention.
It was moved by Duncan Ross and
seconded by Smith Curtis, that this as
sociation urge upon the Provincial government the desirability of designating
the mineral region occupying the Kettle
River basin, as "The Boundary District," and of having this district defined
and named on all maps of the Province.
In support of his resolution Duncan
Ross said the district had at the present
time no known boundaries, and eastern
people were at a loss as to its position in
the Province. Although a sectiou containing many rich properties and the
scene of great activity, it did not appear
as a district on any government map.
The resolution was supported by otner
delegates from the Boundary and passed.
G. 0. Buchanan, of Kaslo, then submitted a long resolution setting forth
that in view of the large amount of
money necessary and desirable to be
spent in public works in Kootenay and
Yale, and the limited appropriations in
proportion to the revenue derived from
these districts, and. further, in view of
the system of expenditure being unsuitable to the requirements of the district,
it is the sense of this convention that
provision should be made by Provincial
enactment for a form of county or district organization by which any of the
counties in the Province could be organized with such powers and duties as are
devolved upon county municipalities in
other Provinces in Canada. Mr. Buchanan made a long speech in support
of his resolution, and was followed by
Msssrs. Walsh,Ross, Daly, Curtis and
Col. Topping. A committee was appointed to report later on.
When the convention assembled on
Friday morning at 10 o'clock the committee appointed to report on the resolutions of Mr. Buchanan submitted another resolution including the same general premises in regard to the inadequacy of appropriations, the disparity
between expenditure in Southern B. C.
and the receipts therefrom, and the unsatisfactory manner in which the moneys
were expended and it was resolved that
it is the sense of this convention that
the Government should borrow on the
credit of the Province a sum of money
sufficient to build and maintain the
roads and bridges which are at present
urgently needed throughout the mining
districts in the Province, and hereafter
they should adopt a system under which
S HELLO BOYS! S
FOR   UP-TO-DATE
CLOTHING,  HATS, CAPS,
NECKTIES, SHIRTS,
UNDERWEAR,   BRACES,
CALL   ON
J.   F. RODGERS,
OLD STAND BANK OF MONTREAL.
COPPER   ST.,
provincial grants for road construction
in the mining districts of the Province
will be more largely increased, the same
to be commensurate with the revenue
derived therefrom and the expenditure
of the same to be made under the super,
vision and control of commissioners
elected by the people, and following the
adoption of some such new and adequate system that provisions should be
made by Provincial enactment for a
form of county or district organization
by which any of the districts or counties
in the Province could, if the residents
therein see fit, be organized into municipalities either on the lines adopted by
the older Provinces of Canada or otherwise with the right in such municipalities of collecting and appropriating for
this use an equitable proportion of the
revenue and taxes at present levied and
collected by the Provincial government,
and particularly such as is derived from
the mining industry, including the recording fees, free miners' licenses and a
percentage of the royalty on the output
of the mines. This was unanimously
carried.
Duncan Ross submitted a report on
behalf of the committee appointed with
reference to postal facilities. This embodied a great many complaints, in regard to irregularity, inadequacy, insufficiency of salaries paid to officials, carelessness, etc., and called the attention
of the postmaster-general to these things
urging upon him the necessity of action,
particularly that of providing a daily
mail service for all towns which have
daily communication by rail, stage or
steamer.   Carried unanimously,
It was next resolved unanimously
after a hearty discussion on the subject
that the Dominion Government be asked
to grant separate representation to the
the Kootenay and Boundary districts,
and that the said memorial be forwarded
to the Government.
Mr. Ross moved, seconded by Mr. McMillan, that, in the opinion of the associated Boards of Trade of Eastern British
Columbia the time has arrived when the
Boundary district should be given separate representation in the Provincial Legislature, and the members of the associated Boards heartily urged upon the
British Columbia Government the desirability of giving said district such representation without delay.   Carried.
The next question to be taken up was
the discussion of the silver-lead question. So far as the Kootenay
country was concerned this was the
most important before the conference.
Mr. Buchanan, of Kaslo, made a long
speech, and an able one on the subject,
concluding by moving this resolution :
Resolved, that an arrangement whereby lead ore, the product of the United
States or Canada would be made reciprocally free of duty between the two
countries, offers the best solution of the
problem at present confronting the lead
producing districts of British Columbia,
as to the disposition of such ores.
Resolved, that this convention approves the stand taken by the British
and  Canadian  commissioners   to   the
Quebec conference in favor of such an
arrangement.
Resolved, that this convention respectfully requests that the said commissioners in event of the resumption
and successful termination of the pending negotiations, will insist upon the retention of lead ores upon the list of products to be made fiee of duty.
After lunch the subject was again
taken up by Mr. Aldridge of the Trail
smelter and as a practical man his address was a valuable contribution to the
discussion. He moved as an amendment :
Resolved, that lead smelted in Canada and refined in bond in the United
States, should be admitted into Canada
free of the Canadian duty on pig lead at
15 per cent.
Resolved, that the Canadian import
duties on white lead, letharge, red lead
or other manufactured lead be increased
to 30 per cent to correspond to the present Canadian duties on lead pipe, sheet
lead, etc., it being understood that the
present duty on pig lead of 15 per cent,
be maintained.
A long debate followed, when the following was accepted as a compromise
and unanimously adopted:
Resolved, that it is the sense of this
association that the largest possible
amount of relief would be given to the
lead mining industry in British Columbia by a reciprocal arrangement with
the United States by which lead in bullion and in ore would be admitted free
of duty into . the market of the United
States and that we shall continue to
urge upon; the Canadian commissioners
to the international conference the paramount importance of using every effort
to secure such an arrangement.
That pending the conclusion of such a
treaty or in the event of the final failure
of negotiations for such a treaty it is the
sense of this association:
(a). That lead smelted in Canada and
refined abroad should be readmitted
duty free into Canada.
(b). That import duties upon manufactured lead coming into Canada should
be increased to a parity with the duties
levied upon other lines of manufactured
goods.
(,<:). That the bounties already earned
by Canadian smelters under the act for
the uncouragement of silver-lead smelting, 1895, should be immediately adjusted and paid,
Tlie association then selected Nelson
as the place of meeting next year and
the following officers were unanimously
elected: President, J. S. C. Fraser;
vice-presidents, Roderick Robertson and
G. 0. Buchanan; executive, Duncan
Ross, S. A. Harvey, T. M. Daly, E. S.
Topping, T. L. Haig and Smith Curtis;
H. W. C. Jackson, secretary-treasurer.
Notice to Advertisers.
All changes of ads must be handed in
to Thb Miner office by Tuesday noon
for that week's issue; also orders for ex
tra copies of paper. THE   GREENWOOD   MINER.
Friday, Aug, 4 1899.
LAID  THE   CORNER  STONE.
Ceremonies la Connection With the Building:
of the Baptist Church.
It was announced to have the laying
Of the corner stone of the Baptist church
take place last Saturday at three o'clock,
but at that hour the sun was blazing
hpt, and those who had assembled to
take part were extremely glad when
Rev. Mri Trotter announced that the
ceremonies would be postponed until
Monday night of this week at 7:30.
On Monday evening by way of contrast it was delightfully Cbol, with a
prospect of a shower. Quite a large
number assembled to participate in the
ceremonies, including ladies for whom
seats were provided. On the platform
were the Mayor, who presided, and
Revs W. T. Stackhouse, president of
the Baptist conference, W; G. W. Fortune,
Presbyterian, and H. P. Balderston,
Methodist; ex-Mayor Wood, Alderman
Cameron, and representatives of the
press. The cornerstone of granite was
suspended by tackle ready to be placed
in position, a mute but significant factor
in the ceremonial of the occassion.
After the singing of a hymn and pray
er  by the pastor, Mayor Hardy, in  a
short   speech opened the proceedings
He congratulated the Messrs. Trotter
and Balderston on the  fact   that   al
though they had been the last in the
field they were the first to erect sub
stantial church edifices.   It was a gratifying thing to those who had been in
the west so long away from the influences of civilization to see church buildings rising up where a few  years ago it
would have been thought impossible.
Addresses were then delivered by Mr
Balderston, Mr. Fortune, Mr. Stack-
house and Mr. Trotter. It would be
quite out of the question to report their
interesting addresses in full. Mr. Bal-
derston's theme was the significance of
church building in relation to social and
economic safety and well being. Mr.
Fortune congratulated the Baptists and
Methodists on their enterprise and said
although the Presbyterians had been in
the field the first, they were last in the
race; and they deserved to be last for
the opportunity they had missed, and
only had themselves to blame. There
was, however, no rivalry. While the
Presbyterians hoped to have a church
structure, too, before the snow flies
there was room for all in the face of the
common foe of sin. Mr. Stackhouse referred to the great wealth of the Boundary district, and said while he came
from Rossland over which there they
felt proud as a city yet in the Boundary
district there was room for half a dozen
of cities as large as Rossland at present
is. He pointed to the desirability of using its great wealth, present and prospective, in building up the moral aud social structure on a broad and enduring
basis. Rev. Trotter thanked all present
for their kindly interest as shown by
their presence, his denominational
brethren, and especially Mr. Wood and
those associated with him in the town-
site, who had so kindly contributed the
lots for the site. He said with a good
deal of pride that the church would be
opened without a dollar of debt, and he
looked forward to the time when its influence for good and humanity would be
commensurate with the expansion of
! natural opportunities in this country.
After the speaking Mayor Hardy then
announced the laying of the stone, the
cereineny in connection with which was
performed by Robt. Wood, assisted by
jMr. Trotter. Prayer by the Rev. Mr.
Stackhouse, and the singing of "God
Save the Queen" brought the proceedings to a close.
Saddles and
Harness*    <��    <��
Turf Goods,
BOOT AND SHOE FINDINGS.
REPAIRING   A   SPECIALTY.
M. S. Butler,      *
GREENWOOD,   B.   C.
Fishing Tackle*
A COMPLETE LINE IN
HOOKS,   FLIES,    LINES,    BOSS,
REELS,  ETC.,   AT
Smith   & McRae's.
Books, and Stationary,  Office Supplies
and  Maps.
CARPENTER & CO.,
Photographers.
LATEST DESIGNS   IN  PLATINUM   CABINETS   AND
MANTELLOS.
Views of Greenwood
and Boundary Creek Mines.
Prices Reasonable.
Studio Opp. WINDSOR Hotel.
JJ A. WRIGHT,-
Boot and shoe
Maker.......
Repairing  neatly done.    Shop  across from
WINDSOR Hotel.
GREENWOOD.        *.        -        B. C.
DR. R. MATHISON
DENTIST   :    :
NADEN BLOCK
GREENWOOD
Graduate Pennsylvania
College of Dental - -
Surgery - - - - -
Philadelphia, Pa.- -
A Licentiate of British
Columbia-  -  -  -  -
M. B. FRAZEE,
GROCERY and BAKERY.
Rye and Graham Bread.
White Bread, 161-lb. loaves $1.00
A Choice Stock of Groceries.
As Fine as in the City	
Hamill
-   Block,
GREENWOOD. B. C.
To the Citizens
of Greenwood,
AND PEOPLE IN GENERAL,
I wish to Inform you that i.t is worth
your while to call oa iu�� i# my new
stand
On Copper Street,
OPP.  H.  A.   KING   &  GO'S.,
*
Where I carry a full line of
Cigars, Tobaccos,
Fancy goods, Jewelry, Etc.   Also a full
line of fruit always on hand.
HENRY SAUVE.
W.   M.    SPROTT,
NEXT DOOR TO TEL. OFFICE.
Fashionable
Dressmaker,
MRS. J. A. CARPENTER.
GOVERNMENT STREET,
Two Doors Below the old MINER Office.
WHEN YOU WANT
THE BEST IMPORTED CIGARS and TOBACCOS, CONFECTIONARY, MAGAZINES,
PERIODICALS, STATIONARY
and HOUSE PLANTS GOTO
Munro's,
Next Door to
BANNERMAN'8.
COPPER STREET.
WMNMIVMMM
Arlington
COPPER STREET,
GREENWOOD.
Hotel,
Hooper & Co.,
Proprietors.
IMPORTED & DOMESTIC
CIGARS,
WINES and LIQUORS.
Headquarters for Mining Men.
McElmon
THE WATCHMAKER
Is now tactutad ,o�� iGreen.-
wood street
OPPOSITE Till NEW
RENDEU, 3U)CK.
35
YEARS
EXPERIENCE.
Full assortment of material andjtools to
do correct, work.
Anaconda Hotel,
MLE0D & CO. Props.
GOOD   DINING   ROO,M  A.QCOJMMQ-
DATIONS.
ALL CLASSES^QF,M|$3.
FINE LIQUORS ayd^DOARjS.
AKACOHDA, BJ&.
A.   B.   JENSEN.
Horse-Shoeing
and
Blacksmithing.
Buckboards and Buggies made to order
Work guaranteed.
Copper St.,
GREENWOOD.        -       -       B.    C.
Palace Hotet
Snodgrass  &     ^^
Kelly, Props., B..c.
Free Baths for Patrons.
One-half Mile From ^Greenwood Citv*',
Rates Reasonable-
Nash & Co.,
PAINTERS and
PAPER HARGERS,
SIQN WORK A
SPECIALTY.
Quick   Work . (hiaranteed.
8HQP.0PP. FISHER SAW MILL. fi
THE  GREENWOOD  MUTER.
Friday, Aug, 11,1899.
MYERS CREEK MINING DISTRICT
Will be a Second Republic.
^.Y,..V,.����^ ^Vm.Vh,V,VW,V,V,,V,V,V.V^
I    The leading mines are the Crystal Butte, (with I |    The   KING   SOLOMON mine, and the WAR
I mill now building,) Review, (owned by Canadians^ I I EAGLE mine.      .^rr^
Adjoining and Parallel to
the War Eagle is the
(I
WISCONSIN GROUP
��
a��a^.1���� WISCONSIN and BLACK HAWK.
These are two good prospects with large sur- $ $     Fred M. Cummings, M. E., obtained following
face mineral  1 lii| ^^ $ I values in gold and silver:.
$13.26   $57.89   $41.55
from a six-foot ledge at a depth of lO feet. A Company is now being formed
to acquire this Group, particulars of which can be obtained from the following named brokers:
M'ENTIRE, M'DONNELL & COMPANY, and
HOLBROOK, KEAN & COMPANY. THE  GREENWOOD  MINER.
Friday, Aug. 11, 1899.
INTERIOR   TOPICS.
Contractors have started work on the
branch of the Crow's Nest line from
Cranbrook to the North Star mine.
Sayward's sawmill at Pilot Bay which
has been lying idle for a long time, has
been running steadily since the first of
March.
Wisconsin and Lucky Strike claims,
the well known properties of the Hen-
nessy Brothers, on Sixteen Mile creek,
are reported bonded to Spokane parties
for $3,000,000, but the report is not confirmed.
The Nelson Poorman Gold mining
company has arranged for the resumption of work on the Poorman mine at
Nelson.
The Rossland Miners' Union has declared itself as opposed to the contract
system, and has decided that hereafter
no member of the union shall be allowed
to do contract work.
An important strike of ten feet of lead
carbonates and galena has been made
on the Hope, one of the Sullivan group
near Fort Steele.
The old Ainsworth camp is at last
showing signs of activity. The Highland concentrator has started up and
will handle 80 or 90 tons of ore per day.
The same company owning the mill is
running a long tunnel into the mountain to tap the leads at great depth.
C. O'Brien Reddin of Spokane, of the
Spokane & B. C. Telegraph Co., applied
to the Inland Telephone & Telepraph
Co. for a telephone and tendered the
rent for it in advance, but was refused,
and now he has applied for a writ of
mandate to compel the putting in of the
telephone.
Samuel Moore, B. A., of Cloverdale,
B. C, has been appointed principal of
the Grand Forks public school.
The Victoria Hotel corner, Grand
Forks, 110 feet on Bridge and 90 on Riverside, has been sold for $15,000 to Chas.
Cummings and Chas. Young.
The Grand Forks Miner last week formally announces the sale of the Miner
to John R Reavis of the Republic Miner
F. H. McCarter & Sons retain the job
plant.
The remains of May Drake, a twenty-
one year old woman, who in a fit of despondency jumped into the Kettle river
at the Forks on May 7th last, was found
a week ago on Sunday. Her parents
live at Wanatchee, Wash., and the consequences of an irregular life is said to
be the cause of her rash act.
Alderman H. B. Thompson, Nelson,
manager of the Nelson branch of the
Turner, Beeton Co. business, on his retirement to go to Cariboo, was banqueted at the Phair hotel there. He was
one of the most popular men in Nelson,
and took a leading part in public affairs.
Sudbury miners have been imported
to work in the Ymir mine on a six
months'contract, under the control of
the Nelson District Mine Owners' Association.
A Good Showing of Ore.
A very promising strike lias been
made on the Mountain View in Summit Camp by Mr. Collins, manager of
the Golden Crown, who has bonded it,
and started in to develop. On the surface there was a large showing of copper oxide which assayed well, the lead
being, so far as can be ascertained, about
33 feet wide. At least, that is the distance between the contact. The shaft
has been sunk in sold ore, and at a distance of eight feet a fine body of copper
pyrites was struck, which is identical
with that of the B. C, which it adjoins
on the south and west. Mr. Collins
brought down some samples for assay
and exhibition. The foot wall is lime,
and the hanging wall porphyry.
PERSONAL  MENTION.
F. Lewin, Bank of B. N. A., has returned to his post after his recent illness.
Dr. Foster has so far recovered from
his attack of typhoid fever as to be able
to resume his practice again.
E. C. Jennings, representing the Giant
Powder Co., Victoria, was in the city
his week.
J. J. Southcott, the well known commercial traveller, was in town several
days this week, representing Simon
Leiser of Victoria;
A. B. Mackenzie, C. P. R. agent, insurance, etc., Rossland, paid Greenwood a vistt this week.
Mr. R. Hutchins, of the Le Roi,
Rossland, succeeds Henry Johns as
mine managerof the Mother Lode.
Mr. Johns, late superintendent of the
Mother Lode, has gone for a holiday
trip before assuming management of the
Sunset. He will return in about three
weeks.
J. T. McMaster, Nelson, representing
the Lake of the Woods Milling Co., was
in town this week.
T. C. Richardson, representing Allan
& Co., boots and shoes, Vancouver,
came in town on Monday.
Fred Starkey, Rossland, representing
the Parsons Produce Co., came in last
week, and went out on Monday.
Thos. McDonnell of McDonnell, Mc-
Entire & Co., has gone to Spokane for
ten days.
R. G. Wynkoop, representing the
Might Directory Co., Toronto, was in
Greenwood this week.
H T. Ceperley, Vancouver, the big
insurance man, who has been here for
some days went out on Wednesday.
life ia Hew Denver.
In one way we are ahead of other Kootenay editors. We have enough wood
on hand to last us until 1900. This is
about the only thing we are long on.
We are extremely short on cash and job
work, while mint juleps, boiled shirts
and diamonds are only visible to us
when we dream of the rosy past. Thus
do things grow serious and serve to teach
us that in the midst of life we are in the
soup, or New Denver.���New Denver
Ledge.
GREENWOOD   STOCK    MARKET.
There is nothing special to report in
stocks this week, except that there has
been some demand for Brandon &
Golden Crown and Boundary Creek
Mining & Milling Co. There is a generally stronger feeling in the market and
it is anticipated that the market will be-
yin to move freely in a few weeks.
Old Ironsides 1 .10
Knob Hill 95
Morrison 15
Winnipeg 27
Brandon 29
Camp McK. G. M. & M. Co....:.    .05
Higv land Queen 05
Pathfinder 16
Mammoth 05
B. C. M. &M. Co 09
Waterloo 08>��
Little Cariboo 01}��
King Mining Company 29
Helen : 05
Rathmullen 08
Minuehaha 26
c^^Vonrmmrr^
SUPERIOR  LINE  OF   CIGARS.
MORENA,
Brands: f INTERIOR and
MINER.
Made by INLAND CIGAR MFG. CO. of Kamloops, B. C.
CLEAR HAVANA  FILLER.
Nothing but B. C. Union Labor Employed.
-FOR SALE AT-
Arlington, Pioneer, International, Pacific, Rossland, Ottawa
and Commercial Hotels, H. A. King & Co.
PROTECT HOME INDUSTRY.
DISSOLUTION NOTICE
���+.,��.���������
1WOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the partnership here-
* ? tofore existing between us, the undersigned, as brokers
and general agents in the City of Greenwood, in the Province of
British Columbia, has been this day dissolved by mutual consent.
All debts owing to the said partnership are to be'paid to Arthur
Mowat, at the City of Greenwood aforesaid, and all claims against
the said partnership are to be presented to the said Arthur Mowat,
by whom the same will be settled. The business of the firm of
Mowat & Palmer will hereafter be conducted by Arthur Mowat.
ARTHUR   MOWAT.
ROBT.   PALMER.
Witness:    P.   P.   THORPE.
Dated at Greenwood this 21st day of July, A. D. 1899.
An Ounce of Fact is Worth
A   1 On Ot V iCtlOn* here are facts that the
WHITE FRONT STORE
have to offer you. Read���Mark���Learn, and inwardly digest. That
we carry a full line of clothing, boots and shoes. Heavy shoes from
$2.00 pr. Underclothing from $1.50 suit; pants from $2 pair, etc. Our
Leader overalls, riveted, $1.00 pr.   THIS WILL INTEREST YOU:���
Our Rock Creek and Rendell (.west fork)
Stores carry a full line prospectors boots, shoes, clothing, hats, caps,
groceries, hardware, picks, shovels, powder, steel, etc., etc.   Just call at
White Front Store Government Street, Km���to the
FOR  FURTHER PARTICULARS.
WE BEG TO INTRODUCE TO THE
PUBLIC THE FAMOUS
"La Fama" agar.
Made   from a   CLEAR HAVANA FILLER, with  a  FINE DELHI
WRAPPER, and CUBAN HAND MADE.   TRY IT.
H. A. King & Co.,
COPPER STREET, GREENWOOD.
New and Second-Hand
Goods*
"0.1. C."
Sewing Machines, Locks, Guns Repaired, Keys Fitted.
A.  L. WHITE &   CO., OPPOSITE    TELEPHOHE     OFFICE.

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