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The Grand Forks Miner Oct 23, 1897

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Array THE GRAND FORKS MINER.
SECOND YEAR.   NO. 7(5
GRAND FOKKS, B. O., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 98- 1897.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
SENT  TO   PRISON   FOR  LIFE.
GLEANINGS     FROM     ALL     AROUND.
Death* of Noted Persons—Fire*, Xloh-
berle* m>d Accidents—Pointers In
If um in-t-km Circles and General
Neiri of the Week.
Senator Wilson haa recommended Jas.
K. Daniels of Spokane for appointment as
deputy collector of customs at Northport,
Wash., to succeed Mart J. Maloney, the
present democratic incumbent. Collector
of Customs Hcustis is to make the recommendation to the department for the appointment also, and there seems to be no
douht that Mr. Daniels will secure the
plum. The salary of the olliee is $1800 a
year,
Hon. Charles \V. Jones, ex-United
Slates senator from Florida, is dead.
Wyoming now has a fully equipped bicycle factory, from which the lirst finish*
ed machine was turned out last week. It
is said to be "light, easy running and
handsome."
Thomas Taggart, democrat, defeated
W. N. Harding, republican, for mayor of
Indianapolis, Ind., by a plurality that
will reach 5000. Taggart is freely spoken
of as the next democratic candidate for
governor. He was nominated on a silver
platform.
C. J, Smith, receiver of the Oregon
Improvement Company, has filed his report for August, 1807. The report shows
gross earnings of $491,188.36; expenses,
$327,427.85; net earnings, $103,710.50.
This is a large increase over the net earnings of August, 189(1, which wero $00,-
757.23. The report also shows that the
net earnings for the fiscal year ending
August 31, 1897, were $638,470.98, an Increase of $345,000 over the preceding year.
Associate Judge Field of the United
States supreme court has made formal
application to President McKlnley to be
retired from the bench under the law allowing members of that court to be retired when 70 years of age. This statement is made upon the highest authority,
and also that Attorney General Joseph
McKenna of California will be named to
succeed him on December 0, when congress convenes, five days after the retirement of Justice Field takes effect.
The municipal election at Chattanooga,
Tenn, resulted in the overwhelming defeat of the republican ticket. Colonel Kd
watkins, democrat, was elected by 095
majority. Thc democrats elected six
out of eight aldermen. The city is normally republican by from 400 to 500 and
the overwhelming reversal of the conditions is due to the apathy of the republican voters and the disaffection of the negroes.   Tli ere was a very light vote.
Tho Union Pacific has resumed business with the Oregon Short Line.
In tho case of Elmer Gilford, charged
with debauching n 16-year-old girl, the
jury have rendered a verdict of guilty, advising that he be given the full extent of
tlie law, which is imprisonment for life.
Pittsburg, Pa., reports that 3500 miners
of the river district, who have been idle
for two weeks, owing to a dispute over
differentials, have resumed work pending
the settlement by arbitration.
It is Deported in official circles that another filibustering expedition has been
landed in the river Arimal, province of
Santa Clara, and has succeeded in joining the Cuban insurgent forces.
The conference of the four railroad
brotherhoods at Peoria, 111., has agreed
upon a plan of federation whioh will bc
submitted to the lodges of the trainmen,
telegraphers, conductors and firemen in
tho United States, Canada and Mexico,
and returns will not all be tn until the
first of January.
Iowa Hills, a mining town in the mountains of Placer eountq, Cal., reports a fire
loss of $40,000; insurance about $10,000.
Two lodgers perished in the (Tames of a
hotel.
Sir Edwin Arnold, the poet and journalist, has married a Japanese lady in London.
It is reported that the Texas hot fly has
made its appearance in Contra Costa
county, Cal.
Alderman J, B. Haberkorn was shot
and perhaps fatally wounded by (leorge
Jensen in a Chicago saloon, in a quarrel
Saturday.
Edward Langtry, the husband of Lily
Langtry, died Saturday at the insane asylum at Chester, England, to which he
was recently committed by a magistrate.
Mrs, E. G. VandUBen, a wealthy woman
of San Francisco, was taken lo the receiving hospital clothed in rags and demented. She had nearly $5000 sewed In her
clothing.
J. S. Wilson and C. C. Douglass, San
Francisco mining men. have started for
the headwaters of the Yaqui river, Mexico, where thc Indians have mined in a
primitive way for 200 years, and where
rich veins are believed to be.
The Wells-Forgo express oflice at Quincy, Cal,, was robbed some time during Friday night, tho robbers taking the express
box which was waiting the outgoing
stage, and carried it to a field half a mile
distant, and broke it open. They secured
coin, gold dust and a gold bar amounting
to $400, and $3800 in checks.
Charles P. Hopkins has been appointed
postmaster at Spokane to succeed II. T,
Mai I on.
Forest fires are destroying much property in sections of New York and Pennsylvania.
Marshal Blanco has started from Spain
for Cuba to begin the work of pacification. No money will be spared to buy
off the chiefs of the insurrection, or to
make their departure easy, though all
negotiations will be denied officially.
Blanco has been given power to pursue
lines kept secret even from the cabinet,
it is reported.
Veteran   Actor   Demi.
Boston, Oct. 19.—John W. Hague, the
well known actor, is dead, aged 58. He
hns supported many famous stars, including Edwin Booth, Mary Anderson, John
McCulIougli nnd Charlotte Cushman.
•Indue   (tends   au   Ah inl   Lecture   to
the Criminal.
Spokane, Oct, Hi.—"Life in the penitentiary."
The above is the sentence imposed upon
Elmer Gilford by Judge Brents yesterday, and the judge's intimation was, although not expressed in words, that lie
wished the defendant were a eat that he
might impose nine life sentences upon
him.
Judge Brents, in addition to placing
Gilford's punishment at the extreme penalty provided by law, subjected tlte con-
dew ned man to an awful denunciation. He
said;
"Before the evidence produced at this
trial I would not have believed, nor could
I have conceived, that a while man could
be so sunken iu iniquity as to subject a
white girl to the lust of a Chinaman.
"Your crime calls for the severest denunciation and (he extreme penalty of the
law. Did I believe that you would reform I would pass it sentence that would
l>e severe enough lo punish and at the
same time give you an opportunity to enjoy liberty as a reformed man. But J
don't believe you would reform. Men 80
sunk in depravity as lo be guilty of trafficking between the lust of heathens and
the virtue of while girls are such a menace to society that the law in its severest
form should be invoked to remove them
beyond the pale of that society they
might otherwise corrupt.
"It makes no difference lo me what the
past life of this girl may have been. The
fact remains that she had not reached the
age of 10 years when she fell into your
hands. In considering the law passed by
our last legislature raising the age of
consent to 18 years, I have sometimes
thought it was too high. In the light of
the circumstances developed in this ease,
it is certainly not too high, and I doubt
if it is high enough when the question of
protecting girls from such influences as
yours is concerned."
NEWS      OF      GENERAL      INTEREST.
A Glance Orer Washington, Montana, Idaho und Drltlsh Columbia
—Industries Pushed hy Go-Ah end
People— Facts and Figures.
REGENTS ARE REMOVED.
Governor: Roger* Makes Chunaefi In
the University of Washington,
Olympia, Wash., Oct. 17. — Governor
Rogers yesterday miyle the following
changes in the board of regents of the
university of Washington: K. Winsor of
Seattle has been appointed for the unexpired term ending the second Monday in
March, 1890, vice Clark Davis, removed;
John B. Allen of Seattle is apopinted for
the unexpired term ending tlie second
Monday in March, 1899, vice James R.
Hoyden, removed; C. M. Easterday of Tacoma is appointed for the unexpired term
ending the second Monday in March,
1902, vice J. P. Fay, removed. Charges
of miscohduct in office are alleged, consisting of intrigue within the board of regents.   Regent Fay will resist removal.
FIFTY SLEEPING BOYS ESCAPE.
Father   Hcld's  Technical  College  tit
S [io I-*. une   Destroyed.
Spokane, Oft. 18.—The Spokane technical school, Father B. Hold's new educational institution for boys, located on the
hill in Cook's addition, was totally destroyed by fire early yesterday morning.
The* loss is about $10,000 or '$11,000, of
whieh only $2500 is covered by insurance.
The origin of the fire is a mystery. It
started somewhere in (he rear of the
building, between the pantry and the oil
room. The barking of a dog awakened
Father Held, who saw the smoke, gave
the alarm, aroused the faculty, and marshaled out the 50 boys who were sleeping
in the structure. Most of them escaped
only with their night clothes. No one
was injured.
TROY'S ACCOUNTS SHORT.
Going   to   Sknguny   to   Get    the   Ex-
Auditor of l'ort An Relet,
Port Angeles, Wash., Oct. 10.—Douglass
Vonng and (J. C. Lyon, who have been
engaged for the last two months expecting tlie books of ex-Auditor John W. Troy,
have filed their report They would not
make public the result of their investigation, but from another source it is learned
that the shortage is about $11,000, $0000
of which occurred during the term of
Baker, Troy's predecessor. Shehrill" Dyke
is now on his way to Skaguay to arrest
Troy. Baker is not subject to criminal
prosecution, the statute of limitation having run its course.
A   LIQUOR   BUSINESS  FAILURE.
f.    Murks,    Mon loon's    Oldest    Wholesaler, Went to the Mall.
Helena, Mont., Oct. 10.—I. Marks, the
leading wholesale and retail liquor dealer
of Helena, who was the first wholesaler
in the slate, aud had been in Helena since
1886, having come from Virginia City,
where he was in business three years, has
assigned to David Morris for tlie benefit
of his creditors. His liabilities are $02,-
000, of whloh $38,800 are preferred. Thc
ordinary creditors are mostly eastern
wholesale (Inns.
Pnydny How Was Fatal.
Wallace, Idaho, Oct. 18.—While celebrating payday at Mullan Saturday
night a general row occurred, during
which a miner named Ryan was shot by
an unknown party. The ball entered the
lower part of the chest on the right side,
going square through the body, coming
out at the left. He was brought down
here to the hospital yesterday. There is
little hope of recovery.
CiiNhter  Convicted.
Kansas City, Mo., Oct. 19.—Cashier Geo.
A. Taylor of the Argentine bank, whieh
failed last year owing thousands of dollars to depositors, has been convicted in
the criminal court, in Argentine, Kan.,
of wrecking (he concern.
Rev.   Ford  Found   Guilty*
Seattle, Oct. 17.—After a trial lasting
two weeks, Rev, W. T. Ford has been convicted in the superior court of the crime
of seducing Jessie Moreford, a 15-year-
old girl, who was formerly a member of
his household and church.
A long pedigree doesn't prevent a horse
from being the last of his race.
Tacoma's city council has fixed the tax
levy at 10 mills.
The King county tax levy for 1807 bus
been fixed at 11 mills.
The total wheat yield of Adams county
is about 2.500.0(H) bushels.
The Seattle board of education has
Axed the tax levy for school purposes for
the ensuing year at 2J mills.
The Everett school board has passed a
I resolution levying a special school tax of
10 mills, which is the highest levy that
j can be made.
It is estimated 800,000 bushels of wheat
will be shipped from Rosalia this season.
Two shingle mills are to be erected at
Arlington, with a capacity of 100,000
shingles per day.
The courses of study offered by the mechanical engineering department of the
agricultural college at Pullman arc being
taken by a larger number of students
than ever before. Electrical engineering
Seems to be the choice of tin; largest number, while hydraulic engineering and
steam engineering have been chosen by a
large number.
Treasurer Elchner of Pacific county has
been figuring out what the delinquent
taxpayers will save if they take advantage of the law passed by the last legislature, which remits all costs, penalties and
interest in excess of (J per cent on all unpaid taxes for years prior to 1890, if paid
before November 30, Every taxpayer who
has property that is delinquent can save
on 1892 or prior years at least 31 per
cent; on 1893, nt least 24A per cent; 1894,
at least 17 per cent, and on 1805, at least
11 per cent.
United States District Judge Han ford
has rendered a decision in tlie case of the
merchants and shippers of Spokane,
against the Northern Pacific Railroad
Company. The decision was in favor of
the railroad company, and confirms the
report of Referee Sawyer, made about six
months ago. The merchants of Spokane
sought to compel the railroad company
to give them the same rate from points on
the Atlantic and east of the Mississippi
as is given to the merchants of Seattle
and other coast terminals.
Montana,
Tho city tax levy for Helena for the
next year will be JM mills.
The assessed value of all property in
Jeirerson county is $3,250,417.
Sixty workmen are employed at Fort
Yellowstone iu pushing to completion the
work of enlarging the post,
It is staled at Great Falls that the
Great Falls & Canada railway will change
to standard gauge in the spring.
Elmer B. Carter, the Billings stock
broker, bas purchased in Fergus county
some 30,000 head of sheep, paying an average of about $2 per head.
It is likely that within a few days the
new barracks at Fort Harrison will be occupied by two additional companies of
thc Second regiment of the United States
infantry.
Lewis county commissioners have fixed
the tax levy for this year at 15 mills for
county purposes, 5 of whieh are for the
bridge fund and 3 mills for the road fund.
The total levy for state and county purposes is 21 mills.
The Sage Creek Sheep Company's clip
of wool, amounling to 215,000 pounds, has
been sold in Boston at 10| cents. "This,"
says a commission bouse, "is, in our opinion, the highest price for the scoured
pound of any Montana wool we have
sold."
Messrs, Ililger and Barne of the land
ofiice at Livingston, Mont., report a greater volume of business for September (ban
for any month during their incumbency of
office. There were 27 homestead entries
made nnd 21 desert land entries, einbroc-
Ing 3030 acres. The total cash receipts of
the office were $3305.05.
Idaho.
At Boise Judge Stewart has decided
the case brought by Blaine county against
Lincoln county for an accounting, in favor of Lincoln county.
The tramway company at Juliaetta is
now running their cleaner night and day
and will continue to do so for the next
three weeks. They have Over 00,000 bushels of wheat to be cleaned.
The citizens of Gibbonsville have subscribed a sufficient amount to complete
the Hitter Root wagon road from that
place tol. be Montana line, where Molilalia people built it to last fall.
Chris Th lesson, the leading sheepman iu
northern Idaho, Thursday sold to a San
Francisco firm 151,000 pounds of wool,
the consideration being $20,000. Mr.
Thiessen has been holding his product
several months and mado several thousand dollars by tbe increased price.
Tho Northern Pacific railway is not to
prosecute further its case against about
300 settlers, involving title to that part
of the north portion of the Coeur d'Alene
Indian reservation, in Idaho, whicli had
been ceded by the Indians to the government. About 200,000 acres are involved
in the eases.
It now seems certain that a convention
of all the settlers on the Nez Perce reservation will be held at Nez Perce, probably
some time during the coming month, to
draft a memorial +^ be presented to the
next congress, nring tho passage of the
measure known as the free homestead bill,
whicli is intended to give relief to homesteaders by exempting (he payment of
$3.75 per acre for ceded lands.
Tho settlement of new lands in Nez
Perce county has reduced tho pasturage
area and the result is now seen in the
moving of sheep and caltlc to the grazing
district of the lower Salmon country. The
county assessor reported 15,000 sheep in
this county several months ago. These
sheep usually winter in the county, but
the past, month over 10,000 have passed
over the line to other ranges, and it is
doubtful if they will be driven back next
yea r.
British Columbia,
'l'he Catholic residents of Sandon have
secured an option on Duffy's hall, with
the intention of converting it into a place
of worship.
A new Miners' union hospital is iu
course of construction at Ainsworth. It
is a co-operative affair, to be maintained
by monthly assessments.
The formal opening of the Columbian
Methodist college at New Westminster,
B. ('., has taken place, Lieutenant Governor Dewdney being among the guests.
Mr. Roy, Dominion government engineer, will visit Golden this month and inspect the Kicking Horse and Columbia
rivers with a view to seeing what would
be required to meet the demands of the
settlers lo project their lands from tbe
flood waters of these rivers.
CLOSE   OF   SPOKANE    FRUIT    FAIR.
F.xpenses  Cleared nnd  11  Good   Kl/.ed
Sum Over.
Spokane, Wash., Oct. 18.—At midnight
Saturday the fourth annual fruit fair
passed out of existence, though it will
live for years iu the memory of the many
w)>o attended. The management, exhibit
ors and the general public who patronized
it so generously ull agree that it has been
a decided success in every way. There was
a paid attendance of nearly 70,000.
Manager Bolster was asked for a statement concerning the success of the fair.
lie said: "I believe each and every one
of the exhibitors goes home perfectly satisfied with the treatment he has received
and with the earnest desire and announced purpose to be here stronger than ever
next year. The exhibitors tell me they
not only thoroughly enjoy the vacation
spent here at the fair, but profit materially by coming in contact wilh prominent growers from other sections. Those
who purchased space have assured me
that they have done a good business. The
general public, which hns attended, I be
lieve has been satisfied with the entertainment afforded. Financially, the fair has
also been a success. Just how much has
been cleared over and above all expenses
I can not say this evening. I know (here
is a balance on the right, side of the
ledger."
CUBANS ASK FAIR PLAY.
Are   Will I iiu-   to   Fight   Spain   I'nder
Those Circumstances.
London, Oct. 10.—Colonel Jose Znyais.
who says he is accredited by the Pahna
Cuban junta of New York as minlstei
plenipotentiary to Great Britain from the
Cuban republic, in an interview is quoted
as expressing the belief that lhe war in
Cuba wiil not last another year. Spain,
said he, cannot finance the campaign, and
should have accepted the insurgents' offer of $150,000,000 for the island, under the
guarantee of the United Stales.
Colonel Zayais does not anticipate assistance from tbe United Slates. All the
Cubans desire, he says, is fair play and the
recognition of belligerent rights, so thai
they can secure the necessary supplies for
their troops.
In conclusion, Colonel Zayais is quoted
as saying: "There is no truth whatever in
the opinion expressed in England that the
Cubans desire annexation to the United
States. We are fighting for independence
and do not hanker after annexation,
which will not. be the outcome of lhe
struggle. There is not the least likelihood of Cubans accepting autonomy, lu
dependence or death is our motto."
THE  SOUTHERN  PACIFIC LOSSES.
Supreme   Court    t pacts
A Until 700,000 Acre*
Us  Claim   ti
or 1.and.
Washington, Oct. 10,—The supreme
court has rendered an opinion against
the railway company iu the case of (he
Southern Pacific Railway ('ompuny vs.
(he United Slates. The case involved
about 700,000 acres of" land in Southern
California, and grew out of the fact that
the forfeited hind grant of (he Atlantic &
Pacific Railway Company overlapped to
some extent the hinds claimed under the
government grant by the Southern Pacific.
Killed  on   the  County  Hoad.
Port Townsend, Wash., Oct. 17.—A telephone message from Brinnon Point, on
Hood's canal, 40 miles west of this place,
has been received here by Sueriff Hamilton, informing him that J. E. Luekey had
been shot and Instantly killed by hie
neighbor, W. J, Keller. From the meager
information obtained it is learned thai
the two men met on the county rond, and
in a quarrel which ensued Luekey was
killed.
Convicted   of   Hnilier.ilemcnt.
Great Falls, Mont., Oct. 10. -Fx-Trcas
urer Bristol of Teton county, recently con
vieted of embezzling $435.15 from the
county and sentenced to one year's im
prisomneiit in the penitentiary, has filed
notice of an appeal to the supreme court
from Judge Smith's denial of his motion
for a new trial. He hns filed a bond for
$5000 pending sueh appeal, and has been
released from custody.
Death   of Admiral   Warden.
Washington, Oct. 19.—Admiral John L,
Worden, retired, died iu this city this
morning. He commanded the Monitor
during its engagement with the Merrimac
in Hampton Roads during the late war.
In 1880 he was retired with the full rank
and pay of admiral, the only Instance of
the kind. He also received (he thanks
of congress for his gallantry during the
war.
Freight Hates  Higher.
Chicago, Oct. lfi. — AH rail rates from
Chicago to the Atlantic seaboard on grain
products have been advanced 2 1*2 cents.
It was the intention of the eastern roads
(o advance the lake and rail rales also,
but the Soo line refused to participate in
the advance, and therefore the lake and
rail rates will remain as they are until the
close of navigation.
A girl seldom kicks when an old man
layi a fortune at her feet.
KILLED By III Cil
THREE DEAD AND THIRTY WOUNDED
The Theater Dome Fell »mi Cincinnati    l*lu.v-Goers*    Are    Killed    nnd
Maimed,  Soon   After   die   Raising
of  the   Curtain.
Cincinnati, Out. 10,—Three persons were
killed and over 30 others were more 01
less seriously injured by the falling of the
dome of Robinson's Opera house last evening. About 8:45 o'clock, soon after the
raising of the curtain to the performance
of "Dangers of a Great City," plastering
began to fall from the dome ceiling, 40 01
50 feet above the heads of the people seat
ed in the parquet. The bouse was fairly
well filled, but, not crowded. The plastering fell in small particles at first, but
enough to alarm some of thc timid, who
retired. A little later the plastering began to shower down iu great chunks,
There was a rush from the gallery, wnich
was not wry well filled. Thc balcony was
soon emptied. Those in the dress circle
retired as promptly as possible, and,
strange to say, without an apparent panic,
The crowding of these to tlie door obstructed the passage of the people in tbe
parquet, which accounts in a measure for
ihe number of casualties. Nobody expected at the moment any other danger than
from thc falling plastering. Suddenly,
and with a great crash, the great central
truss of the ceiling, 80 feet long and 30
feet wide, came plunging down. The ends
■.)f it struck on the two gallery wings and
doubled it up in the center, sending it
lown into the parquet with a great scattering of joists and timbers. Nothing on
tho stage was harmed. Of course, there
were moans from the injured, and, as of
ten happens, the loudest from those least,
hurt.
WINDSOR IS WIPED OUT.
Historic   To\ui   of   Nova   Scotia    Destroyed  by   Fire,
Halifax, X. S„ Oct. 18.—Historic Wind
sor, one of the most beautiful towns ii
the province, was devastated by Hre yes
tcrday morning. For six hours, beginning
shortly before ;i a. hi., the fire, fanned by
.1 violent northwest gale, raged so fiercely
that the local lire department was absolutely helpless to cope with it, and within
half an hour after its discovery the muyoi
begun to call for outside assistance. Long
before noon the town had been eaten up
almost completely, the area covered In
the flames being nearly a mile square, Q|
the 400 or more buildings occupying flu
residence and business sections. bur eh
half a dozen scorched structures remain.
No Nova Scotia town has ever been
visited by a conflagration of such dimen
lions. Of the 3500 people (hat inhabited
the place few have homes of their own to
night. Over .'1000 have been taken care ol
by tbe residents of the surrounding coun
try and neighboring towns, while the remainder of the sufferers have gone to Halifax or are .sheltered in tents erected in
the vacant lots by a detachment of British troops from the garrison. The total
loss is estimated at $3,000,000.
THEIR   CONDITION   DEPLORABLE.
Sot  n   Fifth   of  Those   Starting  (lot
•it \ er    A hiNltii    I'lixMCN.
Aspen, Col., Oct. II). Professor Gliarled
M. Daggett, foi* many years a resident of
this eity, has returned to Aspen from *i
futile attempl to reach the Klondike. He
reports hundreds of men, who n few
months ago left for the gold Holds in the
best spIriU, with well filled pocket-books,
iiom returning heartsick and discouraged. I
without a '■•■nt in the world. Of between
9000 and 10,000 people who stalled foi |
the Klondike, less than 2000 go( over the
passes. Professor 1-MggHi suys their con*
ditioii i- deplorable. Some idea fo tlie
number of men who are without means
now in the country can be gained from
the fact, lhat. 20 stowaways were discovered on ih.' boat which brought the professor back.
Circle city, heretofore the metropolis
of the interior, is absolutely deserted. The
condition", at Dawson (ity an- much more
encouraging. The town is lively and
work plentiful, 'l'he food supply, however, i< a source of worry.
EDITOR   OF   THE    NEW   YORK   SUN.
Mr, Unna's Work for Hull' a Century Hat Camnianded a Foremen!
I'Jiicc- Sketch of 11 1 Refill Career «
Ll   HUNG   CHANG  TO   RETIRE.
Grea t    Chinese    Statesman     Crepares
to   Close   Ills   Life    Work.
Tacoma, Oct, 10.—According to Chinese
advices jsut received. Km I Li I lung
Chang will no longer take an active part
in government.
A native correspondent writing from
Pekin says that Karl Li has been iu ill
health for two or three months pasl
though it is not generally known in Chi
na. He has just obtained leave for an in
definite length of time. This will permi
him to relinquish his duty as grand secre
Lary ami minister of the Tsung Ti SFa
men. Li Hung Chang realizes threre an
many reforms which China must sooi
undertake if she is to preserve her unit}
ind he would like to have a part in car
eying them out. Knowing, however, that
ally a start can be made while he lives
ind that care and work will shorten hi
days, he has decided to retire as -non ac
possible to the quiet of liis o\\ n estati
in Anliin.
WAS DENIED ADMISSION.
Dean Uahhltt Not Allowed to Enter
AU Saints' to Worship.
Spokane, Wash., Oct. 18.— Rev. Dean
Richmond Babbitt was twice refused admission to All Saints' cathedral yesterday.
He first presented himself at the early
morning communion service, when he
found the door locked, and the doorkeeper
refused to allow him to enfer, saying Instructions had been issued io keep hiin
oui. George S. Brooke, by whose order
it is understood the doors were barred
against the dean, said yesterday morning in reply to a question regarding his
action:
"When Dean Babbit! presented himself
for admission I told him that, inasmuch
as it was stated in the morning paper
that be was to take the controversy into
the courts, we had been advised by our
legal counsel not to admit him into the
cathedral under any circumstances, Accordingly 1 told him he could go to Trinity, St. David's chapel or any other chapel
to worship, but that he could noi enter
(he cathedral.''
PAROCHIAL   SCHOOLS.
\ rch his hop   ■) 'orrfKiin   I'r olios cm  1*1 a i
oi' Affiliation.
New York. Oct. II),. fl is reported in
high official circle* thai Archbishop Cor
ligaii has been negotiating with Superin
tendon! Jasper of the public schools foi
affiliation of the parochial and publh
schools in thi> city. He has offered, it i-
illegvd. to turn the Catholic school- will
their 70.000 children, over to the muiliel
oul school authorities, provided he is per
| nitted (ogvienn hour's instruction dail)
o the Catholic children    of    fhe publh
i ichools. This is (he only stipulation. lb
makes  no other, either as  regard-  text
. books or teachers. It i> said many othei
metropolitans are anxious to adopt a Bim
I Unr policy if ii meets the approval ol
the apostolic delegate.
WAS A  MURDEROUS ATTACK.
.   \ttempt    In    Kill    (he    I lilted    Stiitc
Consul General ill Hin Janeiro,
New York, Oct. 10. A dispatch to tin
: Herald front Buenos Ayres, Argentina
says: ''Telegraphic advices from tin
i Herald's correspondent in Rio Janeiro
| Brazil, state that a servant In the cm
ploy of Mr, William T, Towne, United
States consul general iu Rio Janeiro, madi
au unsuccessful attempt to murder (In
consul general. Mr. Towne's ussailanl
was placed under arrest." William T
Towne was appointed consul general ti
Rio Janeiro from Virginia, April 7
1803, by President Cleveland. President
McKlnley on Saturday night announced
tho appointment of Eugene Zoger of Wi
nois consul general in Rio Janeiro to sue
eeed Mr. Towne.
COUNTERFEIT MONEY.
Riverside
lltide   hy   Convli
I'enl
s   In   the
entlory,
Pittsburg, Oct. HI.—Warden Wright of
the Riverside penitentiary has discovered
that the convicts have been muiiufuctur
Ing counterfeit 50 cent pieces. He has un
earthed tho metal from which the "queer*'
money was made and the molds in which ' defeat the powerful efforl then making 1
New York. Oct. 18.—Charles A. Dana,
editor of the New York Sun, died ye-*.
terdiiy afternoon at his home at (ilencove,
I. 1. Mr. Damf.s death hud been expected
tor several hours and bis family und physicians were at his bedside when the end
came. Jlis condition had been such for
several months that the members of his
family bad kept themselves in constant
readiness to go to his bedside ut any moment. On Saturday morning be bad a relapse ami it was apparent thut recovery
was impossible. Several times, however,
he rallied, but toward night began to
-ink. During the night there wero feeble
j rallies, but they did not hist long. This
morning if was seen that the end was
but a few hours off and his attendants remained almost constantly at his bedside.
Thc end eame quietly, Thc extreme heat
of Friday and Saturday hud much to do
with hastening death. On Friday Mr.
Dana showed signs of distress and everything possible was done to relieve him. He
had been weakened by bis long illness and
during tbe summer was several times
thought to be on the verge of a fatal collapse, but each time rallied. He did not
inprove much with fhe coming of cooler
v eat hor, and the sinking spells become
nore frequent. On Friday Mr. Dana was
iblc to take only tlie lightest nourish-
ueiit. and thi- condition continued. Paul
Dana and hi- sisters, .Mrs. Draper. Mrs.
Underbill and Mr-. Branan, win- at his
home on Saturday morning and were
earned fo remain there. They were ;if
be bedside when dcafh came, 'l'he cause
d' Mr. Dana'- death was cirrhosis of the
liver, -.Mi June 0 be was at liis office, ap-
parently strong and healthy. The next
lay he was taken ill and he never afterward visited N'ew York. He was 78 veins
of age.
('harlcs Anderson Dana was born in
[lin.-dalc, X. H.. August 8, 1S|!>. He was
i dcscendenl of Jacob, eldesl son of Rich*
ud Dana, progenitor nf most of those who
bear the name iu the United Mate-. His
'ioyho.1,1 was spent iu Buffalo, X. Y.,
vhere he worked in a -tore until he was
18 years old. A! that age he first studied
'he Latin gram am r and prepared himself
'or college, entering Harvard in 1830, but
ifler two years a serious trouble with bis
yeslghl compelled him to leave. He re-
•oived an honorable dismissal and after-
vard was given a bachelor's and master's
legrees. In |s(l» he became a member of
the Brook Kami Association.
His earliest newspaper experience was
gained in the management of the Harbinger, which was devoted to social rc-
orm and general literature. After about
two years' editorial work on Elizur
Wright's Boston Chronotype, a daily paper. Mr. Dana joined the stall' of the New
York Tribune in 1S47. Tlie next year br
■■pent eight months in Europe, and after
hi- return he became one of the proprietors and managing editor of the Tribune,
i post which he held until April I. 1802.
Ibe extraordinary influence and circulation attained by that newspaper during
'he lu years preceding the civil war was
in a degree due to the development of
Mr. Dana's genius for journalism.
During the first year of tlie war the
ideas of Mr. Greeley and those of Mr.
Dana in regard to the proper conduct of
military operations were somewhat at variance and this disagreement resulted in
the resignation of Mr. Dana after IS
years' service on the Tribune. He was at
nice employed by Secretary Stanton in
special work of importance for ilu- war
depart men! and in 1803 was appointed as-
qstan! secretary <*f war. whicli ofiice be
held until after the surrender of Dee.
A! the time when General Grant's character and probable usefulness were unknown quantities Mr. Dana's confidence
iu Grant's military ability did much io
it was cast.    Tbe counterfeits are mag
nificen! specimens of the coiner's art.  The
i counterfeiters   had   already  secured  eon
break down the rising commander.
Returning to New York, be organized
iu 1807 the slock company that now owns
I neotlon with outside parties and some ol ' ,hl' Sun newspaper and became ita editor
INCREASING ENGLAND'S DEFENSE.
Large increase oi Expenditures Pfe-
eessu ry   Iu   A rmy   a nd   3n vy.
London., Oct 10. -The duke of Cum
bridge, in the course of his speech at
Bull), says be indorsed every word lhat
Lord Wni-ely, the commander in chief,
and Hon. John William Broderick, under secretary of war. bad uttered recently
as (o (he necessity of Increasing (he empire defense by augmenting lhe military
force. Sir Robert Kinsley, the solicitor
general, speaking at Purest. Scotland, said
that a large Increase of expenditures was
necessary in ibe army ami navy, and that
it might become necessary to resort to the
ballot to provide tbat a certain portion
of citizens should serve in the militia.
1 the bad  money is now in circulation.
Factory   House  Fire.
New York. Oct. 18.—A $300,000 fire in
the seven-story factory building at 270
aud 281 Spring street taxed the energies
of the fire department yesterday afternoon. Cornius Christus, 00 years of age,
and his nephew, Michael Christus, M
years of age, iu their fright jumped to the
ground from a nearby tenement house.
They were burned terribly nnd the old
man died soon afterward.
Preached   to   Convicts.
Boston, Oct. 10.—For ihe first, time on
record an acior has preached a sermon to
state prison convicts. Joseph Jefferson is
the man and the prison chapel at Charles-
town was Sunday brightened by thc
hearty presence of the famous por tray cr
of "Rip Van Winkle." Fight hundred
prisoners listened to the address, which
was devoted to the subject of temperance,
The smaller the hole a man gets into,
the louder he howls.
l'he first number of the Sun, issued by
Mr. Dana, appeared .lanuary 27. 1H08, and
since thai time ho has been actively and
continuously engaged in the management
of ihal successful joi ninl and solely responsible fur its conduct. He made the
Sun a democratic newspaper, independent
and outspoken in the expression of iis
opinion respecting (lie affairs of cither
party, His criticism of civil mal-adminls-*
(ration during General Grant's terms as
president led to a notable attempt on (he
part of that administration, in duly. 1873,
lo lake him from New York on a charge
of libel, (o be died without a jury in a
Washington police court. Application
was made to the United States district
court in New York for a writ of removal,
but. in a memorable decision Judge
Blatchford, now a justice of the supreme
court of the United States, refused the
warrant, holding ihe proposed form of
trial to be unconstitutional.    Perhaps to
[        GET   LUMBER   FROM   CANADA.
i 	
Germany   Proposes   to  tut  on   n. .
Trade with thc United States.
Berlin. Od. 10. -The Kolnlsche Xeitung
I urges Germany to open negotiations be j
tween  the Canadian  railway and  canal
companies ami the German chambers ot \
commerce and the timber firms, with ft l
view   lo Importing lumber from Canada
Instead of lhe United States.   The paper
suggests lhat, German capital might be
Introduced  into    lhe    Canadian    timber
(rude and the foundation laid lhat would
lead up to an actual treaty.
Baby's Head Cut  tiff.
Snn Francisco, Oct. 18. — As Howard
Wildgans, a child (wo years old, ran
across Harrison street yesterday afternoon
to join his sisfer at play, an electric car
knocked him down. When (he car was
stopped the baby's body was found bleed- j n ****** extent than '" iho CMe of nn-v
ing on the ear tracks With the head and i other conspicuous journalist, Mr. Dana's
arm entirely sevcrad from tho body. The | Personality was identified in the public
moiornuin was arrested for manslaughter I ,mml Wlfh 1ho newspaper that he edits.
but was released on his own recognizance,   lTo has recorded no theories of journalism
 j other than those of common sense and
Six  Yearn  for a   Dynamiter. : human interest.
Leavenworth, Kan., Oct. 10.—James W. i Mr. Dana's first book was n volume en-
Oliver, the old army veteran, convicted of, titled "Tbc Black Ant," (^ow York ami
attempted murder in connection with the J Leipsie, 18-JS). In 1855 be planned and
dynamite outrage ai the house of Cover- I edited wilh Ccorgc Ripley, fhe "The New
nor Smith of (lie national soldiers' home; American Cyclopaedia" (lfi vols., New
here, has been sentenced by Federal Judge , York. 1873-70). With General James H.
Foster to six.years' imprisonment in the; Wilson be wrote a "Life of Ulysses S.
government penitentiary. J Grant (Springfield, 1808). His "Household
 Book of Poetry," a collection of the best
i.e-kims'inn Hotel Aaslffna, j minor poems of the English language, was
Chicago, Oct. lfi.—The Lexington Hotel. first published in 1857. nnd has since
Building Company, which owns and oper- J passed through many editions, the latest,
ates the Lexington holel, has made an as- j thoroughly revised, being that of 1884. He
signment io Adelbert Ratchelder. As- nlso edited, with Rossi ter Johnson, "Fifty
sets arc $1,078,000, liabilities $000,704.    : Perfect Poems" (New York, 1883). THE   MINER.
THE MINKU Is prime.] ou SaturdAys* and will
be mailed tp any address In tuitiula or thc
United Statin f»»r one year on receipt ot two
dollars.  Biiiglti copies live cents.
CONTRACT AI)\*l:l(TIr*KMKS*TS Inserted at tlie
rate ui fy per column lucli per inonth.
THASSIKST ADVEETISBMESTI! inscrle.1 at
tin-iriu-oi 16 cents par nonpareil line tlm
insertion. Advertisements running tor a
sliorti-r period than three mouths are classed
transient.
CORBESPOXDEKCK from overy part of III"
Yale District and communications upon live
topics always acceptable. Bend in "*onr
news while It Is fresh, and we will do tlio
rest,
job PElSTIua turned out in nrst-claM stylo
al Ihe shortest notice.
Address V  11. MoCARTKR* BON.
uiuni. Porks, B. tr.
'     SATURDAY, OCT. 23,    18*7
Carson Lodge I. O. O. I'. No. 37.
1   A   rv   C    MEKT8  EVERY   SATURDAY
I. U. U. T. ,.,-.. g ais o'clock In Ihclr
hall at < nrsio. il c.   A cordial Invitation ex-
c rr.i.'.l to all BOiournlliff.breiliretl.
jeiiN w. mclaren, x.o*
A. I. for 1 Ho:., U.S.
Church Notice.
PRESBYTERIAN CUUROU-Scrvlcea every
Sabbath In Hi, church at 11 a. m. and 7r30
p. m. Iu the school room at Grand Porks, sab-
l.alh school 10*30 a. 111. in the sohool room.
Al 1 arson wcokl] rr p. in.
It looks just a little bit as if the people of Grand Forks have .-it last realized
tbe necessity of pulling together.
As Primer Turnet has not put in an ap-
pearancs in the Boundary creek district
it is [air to piesuine t.iat he has got mixed up in a "j tck pot" some where over
in tl.e Kootenays.
Tn **. K tmloops Standard makes the
startling annoucement that it is "the
principal Conservative organ of the in*
tciior" To say the least, thiB is rather
a hard blow on the Conservatives.
Thk rightof Ihe provincial health officer to dictate thc sanitary health regulations of the city it being questioned,
A test crse will no doubt be made lo
determine who is vested with authority
in this respect.
The mass meeting last Monday night
came nearer being a success than any
effort of the kind attempted in the past
year. Even now there are some who are
attempting 10 sprinkle cold water on
the efforts being made to harmonize the
interests of our people.
Mr. Harry W. Treat, of New Vo k
nud a cousin to Mr. I'otterof Texas, haB
laid a smelter proposition before tbe city
council of Vancouver. If this man is
any connection to the man by that name
who is secretary of the Olive Gold Mining company, the lcirs the people have
to do with him the belter.
GRAND Fork s has never learned the
value i f harmony and singleness of put-
pose in its business community. Whenever it had a chance to promote the general good, it could be depended upon to
throw it rrr,ay. Selfish personal aims
and unnecessary quarrels among them-
se'.ves are chiefly responsible for the
present state of affairs. Let past experience be a lesson for the future.
P. A. O'Farrell, the well known news
pa per correspendent and mining man of
Spokane, spent several days in this vin-
cinity thn past two weeks looking over
the distiict in search of information for
a series of articles he is preparing for
the Vancouver World and Seattle P.-I,
As Mr. O'Farrell is well posted on
mines and mining, and has expressed
himself as being more than pleased wilh
the showing made in this section, wo
may look for some interesting facts from
his descriptive pen.
It is wondetful what a change of heart
time will bring about. Just before the
last city election Mayor Manly would
have broke his neck tumbling over himself in his haste to get his name down on
a subscription list lo build a road to Summit or any other camp. Now it is
different. During that honorable gentleman's stay in tho city, thia week, he
was waited upon by the committee collecting funds for the building of the
Summit road, and in response to a request tn subscribe something, replied
"that he would not give a d— cent."
The reason gr.-cn for this "cold bluff,"
is that he, the mavor, had supported the
people cf Grand Forks and vicinity for
the last lour years and he did not propose to do it any longer. This is not
the lirst time this same "crack" has been
made, and while no one questions thc
fact that Mr. Manly has done a great
deal towards making Grand Forks what
it is today, there are those who are cruel
enough to claim, thut it was not done
as a philanthropist, but for selli-h motives and personal gain. Wc aro pleased
to state, however, that the road will be
built j et the same. While the commit-
tee would have perferred to have his
name on the list, it never will be missed,
CASCADE   CITY.
Cascade City, Oct. 20th.—(Special
Correspondence)—A contract to sink 50*
feet and build winter quarters on the
E'more property, on Sutherland creek,
has been let. This claim is ownod by
the Belcher Consolidattd Gold Mining
c impany, and has a very good surface
showing assays from which show returns
of sSio in gold aid 2 per c-nt copper.
D. C. Beach is at present pushing
work on the Beach claim, which is near
Elmore. It is Mr. Peach's intention to
sink a fifty foot shift un Ibis property
before quiting work for the wir.rer.
Willison, Johnson and Hanchett, who
own the Yellowstone are working this
property at present. It will be remembered that this property was purchased
from Mr. Kelly ;on*.o few weeks ago lor
a handsome sum.
The Iron Mountain claim on Baker
creek is looking well. Ibe ore in the
face of the jo-foot tunnel assays high in
gold and copper.
A recent average assay right across
the 300-foot ledge on lho Cannon Bill,
on Biker creek, showed returns of $35.-
5*o in gold and copper.
Messrs, Wil lison and Johnson, who
own the Hoodo grou;-, on M Kea creek,
which contains lhe Myitery, M inn tain
Chief and Mermaid claims are pushing
work at present and will likely continue
to work all winter.
Too much credit cannot be bestowed
upou Mr. A. Stuart and party who reside
at English Point for the manner in
which they ure clearing the land and
otherwise impioving this beautiful pom'.
Deer is exceedingly plentiful around
the lake this fall and there ii no lack of
"mowitch" in consequence of this,
John Lawless has located three claims
on McRea creek in Christina lake section.
A high assay was rocently made from
Ed. Buns property on McRea creek,
where he is at present working.
RESERVATION NOTES.
J. E. Pharrof Nelson, has jnst returned
from a ten days visit to Spokane where
he went for the purpose of organizing a
company to develop his three properties
known as the Brimstone, Lilian and Paul.
As a result of his trip tbe Brimstone
Mining and Milling company has been
incorporated with a capital of $1,000,000.
Work will be started .-.n these properties
at once.
An additional contract has been let to
sink fifty feet on the Big Four claim
near Nelson, and work on which will be
commenced at once. This property is
owned by the Big Four Mining and
Milling company whose president, Mr.
A J Piivitt. it will be remembered, gained considerable notoriety lately by being
held up by a bighwaymtn, while on his
way to the mine from Nelson.
William Newton is finishing up winter quarters on the Morriston placer
claim at the mouth ol Lone Ranch creek.
Mr. Newtou has built a dam about half a
mile up the river so as to give a fall of
104 feet, it being his intention to work:
this placer nex. spring. The pay dirt
on the Morriston runs 26 cents to the
yard.
W. M. Clark of Nelson, is authority
for the statement that he is going to put
in a huge gold amalgamator or gold
saving machine, on his placer ground in
the spring, which will have a daily capacity of 400yards.
Work On tbe Old Ironsides.
Frank Hemenway, general manager
of the Old Ironsides and Knob Hillcom-
panies, came down from the companies
works in Greenwood camp last Monday
to meet Mrs. H. who arrived from Spokane the same evening. Mr. Hemenway expressed himself as being well
pleased with the way work was progressing since tbe machinery was started up. He says that it is the intention
to run a double shift all winter. The shaft
will be sunk to tbe 200-foot level, where
crosscuting and drif ing will be carried
on. The shaft will then be sunk to the
300 foot level. The force of men will be
increased as fast as the work advances
so they can be used to advantage. Additional machinery is also to be purchased for the Knob Hill, consisting of a
compressor, a hoist and pump; the latter to be operated with air fiom the compressor on the Ironsides.
W. G. MeMynn, mining recorder and
deputy registrar of the county court
of Yale at Midway, has been in the city
nearly all week on official business.
CLARK   GETS   IT.
A Reservation Surprise Party,
Deputy Custom Inspector Wm. H.
Hutchinson dropped in on the town oi
Nelson this week and created considerable consternation by announcing that
he had instructions to confiscate every
thing which had been brought over the
line fiom this side, and to arrest everyone concerned in taking it over. But
finally tho matter was fixed up by his
taking the names of those implicated
and the amounts of lumber, hay, oats,
etc., which had been taken in. Messrs.
Nelson, Pharr and Jaskulek, threo prominent merchants of that place were taken
down to Northport to appear belore the
U, S. Commissioner at that plaee.
Word comes also from Eureka that
a similar action has been taken in that
camp, and nearly all the merchants and
lesidents of the place are in for it.
Remember that Edward's Ferry is the
only wayside house on tbe road where
good meals and clean beds can be found
AT CHRISTINA
A Well Known Piospectcr of
That Section in Town.
PICTURES ON THE WALL
Description of the Indian Paintings on
thc Mountain Side at Christina Lake.
S. R. Reid, a well known prospector
from the McRea ereek section, was in
the city this week laying in his winter
supplies and was a pleasant caller at
the Mined office. Mr. Reid is an old
time typo who has been forced into the
..•ills by the introduction of type setting
machines, and seems to be well contented with his lot.
Mr. Reid has been in the Christina
lake section for the pat year and in
speaking of bis experience therehe said:
"soon .Iter my arrival in that section
1 was informed tnat there was a point
on the lake about two and a half miles
from English point, where a great variety of Indian paintings in vegetable
dyes -.re found on a level surface of a
limestone rock that projects about fifteen feet above tbe water, cut over the
lake at an angle of probably 45 degrees.
In company with another prospector
named Stewart I visited this lonely spot a
few days ago and carefully examined it.
The paintings consist of a hand, a deer
and several arrows. The mountains at
this point extend for hundreds of
feetabove th.-se pirntings and mlllior s
of tons of loose rock are laying in a pr -
mi cous pile. Although it has been
generally kmwn hy the inhabitants of
Christina lake sec.ion that these paintings existed, the exact spot is only
known by a very few of the most venturesome of the prospectors, The theory
advanced with regard to these paintings
is that they were made by the aborigines
of Christina lake sectio" when 'he lake
was some fifteen feet higher, which must
have been thousands of years ago,"
MINING   RECORDS.
Record of the locations, cert ill eaten of work
transfers, oto. .recorded »t the Mining Recorder's
Olllco, (.ruiiil Forks. B, l.'., for tliu week ending
oct-u-jcr 2Uli,18i)7:
October Mi—
1 Don't Know, James Bullivnnt, Kottle river.
Alice* Chaa, Nelson, Summit camp.
Sunset. James Bullivant- lvottloRirer.
October I5i~
Lost Girl, Bam W.  Ik'iiuVrsou t-t al, Hnrdy
Mountain
October 16:—
Chllcoot, John KoRurs. Sum mlt camp.
Nero, Hugh COOplcy, Brown's cam p.
1'iiohin. J. P. Shannon etal, Orand Fork*.
October IK: —
Triplicate Fraction, James McMiehael et al.
Monttizuma- J. B. retfoslcr*, Christina Inka.
Light lion in.', Randolph Stewart   et al,  Christina lake.
October LOs—
Crow,!*:. 0. Dnhl, [lardy Mountain.
Mountain Monareh, John Rogers, Summit
camp,
Yellow Kid, A. J. Stowiwt, Christina lake.
Knl'.anee, IVn Handle and West Knd, S. R,
Reid, Christina lake.
CKB1IFICATB8 OF WoltK.
October 13:-
Uroken Hill, John Holm et al.
Last Chance, W. \V, Whltbock.
October Hi:—
Acme, Golden Era Prospecting and Development Co., L. L.
Famous, C. A. Lownnui ct ul,
October LS;
Emerald, g. Walker et al.
October 13:—
Monte Crlsto, S. M. Kirkham.
October 21:—
Homirictta.S. L. Lewis.
Raw Hide, McGlnnlset al.
T HANS ['KttS.
Oct. IS --One-third, interest in E. F. W. from
James Fisher lo Thos. Paseo,
Oct. 21—Christina, till interest from F C. Ha-
pen to s. T, Laiitfley.
\vr E. STACHE,
Bath  Rooms,
AND TONSORlAl PARLORS.
RIVERSIDE.      -      -      ■       GRAND FORKS
„ H. A. SHEADS,
-ASSAYER-
GRANC FORKS, B. C.
SAMPLES CIVEN PROMPT AND CAREFULTTENTION
Residents of Nelson will Soon Be Able to
Get a Title to Their Lots.
Early last spring \V, M. Clark made
an application for a patent for tbe five
placer claims on which the town of Nel
son is located. Shortly after tbe application was made Narcis Peone, a half-
breed, filed an adverse to Mr. Clark's
right on the ground that the land covered by these placers wasagricultural and
not mineral. The hearing of the contest
was set for the i.V.h of this month before
tbe United States Land Commissioner
at Spokane. When the time arrived for
tbe case to be heard, Mr. Peone, through
his attorney, withdrew bis contest, and
Mr. Clark was awarded a patent to the
claims, which he will receive as soon as
Ihe necessary fornality can be gone
through with in the land office department.
Bearing Fruit Already.
There was a man in town yesterday
from Summit camp. It was the first
lime he had been in Grand Forks to buy
anything for over a vear. The cause
for coming this time was to consult the
doctor concern ng an attack of heart
failure, caused by tho shock to his nervous system by the report Grand Korks
had actually started to built a road to
Summit. He says that when the road is
completed two-thirds of tbe trade will
come this way.
Fob Sale—A four-roomed furnished
cottage in Upper Grand Forks. For
further Information enquire at tbisoffice.
Northern Pacific
Railway*
Yellowstone Park Line
The Fast Line,
4   BATCHELDER & KADISII,   A
ASSAYERS AND CHEMISTS.
Gold and Gold Ores Melted, Re-
lined and Bought,    .^k.
MINERAL   ACT   1896.
CERTIFICATE OF IMruoVKMENTS.
NOTICE.
Grey Eagle Mineral claim, situate In the (Irand
Fork- Mining Division of Vale District.
When- Located:—ObJcn-atlonMouuwin, adjacent to (irand Forks.
"TAKK NOTICE thai I, Fred WoUbbUm, acting:
' aa agent for Frances J. Walker, free mineral
certificate No. 88,101; c. O'Brien Reddin, free
mi tier's certificate No. U7.790; Norman L. Jack-
hod, free miner's evrtlllcite So. B516A: Chas.
Van Ness, free miner's certificate No. 70,888; W
Waul Spinks, free miner's certificate No. lfttAi
Wm. Ib'iiry Gee, free miller's certificate No. 81.-
7Ifl, and It. Bcott, free miner's certificate No, .v
IluA, Intend, sixty days from date hereof, lo ap.
ply to tho MiuJwr Recorder Tor a Certitieate ol
ln"i|iioviiieiiis, for tbe purpose i>f obtaining n
crown Grant for the above claim, And further
take notice that action, under Bection :>". must
be commenced before the Issuance of such Cor
liiiente of Improvements. Fbku Wollauton,
Dated ibis iotli dav of September 1807.
NOTICE IS IIEKEHY GIVEN that the co-part-
nership heretofore existing between James
Hamilton din I v.. Duford. Udder the lirio ii;ii'h*oi
Hamilton & Duford, in the hotel business in
Grand forks- was dissolved by mutual consent
July 1st, 1897. and I will not be responsible for
any debts incurred bv lhe uii.l JemesHamilton.
EDMUND DOFOBI),
NOTICE.
MINERAL   ACT   1896.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
NOTTCEis ln-rol.v *nven Unit in accordance
with Bectlou mil of tho Sitnitury Regulation
.if 1890, ti resolution lur*. been passed by tho
Provincial Poard nl Health declaring tlie Baol-
turv regulations of 1896 to bo in r-.ri'e In tho city
01 ilniinl Forks. S. H. lurry. .\s, M. P.
Bocrctary ol Provlnolul Board of Health.
NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY lllVF.N THAT THE
Court of Revision for tlio purpose of hear-
IiikuIi LorapliiliiUsgnliisI thcasseumentforthe
v.-nr 1897, an made by tho assessor of the oity ol
Uranil Forks. 11. 0 . will behold ot tlio oounell
cliumber. iu iho citv ol Qrand Forks, nn Moudoy
in., nth day ol October, *. D., 1897, m *> o'clock
11.111 .1  K. Johnson, Acting Clork.
(.•ity Clerks Oflice, Orand Forks, Sept. 1111I1.117.
ta
STOVES,  TIN   AND. GRANITE  WARE
Paints, Oils, Brushes, Sash & Doors,
Anthing Yr,u Want in the Hardware Lice and Can't Find it go to
W. K. C. Manly's Store, Grand Forks, B. C.
NOTICE.
Mountain Unse Mineial Claim*  Minnie In tlie
llrand Korks Mining Division ol Yale his
trirt    Where  located:   Summit  cainp  on
East of .the Emma Mineral claim.
Take NOTICE that i w.T. smith, free miner's
eortllloatc No. Wtis, Intend- sixty days irom
the date hereof, to apply to thu Mining Reeor-
dei for n eeriiiietite of Improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining n Grown Granl <>t the above
claim.    And niilberink. notice thai acllon, under M'ctioti 87, must bo commenced before tbe
Issuance of such certilicate of Improvements.
Hitted Ihis ith daj oi October, 1WI7.
JUBILEE
HOSPITAL
GRAND   FORKS,   B.   V.
R. B- STANLEY SMITH, M. D.
Resident Pbysician & Surgeon,
MINERAL ACT 1806.
CEUTIEICATK OF IMPBOVKMKKTS
NOTICE,
Number Four mineral  claim  situate lu   tbe
Grand Fork.-, mining Dlvisonof Vale district.
Where located:—lu Central camp.
"TAKE NOTICE I John A. Coryell as agent for
■     Henry   White  free miner's certificate   No.
87A5I and M. W.Palmerstou freo miner's certificate No. 61.V, Intend, sixty days from the date
hereof, to apply to the Mining Kecor-
dor fnr certitieate ol Improvements, for the our-
pose of obtaining a Crown grant of tho above
claim.
\nd further take notice that notion, under
section if", must be oommuu-jed bofore the Issuance of snub certilicate of Improvements.
,1'UN A. CotlVKI.L.
Hated thh llth dav of September, 18%.
nORBES M. KBRBY,
Provincial Land Surveyor.
And Civil Engineer.
Opficb, Midway, n. c.
Associate   Member Canadian
Society  nt civil Engineers.
TT   S. CAYLEY,
BARRISTER AT LAW;
Solicitor, Etc.,
OffiCO, Main Street,    -   GRAND FORKS, B. 13.
OLD LOG STORE,
Nelson, Wash.
MINERAL  ACT 1897.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS.
NOTICE.
American Eaglo Mineral Claim, Bltuated In  lhe
Grand Forks Mining Division of Yale District.   Where   located j—Wellington camp,
Eflglc mountain.
take Notice that l, Hugh B. Cayley.as Pgent
<  for John T. O'Brien, free miners certilicate
No. S0788and John Holm, free miner's oertifi-
eate No. 108A, intend, sixty days from the date
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Cerliliente of Improvements, ior tho purpose of
obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice thai action, under
Bection 87, must be commenced before tho issuance of sueh Certitieate of improvements,
H. S. CAYIiBY,
Dated this 21st day of September, 18U7.
MINERAL ACT i8o5,
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS.
Superior Service,
Through Tickets to all points in tbc United
State.s and Canada.
Direct Conned ions with the Spokane Falls &
Northern Railway.
TRAINS   DEPART:
No.lWest  8:2,1 p. m.
No. 2 East 7:4)0 a. m.
Tickets to Japan and China via. Tacoma ami
Northern Fuel tic Steamship Company.
For Information, time cards, maps and tickets
apply to agents of the Spokane falls & Northern
and its connections, or
F. D. GIBBS,
-   General Agent Spokane, Wash.
A, D, CHARLTON, A. G, P. A.,
No. 2.Vi Morrison St., Portland, Or.
Write for new mnp of Kootenay country.
NOTICE.
Monte Carlo Mineral claim situated In the Grand
Forks Mining  Divlalon of   Yale District.
Where located:—Wellington oamp, Eagle
Mountain.
-TAKE NOTICE that I, Hugh S, Cayley, magent
• for John T. O'Brien, five miner's cerliliente
No. su7*.t. and s M. Kirkham, free minor's certificate No. 81*287, Intend, sixty darn from the
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for
n Certilicate of lmprovementa for lhe purpose
of pbttiinlng a Crown Grant of the above claim.
Ami further take notice that action, under
RCCtton 87, lllUSl be commenced before ihe issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
II. S. Caylby.
Dated thiB 21st day of September 1807,
MINERAL   ACT   1895.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS.
NOTICE.
Ruttler Mineral Claim, Situated  ill  the Orand
Korks   Mining   Division of    Vale   District.
Where located:—In Wellington Camp, near
the Summit of Lookout Mountain.
-take Notice that I, John A Coryolt. as agent
' for C. Van Ness, Free Miner's Certilicate No.
7988B, intend, sixty days from the dale hereof,
to apply to tho Mining Recorder for a certitieate
of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining
ll Crown grant of the above claim.   And further
take notice that action, under section 37. must
be commenced before the issuanee of such certilicate <>f improvements     John A. Couyf.u,.
Haled this Hith duy of September, 1897.
p WOLLASTON,
Provincial Land Surveyor.
Civil Engineer, Etc
ORAM) FORKS, B.C.
G
RAND FORKS HOTEL
Barber Shop.
Centrally Looated.   All Work Gauranteed to be
Flist-Class in every Respect.
PETER A. I PARE,
PROPRIETOR.
J, W- JONES,
Manufacturer oi
Spring   Beds,    Mattresses,
LOUNGES,   ETC.
DEALER IN HOUSEHOLD GOODS OF ALL KINDS.
'GRAND   FOHKS,*  B.   C.
IWSmv Piling and all KlinU or Repairing.
Tlr. Providence Fur Company
Providence, R. I.,
Wauls sll kinds of
Raw Furs, Skins,Ginseng,
Scnooa, Are. Prices quoted for next sixty days
nre 11B follows;
BilvorFox  »1B 00 lo J160 00
ll'-ttr     Ii (HI to     25 110
litter*  4 IH) 1.1 li iki
Martin  n 00 to n iki
Deliver (per iiiiiind)  8 HO to 11 on
Wolf  1 00 lo 8 SO
Red Vox  1 00 lo mm
Mink  78 to 1 Oil
Skunk  2.' to l io
Qrtiy Fox  M to 7.1
Kill         20 to 2.-.
Price 1.1st on nil other furs anil skills furnished upon application. Full prices guarautood,
careful selection, courteous treatment aud Immediate remittance on nil consignments.
THE POSTOFFICE STORE.
WHITE tic KER, Proprietors.
Special   Sale of   Hats.
Two dozen Straw Hats at a Bargain.
FINE LINE FELT HATS; TEN PERCENT OFF.
Watch Repairing a Specialty   j*   j»   All Work Guaranteed
-^TORONTO   HOUSED
BROWN'S CAMP, UP THE NORTH FORK.
Choice Wines Liquors and Cigars,
This hotel is located about 12 miles Irom Grand Forks up the North Foik.
Good Fishing and Hunting in the vicinity. Meals served at all hours, and
the best ol slreping accommodations. H.P.TORONTO, Proprietor.
Chicago  Meat Market,
BROWN & SPONG, Proprietors.
The Finest Fresh and Salted Meats
ALWAYS ON HAND.   TRY OUR SAUSAGE.
e^Grand Forks Hotels
Is the Oldest and Leading Hotel in the city,
and Headquarters for Mining and Commercial Men. The house has just heen refitted
and the rooms are unsurpassed for comfort in
the city, while in the Dining room can ho
found the best food in the market.
All Stages Stop at the House. S S
Joseph L. Wiseman, Proprietor:
The White House,
OLIVER BORDEAUX, Proprietor.
Best of Wines, Liquors and Cigars,
"Did'' Brown, well known all over the Kootenays as first-class Restaurant man
has been secured to take charge of the Dining  Room, and every effort will be
made to make the boys from the hills feel at home.   Be sure and   stop and see
I "Dad" and Dick when jn town,
PROSPECTORS AND ni.NERS
Bo Sim- to buy Iho host «i<r**l
.... insure tin, best rosuls.
Canton Steel
is the bc*\ nnd nit) ba liml thn
cl) capes I at our Old LogStoru
Ni'lsnii, or our Eureka Btoro,
Kurd-, ii, VViish.
SpecialjPrices on Large Lots
This 8tee1 i« Guaranteed io hg
Equal i<i Jessep'a lu ltock
Work.
O. B. & P. B. NELSON,
Dealers in General Merchandise,
EUltEKA, WASH,   i
am
J. P. FLOOD.
Grand Forks Meat Market,
FIRST ST. TWO DOORS FROM BRIDGE,
Kerr & Flood, Butchers,
GRAND KORKS, GREENWOOD AND MIDWAY.
83JI.A11 Kinds of Meats German Sausages and Head Cheese Always on Hand.
-jtTHE MIDWAY HOTELS
MIDWAY, KETTLE RIVER.
First-Class   Accommodations,  Good Stabling, Termius  of
Stage Line From Marcus,  Washington.
McAuley& Keightley,
Proprietors*
J A, HUNTLY,
5 Deulor iu
Tobacco and Cigars,
Groceries, Salt Meats and Miners Supplies,
The Only Place in Town
that Handles Fruit.
ils!i Sn|.ply Etectived lisll*..
BRIDGE STREET (IRAND FORKS, B.C.
/HsT-Prospcotors and Minors will find It to tlurir interest to ulvo ine a ™il belorp purchasing
I enn save you money.  Full Line ul Fishing Taeklti Just lie-civeil.
COSMOS  HOTEL
■n/n.-Grand Forks, B.   C.~*s^>
Everything New and   Best Furnished
Hourre, and is in everyway prepared to
welcome Guests and provide Good Accommodation. , ......        „
X0X0 Headquarters  for  Mining Men.   Best
0X.0X of Wines. T.iquors and Cigars.    Special
altentio.r paid to Transcicnt trade.'■
XX
EZRA INBODY,
Proprietor.
Boundary Greek Mining Exchange
SANSOM & HOLBROOK,
S Financial and Mining Brokers *&
OFFICE AT GREENWOOD CITY, 11. C.
Groups of chims Bought for Stock Companies,  Etc, Etc.
asaPROSPECTORfe^
Livery and Feed Stable,
Riverside Ave., Grand Forks.
Livery Teams, Saddle,
Pack and Ltdics Saddle Horses a Specialty.
Harness Shop in connection.
Teaming of All Kinds Done.
Plenty ot Barn Room Ior Freighters. Give us a trial
KETTLE   RIVER
Q. W. WILLIAH5, Manager.
Daily from Marcus to Grand Forks
Greenwood City, Anaconda, Boundary Falls, Midway
and All Points on Colville Indian Resevation.
Stage Leaves Marcus on the Arrival of '.hy Northbound Ti ..in, anivir.jj atjllraud
FoikB at 8:45 P. m* Leaves the Forks at 4:00 a. ni., arriving n: Marcus 1.1 imc to
connect with northbound Train. PaseenRets trc-3) jCjJttUimy Points »««« conn-e-
tion at Bossburg going n»d pom'ng.
\~
1 supinOnD
Work on a Wagon Road Into
the Camp Begun.
MORE MONEY IS NEEDED
To Put the Road Through but When
Completed It Will More Than
Repay Us.
Last Monday evening a mass meeting
of the citizens of Grand Forks was held
in the club room, for the purpose of providing ways and means lor tbe construction of a wagon road from the mouth of
Fisherman creek to Summit camp. Without doubt this meeting was more generally attonded than any other simi'ar
gathering held in Grand Forks for a
long time—in fact—since the Hay*Mc-
Callum meeting the evening belore thc
last city election. Nearly every faction
aud branch of business in the city was
represented, and reminded one forcibly
of an old fashioned love feast. Everyone
present agreed that the time had come
when the citizens of Grand Forks must
lay aside their petty differences, put
their shoulder to tbe wheel and pull together tor the common good of the community, instead of the cat-hauling and
hair pulling that has characterized every
effort that has heretofore been made in
th: direction of attracting trade here
for fear that one man would get a few
dollars more out of it than the other.
Every person present agreed tbat in
order to secure the trade of the surrounding couutry, steps must be taken to place
our merchants in a position thit they
can compete with those of other towns.
In order to do this one of the most essential requirements necessary was good
roids and trails to the numerous mining
camps and the citizens ot the town mast
take the initial step in building these
thoroughfares instead ol hanging back
and waiting for the goverment to do it
for them.
The meeting was called to order by
Mr. Robert Hewitt, manager of tbe
Grand Forks brewery, who made a brief
statement as to its object, and upon' tbe
motion of Jeff Davis, F. H. McCarter was
made chairman and James Addison secretary.
In order that those present might fully
understand the situation, the chairman
statod, tbat about ten days ago upon the
solicitation of a number of representative business men of Grand Forks, prospectors and property owners in Summit
camp and vicinity, a subscription list
bad been prepared and circulated asking lor contributions for the construction of a wagon road from the mouth of
Fisheiman creek to Summit camp, the
es'ima'ed costof which was about $1,000.
He was pleased to announce, however,
notwithstanding the fact that the usual
amount of cold water had been thrown
upon tho project, lhat nearly one-half of
that amount had been promised, besides
a large amount of workhadbeendonated
by prospectors and others interested in
that locality. In view of the statement
made by the Hon. G. B. Martin, chief
commissioner of land and works, at the
public reception given that gentleman
on his recent visit to this city, "thatit was
the policy of the government to meet
the settlers and prospectors half way on
all propositions that had a tendency to
opon up and develop the resources
of the country," it was safe to presume
that the government would respond liberally to a call for assistance toward
tbe building of the road. That owing
to thc near approach of winter, it was
necessary that in order to complete the
road before bad weather sets in, work
should be commenced at once. If we
waited until tbe entire amount was secured before work was commenced, it
would doubtless be tolatetodo anything
this fall, and the object of tbis meeting
was to decide whether it would be better to make a start and expend what
funds had already been secured, or to
defer action until such time as the entire amount had been secured.
The prevailing opinion seemed to be
that tbe sooner a start was made the better and upon motion of Jeff Davis, seconded by W. K. C. Manly, Mr. Joseph
Wiseman, was asked to take charge of
tbe construction of the road with instructions to make a start as soon as the
necessary arrangements could be made.
Mr. Wiseman having made several
trips over thc proposed route, said that
twenty men could build afirst-class winter road from the mouth of Fisherman
creek to Summit camp in twenty days,
then if the weathor pormitted, and the
funds held out they could double back
over the road and put it in good condition.
An exocutive committee consisting of
W.K.C. Manly, chairman; James Addison, secretary, and Jeff Davis, treasurer,
was chosen, and authorzsd to take
charge of the collecting and dispersing
of the road fund.
Robert Hewitt, Neai McCallum and
E. Spraggett were named as a committee
to solicit further contributions, and those
who cannot afford to subscribe money
can help tho cause along by going out
and working a few days on tbe road.
A resolution was passed instructing
tbe secretary to communicate with tbe
Hon. G. 11. Martin, chiet commissioner
of land and works, laying before him
the importance of tbe road, and requesting an appropriation from the government toward building the same,
The RauUton Brothers, owners of the
Diamond Hitch and a number of other
promising prospects up the North Fork,
were present and addressed the meeting. They stated that it was their intention to put in the winter developing
their North Fork properties, and Messrs
Pftrkin*;on and Pfeifer, of the Pathfinder
would continue work during the winter,
provided the necessary machinery to
successfully carry on the work could be
got into the property. In order to accomplish this about three miles of road
would have to be built. With what
work that would be donated by those
interested in that locality, a good winter
road could be built for $50 a mile. This
amount he asked tbe citizens of Grand
Forks to donate*.
The necessity of the road was recognized by all present and steps will at
once be taken to raise the amount necessary for its construction.
The meeting then adjourned.
LOCAL   NOTES.
A. C. Sutton has gone to Rossland on
legal business.
A Laides' Aid society is among thc
latest acquisitions to the city.
Snow bas made its appearance on tbe
h'gh peaks up the North Fork.
Mr. Tom Walsh,of Greenwood,spent
several days in theeity this week,
A perfect stream of prospectors are
continually coming and going up McRea creek,
Mr. H. S. Cayley left Tuesday morning last for Nelsor, B. C, where he went
to attend court,
Doc and L. A. Manly made a hasty
trip to Eureka camp thia week, to look
after their mining interests.
George Cumings will leave in a few
days for Chicago to accept a position as
a travelling salesman.
A report is prevailent that several aggravated cases of glanders have occurred among horses in the Boundary creek
district.
The report comes from Vernon that
W. R. Megaw, will not open his Grand
Forks branch until about the first of the
new year.
John Martin,. the miner shot by Jacl -
Hennessy at Eureka, last week, is re-
cover'ng slowly, although he is not considered out of danger yet.
7he ofiice cat ate two yeast cakes for
breakfast the other morning, and as a
result he is swelled up bigger than some
Grand Forks people we know.
Wm. Spong has soli his interest in the
Chicago meat market lo Mr. Sears and
hereafter thc business will be conducted
under tbe firm name of Brown &  Seats.
Contractor Divey will be here next
week to enter into further negotiations
with the city council regarding the putting in of* the water and light system.
Several more able bodied men can
find employment ou the road now being
built from this city to Summit camp,
Tbe wages paid are {1.50 a day and
board.
lames Clark, the head push of Eureka
camp, arrived from Spokane Thursday
evening and stopped ovor in the city
yesterday to attend to some business
■ratters.
Provincial Constable I. A. Dinsmore
arrested John F. Hennessy, who shot
John Martin, at Enreka, some two weeks
ago, near R. R. Gilpins place, early this
morning.
A par'.y of some hall dozen miners
have gone to Edward's camp lo build
quarters and complete arrangements for
working on a couple of claims in tne camp
all winter.
Mr, Gait of Rossland, has just completed his annual assessment work on
the Giant claim, on Castle creek, and it
is learned that some exceptionally fine
ore rewarded him for his labors.
Chas. Emmert has returned to Grand
Forks to reside and will hereafter be
found in charge of the Prospectors' livery feed and sale stable, where be will
be pleased to see his old customers.
Wm. Graham, projector and builder
of tbe bridge at Edward's Ferry, was in
tbe city yesterday on business. By crossing at this point freighters and others
can save from two to three miles travel.
B. C. Van Houten, largely interested
in reservation mining property in the
vicinity of Nelson, has been appointed
a deputy U. S. marshal lor the state of
Washington with headquarters at Seat
tie.
It is reported that Mr. Bailey of Rossland, who is at present at work on a
map showing the different mineral locations on the east side of Christina lake,
will be through his task by November
1st.
Tom Parkinson, presidentof the Pathfinder Mining, Reduction and Investment company, went to Rossland this
week on business connected with the
further development of the Patherfinder
mine.
Jas. McNicol, tho rustling merchant of
Midway and Anaconda, passed through
the city Thursday on bis way home
from tbe Spokane fair. He was accompanied by Mrs. Mc and the, report having bad a pleasant trip.
Mayor Manly came over from Rossland last Wednesday and returned home
Friday. He was accompanied by his
brother, the doctor. The mayor is chuck
full of smelter news and is confident tbat
inside of twelve months a smelter would
be running in full blast.
S. R. Reid and A. J, Stewart who own
the Panhandle, Cockoonee, Yellow Kid
and West End, on McRea creek, are
making preparations to open these
Claims up in the early spring. Like all
other property in that locality there is
an immense surface showing on these
claims.
Mr. G%lloway, one of the townsite
owners of Greenwood City, was an arrival on Monday's evening stage from
Marcus. He was accompanied by bis
family and was on bis way borne from
Spokane where he had been lookinj- after the Boundary creek exhibt at tbe
Spokane fair.
On and after October 31st, Messrs.
Kerr tic Flood, proprietors of the Grand
Forks meat 111 11 kct, will close their place
of business on Sundays. Patrons of the
market are requested to bear this fact
in mind and to procure their meat for
Sunday Saturday nights,
SMELTERS.
New Company Organize* to
Build Two of Them
ELECTRIC RAILWAY TOO
Proposed to Put in Reduction  Works
at Both Grand Forks and
Midway.
W. C.McDougall, a well known mining
man of Rossland and Grand Forks has
been instrumental in organizing a company for the purpose of building a smelter at Grand Forks and one at Midway.
Tbe company is known as the Kettle
River Smelting and Tramway Co., and
its capitalization is $2,000,000. Itiscom-
posed of both English and American
capitalists. Mr, McDougall r-ais that
the plans of this new company are to
build a one hundred ton smelter at
Grand Forks and one at Midway and
also to construct electrical tramways
from Christina lake to Rock creok, with
branch line running to the different
mines for the purpose of conveying ore
to tbe smellers.
Mr. McDougall s.-ys that months ago,
befo-e this smelter scheme had assumed
its present proportions, the Kettle River
district had been carefully examined by
experienced mining men whose reports
had been sent back to the company in
London, Eng , so tbe promotors of this
present smelter scheme did not go into
it with their eyes shut but were kept
thoroughly posted from time to time
about this section of the country. The
company is said to be ready to start
at once provided the city furnish a site
and water power for this purpose of
generating power for electrical purposes
The cost of smelting the ores will be
about $10 a ton so tbat ores that have
a value of ft; per ton will pay to smelt
after deducting a couple of dollars per
ton for freighting the ore to the smelter.
The exact time that work will be commenced on tire smelter depends now entirely on the action of the city council
with regard to securing a water right
and site for smelter and as they are now
working on that matter thore is every
reason to believe that satisfactory arrangement for the securing of a water
right and smelter site will be made within the next 30 days. In that event the
preliminary work on the smelter will
according to Mr. McDougall, be commenced this fall.
WILL BE THE FIRST THERE.
The First Wagon to Summit Will Go Over
the  Grand Forks Road.
The people ot Grand Forks may be
slow about getting started but when
they do make up their minds to do a
thing they generally get there with "both
feet." At a mass meeting last Monday
night, it was decided that thoy would
build a wagon road to Summit camp.
Tuesday morning every idle man in
town who would work was secured, the
necessary tools for road building, camp
and boarding house equipments were
got together, and in the afternoon were
moved to the seat of war, and early
Wednesday morning dirt was Hying on
the road, under the direction of Mr.
Joseph Wiseman, the champion road
builder of the Kettle river district, who
has given his word for it that the first
wagon that goes into Summit will go
over the Grand Forks road.
While Mr, Wiseman is pushing things
at the other end of the route, those at
bis end must not be idle, as there is
something over $300 yet to be raised to
complete the work. Lot everyone come
forward and give something toward tbb
enterprise. If you cannot afford to give
money work will do just as well.
CONVOY   ABOLISHED.
Collector of Customs to be Appointed at Cascade City.
J. S. Clute, special customs inspector
fir British Columbia, has been in the
city for tbe past few days on business
connected with custom affairs, chief
among which, is the establishment of a
custom out-port at Cascade City, with
Mr. Geo. Rose, J. P., of that town in
charge of it.
Inspector Clute has also done away
wilh the convoy that has been in force
here for years past to go through with
all freight passing through the country
Under this new arrangement all freight
teams aud stages will have to go via
Cascade City coming in.
The custom department is to be cot ■
mended on tho action it has taken in this
matter, as the convoy question has been
a bone of contention for a long time.
Will Start Work.
Henry White, manager of tbo City of
Paris and Lincoln properties, which are
situated in White's camp on this side of
the line, is expected to arrive from Spokane almost any uay now. If reports
are any ciiteiion to go by, extensive
operations will be commenced on these
properties at once, the company which
owns them having appiopriated $25,020
for development work, A hoisting and
pumping plant and other necessary machinery is to be put in at once, and a
good wagon road from Nelson to these
propertis is to be built. This road will
go by the Comstock mine.
LOST.
From Williams' stage on Saturday,
Oct. 2nd, 1807, an Olive colored grip between Grand Forks and Edwards' Forry,
B. 0. Grip is marked J. J. Sullivan,
Toledo, Oh'o, and contains letters, papers, &c, oi no value to anyone but the
owner. Finder will please return to
Williams stage line.
Never say you have when you haven't
for you may have too, to square yourself.
e • •
The mills of the government grind
slowly, but like tbe bedbug they gtt
there just tbe same.
• •   9
When business men themselves cross
the line to buy goods how can they expect others not to do likewise.
• ■  •
Davey? Davey? Seems to us—oh,
yes! That's the Rossland contractor
that Mayor Manly steeied up againrt
the city council.
• •  •
Don't worry about tbe winter season
not setting in, All things, even the subscription paper to the Summit road fund,
come to those who wait.
(see
The  fate of our  late city clerk wi 1
probably show some others that there is
such a thing as a barrister getting too
gay, even ii he is EnglUh born,
e   •   «
A Kansas fanner died the other day
leaving a fortuno of $150,000. There is
nothing stratify e about Ihis except that
he did not make it out of this year's
wheat ciop,
e • •
Women, God bless them, they ire thc
sunshine of any household. But, too
many of them are liko a buzz saw, and tie
man who has moiethan one on the string
at a time is bound to get badly cut in the
long run.
• •  •
The report comes f.-om Eureka that
they had anctber shooting scrape there
last Saturday night. This time the fracas
took place in what is know as the Midway Plaisance district, and while no one
was killed some of the participants were
pretty badly "scratched."
• c  •
Tom Twobellies, the office cat, has
been engaged to wrile a spectacular
farce in three acts and a prologue for
the Grand Forks dramatic club. T.ie
farce will be entitled "The WaterWoiks
or that Terrible Cat,"and will be rich,rare
racy from the time the curtain goes up
until it falls on the last act. Advance
shee s will be ready for tbe press in the
course of a week or two, and the play
will be put on the boards some time
during the holiday days.under thediiec-
tion and subervision of Mr. Aithur Milthorp, who has had more or less experience in that line.
• e •
Mose Burns, the all round miner and
prospector made a hasly tiip to Summit
camp this week. If there is one thing
more than another tbut Mose likes, it is
a good fat duck. While on his way
home the other day he spied two Mallards serenely swimming around in a
pond to one side of the road. Mose says
to himself "they are my meat." So, accordingly, he proceeded to crawl upon
them two unspectinj ducks, like a turkey gobbler after a grasshopper. On
arriving at shooting distance, Mose took
a rest over a log, and casting that eagle
eye of lis over the barrels of the gun
turned both barrels loo :e. The reaction
was too much for Mose, and alter taking
an inventory of himself to see if he was
all there, recollections of roast duck
returned. Hut, alas, it was but a dream
--while a swath four feot wide had been
cut through tbe bull rushes clear across
tbe pond the ducks bad managed to escape unbuit.
Got Six Months.
I'eter Costello, cf Rossland, and a
partner of Contractor Davey, who has
the contract to put in the water and light
svst ra in this city, was sentenced to six
months in the provincial jail at Kam-
loomps at hard labor, l..st Thur.-day, at
Ntleon, B.C.. The charge on which
Castello was sent over the road was for
committing an assault on Ed. Cronyn, a
Rossland lawyer.
MRS. PRIBILSKY, $300 Takes ]
Dealer
A Short Session.
The regular weekly session of the cily
council was held yesterday af.ernoon
with Hepworth in the chair.
A communication from Contractor
MrDonald, requesting payment of a bil*
of $50 for putting the fence around the
school house, was read and placed on
file, as was also one from the deputy
minister of finance enclosing a cheque
for $176, back taxes due the city from
the Provincial government.
Johnson, of the water rights committee, reported tbat Mr. Cayley was communicating with the proper authorities
regarding the steps necessary to obtain
a water right for the city at Grand Forks.
L. A. Manly reported on behalf of the
board of works that Mr. Fred Cooper
had been given the contract for replank-
iug the bridge and that inateial was
now being hauled for the pur.ose.
Criminal Carelessness.
Once again we ae called upon to warn
the city authoiit'es of the dangerous condition of fhe side walk between the
Wbitehouse and Main street, on Riverside avenue. Elevated as it is some four
or five feet, without railings on either
side to prevent people irom walking off
of it on a dark night, it is only a matter
of time before someone breaks a leg,
arm cr is seriously injured, as there is
hardly a night passes but some person
steps off this piece of walk. Fortunately for the city, so far, no one has been
badly hurt, but unless some steps arc
soon taken to remedy this evil, the city
will have an opportunity to figure as
defendant in a first class liabel suit.
Mining Company Incorporated,
Artic'es were filed last Monday in
Spokane incorporating the Copper Bullion Mining company, with headquarters
at Spokane. The capitalization is ffioo,-
000, divided into shares of the par value
of $1 each. The incorporators and trustees are Alexander Dunphy, OitoGiuno,
L A. Doherty and A. G. Kerns. The
propeity already controlled by the company consists of the Copper Bullion and
Morning Star claims in the Curlew district on the Colville teservation.
Arcada Reopened.
"One, by one, the wandering sinners
return." Mrs. A Hammer, has r. turned
from Spokane and r ripened the Arcada
oyster and coffee house as a Watlle
Factory, where hot walil rs with Sa*aio-
go chips on ihe side will be served ( ur-
ing all hours of the night. This will be
a great convience to passengers leaving
town on thc early morning s ages.
Fine plinery
The furniture, fixtu-es and ev
with a busine j tbat can be ma.
rood motiey. Uest location i
For Further particulars, Addresi
Box 25, Grand Forks, li. C.
ALL   THE    LATEST    NOVELTIES
OF THE ART.
Riverside Ave.    Grand Forks.
The Following Desirable
Property at a
SACRIFICE!
Ton acres (moro or less) tyinnnlotifi tlio north-
orn boundary ot lot BJfti, A. v,. 1 linn ion LmM.
mi which thero is onjctcdUKOodrtwoliinK house,
a ~>r\ .\cJii\S, more or i«-sh. laying ultmi: tiii-
l/Ufroutheru bouudary of suid lol !M2, nnd
bounded oil tho caul by the main Kettlo river,
on tin' nortli hy tho Van Ness addition to (irand
Porks. A one third Interest in nil tin- unsold
lots tu suid VunNcss Addition. Theabovo |iw
pi'i'tv Is nil situated within tho incorporated
limits of tha oity of Grand Forks. Will also pell
/ r\ ACKKS, moreor lcra. lylutralougihe Knst
w crn houndarv of said l.o'i SK, and bounded
on tho West and North by lhe muni Kettle river,
n.it Included in tin.' incorporate limits.
Will soil tho abovo property In ono group or
any portion to suit purohnaer.
For further particulars upply to
Peter T. McCallum, J. P.,
GRAND FORKS, II. (■■
j   K. JOHNSON,
Law and Collecting Agency,
Spokane Falls
Northern;
Nelson & Ft. Sheppard,
Red Mountain Railways.
The Only All-rail Route,without cha
of cars, between Spokane, Ros-t-
land and Nelson.
Coins North.
Urle 11. 111..  ..
CONVEYANCER, MINERAL CLAIMS BOUGHT
AND SOLD.   NOTARY PUBLIC.
-X-
1    Passengers toi  Kotllti Itiver awl  Boui
IRAND   FORKB,   -    IlltlTISII   COLUMBIA I cn-°k eonuect at Marcus with sttge <Jully.
uloieConocctlonsntNolson with Bteaiu
r.ir Kaslo null nil Kootenay l.uk. I'olul -.
A Beautiful Situated Townsite, at the Natural
Gateway one of the Greatest Mining Sections
of the World, and in the center ot one of the
Finest Agricultural and Fruit Growin sections
British Columbia.
PROVINCIAL BKURKTARY'S OFFICE.
null August, IW.
HIS HONOUR um Meutcnant-Oorcr * has
heeui pli'iiscil toiuukothc lullowiug appointments:—-
istlr September, 189".
SlDNISY Kiisr.jrl.1. ALMOND, Bsquko, J. P., Mining Recorder at .Jrand Forks, tu lien Registrar
iiii.l.T ll.t* "Marriage Act."
28111 September, l«i7.
Sidney   Russku.  Almond.   Esquire, J.  1'..
Mining Reennler, to bo n Deputy Registrar of
the Uountv Court of Viiky nt Uranil l-'orks.
Tax Notice*
Unpaid Taxes Within the Municipal
Limits of the Cities of Urand Forks
and Greenwood.
as PROVIDED by the "Speodv Incorporation
H. ofTowns Act, 1807," urutehlo Dnrtlon of ttic*
Itoal Estate taxes within tho inunloipal limits
of the cities of Grand Forks ninl Greemvood for
tlie year 1807* is payable to tho respective municipalities, In order that the Provincial uses**
ment roll may be closed, in so iur uu relates to
property assessed within said cities, ndllco i*
herein- glvou that unless nil arrears of taxes due
ninl payable on suid property nre paid to lhe undersigned at the Assessor's office, Osoyoos, of
or la-fore thu 80th day of November, 18D7, the
hinds and proporty ngaiust which tnxesarc ihen
unpaid will lie advertised for sale tn accordance
will, the provisioned Tax sales under thu "Assessment Act."
C.  A.  It. I.VMIU.V,
Assessor and Collector.
Goverment Oflice, Osojoos, October 5th, 1807.
"TIT   G. HEPWORTH, M. D., O. M.
Physician and Surgeon.
UcGILL, MONTREAL,
Oflice In Drug Store.
ORAM) FORKS. D. C.
A.
baumgartner.
Boot and Shoe Shop.
Hoots and ihoCB inn ie to order of the very beat
inatorial.   Repairing promptly done.
END 01p THE BRIDGE, - -   - ORAND FORKS,
In Grand Forks now Pr
sents one of the best oppo
tunities for investment
A
l. Mcdonald,
Contractor and Builder,
GRAND   FORKB,   11.   0.
I'lnu-i nun* specifications drawn, esllmales fur-
iilslii-il ou all kinds ol birilillng, Worn strictly
It rat-class.
A    n. HART.
Contractors and Builders,
Oflice, store, mnl Saloon Fixtures n Specialty- I
Plans and Specifications Made and Estimates
Made.
OFFICE, RIVERSIDE AVE., GRAND FORK.4,
The Grand
Forks S
Miner S S\
A RED HOT News-;
paper   Published in
a RED  HOI  Town
TS sure to be the Leading Railway ar.d
Mining Center of the Kettle River
and Bourduy Creek Districts, its location makes it the Natural Gateway to
one of the Largest and Most Promising
Mining Districts
In the Woild. It has Christina Lake
on the East, the North Fork of the Kittle River on the North, Bound;, ry Creek
on the West, and the Colville Indian
Reservation on the South As every
character of ore necessary for smelting
purposes are found in these districts,
and the central location of the town,
makes it beyond a doubt the future
smelting and distributing point of this
section.
-*/'^.
i   kkluta
Don't forget to drop in and see Graham, at Edwardjs ferry, ay you pass by,
Well Bc Firahed Next Month,
Work on the new recorder's oflice and
court bouse is progressing as rapidly as
circumstances will permit. The plasters
have finished their task and the bui'd-
ing has been turned over to the carpenters and prnuters (or tho finishing touch.
The contractor expects to have everything completed so that the building can
bc turned over to the government about
the ij.h of next month.
Invest before a Railways Starts to Build this
way. Work once staned on the road the price
of lots will double,   The Plan for the
Subscription
$2.00 Per Year. North Addition to  Grand  Forks,
——is—
Gives the News cf the
Entire District.
Best Advertising
Medium in the
Kettle River and
Boundary Districts.
ow on ja
F. H. ilcCarter & Te
Son, Props, dt dt
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
Don't Miss the opportunity to get in en this deal.   Its the
most desirable Resider.ce portion of Grand Forks.     Easy
rms.    For Further Particulars Call or Addre s
Agent Grand Forks Townsite Co*,
GRAND   FORKS,   B.   C. THE  MINER.
THE MINES 1* prints*] ou Saturdays, and will
be mailed to any address In Canada or thc
I'nilpd Stntcs for one year on receipt ol two
dollars.   Blngle copies live eeuts.
CONTRACT t DVEKTHKil EXT3 Inserted «l the
rate oils per column Inch per month.
THANSIKNT ADVEttTISBMKSTU iiiscrle.l lit
tliernteof lfieentapar nonpareil tine lirst
insertion. Advertisements running tor a
shorter period than tliree month- are classed
transient.
COKBEBPONJ-ENCB (r..tu every part nl the
Val.r Distrlot andeomuiunlealtons upon live
topics always afeei.tnljle. Henri ill your
news while it Is (resh, and wo will do tho
resl.
JOB PElNTISQ turned out In first-class ntyli-
at tho shortest notice.
Ad.lr.a- If. 11. McCARTKR .tr SON.
(jiUM. I'onKs, B. tr.
SATURDAY, OCT. 23.   18*7
Carson Lodge I. 0. O. P. No. 37.
T C\ Cl V! MEKT8 EVERY 8AT0RDAY
I, YI. YJ. r. evening ats o't'loc-t In ihcir
hall nt Cnnroii It C.   A  dial Invitation ei
c 11.1...1 to 1111 -.i.joiinilnc.lircthrpii.
J ..UN IY. M< I.AIIKN. N.().
A. I . Col-r .I.•.*.', It. S.
Church Notice,
PRKBBYTERIAN Clliritcll-Servlcus every
Sabbath Iu tbo church at II a. 111. ami 7*30
p* m. In the school room at Grand Forks, balj-
bath school 10*80 a. in. in tlio sohool room.
At Carson wv.-k'.. rr p. in.
It looks just a little bit as if the people of G-and Forks have at last realized
the necessity of pulling together.
As Primer Turnei has not put in an appearance in the Boundary creek district
it is fair to presume t.iat he has got mixed up in a "j ick pot" some where over
in the Kootenays.
Til*-*, Kimloops Standard makes the
Startling annoucement that it is "ihe
principal Conservative organ of the in-
tetior" To say the least, this is rather
a haul blow on thp Conservatives.
Tin: right of lhe provincial health officer lo dictate the sanitary health regulations of the city ig being questioned.
A test crse will no doubt be made to
determine who is vested with authority
in this respect,
Thk mass meeting last Monday nigfct
c..me nearer being a success than any
effjrt of the kind attempted in the past
year. Even now there are some who are
attempting lo sprinkle cold water on
the efforts being made to harmonize the
interests of our people.
CASCADE   CITY.
Cascade Citv, Oct. 20th.—(Special
Correspondence)—A contract to sink 50-
fect and build winter quarters on the
Elmore property, on Sutherland creek,
has been let. This claim is ownod by
the Belcher Consolidated Gold Mining
C iinpjuy, and has a very good surface
Bhjvving assays from which show returns
of $10 in gold and 2 per c**nt copper.
D. C. lleach is at present pushing
work on the lleach claim, which ,s near
Elmore. It is Mr. toach's intention to
sink a fifty foot shaft on this property
before quiting work for the wir.rer.
Willison, Johnson and Hanchett, who
own the Yellowstone are woiking this
properly at present. It will be remembered that this property was purchased
from Mr. Kelly ;on*.o few weeks ago tor
a handsome sum.
The Iron Mountain claim on llaker
creek is looking well. Ihe ore in the
face of the 50-foot tunnel assays high in
gold and copper.
A recent average assay right across
the loo-loot ledge on tho Cannon Hill,
011 Hiker creek, showed returns of $35.-
50 in gold and copper.
Messrs. Wil lison and Johnson, who
own the Hoodo group, on ll.Kea creek,
which contains the Mystery, Miuntain
Chief and Mermaid claims are pushing
work at present and will likely continue
to work all winter.
Too much credit cannot be bestowed
upon Mr. A. Stuart and party who reside
at English Point for the manner in
which they ure clearing tbe land and
otherwise improving this beautiful pom'.
Deer is exceedingly plentiful around
the lake this fall and there ii no lack of
"mowitch" in consequence of this,
John Lawless has located three claims
on McRea creek in Christina lake section.
A high assay was rocentiy made from
Ed, Buns property on McRea creek,
where he is at present working.
Mr. Harry W. Treat, of New Vo k
and a cousin to Mr. l'otterof Texas, haB
laid a smelter proposition before the city
council of Vancouver, If this man is
any connection to the man by that name
who is secretary nf ihe Olive Gold Mining company, lhe lens the people have
to do with him the butter.
Grand Forks has never learned the
value 1 f harmony and singleness of put-
pose in its business community. Whenever it had a chance to promote the general good, it could be depended upon to
throw it a*vay. Selfish personal aims
nnd unnecessary quarrels among themselves are chiefly responsible for the
present state of affairs. Let past experience be a lesson lor tbe future.
P. A. O'Farrell, the well known news-
pa per correspondent and mining man of
Spokane, spent several days in this vin-
cinity tho pas', two weeks looking over
the distiict in search of information for
a series of articles be is preparing for
the Vancouver World and Seattle P,-I,
As Mr. O'Farrell is well posted on
mines and p.rinng, and has expressed
himself as being more than pleased with
the showing made in this section, we
may look for some interesting facts from
bis descriptive pen.
ATGHRISTINflff
A Well Known Piospectcr of
That Section in Town.
PICTURES ON THE WALL
Description of the Indian Paintings on
the Mountain Side at Chris.
tlna Lake.
It is wondeiful what a change of heart
time will bring about. Just before the
last city election Mayor Manly would
have broke his neck tumbling over himself in his haste to get his name down on
a subscription list tobuilda roadtoSum-
mit or any other camp. Now it is
different. During that honorable gentleman's stay in tho city, thia week, he
was waited upon by the committee col*
lecting funds for the building of the
Summit road, and in response to are-
quest to subscribe something, replied
"that he would not give a d— cent."
The reason gr/en for this "cold bluff,"
is that ho, the mavor, had supported the
people of Grand Forks and vicinity for
the last lour years and he did not propose to do it any longer. This is not
the first time this same "crack" has been
made, and while no one questions thc
fact that Mr. Manly has done a great
deal towards making Grand Forks what
it is today, there are those who are cruel
enough to claim, thut it was not done
as a philanthropist, but for selfish motives and personal gain. We aro pleased
to state, however, that the road will be
built j Bt the sumo. While the committee would have perlcrred to have his
name on the list, it never will be missed.
A Reservation Surprise Party.
Deputy Custom Inspector Wm. H.
Hutchinson dropped in on the town of
Nelson this week and created considerable consternation by announcing that
be had instructions to confiscate every
thing which had been brought over the
line fiom this side, and to arrest everyone concerned in taking it over. But
finally the matter was fixed up by bis
taking the names of those implicated
and tbe amounts of lumber, hay, oats,
etc., which hsd been taken in. Messrs.
Nelson, Pharr and Jaskulek, three prominent merchants ol that place were taken
down to Northport to appear belore the
U. S. Commissioner at tbat plaoe.
Word comes also Irom Eureka that
a similar action has been taken in that
camp, and nearly all tbe merchants and
tesidents of the place are in for it.
Remember that Edward's Perry is the
only wayside house on tbe road where
g ood meals and clean beds can be foun d
RESERVATION NOTES.
J. E. Pharrof Nelson, has jast returned
from a ten days visit to Spokane where
he went for tbe purpose of organizing a
company to develop his three properties
known as the Brimstone, Lilian and Paul.
As a result of his trip the Brimstone
Mining and Milling compiny has been
incorporated with a capital of $1,000,000.
Work will be started on these properties
at once.
An additional contract has been let to
sink fifty feet on the Big Four claim
near Nelson, and work on which will be
commenced at once. This property is
owned by the Big Four Mining and
Milling company whose president, Mr.
A J Piivitt. it will be remembered,gained considerable notoriety lately by being
held up by a highwaymtn, while on his
way to the mine from Nelson.
William Newton is finishing up winter quarters on the Morriston placer
claim at tbe mouth ol Lone Ranch creek.
Mr. Newton hat built a dam about half a
mile up the river so as to give a fall of
104 feet, it being his intention to work;
this placer nex. spring. The pay dirt
on the Morriston runs 26 cents to the
yard.
W. M. Clark of Neison, is authority
for the statement that he is going to put
in a huge gold amalgamator or gold
saving machine, on his placor ground in
tbe spring, which -will have a daily capacity of 400 yards.
Work On the Old Ironsides.
Frank Hemenway, general manager
of the Old Ironsides and Knob Hill companies, came down from the companies
works in Greenwood camp last Monday
to meet Mrs. H, who arrived from Spokane the same evening. Mr. Hemenway expressed himself as being well
pleased with the way work was progressing since the machinery was started up. He says that it is the intention
to run a double shift all winter. Thc shaft
will be sunk to the 200-foot level, where
crosscuting and drif ing will be carried
on. The shaft will then be sunk to the
300 foot level. The force of men will be
increased as fast as the work advances
so they can be used lo advantage. Additional machinery is also to be purchased for the Knob Hill, consisting of a
compressor, a hoist and pump; tbe latter to be operated with air fiom the compressor on tbe Ironsides.
W. G. MeMynn, mining recor der and
deputy registrar of the county court
of Yale at Midway, has been in the city
nearly all week on cfllcial business.
S. R. Reid, a well known prospector
from the McRea creek section, was in
the city this week laying in his winter
supplies and was a pleasant caller at
the MlNEO office. Mr. Reid is an old
time typo who .has been forced into the
jills by the introduction of type setting
machines, and seems to be well contented with his lot.
Mr. Reid has been in the Cbii-stina
lake section for the pat year and in
speaking of bis experience there he said:
"soon ifter my arrival in that section
1 was informed that there was a point
on the lake about two and a half miles
from English point, where a great variety of Indian paintings in vegetable
dyes -re found on a level surface of a
limestone rock that projects about fifteen feet above the water, out over the
lake at an angle of probably 45 degrees.
In company with another prospector
named Stewart I visited this lonely spot a
few days ago and carefully examined it.
The paintings consist of a hand, a deer
and several arrows. The mountains ot
this point ext;nd for hundreds of
feet above th.'se printings and millior s
of tons of loose rock are laying in a pr -
mi cous pile. Although it has been
generally kniwn by the inhabitants of
Christina lake section that these paintings existed, the exact spot is only
known by a very few of the most venturesome of the prospectors, The theory
advanced with regard to these paintings
is that they were made by the aborigines
of Christina lake sectio" when 'he lake
was some fifteen feet higher, which must
'have been thousands of years ago."
CLARK   GETS   IT.
Residents of Nelson will Soon Be Able to
Get a Title to Their Lots.
Early last spring W. M. Clark made
an application for a patent for the five
placer claims on which the town of Nel
son is located. Shortly after tbe application was made Narcis Peone, a half-
breed, filed an adverse to Mr. Clark's
right on tbe ground tbat the land covered by these placers wasagricultural and
not mineral. The hearing of the contest
was set for the i.Vh of this month before
the United States Land Commissioner
at Spokano. When tbe time arrived for
the case to be heard, Mr. Peone, through
his attorney, withdrew his contest, and
Mr. Clark was awarded a patent to the
claims, which be will receive as soon as
Ihe necessary fornality can be gone
through with in the land office department.
MINING    RECORDS.
Record of the locations, certiilentcs of work
triu 1 mft.-is, etc. .recorded nt thf Mining Recorder's
olliee, Grand Forks. B. C- fur tho week ending
October Ul.li.lW7:
Oetobor 11:—
I Don't Know, JumeaBullivfint, Kettle river.
Allee, Chaa, Nelson, Summit camp.
sunset. James BulUvant, Kettle. Hirer.
October 15:—
Lost f.iirl, y»m W. Jlentlerton et al, Hardy
Mountain
October 16:—
Chilcoot, John Rogors, Bum mtt camp.
Nero, Hugh COopley, Brown's oamp.
Pueblo. .1. P, Shannon ut nl, Qnuul Fork*.
October 18:—
Triplicate Frftclion, James McMiehael etal.
Montazuma, J. it. Co hosiers- Christina lake
Lighthonae, Kamlolpli Stcwurl  et al,  Christina lake.
October 19: —
Crow, 1$. G. Dalit, Hardy Mountain.
Mountain Moiiureh, John ltogerB, Summit
camp.
Yellow Kid, A. J. Stewart, Christina lake..
Kol.anee. Pan Handle ami West Enid, 9. R,
Reid, Christina lake.
CBltllFlCATKS OF WOItJC.
October IS :-
Broken Hill, John Holm ct ol,
Last Chance, W. W. Whltbeik.
October lfi: —
Acme, Golden Era Prospecting and Development Co., h. L.
Famous, C. A. Low.nun ct al.
OctolMir lrt:
Emerald, G. Walker et al.
October 18:—
Monte(,'ristu, S. M. Kirkham.
October 21:—
Honnrietta.S. L. Lewis.
Raw Hide, McGinnis ct al.
THANSI'KItS.
Oct. 18 -Ono-thinl iutorcst in B. F. W. from
James Fisher to Thos. Pasco,
Oct. 21—Christina, all interest from F C. Ha
gen toS.T. Lnnglcy.
UT E. STACHE,
Bath  Rooms,
AND TONSORlAL PARLORS.
RIVERSIDE,      - GRAND FORKS
3   BATCHELDER & KADISH, A
ASSAYERS AND CHEMISTS.
  **
Gold and Gold Ores Melted, Re-
x     .    lined and Bought     ^*.
P. O. Box 1795. •    Spokane, Wash, jj
.1 / j -T-xyx s^x,s.*s t.x^xy././ j-.j^aA.
MINERAL   ACT    io'/j.
CERTIFICATE OF IMI'ROVKMENTS.
NOTICE.
(Jrey Eagle Min.'nil claim, sitnntc in the Orand
Forks   Mining   Division   of    Yale.   District.
Where Located:—Observation Mountain, adjacent to (irand Finks.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the copartnership heretofore existing between James
! Hamilton aud !■:. imfonl, under the firm mimcof
Hamilton & Duford, in thc hotel business in
1 Grand Forks, was dissolved by mutual consent
July 1st, 1897. and I wil! not be responsible for
1 any debts incurred bv the said James. Hamilton.
EUMONI) DdPOttD.
NOTICE.
Wm. Henry Gee, free miner's certitieate No. Hi
71-~>, and It. Scott, free miner's certilicate No. 6,*
11UA, intend, sixty days from date hereof, to ap.
ply to tlm Miiiiuir Recorder for a Certificate of
Iinprovluenis, fur the purpose of obtaining; 11
Crown Grant for tlte above claim. And further
take notice that action, under section 37. must
he commenced before the issuance of such Cer
tifieate of Improvements. PBJCD WojJ.ASTON.
Dated this IfltJl day of September 1M7.
# H. A. SHEADS,
- ASSAYER -
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
SAMPLESCIVEN PROMPT ANDCAREFULTTENTION
Northern Pacific
Railway*
Yellowstone Park Line
The Fast Line,
MINERAL   ACT   1896.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THK
Court nf Revision for tlio purposo of Iti'ttr-
Itiffall r-iiiriplaintssgninr-t thoassesstnencfor the
year 1*117, au mado by Hi., assessor of tho .iiy ol
ilniinl Forks, 11. 0 . "HI Ire lu'1.1 nl lire council
chamber. In the city of Qrand Forks, on Monday
mc nth day nl October, a. p., isr'7, rri ri o'clock
p. ni .1   K. Johnson, Acting clerk.
Cily Clerks Olliee, ilrinul Forks, Sepl. llllll. '07.
STOVES,   TIN   AND3 GRANITE  WARE,
Paints, Oils, Brushes, Sash & Doors,
Anthing Yon Want in tho Hardware Line and Can't Find it go to
W. K. C. Manly's Store, Grand Forks, B. C.
NOTICK.
Mountain Hose Mineral claim, situate In
•-•rami Forks  Mining   Division of Vale I
trlet    Where  located;—Summit  Camp
I5fl*t OjillO Kuimii Mineral claim.
XAKK NOTICE that I W. T. Smith, freeinim
»   certilicate No. KDM'J, intend, sixty days   fr
the date heroof, tonpply to thu Minion Better for a cerliliente of Improvements, for
purpose of obtaining n Crown Grant ot thcui.
claim. And further lake notice that action,
dftr section 87, must be commenced before
Issuance of sueh certificate of improvements
Dated this 4th day of October, mil.
JUBILEE
HOSPITAL
the
MINERAL ACT 1896.
CKBTIEIOAT-B OF IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE.
Number  Pour mineral  claim   situate  In   tli
Grand Forlta mining Dlvison of Valodistrlc
Where located:—in Central camp. |
TAKE NOTICE! John A. Coryell us agent for
I Henry White freo miner's certilicate No.
S7.">M and M. W. i'liluierr-tou free miner's ecrUll- i
cate No. 8t.V, intend, sixty days from the date!
hereof, to apply to the " Mining Recor- !
der for certificate of Improvements, for the pur-
povcof obtaining a Grown grant of tlie above
' im.
nnd further take notice that action, under
Bection u", must be commenced bofore tlio issuance of such certilicate of Improvements,
,1'JIN A. COKYBIX.
Dated this 11th dav of September, 189(1.
GRAND   FORKS,   B.   l\
E. B- STANLEY SMITH, M. D.
Resident Physician & Surgeon.
™rbes m. kerby,
Provincial Land Surveyor.
And Civil Engineer,
! Office, Midway, ij. c.
I Associate  Member Canadian
Society   of  Civil   Englueers,
XT   S. CAYLEY,
BARRISTER AT LAW;
Solicitor, Etc.,
Office, Main.Street,   -   GRAND FORKS, B. B,
WOLLASTON,
MINERAL ACT 1897.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPBOVEWENTS.
NOTICE.
American Eaglo Mineral Claim, situated in ttic
Grand Forks Mining Division of Vale  District.   Where    located;—Wellington  camp,
Eagle mountain.
TAKK NOTICE lhat 1, Hugh S. Cayley,as ngcut
for John T, O'Brien, free miners certificate
No. S078Band John Holm, free miner's certificate No. 10SA, intend, sixty days from tlie date
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of
Obtaining a Crown Grunt of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
Bection :t7, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
li. s. Cayley,
Dated tills 21st day Of September, 1S97.
MINERAL ACT 1896,
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS.
NOTICE.
Mi.lite Carlo Mineral claim situated iu thc (irand
Forks  Milling   DlVlBton  of   Vale   District.
Where located:—Wellington  camp, Eagle
Mountain.
takk NOTICE thatl, Hughs. Cayley, as agent
I for John T. O'Brien, free miner's certificate
Nn. S117S.1. mid S M. Kirkham, free minor's cor-
MAcute No. 80287, intend, sixty days from the
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for
a Certilicate of lmprovementa for the purpose
of obtaining a Crown Grant Of tho above claim.
Ami further take notice thnt action, under
section 87, must be commenced before the Issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
h. s. Cayley.
Dated lids 21st duy of September 1807,
MINERAL   ACT    1896.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS.
NOTICE.
Rattler Mineral Claim, Situated  in lhe (irand
Forks   Mining   Division of     Vale   District.
Where locatod:—In Wellington Camp, near
the Summit of Lookout Mountain.
xakk notice thnt 1. John a Corvell,osagent
1   Ior C. Van Ness, Free Minor's Certificate No,
70888, intend, sixty days from the date hereof,
to apply to the Mining Hocorder for a certificate
of improvements, for the purpose of Obtaining
a Crown grant of the above claim. And further
take notice that action, tinder section 37. must
be commenced before lhe issuance of sucli certilicate of improvements.     John A. CORYELL.
Dated this UUh day of September, 1S«J7.
F.
Provincial Land Surveyor.
Civil Engineer, Etc.
GRAND FORKS, B.C.
G
RAND FORKS HOTEL
Barber Shop.
Centrally Looated,   All Work Gauranteed to bc
Fiist-Chiss in every Respect.
PETER A. Z* PARE,      *      *      PROPRIETOR.
J, W- JONES,
Manufacturer of
Spring   Beds,   Mattresses,
LOUNGES,   ETC.
DEALER IN HOUSEHOLD GOODS OF ALL KINDS.
'GRAND   1'OUKS,.   D.   C.
Saw Filing and all Kiml* o[ Repairing.
Thi Providence Fur Company
Providence, R. !.,
Wauls all kinds ol
Raw Furs, Skins,Ginseng,
Seneca, A:c.   Prices quoted for next sixty days
are us follows;
Silver Fox  $lfi 00 to ?15» 00
Hear  .1 00 to 25 tit)
Otter  4 IK) to JMK»
Martin    2 00 to H IK)
Beaver (per pound)  0 no to D ho
Wolf  1 00 to 8 GO
Red Fox    1 on to 2 00
Mink  7.ri to 1 00
Skunk  2-'> to 1 (0
Gray Fox  M) to 75
Rat        20 to 2.-1
Price List on all other furs and skins furnished upon application, Full prices guaranteed,
careful selection, courteous treatment and immediate remittance on till consignments.
THE POSTOFFICE STORE.
WHITE & KER, Proprietors.
Special   Sale of   Hats.
Two dozen Straw Ilats at a Bargain.
FINE LINE FELT HATS; TEN PERCENT OFF.
Watch Repairing a Specialty   j«   .**   All Work Guaranteed
Superior Service,
Bearing Fruit Already.
There was a man in town yesterday
from Summit camp. It was the first
lime be had been in Giand Forks to buy
anything for over a year. The cause
tor coming tbis lime was to consult the
doctor concern ng an attack of heart
failure, caused by tbo shock to his nervous system by the leport Orand Forks
had actually started to built a road to
Summit. He says that when the road is
completed two-thirds of the trade will
come this way.
Foit Sai,e—A four-roomed furnished
cottage in Upper (irand Forks. For
further information enquire at this office.
Through Tiirkets to nil points In tlie Unile.l
Btatcs nnrl t'linaln.
Direct r.iniiGelloiis with lho Sinrlturri- Falls &
Northern Railway.
TRAINS   DEPART:
Nn.l Wesl    ISp. in.
No. 2 Hast 7:1)0 a. m.
Tickets to Japan and Ohina via, Taooma ami
Northern Pacific steamship Company.
For information, time cards,maps anil tiekr-IB
apply to agent, of the Spokano Falls .t Northern
alio Its connections, or
f. n. Ginns,
-   General A*-ent Spokane, Wash.
A. D. GIIARI.TON, A. O. P. A.,
No. 245 Morrison St., Portland, Or.
Wrltp Ior new imip ol Kootenay country.
^TORONTO   HOUSED
BROWN'S CAMP, UP THE NORTH FORK.
Choice Wines Liquors and Cigars,
This hotel is located about 12 miles from Grand Forks up the North Foik.
Good Fishing and Hunting in the vicinity. Meals served at all hours, and
the best of sleeping accommodation!*. H.P.TORONTO, Proprietor.
Chicago  Meat Market,
BROWN & SPONG, Proprietors.
The Finest Fresh and Salted Meats
ALWAYS ON HAND.   TRY OUR SAUSAGE.
e^Grand Forks Hotels
Is the Oldest and Leading Hotel in the city,
and Headquarters for Mining and Commercial Men. The house has just been refitted
and the rooms are unsurpassed for comfort in
the city, while in the Dining room can bo
found the best food in the market.
All Stages Stop at the House, -£ *&
Joseph L. Wiseman, Proprietor:
The White House,
OLIVER BORDEAUX, Proprietor.
Best of Wines, Liquors and Cigars*
"Dad'' Brown, well known all over the Kootenays as first-class Restaurant man
has been secured to take charge of the Dining Room, and every effort will be
, made to make the boys from tbe hills feel at home.   Be sure and   stop and see
I "Dad" and Dick when in town,
OLD LOG STORE,
Nelson, Wash.
PROSPECTORS AND HINERS
He luro to buy Ihe U-cst »t«l
to UiBuro tin* bail '.'bills.
Canton Steel
in the lir'sf bihI ciin bo had tilt
cheapest »t our Old [.og Store
Kelson, *>r our Eureka Btorcs
Eurel.ii,\Vttsh.
SpeciarPrices on Large Lots
This steel Is Guaranteed 10 l.y
Equal ta Jossep's Iu lloelt
Work.
O. B. & P. BL NELSON,
Dealers In Ueneral Merchandise,
NELSON, WASH.
KUKEKA, WASH.
1.  P. FLOOD.
Grand Forks Meat Market,
FIRST ST. TWO DOORS FROM BRIDGE,
Kerr & Flood, Butchers,
GRAND FORKS, GREENWOOD AND MIDWAY.
.All Kinds of Meats German Sausages and Head Cheese Always on Hand.
^THE MIDWAY HOTEL
trS*
MIDWAY, KETTLE R1VEK.
First-Class  Accommodations,  Good Stabling, Termius  of
Stage Line From Marcus,  Washington.
McAuley& Keightley,
Proprietors*
The Only Race in Town
that Handles Fruit.
HA. HUNTLY,
Deiilor in
* Tobacco and Cigars,
Groceries, Salt Meats and Miners Supplies*
resh Supply Ructlved Dally.
BRIDGE STREET (JRAND FORKS, B.C.
©^•Prospectors and Miners will lliiil it to their interest to give ine a call beforo pMrehtising
l can save you money.  Full Line of Fishing Taoklc just Uonelved,
COSMOS  HOTEL
>y\^GRAND Forks, B.   C.->^v-
XX
X*x
Everything New and Best Furnished
Houne, and is in everyway prepared to
welcome Guests and provide Good Accommodation.
HrfXj* Headquarters  for  Milling Men.   Best
pX0X. of Wines, '.iquorsand Cigars.    Special
r paid I
XX
EZRA INBODY,
attention paid lo Transcicnt trade/
Proprietor.
Boundary Greek Mining Exchange
SANSOM & HOLBROOK,
& Financial and Mining Brokers <£
OFFICE AT GREENWOOD CITY, 11. C.
Groups of chillis Bought for Stock Companies,  Etc., Etc.
isaPROSPECTORSfsS
Livery and Feed Stable,
Riveiside Ave., Grand Forks.
Livery Teams, Saddle,
Pack and Lidics Saddle Horses a Specialty.
Harness Shop in connection.
Teaming cf All Kinds Done.
Plenty of Barn Room for Freighters. Give us a trial
KETTLE   RIVER
G. W. W1LLIAHS, Manager.
Daily from Marcus to Grand Forks
Greenwood City, Anaconda, Boundary Falls, Midway
and All Points on Colville Indian Resev-ition.
Stage Leaves Marcus on the Arrival of the Northbound Train, arriving atJOjind.
Forks at 8:45 p. m. Leaves the Forks at 4:0.1 H, tn., arriving ny Mnreus i.i ti*ne to
connect wiiti northbound Train. Passengers ito-'n J^OttpiyFoluta niak'r *J0B.H8t'
tion at Bossburg going nnd Com ng.
V
)
T SUMMIT ROAD
*.
Work on a Wagon Road Into
the Camp Begun.
MORE MONEY IS NEEDED
To Put the Road Through but When
Completed It Will More Than
Repay Us.
Last Monday evening a mass meeting
of the citizens of Grand Forks was held
in the club room, for the purpose of providing ways and means lor the construction of a wagon road from the mouth of
Fisherman creek to Summit camp. Without doubt this meeting was more generally attonded than any other simi'ar
gathering held in Grand Forks for a
long time—in fact—since the Hay-Mc-
Callum meeting the evening before the
last city election. Nearly every faction
aud branch of business in the city was
represented, and reminded one forcibly
of an old fashioned love feast. Everyone
present agreed that the time had come
when the citizens of Grand Forks must
lay aside their petty differences, put
their shoulder to the wheel and pull together for th; common goodot the community, instead of the cat-hauling and
hair pulling that has characterizidevery
effort that has heretofore been made in
the direction of attracting trade here
for fear that one man would get a few
dollars more out of it than the other.
Every person present agreed that in
order to secure the trade of the surround
ing couutry, steps must be taken to place
our merchants in a position thit they
can compete with those of other towns.
In order to do this one of the most essential requirements necessary was good
roids and trails to the numerous mining
camps and the citizens ot the town mast
take the initial step in building these
thoroughfares instead ot hanging back
and waiting for the goverment to do it
for* them.
The meeting was called to order by
Mr. Robert Hewitt, manager of the
Grand Forks brewery, who made a brief
statement as to its object, and upon' the
motion of Jeff Davis, F.H. McCarter was
made chairman and James Addison secretary.
In order that those present mightfully
understand the situation, the chairman
statod, tbat about ten days ago upon the
solicitation of a number of representative business men of Grand Forks, prospectors and property owners in Summit
camp and vicinity, a subscription list
bad been prepared and circulated asking lor contributions for the construction of a wagon road from the mouth of
Fishetman creek to Summit camp, the
es'imaied cost of which was about $1,000.
He was pleased to announce, however,
notwithstanding the fact that tho usual
amount of cold water had been thrown
upon tho project, that nearly one-half of
that amount had been promised, besides
a large amount ol work had been donated
by pro.ipectors. and others interested in
that locality. In view of the statement
madi by the Hon. G. B. Martin, chief
commissioner of land and works, at the
public reception given that gentleman
on his recent visit to this city, "thatit was
the policy of the government lo meet
the settlers and prospectors half way on
all propositions that had a tendency to
opon up and develop the resources
ot the country," it was safe to presume
that the government would respond liberally to a call for assistance toward
the building of the road. That owing
to the near approach of winter, it was
necessary that in order to complete the
road before bad weather sets in, work
should be commenced at once. If we
waited until the entire amount was secured before work was commenced, it
would doubtless be to late to do anything
this fall, and the object of tbis meeting
was to decide whether it would be better to make a start and expend what
funds had already been secured, or to
defer action until such time as the entire amount had been secured,
The prevailing opinion seemed to be
that the sooner a start was made the better and upon motion of Jeff Davis, seconded by W. K. C. Manly, Mr. Joseph
Wiseman, was asked to take charge of
the construction of the road with in
structions to make a start as soon as the
necessary arrangements could be made,
Mr. Wiseman having made several
trips over the proposed route, said that
twenty men could build afirst-class win.
ter road from the mouth of Fisherman
creek to Summit camp in twenty days,
then if the weather pormitted, and the
funds held out they could double back
over thc road and put it in good condition.
An exocutive committee consisting of
W. K. C. Manly, chairman; James Addison, secretary, and Jeff Davis, treasurer,
was chosen, and authorized to take
charge of the collecting and dispersing
of the road fund.
Robert Hewitt, Neai McCallum and
E. Spraggett were named as a committee
to solicit further contributions, and those
who cannot afford to subscribe money
can help tbo cause along by going out
and working a few days on the road.
A resolution was passed instructing
tbe secretary to communicate with tbe
Hon. G. II. Martin, cbiet commissioner
of land and works, laying before him
the importance of tbe road, and requesting an appropriation from the government toward building the same,
The RauUton Rrothers, owners of the
Diamond Hitch and a number of other
promising prospects up the North Fork,
were present and addressed the meeting. They stated that it was their intention to put in the winter developing
their North Fork properties, and Messrs
IVkmsoii and ffeifer, of the ratlifiuder
would continue work during the winter,
provided the necessary machinery to
successfully carry on the work could be
got into the property. In order to accomplish this about three miles of road
would have to be built. With what
work tbat would be donated by those
interested in that locality, a good winter
road could be built for $50 a mile. This
amount he asked the citizens of Grand
Fork? to donate.
The necessity of the road was recognized by all present and steps will at
once be taken to raise the amount necessary Ior its construction.
The meeting then adjojrned.
LOCAL   NOTES.
A. C. Sutton has gone to Rossland on
legal business.
A Laides' Aid society is among thc
latest acquisitions to the city.
Snow has made its appearance on the
high peaks up the North Fork.
Mr. Tom Walsh, of Greenwood,spent
several days in the city this week,
A perfrxt stream of prospectors are
continually coming and going up McRea creek,
Mr. H. S. Cayley left Tuesday morning last for Nelson, B. C, where he went
to attend court,
Doc and L. A. Manly made a hasty
trip to Eureka camp thiB week, to look
after their mining interests.
George Cumings will leave in a few
days for Chicago to accept a position as
a travelling salesman.
A report is prevailent that several aggravated cases of glanders have occurred among horses in the Boundary creek
district.
The report comes from Vernon that
W. R. Megaw, will not open his Grand
Forks branch until about tbe first of the
new year.
John Martin,. the miner shot by Jacl ■
Hennessy at Eureka, last week, is recovering slowly, although he is not considered out of danger yet.
The office cat ate two yeast cakes for
breakfast the other morning, and as a
result he is swelled up bigger than some
Grand Forks people we know.
Wm. Spong has soli his interest in the
Chicago meat market 10 Mr. Sears and
hereafter the business will be conducted
under the firm name of Brown &  Seais.
Contractor Divey will be here nett
week to enter into further negotiations
with the city council regarding the put-
ling in ofjthe water and light system.
Several more able bodied men can
find employment on the road now being
built from this city to Summit camp.
The wages paid are {1.50 a day and
board.
lames Clark, the head push of Eureka
camp, arrived from Spokane Thursday
evening and stopped ovor in tbe city
yesterday to attend to some business
nratters.
Provincial Constable I. A. Dinsmore
arrested John F. Hennessy, who shot
John Martin, at Enreka, some two weeks
ago, near R. R. Gilpins place, early tbis
morning.
A par'.y of some bait dozen miners
have gone to Edward's camp to build
quarters and complete arrangements for
working on a couple of claims in tne camp
all winter.
Mr. Gait of Rossland, has just completed his annual assessment work on
the Giant claim, on Castle creek, and it
is learned that some exceptionally fine
ore rewarded him for his labors.
Cbas. Emmert has returned to Grand
Forks to reside and will hereafter be
found in charge of the Prospectors' livery feed and sale stable, where be will
be pleased to Bee his old customers.
Wm. Graham, projector and builder
of the bridge at Edward's Ferry, was in
the city yesterday on business. By crossing at this point freighters and others
can save from two to three miles travel.
B. C. Van Houten, largely interested
in reservation mining property in the
vicinity of Nelson, has been appointed
a deputy U. S. marshal Ior the state of
Washington with headquarters at Seat
tie.
It is reported that Mr. Bailey of Rossland, who is at present at work on a
map showing tbe different mineral locations on tbe east side of Christina lake,
will be through his task by November
1st.
Tom Parkinson, president of the Pathfinder Mining, Reduction and Investment company, went to Rossland this
week on business connected with the
further development of the Patherfinder
mine.
Jas. McNicol, tho rustling merchant of
Midway and Anaconda, passed through
tbe city Thursday on bis way home
from the Spokane fair. He was accompanied by Mrs. Mc and the, report having had a pleasant trip.
Mayor Manly came over from Rossland last Wednesday and returned home
Friday. He was accompanied by his
brother, the doctor. The mayor ie chuck
full of smelter news and is confident that
inside of twelve months a smelter would
be running in full blast.
S. R. Reid and A. J. Stewart who own
the Panhandle, Cockoonee, Yellow Kid
and West End, on McRea creek, are
making preparations to open these
Claims up in the early spring. Like all
other property in that locality there is
an immense surface showing on these
claims.
Mr. Galloway, one of the townsite
owners of Greenwood City, was an arrival on Monday's evening stage from
Marcus. He was accompanied by his
family and was on his way home from
Spokane where be had been looking alter the Boundary creek exhibt at the
Spokane fair.
On and after October 31st, Messrs.
Kerr & Flood, proprietors of the Grand
Forks meat mirket, will close their place
of business on Sundays. Patrons 01* the
market are requested to bear this fact
in mind and to procure their meat for
Sunday Saturday nights,
SMELTERS.
New Company Organized^"to
Build Two of Them
ELECTRIC RAILWAY TOO
Proposed to Put In Reduction  Works
at Both Orand Forks and
Midway.
W. CMcDougall.a well known mining
man of Rossland and Grand Forks has
b^en instrumental in organizing a company for the purpose of building a smelter at Grand Forks and one at Midway.
Tbe company is known as the Kettle
River Smelting and Tramway Co., and
its capitalization is $2,000,000. It Ucom-
posed cf both English and American
capitalists. Mr. McDougall sais tbat
the plans of this new company are to
build a one hundred ton smelter at
Grand Forks and one at Midway and
also to construct electrical tramways
from Christina lake lo Rock creek, with
branch line running to the different
mines fortbe purpose of conveying ore
to tbe smelters.
Mr. McDougall srys that months ago,
befo'e this smelter scheme had assumed
its present proportions, the Kettle River
district had Been carefully examined by
experienced mining men whose reports
had been sent back to tbe company in
London, Eng , so the promotors of this
present smelter scheme did not go into
it with their eyes shut but were kept
thoroughly posted from time to time
about this section of the country. The
company is said to be ready to start
at once provided the city furnish a site
and water power for this purpose of
generating power for electrical purpose?.
The cost of smelting the ores will be
about $10 a ton so that ores that have
a value of $15 per ton will pay to smelt
after deducting a couple of dollars per
ton for freighting the ore to the smelter.
The exact time lhat work will be commenced on the smelter depends now entirely on the action of the city council
with regard to securing a water right
and site for smelter and as they are now
working on that matter thore is every
reason to believe tbat satisfactory arrangement for the securing of a water
right and smelter site will be made witi-
in tbe next 30 days. In that event the
preliminary work on the smelter will
according to Mr. McDougall, be commenced tbis fall.
WILL BE THE FIRST THERE.
The First Wagon to Summit Will Go Over
the  Grand Forks Road.
The people ot Grand Forks may be
slow about getting started but when
they do make up their minds to do a
thing they generally get there with "both
feet." At a mass meeting last Monday
night, it was decided that they would
build a wagon road to Summit camp.
Tuesday morning every idle man in
town who would work was secured, the
necessary tools for road building, camp
and boarding house equipments were
got together, and in the afternoon were
moved to the seat of war, ond early
Wednesday morning dirt was Hying on
the road, under the direction of Mr.
Joseph Wiseman, the champion road
builder of the Kettle river district, who
bas given bis word for it tbat the first
wagon that goes into Summit will go
over the Grand Forks road.
While Mr, Wiseman is pushing things
at the other end of the route, those at
his end must not be idle, as there is
something over $300 yet to be raised to
complete the work. Lot everyone come
forward and give something toward thb
enterprise. If you cannot afford to give
money work will do just as well.
CONVOY   ABOLISHED.
Collector of Customs to be Appointed at Cascade City.
J. S. Clute, special customs inspector
for British Columbia, bas been in the
city for the past few days on business
connected with custom affairs, chief
among which, is the establishment of a
custom out-port at Cascade City, with
Mr. Geo. Rose, J, P., of that town in
charge of it.
Inspector Clute has also done away
with the convoy that has been in force
here for years past to go through with
all freight passing through the country.
Under tbis new arrangement all freight
teams and stages will have to go via
Cascade City coming in.
The custom department is to be cot-
mended on tho action it has taken in this
matter, as the convoy question has been
a bone of contention for a long time.
Will Start Work.
Henry White, manager of tho City of
Paris and Lincoln properties, which are
situated in White's camp on tbis side ol
the line, is expected to arrive from Spokane almost any nay now. If reports
are any ciiterion to go by, extensive
operations will be commenced on these
properties at once, the company which
owns them having appiopriated $25,000
for development work. A hoisting and
pumping plant and other necessary machinery is to be put in at once, and a
good wagon road from Nelson to these
propertis is to be built. This road will
go by the Comstock mine.
LOST.
From Williams' stage on Saturday,
Oct. 2nd, 1897, an Olive colored grip between Grand Forks and Edwards' Forry,
B. C. Grip is marked J. J. Sullivan,
Toledo, Oti'o, and contains letters, papers, &c-, of no value to anyone but the
owner. Finder will please return to
Williams stage line.
Never say you have when you haven't
for you may have too, to square yourself.
• •   •
The mills of the government grind
slowly, but like the bedbug they gtt
there just the same.
• •   •
When business men themselves cross
the line to buy goods how can they expect others not to do likewise.
• 00
Davey? Davey? Seems to us—oh,
yes! That's the Rossland contractor
that Mayor Manly steered up again.t
the city council.
• •  •
Don't worry about the winter season
not setting in, All things, even the subscription paper to the Summit road fund,
come to those who wait.
• •  •
The fate of our late city clerk wi 1
probably show some olhers that there is
such a thing as a barrister getting too
gay, even it he is English born.
e • a
A Kansas farmer died the other day
leaving a fortuno of $150,000. There is
nothing strange about this except that
he did not make it out of this year's
wheat ciop.
e e •
Women. God bless them, they :re the
sunshine of any household, But. too
many of them are liko a buzz saw, and tie
man who has moiethan one on the string
at a time is bound to get badly cut in the
long run.
• •   •
The report comes from Eureka that
they had another shooting scrape there
last Saturday night. This time the fracas
took place in what is know as the Midway Plaisance district, and while no one
was killed some of the participants were
pr:tty badly "scratched."
• •  •
Tom Twohellies, the office cat, has
been engaged to wrile a spectacular
farce in three acts and a prologue for
the Grand Forks dramatic club. T.;e
farce will be entitled "The WaterWoiks
or that Terrible Cat,"and will be rich.rare
rary from the time the curtain goes up
until it falls on the last act. Advance
shoe's will be ready for the press in lhe
course of a week or two, and the play
will be put on the boards some time
during the holiday days,under thedirec-
lion and subervision of Mr. Arthur Milthorp, who has had more or less experience in that line.
• e •
Mose Burns, the all round miner and
prospector made a hasty trip to Summit
camp this week. If there is one thing
more than another that Mose likes, it is
a goo.l fat duck. While on his way
home the other day he spied two Mallards serenely swimming around in a
pond to one side of the road. Mose says
to himself "they are my meat." So, accordingly, he proceeded to crawl upon
them two unspecting ducks, like a lur-
key gobbler after a grasshopper. On
arriving at shooting distance, Mose took
a rest over a log, and casting that eagle
eye of Lis over the barrels of the gun
turned both barrels loo re. The reaction
was too much for Mose, and alter taking
an inventory of himself to see if he was
all there, recollections of roast duck
returned. But, alas, it was but a dream
—while a swath four feot wide had been
cut through the hull rushes clear across
the pond the ducks bad managed to escape unbuit.
Got Six Months.
I'eter Costello,   cf   Rossland,   and  a!
partner of Contractor   Davey,   who  has
the contract to put in the water and light |
syst m in this city, was sentenced to six '
months in the  provincial  jail at Kmi-I
loomps at hard labor, 1 ..st Thursday, at.
Nikon, B. C.     The charge  on  which j
Castello was sent over the road  was Ior
committing an assault on Ed. Cronyn, a
Rossland lawyer.
MRS. PRIBILSKY, $300 Takes 1
Dealer   in
Arcada Reopened.
"One, by one, the wandering sinners
return." Mrs. A Hammer, has r. turned
from Spokane and r opened the Arcifla
oyster and coffee house as a Wailli
Factory, where hot walil rs with Sa*ato-
go chips on lhe side will be served <ur*
ing all hours of the night. Tbis will be
a great convience to passengers leaving
town on the early morning s ages.
Don't forget to drop in and see Graham, at Edwardjs ferry, a; you pass by,
A Short Session.
The regular weekly session of the city
council was held yesterday af.ernoon
with Hepworth in the chair.
A communication from Contractor
MrUonald, requesting payment of a bil'
of $50 for putting the fence around the
school house, was read and placed on
file, as was also one from the deputy
minister of finance enclosing a cheque
for $176, back taxes due the city from
the Provincial government,
Johnson, of the w.rter rights committee, reported that Mr. Cayley was communicating with the proper authorities
regarding the steps necessary to obtain
a water right for the cityar Grand Forks.
L. A. Manly reported on behalf of the
board of works that Mr. Fred Cooper
had been given the contract for replank-
ing the bridge and that material was
now being hauled for the pur.ose.
Criminal Carelessness.
Once again we a-e called upon to warn
the city authoiit'es of the dangerous condition of the side walk between the
Whitehouse and Main street, on Riverside avenue. Elevated as it is Borne four
or five feet, without railings on either
side to prevent people Irom walking off
of it on a dark night, it is only a matter
of time before someone breaks a leg,
arm cr is seriously injured, as there is
hardly a night passes but some person
steps off this piece of walk. Fortunately for the city, so far, no one has been
badly hurt, but unless some steps arc
soon taken to remedy this evil, the city
will have an opportunity to li.urc as
defendant in a first class llabel suit.
Mining Company Incorporated.
Artic'es were tiled last Monday in
Spokane incorporating the Copper Bullion Mining company, with headquarters
at Spokane. The capitalization is $5oo,-
000, divided into shares of the par value
of $1 each. The incorporators and trustees are Alexander Dunphy.OitoGiuno,
L A. Doherty and A. G. Kerns. The
propeity already controlled by the company consists of ihe Copper Bullion and
Morning Star claims in tbe Curlew district on the Colville icservation.
Well Bc Flushed Next Month,
Work on the new, recordei's office and
court house is progressing as rapidly as
circumstances will permit. The plasters
have finished their task and the bui'd-
ing has been turned over to the carpenters and painters for tho finishing touch.
The contractor expects to bave everything completed so tbat tho building can
be turned over to the government about
the 15 h ot next month,
F
The Following Desirable
Property at a
1
Fine (Jillineri-
i The furniture, fixtu-es and cv
i with a husir.y t that can be ma.
poo 1 money. Best location i
. For Further particulars, Addresi
Ilo/. 25, wra.d Forks, li C.
ALL   THE    LATEST    NOVELTIES
OF THE ART.
Riverside Ave.    Grand Forks.
J
K. JOHNSON,
Law and Collecting Agency.
CONVEYANCER,  MINERAL CLAIIViS BOOT
AND SOLD.   NOTARY PUBLIC.
IIUSD   FOBKB,    -    1:H111-II   COLUMBIA
Spokane Falls
Northern,
Nelson & Ft. Sheppard,
Red Mountain Railways.
The Only AU-rail Route, without cha
of cars, between Spokane, Rowland and Nelson.
' «.oiii^ Nortli.                                   (iolngf-
12:12 a. in MARCU8  3iQ8
( lowConocctloui'fil Nelson with steam'
fur Kaslo aud all Kootenay Lake Paints,
Pataengen for Kottle River find Bout
<'ri"-k conueel .it Marcm with tstn^e dully.
Ton acres (more or lens) lylntt along the nortn- 1
■u boundary uf ini B82. A. No, i Garden Land, i
(hi wli icil there Is erected a good dwelling house. '
,! jn ackks, iimi'i'or less, laying: along tlu-
17U southern boundary ■■f mild Im JWJ.nnd
bounded on tlio east by tne main Kettto river,
nn tin- north by tin- Van Nob* addition to (iraud
Korks, A ono-third Interest in nil tin- unsold
lots in suid VanNess Addition. Tin- above i-rj-
pertv in nil situated within tho Incorporated
limits <*f Un; city ol Grand Forks. Will nlso sell
/ r\ ACHKB, mureor lens, lyintr alone the Knst
OU ern boundary of Btild Ul 3S2, end hounded
on tin. VV cut nnd North by iho main Kettle river,
not Included in (lie Incorporate limits.
Will sell tho above property ln ono tfrutip or
nny portion to suit purchaser.
Fur further particulars upplv in
Peter T. McCallum, J. P.,
GRAND FORKS, 11. ('.
%
>*:A--«.,--J
KH223***V_
PROVINCIAL SECIItETARY'S OFFICE.
IHtli August, 11*117.
HIS HONOUR iho Lieutenant-Governor has
been plt-asod itj luukothc fullowlug appointments:—
isth September, ihsit.
StDNKY RUSSKLI, ALMOND, Esqul**C, J. IJ.. Mill -
IngRuconloratUranit Forks, in bea Registrar
under tin' "Marriage Aet."
28th September, 1WI,
Sidney   I'i'ssku,   Almond.   Esquire, .1.  ly.
Mining Recorder, in lie a IVimty Keglstrar r.r
ilu- Uouutv (rr.ui-i of Yalo, nt Oram! Finks.
Tax Notice*
Unpaid Taxes Within the Municipa"
Limits of the Cities of Grand Forks
and Greenwood.
as PROVIDKDby the "Speodv Incorporation
■rt of Towns Aet, 1807," a ratable Dorttonof the
Ileal Estate taxes within tin- munioipal limits
nf tlie cities of Grand Forks aud Greenwood for
tin- year ikut, is payable to tliu respective municipalities. In order that the Provincial mtv*,*-
mout roll may be closod, in so far as relate* tn
property assessed within said cities, notice is
hereby jrivou that unless all arrears nf tuxea due
nnd payable on said properly am paid tn the 1111-
dOrBlgUCd at tlie Assessor' a olliee, Usnynns, of
or before the 80th day of November, 18117, the
lands and proporty against whieh taxes are then
unpaid will bo advertised for sale fn accordance
with tiie provisions of Tax sales under the '"Assessment Act."
C. A. It. I.amiii.y*
Assessor ami Collector,
Goverment Oflice, Osu>oos, October 6th, UW7-
w,
G. HEPWORTH, M.D., O. M.
Physician and Surgeon,
Mi'iy.Il.L,  MOSTREAL.
omce Irr Drugstore.
GRAND FORKS. B. C.
A.
BAUMGARTNER.
Boot and Shoe Shop.
Boots and shoca made tn order of the very best
material.   Repairing promptly dune.
END OF THE BRIDGE, - - - GRAND FORKS.
A
l. McDonald,
Contractor and Builder,
GRAND   FORKS,   Ii.   U.
l'lfliis nnd Bpeolfleatlons drawn, estimates tur-
nishod .ni all kindsol bnlldiug. Work strictly
ttrst-olass.
A    11. HART.
Contractors and Builders
Oflice, Store, ami Snlonn Fixtures n Fpeclalty. j
Plans and Specifications .Made and Estimates
Made.
OFFICE, RIVERSIDE AVE.,  GRAND FORKS,
The Grand
Forks S
Miner S> *£|
A RED HOT Newspaper Published in
a RED  HOT Town
A Beautiful Situated Townsite, at the Natural
Gateway one of the Greatest Mining Sections
of the Wodd. and in the center ot one of the
Finest Agricultural and Fruit G.-owin sections
British Columbia.
In Grand Forks now Pre
sents one oi the best oppo:
tunities for investment*
T5 sure to be the Leading* Railway and
Mining Center of the Kettle River
and Bound iry Creek Districts, its location makes it die Natural Gateway to
one of the Largest ana Most Promising
Mining Districts
In the Woild. It has Christina Lake
on the East, the North Fork of the Katie River on the North, Bound;.ry Creek
on the West, and the Colville Indian
Reservation on the South As every
character of ore necessary for smelting
purposes are found in ihese dstricts.
and the central location of th; town,
makes it beyond a doubt the future
smelting and distributing point of.this
section.
*s-*^/°*—
1 liU Hi H
Invest before a Railways Starts to Build this
way. Work once staned on the road the price
of lots will double,   The Plan for the
Subscription ..,
$2.00 Per Year;North Addition to  Grand Forks,
-—is—
Gives the News ct
Entire District.
Best Advertising
Medium in the
Kettle River and
Boundary Districts.
F. H. HcCarter &
Son, Props, dt «-#
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
Don't Miss the opportunity to get in en this deal. Its tie
most desirable Residence portion of Grand Forks. Easy
Terms.   For Further Particulars Call or Addre s
Agent Grand Forks Townsite Co.r
CRAND    FORKS,    B.   C. IS
SMALLEST   BOOK    IN    THE    WORLD.
OREGON   SHORT   LINE'S   GATEWAY.
Mutually Su 11»i h v t»r>   \ yree m cut  I»
Heaoued Between tbe Three Con-
I»Hiiii'K uml   llie  itt'nuiiijH Ion   uf All
Truffle itt-iutloitu.
Salt Lake, Oct, lit.   At a meeting yes-1
terduy of the officials of the Union Pacific,j
tbegun Short Line and t), 11. &. N. a mutually satisfactory agreement was entered into between the three companies. The
agreement provides for the resumption
of nil traffic relations between the roads
whieh were in existence prior to Septem-
ber Jtt last, when the calcellation of tin;,
Oregon Bailway &. Navigation tariffs by [
the Union Pacific took place.
The agreement al.no provides for tlie restoration of local tariff rates between the
Union Pacific and the Oregon Short Line
in Utah, Idaho. Wyoming and Colorado,
the K. Ellery agreement of last week
only covering Missouri river business.
The Oregon Short Line's several gateways
wilt remain open to all roads.
The Chicago ami Portland train service
via tho Chicago & Northwestern uud Union Pacific will be resumed at once. The
through service to Portland via the Rio
Grande lines will he continued.
PASSED THE  ONE   HUNDRED   MARK.
yellow Fever Reeord at New O Henna
uml other Stricken Cities.
N'.w Orleans, Oct 10. -Before 7 o'clock
last evening the 100 mark of deaths during the present period of yellow fever
prevalence had been reached. This century of deaths has occurred as among less
than 000 eases thai have been reported
to the hoard since early in September.
when the lirst ease made its appearance
in   New  Orleans.
Si tun tion  Ih  Unfavorable-,
Washington. Oct. 10. -The yellow fever
situation yesterday, as reported to Surgeon General Wyman. was not favorable,
the disease having made its appearance at
I la ton Rouge, where there was one ease,
and at Montgomery, Ala., both of which
places heretofore have been free from the
disease. From Montgomery Dr, Wyman's
information was that fever had been reported by State Health Ollicer Sanders,
though the number of eases was not
stated. Dispatches from other places
show new eases and deaths as follows:
Mobile, Ala., six cases, one death; Scran-
ton, La., 12 eases; I'ascagoula, Miss., two
easoH; Kdwards, two eases and three
deaths; Cayuga, Miss., three cases, one
death.
\\ under f ul  5|>f *riineii   uf    J \ DOB raj nil -
n'lil   Skill.
i Italy has succeeded In producing lhe
smallest book In the world, says the Philadelphia Bulletin.   As far back as l&u lhe
I well known historian, Cetera C'antu, together with the publisher Gnocehl of Milan undertook to Issue au edition of "Tbe
Divine Conimetlia" of Dante in tbe .smallest known characters, but they were unsuccessful, although the Qnocchl house
tried  fur io years,    in 1870 the brothers
1 Salmln of Padua took over the work and
I were successful in producing a tiny book
of 500 pages, Mx'22 millimeters In size, with
| 111 lines in each page, which book they
claimed as the smallest in the world, and,
In fact, was of less dimensions than "The
Oflleiolum" of the celebrated Gluntl, 49x
33 millimeters, printed ln Venice in 1519,
and a Senect, "De Tranqulllitate Animl,"
12x82, printed in L.eyden in 1601.
Hut another victory has been scored for
the modern Italian typographical art by
the brothers Salmin, who have made the
booklet one-third smaller than the Dante
possessed by M. George Salomon of Paris,
who solemnly declared himself the possessor of lhe smallest book In the world.
His book was printed In Holland in 1G47,
Is 10x6 millimeters, but with such large
letters that only a few words go to each
page, and so it loses Its likeness to a
book. The Salmln house has made within the same dimensions a real book of 2US
pages, each page with nine lines and 95 to
100 letters, being an unpublished letter of
Galileo to Mme. Cristine of Lorraine In
liilS. Anyone who sees this masterpiece
uf the art of printing can not help being
astonished at the small ness, exactness
and elegance of the characters.
IN   FAVOR   OF   ANNEXATION.
Tho    DuHlnesfl    Element   in    Huvnnn
ii ii11  i;l.■>.e w bere In  Culm,
Matanzas Cuba, via Key Wost, Fla.,
oct. lfi. -The business element here, in
Havana and elsewhere seem tu have
reached the conclusion that Spain can not
end the war on the basis of autonomy to
Culm, nnd are holding secret, meetings,
with a view of obtaining expressions from
the people as to what is best lo further
their interests and tho interests of the
island in general. It is believed lhat iho
sentiment will be in favor of annexation
of Cuba to the United States as fhe only
means of guaranteeing protection of life
and property. If it, is ascertained that
the general sentiment is in favor of annexation a commit ten will be sent to
lay the matter before men of prominence
in the United States and ask the latter lo
unite with the business men of Cuba in
a petition to Hie Washington government
to bring about, such a result.
THEY   WILL   OPEN   DUNCAN   RIVER.
In I ere* tiny   Meeting1   Held    li>     Ivtlftlo
Citl/.eiin Saturday.
Kaslo, B. ('.. Oct. 10.—At a largely attended meeting, presided over by Mayor
Green, Saturday evening, an organization
was effected to aid the government in opening up to navigation Duncan river,
which empties into the north end of
Kootenay lake and widens out into Sous-
er lake further north. By opening this
river a large part of the trade of this part
of the Lardeau will be thrown Into Kaslo.
Favorable addresses were made by .lame-
McK. Anderson, ti. 0. Buchanan ami
Postmaster Simpson of Duncan City. J.
B. McKilligan was elected president of
the organization; J. Kolf, secretary: !•'.
O'Brien, trasurer, A strong working committee was also appointed.
CONTEST THEIR  FATHER'S  WILL.
SUtem  Ohjeet   to  Their  Stepmother
Gettliigr  Everything-.
Portland, Or., Oct. 15.—Blanche Minerva Kearney and May Louisa Kearney of
Livermore, Cal., have brought suit to set
aside thc will of their father, K. Smith
Kearney, who died in this city In February last, leaving an estate valued at $125.-
(KJO. Kearney left his daughters $2000
each and the remainder to his wife, who
is a stepmother to his daughters. The
basis of the contest is that Kearney's
mind had been ailing for several years.
The fancy took possesion of his mind that
his daughters were not Ills legitimate
children and that they were born out of
wedlock. The petitioners allege improper
Influence was exerted oil the deceased's
enfeebled mind.
CHOKED HIM TO DEATH.
Mimliiil    Th u rm   'I'u rt ii red   ii   Wen ItUy
i.nud  Owner,
Kendallville. Ind., Oct, 16.—Thursday
night near Uloomlield, a small town near
this eity, Adam Huffman, a large land
owner, was murdered, and his hired man
was so seriously injured that he may not
recover. About 2 o'clock in the morning
two masked mon entered Huffman's house
and after gagging the hired man ordered
Huffman to give up his money. When
Huffman refused the men placed a rope
around his neck and began a terrible two-
hours' torture by pulling him up until lie
would strangle. After the robbers saw
that Huffman would not give up, they
choked him to death. Moodhounds have
been plnced on their trail.
Murk el    Iteport.
Wheat at Chicago, D2$0j at Portland.
bluest-em 82cj at Tacoma, No. I blue-stem
H.'i.lc; at Walla Walla, bluestem 83c.
Silver   mud   I,end.
Bar silver at New York, 68|cj nt San
Francisco, 573c.    Lend $3.00@4.
1,1 viiii;    l'|i   to   tlie   Viiine.
Uncle   Roub—What's   that?    A   dollarnahalf
fnr effgfl nn" coffee!    It's a dodgone oiitntK.'.
CunhlPr— Didn't   you   see   the   sign   OUtBlde—
•■The Klondike Cafe?"
"Well,   wiiut  of  it?"
"Them's regular Klondike pHoei, my friend.
Ai..*,w on,  please,"—Cincinnati  Enquirer.
GIBSON   WAS   EXONERATED.
111"-!   .■-■•'■■ill   I.Illl..11   III   Sjlilllill..   Ill
Belf-Defcu»c.
Sylvunit*., Mont., Oct. 10. -Coroner Mo-
Million, County Attorney Long and Sheriff Hubbard, Flathead county officials,
hiiv.. arrived from Kalispell lo inquire
inl.i the death ol Joseph Gillian, who wus
shot by Joseph Gibson Monday night. The
coroner summoned u jury and the inquest
proceedings began lust night und wore
concluded yesterday. The jury agreed
upon a verdict in a few minutes, deciding
iliut tlio act wus committed in self-dcfensi
nnil exonerating Gibson from till blame.
The jurors Instructed the coroner to ex-
tract the bulls from the body of deceased.
The post mortem showed that one ball
entered between the third and fourth ribs
on the left side, severing the asteroid nr-
tery nnd lodging in the right hip; the
other entered between the lirsl and second
ribs on the left sirlo. coining out between
the fourth uml liflli ribs ou lhe right side.
Denlh wns caused by internal bleeding.
'l'he remains were interred nt 4 o'eloek
this afternoon. Gillian had been iu the
camp about a your, coming here from
Libby. He wus ugly when drinking uml
quick to flash n gun.
THREE MEN ARE SHOT DEAD.
moody Trnsveiiy Near MtuskoireCi In-
iIImh   Territory.
Muskogee, I. ')*., (let. 15. — A bloody
tragedy in whieh three men lost their
lives occurred on Spaniel creek, 12 miles
southeast of here, ubout 4 o'clock yesterday morning. The dead are .1. I'. Jordan, n farmer; Moses Miller, un old desperado; Hill Watson, a Cherokee outlaw.
Jordan wns returning home after spend
ing lho right, sitting up with n sick friend
a lew miles away, lie noticed two rough
looking strangers lying by the roadside.
His suspicions wore erouscd und he went
In his brolhei* for assistance. The. Jordans
returned to whero the men wore lying nnd
asked them who they were. The desperadoes replied with u shot nnd Jordan fell.
-lint through lire heart. John Jordan thou
opened fire on the desperadoes nnd killed
them both.
United States deputy marohals wore no*
lifiod of the tragedy und on their arrival
iit the scene identified one of the (lend
men us Moses Miller, whoso brother, John,
recently killed .Mr. Madden, a merchant
of Braggs, I. T. The other wns identified
ns n Cherokee fugitive named Watson,
AN UNTAMABLE SAVAGE.
Ihe     Australian     Abort-fine   Is   lhe
strangest of Human Creatures.
I    The Central Australian aborlgln   Is
i the living representative   of   a stone
■ age, who still fashions his spear beads
and knives from tlini or sandstone, aud
performs lhe most during surgical operations  with  them.    His origin  aud
his history are lost in the gloomy rate's
of the past.    He has no written records nud few oral traditions.    In appearance he Is a naked hirsute savage,
i with a type of features occasionally
pronouncedly Jewish.   He Is by nature
j light-hearted,    merry   nnd   prone   to
laughter; a  splendid   mimic,    supple-
; Jointed, with  an  unerring  hand  that
I works In perfect unison with bis eye,
i which Is as keen as that of an eagle.
I He lias never beeu knowr to wash. He
has uo private ownership of laud, except ns regards that which is not over
carefully concealed about his own per-
! sou.    He cultivates nothing, but lives
entirely ou the spoils of the chase, and
although the thermometer frequently
ranges from in degrees to over UU de*
i grees Fahrenheit lu 24 hours, and his
country Is teeming with furred game,
lie makes no use of the skins for clothing, but goes about during tie day and
sleeps lu the open ut ulght perfectly
' nude.
He builds no permanent habitation,
and usually camps where night or fatigue overtakes him. He can travel
from point to point for hundreds or
miles through the pathless busb with
unerring precision, and can track an
animal over rocks and stoues, where a
European eye would be unable'to distinguish a mark. He Is a keen observ-
er, and knows the habits and changes
of form of every variety of animal or
vegetable life In his country. Hellg*
ions belief be has none, but Is excessively superstitious, living in constant
dread of au evil spirit, which Is supposed to lurk around his cninp at night.
He has uo gratitude except that of the
anticipatory order, nnd Is as treacherous as .Tildas. He has no traditions
and yet continues  to   practice    with
. scrupulous exactness a number of
hideous customs nnd ceremonies which
. have been handed down from his fathers, and of lhe origin or reason of
which he knows nothing. Ofttlmel
kind and even affectionate to those of
his children who have been permitted
[to live, be still practices, without any
; reason except that his father did so before him, the most cruel and revolting
mutilations upon the young men and
' maidens of his tribe.
He is not a cannibal.    No cold Joint
: of rplsslonary graces his sideboard, and
i should hunger, as a penally for his improvident gluttony,  overtake him,  he
simply lies a thin hair girdle tightly
; round  his  stomach,  und  .almost  persuades himself Hint lie is still suffering
from repletion.    He is absolutely un*
tamable.   You may clothe nud care for
him for years.   When suddenly the demon of unrest takes   possession    he
throws  olf  his  clothing and  plunges
Into the trackless depths of his native
bush, at once reverting to his old and
hideous customs, aud when sated, after
: months  of privation,  he  will   return
again to clothing aud civilization, only
to repent the   performance  later  ou.
Verily, his moods are ns eccentric a>
j lhe flight of his owu boomerang.
SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY.
t'upllallati-    Will    Hi*. .-I<i|i   It   iu   the
ills Urniiile Valley.
I Santa Fe, N. -M., Oct. 19.—Industrial
! Commissioner Davis of the Santa Fe railway, and a party of capitalists, have been
examining the sugar beet farms in this
locality. They have found acres of beets
weighing from one to six pounds, which.
according to analysis hy the territorial
; agricultural college, yielded from lo to 18
j por cent sugar. Much surprise is expressed that Rocky mountain valleys, above
71100 feet in altitude, can show results.
There is a project on foot to erect a sugar factory here and Commissioner Davis
suid his corporation will give it ull possible support. He nlso says thnt it is
probable thnt eastern capital will in a
short time establish n sugur factory somewhere in the centra] Rio Grande valley.
Portland Jnrlt-t Dead.
Portland, Or., Oct. 17.—Judge T. A.
Stephens of the criminal department of
the slate circuit court, died yesterday after a long illness. His ailment wus nervous exhaustion due to overwork. Judge
Stephens enme here 16 yours ngo from
Virginia City, New
Iloj-a Murdered By Iloyn.
Carlisle, Ky., Oct. 10.—Samuel Wilson,
aged Hi years, wus shot, and killed by Kd
Crump, aged 15 years. Crump was arrested on the charge of murder. Crump
got the worst of it in a tight, anil afterward scoured a revolver, and, laying in
wait for Wilson, shot him.
At threescore und ten a man has usu-
ully accumulated enough wisdom to enable him to acknowledge his ignorance.
(iOMO   OLIMMERINQ.
One ripe summer, frosh and fair, lias
gone glimmering. What with rain and
breeze and fair sun, the harvest has left
us grain enough to feed the world, and
hard times are trroken hy a kindly hand.
Hut autumn changes come, and we can
not be too self-content not to guard
against what niitunin brings. It is the
changeful temperature of midday warmth
and night and morning chill, from the
dampness of dews or vapors east adrift
on eastern winds. With the breath of
such comes back to very many old-time
physical troubles of pains and aches,
rheumatism, neuralgia, soreness and stiffness. This is a crop not spoken of ln a
farmer's almanac, but It must be carerl
for, else it wili lay waste and grow misery. St. Jacob's Oil ls a reaper and binder; It reaps the lield of pain and binds up
and cures. There Is no bodily pain It
won't relieve, and to tho whole group of
rheumatic pains, It ls a certain and spe-
oille cure. Let not the bounties that have
been reaped be marred by misery and
pain. St. Jacob's Oil Is the helper to enjoy the belter times.
It is a physical impossibility for hearts
to break, but there are lots of cracked
bruins.
SUICIDE OF JOHN BAKER.
Illnc*  Affected   tlie   Mind  of  n   Man
One*   Prominent   in   Untie.
Untie. Mont., (lit. 18.—John A. linker,
formerly assistant city treasurer, killed
himself yesterday morning by shooting
himself through the head. lie had been
ailing a year. The trouble seemed to affect his head. It did not keep him from
business. For several weeks past he suffered severely nnd al. times was out of his
head. This morning while alone in his
room lie committed the deed. His hand
wns unsteady und the lirst two shots
missed. The third entered the brain. He
wns stunding in front of the mirror ut the
time. Mr. linker wus from Philadelphia
und worked in the Union Pacific office iu
Omaha. Ho camo here in 1888 nnd entered the service of the Montana Union
road. Later he held other mercantile positions, nnd under the lust eity minimis-
trution wus assistant treasurer. He wns
nlso a school trustee, retiring lust spring.
WORK  YET FOR  BARRIOS.
l.iiuleiiiiiln'H Insura-cut Army 1. Still
Intact.
San Franeisco, Oct. 10.—According to
advices received from Guatemala the insurgent army is still intact, und hns not
yet eml. witli defeat, the evacuation of
Quesaltenango being merely a strategic
move ou its part 'l'he report thut. Pros-
pero Morales hud sought refuge in Mexico
is emphatically denied, nnd it is anonunc*
edt hut he is at the head of his troops ut
Sun Marcos, und within lo miles of tho
oity of Guatemala. The anonuncoment is
also made thut Fellciano Agnellis has been
iiuineil as provisional president by lhe insurgents, who are detoriiiini.il to revenge
the dnith of their friends nt Barrios'
hand..
Oricln or Fencing.
! From the lirst Invention of the sword
down to the period when the fifteenth
century was drawing to a close, the
weapon had always beeu used as an
arm of offense.
The person using It Ihr* st or hewed
It into the body of his antagonist whenever he had a chance, aud the only de-
! feuse against it was a stout armour or
jau interposed shield.
! It ls not to be supposed that an ancient warrior, or one 1 'longing to the
earlier middle ages, never thrust aside
or parried with Ills owu a stroke f his
enemy's; but this method of deferse
was uot depended upon 1- those days;
the breast plate,  the helmet,   or the
I buckler was expected to shield the sol-
idler while be was endeavoring to get
his owu sword Into some unprotected
portion of the body of nis antagonist.
But about the time of Ferdinand and
' Isabella of Spain the science of fencing
was invented.    This new   system    of
lighting gave au entirely new use to
the sword.
It now became a weapon of defense
; as well as offense. Long, slender rapiers, sharpened only at the poiut, were
tbe swords used lu fencing.
Armed with one of these a gallant
knight or high-toned courier, who chose
the new method of combat, disdained
the use of armor; the strokes of his
opponent were warded off by his own
(light weapon, and whichever of the two
contestants were enabled to disarm the
other, or deliver a thrust which could
not bc parried, could drive the sharp
polM of his rapier into the body of bis
oppoueut if he felt so inclined.
Tbe rapier, which was adopted to
combat two persons, and not for general warfare, soon became the weapon
of the duellists; and as duels used to be
. as common ns law suits nre now, It wns
thought necessary that a man should
know bow to fence, nnd thus protect
the life and honor of himself, his family, nud his friends.
A GOOD THINU
For Women to Remember.
flint In fKldreswitiK Mrs.. Plnkham they are
communicating with a woman—a woman whose
experience in treating woman's ills In greater
than that of any living physician—male or female.
A woman enn talk freely to a woman when it
Ih revolting to relate her private troubles to a
man—besides, a man does not understand—simply because lie is a man.
Many women suffer ln silence and drift along
from bad to worse, knowing full well that they
should have immediate assistance, but a natural modesty impels them to nhrink from exposing themselves to rpiestlonH and probable
examinations of even their family physician.
It i.s unnecessary. Without money or price you
can consult a woman, whose knowledge frnm
actual experience is greater than any local
physician living.
The following invitation is freely offered; accept it in the same spirit.
Women suffering from any form of female
weakness are invited to freely communicate
with Mrs. l'lnkham at Lynn, Mass. All letters
are received, opened, read and answered by
women only, thus has been established the
eternal confidence between Mrs. Pinkham and
the women of America which has never been
broken, and has Induced more than 100,000 sufferers to write her for advice during the last
four months. Out of the vaBt volume of experience which she has to draw from, it I?
more than possible that she has gained the
very knowledge that will help your case. She
auks nothing In return except your good will,
and her advice has relieved thousands. Surely
any woman, rich or poor, ls very foolish If she
does not take advantage of this generous offer
of assistance.—Lydla E. Pinkham Medicine Co.,
Lynn, Mass.
One   Comfort.
lie had come home very unsteady, and she
was good  and  mad.
"Yes, you are my husband, Mr. Stubbs; but,
thank goodness, you are no blood relation to
mt'."-Brouklyn Life.
Piso's Cure for Consumption haa saved
me large doctor bills.—C. L. Baker, 42H8
Regent Sq., Philadelphia, Pa„ Dec 8, '1)5.
It is easy enough for a man to believe
that a public olliee is a public trust—when
some other man hu.ds thc office.
Try Schilling's Best tea and baking powder.
It keeps some men busy inventing
schemes to separate other men from their
money.
The weather bureau has established a
volunteer station at Dayton.
ADVICE TO WOMEN.
DEMAND FOR GOODS FALL OFF.
Truth*  In   M.-r.-lui n.l Is*. Siniiller Tliim
Two  .Molilhn   Au...
New York, Oct. 1(1.—Bradstreet's snys:
"The activity in staple lines of merchandise is less pronouncod thnn n i ith ngo,
due to interior merchants having supplied
their demands for the time, a gradual increase of the territory included by tho
yellow fever quarantine, the low price of
cotton, a tendency in the Missouri valley
nnd spring wheat stnt.es to hold wheat for
higher prices, und to farmers being busy
with full planting. Unseasonable weather
has hud un unfavorable influence on tiio
distribution of merchandise throughout
the central west, nnd ut Chicago a nil St.
Louis snles have fnllen off.
The nine Glass Craze.
About twenty years ago somebody
(live to the world the Information thai
blue rays were health rays, aud that to
alt In the light falling through blue
glass would cure you of almost anything you happened to have. Half lhe
Louses one passed hud a blue glass
window. 'There were even blue glass
•uu parlors, and Invalids basked in the
ghastly light, and ninny of them regained their health, till somebody
proved the blue glass Idea to be utter
nonsense, when, of course, they discovered that they hadn't really been
helped at all.
John KrelillK Dead.
Snn Francisco, Oct. HI.—John Kreling, n
prominent citizen of this city, is dead
us I lie result of u stroke, of paralysis,
which he sustained Friday evening while
apparently in the best, of health. He
wns one of the founders of the Tivoli tlie*
ntcr, with whicli he wns connected until
three years ago.
Prolongation of Human Life.
Statistics tending to prove that 'he
average of man's life hns been increased  through  modern  Improvements  In
| medicine nnd hygiene are always Interesting.   Among the most recent In-
! stances is a table prepared by a correspondent of Nature, showing a steady
Increase In the proportion of sexagenarians among the population of Canada, ln 1851, out of every 100 persons
living in Canada, 3.70 were 00 years or
age or over. In 18U1 the percentage of
sexagenarians In the population had In-
j creased to 4.40.   In 1871 It had become
15.10; In 1881, 6.32, and ln 1891, 7.01.
You cannot have nerve trouble and
keep your health. In ninety-nine
•uses out of a hundred the womb, the
ovaries and tlio bladder arc affected. They
are not vital organs,
hence they give out
soonest.
Mrs. Lydla
E. 1 iiikliujn'.s
Vegetable)
!Com pound, by
building up
the nerves and
■eBtoring woman's organism to its natural
state, relieves all
these troublcsomo
uterine symptoms. In
confirmation of this we, by permission,
refer to tlie following women, all of
Whom speak from experience : Miss
Crrr.iA Van Houn, 1012 Sharswood St.,
Philadelphia, Pa.; Miss Gbace Col-
loud, 1434 Eastern Ave., Cincinnati,
O.; jliia. Newell, 50 Itycrson St.,
Brooklyn, N. Y.; Mrs. Isabel Oiieho,
220 Chestnut St., Woburn, Mass.; Mrs.
A. II. Cole, Kew Ilochclle, N. Y., and
many others.
Women Buffering from any form of female weakness arc invited to promptly
communicate with Mrs. Pinkham at
Lynn, Mass.
You can talk freely to a woman when
It is revolting to relate your private
Ills to a man
THE    MINES    ON    MINOOK    CREEK, j
82000*
in
IIuNfuii    uml    Moutnna   Company   In -
creating  Hh   Capacity — 972,000 j
in Gold  i*ii*i  iruiii  si. Itllflin-pii— ;
\otrw   From   All   Around   tbe   I ani|i.
No, 48, 'I)T.
PISO'S  CURE   FOR
CURfcS WHtflE ALL ttst FAILS, _
Bout Cough Syrup. Tastes Good.   UflO
In linn-.   Polcl iivdnar^lrjtP.
According to O. W. Ross, deputy collector of customs of Circle City, who has
just arrived at Seattle from Alaska, Rampart City, on Minook creek, is to be the
biggest mining camp on the Yukon river
before another season. Claims, according
to Mr. Ho*s, arc selling at an average of
$0500 for a half interest on Little Minook,
Hunter and HooBier creeks. IX Baxter
and C. O. Johnson of San Francisco
bought No. 12, above discovery, for $401)0
and were offered an advance of $1000
for their bargain two days later. Johnson,
who owns No. (1 on Little Minook, in 20
days took out $2000. The owners of No.
4 took out $1500 iu five days, all in nuggets. It is claimed that tiie gold on the
Minook is of a higher grade than Hint.
of the Klondike. There ure 1500 people
on the Minook and as many more will
find their way there this winter.
Hon ton   and   Montana.
Superintendent Kvans of the Kostnn &
Montana Mining Company is credited
with saying: "At Great Kails the Boston
and Montana company is increasing tlie
capacity of its smelting, refining and concentrating works Hit 1-,'t per cent preparatory to an increased output from that
and the Butte and Boston property. The
old machinery at the Boston and Montana mine is also being supplanted by
the new and more modern appliances.
The copper basin of Montana is a mile
wide and three miles long and continues
to hold good nt tho greatest depth thus
far attained, viz., 200 feet." The Butte
and Boston has fourteen claims, of which
but two ure thoroughly developed. Explorations are being conducted in other
parts of its territory, and several of these
places arc opening up well. This work
has been going on since the reorganization
and no attempt will be made at regular
production for about a year to come.
•72.000   In   Gold   Dust.
The steamer Danube, from St. Michaels,
lias brought down H2 passengers, most of
them men who failed to reach tbe mines
by all water route. Some got as far as
Fort Yukon and had to turn back. There
are 12 miners from Circle City, who bring
about $72,000 in gold mst. Most of them
have been working around Circle City,
but a few of them are interested in the
Klondike claims. A lot of provisions is
at Fort Yukon, but it is feared that if
there is a rush from Dawson it will cause
a shortage further down the river. It is
predicted that many men will perish in
the attempt to escape starvation by coming down the river. The steamer P. B.
Weare, after being on a sand bar 20 days,
got oft" and arrived at St. Michaels on
September 20. She started up again
with a load of freight, but it is feared she
will never get up the river. The steamer
Alice arrived at St. Miehales September
24 with 120 miners, starting again on tho
27th, but ran aground at the mouth of
the river.
A Sixty-Stamp Mill.
It is stated that the Kennett company,
in Madison county, Montana, has decided
to put in a 00-stamp mill and that the
contract will be let and the work of construction undertaken at once. Thc Kennett people have directed operations to
exploiting the mino rather than to thc
production of ore during the past two
years, and the fact that they have decided to put in a mill of such extensive
stampage is proof positive that the ores
reserves are ample and the mine all right,
'lhe public had entertained some apprehension concerning its future since the
greater portion of its working force was
laid off a few weeks since. The fact that
the Kennett is to be put into immediate
lino with Montana's big gold producers
will be a great thing for Madison county.
The   KvenliiK   Star.
The upper tunnel of the Evening Star,
where the strike was recently made, is
now in about 215 feet. The ore body
continues as vigorous as ever, is the report from Rossland. A crosscut will be
commenced now to disclose the width of
the chute. So far nothing is known of
the thickness of thc ore body. The surface workings farther down on the out-
cap of thc same vein continue to show-
up very favorably, and a wagon road is
under way to reach them. The road will
be completed in about 10 days, when operations in the surface shaft will be resumed, and the bole will be sunk 10 or
15 feet deeper for the purpose of opening
up the vein. If the roe body proves permanent and its trend can be established,
operations will be resumed in thc lower
crosscut tunnel. This tunnel never reached the ledge, but the intention now is
to continuue it until the. vein is tapped,
when a winze will be started to connect
it witli the Upper tunnel, 50 feet above.
Atlantic*  ('niiiliflnv   Hull.linn*.
Wallace, Idaho, reports that the Atlantic Mining Company has completed its
buildings ready for work this winter and
during the week took up a ear nnd
enough steel rails to put a track in. The
tunnel is uow iu 275 feet and a contract
has been lot foi' continuing it its soon as
the track is completed. The company
owns two claims three and a half miles
north from Wallace on a little brunch of
Nine Mile, running from the Black Cloud
over to Grouse gulch, and are running a
tunnel from the ereek level that will givo
them near 1000 feet of Stoping ground
when they get under the top of the hill.
From surfaced showings they expect lo
strike ore before they get near that fnr
iu, and thut it will continue beyond the
summit.
The   Mayflower.
Thc Mayflower mine, in Madison county. Montana, is now the greatest producer
of the state. Last year it produced about
.y.jSO.OOO, but this year even if the present
rich ore body holds out it will not yield
more than $200,000. The introduction of
the cyanide process in many old districts
in Montana this season will have an
Important bearing on the output of next
year. In many portions of tlie state there
are bodies of low-grade ore whieh, it is
thought, can be profitably worked by this
process.
Around   Knnlo.
The output of thc Payne mine is about
70 tons of ore. per Day. Its shipments aro
divided between thc Everett and Pueblo
smelters. The new three-track tramway
for the Payne is well under way and will
be one nnd a half miles long. The Reco
ships (10 tons per week to Omaha.    The
prizes to make twice as many people
ask their grocers for Schillings Best baking
powder and tea.
Schillings Best baking-powder and tea are
 because they are money-back.
What is the missing word?—not SAFE, although Schilling's Bed baking
powder and tea are safe. 	
Get Schilling's Best baking powder or tea at your grocers'; take out the
ticket (brown ticket in every package of baking powder; yellow ticket in the
tea); send a ticket with each word to address below before December 3rst.
Until October 15th two words allowed for every ticket; after tbat only one
word for every ticket.
If only one person finds the word, that person gets $2000.00; if several find
it, I2000.00 will be equally divided among them.
Every one sending a brown or yellow ticket will receive a set of cardboard
creeping babies at the end of the contest. Those sending three or more in one
tnvelope will receive an 1898 pocket calendar—no advertising on it. These
creeping babies and pocket calendars will be diiTerent from the ones offered in
the last contest.
Better cut these rules out.
Address:   MONEY-BACK,  SAN   FRANCISCO.
3011
output will be greatly increased when the
rawhiding season opens.   The Montezuma
concentrator, on the south fork of Kaslo
creek,   is   fast   nearing   completion,   and
machinery for it is arriving daily.
In the Greenwood Camp.
Patsy Clark has bonded the Snowshoe
claim, Greenwood camp, under   a   bond
j which   calls  for  continuous  work, com-
! inencing within 10 days.   The amount of
! the bond is $50,000, payable one-third in
six months and the balance in equal instalments at nine and  12 months from
date. ,J. D. Harvey, who negotiated the
deal,  will   remain  here to supervise development work.   The Snowshoe has one
of the largest surface showings of mineral in the district.   As the main wagon
road crosses the claim it is well situated
for transportation under present limited
conditions.
Pence River Mines.
The overland route from Spokane by
way of Ashcroft to the gold fields of the
I northwest is a subject of much interest in
Sandon und oilier towns of the Slocan.
Public attention is now being largely diverted from the far-away Klondike to the.
rich districts of Peace river, Cassiar and
Cariboo, and many miners and prospectors who have figured on going to Alaska
in the spring are now discussing the possibilities of these more accessible fields.
Clout Creek MlncN.
Gont creek mines are situated on the
upper Mcthow, about 50 miles from the
Columbia river. Active work commenced
in this district two years ago, and has
been steadily developing the different
claims. Each year's work shows great
Improvement in quality of ore as greater
depth is reached. The ore is principally
pyrite, similar to the Rossland district,
and is a concentrating proposition, although thero is considerable free milling
ore in places.
IT  WAS  A  GREAT  SUCCESS.
Idalio'M   Inter mountain   Fair  Cloned
In   a   Illaxe   ot   Glory.
Boise, Idaho, Oct. 17.—The first Idaho
I intermountain fair went out yesterday in
a blaze of glory. The day was perfect and
the crowd in attendance was larger than
on any previous day. Never before in the
history of Idaho has anything given such
general satisfaction. One great feature
of the week was the presence of Miss
Vollmer, queen of the fair. By her beauty
and grace she won the heart of everybody
and wherever she has appeared she has
been enthusiastically greeted.
GOING TO KLONDIKE OVERLAND.
John   Hummel   of Wallace   Will  Out-
tit  at Spokane.
Wallace, Idaho, Oct. 18. — John Hummel, in spite of the gray hairs that age has
given him, is determined to go to Klondike next spring and is anxious to try
the overland route, outfitting at Spokane.
He counts on taking 40 pack horses with
five men to pack them, and offers to give
$500 to any man who will pilot him
through from the nearest railroad point
to Dawson in 105 days. He cares not how
many others may be in the party, as all
he wants is a guide.
iuu's wmi mm
For Constipation, Biliousness, Torpid Liver,
Kidneys, it is the hettt pill made. Only
one or two required to act; and regulates H10
bowels.   Send 25c. and we will mail you sumu.
....FRANK NAU....
Portland Hotel Pharmacy. Sixth and Morrison Sts..
1'OSItAND, OKEGON.
Send for Catalogue
Meeting? of Pre*!*  A.HOclntloiiB.
Baker City, Or., Oct. 18.—The Oregon
Press Association, now in session here, lias
decided to hold its next riiiiiunl meeting
with thc press associations of Washing- j PORTLAND, OREGON
ton and Idaho at Spokane. The newspaper men of British Columbia, as well as
the state association of Montana, have
been also invited to meet with the Washington association at Spokane.
Janet In n Flint Filly.
Lexington, Ky., Oct. 1(1.—The most successful meeting in the history of the Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' Association has just closed. More than 30 stakes
and purses, aggregating over $70,000, were
contested during the 10 days of the meeting. The Kentucky farm stjikes for two-
year-olds was won easily by Janet, and
in the last heat she smashed the world's
two-year-old record for fillies by making
lhe mile in 2:14.
Weakness of Men
Quickly,  Thoroughly-,  Forever Cured
b; a now perfected soientifle
iii-.th.nl that cannot fall
uqIobs the caBO is beyond
humiiii tiid.   You foel Un-
Croved tbe first day, feel a
(Mit-lii every duy, noon knovr
yourself a king among men
In body, mind and heart.
Drains and losses ended.
Every obstscto to happy
married life removed. Nerve
force, will, energy, when
failing or lost, are rostored by thia treatment. All
weak portions of the body enlarged nnd strength'
ouud. Write for our book, with explanations and
proofs.   -Sont sealod, freo.   Ovur 2,000 references.
ERIE MEDICAL CO,, ««*?,
AN OPEN LETTER
To MOTHERS.
WE ARE ASSERTING IN THE COURTS OUR RIGHT TO THE
EXCLUSIVE USE OP THE WORD "CASTORIA" AND
' PITCHER'S   CASTORIA,"   AS  OUR TRADE 'mark.
-T, DR. SAMUEL PITCHER, of Eyannia, Massachusetts,
was tlie originator of "PITCHER'S CASTORIA," the same
that has borne and, does now yftf //&/>. JT~" on every
bear the facsimile signature of ^a^yf/-a4cJ(Uc wrapper.
This is the original "PITCHER'S CASTORIA," which lias been
used in the homes of the mothers of America for over thirty
years. LOOK CAREFULl Y at the wrapper and see that it is
the hind you, have always bought stf //$/>', 5T" on the
and has the signature of,^*ixt^/t /■ct&£t/U wrapper. JTo one has authority from me to use my name except
The Centaur Company of which Chas. H. Fletcher is
President. *
March 8, 1897. <2$*~***££&*/**—*«.p.
Do Not Be Deceived.
Do not endanger the life of your child by accepting a cheap substitute
which some druggist may offer you (because he makes a few more pennies
on it), the ingredients of which even he docs not know.
"The Kind You Have Always Bought"
BEARS THE FAC-SIMILE SIGNATURE OF
Insist on Having
The Kind That Never Failed You.
THC CCNTAUH COMPANY, TT HUHHAV ITHIIT,  NIWVUKN CITY.
ONE
HUNDRED
THOUSAND
FRUIT
Tnrro~ftnd not a bn
KM Y X or pest on there
1 IVLL-U Send for our tf<
Boriptive rric° Hat—free.
 BUY YOUR	
FUR GARMENTS
Direct from tho manufacturer and cave middleman's profit, oa
we undersell them all. Our garments are custom mado and not
like those thrown together in New York sweat-shops, where filth
and disease reign. Our garments are guaranteed as to durability and style. Our prices on fur Capes range from <W8 upwards;
on Fur Collarettes, from 95 upwards; Neck Boas, from 76c upwards; genuine Alaska 8ealskin Garments made from V1BO upwards.   Write for information and catalogue.
SC.I«roffiAli-1      Loading Fur Manufacturer,
• SUVcrnCKl-, 14;[ Third St., Portland, Or.

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