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General Conference Daily Bulletin Aug 30, 1910

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Array P»-oceedmgs of tr)e General C«»f.~_ ...  .
Vol. I. No. 14
rence Session of the Methodist Church
IRD
•viurnun rKICC—50 eenls for
i.ornplctr    jrrirv        S   C0fltl   per   c<
THE GREAT CONFERENCE ENDS TO-DAY
A  TENDER   FAREWELL THE r.Bint»""
sw   to
noth-
e.
terent
The General Conference will close, its
Fi'ssiona today and consequently this it the
last issue of the "Daily Bulletin." Ii i-
almost with ii pang thai we say farewell
.•ind pass, like the Conference itself, into
a mere memory, for the intimacy bstween
us and  the  Conference  bad   becomn  so
close and so   affectionate   thai    we   fain
\ wiild have it continue.    Bui once again
ive are reminded thai in this world    the
sweetest experiences are often Bhort-Lvod.
Ii is not good for us thai they lasl too long.
In a final word   we would   thank   a hosl
of   people   fer   the   hearty   encouragement they have given the Bulletin.   Ii v.-.• .-
n i bghl undertaking to run a daily Methodist paper, even for two weeks. Then; was
no precedent to guide us and we could only
conjecture how il would h- received rind
bow near the  line  between  success  and
failure we might be driven; but we hav<
nothing to complain of. We took over 500
subscriptions during the Conference session and issued over 2,ooo   copies   daily,
and we are full of gratitude.   First    the
merchants of Victoria and Vancouver r-.il
Ii d to tlic idea most generously and  ive
run only hope their public spirit in Becking to advertise our Province    by   such
melius will bring them good recompense,
THE LEADINGS OF PROVIDENCE    COMMENT BY OUR CHIEF SCRIBE
\ ■
if ""f   directly,   then   indirectlv;
e\
/i< >nId soon be given evidence that by a .
vertising in the Bulletin mid so magnifying the West they had made nil Methodists
their friends and   many   their   patrons.
Then the Bulletin is deeply indebted  lo
Dp. T. Albert Moore and his    staff    for
placing every facility within.our  reach
for full and accurate reports,    and    last,
though not least, we   greatly   appreciate
the ready help given U8 in the supply of
''copy." Probably no paper ever published
in Canada had on its staff at any one time
B  larger number of full-fledged  editors
find experienced journalists than the Daily
Bulletin has had during its natural life.
Wo were not allowed to publish names, or
many of the contributions    would    bave
claimed the deepest interest--as probably
in any ease they did.   But we can al least
publicly thank those who nun uoi bo pub'
h' lv named, and we wish them God-speed
in their own distinguished offices.    They
bi Iped us to make history i.y helping ijs
['" publish for the first time in tli ■ history
'tour Church, a (ieneral Conference daily
baper.    AVe wish their names could have
n linked with tho enterprise.
The  Conference is not ended,  though
fits membership is already greatly decimated; there are several important reports
1' to come from Committees, e.g., Book
Publishing Report, Coursa of Study,
Sociological, State of the Work, etc, etc.
"O can only say to our readers of this
-hey may find an account in the next issue
)f the "Western Methodist Recorder,    our
"cgular publication, wheih may be had for
I,' ear for one dollar.   The September and
October issues will contain carefully edit-
fd, condensed reports of the entire General
''inference.    Order this at   once    at the
'tilleiin table in the Church or by addr- ss-
Ug Manager Methodist Recorder P. &. P.
b., Victoria, B. C.
I
Among the unplanned   results  of this
greal General  Conference, is the mark d
and magnificent  leading of Providence.
Many earnest believing   prayers    Ivivi
risen to heaven from all pun- of the Dominion and Xewf [land, thai the Vic
toria General ('onference will be Divinely
attended, guided, and filled with powur.
" I he prayers of saints  to  heav n  as-
i    ci ii I. grateful, accepted sacrifice."
The prayers of God's people have Lfen
heard an i answered.
The presence of God has been won |Pr
fully evidenced al   every   Bession.     T!i
leading of Bis Spirit has been an    on I
standing feature of all the gatherings.
Three instances of many thai mighl be
cii il are given.
The question of the   'Fool-note"   bas
been a veritable storm centre for over eight
year--: the question has been to the fori
and fading has grown more and more intense.
When the commission to revise the Dis
cipline, proposed to eliminate the "F ot-
noie," and substitute a suggested clause,
the.Conference was immediately divi 'ed.
Ii looked very threatening for a storm, and
we trembled, when    Professor    Andrews
.rose with a beautiful clause touching the
highest possible ground,    and    a  clause
which    the      ('(inference    accepted    almost   unanimously.    The "Foot-note"  is
dead and from the grave, touched by !,he
finger of God, a new and most beautiful
"Note" has risen to life.
What will  puss  into history as ' The
-Jackson Controversy"   was   the   question
feared weeks before the Conference opened.    Many feared, prayed, arid worked lo
avoid the discussion of a question of f'oc-
trine under such circumstances   and    at
such a time.     Il  would not down, and so
we entered into the cloud with agony of
spirit. The consciousness that the whol! of
Canada and far beyond was listening . nd
waiting, made the hour painful with its
intensity of feeling.
Then Dr. Watson rose with an amendment asking us to strongly and emp'iat'
ically affirm our Saviour and God. Then
the question of the infallibility of Jews
was introduced and again   the    peaceful
solution moved beyond the line of vision.
After an hour of agony of   spirit,    Mr.
Rowell introduced an added clause affirming faith in the infallibility of Jesus. The
Conference voted unanimously   and once
again the danger was over and we were
awed and trusted in  the presence of the
Divine guidance.
I low many times we have asked, and
asked anxiously: "Who shall we find for
the great offices of our Church?" When
the hour came, how manifest was the
presence of the guiding hand of God.
We can never forget thai service of call
and Penticostal baptism. It was grand
and blessed beyond language to perceive
tho spirit in which the newly elected officers accepted their call to great tasks and
o'pejlt".   PflflnnnaiKi 1, (...
A   somewhat    ivarm   discussion   Bros*
over salaries matters of considerable  inferos! to uio-i people. Rev. Darwin felt a
young ordained Bihglc minister should !>■
pui on a like basis to salary as ordain d
men.    Said   he:  "There  are  some  urn
who spend a  large amount  of tim ■ and
money securing the besl   education   they
can, and unless they marry at mice they
must take a smaller salary,    while  -one.
fellow with little education tumbling over
himself to gel married gets the advantage
of a largi r salary -imply because be get*
married.
Dr. Heartz and Dr. Sprague fell alarmed that the -alary basis in the Far East
was not so high as those in the Central
Provinces. Tiny argued that a large part
of tind rlivinc came from Ontario and that
living cost more with them than in On
tario.    This was carried by the Confer
once.
Dr.  Kilborn advocated the represents
tion of the missionaries of WeaJ China in
General Conference.    Ii has 1) •■ *ii suggested thai as the West China missionaries
are members of the Conferences al home,
but h • this as ii may, our men have Inn a
remote chance of election and even if our
men were chosen they could nol properly
represent  tho Home    Conference.    Some
have suggested that we form ourselves into an  Annual  Conference.    Tin's  [g  n<>i
advisable as present for it is desirable that
we keep all our men on the same level as
they are in the present council.    The Chinese are not yet ready for a Conference
with all its machinery   of   organisation.
We are not asking   delegates    to be sent
from China as such would involve a great
expense, but that these delegates be chosen  from  the  missionaries    on   furlough.
There are 53 of us in I Ihina in the .Mission Council and surely it is not fair that
we have no representation.
I lr. McLaren The parliament of Britain can legislate in all matters except
thai of turning a man into a woman and
vice-verBa. Dr. Kilborn's agitation i- to
endeavor to do this very thing ecclesiastically.
T. E. I'.'. Shore     We are discussing here
the  interests of   I I   million   people  whom
We   ;ilv   scel/iiiT   I
The .Merry Widow bat of one of the
lady reporters was more in evidence than
usual in the session of the Conference at
the Presbyterian Church, when Borne time
after the opening of thi session the hat
ivalked deliberately and decisively and determinedly to the front.
Discussion arose over    the    report  on
Systematic Beneficence.     The Committee
advised  the paying of $1,000  from  the
.Missionary   fund   and  $1,000   from   the
Educational,   Temperance   and   Sunday
School Fund-.    The report was advocated
by Beveral, but opposed strongly by Principal Sparling.   The Secretary, Dr. Moore
.-poke well of the work of the Association
of Christian Stewards  under  the direction of Rev. R. Woodsworth.    He would
however not   legislate along  the line of
the Committee's report.    Be thought Missions had largely profited by    the    work
don ■ bv Mr.  Woodsworth, bul    did    not
kuo v that the oilier funds had so profited.
Dr. Williamson tboughl the reports of thi
< ommittee should pass,    lie    felt    that
Systematic giving as proposed    in    Mr.
Wood-wo rili'-   plans   would   solve  all   < nr
financial difficulties.
Dr. Stewart pointed out that the work
of Mr, Woodsworth was interdenominational and the other lenominationa should
bein in this matter.
Mr. McGregor Whi re K. W. Wood*
worth goes vou will find that thousands
have come into our mission funds. lie
has given himself to this work and we
outrht to supporl him.
Thomas Hilliard—I am in sympathy
with this work but we are asked to pay
out money for interdenominational
schemes.    The debate (dosed with   idop-
lion of the report.
responsibilities. ^s^^^^^^^^H
This is the vital lesson for us all to
learn. Perhaps the Conference will
scarcely leave a greater lesson in Western
Canada, groaning under the burden of a
perilous materialism:—The Lesson of
the Real Presence of God.
"God moves in a mysterious way,
His wonders to perform.
He plants His footsteps on the sea
And rides upon the storm."
we arc seeking to evangelize. In a few-
years we shall have a score of hospitals,
hundreds of mission Bchools, medical and
high schools, and a christian University.
Surely we should not expect the Secretary
of   Mission8   tO   represent   this  entire   field
and if such is the case wc ought to give
them representation.
In the debate on the Jackson or N"ew
Theology controversy one delegate with
tear and trembling asked thai he be excused froin voting as he did not feel he
would care to stand anywhere but on the
fence.      It   did   not   m'Uii   lo  occur   to   the
brother that there was a door in every
direction and that if he did not care to
come in he had the alternative of getting
out.
I   came   to  this  Conference,     said     ♦ho
Secretary, expecting to leave it as I tome.
J cannot say when I can drop the v ork
I have as Secretary of the Lord's Day Alliance before the end of this year. Then
too, in the new Department of Temperance and .Moral Reform to which you have
elected   lue    I.   call   see    ils   importance.      I
feel that no man can handle thai wck as
well as Dr. Chown, and SO we have ar
ranged between us that, we shall wori: to-
gi iIn r to so handle the work that we ear
lay ii down without loss to either department.
MINISTERS' VACATION
The Monday evening session of the General Conference was held in the First
Presbyterian church .Several of the delegates stood at the door and said to others:
This is our Church, walk in. AVe thank
our Presbyterian friends for their kindness rnd assure them that w»3 felt quite
at home.
A clause is to be inserted in our Discipline directing the Stewards to yearly
consider and make arrangements for the
Pastors' holiday. The (Ieneral Conference never came nearer the gates of Eden
than at that greal moment.
WOMAN'S  SUFFRAGE
The great question of woman's suffrage
in  the  Methodist Church of Canada was
dismissed in about 10 minutes.    The male
suffragettes were evidently gone home and
it was too early for the ladies to appear in
the galleries and with flashing eyes sub-
duo tho mere male members of Conference.
Dr. Huff—I'm a woman's rightor. You
will remember I made a very able speech
four years ago on Woman's suffrage. I believe women ought to have a   vote,    but
there are not enough of us here to pass
such legislation.     Lost    by 34   for,    65
against.
■ GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
General Conference Proceedings
Transcript of Minutes
THIRTEENTH    DAY—TWENTY-
THIRD SESSION
Saturday Afternoon,
August 27th, 1910.
Conference resumed at 2 p. m.
Rev. A. Carman, D.D., General Superintendent, in the Chair.
Devotional exercises were conducted by Rev. Benj. Hills, D.D., of Nova
Scotia  Conference.
On  motion   of  Rev.  S.  J.   Shorey,
D.D.,
Seconded by Rev. S. G. Bland, D.D.
The vote on paragraph 413, 13 was
reconsidered.
Moved by Rev. S. J. Shorey, L\D.,
Seconded by Rev. S. G. Bland, D.D.
That Item in the report of the Misrepresentation from the Mission
Councils in the General Conference,
be recommitted to said Committee
for  further  consideration.
Consideraten of Item 17 of repoit
of Commitii'! v as resumed.
Item 17 with sub-sections was
adopted.
Item 18 was adopted.
Item 19, to delet paragraph 146 of
the Discipline, "Each Annual Conference may appoint a Committee of
ministers and laymen to negotiate
with any Committee o.- Committee's
apointed by any other Kvangclical
Chinch, having for their object to so
arrange Home Mission work within
its bounds as to prevent such overlapping as is plainly hurtful to the advance of Christ's Kingdom.
Moved to adopt.
Moved in amendment by Rev. T.
A. Moore, D.D.,
Seconded by Dr. A.  Stewart,
That  Section   146 of the  Discipline
be amended to read:
"Each    Annual    Conference, where
there is not a  missionary  Committee
shall  appoint  a  Committee  of Ministers   and   Laymen   to   promote   Missionary education    and    self-support,
and  negotiate  and  conclude  arrangements with other denmoinations, with
the   view   to   prevent  overlapping  in
circuit and mission work in harmony
with    the    policy  of    the   Methodist
Church.
The amendment carried.
Items 20, 21  and 22 adopted.
Item  23,    Sections    1,  2,   3  and 4
adopted.
Items 24, 25,  26, 27, 28,  29, 30, 31,
32, 33. 34. 35, 36, 37 and 38 adopted.
Moved by W. G. Hunt.,
Seconded by  Rev. T.  E.   E.  Shore,
That this General Conference memorialize the Dominion Government to
call   a  convention  of  Indian   Agents,
Indian    Missionaries,    and    teachers,
with a view of getting a uniform and
satisfactory   system   of   work   among
the Indians and that this communication  be    forwarded  by    our  General
Secretary of Foreign  Department.
On motion it was referred to Committee on  Missions.
Moved by the Secretary of Conference.
That the order of business be suspended from time to time as necessary for taking of ballots for remaining elections.    Carried.
On motion of Secretary of Conference it was carried that nominations
by delegations for the Board of Epworth Leagues and Sunday Schools
be accepted and the persons so nominated arc now elected members of
that Board—also that nominations by
Conference delegations for Board of
Temperance and Moral Reform be
accepted and the persons so nominated are now elected members of that
Board.    Carried.
The Chair submitted the following
nominations for the Court of Appeal:
Rev. James S. Ross, D.D., Rev. S.
F. Huestis, D.D., Rev. S. J. Shorey,
D.D., Rev. R. N. Burns, D.D., Rev. W.
I. Shaw. D.D., Rev. Alex. Langford,
D.D., Rev. Stephen Bond, Rev. J. C.
Antliff, D. D., Rev. W. R. Young,
D.D., Rev. J. E. Mavety, Rev. Andrew Stewart, D.D., Rev. Tho. Manning. D.D., N. W. Rowell, Justice
Maclaren. Judge Chesley, Alexander
Mills, J. R. Inch, LL.D.. VV. A. Briggs.
J. R. L. Starr, F. E. O'Flynn, Edmund
Sweet, Thomas Hilliard, Abraham
Shaw, E. J. Davis.
A ballot was taken and the scrutineers retired.
Rev. S. G. Bland, D.D., presented
report of Committee on Education.
Items 1, 2, 3, 4, g, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
ir, la, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, t8, 19, 20.
21, 22 and 23, were adopted.
The Srutineers reported result of
first ballot for election of members
of Court of Appeal.
The following were elected in the
order named:
Ministers—Rev. Jas. S. Ross, D.D.,
Rev. A. Stewart, D.D., Rev. S. J.
Shorey, D.D, Rev. J. C. Antliff, D.D.,
Rev. Thos. Manning, D.D.
Laymen—X. VV. Rowell, K.C, Judge
Chcslty, Justice Maclaren, A. W.
Briggs.
A second ballot was taken for remainder of members of the Court of
Appeal, and the Scrutineers retired.
Conference   resumed   consideration
of report of Committee on Education.
Item 24 was adopted.
Item 25, on  Board of Management
of Albert College, moved to adopt.
Moved in amendment by J. J. Maclaren.
Seconded by Rev. T. A. Moore,
D.D.,
That should the Charter of Albert
College require further nominations
for its Board of Management, the
General Conference Special Committee have power to appoint such persons.    Carried.
Items 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33.
were adopted.
Scrutineers reported result of the
second ballot for election of members
of Court of Appeal.
Rev. A. Langford, D.D. was declared elected. No laymen were
elected.
A third ballot was taken for remainder of members of the Court of
Appeal, and the Scrutineers retired.
Conference   resumed   consideration
of report of Committee on Education.
Items 34, 35, 36 were adopted.
Moved by Rev. W. Glendennin that
vote  on    Item    34    be  reconsidered.
Lost.
Item 37, moved that Item be read.
Lost.
The Scrutineers report result of
third ballot for election of members
of Court of Appeal. J. R. L. Starr
and A. Mills were declared elected.
On motion conference proceeded to
election of the delegates of the Ecumenical Conference. The following
nominations were made:
On motion the Secretary of Conference was instructed to cast a ballot for Dr. Chown. The ballot was
cast and Dr. Chown was declared
elected.
Nominations of laymen were made,
a.s follows:
D. S. Curtis. Dr. D. Allison, Hon.
G. A. Cox, C. D. Massey, F. E.
O'Flynn. J. H. Chapman, I. Hilliard,
J. W. Flavelle, NT. W. Rowell, Dr.
Inch, E. E. Sweet. Justice Brown, A.
S. Argue, J. H, Carson, E. S. Hunt,
Hon. G. P. Graham, J. Mills, H.
Miller. E. J. Davis. G. If. Johnson, J.
A. M. Aikens.
Report No. 13. of the Business
Committee, was presented by Rev. A.
E.  Roberts, as  follows:
1. Your Committc recommends that
Conference have a session this evening from 7:30 to 10.
Moved to adopt.
Moved to amend by inserted 7:30
and  10:00.
The amendment was adopted.
2. Owing.to the lecture previously
arranged by the officials of the Church
to be held on Monday evening next,
your Committee has arranged for the
session of the Conference that evening, lo be held in First Presbyterian
Church.    Adopted.
3. That committees present their
reports, after the order already passed
has been exhausted, as follows:
1. Class Leaders and Local Preachers.
2. Superannuation Fund.
3. Itinerancy No. 2.
4. State of the Work.
5. General Conference Fund and
Finance.
On motion this item was amended
by inserting "Report of Committee on
Salaries, after Education."
Announcements were made and
Conference adjourned at 5:30 p. m.,
the Benediction being pronounced by
Rev. C. E. Bland, B.A.
lay  delegates  to  Ecumenical  Conference.
The following were added to the
list of Scrutineers: Rev. John Garbutt, Mr. F. B. Holtby, Rev. C. E.
Crowell, Rev. H. W. Crews, Mr A.
H. Lambert and Rev. W. A. Mac-
Haffie.
The Scrutineers retired.
Conference resumed consideration
of the report of the Committee on
Education.
Item 37, adopted provisionally, upon
the balance of the report being
adopted.
Items 38 and 39 were adopted.
Rev. Dr. Cleaver presented the following Resolution:
"Whereas, it is regrettable that during the past quadrennium, in the college teaching of our Church, orally
and in publications, there have been
set forth doctrines of an unsettling
and injurious character.
"This Conference hereby expresses
its strong disaproval of all such
teaching as has a tendency to disparage the Deity and infallibility of
Christ, while here upon the earth; to
weaken the authority of Christ and
His Apostles, or to discredit the
Scripture as a trustworthy revelation
from God;
"And further, this Conference condemns teaching of which the following arc illustrations:
"1. The early chapters of Genesis
'are not history and they are not
science; they contain no account of
the real beginnings, either of the
earth itself ,or of man and human
civilization upon it.'
"2. 'Chrst assuimes the Mosac authorship of the Pentateuch and the
Davidic authorship of the I loth
Psalm; modern scholarship denies
both.'
"3. 'A man may not do violence to
his intellectual conscience at the bidding of any authority, however august,
and such anappeal can accomplish
nothing unless it be to discredit the
authority itself
"4. 'On a question of moral duty
Jesus is to be listened to on this matter, (the casting out of devils). He
is simply to be ignored.' "
It was declared out of order.
Item 40:
(Continued  on   Page   Four)
THIRTEENTH    DAY—TWENTY-
FOURTH SESSION
Saturday Evening,
August 27, 1910.
Conference resumed at 7:30 p. m.
Rev. A. Carman, D.D., General Superintendent, in the Chair.
Rev. S. T. Bartlett, General Secretary of Sunday Schools and Epworth
Leagues of Bay of Quine Conference,
conducted devotional exercises.
Minutes of Twenty-third sessions
were read and confirmed.
A ballot was  taken for  election  of
EDUCATIVE INFLUENCES IN A
CITY
British  Columbia,  through  its government  has    recently    appointed  a
Commission to report upon the question of the site of its Provincial Uni-
versty.    As  yet no  report  has  been
forthcoming as to the results of their
deliberations.    The   city  of  Victoria
has   many    attractive     features   that
might well incline the Commission to
a report in its favor.    Wc do not intend   in     this   article     to   enumerate
these.    We  wish  to  say  that as  far
as  possible  every  phase of our  civic
life that presents itself to the public
eye   should   be   educative  in   its   tendency looking to the development of
the citizens, young and old, along such
lines   as   will   strengthen   the   moral
and spiritual  forces  of life, and  that
in   such   development   will   make   for
clean  citzcnship    and   the    strongest
manhood. That our churches, schools,
colleges and universities have such an
end in view may perhaps be beyond
question, but it does occur to all that
the  play  impulse within  us and  our
desire for amusement should be given
a   similar   direction.     The   true   psychology of eductton works along the
line of play mpulsc and on no side
of child life can impressions be more
easily  made  nor  be  rendered  so  enduring.   It is an old saying, but none
the  less   true,   that   "As   the  twig   is
bent so will it grow," and the safety
of   our   civic   and   national   life   lies
the care  exercised  in  the  proper  inclining of the twigs of early life.  The
sports  and   amusements  in  civic  life
may  have  more  to  do  for its  weal
or  woe   than   the   sermons   that  are
preached,   or   the   lectures   delivered
therein.    It will be a day of blessing
to our cities when its dance halls and
poisonous moving picture plagues are
matters    belonging only    to history.
Both  of  these  forms  of amusement
are, however, only semi-public, and it
is possible in some measure to limit
the attendance of    our    youth  upon
them.    More serious to our mind  is
the influence of some excursions and
public picnics to which  children are
invited and in which they are invited
to take a  part, and in which  are allowed autefers that are sure to leave
impressions   that  will   at   least   minimize in  their thought the disastrous
influences   of   strong   drink.     In   the
(Continued   on   Page   Seven)
Bank of Montreal Chambers,
To the
Delegates and Friends,
Methodist Conference, 1910.
Gentlemen:
RE OURSELVES
The Island Investment Company, Limited, was
organized principally for the purpose of assisting
in the development of Victoria City and the vast
resources of Vancouver Island as well as points
on the Mainland.
During the last six months the Company has
shown very marked increase as regards Capital,
Earnings and Assets, which are as follows:—
Subscribed Capital (approximate) $200,000.00,
an increase of $75,000.00.    Assets are now over
the quarter million mark, an increase of nearly
$100,000.00.
The Company has been most successful and
has paid its shareholders large dividends from
the date of its inception;  in fact the Company
has been such a good dividend payer that old
shareholders have been steadily increasing their
holdings.
The Capital is nearly all local and amongst the
shareholders are many prominent business men
of this city.   Our Directors have been required to
purchase $5,000 worth of stock in order to
qualify them for the position.
The foregoing facts should be a .guarantee of
the progressiveness of the Company.
We have for sale some of the best dividend-
paying stocks offered in the Province with the
best of security.   We also have Victoria City
residential and business lots for sale, Vancouver
City lots which are handled through our
Vancouver Branch, 431 Homer Street.    We also
have Timber lands, farms in the Bulkley Valley
along the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific ranging
from half a mile to three and one-half miles from
the main line of the Railway, which we can
dispose of in quarter sections, up to 8,000 acres
in a single tract.   Owing to the great possibilities
of this valley from a mineral and agricultural
standpoint we cannot too highly recommend an
investigation into these lands, further particulars
of which will be given in later issues of this paper.
There is one thing which we would request
of you and it is that you make a thorough
investigation as to the personnel of the management
of this Company and satisfy yourselves as to
our reliability before making investments elsewhere.
We intend that the Island Development Company,
Limited, shall always maintain clean business
principles.   We aim at making the Company a
medium through which a large amount of Eastern
and Foreign capital may be safely invested in
Vancouver Island and Mainland.
There is one thing that the management of
the Island Investment Company, Limited, are
convinced of, and that is that it has in it the making
of one of the most promising Financial Institutions
in Western Canada.   We refer you to the
Merchants Bank of Canada.
Yours faithfully,
ISLAND INVESTMENT COMPANY.
(Limited)
D. C. REID, President. GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
Keep Up with tbe
General Conference
Business
And  keep   informed  Regarding
Methodism in
the   West   by   Subscribing for the
General Conference Daily
Bulletin
and the
Western Methodist
Recorder
lYISIT OUR STALL AT THE
CONFERENCE CHURCH
It will pay you to call on
lLorne C.
Kyle
337 Hastings St. W.,
Vancouver, B.C.,
when looking for
Good
and
Safe
Investments
DOIT
SEEING   VANCOUVER
The Observation Car leaves corner of Granville
and Robson streets at 9.30 a.m., 2 and 4 p.m.—a
pleasant trip of two hours through the city.
Interurban cars leave hourly for Steveston. See
the fishing fleet and the canneries.
Interurban cars leave half-hourly for New
Westminster.
SEEING VICTORIA
The Sight-Seeing Car leaves corner of Government and Yates streets at 9.1S a.m. and 2.15 p.m.
daily.
A  THREE   HOURS   RIDE
FARE—ROUND TRIP—50c
Car stops over at Oak Bay, The Gorge and Esquimalt, giving time to visit these beautiful places.
ENLIGHTENING—ENJOYABLE—INSTRUCTIVE
BRITISH COLUMBIA ELECTRIC RAILWAY 6©., Limited
Western Prosperity
WILL SOON DOUBLE YOUR IDLE DOLLAR
66 by 120 on i6th Avenue.    Price $2,950.
$1,000 cash, balance 6 and 12 months.
Car passes this way.
THE MAPLE LEAF REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE
|J. H. Craig, Pres.       I^a^a^a^s^i^i^M
1150 Granville St., Vancouver, B.C.
Branch Office: Cor. of Maple and Sixth Avenue
Phones 2242 and 4123 -     ^^|     Victoria Phone 1509
What they say about Vancouver
Ideal
Investments
First Mortgage Loans on
Improved City Property in
Vancouver yield from 6 to 8
per  cent.    We   have   made
this   department   a   special
feature of our business for
the past 18 years and are in
a  position  to  place  money
for   clients    with    absolute
security.     Collection   of  interest  and  principal  undertaken.
Correspondence   solicited.
).}. Banfield
607   Hastings St. W.,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
British Columbia
HAS JUST STARTED ON ITS FORWARD
MARCH
J. J. Hill, in a Public Address—
Vancouver lias not yet started on its fur-
ward career. I see a day coming when half a
score of lines from Northern British Columbia
will converge on Durrani Inlet. You have
untold wealth in the seas, the greatest timber
resources on the continent and mineral assets
that will make British Columbia the greatest
province in the Dominion.
MOST BEAUTIFUL PARK IN THE
WORLD
W. E. Curtis, in the Chicago "Record-Herald"
Stanley Forest has nine miles of roadways
and twenty-two miles of footpaths, with here
and there benches Upon which pedestrians ma}
rest. The roads are in perfect condition. I
wish the Californian Commissioners of the
Yosemite Valley could see them. I do not
know of a more lovely drive. In all my travels
I have never seen a more unique or attractive
park than this.
9.65 Acres
Near Port Kells in Langley;
C. X. R. line runs close by.
Station expected near but
not yet located; two and
one-half miles from Port
Kells Station, G. N. R . and
same distance from River
landing'. Good soil and
easily cleared.
Price, $1,000.00
Terms — One-quarter cash,
and the balance over 6, 12.
18 and 24 mos. at 7 per cent.
McLeod
Mark & Go
403 Pender Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
740 Columbia Street,
NEW  WESTMINSTER
Beaver Oil Stock Advanced from 10 Cents
(o 15 Cents per Share, Par Value, $1.00
We gave notice they would advance at a certain date, and those who
did not buy are now sorry.
However, we have allotted 20,000 shares more, at 15 cents per share,
and buy now before we raise the price, which surely will result very
soon.
Evidence of Oil strata and already Oil gas being encountered, justify
advancing prices to 20 cents or 25 cents per share.
However, our Board decided placing a small allottment at 15 cents
per share to give intending purchasers the privilege to buy at that price
before advancing them to the 20 or 25 cents. Do not hesitate if you
wish to secure shares at 15 cents.
Our Company holds about 4,000 acres of Oil land, and when Oil is
struck our stock will soar to phenominal figures.
The well is now nearing 900 feet in depth, and expect encouraging
reports in the near future.
For further particulars, or shares, apply to the following:
A. D. Paterson, 570 Granville St.   R. D. Rorison & Son, 786 Granville St.   P. LeFeurve, 2141 Granville St
E. W. Leeson, 329 Pender Street West.       T. J. Beatty, 317 Pender Street West. GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
(Beneral Conference Daili?
Bulletin
Devoted specially to the Proceedings
of  the  General   Conference  of
The   Methodist   Church,
August,  1910.
JOHN  P.  HICKS
Editor
GENERAL   CONFERENCE   PROCEEDINGS
(Continued from Page Two.)
"(3) The Board of Education shall,
Ijpon receiving any coinplant or complaints from any college hoard under
the provision! of tliis paragraph, select five persons, being ministers of
good repute for their knowledge ol
questions of doctrine, wlio shall Ciinstitute the Committee of Trial in the
case, and name the presiding officer,
who shall he one of the (ieneral Superintendents and who shall have all
the powers and duties belonging to
said officer.
"All the principle! and proccduce
relating to trials, as set forth in the
discipline, shall mutatis mutandis be
followed."
Moved by Rev. J. W. Colley, and
seconded,
That Item 40 be laid on the table.
Lost.
Moved to reconsider vote on Item
39.   Lost.
Moved in amendment by W. C,
Hunt,
Seconded by Rev. J. S. Ross,
That Item 40 be amended by adding the following words after "College Board," "or from five members
in good standing of the Methodist
Church, who have laid a complaint to
the College Board and no action taken
within sixty days."
The amendment was adopted.
Item 40 was adopted as amended.
Items 4t and 42 were adopted.
Item 43—"Amend paragraph 284 of
Discipline, by inserting a new subparagraph after sub-paragraph 3, as
follows:
"In case a complaint is received by
the Board from any College Board, as
provided in paragraph 254a, the Board
shall appoint a Committee of Trial
as provided in said paragraph, and
name the presiding officer thereof."
Moved to adopt.
Moved in amendment by Rev. J. S.
Ross, D.D., and seconded,
That the paragraph be amended by
adding the following after the words
"thereof" in the last line; "Who shall
be one of the General Superintendents, and who shall have the powers
and duties belonging to said officer."
Carried.
tern 44 was adopted.
Moved by Chancellor Burwash that
Items 37 to 43 be adopted as a whole
as amended.
Rev. S. Cleaver, D.D. moved to
amend the report by inserting in
Item 37 of the report (the preamble)
the resolution he had already brought
before the Conference.
After discussion it was agreed that
as the resolution did not contemplate
legislation it be withdrawn for the
present, and afterwards presented as
a substantive resolution.
Memorial No. 13 was called for and
read.
Moved that the first order of ihe
day on Monday he the introduction
of the resolution of Rev. S. Cleaver.
Moved in amendment that Rev. S.
Cleaver, D.D. be heard immediately
on the adoption of the report.
The amendment was lost and the
motion carried.
The report was adopted as a whole
as amended.
Report of Scrutineers on first ballot for election of lay delegates to
Ecumenical  Conference.     •
C. D. Masscy, N. VV. Rowell. K.C,
J. A. M. Aikins were declared elected.
Announcements were made. Conference adjourned at 10 p. tn., the
Benediction being pronounced by Rev.
A. Stewart, D.D.
FIFTEENTH DAY
Sunday, August 28, 1910.
The morning service opened at it
o'clock when a sermon was preached
by Rev. Wm. Briggs. D.D., the Book
Steward,  of the Toronto  Conference.
At 4 p. m. a Conference on Evangelism was conducted by General Superintendent-elect Rev. S. D. Chown,
D.D.
At 7:30 p. m. N. W. Rowell, K.C,
gave an account of the recent World's
Missionary Conference at Edinburgh,
Scotland.
SIXTEENTH  DAY—TWENTY-
FIFTH SESSION
Monday, August 29th, 1910.
Conference opened at 8:30 p. m.
Rev. A. Carman, D.D.. General Superintendent, in the Chair.
Devotional exercises irere conduct-
id by Rev. D. McCamus, of London
Conference.
Minute! "f the Twenty-fourth Session were read and confirmed,
Moved by  Rev. T. Albert  Moore,
Jl I).
Seconded by Rev. J. S. Williamson,
Thai  in the editing ol  the Journal
of Proceeding! of this General Con-
ference all College Degrees be
omitted) except in the certified lists of
■:ile, and re-erves from the several conferences, and in the lists of
member! of the (ieneral Conference
Board! and Committees, ami the
Boards, etc, of the Universities and
Colleges.   Carried.
Conference took up the order of the
da)—the resolution of Rev. S. Cleaver.
Moved by Rev. S. Cleaver. D.D,
Seconded by P. VV. Winters,
Whereass, it is regrettable that during the past qnadrennum, in the cole-
lege  teaching   of  our  Church,   orally
and  in  publications,  there  have been
set  forth   doctrittei  of  an   unsettling
and injurious character, such as:
1. The early chapters of Gcneisis
"are not hisior^Jind they are not
science; they ceSijjflin no account of
the real bcginniiiHpeither of the earth
itself, or of mai3jjiel human civilization upon it."    '?£■
2. Christ "assumes the Mosaic authorship of the'"l*entatcuch and the
Davidic authorahip of the noth
Psalm; modern scholarship denies
both."
3. "A man may not do violence to
his intellectual conscience at the bidding of any authority, howover august, and such an appeal can accomplish nothing unless it be to discredit
the authority itself."
4. "On a question of moral duty
Jesus is to be listened to; on ths mat-
iter (conccrnng the casting out of
devils I.    He is simply to be ignored."
Therefore, this Conference expresses its strong disapproval of this,
and all such teaching as has a tendency to disparage the Dicty and In-
falibility of Christ, while here upon
the earth; to weaken the authority of
Christ and His Apostles, or to discredit the Scriptures as a trustworthy
revelation from God.
Moved by Dr. A. D. Watson,
Seconded by Rev. Principal Sparling.
That whereas, the matters contained in the resolution now presented are in their nature such as call for
the most careful and mature deliberation of thos best fitted to adjudicate in such matters, and inasmuch
as this General Conference, which is
by constitution and- usage a legislature, rather than a court of trial, and
cannot give that patient and clam deliberation In these matters which the
interests of great truth and highest
fellowship demand; having provided
legislation embodying a method of
procedure in cases of supposed departure from the teaching of Methodism, which we believe will not tend to
Stiflle the candor of our professors,
yet will serve to keep inviolate the
integrty of our Methodist doctrine,
and at the same time hold firm the
confidence of our people; therefore,
Resolved, That having provided
adequately for eases such as arc referred tu in the resolution, this General Conference reaffirms ils allegiance to Christ as King ai.d Saviour
and God and its faithful adherence to
the Word of God, which liveth and
abidelh forever; thai as in ]|is Word
God has spoken to us by His Son. we
acknowledge Him as the infallible
Teacher a.s well as Revealer of the
things of God.
Carried almost unanimously.
On motion of L. Hilliard the order
of the day was suspended in order to
take up the report of Committee on
Superannuation Fund.
On motion the report of Superannuation Fund was taken from the table.
I. Hilliard moved as a substitute
to the item of the report and the
amendments, that the report be
amended by inserting aflcr the word
"fuel" the words "and amount raised
for horse-keep on Domestic Missions."
And that the words be struck out
from "and in addition" down to "Sunday School Aid Funds," and that the
following be inserted:
"And in addition to the foregoing
percentage based a.s aforesaid, each
Circuit and Domestic Mission shall be
required to contribute annually during the next quadrennium a sum
equal to three and a half per cent of
the average amount raised and reported to the Conference during the
pact quadrennium, 011 the following
connexional funds, viz: Missionary
(general) Superannuaton, Educational, General Conference, Contingent,
Union Church Relief and Sunday
School Aid Funds."
Moved in amendment by Rev. \.
J.  Irwin,
Seconded by Dr. A. D. Watson,
In substitute:
"That the basis be ihe salary and
the assessable fund-, as at present,
saving  that   the  giving!   be  averaged
for  Ihe  past   n I   reunion,  and  that
the rale for the coming quadrennium
be six per cent on this average.    Lost.
Moved by Rev. J.  II. White,
Seconded by
That the amendment of Mr. Hilliard be amended by striking out the
elaus<- referring to horse-keep on
Domestic Missions.
The- amendment to the amendment
was lost.
The amendment was hist.
The  substitute  was  lost.
The amendment to amendment by
Rev.  J.   Rankin. D.D., was lost.
The- amendment to amendment of
which neitice had been given by Rev.
T. E. E. Shore, D.D., was put and
carried.
The- amendment by Rev. C. S.
Deeproie was put and lost.
Item 4 as amended was adopted.
The report was adopted as amended as a whole.
Report of Committee on Salaries
was presented by  Rev.  R. J.  Elliott.
Moved to consider them item by
item.    Lost.
Moved to adopt.
Announcements   were  made.
Report of the Business Committee
Xo. 14 was read.
"Your Committee recommends that
the remaining Committee reports be
taken up in the following order:
1. Memorials.
2. Systematic Beneficence.
3. Salaries.
4. Discipline No.  1.
5. Discipline No. 2,
6. Discipline No. 3.
7. Book and Publising.
8. Local Preachers and Class Leaders.
9. Supcrimmeray.
10. Itinerancy (No. 2.)
11. State of the work.
12. General Conference Fund (No.
2.)
13. Sunday School and Epworth
League.
14. Deaconess Movement.
15. Sabbath Observance.
16. Course of Study.
17. Church and Parsonage Aid.
18. Church Property.
19. Statistical.
20. Skill and King;.
21. Sociological.
Adopted.
Conference adjourned at 12:30 with
benediction being pronounced by
Rev. J. J. Ferguson, B.D.
Brethren of the General Conference:
Your visit has been a blessing to the
\\ est,   You will now want to keep in
touch with our work in this Province.
Why not  subscribe for the Western
Methodist    Recorder, and   know   all
about it for the next year?
Adelress
Manager  Methodist  Recorder
P. & P. CO., Ltd.,
.  Victoria,   B.   C.
CORRECTION
In yesterday's report of Dr. Bur-
wash's address given in reply to Rev.
D. Cleaver's remarks, it was stated
that "The- German theory regarding
Christ's Humanity and Deity was
that llis Divinity was veiled, and that
John Wesley's theory was that He
emptied Himself of the Divine fulness during His earthly life and regained it at His exaltation." This
report is not a correct statement of
Dr. Burwash's remarks and we desire
to correct the report, as follows: The
German theory is the "kenosis"
theory, viz: that Christ emptied Himself of the Divine fulness during His
eartliy life and regained it at His
exaltation. And the English theory
is that His Divine fulness was veiled
during his earthly life, and that John
Wesley in his notes on Phil. 2:618 accepts both theories, and further, that
Geo. Jackson unhesitatingly accepts
the interpretation of John Wesley on
the humanity and deity of Christ as
founel in John Wesley's notes.
Rev. J. C. Speer, D.D., of Toronto,
a former pastor of the Metropolitan
Church, will preache in tint church
next Sunday evening, and also give
one e,f his popular lectures on the following evening, under the auspices
of the Metropolitan Ladies' Guild.
Many Styles and Prices in A Qp A M Q
Church.School and Parlor UnUnllO
We are the Sole Agents for the World
Renowned THOMAS ORGAN.    We believe
it to be the best reed Organ that can be made.
Every instrument is carefully tested ind
examined before leaving the factory and sold
under a guarantee for 6 years.
We have a large variety of case designs and
many different actions, suitable for all purposes.
The THOMAS ORGAN is noted for Quality of Tone, Promptness of Speech, Light
Touch and strong, easy working Bellows.
Catalog and Prices on application.
HICKS & LOVICK PIANO CO., LTD.
809 Government Street
VICTORIA
1117 Granville Street
VANCOUVER
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TAKE A PANEL
of experienced builders and ask tin
what   they   think   of  our   mill    v«
both    as  a house    beautifier    and!
money  saver.    Then  come  pic!
the panels, the mantels, the mat
for a handsome cabinet or close:,
grill   work,   the   wainscoting,   m
ings, ets., you will find here.    Fo
disregarel   their  verdict  is  impo
for a sensible man like you.
JAS. LEIGH & SONS,
PLEASANT   STREET
PHONE  392 VICTORIA, B I
Micfean Pop, Sound Liber Co.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Successors to J. A. Sayward
Shall be pleased to receive your inquiries for all kinds ol
rough and dressed lumber; also sash, doors and interior finish
All kinds of fruit boxes and crates constantly on hand.
B. C. Timber Dealers
Ask for our pamphlet giving general information re B.
C. Timber.
We employ our own cruisers and guarantee estimates.
Western Finance Co., Limited
(Robertson Bros.)
Lumber Exch. Building, Broughton St. W., Victoria, B.C.
1MB )
GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
DEAVILLE
SONS & CO.
Family
Grocers, Etc.
FLOUR
FEED
FRUIT
And a  full  supply of high
elass goods always on hand.
HILLSIDE    AVE.    AND
ROSE ST.,
Phone 324  -   Victoria, B.C.
New
W. G.& R.
Shirts and
Collars
Call and see our selection.
Prices  Moderate
Fitzpatrick &
O'Connell
811-813  Government  Street
Opp. P. O.
"You'll like our Clothes"
(Keg-)
■ ki I" :    ■
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SUtt'i '
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if'- *  -
—±~± AML...
IiWP»BBBtff*"~"T
HEfcf        .' **u.h£!!«P?£I
"The Best in the West"
We are consuming timber three times faster than it is growing. Do you wonder, therefor, that the increase in values is so rapid and so certain?. .We will gladly send you our booklet
which contains many interesting facts.
Hillis Timber & Trading Co., Limited
LUMBER EXCHANGE BUILDING VICTORIA, B. C.
Victoria, the Home City
Home-building in Victoria is an Art. In
most cities it is an expedient. The burning
desire to live in a "flat" has not yet afflicted
Victoria's citizens to any appreciable extent.
There arc all kinds of homes in the city ranging from the palatial to the modest, from the
mansion with many acres of lawn and garden,
to the retired little homes peeping out from
vines and flowers, lovely in their seclusion.
Visitors to Victoria are at once impressed
by this love for the beautiful which is so
typical of the city's entire surroundings. All
outlook, beauty; all season Summer might
well have been written of Victoria, since it is
rare, indeed, when the roses do not. fling their
petaled fragrance into the air. From earliest
springtime until in other climes the drifts have
wrapped all Nature in a winding-sheet of spotless white, the flowers in British Columbia's
Capital City continue to blossom and send
their perfume abroad. Never a month but
what somewhere the flowers blow.
Difference and distinction mark the architectural beauties of the dwellings. Taste and
culture combine to make them dreams of loveliness and contentment, in many districts
the sea beckons; in many others the woods
stand bathed in sunshine or ruffled at times
with the plumes of passing winds. Hedges and
shrubbery wall in many of these houses, and
their gardens and lawns show everywhere the
patient and loving care of the owners.
Victoria, in the truest and most satisfying
spirit, is indeed "The City of Homes."
THE
Moore
Whittington
Lumber Co.
LIMITED
VICTORIA, B.C.
Manufacturers   and
Dealers in
FIR, CEDAR
AND SPRUCE
LUMBER
LATHS AND
NO. 1 BRAND
HIGH GRADE
CEDAR SHINGLES
We  do  planing  mill work
promptly and properly
SASH  DOORS  AND
MOULDINGS
SHIPMENT BY  RAIL
OR WATER
Phone Mill 298
Phone Factory A750
ARE YOU INTERESTED
IN
California
Oil
Or do you want to know
anything about the most
profitable industrial business
in the world in spite of
trusts?
If so, while in Victoria get
"Questions and Answers on
California Oil" from
A.T.Frampton
Mahon Building
GOVERNMENT STREET
Company dividends for May
$1,326,626.00.
Dividends to date
$31,284,902.00.
Charming   array  of   new
Suits, Veilings, Neckwear
and    Gloves.     All    new
goods.
Charming   array   of   new
Suits,  Veilings, Neckwear
and    Gloves.      All    new
goods.
GOLFERS
FOR LADIES, MISSES AND
—CHILDREN
While travelling, there is nothing more serviceable than a Golfer, an outer garment that protects you against
inclement weather.    We draw your attention to our special values in Golfers:
Ladies' Golfers, with  and  without military collars,  in Golfers in three-quarter length, plain weave, with poc-
white. grey, navy, cardinal and black; fancy weaves. kets. in white and black.  Campbell's special at $6.75
Campbell's special   $2.75
Misses   Golfers, in navy and white, ages 6 to 12 years.
Ladies' Golfers, in fancy weave: white, navy, black, grey. Campbell's special  .$2.50
emerald and cardinal.    Campbell's special $3.75 nviJ      .   ~ ,r ,.    ,      «
Children s Golfers in cardinal and navy, with pockets and
Ladies' Golfers in white, navy and black, with pockets. brass buttons, for ages of 2 and 4 years.   Campbell's
Campbell's special  $4.25 special ( $1.50 GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
THE SUNDAY SERVICES
ECHOES OF THE SECOND
WEEK
Sermon by Dr. Briggs.
The morning sermon of the last
General Conference Sunday (Aug.
28) was by Rev. Dr. Briggs, the Book
Steward, who spoke with eloquence
and unction on the Bible, from the
text, Pslam Il9:v.l29, "Thy testimonies are wonderful." He began
by referring to the amplitude of the
Pialm in applicaton to all human
needs. Whether in sickness or health,
sorrow or joy, storm or sunshine,
battle or peace, whether the person
be sinner or saint, there was something adaptable to everyone from this
woaderful harp of varied chords. Nos.
1, 19 and especially 119, were notable as expressing the highest phases
of Divine law. The latter was the
Psalmist's  great  hymn  of  duty.
The Bible at large, however, would
be the speaker's theme—the royal
book of the English tongue. The
miracles attest God's omnipotence;
its prophecies attest God's truth.
They shine clearly over ruins of
cities and nations once powerful and
populous. All scripture is given by
inspiration of God—else how such
marvelous coincidences and agreement between writers of varied birth
and condition and widely separted by
the centuries? But the testimony of
a clean heart was after all the highest testimony to the Bible's inspiration.
Wonderful was the Bible for its
diversities of style, though with unity
of purpose manifest through it all.
Hence divers manners as well as divers persons were illustrated in its
pages—some in simple language, others in the highest imagery; others
marked with Oriental glow—with infinite varety, addressing itself to
divers faculties as well as divers men.
Some saw the truth in dogma; sonic
in simile; some in counsel; some in
God's love and forbearance. How
Romans accords with David; Jeremiah with Proverbs.
"O, wonderful  things  in  the  Bible  I
see,
But   this   is   the   dearest,   that   Jesus
loves me!"
The Bible's versatility appealed
also to the student of nature, and
science and art draw confirmation
and embellishment from it. The noble Christian classics—Baxter, Banyan, Taylor, Milton, Doddridge,
Knox. Matthew Henry. Whitcfield,
the Weslcys, found a true fount of inspiration here. The deep and wondrous verse of Shakespeare derived
suggestion from it; a large volume
had been compiled of Shakespearean
allusions and quotation! arising out
of the Bible. Likewise masters of
poetical literature, from Spencer,
Cowper. Montgomery lo Tennyson,
proved by their works the value to
them   of   the   Bible.     Il    i>   lilted   to
guide  in  every age mihI  relation of
life. Sir Walter Scot! on nil death
bed bore testimony that "There is
but one book, (he Bible." It il the
charter .if glory lo millions. For
faith we turn to Abraham; for \vc;ik-
nesi to Moses; for patience to Job;
for clinging tenderness to Ruth; for
paternal love to David; for fraternal
forgiveness to Joseph; for linn
friendship to David and Jonathan;
for devotion to God'i mission to
Paul, but above all that i- perfect
and lmly to Christ All others betray <-onie imperfection; Christ only
displays not the slightest mixture of
evil  or shade  of deformity.
The great design of the Bible is to
make us like Christ; to aid us to get
lis spirit in us. to follow in his footsteps, to become the temples of indwelling deity. Let us receive with
meekness the ingrafted word able to
save our souls. To Ihe preacher he
would apply the anecdotal quotation,
"Mangle your grammar rather than
lose your grace." The doctor was delighted that General Conference was
taking up the evangelical note. This
should be pre-eminent in our hearts,
never to doubt the Bible. There were
some , as Disraeli had put it. "In the
inconvenient profundity of their intellects." who had assumed to rerisc
(he sacred volume. Don't let it be
persecuted. amputated. dissected.
What it has done for millions it will
do for millions more. Other books
have lost their power, but this shall
endure forever. Its the blessed medium of transmission of the plan of
salvation, of redemption in Christ, of
the wideness of redeeming love.
Don't have it a.s a transient guest,
but fix it in the heart as a constant
treasure. It sings to us of our heavenly home—may we all reach it!
One cannot but recognize the fact
that many of the delegates are getting anxious to see the end of the
Conference and get back to home and
regular work. That SO many of our
leading laymen have been willing to
travel so far and stay so long ihowi
the very great interest taken by them
in the affairs of the Church. A good
deal of time has been taken by the
Fraternal Delegates in their addresses
and farewells. This week we had
some eloquent words from the messengers of the two great Methodist
bodies in the United States. Senator
Booth from Oregon and Dr. Brown
from San Francisco had an evening
at their disposal and were cordially
welcomed. Their words met with a
hearty response. Dr. Du Bose of
Nashville gave us an illustration of a
true Southerner. His words and
metaphors and illustrations will long
be remembered. It seems a pity that
more time cannot be given to the
cultivation of these fraternal relations.
Elections were given a prominent
place in the business of the week. The
results were in every case just what
had been expected for months, and
Ihe officers-elect were given to understand they had the support of the
entire Conference. The new General
Superintendent-elect is so widely
known and has had such an opportunity to become familiar with the
whole Dominion, the delegates knew
the man whom they were electing,
and made no mistake. The qucrry in
some minds is and it finds expression
011 many lips, "Is the General Superintendency a life job?" It has been
in the past. Is it to be be continued?
Such was not the intention at the beginning. One not familiar with
Methodist economy might ask, "How
many officials does it require to do
the business of the Methodist
Church?" Were the roll of officers-
elect to be called it would take some
time. The "man behind the gun" is
hidden by the noble army of officers
in front. The Union question has for
1 he present been settled and the
arena of debate transferred to the Annual Conferences and District meetings of ion. The debate did not
bring out any striking statements.
The legal aspects were discussed by
two well known jurists, whose voices
are often heard in our Church Courts.
Their views were widely divergent.
If such learned counsellors and justices can not agree as to the tenure
of Church property it will be hard
for the average trustee to decide
Whether or not the property he holds
in trust for the (liurch is property
over which he can exercise any authority. Tlu theologians of the Conference', both lay and clerical, took a
hand in the creed in the proposed
l!;isis. It was evident that the man
in the pew is not indifferent as to
the exact Statemeit of the creed to
which he is asked to subscribe. Like
the elections to office the result of
the Vote was ;i forgone conclusion lie-
fore Conference opened. The tone
of the debate was good. The speakers seemed with few exceptions to
feel the importance of the subject,
There was a willingness lo hear both
sides of the case discussed. Some
who favored Union were a little impatient when telling points were made
against their proposition. The good
brother who spoke after Prof. Patton
revealed the fact that in the past and
in dealing with problems and semi-
political opponents, be had cultivated
the habit of attacking his opponent
rather than proving the correctness of
his own position. The poorest kind
of argument is ridicule, and yet it
frequently carries the crowd. There
was as far as one could see no desire
to prevent the sending of the proposed basis to the people for consideration. The simple question was,
shall it go with the approval of the
Conference or shall it go without
such expression of opinion. The singing of the Doxology after the vote
was taken was not in good taste, to-
say the least. Those who voted to
send the basis to the people without
expressing approval were just as loyal
to the Church as those who voted
the other way. and to sing "Praise
God from whom all blessings flow,"
because these were fewer in number
than the others, does not seem to be
the manifestation of a good spirit.
It  requires some ingenuity to har
monize the action of some speakers
made during the week. One day
when it was proposed to lengthen the
pastoral terms it was urged that the
Church would suffer should the
preacher stay longer than four years.
Some of those who argued thus were
departmental officers and men who
were not in the pastorate. The next
day these men were enthusiastic in
their advocacy of a Union in which
every vestige of the itinerancy is
obliterated. Mr. Blank argues on
Tuesday that he can stand his present pastor for four years and no
longer, and even three would be better. On Wednesday the same Mr.
Blank argues that in the interests of
Union he would be willing to retain
his present pastor for any number of
years. Perhaps some Higher Critic
will explain the reason for this difference of view. The frequent application of closure would have the
approval of many more if it reached
the right men. Some are determined
to speak on every subject, and as
soon a.s they have spoken will cry,
"Vote, vote." The venerable superintendent has a hard time occasionally in keeping order. Occasionally a
star rises and calls the attention of
the Conference to the fact that the
Chairman is wrong. A unique tiling
has happened a couple of times during the week. The star gave more
light than the ruling orb. It only
proves the truth, no one is infallible. The Conference at last summoned sufficient courage to make a
change in the famous "foot-note." Not
that any permission is given to do
that which is forbidden in the rules,
but opportunity is given for the individual to exercise his own judgment
in interpreting the rules. This has
been the contention of many for years
and the remarkable unanimity of the
vote making the change is ominous
for good. In the new Church, after
Union, there will be no rules. These,
with all the precious heritage of
Methodism will become ancient history. The new note of Evangelism
sounded on Friday night is a hopeful
note. It will meet with a hearty
response, The only fear is official
evangelism, and yet some organization seems necessary. The Conference should endeavor to get along
without another general officer. That
was a wise move in Ihe missionary
work which gave the W. M. S. an interest in the Sunday School'work of
the Church. Some say it is the Sunday School that makes members for
the W, M. S., and others say the W.
M. S. makes teachers for the Sunday School, ft may be hard to determine which is correct, but the more
intimate the relations between the
different departments of the Church
the more satisfactory will be the
work done. The cordial co-operation
of the W. M. Society will mean far
more to the general work of the missionary department of the Church
than is represented by the financial
aspect of the case. The policy of the
centralization of the management of
our mission work in Toronto received a jar on Saturday when the
Conference adopted a constitution for
an Annual Conference Missionary
Committee. It lias been claimed that
there was not sufficient power given
lo those who were responsible for
local missionary work. The route
was loo long and difficult, There is a
general feeling thai the legislation is
.1 step in the right direction. Those
who were anxious lo increase the
Strength of the General Hoard of Missions by making a number of ex-of-
ficio members were not good tacticians. They might have succeeded
by takng it piecemeal, but to ask the
Conference to add at once eight and
possibly ten ex-officio members to a
board which already numbers forty,
was more than that conservative body
could stand. Some thought it might
mean that the tail would wag the dog.
The long looked for storm on
theological questions was trying to
break on Saturday night. The work
of the week had been very taxing and
the hour was late, but still there was
enough electricity in the air to make
trouble. It was found impossible to
reach a discussion of the main question, owing to the number of points
of order to be settled. A discussion
may be avoided by the introduction
of-such methods, but the shelving of
a question is not a settlement of it.
There has been a vast amount of business transacted during the week. The
hours have been long—the elections
many—the issues important, the discussions earnest, the eloquence wonderful, the fund of good nature ex-
haustless and the presence of God's
Spirit clearly manifest. A few hours
more and the Conference of 1910 will
have passed into history.
The business man who doesn't advertise because it costs money,
should stop paying salaries for the same reason.
IT might be of interest to you to learn
that this paper  is  printed  with   the
approbation of the  Presbyterian
Church (Old Kirk) at the corner Courtney
and Gordon streets.
In the strangely simple economy of this world,
Our  business  never grows faster  than we grow.
The Material, Style and Finish
Of the Gibson  Photo secures for
us the patronage of the Discriminating public
"There's a Reason"
THE GIBSON STUDIO
626 YATES STREET, COR. BROAD
Phone 2024
8ET YOUR COHFERENGE BULLETINS
BOUND
As Souvenirs of Your Trip
Before Returning
Home
Orders taken at Recorder
Booth in  Church.
We are headquarters for Gold
Lettering on  Leather Goods.
All Classes of Bookbinding'
O.J. B.LANE
Book-hinder and Paper-ruler
614 COURTNEY STREET
(Upstairs)
xIhere
Thomas Hooper
ARCHITECT
Specialist in Church Plans. Designed the General Conference
Church (Metropolitan Church,
Victoria), also Centennial Methodist Church.
OFFICES:
Five Sisters Block, Victoria
Winch  Block,  Vancouver
The
range that's
Built ox Honor
or the best materials—
Malleable and Charcoal
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The Great and Grand
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has a nnmberof nxclu«!v« features, ea<*h
0110 adding to Its dun bllltv and practical ipi-vleo, muklnfcj the Majkhtic the
b?st raj^e y<<u cun buy roifardlaia of
prffe. That • why fifteen, other inuau-
xacturers fry to imitate It.
FOR SALE BY
POWELL   &   CO.,
Government Street
Dame Diirfa's Tea Booms
For
BREAKFASTS
LUNCH AND TEA
Home    made    Cakes    and
Sweets a Specialty
ion
Look the Part
Men must look right and be right to command success.
Clear eyes, a bright mind and a quick hand are imperative.
If you are feeling sluggish or ruii down, our REJUVENATING
TONIC will put you right.
TERRY'S Drug Store, Fort and Douglas
THE SUN TYPEWRITER
Light, Strong and Durable
All Writing Absolutely Visible
The Sun is the Clergyman's ideal typewriter, and all who decide
to take one of them home will have a lasting and pleasant reminder
of the Convention and its associations. EVERY machine fully
guaranteed.
PRICE, COMPLETE—$50.00 TERMS ARRANGED
Call at our store and examine this typewriter.
Opposite Spencers' Store
THOS.   PLIMLEY
1110 Government Street
Victoria, B.C. GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
rDUCATIVE INFLUENCES IN A
CITY
i Continued from Page Two)
11 v press of this city wc notice the
L    uecnicnt of a  picnic to be held
L    rplember 3 under the auspices of
|ni|'ioyees   of  the   B.   C.   E.   Railway
j,i the  city.    There   are  to  be   held
hirty-three  sporting  events,  in   sev-
ral of which boys, girls and woim-n
■c to take part.    There are several
gitimatc and desirable prizes to be
yen, but what of the following that
c offered among others:
Gents  race:  First—Two bottles  of
hokey;      second—one     bottle     of
'hickey.
Fat man's race: Third—Twei bot-
les i>f whiskey.
Old men's race: First—Three bot-
les "f whiskey; second—two bottles
[ whiskey; third—one bottle of
hiskey.
Si-.inel Hotel Race: Third—Two
jttles of whiskey.
Managers, Superintendent's anel
oreinen's Race: First—Four botes of whiskey; second—three bottles
[ whiskey; third—two bottles of
hi-Uy; fourth—one bottle of whis-
■y.
Committeemen's Race: Third—
irty eight bottles of beer.
Tug of war: Ten gallons of beer.
Sports of legitimate kind is desir-
ile- in every community and should
r encouraged, but think e>f men sttp-
ieil in their play, as in their work,
lie- an example to our youth, put-
ifj themselves in the public gaze of
iys. girls and ladies and running
Ml i'ir whiskey! Managers and su-
riniendents of a railway corpora-
11 and old men running races for
liskey! Such is certainly not in-
ided to impress Victoria's visitors
th the high moral standard of her
ople. and in our judgment is an
suit tei the numbers of her citizens
in aspre to nobler things and who
sire to see less than this would
cm 10 imply her to be  a whiskey-
cn city.
If San Francisco thought worth
ile to exclude the Johnson-Jeffries
bt to save for herself a popular na-
nal exhibition in 1912. We think
re are some things Victora must
:lmle from public exhibition to save
■ civic  life  from  moral  degenera-
SPECIFICATIONS   OF   METROPOLITAN  CHURCH   ORGAN.
Many visitors attending the General Conference have expressed their
ailiniration for the large new organ
of the Metropolitan Church, and
mimical people have asked for particular-, ejf its specifications. We
have pleasure in gving this information, as follows:
The organ consists of four manuals and pedals and contains some
fifty-three speaking stops, which are
grouped each side of the player, and
thirty-four couplers, etc., which are
operated by rocking tablets placed
above the Solo manual. The thumb-
pistons, for the easy manipulation of
the stops, are placed between the
manuals and are twenty-five in number. There are also five foot-pistons
which control the stops and couplers.
The action is on the builders latest
electro-pneumatic patents and the
wind is generated by fans worked by
a S H.P. electric motor.
The Chimes, which are the gift of
the Ladies' Guild of the Metropolitan
Church, arc an especially beautiful
feature of this organ. They are
formed of Reveille tubes, operated by
Messrs. Casavant's latest patent action.
A study of the subjoined list of
stops will reveal to those acquainted
with organs and organ construction
the great amount of 16 and 18-foot
tone and also the great variety of solo
stops. There are four different wind-
pressures ranging from 3 1-2 to 7
inches.
Compass of Manuals CC to C.61 keys
Compass of Pedals CCC to F.30 keys
Feet Notes
1. Double Open  ..  16 68 A
2. Open    Diapason
(large)        8 68 A
3. Open    Diapason
(medium)   .... 8 68 A
4. Violin   Diapasem 8 61 G
5. Dopple Flute... 8 68 A
6. Stopped    Diapa
son     8 61 G
7. Salicional    8 61 G
8. Walde Flue  .... 4 61 G
9. Octave     4 68 A
10. Twelfth        2 2-3 68 A
11. Fifteenth        2 61 G
12. Mixture        3 ranks 183 G
13. Trumpet        8 61 G
14. Posaune   '8 68 A
Swell Organ
15. Bourdon  .16 68'
16. Open    Diapason
(leathered)  ... 8
17. Clarabella    8
18. Stopped    Diapa
son    8
19. Viola di Gamba. 8
20. Voix Celete .... 8
21. Aeoline     8
22. Principal      4
23. I'lauto Traverso 4
24  Piccolo   2
25. Cornet     3 ranks
26. Bassoon    16
27. Cornopean    8
28. Oboe    8
29. Vox  Humana.. . 8
Choir Organ
30. Open  Diapason. 8
31. Melodia     8
32. Dulciana     8
33. Harmonica Flute 4
34. Violina     4
35. Flageolet    2
36. Clarinet     8
Solo Organ
37. Gross  Flute  8
38. Gamba    8
31;. Harmonic Flute. 4
40. Harmonic     Pic
colo   2
41. Tuba   8
42. Cor  Anglais  8
Pedal Organ
43. Double Open  (7
acoustic)    32
44. Open  Diapason.  16
4g. Open    Diapason
(from    No.    1
metal)       16
46. Vlolone      16
47. Bourdon        16
48. Gedackt      (from
No. 15.)    16
49. Octave        (from
Xo. 44     8
$o. Octave (18 from
47)        8
51. Violoncello     (18
from 46)       8
52. Trombone      16
53. Trumpet (18
from 52)        8
Pistons
5 adjustable to Great.
5 to Swell,
3 to Choir.
3 " to Solo.
4 to Pedal.
1 reversible Solo to Pedal.
1 " Swell to Pedal,
r Great to Pedal.
1 " Choir to Pedal.
1  adjuster.
68
68
68
68
56
68
68
68
61
204
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
6r
68
68
68
61
61
68
68
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
4 adjustable foot-pistons acting on all
stops anel couplers.
1 loot-piston Great to Pedal.
Pedals.
:   Swell  Pe.lal.
1 Swell Pedal for Croir and Solo.
1 Crcsendo Pedal.
Mechanical Registers
54. Great to Pedal.
55. Swell to Pedal.
56. Choir to Pedal.
57. Solo tn Pedal.
58. Swell super lo  Pedal.
50. Sole, super to Pedal.
60. Swell to Great.
61. Choir to Great.
62. Solo to Great.
63. Solo to Swell.
64. Solo to Choir.
65. Swell to Choir.
66. Swell sub to Great.
67. Swell super to Great,
68. Swell sub to Choir.
69. Swell super to Choir.
70. Solo sub to Great.
71. Solo super to Great.
72. Great sub G.
73. Great super A.
74. Swell sub.
75. Swell super.
76. Choir sub.
77. Choir super.
78. Solo sub.
79. Solo super.
80. Tremulant to Swell.
81. Tremulant to Solo.
82. Chimes to Great.
83. Chimes to Swell.
84. Chimes to Choir.
85. Chimes to Solo.
86. Chimes to Solo.
87. Chimes super to Solo.
88. Tremulant to Choir.
ft should be added that the installation of the organ, which cost nearly
$13,000, is largely due to the energy
and perseverance of the talented organist, Mr. Edward Parsons, who is
warmly congratulated on the achievement.
CALL ON
TRACKSELl, ANDERSON & CO.,
Broad St. Opp. Colonist Office
for Timely  Investments  in
Victoria Real Estate.
Splendid offerings for Prudent Investors.
The Famous
Chilliwack
Valley
There arc many beautiful spots
In British Columbia, but none
that has the attraction for the
Eastern visitor than the far-
famed Chilliwack Valley. The
lovely situation, the splendid
crops and the prosperous farms
and homes are productive of the
highest expressions of wonder and
Interest from those who see them
for the first time, and it will be
a pleasure for us to show you
around if you will come to us and
say so. With the advent of the
electric tram connecting- with
Vancouver direct, the Great Northern Railway, the Canadian Northern Railway, Chilliwack Is
emerging from her retired situation and Is being brought into
the light of prominence; choice
spots are being picked up by the
City business man or Investor
for country homes, particularly
those that are bounded by the
many beautiful streams, the small
farmer and fruit grower is coming in and settling on 10 or 20
acre plots, and the investor la
now fully aware of the possibilities and tho brilliant future ahead
of the city and district of Chilliwack.
We have on our lists many
choice and desirable properties,
both in Improved and revenue
producing farms; improved and
unimproved acreage, and city property both business or residential
either improved and bearing revenue or vacant, and we shall be
happy to answer any inquiry and
to send our new birdseye map of
the district, also illustrated booklet to anyone asking for It.
A connection of nearly 20 years
In Chilliwack In this business,
gives us a knowledge of the land,
the conditions and values, rarely
met with, and this knowledge is
at your disposal.
Bent & Goodland
3. Howe Bent
K. T. Ooodland
Real Estate   Agents,   Conveyancers, Valuators, and Financial  Brokers,   etc.
CHILLIWACK
B. C.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S ADVANTAGES
BRITISH COLUMBIA is the Pacific Coast Province of Canada.
Area—395,000 square miles, or 252,800,000 acres.
Coast-line—7,000 miles.
Forest and Woodland—182,000,000 acres.
Population (estimated)—280,000, exclusive of Asiatics.
The whole of British Columbia south of 52 degrees and cast of the Coast Range
is a grazing country up to 3,500 feet, and a farming country up to 2t500
feet, where irrigation is possible.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S trade has increased by overnineteen million dollars in four
years.
BRITISH COLUMBIA fisheries, one hundred and fourteen million dollars.
BRITISH COLUMBIA forests produce over twelve million dollars annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA has millions of acres of paper-making material undeveloped.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   farms   and   orchards   produce   over   eight   million   dollars
annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA has immense deposits of iron ore awaiting development.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S coal deposits are the most extensive in the world.
The Kootenay coalfields alone are capable of yielding ten million tons of coal
a year for seven thousand years.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S area of standing timber is the largest and most compact
in America.
BRITISH COLUMBIA has over ten million acres of wheat lands.
BRITISH COLUMBIA produces over two million pounds of butler annually, and
imports over four million pounds.
BRITISH COLUMBIA imports over two million dollars' worth of eggs and poultry
annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA shipped over six thousand tons of fruit in 1908, and imported
fruit to the value of two hundred thousand dollars.
BRITISH COLUMBIA fruits—apples, pears, plums, cherries, and peaches—are the
finest in the world.
BRITISH COLUMBIA fruit has won the highest awards at  exhibitions  in  Great
Britain, Eastern Canada, and the United States.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S net revenue is increasing at the rate of one million dollars
annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S liabilities over assets are decreasing at the rate of over one
million dollars annually.
TO THE CAPITALIST—
The most profitable field for investment in the known world.
TO THE MANUFACTURER—
A great wealth of raw materials.
Unsurpassed shipping facilities.
Rapidly increasing markets at home and in the new Provinces of Saskatchewan
and Alberta, Mexico, Australia, and the Orient.
TO THE LUMBERMAN—
Millions of acres of the finest timber in the world.
An ever-incrsasing demand for lumber at home and abroad.
TO THE FISHERMAN—
Inexhaustible quantities of salmon, halibut, cod, herring, and other fish.
TO THE FRUIT GROWER—
Many thousands of acres of land producing all the hardier  fruits, as well as
peaches, grapes, apricots, melons, nuts, etc.
TO THE DAIRYMAN—
Splendid pasture and high prices for butter, milk, and cream.
TO THE WORKINGMAN—
Fair wages and a reasonable working day.
TO THE POULTRYMAN—
A cash home market for poultry and eggs at big prices.
TO THE FARMER—
Large profits from mixed farming and vegetable-growing.
TO THE MINER—
Three hundred thousand square miles of unprospected mineral-bearing country.
TO THE SPORTSMAN—
An infinite variety of game animals, big and small, game fishes and game birds.
TO THE TOURIST—
Magnificent scenery.
Good hotels.
Well-equipped trains.
Palatial steamships.
TO EVERYBODY—
A healthful climate.
Inspiring surroundings.
Golden opportunities in all walks of life.
Just laws, well administered.
A  complete modern  educational  system—free,  undenominational  primary  and
high schools.
All the conveniences of civilised life.
Health, peace, contentment, and happiness.
Information regarding B. C. and its Resources may be had by applying to the Bureau of Information, Victoria, B. C, or
the Agent General of B. C, Salisbury House, Finsbury Circus, London, England. SMSMBBBsWMMsMI
emm>
BH^^^^^H
GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
i si.   .■ ■ ■—■■ -■ r.ia^i^
GURNEY-OXFORD
New Chancellor
An advance sample of this the
finest of all wood and coal ranges
has just arrived,—the very newest and best idea In cooking apparatus. It more than pleases all
expert cooks and discerning housewives.
You are welcome if only as a
looker. Come In and allow us to
demonstrate Its great superiority
over others. Price will please, too.
Drake   Hardware
Co.
608 Yates St.
NEAR   GOTEBNMEHT
OCEAN PARK
=—— An Ideal Pacific Chatauqua
To Sum Up
We Believe in V. C.
Because
We Believe in Quality
To Win
We Are Doing All
We Can, But it is
Up to You to Make
The Trial.
Ask your Grocer
For V. C. T.
Packed by
THE
W. H. Malkin Go.
LIMITED
VANCOUVER
Providers of Cup
Quality
TEAS AND COFFEES
The property comprising this subdivision
consists of the point of perhaps the most beautiful promintory in British Columbia. The
land itself on its seaward frontage, sweeping
in a semi-circle from the southeast corner of
the land to the northwest corner, rises from
the beach in a beautiful cliff formation of from
seventy-five to one hundred and fifty feet in
height. Around the foot of this rise the new
main line of the Great Northern runs, over the
rails of which it is also expected the Northern
Pacific will run its trains.
The Beach
From Blaine on the east to Blackies' Spit on
the north there runs one of the finest beaches
in British Columbia.
Eastward toward Blaine the tide leaves a
beach nearly a mile in width. Immediately
south of the property deep water is reached
in about from one to three hundred yards.
West of the property a sand beach is left by
the receding tide, extending fully three miles
from high water mark.
The sands are of a firm character. The
water coming in over the heated sands on a
summer evening resembles an artificially heated bath rendering bathing ideal and safe.
The Project
It is proposed to make this property, naturally so well situated for the purpose, into a
residential park on the Chataqua principal.
This is the first attempt to meet the demand
for a rallying place for Christian societies in
their conventions and summer schools, and
cannot be duplicated for beauty and surrounding conveniences, of grounds and accessibility
to all the Coast and Sound cities and towns.
In order to improve the property, erect a
pavilion, and beautify the park, fifty per cent,
of the proceeds of the sale price of the lots has
been donated by the original holders, together
with a further donation by one of the promoters of ten thousand dollars.
They have already transferred their full
rights and titles to trustees, who have covenanted to hold the same in trust for the purpose for which it is intended.
The property has been subdivided, according to the plan shown in the folder, into two
parks for recreation and pavilion purposes,
together with suitable streets and 50-foot residential lots.
Proper safeguards have been made to prevent the alienation of any portion of this property from the purposes as set forth above.
For further information consult:
Ocean Park Ass n
329 Pender St., W
Phone 6015
=OR=
Rev* Re F. Stillman \m venabies St., Vancouver
GURNEY-OXFORD
Gas Range
Is   constructed   with   a   view   lo
economy and durability with notl
lng overlooked in appearance.
See this Range  in Its  dlfferei t
styles and sizes at
The
Victoria Gas Co'y
Limited
YATES ST. SHOW BOOK
Residence Telephone 122
Office Telephone 557
Lewis Hall
Doctor Dental Surgery
JEWEL BLOCK
Cor. Yatea and Douglas Stre ts
VICTORIA, B.C.
LEESON, DICKIE k GROSS
LIMITED
Wholesale Grocers
Corner Water and Abbott Sts. VANCOUVER, B.C.
Investments
IN  B.  C.  ARE  DEMANDING WIDESPREAD ATTENTION IN ENGLAND, U. S. AND
EASTERN CANADA
WHY ?
Because we have a vast area of Agricultural Lands, Fruit Lands, Mineral Deposits, Coal and Oil
Lands and Timber Lands which are UNDEVELOPED.
We specialize in all these lines, also in investments in INSIDE BUSINESS PROPERTY
IN VANCOUVER
We  recommend  nothing but  sound  inves -
ments.  Write us, or better still, call and see
us PERSONALLY
H. H. Stevens St Qo.
Brokers Notary Public
Fiscal Agents:
Portland Star Mines,
Texada Island Copper Co.
317 PENDER ST., WEST,
VANCOUVER, B. 6. GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
GURNEY-OXFORD
New Chancellor
An advance sample of this the
finest of all wood and e-oal ranges
has just arrived,—the very newest and best ieleu in cooking apparatus. It more than pleases all
expert e^ooks and discerning housewives.
You are Welcome If only as a
looker. Come in and allow u.s to
demonstrate Its great superiority
over others. Price will please, too.
Drake   Hardware
Co.
608 Yates St.
NEAR   GOVEBNMENT
To Sum Up
We Believe in V. C.
Because
We Believe in Quality
To Win
We Are Doing: All
We Can, But it is
Up to You to Make
The Trial.
Ask your Grocer
For V. C. T.
Packed by
THE
W. H. Malkin Co.
LIMITED
VANCOUVER
Providers of Cup
Quality
TEAS AND COFFEES
OCEAN PARK
A *-»     T/4/»^»l     M^ r+4+4f+    1      Y\^t*\44r%44'\   	
iiv   \jiiaiauuua
The  property  comprising  this  subdivision
consists of the point of perhaps the most beautiful   promintory  in   British   Columbia.     The
land itself on its seaward frontage, sweeping
in a semi-circle from the southeast corner of
the land to the northwest corner, rises from
the beach in a beautiful cliff formation of from
seventy-five to one hundred and fifty feet in
height.   Around the foot of this rise the new
main line of the Great Northern runs, over the
rails of which it is also expected the Northern
Pacific will run its trains.
The Beach
From Blaine on the east to Blackies' Spit on
the north there runs one of the finest beaches
in British Columbia.
Eastward toward Blaine the tide leaves a
beach nearly a mile in width.    Immediately
south of the property deep water is reached
in  about  from  one  to  three  hundred yards.
West of the property a sand beach is left by
the receding tide, extending fully three miles
from bigh water mark.
The sands are of a firm  character.    The
water coming in over the heated sands on a
summer evening resembles an artificially heated bath rendering bathing ideal and safe.
The Project
It is proposed to make this property, naturally so well situated for the purpose, into a
residential park on the Chataqua principal.
This is the first attempt to meet the demand
for a rallying place for Christian societies in
their conventions and summer schools, and
cannot be duplicated for beauty and surrounding conveniences, of grounds and accessibility
to all the Coast and Sound cities and towns.
In order to improve the property, erect a
pavilion, and beautify the park, fifty per cent,
of the proceeds of the sale price of the lots has
been donated by the original holders, together
with a further donation by one of the promoters of ten thousand dollars.
They have already transferred their full
rights and titles to trustees, who have covenanted to hold the same in trust for the purpose for which it is intended.
The property has been subdivided, according to the plan shown in the folder, into two
parks for recreation and pavilion purposes,
together with suitable streets and 50-foot residential lots.
Proper safeguards have been made to prevent the alienation of any portion of this property from the purposes as set forth above.
For further information consult:
Ocean Pc
329 Pender St., W
  - n
irk Ass n
Phone 6015
p
Rev* R. F, Stillman J875 venabies St., Vancouver
LEESON, DICKIE k GROSS
LIMITED
Wholesale Grocers
Corner Water and Abbott Sts. VANCOUVER, B.C.
GURNEY-OXFORI*
Gas Range
Is constructed with a view t
economy and durability with not I
ins overlooked in appearance.
See this  Range  In  Its  differei
styles and  sizes  at
The
Victoria Gas Co%
Limited
YATES ST. SHOW BOOM
Residence Telephone 122
Office Telephone 557
Lewis Hall
Doctor Dental Surgery
JEWEL BLOCK
Cor. Yates and Douglas Stre ts
VICTORIA, B.C.
Investments
IN  B.  C.  ARE   DEMANDING  WIDESPREAD ATTENTION IN ENGLAND, U. S. ANJ>
EASTERN  CANADA
WHY ?
Because we have a vast area of Agricultural Lands, Fruit Lands, Mineral Deposits, Coal and 0 1
Lands and Timber Lands which are UNDEVELOPED.
We specialize in all these lines, also in investments in INSIDE BUSINESS PROPERTY
IN VANCOUVFR
We  recommend  nothing  but  sound  inves -
ments.  Write us, or better still, call and see
us PERSONALLY
H. H. Stevens St Qo.
Fiscal Agents:
Portland Star Mines,
Texada Island Copper Co.
Brokers Notary Public
317 PENDER ST., WEST,
YHNeeUYER, B. e.| GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
GURNEY-OXFORD
New Chancellor
An advance sample nf this the
fine'st ot all wood and ooal ranees
has just arrived, the trary new-
est anel beat Idea In cooking apparatus, it mors Hem pleases all
expert oooks and dlscernlnc housewives.
Vein arc tvelOOntS if only :eK a
looker. Come in ami allow us in
demonstrate its great superiority
over others. Price will please, too.
Drake   Hardware
Co.
608 Yates St.
NEAR   GOVERNMENT
To Sum Up
We Believe in V. C.
Because
We Believe in Quality
To Win
We Are Doing All
We Can, But it is
Up to You to Make
The Trial.
Ask your Grocer
For V. C. T.
Packed by
THE
W. H. Malkin Go.
LIMITED
VANCOUVER
Providers of Cup
Quality
TEAS AND COFFEES
OCEAN PARK
An Ideal Pacific Chatauqua ——
The property comprising this subdivision
consists of the point of perhaps the most beautiful promintory in British Columbia. The
land itself on its seaward frontage, sweeping
in a semi-circle from the southeast corner of
the land to the northwest corner, rises from
the beach in a beautiful cliff formation of from
seventy-live to one hundred and fifty feet in
height. Around the foot of this rise the new
main line of the Great Northern runs, over the
rails of which it is also expected the Northern
Pacific will run its trains.
The Beach
The Project
From Blaine on the east to Blackies' Spit on
the north there runs one of the finest beaches
in British Columbia.
Eastward toward Blaine the tide leaves a
beach nearly a mile in width. Immediately
south of the property deep water is reached
in about from one to three hundred yards.
West of the property a sand beach is left by
the receding tide, extending fully three miles
from high water mark.
The sands are of a firm character. The
water coming in over the heated sands on a
summer evening resembles an artificially heated bath rendering bathing ideal and safe.
It is proposed to make this property, naturally so well situated for the purpose, into a
residential park on the Chataqtia principal.
This is the first attempt to meet the demand
for a rallying place for Christian societies in
their conventions and summer schools, and
cannot be duplicated for beauty and surrounding conveniences, of grounds and accessibility
to all the Coast and Sound cities and towns.
In order to improve the property, erect a
pavilion, and beautify the park, fifty per cent,
of the proceeds of the sale price of the lots has
been donated by the original holders, together
with a further donation by one of the promoters of ten thousand dollars.
They have already transferred their full
rights and titles to trustees, who have covenanted to hold the same in trust for the purpose for which it is intended.
The property has been subdivided, according to the plan shown in the folder, into two
parks for recreation and pavilion purposes,
together with suitable streets and 50-foot residential lots.
Proper safeguards have been made to prevent the alienation of any portion of this property from the purposes as set forth above.
For further information consult:
Ocean Park Ass n
329 Pender St., W
Phone 6015
:OR=
Rev* R, F* Stillman ms venabies St., Vancouver
GURNEY-OXFORI
Gas Range
Is constructed with a view I
economy and durability with not!
Ing overlooked In appearance.
See  thhj  Range  In  its  dUTerc
styles  anel sizes  at
The
Victoria Gas Co':
Limited
YATES  ST. SHOW BOOM
Residence Telephone 122
Office Telephone 557
Lewis Hall
Doctor Dental Surgery
JEWEL BLOCK
Cor. Yates and Douglas Streets
VICTORIA, B.C.
LEESON, DICKIE k GROSS
LIMITED
Wholesale Grocers
Corner Water and Abbott Sts. VANCOUVER, B.C.
Investments
IN  B.  C.  ARE  DEMANDING  WIDESPREAD ATTENTION IN ENGLAND, U. S. AN1
EASTERN  CANADA
WHY ?
Because we have a vast area of Agricultural Lands, Fruit Lands, Mineral Deposits, Coal and O
Lands and Timber Lands which are UNDEVELOPED.
We specialize in all these lines, also in investments in INSIDE BUSINESS PROPERTY
IN VANCOUVER
We  recommend  nothing  but  sound  invest
ments. Write us, or better still, call and se.^
us PERSONALLY
H. H. Stevens St Qo.
Brokers Notary Public
Fiscal Agents:
Portland Star Mines,
Texada Island Copper Co.
317 PENDER ST., WEST,
VANCOUVER, B. C.

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