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General Conference Daily Bulletin Aug 16, 1910

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Array (Beneral Conference Dairg bulletin
Devoted Specially to the Proceedings of the General Conference Session of the Methodist Church
Vol.
VICTORIA, B.C., AUGUST 16, 1910
No. 2.
The General Superintendent's Address to the General Conference, 1910
(Condensed  Report)
'Id the Ministerial and Pay Delegates of
the Annual Conferences of the Metho-
ference   Assembled :
Dearly Beloved Fathers and Brethren:
In the wonderful Providence of find,
our Heavenly Father, in the due succession of the years, at the appointed time,
in this city of Victoria, British Columbia,
we are gathered together in the fellowship of Christ and the unity of His Spirit
and His Church for the performance of
the duties required of a General Conference, the exercise of its functions and the
enjoyment of its privileges, Everyone oi
us should comprehend fully, and should
be deeply impressed with the consideration of, what is demanded of him in this
capacity and relationship. In the first
place, we are the servants of the ever-
living and unchangeable God, infinite in
wisdom, love and power. Were we not
called to present and vigorous action, the
consideration of that statement and meditation upon it in all its bearings might
easily absorb all the time allotted for our
Conference. While we may not abide in
the quiet and fruitful mysticism of such
a meditation, we certainly need all the
moral and spiritual force we might
gather from it, from such communion
with Cod, and such exercise of faith,
prayer and holy consecration as the most
earnest service of our Father, Cod, implies.   We must do our work as constant-
Rev.   Ephraim   Evans,   D.D.,   Senior
Member of the Pioneer Band of
Missionaries to B. C.
ly in the light of God, faithfully as the
profoundest gratitude and clearest intelligence might call for at our hands. And
wc must do it in the light of the full and
unfailing sense of our constant dependence upon the guidance and assistance of
His ever blessed Ho.lv Spirit; so working
in Him, to Him and for Him, our work
shall not be in vain in the Lord.
Then we have a constituency of this
world, which also we must serve according to the mind and will of God. The
Church is the army of the living God,
fighting His battles in an enemy's country, for the faith as delivered to the saints
and for the rightful sovereignty of the
King of Kings. Surely we are sadly at
fault if we mar or neglect the efficiency
of its battalions, or the success of its
operations. If we are not some way/:
vitally connected with the Church, clearly identified with its movements, and
deeply interested in its prosperity, we
have no business here. The heathen,
even the most benighted of them, are
within the provision and operations of
the Kingdom of God, the pillar and
ground of the truth. They have all the
moral and spiritual advantages of Nature in themselves and in the universe
about them; yet they seldom make headway in religious knowledge or life. They
rather sink into ignorance, immorality
and spiritual death, as the history of the
nations  clearly  demonstrates.     But  the
Rev. Ebenezer and Mrs.  Robson
Dr.  Robson  was actually the first of  the  group  to land
the only survivi >r.
C.  and  i-
Church of God is founded on the revelation.of God in Jesus Christ, superadded;
to the light of Nature, and is instinct with
divine life and power. The Church is a
quickened, organized, supernaturally,
and for its purpose omnipotently,
aggressive energy, directed, supplied and
sustained from heaven for the moral and
spiritual conquest of the world. We repeat the Church is the army of the,living
God, warring to establish the Kingdom
of His Christ. But the weapons oi our
warfare are not carnal, but mighty
through Cod to the pulling down of
strongholds. In the interest of this
Church of God have we conic together
to atke counsel, to form our nlans. to
look after our defences, to guard and increase our resources, and to push on our
campaign. The words of the covenant
and vow of the minister in the solemn
admonition and pledge of ordination may
not be unsuitable to any of us in this
hour: "Have always printed in your remembrance bow great a treasure is committed to your charge. If it shall happen
the Church or any member thereoi do
take any hurt or hindrance by reason of
your negligence, ye know the greatness
of the fault, and also the fearful punishment that will ensue." .And may the
Spirit of Christ give unto everyone of
us, and to us all collectively, the needed
wisdom and strength for the deliberations and decisions of this Conference.
During the quadrennitim now closing,
brethren faithful, honored and beloved,
members of our last General Conference
and of the Connexional officiary, have
entered into their rest—Rev. Dr. Charles
II. Paisley and Rev. William Dobson,
lohit  Potts,  William  II.  Withrow, Alex
ander Sutherland. T. <!. Williams, S. ('.
Stone and David Winter.
Other names, renowned predecsors
precious, in our memory, shine out upon the Honor Poll of the .living years;
but we may not linger. We can only entwine the laurel and press on in the
mar,ch. As God bath appointed and the
prophets have foretold, multitudes of ardent youth are aroused by the supernatural voice, and with hearts touched are
responding to the call of our Heavenly
Father in Mis love for the human race.
They crowd college halls for safe and
sound instruction and true doctrines in
the things relating to Christ and our Holy
Religion—and what else amid the multiform errors of earth should their education supply? This glorious chivalry
of the youthful cohorts of our Christian
faith, our souls delight in. Stranger
events than the tumbling walls of Jericho,
and wider opportunities than Jonah's
mission are to their band. The doors of
the nations are open. Earth's broad expanses of sea and land lie free and limitless before them. What have they to do
but go up and possess for God and His
Church? Purer doctrine, sounder and
safer instruction or more effective ministrations than our fathers, our young
men coming on will not, cannot have.
Through widening fields they may come
into greater privileges ami grander opportunities. But these will onlj lay on
them the weightier obligation for increased diligence and vigilance and closer
walk with < rod.
As  I  consider these things   I  have  but
one anxiety concerning our Methodism,
It is that we be saved from worldliness
and spiritual sloth and indifference and
all their consequences in every form,
shape, measure and degree. Herein, possibly, is our greatest present danger; we
are becoming wealthy, and may casilv
lose   the   vigor   and   tension   of   spiritual
Rev. Enoch Wood, D.D.,
Who   as   General   Secretary   of   Missions,     sent     out     the     Pioneer
Missionaries to B.  C. in 1859
life and the voice and lone of aggressive
evangelism. We have time for vain
jangling and oppositions of science,
falsely so called. It is very easy to
slacken up our push ami pace: be satisfied with our attainments and sink into
the la]) of formalism and naturalism and
of worldly comfort and ease. At such
times ami under such conditions novel-
tie- are preached for the well-proven doctrines of converting grace and sanctifying power, 'fbe eye of the Church is
dimmed and her arm is paralyzed. There
is no strength in her movements, or victory in her march. Even good men are
dazzled with tin- glitter of theories, and
befooled with empty -peculation. The
grey solidity and stern simplicity of the
truth have no charms for their intoxicated understanding, 'fbe tendency, current and force in the spiritual life of our
humanity, left to itself, is ever downward
and not upward, as some do vainly and
erroneously teach. They build up conjecture, assumption and human art and
device to our utter undoing. This is
heathenism: this and this alone in the
Christian and Biblical ethnology explains the paganism of the nations. This
lias happened to the Church again and
again in her history, ami our Methodist
Church has no covenant of security, no
bond of exemption in this regard. ( 'ur
only hope, as it is our certain duty, is our
consecration to faithful evangelism at
home and to the extension of mission
work abroad in  constant  and  full  devo-
Rev.  Edward  White  of  the  Pioneer
Band of Missionaries to B. C.
Rev. Arthur Browning,   Junior   Member of the Pioneer Missionaries
of B. C.
tion to the doctrines of divine revelation
as the} are taught in the Holy Scriptures.
The quadrennium just closing has been
one of remarkable activity in several directions in our /ion. Our last General
Conference, prompted by faith and courage, undertook great things in the name
of the Lord Jesus, and at least some wonderful things, through His Spirit, have
been   accomplished.
Attendant upon the growth of the
growth ^i the Church and the multiplication, enlargement and improvement of
our institutions has been the remarkable
increase of the liberality of our people in
their financial contributions to the maintenance of the work. On the one side
as an effect of the blessed operation of
divine grace upon the heart and in the
movements of the Church, and on the
other side as both a cause and occasion
of the Church's progress, this increasing
liberality affords abundant reason for
gratitude to God. and for commendation
of the benefactors.
The four years just closing have been
characterized by several remarkable
movements and activities in our Church
life. The Laymen's Missionary Movement, the Adult Bible Class Movement,
the expansion and increased intensity of
the Student Volunteer Movement, the
compacter organization of the Sunday
Schools for mission work and the cooperation of the Woman's Missionary
(Continued on Page 4)
I
I < GENERAL CONFERENCE  DAILY BULLETIN
(Seneral Conference ©ail?
Bulletin
Devoted specially to the Proceedings
of   the   General   Conference   of
The    Methodist    Church.
August,   1910.
JOHN   P.   HICKS
Editor
APPRECIATION
Rev. J. P. Hicks,
Editor General Conference
Daily Bulletin.
Dear Mr. Hicks:
Allow me to congratulate you most
heartily on your enterprise in undertaking the publication of a daily paper
during the sessions of General Conference, and on the splendid success
of your number. The scheme of issuing a General Conference daily is indeed a courageous one, but it is one
in the carrying out of which I feel
sure you will earn the gratitude, not
only of the Conference but of a large
section of the Church as well. That
you may have the hearty support and
encouragement in this enterprise that
you deserve will be the wish of many
appreciative readers of the opening
number of the General Conference
Daily Bulletin.
I  am cordially yours,
W. B. CREIGHTON.
NOTES
The Toronto tandem team of Sabbath School speakers at the Conference Church travelled in good style
and won many complimentary words
frov the youngsters and their older
friends assembled.
The overflowing crowds on Sunday
night was a line tribute to Dr. Cleaver's popularity in the church where
he became famous fourteen or fifteen
years ago.
Dr. Stephenson, tin- missionary
genius of the General Conference, is
impressing the imagination of tin-
delegates and creating a missionary
atmosphere by the interesting exhibit
in the schoolroom.
The Premier of the Province of
British Columbia. Hon. Richard McBride, has evinced a deep interest in
the coming of the General Conference to Victoria and it will be a delight to all the delegates to hear his
words of welcome today.
COMMENTS FROM GALLERY
A splendid body of men! with a
splendid purpose and a splendid opportunity.
The enthusiasm of some of the
brethren sometimes overreaches the
bounds of propriety. One brother
was on the floor twenty-live times
in an hour and a half of the first
morning session. We were led to
wonder what would have happened if
he had not been there. If every
member had tried to talk as much as
he we could hardly imagine when a
General Conference composed of 400
members and over would get home
again.
There was quite a number of the
fair sex looking down upon the Conference from the nailery.
Dr. Griffin, the genial Treasurer of
the Superannuation Fund, who so vigorously opposed the coming of the
Conference to Victoria on account of
the heavy expense involved, moved a
resolution of further expenditure to
provide each delegate with a writing
pad.    Generous and genial Dr. Griffin.
Quite a sensation was created when
it was learned that no stop-over would
be allowed to delegates west of Port
Arthur when making the return journey. "Not even J4 hours in Vancouver." said a delegate from Calgary.
The Business Committee are endeavoring to arrange otherwise.
The General Superintendent has
still his decision, conciseness and control as in days gone by. Quick in
powers of discernment, precise in
judgment, he is not found to lack
alertness even by the Judges and
Crown Attorneys who have eyes peering about for legal technicalities.
"What about expenses?" remarked
a Layman from the East. "Some of
us are from Newfoundland and have
had to live on the train for days.
Some of us have stopped off along the
way at Winnipeg and Banff and we
would like to know about these expenses?" "We'll attend to that." said
Dr. Griffin, with a smile as he mentally pulled in the purse strings of
the General  Conference Fund.
The RillctiiiR Committee, under
Rev. A. E. Roberts, is doing its best
to entertain the Conference, but finds
the task a heavy one. because so
many friends have taken advantage
of the opportunity to come West.
Rut they are all welcome! and will
find a genial host in the beautiful
city of Victoria.
The accommodations arranged for
the delegates in and about the Conference Church are meeting with the
hearty approval of the delegates on
every hand.
Following the Roll Call, the election of Secretary was then proceeded
with. It was first moved that a ballot be cast for the re-election of the
present Secretary. T. A. Moore, D.D.
This was nol satisfactory to a large
number of the Conference and a general ballot was called for. The result
of the ballot was found to elect Rev.
T. A. Moore. D.D., by 127 votes out
of a total ballol of -'-7- Other names
suggested wiri- those of G. \\. Kir-
by, B.A., I. W. Conley, A. Brown,
B.A . A.  I fills.  B.D., and  others.
The Conference boundaries were
now fixed as the floor below and
visitors were asked to take the gallery, the chairman remarking that it
waV belter '.1 go above than to go
below. Considerable discussion arose
over the admission of returned tnis-
lionaries as corresponding members
of the Conference The Chairman
declared emphatically that while a
motion to this effect was not out of
order it wa> at least Unconstitutional
and that a representative body such
a- the C'i inference was, was also a
legislative body, and that the action
now proposed was liable to open the
door of the Conference surprisingly
wide. It was finally arranged that
these returned missionaries be given
corresponding privileges in the Missionary Committee and the motion to
constitute them corresponding privileges in the Conference was withdrawn by the mover, Dr. Rankin. The
courtesies of the platform were then
extended to the fraternal delegates
from the Rritish Wesleyan and the
Irish  Conference.
The report of the Agenda Committee was then presented and after
a few minor amendments was
adopted.
A Business Committee was appointed. This committee will manage the
financial arrangements of the Conference and only on their approval
and recommendation can delegates
be excused from attendance. Delegates must also declare their attendance before their expenses shall be
paid.
Chronology of Constitutional Changes
and other Historical Events, leading to the Present Position of The
Methodist   Church.
1703—John  Wesley born.
1738—John Wesley converted.
1739— first  Methodist Class formed.
1744—First Methodist Conference
held; number of ministers, 10.
176S—Commencement of Methodism
in America by Lawrence Cough-
Ian, in  New foundland.
1766—First Methodist Class formed
in the Colonies, which afterwards
became the United States.
1784—Organization of the M. !■'.
Church of the U. S. Coke ordained by Wesley, as Superintendent or  Bishop.
1786—First Session of the Eastern
Rritish American Conference;
number of ministers, 6; Church
membership, 510. The conference under the supervision of
bishops Coke and Asbury, of the
M. E. Church, U.S.
1791—Year of Wesley's death. . W.
Losee appointed by the N. V.
Conference of the M. E. Church
of the U. S. to Canada. Firsl
Class in Upper Canada formed at
Adolphustown. First Class in
New Brunswick formed at St.
John.
1797—Organization of the New Connexion Methodist Church in
England.
1799—Withdrawal of American Methodist Ministers from the Lower
Provinces, and severance of connection between the E. B. A.
Conference and the M. E. Church
of the  U.  S.
1817—Wesleyan Methodist Ministers
sent into Upper and Lower Canada, by the Wesleyan Methodist
Missionary Committee of London.
1820 Agreement made between the
British Conference and the General Conference of Ihe M. E.
Church of the U. S., that Lower
Canada should be occupied by
the former, and Upper Canada by
the latter.
1824—First Session of the Upper Canada Conference of the M. E.
Church of the U. S.. held at
Hallo well (now Picton); Bishops
George and Hcdding presiding;
number  of ministers  present, 36.
1828—The Upper Canada Conference
separated amicably from the M.
E. Church of the U. S., and formed an independent organization
with General and Annual Conferences. No bishop, however, was
ever ordained.
1833—The M. E. Church of Upper
Canada, became affiliated to the
W. M. Conference of England,
as the W. M. Church of Canada.
1834—Opponents of the said Union,
continued the organization of the
M. E. Church.
1837—First Methodist New Connexion Missionaries sent into Canada.
1841—Union between the W. M. Conference of Canada and the W.
M. Conference of England, reformed and continued till  1874.
1854—The W. M. Missionary District
of Lower Canada (which was not
included in the Union of 1833 or
of 1848) united with the W. M.
Church   of   Canada.
1874—The W. M. Church of Canada,
the W. M. Church of Eastern
Rritish   America,   and   the   New-
Connexion Methodist Church of
Canada, separated amicably from
the two parent bodies in England, and formed "The Methodist  Church  of  Canada."
1K7K—Second Session of the General
Conference held in Montreal;
number of delegates, 230.
1833—Union of the Methodist Church
.11 Canada. The M. E Church
of Canada, flu- Bible Christian
Church and the Primitive Mcth
oilist Church, forming "The
Methodist Church," including at
present 12 Annual Conferences in
the Dominion and Newfoundland.
1902—The General Conference in session at Winnipeg, proposed negotiation! for the union of the
Methodist, Presbyterian and Congregational   Churches.
1905—-The joint Committee of these
Churches met in Toronto, and
agreed on a proposed doctrinal
basis of Union and an outline of
points for consideration as to
polity,  ministry,  institutions,  etc.
1906—The General Conference meets
in Montreal. Sept. 12th, with 150
clerical and 150 lay Delegates,
being one clerical and one lay
Delegate  for  every   12  Ministers.
1910—The General Conference meets
Aug. 14th in Victoria, R.C., with
160 clerical and 160 lay Delegates.
0*
AGENDA
Wednesday  Morning,  Aug.   17th
Meeting of Committees: Groups A,
B, C, D.
Wednesday Afternoon, Aug. 17th
Opening exercises.
Routine Business as per Rules of
Order.
Reception of Deputation from Bible
Society.
Reception of Deputation from
Lord's Day Alliance.
Reports of Committees.
Miscellaneous.
Report of Business Committee.
Wednesday   Evening,   Aug.   17th
The Conference, by invitation of
the Government of British Columbia,
to attend the Reception to the Right
Honorable Sir Wilfrid Lauder, G.C.
M.G., P.C., Premier of Canada.
Thursday  Morning,  Aug.  18th
Meeting of Committees: Groups
A,  B, C, D.
Thursday Afternoon, Aug. 18th
Opening exercises.
Routine Business.
Reports of Committees.
Miscellaneous.
Report  of  business   Committee.
Thursday  Evening,  Aug.  18th
Meeting of Committees:
Group A, 8 to 9.
Group B, 9 to 10.
Friday Afternoon, Aug. 19th
Opening exercises.
Routine   Business.
Reports of Committees.
Miscellaneous.
Report  of   Business  Committee.
4.30—Meeting of Eastern Conference Delegation re Supernumerary
Fund.     (Par.   486.)
4.30—Meeting of Western Conference Delegation re Superannuation
Fund.    (Par. 426.)
Friday Evening, Aug. 19th
Meeting of Committees:
Group A, 8 to 9.
Group R. 9 to 10.
Saturday Morning, Aug. 20th
Meeting of Committees:—Groups
A, B, C, I).
Saturday Afternoon, Aug. 20th
Opening exercises.
Routine Business.
Reports  of  Committees.
Miscellaneous.
Report of Business Committee.
Recommendations  of Agenda
Committee
I Vide  page   57,   Agenda)
1. That all Reports of Roards,
Committees, etc. together with the
Memorials, Resolutions and Notices
of Motions, as printed or tabulated in
the Agenda, be referred to the Committees of the General Conference as
herein indicated.
2. That a typewriter shall be under the direction of the Secretary of
Conference. The Minutes and all Reports of Committees to be typed in
quadruplicate.
3. That, instead of a written Journal, there shall be kept on file the
Minutes of Sessions as confirmed,
and reports of Committees as adopted. Also, the pages of the printed
Journal shall be printed two to a
page, on ledger paper, and these
hound in a loose leaf ledger shall
form the official and permanent journal of the Conference.
4. That Rules of Order (Appendix
VI. of the Discipline) be amended:
(a) No. 4 be amended by adding
the following: Unless otherwise directed, the Report of a Committee
shall be read by its Secretary, and
its adoption moved (unless he disagrees with it) by the Chairman, who
shall also give such information regarding it as may be required.
(b) No. 34 be repealed.
(3) That   the   Rules   of  Order.
hereby   amended,   be   the   Rules
Order of the General Conference.
T. ALBERT MOORE, Secretary.
A. CARMAN. Chairman.
as
of
^:
Victoria, B.C., Aug. 16, 1910.
To the
Delegates and Friends
Methodist Conference, 1910
Gentlemen:
RE OURSELVES
The Island Investment Company, Limited, was
organized principally for the purpose of assisting
in the development of Victoria City and the vast
resources of Vancouver Island as well as points
on the Mainland.
During the last six months the Company has
shown very marked increase as regards Capital,
Earnings and Assets, which are as follows:—
Subscribed   Capital   (approximate)   $200,000.00,
an increase of $75,000.00.    Assets are now over
the quarter million mark, an increase of nearly
$100,000.00.
The Company has been most successful and
has paid its shareholders large dividends from
the date of its inception;  in fact the Company
has been such a good dividend payer that old
shareholders have been steadily increasing their
holdings.
The Capital is nearly all local and amongst the
shareholders are many prominent business men
of this city.    Our Directors have been required to
purchase $5,000 worth of stock in order to
qualify them for the position.
The foregoing facts should be a guarantee of
the progressiveness of the Company.
We have for sale some of the best dividend-
paying stocks offered in the Province with the
best of security.   We also have Victoria City
residential and business lots for sale, Vancouver
City lots which are handled through our
Vancouver Branch, 431 Homer Street.   We also
have Timber lands, farms in the Bulkley Valley
along the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific ranging
from half a mile to three and one-half miles from
the main line of the Railway, which we can
dispose of in quarter sections, up to 8,000 acres
in a single tract.    Owing to the great possibilities
of this valley from a mineral and agricultural
standpoint we cannot too highly recommend an
investigation into these lands, further particulars
of which will be given in later issues of this paper.
There is one thing which we would request
of you and it is that you make a thorough
investigation as to the personel of the management
of this Company and satisfy yourselves as to
our reliability before making investments elsewhere.
We intend that the Island Development Company,
Limited, shall always maintain clean business
principles.    We aim at making the Company a
medium through which a large amount of Eastern
and Foreign capital may be safely invested in
Vancouver Island and Mainland.
There is one thing that the management of
the Island Investment  Company, Limited, are
convinced of, and it is that it has in it the making
of one of the most promising Financial Institutions
in Western Canada.   W erefer you to the
Merchants Bank of Canada.
Yours faithfully,
ISLAND  INVESTMENT  COMPANY,
(Limited)
D. C. REID, President.
i GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
Keep Up with the
General Conference
Business
And keep informed
with Methodism in
the West by Subscribing for the
General Conference Daily
Bulletin
and the
Western Methodist
Recorder
VISIT OUR STALL AT THE
CONFERENCE CHURCH
It will pay you to call on
Lome C.
Kyle
337 Hastings St. W.,
Vancouver, B.C.,
when looking for
Good
and
Safe
Investments
SEEING   VANCOUVER
The Observation Car leaves corner of Granville
anil Robson streets at °3() a.m., 2 and 4 p.m.—a
pleasant trip of two hours through the city.
Interurban  carl  have  hourly  for  SteveStOn,     See
tin- fishing ileet and the canneries
Interurban     can     have     ball hourly     for     New
Westminster.
SEEING VICTORIA
Tin- Sight-Seeing Car leaves corner of Govern
un-nt  and  Yates streets ai  9.1S a.m. and 2.1? p.m.
daily.
A  THREE   HOURS   RIDE
FARE—ROUND TRIP—50c
itopi over si Oak Bay, The Gorge and Esquimalt, giving time to visit this,  beautiful pi
ENLIGHTENING—ENJOYABLE—INSTRUCTIVE
BRITISH COLUMBIA ELECTRIC RAILWAY CO., Limited
Money Makers, Nos. 2 and 3
120 feet 'in Alma St.    Price  $31^75
If** rl
'                              Terms—One-tbird cash, balance (1 and  12
months.
!                          Two Lots mi 15th Ave.    Street i< 132 ft. wide.
Street car will pass those lots.   You missed
|                          the last one, why miss this?
THE MAPLE LEAF REAL ESTATE EXGHAN6E
JAMES H. CRAIG, President
1150 Granville Street
Office, cor. Maple and Sixth Ave.         Phones 2242 and 4123
Ideal
Investments
First Mortgage Loans on
Improved City Property in
\ ancouver yield from 6 to 8
per cent. We have made
this department a special
feature of our business for
the pasl 18 years and are in
a position to place money
for clients with absolute
security. Collection of interest and principal undertaken.
('. irrespondence  solicited.
). }. Banfield
607   Hastings St. W.,
VANCOUVER,      -     B.C.
Editor's Notice:
For the benefit of our Visitors, We hope to
keep this Space filled from day to day with
interesting facts concerning the City of Vancouver and its Surroundings, a City which in many
respects is one of the most remarkable developments of the West*
16 acres with a varying quality of soil from sandy loam
to black loam: five acres
cleared, about up fruit trees,
cleared; fruit trees; 6-room
bouse; small barns: medium
clearing for balance; on
good road about two hundred yards from G. \. K.
station at ( )ttcr.
Price $3,000
(lood terms arranged.
McLeod
Mark & <2o
403 Pender Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
740 Columbia Street,
NEW  WESTMINSTER
DO NOT
Beaver Oil Stock Advanced from 10 Cents
to 15 Cents per Share, Par Value, $1.00
We gave notice they would advance at a certain date, and those who
did not buy are now sorry.
However, we have allotted 20,000 shares more, at 15 cents per share,
and buy now before we raise the price, which surely will result very
soon.
Evidence of Oil strata and already Oil gas being encountered, justify
advancing prices to 20 cents or 25 cents per share.
However, our Board decided placing a small allottment at 15 cents
per share to give intending purchasers the privilege to buy at that price
before advancing them to the 20 or 25 cents. Do not hesitate if you
wish to secure shares at 15 cents.
Our Company holds about 4,000 acres of Oil land, and when Oil is
struck our stock will soar to phenominal figures.
The well is now nearing 900 feet in depth, and expect encouraging
reports in the near future.
loir further particulars, or shares, apply to the following:
A. D. Paterson, 570 Granville St.   R. D. Rorison & Son, 786 Granville St.   P. LeFeurve, 2141 Granville St.
E. W. Leeson, 329 Pender Street West.       T. J. Beatty, 317 Pender Street West.
• GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY  BULLETIN
GENERAL   SUPERINTENDENT'S
ADDRESS TO THE GENERAL
CONFERENCE, igio
(Continued from Page n
Society therein, the widening of the
scope hi iHir Miir.il Kef..rin enterprises, their gratifying success and the
efficiency of their active secretariate,
the appointment of additional force
for Sunday Schools and Epworth
Leagui - in their educational ami ag
gressivi agencies, and the extension
of the field anil enlargement of the
operations of our Missionary Superintendents, all indicate the inflowing
of a mighty tide of energy and pur-
pose as concerning the establishment
nf tin- Kingdom of God in the world.
It i- as when the heaving ocean rolls
in upon ihe continents, filling ihe harbors, lifting the navies, and pouring
its floods far up tin- bays anil rivers.
As these advances «'ill be fully reported upon by the respective departments, I need not inter into particulars. The niis-.inn.iry reports will
show that in our growth in the West-
em Conferences it has been thought
necessary year by year to seek for
candidates for our ministry in Great
Britain and Ireland that the needs of
our opening domain be met. This
must lay the burden of a heavy responsibility upon our Church leaders
in that domain rej,rardiiiK education,
organization and happy adaptation to
the vanls of a growing country. Our
Newfoundland Conference also has
and presents its problems, Rapidly,
it seems, is it becoming the case that
young men are brought in from the
mother lands, abide but a few years
for training in the Ancient Colony,
and then move westward. These
facts look forcefully toward the need
of strengthening our General Super-
intendency, the better to preserve our
unity.
Gratifying instances of large-heart-
edncss and open-handedness of
brethren and friends in their outlook
over the Church and country cheer
on and sustain the toilers. Princely
donations and bequests honour the
name of the living and hallow the
memory of the dead. Nothing but
keenest appreciation and sincerest
gratitude on the part of all concerned
is a suitable recognition of these
faithful, loving thoughts and deeds.
All honour to the men wdiose bounties uphold and enlarge our institutions, so long as it is not done at the
sacrifice of the Church's honour and
with the ieopardy of her highest interests. It is truly a pity that any
reflection or consideration should
mar so inspiring a scene. Yet danger
lurks even here. The masses of men
easily lose self-reliance, and sag and
sink into shameful dependence.
Tt seems at times necessary to recall the words of John Wesley, the
originating spirit of our Methodism,
that we are to beware lest we make
rich men a necessity to us and in a
way to our ecclesiastical movements.
The money power is a tremendous
power, and even in the hands of well-
meaning men it may be misdirected.
There is a possibility that such men
count their money as their own, and
in a way almost unconsciously to
themselves become self-opinionated
and self-willed. There is an insi-
diousness and a deceitfulness in this
sin as well as in any other. More
than once in the history of the Church
this money power has checked its
progress and involved it in shame and
at least temporary defeat. And it is
defeat in any way to becloud or color
the light that should shine clear and
strong from the pulpit. Tf is positively sad defeat to turn the edge or
darken the gleam of the Sword of
the Spirit, which is the Word nf God.
"We pay for it. and we will have it,"
is no argument here. Rich men must
be listened to like Other men in the
Church nf God. However desirable
I heir counsel and their aid. they
must, ceteris paribus, be taken as the
counsel and tlu- aid of other men.
Their decisions and measures must
be judged by the Standards that determine the merit of the decisions and
measures of poorer men in the House
of the Lord.
T read with surprise and reerct in
the report of the Hoard of Regents
of Victoria University, as penned presumably by the learned Chancellor,
among many most encouraging statements, a strong plea for increase in
the professional staff, particularly in
philosophy, psychology and kindred
subjects; that the positions of personality and its relations in instruction
be clearly defined and firmly held.
Here. I apprehend, is the root of the
whole trouble; and it is satisfactory
to know that the Chancellor has his
eye upon it. He evidently detects
the deflection and the sagging which
forever deflect further and sag more
dangerously as they take in the soak-
age from Naturalism. Rationalism
and incipient heathenism unless toned
up. braced up by adequate conceptions
of God and man. Personality! Cloudless, flawless ideas of personality! The
Personality of God! The personality
of each and every man! This and
this alone is the basis of sound
ethics! This, with what it implies.
is the indestructible foundation of
pure and true Religion.    A right and
complete, a full-orbed personality, immanent and transcendent  and  free;  in
natural law and in miracles adjusting
many a conflict Without il. as apprehended by the common mind.
according to the will of (ind. can be
no conviction nf sin or conversion.
Even a secular college ought i" teach
and maintain thi- moral, ethical and
civil personality if ii would build and
fortify the Commonwealth A religious and theological college that
do< - not hold it aloft as in tin- light
■ f noonday and proclaim it and the
spiritual personality and what it in-
volvea as from the mountain tops is
a perversion and i failure, if,nut ■
snare. Personality .in its absolute
unity and accountability, Its intelligence, conscience, freed, mi. feeling
and will  is the clamp,  the clasp of
Steel that must keep all lines of investigation and knowledge in full
stretch and each in its ,,wn place.
Through it must pass the physical
and the metaphysical, the scientific
and the pholosophic. the rational and
spiritual, the moral and religious.
The clasp must hold or the strings
slacken, dangle and fall into confusion, This is heathenism or far on
the road to it. This is precisely what
Paul meant of the heathen world
when he said: "When they knew God
they glorified him not as God, neither
were thankful; but became vain in
their imaginations and their foolish
heart was darkened. God gave them
over to a reprobate mind to do the
things that are not convenient. On
the Godward side personality means
creation, revelation, inspiration, authority, superhuman act, miracle; on
man's side it is regeneration, adoration, obedience, reason, faith. This
we should hold if we drop everything
else to hold it. or give up the pretence of university education. You
will see I am decidedly with our
Chancellor in stiffening up the conception and clarifying the idea of the
personality of God and man in the instruction of the colleges. And I
think we could find half a dozen
Methodist superannuates who could
and would do it.
There is no science without basal
principles; and God is the principle
of principles. There is no philosophy
without reason and consciousness; and
the rational consciousness—supra or
sub.—is the warp and woof, the very
fibre and substance of our spiritual
and personal unity, our moral liberty
and accountability to God and man,
the essential basis of both religion
and capstone of the sciences and philosophy. Failing to lead us to this,
they so far fail utterly. Yes, the
Chancellor is right: we must maintain personality and the keenest sense
and fullest consequences of it in our
colleges or go out of this business.
Better drop other professoriates and
do this one thing. Tf we want Pantheism, it is of high order in Buddhism. Tf we want rules of life. Confucianism is full of them, and so was
the ancient Polytheism. If we want
speculation and chimera. German Rationalism and Scottish Idealism
abound in them. Rut if we'want soul,
nation and race saving Religion and
morals we must hold to the personality of God and man as taught in
the Revelation of God, and its full
acceptance by man.
Union of Churches
The question of Church Union, important beyond all estimate, must
come before the Conference and be
considered by it in all earnestness
and seriousness.
We want no questionable foundations, no devious bypaths, no uncertain, unsteady steps. Tn prayer and
faith and obedience we must have a
clear vision, and be strong and well
assured in the way of our going.
Whether Union comes or not, there
must be much anxiety and labour. Tf
Union comes who can tell the immensity of the responsibility? How
many differences to reconcile! How
many problems to solve! I low many
intricacies and perplexities In unravel I
What opportunities for distraction,
contention and strife! Truly nothing
but the love of God that passeth
knowledge and the peace of God that
passeth all understanding, the Spirit
of Wisdom, of power and of a sound
mind is sufficient for these things.
The history of barbarism is the history of clans and tribes, of feuds and
strifes, of chieftains and conflicts. The
Christian history has been a history
of the formation of governments and
councils, of kingdoms and empires, of
churches and commonwealths, of the
humanization and Christianization of
men. Possibly we do better to follow on.
General Superintendency
Tt may be well to consider the relation of the General Superintendency
to our work. On this subject T may
now speak the more freely, as the
personal equation does not count. No
doubt the Church Union Movement
has its bearing on any proposition
made regarding it. Rut, union or no
union, we arc in duty bound in this
Conference to do the best practicable
thing for the Methodist Church, and
so in the aggregate and end for all
the churches, separate or joined together, as may in the good providence
of our God be determined. Said
union,   even   if   accomplished   in   our
time, may be deferred yet for years;
and 1 do not think ue or our people
should withhold our hands, slacken
our pace, or take or omit any important step tn our damage and loss out
nf deference In the contemplated
union. We certainly will do nothing
to impede, retard nr prevent it; but
We as certainly will not weaken ourselves by wailing fur it nr adapting
our course to its yet problematical
requirements. We will do as our
brethren nf the other churches are
doing Keep our -ails in full stretch
to tin- airs of heaven, that when we
all enter, there may be abundant entrance.    We cannot meet our obliga
timis tn God and ihe people by acting
otherwise concerning it.   We an- nol
yet by any means prepared tn cmi
stimulate the union. We are not yet
reaily In desist and declare that agitation regarding it cease. Hut we must
ever be ready lo maintain our Church
in its efficiency. So we may give due
attention to our economy and the
place of the General Superintendency
in it. J am persuaded some balance-
wheels and possibly some directive
and motor equipment could be introduced into our economy tn advantage.
In some regards our centrifugal forces
are stronger than the centripetal; and
there are those who say that in other
regards quite the opposite is the case.
Such a machinery may easily get out
of shape, and gear binding too snugly on sonic bearings and playing
loosely on others. This, of course,
means irregular and ineffective motion. There is often a loss of power.
Such a condition might well be expected in arrangements made on certain considerations and under certain
circumstances in 1S83-4, when now a
quarter of a century afterward the
environment has very much changed,
and the amount of material to be
handled, of work to be done, has so
greatly increased. The marvel is that
we have done so well.
I know for a fact, and it cannot
have escaped the notice of others,
that our Methodism suffers time and
again, and if often, as compared with
others, put to disadvantage in social
civil and public relationships, and especially in a time like this, in great
popular, patriotic, interdenominational, benevolent and religiously educational movements. To cite a single
instance from scores. A man cannot
well maintain the place and dignity
of his Church in a great public function in Canada and simultaneously
attend the session of a Missionary
Commission in New York or North
Carolina. The matter of public
functions and of duties and relations
10 the whole people of the Dominion
or the Empire, may, in the eyes of
some, be of little or no importance,
lint in my humble opinion our Canadian Methodism owes it to itself and
to Canada and to the world at large
to provide for its public and even
national relationships. Some of our
needs could he, in a measure, met by
a lengthened term of Presidency; but
not all. Were the General Superintendency made stronger it might, under proper regulations, organize about
itself an effective evangelism. This
is strongly called for by several of
our Departments. The increase of
all the Secretariates is at once an indication and a proof that something
is here required. 1 sec many potent
reasons why this subject should engage the serious consideration of the
Conference, and why some of the evident needs of our condition and work
should be met by the provisions here
suggested, or on some wiser plan.
Among the Presbyterians the annual
meeting of their General Assembly
accomplishes much that cannot be expected of our Quadrennial General
Conference and their expenses in this
regard arc greater than ours. In my
humble opinion there should be at
least two effective men in our General Superintendency, both for counsel and action.
Other matters referred to in the
address of the General Superintendent were: Ecumenical Conference;
The Laymen's Missionary Movement;
Financial Scheme; Church Courts;
Supervision nf Records; The W. M.
S. Memorial; Course of Study; Ex-
officio; Licentiates of Conference and
Mission Board; Employed by Chairmen of Districts; Missionary Superintendents; Ladies' Aid Societies; Interim Stationing Committee; Stewards
and Trustees in Uniting and Dividing
Circuits; Choirs; Codification, Revision, etc.; Horse Keep; Missionary
Subscriptions and Superannuation
Fund, and General Superintendent.
Ms?" R Pointer
Buy Real Estate and buy it in
VICTORIA
Let us tell you why—
TRACKSELL  ANDERSON  &   CO.
Opposite   Colonist   Office.
Ground Floor—1210 Broad  St.
Opp. Colonist Office.
Delegates and Visitors to
the General Conference
Are specially invited to call and see our splendid assortment
of Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, including Ladies' Waists,
Whitewear, Corsets, Underwear, Gloves, Ribbons, Laces,
Smallwares, Hankerchiefs, Neckwear, Parasols, Umbrellas,
English and Scotch Wool Blankets, Comforters, Sheetings,
Pillows, Linens, Curtains, etc., etc.
GOOD HOSIERY OUR SPECIALTY
Our Cash System of buying and selling enables 11s to give
the best possible qualities at the lowest possible prices.
ALL GOODS ARE MARKED IN PLAIN FIGURES
AND ONE PRICE TO EVERYBODY
Robinson's Cash Store
J. E. ANDREWS, MANAGER
Phone 2190 - - 642 Yates Street
Opposite Kin"; Edward Hotel
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LUMBER  LONGEST  HER
Is sent out first. And you can 1
sure It has been here long enouf
to be thoroughly dried and sei
soned. Kver had any experlem
With tfreen lumber? If not, dor
hanker after it. Take th. exper
ence of others and use only ti
seasoned kind, the only lumbi
we  sell.
JAS. LEIGH & SONS,
PLEASANT   STREET
PHONE  392
VICTORIA, B.
lip Fiem Soon Lite Co.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Successors to J. A. Sayward
Shall be pleased  to receive your  inquiries for all  kinds  of
rough and dressed lumber; also sash, doors and interior finish.
All kinds of fruit boxes and crates constantly on hand.
B. C. Timber Dealers
Ask for our pamphlet giving general information re B.
C. Timber.
We employ our own cruisers and guarantee estimates.
Western Finance Co., Limited
(Robertson Bros.)
Lumber Exch. Building, Broughton St. W., Victoria, B.C. GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
DEAVILLE
SONS & CO.
Family
Grocers, Etc.
FLOUR
FEED
FRUIT
And a  full   supply of high
class goods always on hand.
HILLSIDE    AVE.    AND
ROSE ST.,
Phone 324   -   Victoria, B.C.
Proper
Clothes
For
Men
In all the new fine
styles at
$15 to $30
Fitzpatrick &
O'Connell
811-813   Government  Street
Opp. P. O.
"You'll like our Clothes"
(Reg.)
To
The
Strangers
Within
Our
Gates
"The Last Stand"
BUY   NOW   AND   GROW   RICH
PRICES   ARE   LOW
TAXES  ARE  LIGHT
The demand is great and is ever increasing.    In many  instances  tbe   increase  has  been
over one hundred per cent, per year.  Information gladly given.
Hillis Timber & Trading Co., Limited
LUMBER EXCHANGE BUILDING VICTORIA, B. C.
VICTORIA AS A CITY OF PUBLIC SPIRIT
The Capital City of British Columbia has
a quality of public spirit which only needs
to be aroused in a good cause to show its
mettle. When its people decided on a building for the'Y.M.C.A. which should be an
honor to the Association and the City, there
was no lack of initiative and enthusiasm to
bring about the desired result.
( )nce started, the movement never lagged.
It was a lesson to all faint-hearts, and a
crushing rebuke to the cynicism of "Mr.
Worldly Wise-man." From-ten, to twenty.
to fifty, to seventy, and to one hundred
thousand dollar- the monetary tide rose, and
the edifice is already under construction.
The Y.M.C.A. building in Victoria is going to bo more than a home for the Association and an addition to the beauty of the
Capital. .It is a monument to Progress and
humanity, a land-mark on the highway of
civilization, an example of Public Spirit
roused to rightful action.
Xot only ihe wails and columns showing
the structure itself; not merely the inner
decorations and attractions; but the subtler
manifestations of the courage and devotion.
which, in the last analysis, were responsible
for it   all,   this   is   the   final   lesson   of   the
V. M. C. A. buildine.
We Illustrate Forthwith
the Famous "Burberry*'
Coat
THE
Moore
Whittington
Lumber Co.
LIMITED
VICTORIA, B.C.
Manufacturers   and
Dealers in
FIR, CEDAR
AND SPRUCE
LUMBER
LATHS AND
NO. 1 BRAND
HIGH GRADE
CEDAR SHINGLES
We   do   planing   mill   work
promptly  and  properly
SASH   DOORS  AND
MOULDINGS
SHIPMENT BY  RAIL
OR WATER
Phone Mill 298
Phone  Factory A750
ARE YOU INTERESTED
IN
California
Oil
Or do you want to know
anything about the most
profitable industrial business
in the world in spite of
trusts?
If so, while in Victoria get
"Questions and Answers on
California Oil" from
A.T.Frampton
Mahon Building
GOVERNMENT STREET
Company dividends for May
$1,326,626.00.
Dividends to date
S31.jS4.902.00.
(for which we are sole agents).    For sport, travel, town or
ccuntry, this coat affords incomparable qualities that lift it
far above the plane of conventional artistry.    We particularly want you to see them.
Inverness Capes
Another travelling garment and protector from inclement weather. We have these in splendid materials
and various weights.
Gloves
Genuine English Nappa Gloves, pique sewn, gusset between   lingers.     1 'er  pair goc
Maggioni, 2-button, glace kid, a really fine, dressy glove,
all shades.    Per pair $1.50
We offer you many exclusive novelties in Neckwear, Belts. Bags, etc.
'
*l
10 J 2 Government Street
Victoria, B. C. GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
General Conference Proceedings
Transcript  of  Minutes
SECOND  DAY
The   Ki^lith   General   Conference-  of
the Methodist Church assembled for
business in the Metropolitan Church,
Victoria, B.C., .it 9 o'clock a.m. on
Monday, 15th August, 1910, pursuant
tn the call of the General Conference
Special Committee, Rev. Allien Carman. D.D., General Superintendent,
President, in the chair,
The General Superintendent announced Hymn 1JI, the Secretary read
Psalm   ill. and  Rev.   L.  Curtis.  D.D.,
hi St. John, Newfoundland, and II.
L. Lovering, Esq., of Coldwater, On-
tario, led in prayer. Hymn [90 was
then sung. The Secretary read Kphe-
sians .}: 14—4: 16, and Rev. S. I'.
Rose, I i.lr. -I Toronto, and W. 11.
Lainbly. Inverness, Quebec, led in
prayer.
Rev. T. A. Moore, D.D.. the Secretary, presented the certified lists of
the delegates elected by the several
annual Conferences as members of the
General   Conference.
The roll of each Conference was
called in the following order:—Toronto. London, Hamilton, Hay of
Quinte, Montreal, Nova Scotia, New
Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.
Newfoundland. Manitoba. Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia,
when 1-'.? Ministers and 108 Laymen
answered to their names.
The following changes in the Conference delegations were reported by
the respective presidents of Conference.
Toronto  Conference
Dr. Sutherland, deceased; John
Locke tills vacancy.
J. Peppall resigned; J. R. L. Starr
fills  vacancy.
Joseph Tail resigned; Thomas
Kenugh   tills  vacancy.
London Conference
T. B. Shillington resigned; W. 11 ea-
man   fills   vacancy.
\V. II. Kerr resigned; John Joynt
fills   vacancy.
Bay of Quinte Conference
William Johnson resigned; \V. Sig-
gitt tills vacancy.
J. J. Mason resigned; M. A. James
tills vacancy.
Montreal Conference
G. F. Mckim resigned; S. Stevens
tills vacancy.
Nova Scotia  Conference
Rev. A. C. Borden resigned; C. E.
Crowell  tills vacancy.
J. T. Burchill resigned; W. S.
Whitman tills vacancy.
Saskatchewan Conference
B. I'. Richardson deceased; J. F.
Middlemiss fills vacancy.
The Conference proceeded to vote
for Secretary, and on first ballot Rev.
T. Albert '.Moore, D.D., Hamilton
Conference,  was  elected.
Moved by Rev. Dr. Young, seconded by Rev. Dr. Ryckman, that the
courtesies of the platform be extended to the fraternal delegates attending
the   Conference.—Carried.
The Secretary presented the report
of the Agenda Committee, pages 57
.ind 58 of the Agenda. Recommendations 1. -' and 3 were adopted. Recommendation 4 was amended on motion  of  X.  \V.   Rowell,  by  inserting
after the words "unless otherwise directed," the words, "by the Conference or committee reporting." Item
4. section "B," mi motion of Dr.
Burns, was referred lo Discipline
Committee, number 3 to be reported
upon  lo tlit—  Conference.
Supplementary report of the Agenda Committee;
Recommendation   No.   1—That  the
following be members of the business
committee: II. I'. Moore (convenor),
Hi Will,not. (i. W. Brown. Rev. A.
1-;. Roberts, Rev. Dr. Rankin, Rev.
Geo Steel, Ke-v. Dr. Shorey.—Carried.
Recommendation Xo. 2—That dele-
gates   In-   expected   to   attend   all   ses-
sions of Conference and committees,
except when excused by the Conference, on recommendation of the liusi-
ness Committee, and That delegates
be required to make a declaration as
to the number of days in attendance.
when expenses will be paid accordingly.—Carried.
On motion, the Secretary of Conference was instructed to correct the
addresses of members of the Conference in the printed journal.
Moved by Dr. Burns, seconded by
Dr. Hmcks. that the reserves take the
place of the principal delegates on the
various committees to which they
were appointed by the delegation and
that any other exchanges be made
afterwards.—Carried.
Moved by Rev. Dr. Sparling, seconded by A. M. Aikens, that a delegation may consider and recommend
any exchange- of delegate's on committees within its own delegation.—
Carried
Moved by W. R. Young, D.D.. and
seconded, that there must be a majority of the members of each committee present to form the quorum
for   organization.—Lost.
The Secretary of Conference announced that on page 44 of the Agenda the first four names of Laymen
on the Superannuation Fund Committee should be eliminated and the fol
lowing inserted:—R. C. Vaughan, H.
L. Lovering, Hon. E. J. Davis, C. H.
C.   Fortner.
On motion, the Secretary was instructed to obtain blank pads for the
u-e- of the- members of the Conference.
Moved by Dr. Inch, and seconded,
that the hours of session be- Irom
0 to [2.30, 8.3O to 5.30, and 8 to 10.—
Carried.
Moved  by   Rev.  J.   Burns,  seconded
by T. A. Moore, that the programme
of Conference as printed in the Agenda  be adopted.—Carried.
Moved by Dr. K. X. Burns and sec-
onded, that the committees in Groups
A and 11 meet for organization this
evening, and committees in Groups
C and D meet for organization tomorrow morning.
Moved in amendment by Dr. Hazel-
wood and seconded, that committees
in Group A meet for organization immediately. The amendment was
adopted and the motion as amended
was   adopted.
On motion the Conference adjourned at 12 o'clock, the benediction
being pronounced by Rev. W. S. Grif-
lin.   D.D.
THIRD SESSION
Conference resumed at 2.30 p.m.. the
General Superintendent. Rev. A. Carman,   D.D.,  in  the  chair.
Rev. T. C. Buchanan, of Alberta
Conference, conducted the devotional
exercises.
The minutes of the second session
were read and Confirmed.
A communication was received
from Mr. Brace. Secretary of the
Y.M.C.A., inviting Conference to be
present at stone laying tomorrow. Referred   to   Business   Committee.
On nomination of the Secretary, the
following were appointed assistant
secretaries: Rev. Benjamin Hills.
Nova Scotia; Rev. Gea. Kerby. Alberta; J. H. Carson, Montreal, and
Dr.   W.   E.   Wilmolt,   Toronto.
The following Memorials, etc., were
referred as indicated:
On Statistics, from General Conference Statistician, referred to Committee  on  Statistics.
On Deaconess Work, from General
Board, referred to Deaconess Committee.
On Missions, from Foreign Department, referred to Missionary Committee.
Mission Plant, etc., from Foreign
Department, referred to Missionary
Committee.
On Salaries of General Conference
Officers, from S. Cleaver and J. M.
Luke, referred to Notice of Motion
Committee.
On Calgary College Board of Governors, from Alberta Conference, referred to Special Committee on Education.
On Composition of Quarterly
Board, from Fred Mann, referred to
Discipline  Committee   Xo.   2,
On Residential Decision, from New
Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.
referred to Discipline Committee Xo.
3.
On Course of Study, from Students
of Victoria University, referred lo
Committee 011 Course of Study.
Re Church Union, from Xew Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, referred to Committee on Church
Union.
On Race Track Gambling, from P.
W. Andrews. Nova Scotia Conference,
referred to Committee on Moral Reform.
On Superannuation Fund Claim of
Rev. Thos. Crosby. D.D.. from B. C.
Conference, referred to Superannuation Committee.
On Superintendent of Mission, Nova Scotia Conference, from Rev. Arthur Rockin and W. A. Outerbridge,
referred to Committee on  Missions.
( )n Composition of Quarterly
Board. Chap. 3. page 104. Sec. 1. from
Fred. Mann, referred to Discipline
Committee Xo. 2.
On Financial Statement, from Theological College, Montreal, referred
to Committee on Education.
On Decisions on Question of Law-
re City Missions, from Hamilton Conference, referred to Discipline Committee Xo. 3.
On Selection of Candidates and
Course eif Study, from Faculty. Victoria College, referred to Committee
011  Course of Study.
On Decisions of President Nova
Scotia Conference, 1906-10. referred
to Discipline Committee Xo. 3.
On Local Preachers, etc.. referred
to Committee on Class Leaders and
Local  Preachers.
On President's Ruling, from D. W.
Snider, referred to Discipline Committee Xo. 3.
On Course of Studv. from Prof.
Bowles, referred to Committee on
Course of Study.
Mr. McCanns, referred to General
Conference Committee.
On Rulings, from President of Nova Scotia Conference, referred to
Discipline Committee XTo. 3.
On Rulings of Standing Committee
on  Local  Preachers, etc.
The Committees of Group A reported organizations as follows:
Course   of   Study—Chairman.   Rev.
Dr.   Warner;   Secretary,   Rev.   C.   E.
Bland.
Church Union — Chairman. Rev.
Chancellor IHirwash; Secretary, Rev.
J.   W.  Cooley.
Discipline Xo. 1—Chairman, Rev.
George Steel; Secretary, Edmund
Sweet.
General Conference — Chairman,
Rev.  J    E.   Mavety.
Fund and Finance—Secretary. A.
II.   Lambert.
Itinerary and Transfers—Chairman.
Rev. W. II. Sparling; Secretary, W.
E.  Hutchison.
Local Preachers. Class Leaders, and
other Lay Agencies—Chairman. R. E.
Vaughan;  Secretary,  Rev.   A.   Barner.
Missions—Chairman, Rev. W. K.
Young; Secretary, R, W. Clarke.
Business—Chairman, H. P. Moore;
Secretary.   Rev.   A.   E.   Roberts.
Statistics and Schedules—Chairman,
Rev. W. II. Dotchon; Secretary, W.
E.  Willmott.
Moved by Rev. S. P. Rose, D.D.,
and seconded by X. W. Rowell. K.C..
and Resolved: That the Committee 011
Missionary Work be requested tei
prepare for early submission to this
Conference a fitting resolution regarding the death of the Rev. Alex.
Sutherland, D.D.; that the Committee
on Education be requested to prepare
a similar resolution regarding the late
Rev. John Potts, D.D.. LL.D.; that
the Committee on Book Room and
Publishing Affairs be requested to
prepare a similar motion in reference
to the late Rev. W. H. Withrow,
D.D.; and that it be an instruction tf)
the Business Committee to determine
upon a time for the simultaneous
submission to Genera! Conference of
the  above  resolutions.—Carried.
Moved by Rev. R. X. Burns, D.D.,
seconded by Rev. J. C. Antliff, D.D.,
That the Conference on Civil Rights
and Privileges be asked to prepare
resolutions relating to the death of
King Edward the VII and the accession  of  King  George V.
The Secretary read the minutes of
the meeting of the General Conference  Special  Committee.
The General Superintendent presented his quadrennial address, after
which he led Ihe Conference in
prayer.
Moved by J. A. M. Aikens, K.C..
and seconded by Hon. Thos. Crawford. That those portions of the General Superintendent's address relating to the matters concerning which
standing committees have been appointed be referred respectively to
such committees, but that a special
committee be forthwith nominated by
the Nominating Committee to • consider and report upon the question of
the superintendency of the church,
and the propriety of appointing more
than one superintendent and in connection therewith the expediency or
desirability of having a general superintendent resident in Western Canada.
—Carried.
Moved by Rev. R. W. Young. D.D.,
seconded bv Thos. I". Harrison, that
ihe Special Committee on General
Superintendency, consist of seventeen
Laymen and seventeen Ministers.—
Carried.
Moved by Rev. T. B. Wilson, seconded by Wm. Gibson. That the-
Manitoba delegation recommend the
exchange of James Woodside. from
the Committee on Church Union to
the Committee on Itinerary and
Transfers and of Mr. J. A. M. Aikins
from the Committee on Itinerary and
Transfers to the Committee on
Church  Union.
On motion, it was decided that this
motion lay on the table until other
changes in membership of committees.
Moved by Prof. Frank Allan, seconded by Rev. J. C. Speer. D.D., that
the thanks of the Conference be
given the General Superintendent for
his address.—Carried, standing vote.
Rev. A. E. Roberts presented the
reoort of the Business Committee, as
follows:
The Business Committee organized.
electing; II. P. Moore chairman and
Rev. A. ]•". Roberts, secretary. The
following was recommended: That the
order for the day (T) Tuesday, Aug.
16th. be as follows: 3.30 p.m.. the
Ministerial Association, Rev. W. L.
Clay; 3.45, Civic Deputation. Mayor
Morlev; 4.00 p.m.. Hon. R. McRride.
Premier   of  the   Province.
(2) That on Wednesday, August
17th. tin- order of the day at 3 p.m.
be Ihe hearing of the fraternal delegates of the General Assembly of the
Presbyterian  Church.
W. E. WILMOTT.
Secretary pro tern.
After announcements the General
Conference adtoumed, the benediction
being pronounced bv Bro. Manning.
D.D. "
Strange Indeed
Miss     Ilomcleigh:     Perhaps you
won't believe it, but a strange man
tried  to kiss  me once.
Miss   Cutting:   Really!    Well, he'd
have been a strange man if he'd tried
to  kiss   you   twice!—Illustrated Bits.
From   Friend  Wife
Didn't some idiot propose to you
before  our  marriage?"
"Certainly!"
"Then you ought to have married
him."
"That's just what I did!"—Punch.
Very often the kindness we show.
Is nothing but the vanity we display.
IT might be of interest to you to learn
that this paper  is  printed  with  the
approbation of the  Presbyterian
Church (Old Kirk) at the corner Courtney
and Gordon streets.
You may do anything you wish provided you do not talk about it;
And talk about anything you wish provided you do not do it.
GIBSON
PHOTOS
ARE  Th|E  BEST
626 YATES STREET, COR. BROAD
Phone 2024
Get Your Conference
Bulletins Bound
Am Souvenir* of Your Trip
Before  Returning
Home
Orders taken at Recorder
Booth in  Church.
We arc headquarters for Gold
Lettering  on   Leather  Goods.
All Classes of Bookbinding
O.J. B.LANE
Book-binder mid Paper-ruler
614 COURTNEY  STREET
(Upstairs)
ere
ftvVV\.„\\|,i,«\W,W
Thomas Hooper
ARCHITECT
Specialist In Church Plans. l»c-
signed the General Conference
Church (Metropolitan Chure-li,
Victoria), also Centennial Methodist Church,
OFFICES:
Five Sisters Block, Victoria
Winch   Block,   Vancouver
Tha_sni™
range that's
Built on Honor.
of tin- best mill, TlolS-
Mallcablo and ehari-nal
Iron— tho   ranee   that's
known the -world over ai a
Perfect Baker—always uniform— air-tight   oven— Lined     ,
throughout with Pcub Abbcstos—
saves hall your fuel bill.
The Great and Grand
MAvJESTIC
Malleable and Charcoal Iron.
has a nnmborof exclusive features, each    fa
0110 adding to if •• dun Mlltvand practical H'-r.j, «-, niakinie the Majkntio the
best ruiiL-c y<»u can buy* reirardloss of
Frlce.   That1* whv fifteen other inanu-
uuturerB fry to Imitate it.
FOR  SALE BY
POWELL   &   CO.,
Government Street
Dame Burden's Tea Rooms
For
BREAKFASTS
LUNCH AND TEA
Home    made     Cakes     and
Sweets a Specialty
non
I Am Particular, Are You?
MY  ICE   CREAM   AND   SODAS
are the purest and most delieious
TERRY, Chemist
Cor. Fort and Douglas
THE SUN TYPEWRITER
Light, Strong and Durable
All Writing Absolutely Visible
The Sun is the Clergyman's ideal typewriter, and all who decide
to take one of them home will have a lasting and pleasant reminder
of the Convention and its associations. EVERY machine fully
guaranteed.
PRICE, COMPLETE—$50.00 TERMS ARRANGED
Call at our store and examine this  typewriter.
THOS.   PLIMLEY
1110 Government Street
Opposite Spencers' Store - -       - - Victoria, B.C. GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
THE  CENSUS  OF  CANADA   METHODISM
Report  of  the  Ceneral  Conference  Statistician
Showing the increase or decrease in  each   Annual   Conference   for  the
ear and  for the Quadrcnnium:—
Members,
Conference.               inclu. proba'f.
oronto      58,562
.nii.hm       50,623
j.i.n.lton        52.4KX
of Quinte       40,870
lo'ntreal     38,724
ova Scotia     16,184
few Brunswick & P.E.I..    14,487
'ewfoundland       13,634
lanitoba        17,080
ikatchewan      15,358
l.crta         10,0511
iritish Columbia        9,800
^Vst China Mission       1,625
ipan 	
19iu.
Total    340,091
821
8
636
119
14
471
46
307
1,049
1,093
7o4
680
5.424 net
Dec
554
inc.
5.41,1
210
1769
523
1.042
641
1,002
1,691
4,553
4.742
2,595
1,375
1906 loin.
Dec.
127
*3,103
22,374 net
♦Transferred to United  Methodist   Church  of Japan.
The  following is  a statement  of the increase in membership since the
lion of 1883 by Quadrenniums:
In 1883 the membership of the Uniting Churches was  169,803
The increase for the 3 years, 1884-1886     27,666
The increase for the 4 years, 1887-1890     36,399
The increase for the 4 years, 1891 1894     27,085
The increase for the 4 years, 1895-1898     19,584
The increase for the 4 years, 1899-1902     11,358
The increase for the 4 years, 1903-1900     25,822
The increase for the 4 years, 1907-1910     22,374
Total     340,091
Schedule  B  relates  to ministers and  lay officials.
1.    Ministers and probationers for the ministry,
he number for each  Annual  Conference is as follows:—
Ministers.    I'robat's.    Total.  Inc. for quad
Conferences.
Toronto    27.->
London    :  238
Hamilton      243
Bay of Quinte     173
Montreal
Nova Scotia 	
New Brunswick and P.E.I.
New foundland  	
Manitoba 	
Saskatchewan  	
Alberta	
British  Columbia   	
240
127
107
54
128
101
105
94
Total •    1,885
88
35
44
38
45
22
18
62
56
129
126
32
695
363
273
287
211
285
149
125
116
184
230
231
126
2,5.80
W the close of the Annual  Conference   of   1906  the   number  of
young men or promation for the ministry was	
The Conferences of 1907 admitted 	
The Conferences of 1908 admitted 	
The Conferences of 1909 admitted 	
The Conferences of 1910 admitted 	
Total
38
17
12
3
4
15
9
34
23
96
129
30
381 net
388
157
16P
146
179
.030
Glorious Kootenay
NELSON
The Capital and Centre
OF THE SCENIC AND COMMERCIAL ATTRACTIONS OF THE
DISTRICT WILL BE REMEMBERED BY THOSE WHO ATTENDED
THE CONFERENCE IN MAY LAST. THE VISITORS NOW IN
VICTORIA AT THE GENERAL CONFERENCE ARE CORDIALLY
INVITED TO RETURN TO THE EAST BY THE ARROW LAKES
AND THE CROW'S NEST PASS ROUTE AND TO STAY AT LEAST
ONE DAY AT NELSON IN PASSING.
Return Tickets Are Made A vailable for
This Without Extra Charge
See Jos. Patrick, The Nelson Delegate
or for further information write to        W
E. K. BEESTON,
Secretary Nelson Board of Trade
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S ADVANTAGES
BRITISH COLUMBIA is the Pacific Coast Province of Canada.
Area—395,000 square miles, or 252,800,000 acres.
Coast-line—7,000 miles.
Forest and Woodland—182.000,000 acres.
Population  (estimated)—280,000, exclusive of Asiatics.
The whole of British Columbia south of 52 degrees and east of tile Coast  Range
is a grazing country up to 3,500 feet, and a farming country up  to 2,500
feet, where irrigation is possible.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S trade has increased by overnineteen million dollars in four
years.
BRITISH COLUMBIA fisheries, one hundred and fourteen million dollars.
BRITISH COLUMBIA forests produce over twelve million dollars annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA has millions of acres of paper-making; material undeveloped.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   farms   and   orchards   produce-   over   eight   million   dollars
annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA has immense deposits of iron ore awaiting development.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S coal deposits are the most extensive in  the world.
The  Kootenay coalfields alone are capable m' yielding ten million tons of coal
a year for seven thousand years.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA'S area  of  standing timber  is  the- largest ami  most   compact
in America.
BRITISH COLUMBIA has over ten million acres of wheat lands.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  produces   over  two  million pounds  of  butter  annually,  and
imports over four million pounds.
BRITISH COLUMBIA imports over two million dollars' worth of eggs and poultry
annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA shipped over six thousand tons of fruit in 1908. and imported
fruit to the value of two hundred thousand dollars.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  fruits—apples,  pears,  plums,  cherries,  and  peaches—arc  the
finest in the world.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  fruit   has   won   ihe  highest  awards  at   exhibitions  in   Great
Britain, Eastern Canada, and the United States.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S net revenue is increasing at Ihe rate of one million dollars
annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S liabilities over assets are decreasing at the rate of over one
million dollars annually.
TO THE CAPITALIST—
The most profitable field for investment in the known world.
TO THE MANUFACTURER—
A great wealth of raw materials.
Unsurpassed shipping facilities.
Rapidly increasing markets at home and in the new Provinces of Saskatchewan
and Alberta, Mexico. Australia, and the Orient.
TO THE LUMBERMAN—
Millions of acres of the finest timber in the world.
An  ever increasing demand  for lumber at home ami abroad.
TO THE FISHERMAN—
Inexhaustible quantities of salmon, halibut, cod, herring, and other fish.
TO THE FRUIT GROWER—
Many   thousands  of acres  of land  producing  all  the  hardier   fruits,  as  well  as
peaches, grapes, apricots, melons, nuts. etc.
TO THE DAIRYMAN—
Splendid pasture and high prices for butter, milk, and cream.
TO THE WORKINGMAN—
Fair wages and a reasonable working day.
TO THE POULTRYMAN—
A cash Inline- market  fur poultry ami eggs at  hie; prices
TO THE FARMER—
Large- profits from mixed farming and vegetable-growing.
TO THE MINER—
Three hundred thousand square miles of unprospected mineral-bearing country.
TO THE SPORTSMAN—
An infinite variety of game animals, big and .small, game fishes and game birds.
TO THE TOURIST—'
Magnificent scenery.
Good hotels.
Well-equipped trains.
Palatial  steamships.
TO EVERYBODY—
A healthful climate.
I nspiring surroundings.
Golden opportunities in all walks of life.
Just law-s, well administered.
A   complete   modern   educational   system—free,   undenominationa1   primary   and
high schools.
All the conveniences of civilised life.
Health, peace, contentment, and happiness.
Information regarding B. C. and its Resources may be had by applying to the Bureau of Information, Victoria, B. C, or
the Agent General of B. C, Salisbury House, Finsbury Circus, London, England. GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
The Best Range
For Your
Kitchen
There is only ONE BEST
in anything — Ranges or
other Kitchen Apparatus—
and we want to demonstrate
to you that for this Province
—using Soft Coal—
THE OXFORD
CHANCELLOR
is by far the LEADER IN
RANGES.
Ask
The
Drake   Hardware
Co.
YATES STREET
THE
W. H. Malkin Go.
LIMITED
Wholesale Grocers and
Specialists in Teas and
Coffees
57 WATER STREET
VANCOUVER
Packers of
"VICTORIA CROSS"
brand in all lines.
Ask your Grocer for
Victoria Cross Tea
Brown  Berries  Coffee
Daddy's Coffee
Everybody's Tea
Deckajulie Tea
OCEAN PARK
The property comprising this subdivision
consists of the point of perhaps the most beautiful promintory in British Columbia. The
land itself on its seaward frontage, sweeping
in a semi-circle from the southeast corner of
the land to the northwest corner, rises from
the beach in a beautiful cliff formation of from
seventy-five to one hundred and fifty feet in
height. Around the foot of this rise the new
main line of the Great Northern runs, over the
rails of which it is also expected the Northern
Pacific will run its trains.
The Beach
From Blaine on the east to Blackies' Spit on
the north there runs one of the finest beaches
in British Columbia.
Eastward toward Blaine the tide leaves a
beach nearly a mile in width. Immediately
south of the property deep water is reached
in about from one to three hundred yards.
West of the property a sand beach is left by
the receding tide, extending fully three miles
from high water mark.
The sands are of a firm character. The
water coming in over the heated sands on a
summer evening resembles an artificially heated bath rendering bathing ideal and safe.
The Project
It is proposed to make this property, naturally so well situated for the purpose, into a
residential park on the Chataqua principal.
This is the first attempt to meet the demand
for a rallying place for Christian societies in
their conventions and summer schools, and
cannot be duplicated for beauty and surrounding conveniences, of grounds and accessibility
to all the Coast and Sound cities and towns.
In order to improve the property, erect a
pavilion, and beautify the park, fifty per cent,
of the proceeds of the sale price of the lots has
been donated by the original holders, together
with a further donation by one of the promoters of ten thousand dollars.
They have already transferred their full
rights and titles to trustees, who have covenanted to hold the same in trust for the purpose for which it is intended.
The property has been subdivided, according to the plan shown in the folder, into two
parks for recreation and pavilion purposes,
together with suitable streets and 50-foot residential lots.
Proper safeguards have been made to prevent the alienation of any portion of this property from the purposes as set forth above.
For further information consult:
Ocean Park Ass n
329 Pender St., W
Phone 6015
=OR,
Rev* R* F* Stillman 1875 venule* St., Vancouver
THIS SPACE IS  RESERVED FOR
LEESON, DICKIE & GROSS
Wholesale Merchants    -    Vancouver
We Welcome
You
to British Columbia
We know you will enjoy
every minute of your stay
and should you like it well
enough to remain here,
would  suggest a visit to a
GURNEY-OXFORD
AGENT
and inspect the splendid
KITCHEN RANGES made
at our Factory in Toronto,
especially for this Province,
or at our Show-room.
The
Gurney Foundry
Co., Limited
566-570 Beatty Street,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Residence Telephone 122
Office Telephone 557
Lewis Hall
Doctor Dental Surgery
JEWEL BLOCK
Cor. Yates and Douglas Street:
VICTORIA, B.C.
Investments
IN  B.  C.  ARE   DEMANDING  WIDESPREAD ATTENTION IN ENGLAND, U. S. AND
EASTERN  CANADA
WHY?
Because we have a vast area of Agricultural Lands, Fruit Lands, Mineral Deposits, Coal and Oil
Lands and Timber Lands which are UNDEVELOPED.
We specialize in all these lines, also in investments in INSIDE BUSINESS PROPERTY
IN VANCOUVFR
We   recommend  nothing  but  sound  investments.  Write us, or better still, call and see
us PERSONALLY
H. H. Stevens & Qo.
Brokers Notary Public
Fiscal Agents:
Portland Star Mines,
Texada Island Copper Co.
317 PENDER ST., WEST,
VANCOUVER, B. e

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