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General Conference Daily Bulletin Aug 15, 1910

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 General Conference XDail£ ^Bulletin
Devoted Specially to the Proceedings of the General Conference Session of the Methodist Church;
Vol. I.
VICTORIA, B. C, AUGUST 15, 1910
No. 1.
British Columbia Welcomes the General Conference
THE PREMIER'S  KIND WORDS
Prime Minister's Office.
Dear Mr. Hicks:
May I extend through you, as Editor of the
"Conference Daily Bulletin," a most hearty
welcome to British Columbia to the General
Superintendent and Members of the General
Conference of the Methodist Church in
Canada.
We, in the far West, are deeply sensible of
the great compliment paid our Province
through the selection of Victoria as your
quadrennial meeting place. May success in
the fullest measure result from the deliberations of the Convention.
Most sincerely,
RICHARD McBRIDE.
August 12,  1910.
Hon. Richard McBride. Premier of  British Columbia
Rev.   Dr.   Carmen,   General   Superintendent
i
s
Parliament   Buildings,  Victoria,   B.C.
s> j.. M GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
General Conference Dail\>
^Bulletin
Devoted specially to the Proceedings
of   the   General   Conference   of
The    Methodist    Church.
August,   1910.
THE PASTOR'S GREETING
JOHN  P.   HICKS
Editor
Words of Welcome
The General Conference Daily
Bulletin was undertaken as a special
compliment to the General Conference in appreciation of its session being held for the first time in Rritish
Columbia, and its editors are anxious at
once to extend the heartiest welcome
to all our visitors. We have much
in B. C. of which we are proud, both
in natural scenery and material
wealth and hope our guests may find
time to take at least a hasty run
round to many parts of the province.
Vancouver Island is rich in natural
resources and beauty and the mainland is equally so, offering most alluring inducements for residence and
investment; it will be well worth
while for a visitor to sec as much as
possible of all  these things.
As to the "Bulletin" we understand
we are history makers in being the
pioneer of Methodist dailies, as far
as Canada is concerned, even the
General Conference never having had
such a journal before. We are proud
of this. We have not found it a light
undertaking, but it is characteristic
of the West to assume ambitious responsibilities and generally to make
them succeed. The success of this
venture financially is largely due to
its hearty appreciation by our business men, who applauded it as
"splendid Western enterprise" that
would impress our visitors and call
most favourable attention to the province. We are anxious now to learn
what the delegates themselves think
of us. We intend from day to day
to follow closely the line of the
Minutes in our reports, carefully condensing everything, so as to make
the record as complete as possible
for the entire session. The Bulletin
will thus be a valued companion of the
delegates, and a work of reference
when the Conference has passed into
history.
If this appeals to the reader as
worthy of commendation and encouragement he will perhaps express his
good-will by subscribing -for the fourteen issues for himself and for some
friend at home who would like to
know how Conference is going. The
subscription is only SO cents, which
includes postage to any address.
Leave your subscription with our
agent in constant attendance at the
Church—at the Daily Bulletin and
Methodist Recorder stall—and the
pleasure  will be mutual.
As pastor of the General Conference Church it is a pleasure to welcome on behalf of our congregation
the delegates and friends who have
come, in many cases, great distances
to attend the quadrennial parliament
of the  Methodist Church
We feel honoured in receiving Unrepresentative-, of Methodism to this
the mother church of the province.
We hope yon will find our beautiful
building convenient and comfortable.
We extend to you the freedom of the
Metropolitan Church. We pray that
the divine presence and blessing may
A PIONEER'S WELCOME
2S35 Second Ave. West,
Vancouver,  Aug.  9,  1910.
Dear  Bro.  Hicks:
As a pioneer of the pioneers I
would extend to the members of the
General Conference, one and all, a
most hearty welcome to our glorious
province of the West. I am glad f
live to see the day of this great gathering which 1 feel sure will give a
real and very special impetus to the
work committed to us in this wonderful land.
My own mind goes back to the
District Meeting long ago when I
was ordained in the old Pandora St.
Church by Dr. Punshon. What a
benediction his visit and that of his
associates in travel was to us in that
early day! Tt is with joy and gratitude to the God of all grace that I
recall the revivals of the intervening
forty-nine years, as witnessed on the
Chilliwack, in the erstwhile bar-room
in Victoria, among the tribes of the
North away up into Alaska and far
in the Interior. Thousands of souls
have been saved and hundreds are already safe in heaven, and I believe
we are on the way to greater things
yet. May Divine Wisdom direct this
Conference in all things. Serious
questions will be up—Church Union,
ihe revision of our hymn book, the
admission of our sisters to our
higher church courts. I shall watch
all these with prayerful interest. But
above all in its far-reaching consequences will be the shaping of our
plans for doing our part in evangelizing the world, in bringing back the
lost  to  their  Father's   House.
With  kindly  greetings   to  all.
Yours in  Christ,
THOS.CROSBY.
Rev. T. E. Holling, B.A.
richly rest upon the various services
and meetings held here, and that a
deepening of the spiritual life and
a quickening of interest in the activities and enterprises of the whole
Church may be the result of your
coming together.
Although your time and attention
will be largely taken up with the
work of the Conference, we trust
you will find the social life of our
homes congenial, and that the fellowships there formed may be very
pleasant and helpful to you and to us.
We hope you will reach your homes
in safety, and 'hat you will carry
away memories of the General Conference in Victoria of the most pleasant character.
(2)  Returning from   Esquimalt   ish
for a transfer to the Gorge Park and
you will visit again a piece of lovely
and enchanting scenery, and incidentally, be within a short distance of the
old building—(now known as the
CraigHower Schoolhouse, but formerly a Hudson Bay trading point) —
where Dr. Kbcnc/.er RobsOn, our beloved  pioneer,  preached   bit  lirst   .-.er-
inou in   British Columbia,
i.ii Returning from the Gorge take
your   car   to   Oak   Bay,   a   beautiful
suburb, whence a line view may mi
any char day be had of famous Mt.
Baker, ami 01 San Juan I-land, where
the international boundary line strikes
and the little spot which, through
two men quarrelling about a pig, almost precipitated a war between Britain and the United States, about fifty
years  ago.
(4) Returning from here (you will
hardly be able to do it all in one
day, though), run out to Beacon Hill
anil gee our exquisite little Park,
and from there feast your aesthetic
eves on the glories well-nigh un-
qualled of the Olympic  Range.
(5) We have, of course, in so
young a country comparatively feu-
public buildings of great interest, but
we are at least proud of our Parliament Buildings and when seeing
them be sure to take time to go
through our Provincial Museum,
when you will find more interesting
things characteristic of this province
than  you  are  apt  to  expect.
(6) If you find time to run out of
the city a few miles you may enjoy
the most delightful auto ride you ever
had, or you might be equally happy
in taking the E. & N. train to points
up the Island—Coldstream, Shawni-
gan, Duncans, Ladysmith, and Xanai-
mo. Or take the Victoria & Sidney
line to Sidney and spend a day on
a little steamer among the islands.
There are numerous other places easily accessible that your hosts will be
able to readily mention, a visit to any
of which may add a little to the
pleasure  of  your  stay  in  our  city.
THE   GENERAL    SUPERINTENDENT'S STIRRING APPEAL
TO B. C.
(Reprinted from the Jubilee  Number
of Western  Methodist  Recorder)
t
Lift up your heads, O ye majestic
mountains, symbols of the wealth and
power and glory of our noble Province of British Columbia. Let the
mountain  of the  House  of the  Lord
The Conventicn Church
SEEING THE CITY—AND
SUBURBS
We all want our visitors to enjoy
themselves and see what they can of
the city. But a stranger is, of course
handicapped, not knowing either what
there is to see or how to get to sec-
it. In view of this we offer a few
suggestions,—"free, gratis and all for
nothing."
First, you may obtain all kinds of
literature respecting Victoria and
Vancouver Island from The Vancouver
Island Development League or from
the Provincial Government Bureau of
Information, at the Parliament Buildings, free of cost. The Provincial
Government in this laudable direction
have spent during the past few
years tens of thousands of dollars
in gathering, classifying, compiling
and publishing such information, and
whose officials are courtesy itself in
their attention to visitors.
But apart from this, on "the short
order plan," so to speak, you would
be interested in a good many things
or places which may be mentioned.
For example:
(1) If you take the car at the corner of Government and Yates Street
and run out to Esquimalt you may
get a peep at the Drydock, possibly
the Naval Yard and certain features
of the fortifications, also a view of
Esquimalt Harbour, one of the finest
in the world and one destined to take,
perhaps, in the not distant future, a
foremost place in the affairs of the
world. In making this trip and looking seaward you will see the entrance
to Victoria Harbour, also the Work-
Point Barracks and some magnificent
scenery beyond it.
be established in the top of the mountains and exalted above the hills. Let
your mighty seas roar and the fulness thereof. Let your Hoods clap
their hands, and the hills be joyful
together before the Lord. British
Columbia is on the highway of the
nations. It sits at the concourse of
the people. Who in the latter days
shall so well call to the tribes of men:
"Come and let us go up to the' mountain of the Lord and to the house of
the God of Jacob; and He will teach
us of His ways, and we will walk in
his paths."
Mountains of wealth in the mines
and the soil and the seas; mountains
of political power in the incoming
multitudes and the maintenance of
just government by a lofty statesmanship in freedom and righteousness;
mountains of social beauty and excellency in the purity of the people and
the safety, strength and joy of the
homes; mountains of industrial thrift
and progress in the contentment and
prosperity of the inhabitants, the
growth of the cities and the stability
of the nation; mountains of civil
authority in parliaments and courts,
in equal law and faithful administration; mountains of knowledge and
widespread intelligence, of science
and art; mountains of morality and
religion in mighty churches, in
blessed fraternities and philanthropies
and faithful Christian service; what
has Methodism in British Columbia
done toward all this sublime attainment? What shall this JuJbilee of
Methodism contribute to so triumphant and glorious an issue? Come, ye
consecrated  men  and  women  of  the
(Continued on Page 7)
VICTORIA, B.C., AUG. 15, 1910.
To the
Delegates and Friends
Methodist Conference
Gentlemen:
We wish to convey to the visiting delegates
and friends of the Methodist Conference a very,
very hearty welcome to Victoria City and
Vancouver Island.
No doubt this will have been for many of you
your first visit to our City and Province, and we
believe that, while you may not have the privilege
of visiting outside points on the Island and
Mainland of British Columbia, that you will
leave Victoria very much impressed with the
future possibilities of the City as a tourist and
residential City.    Those of you who have seen
something of the fastness of this Island must
realize that the immense natural resources are
greater than even the most sanguine could
imagine.    You will see that in order to take
advantage of the immense timber growth, minerals,
fisheries, etc., that capital is required, and it is
our intention to endeavour to show in these
columns from day to day a series of investments
that will be of interest to anyone desirous of laying
up a competency for the proverbial "rainy day."
We are well posted on the possibilities of
British Columbia as a place for the investment of
capital, and we invite you to call at our office,
Bank of Montreal Chambers, where information
with regard to any point in British Columbia will
be cheerfully given.    We have on hand the class
of investment suitable to the small man, and to
the wealthy, which offer first class security with
liberal returns.   We trust that you will make our
office a depot for information during your visit here.
Yours faithfully,
ISLAND  INVESTMENT  COMPANY,
(Limited)
D. C. REID, President.
^ GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
Keep Up with the
General Conference
Business
And keep informed
wiili Methodism in
the West by Subscribing tor tlie
General Conference Daily
Bulletin
and the
Western Methodist
Recorder
VISIT OUR STALL AT THE
CONFERENCE CHURCH
It will pay you to call on
Lome C.
Kyle
337 Hastings St. W.,
Vancouver, B.C.,
when looking for
Good
and
Safe
Investments
Vancouver, B.S.
The only way to see Vancouver and vicinity
is by the Street Railway system.
Don't fail to take the Observation Car or a
ride on the various City or lntertirban lines.
Victoria, B.e.
To see this beautiful city get aboard the
Sight-Seeing Car.
A THREE HOURS' RIDE
FARE, ROUND TRIP—50c
Car   lea\es   corner   Government   and   Yates
Streets at u.15 a.m. and 2.15 p.m. daily.
ENLIGHTENING—ENJOYABLE—INSTRUCTIVE
BRITISH COLUMBIA ELECTRIC RAILWAY CO., Limited
Watch This Space for Money Makers
WE ARE VANCOUVER REAL ESTATE
SPECIALISTS
i                         Money  Maker  No.   1—<>o  ft.,  close  to   Alma
Street.     Trice  . .$2,500
Terms—One-third   cash,    balance   6   and    12
months.
THE MAPLE LEAF REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE
JAMES H. CRAIG, President
1150 Granville Street
Office, cor. Maple and Sixth Ave.         Phones 2242 and 4123
Editor's Notice:
For the benefit of our Visitors, We hope to
keep this Space filled from day to day with
interesting facts concerning the City of Vancouver and its Surroundings, a City which in many
respects is one of the most remarkable developments of the West*
Ideal
Investments
First Mortgage Loans on
Improved City Property in
Vancouver yield from 6 to X
per cent. We have made
thi>   department   a   special
feature of our business for
the past \H years and are in
a position to place money
for clients with absolute
security. Collection of interest and principal undertaken.
Correspondence  solicited.
J. J. Banfield
607   Hastings St. W.,
VANCOUVER,      -      B. C.
Are
You
Thinkinq
Of securing a piece of our
Fraser River Valley Fruit
and Poultry Land, or are
you interested in Rental-
Bearing Properties?
If so, watch this space
daily during Conference
Session.
McLeod
Mark & Co
403 Pender Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
740 Columbia Street,
NEW   WESTMINSTER
DO NOT
Beaver Oil Stock Advanced from 10 Cents
to 15 Cents per Share, Par Value, $1.00
We gave notice they would advance at a certain date, and those who
did not buy are now sorry.
However, we have allotted 20,000 shares more, at 15 cents per share,
and buy now before we raise the price, which surely will result very
soon.
Evidence of Oil strata and already Oil gas being encountered, justify
advancing prices to 20 cents or 25 cents per share.
However, our Board decided placing a small allottment at 15 cents
per share to give intending purchasers the privilege to buy at that price
before advancing them to the 20 or 25 cents. Do not hesitate if you
wish to secure shares at 15 cents.
Our Company holds about 4,000 acres of Oil land, and when Oil is
struck our stock will soar to phenominal figures.
The well is now nearing 900 feet in depth, and expect encouraging
reports in the near future.
For further particulars, or shares, apply to the following:
A. D. Paterson, 570 Granville St.   R. D. Rorison & Son, 786 Granville St.   P. LeFeurve, 2141 Granville St.
E. W. Leeson, 329 Pender Street West.       T. J. Beatty, 317 Pender Street West. GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
General Conference Opened
Impressive Services in Metropolitan Church Yesterday
—Sermons by Rev. Henry Haigh of England
and Rev. Dr. Solomon Cleaver, Toronto
The opening Mrvicei of the Gen
eral Conference commenced in the
Metropolitan Church with the Love
Pcast .it 9.30, conducted by Rev.
Principal Sparling, D.D., of Wesley
College, Winnipeg. It wm ■ service
of great power and old-time ipjritual
fervor, and irai participated in by
numeroui membera of the Conference
and Methodisti of the city.
The   service   ot   public   worship   at
11 o'clock found every available leal
occupied. Rev. A. Carman. D.D., the
General Superintendent, was in charge
and offered the opening prayer.
The choir sang the very appropriate
anthem, How Lovely are the -Messengers." Rev. T. E. Holling, B.A.,
the pastor, announced the responsive
reading, Ps. 8, and Rev. T. Albert
Moore. D.D., Secretary of the General Conference, read the New Testament lesson, Mark 8: 22-38.
British Delegate's Sermon
Rev. Henry Haigh, the fraternal
delegate from the British Wesleyan
Conference, was the preacher. I lis
discourse was a forceful, clear-cut,
heart-to-heart discussion of the character and work of John the Baptist,
a lucid and impressive delineating of
and appeal for religious genuineness.
The text was Matt. 3: 12, "Biography is the Heart of History," said
Mr. Haigh. "We will study briefly
this morning the biography of John
the Baptist." He retired into the wilderness, which act had a deep significance. It was a break from the
popular and absorbing occupations.
The religion of the day was ritualistic: was clothed with respectability.
but was unclean and heartless It
meant the determined and rigorous
effort to curb and master his own
body, and to drink in the deep things
to his soul. He went forth into the
wilderness with a desire for God. It
was a spiritual retreat.
"What came of it? He went into
the wilderness a priest; he came out
a prophet. A priest studies rules;
a prophet demands a clean heart. He
sought to have done with empty
ceremonies, and to talk face to face
with God. He came forth a man
inspired. He was a strong, reverent,
helpful man. He was a man who had
been alone with God, and he feared
none.
"Our study of this subject brings
out three principal thoughts:
"1. Our Lord's interpretation of
John. What did it mean? That John
was not a man who pandered after
popularity. He was no reed shaken
with the wind. He was a pillar four
square. He was not a man whose
popularity depended upon any adventitious circumstances. Our Lord says
he was a prophet, a forth teller, who
had the power to tell (he message,
clear-eyed, pure souled, burning with
desire to overthrow the evil that was
in the world. Ordinary ambition had
no place with him. His message to
his age was all he thought of.
Put a man of that sort in the pulpit and you have a man whose whole
being is thrilled with his message, one
who will always have an audience.
His soul is gripped by a great principle; he is fired with God and will
always be listened to. They may
snear: they may kill, but they cannot
ignore him. We need men of thai
sort in our political life, whose truth
and righteousness are paramount—
men who have forgotten themselves
because of the ardor of their message.
"2. What was his message? 'Repent ye, for the kingdom of heaven
is at hand ' The Jews wanted a king'
dom in which the hated Roman rule
would be at an end. They wanted a
kingdom in which the Jews would
be glorified, but John tells them the
kingdom is a spiritual one, born in
love, universal, democratic—aristocratic too—which no one can enter except by birth from above. All who
take their place in this kingdom must
be true servants of the Lord Jesus.
Religious genuineness must be theirs.'
Repent ye! turn around, become men.
There is no message greater today
than religious genuineness.
"Every man among you," said the
preacher, addressing the members of
the Conference, "stands for a great
principle. Is the thing I preach the
thing T live by? Is the thing I
support equal to truth's secret demands. We must train ourselves for
public work by private prayer and
meditation. The cry which should
ring through this great dominion in
this age is the cry for religious reality. Show what the Christ life is
and men   will follow.
"3. His own life was directed and
shaped by his own teaching. He was
trying  to  differentiate   between   con
vention, cl   and   traditional   religion*.
Tli.it winch may be historically false.
Vccordina to all canoni ' am a Meth
. but have 1 a Methodist heart?
I),, i icek to have all true holinesi
nf heart?    But  there if a larger name
than  Methodist.    1  am a  Christian,
which is to ihOW and imitate the life
,,i  Christ.    He lived a  life of rapt
communion  with the  lather       He WMS
a ni.,,1 of self denial, of lleepleiS phil •
anthropy.   What do we know of this
qualification?
"John's life was in full accord with
the'principles he preached, lie was a
man of grand speech and glowing tire.
■> esterday men followed him; now
men are suddenly turning from him
aid Allowing Christ. 'He must increase,  1  must decrease.'
"His genuineness was tested in the
presence of Herod. With outright-
ness of unswerving integrity he weir
to Herod and charged hi with his
sin. Some say the res .. was a
failure. Nol Was the work of Him
who went to Calvary cross a failure?
No! He was a victor and a victor's
crown awaits  his brow.
Let us look into our own hearts
and listen to John the Baptist's cry
when he said: 'Repent ye, for the
kingdom of heaven is at hand.' May
we all he within what we seem to be
without."
THE GENERAL SECRETARY
Any man with the slightest experience with similar undertakings will
realize what a vast amount of work
has been involved in the preparation
of the "Agenda 1910" of the General
Conference. It is a book of 235 pages
packed full of classified information,
and arranged so carefully that it must
greatly expedite the business of the
sessions. There are ten pages of
Memorials (about 250 in all) which
have been sorted out and referred to
their proper place, beside endless
tables, reports and suggestions. The
work  has  been  done  almost   entirely
various exercises    by    Drs.    Heartz,
Sprague   and   others,   and   then   followed an eloquent
Sermon by Dr. Solomon Cleaver.
Before announcing his text Dr.
Cleaver spoke of his delight in meeting the Metropolitan congregation
once more and of revisiting Victoria.
He then choose for his text. Kzek.
47: 1, and preached a delightful and
able discourse on the prophet's vis
ion of the  waters.
Following his well known style the
speaker first graphically described the
vision and then turned to its significance. Some of the lessons intended
were, he said, hard to understand, but
many stood out clear and unmistakable.'    What   was  the   significance  of
the stream? All interpreters agreed
that it symbolized the kingdom of
Christ or Christ Himself as the fountain of life. He is the water of life.
We might gather the lessons by looking at the stream in its Origin, its
Direction and its Destiny.
1. Its Origin—it issued from under
ihe House of God. i.e., the ideas of
strength and firmness. This is the
foundation of the church. Men at
times build on other foundations—
on good music, good building, or
good scholarship, but no church was
God's church whose source was not
the House of God. Another fact was
that the water issued not from the
back of the House or any part but
the threshold of the door. So Christ
was the door by which all must enter
life. But in the midst of the stream
was a swamp. Surely this was some
mistake! No, it was there to mar the
picture, but the very marring pointed
an important truth. What was the
cause of a swamp? It was the selfishness of the soil in trying to keep
for itself alone the moisture it received. It was so in the church when
men sought religion only for personal
comfort and happiness there was a
spiritual swamp. The speaker by apt
and homely illustration illumined this
point as well as all parts of his sermon and remarked that swamps could
be cured. He then proceeded to
speak of
(2) The Direction of the Stream
and its Destiny. It went east. Why?
Because that was desert when the
water was needed. Thus Christ
comes to those who need, and thus
He sends us into the world. Perhaps there was another reason why it
went eastward and not westward, because west meant Sunset and east
meant Sunrise. Christianity looks always to a greater dawn and not to a
closing day.
Speaking of the Destiny of thq
stream, Dr. Cleaver alluded to the
measurements of a 1,000 cubits and
said they might signify years. He
then pointed to the small beginning
of Christianity—only to the "ankles,"
but in a thousand years and much
deeper, another thousand (our day)
deeper still, and what in a 1,000 years
more? Someday at any rate the kingdom of God will be universal and how
glorious would be the moral and
spiritual landscape when the Gospel
had so covered the earth.
At the close of the service the
Sacrament of the Lord's supper was
administered, and all felt the day
had been a gracious inauguration of
the General Conference Session.
Rev. T. Albert Moore
by the General Secretary, and the fact
that he has accomplished it so well
in the busy life he leads is no trilling
demonstration of his unusual secretarial capacity, and of the good judgment of the last General Conference
in electing him to office. He has
method in everything and a cheery
smile in il all -as well as a voice that
is at least sufficient in any ordinary
building. Who his mantle may fall
on this time we have no idea, but
one Mould hope his own "translation"
i- nol yet imminent for it is doubtful
whether his Klisha has yet been
anointed.
Afternoon
In the afternoon an open session
of the Sunday School was held when
addresses were given by Rev. Dr.
Ht'ncks and Rev. J. C. Speer, a former
pastor of the church and who still
has hosts of warm friends in the city.
Mr. Walter Staneland, superintendent
of the school, took charge of the service.
Evening Service
As early as 6.30 people were wending their way again to the Conference Church and before the regular
opening hour (7.30) the large edifice
was crowded to the doors and hundreds were turned away. The or
ganist gave a sacred recital which
with its sympathy and impressive-
ness prepared the way for tne grcr.t
service  which   followed.
The General Superintendent opened
the  service  and  was  assisted  in   the
Y. M. C. A. EVENT
At 5.15 Tuesday the Y.M.C.A. will
have the corner stone of their new
building (corner of View and Blan-
chard streets) laid by the Hon.
Richard McBride, Premier of (he Province. Visitors from the east will be
well repaid by attending and hearing
an address from Mr. McBride, whose
eloquence may have an increasing
effect in days to come upon the political  life of Canada.
GOVERNMENT   RECEPTION
On Wednesday night ihe members
of Conference an1 invited to attend
the Government Reception tendered
Sir Wilfrid I.auricr. a royal lime
awaits them.
MRS. SPENCER'S RECEPTION
In keeping with her usual grace and
thought fulness, Mrs. David Spencer
will entertain Ihe delegates and their
friends at her home on Moss street on
Friday afternoon from 4 to 7.
PERSONAL
If you appreciate the Daily Bulletin
don't look for a free copy every day,
but hand our agent fifty cents for the
fourteen issues and have them sent
to your address regularly.
THE MEN WHO DID THE
WORK
Be it known to all men—at the
General Conference—that while many
have done valiantly in preparing for
the great gathering. Rev. T. E. Holling and Rev. A. E. Roberts, and next
to them Messrs. A. Lee and W. N.
Mitchell "have excelled them all."
Delegates and Visitors tc
the General Conference
Are specially invited to call and see our splendid assortmen
of Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, including Ladies' Waists
Whitewear, Corsets, Underwear, Gloves, Ribbons, Laces
Smallwares, Hankerchiefs, Neckwear, Parasols, Umbrellas
English and Scotch Wool Blankets, Comforters, Sheetings
Pillows, Linens, Curtains, etc., etc.
GOOD HOSIERY OUR SPECIALTY
(>tir Cash System of buying and Belling enables us to give
the Best possible qualities at the lowest possible prices.
ALL GOODS ARE MARKED IN PLAIN FIGURES
AND ONE PRICE TO EVERYBODY
Robinson's Cash Store
J. E. ANDREWS, MANAGER
Phone 2190 - - 642 Yates Street
Opposite King Edward Hotel
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LUMBER  LONGEST  HERE
is sent out first. And you can be
sure it lias been here long enough
to be thoroughly dried and seasoned. Kver had any experience
with green lumber? If not, don't
hanker after it. Take th_ experience of others and use only tus
seasoned kind, the only lumber
we  sell.
JAS. LEIGH & SONS,
PLEASANT   STBEET
PHONE 392 VICTOBIA, B.C.
Micftai Pflpt Sold Lumber Co.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Successors to J. A. Sayward
Shall be pleased to receive your inquiries for all  kinds of
rough and dressed lumber; also sash, doors and interior finish.
All kinds of fruit boxes and crates constantly on hand.
B. C. Timber Dealers
Ask for our pamphlet giving general information re B.
C. Timber.
We employ our own cruisers and guarantee estimates.
Western Finance Co., Limited
(Robertson Bros.)
Lumber Exch. Building, Broughton St. W., Victoria, B.C.
■ GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
DEAVILLE
SONS & CO.
Family
Grocers, Etc.
FLOUR
FEED
FRUIT
And a  full   supply  of  high
class goods always on hand.
HILLSIDE    AVE.    AND
ROSE ST.,
Phone 324   -   Victoria, B.C.
Proper
Gothes
For
Men
In all the new fine
styles at
$15 to $30
Fitepatrick &
O'Connell
811-813   Government  Street
Opp. P. O.
"You'll like our Clothes"
(Reg-)
To
The
Strangers
Within
Our
Gates
IS    »iff    -1     i
PS
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33s*3KSis£3B9R>?    - A.-2US6B&
"The Last Stand"
BUY   NOW   AND   GROW   RICH
PRICES   ARE  LOW                TAXES  ARE  LIGHT
The demand is great and is ever increasing.    In many instances the increase has been over
ten
per cent, per year.    Information gladly given.
Hillis Timber & Trading Co., Limited
LUMBER EXCHANGE BUILDING VICTORIA, B.
c.
Why the Methodist Quadriennial
Conference Came to Victoria:
BECAUSE Victoria is a hospitable city.
BECAUSE Victoria is a law-abiding city.
BECAUSE Victoria is a beautiful city.
BECAUSE -Victoria is a healthy city.
BECAUSE Victoria is the only Last Great West.
BECAUSE Victoria is in a. class by itself.
BECAUSE Victoria's climate is unsurpassed.
BECAUSE Victoria spared no pains to capture the prize.
BECAUSE not to know Victoria is to argue one's self unknown.
BECAUSE Victoria is a stronghold of Methodism.
We Illustrate Forthwith
the Famous "Burberry"
Coat
THE
Moore
Whittington
Lumber Co.
LIMITED
VICTORIA, B.C.
Manufacturers   and
Dealers in
FIR, CEDAR
AND SPRUCE
LUMBER
LATHS AND
NO. 1 BRAND
HIGH GRADE
CEDAR SHINGLES
We   do  planing  mill  work
promptly  and  properly
SASH  DOORS  AND
MOULDINGS
SHIPMENT BY RAIL
OR WATER
Phone Mill 298
Phone  Factory A750
ARE YOU INTERESTED
IN
California
Oil
Or do you want to know
anything about the most
profitable industrial business
in the world in spite of
trusts?
If so, while in Victoria get
"Questions and Answers on
California Oil" from
A.T.Frampton
Mahon Building
GOVERNMENT STREET
Company dividends for May
$1,326,626.00.
Dividends to date
S31,284.902.00.
(for which we are sole agents).    For sport, travel, town or
country, this coat affords incomparable qualities that lift it
far above the plane of conventional artistry.    We particularly want you to see them.
Inverness Capes
Another travelling garment and protector from inclement weather. We have these in splendid materials
and various weights.
Gloves
Genuine English Nappa Gloves, pique sewn, gusset between fingers.    Per  pair    90c
Maggioni, 2-button, glace kid, a really fine, dressy glove,
all shades.    Per pair  $1.50
We offer you many exclusive novelties in Neckwear, Belts, Bags, etc.
il
;
1012 Government Street
Victoria, B» C. GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
AGENDA
THE FIRST WEEK
Lord's Day, Aug. 14, 1910
HI  a.m.—Fellowship   Service.
11 a.m.—Public Worship. Preacher
—Rev.   Henry   Haigh,  Newcastle-on-
Tyne,   Fraternal   Delegate from  lira
i-ii Wesleyan Conference.
7 pin - -Public Worship.    Preacher
— Rev    Solomon   (.'leaver.   HA,   DI>,
Toronto.
Monday, Aug.   15th
9 a.m.—Opening exercises.
Roll call.
Reserves.
Election   of   Secretary.
Report of Agenda Committee.
Fixing hours for meeting and adjournment.
Meeting of Committees for election
of their officers.
Meeting   of   Committees   for   election of their officers.    Fifteen minutes
each   to   Groups   A,   B,   C,   D.
Monday Afternoon, Aug. 15th
Opening  exercises.
Routine business as per Rules of
Order.
Appointment of Association Secretaries.
Quadrennial Address of the General
Superintendent.
Reading Minutes of Meetings of
General Conference Special Committee.    (Par.  104.)
Reports of our Fraternal Delegates
to other Churches during the Quad-
rennium.
Distribution of Memorials and
Notices of Motion to Chairmen of
Committees.
Monday Evening, Aug.  15th
Meeting  of   Committees:
Group A, 8 to 9.
Group  B, 9 to 10.
Tuesday  Morning,  Aug.   16th
Meeting of Committees:
Group A, 9 to 10.
Group B, 10 to 11.
Group C, 11 to 12.
Group  D, 12 to 12.30.
Tuesday Afternoon, Aug. 16th
Opening exercises.
Routine business as per Rules of
Order.
Reception of Deputation from Women's   Christian   Temperance   Union.
Reception of Deputation from Women's   Missionary  Society.
Reports of Committees.
Miscellaneous.
Report of Business Committee.
Tuesday   Evening,   Aug.   16th
Reception   of   Fraternal   Delegates:
Wesleyan Conference of Great Britain—Rev.   Henry  Haigh.
Irish Wesleyan Conference—Rev.
Wm.  A.   Bracken.
Wednesday  Morning,  Aug.   17th
Meeting of Committees: Groups A,
B, C,  I).
Wednesday Afternoon, Aug. 17th
Opening exercises.
Routine Business as per Rules of
Order.
Reception of Deputation from Bible
Society.
Reception of Deputation from
Lord's   Day   Alliance.
Reports  of Committees.
Miscellaneous.
Report  of Business Committee.
Wednesday   Evening,   Aug.   17th
The Conference, by invitation of
the Government of British Columbia,
to attend the Reception to the Right
Honorable Sir Wilfrid Laurier, G.C.
M G.. I'.C, Premier of Canada.
Thursday  Morning, Aug.  18th
Meeting of Committees: Groups
A.   B,  ( .   1).
Thursday Afternoon, Aug. 18th
Opening exercises,
Routine   Business.
Reports of Committees.
Miscellaneous,
Report  of  Business   Committee.
Thursday Evening,  Aug.  18th
Meeting of Committees:
Group   A,  8  to  9.
Group B, 9 to 10.
Friday Afternoon, Aug.  19th
Opening exercises.
Routine   Business.
Reports of Committees.
Miscellaneous.
Report  of   Business  Committee.
4.30—Meeting of Eastern Conference Delegation re Supernumerary
Fund.     (Par.   486.)
4.30—Meeting of Western Conference Delegation re Superannuation
Fund.    (Par. 426.)
Friday Evening, Aug. 19th
Meeting of Committees:
Group A, 8 to 9.
Group B, 9 to 10.
Saturday Morning, Aug. 20th
Meeting   of   Committees:—Groups
A, B, C, D.
Saturday Afternoon, Aug. 20th
Opening exercises.
Routine Business.
Reports  of  Committees.
Miscellaneous.
Report of Business Committee.
Recommendations of Agenda
Committee
(Vide  page  57,  Agenda)
1. That all Reports of Boards,
Committees, etc . together with the
Memorials, Resolutions and Notices
of Motions, as printed or tabulated in
the Agenda, be referred to the Committees of thi' General Conference as
herein indicated
2. That   a   typewriter   shall   be   nil
der  the  direction  of  (he  Secretary  of
Conference. The Minutes and all Reports of Committees to be typed in
quadruplicate.
3. That, instead of a written Jour
nal, there shall be kept on file the
Minutes of Sessions as confirmed,
and reports of Committees as adopted. Also, the pages of ihe printed
Journal shall be printed two to a
page, on ledger paper, and these
bound in a loose leaf ledger shall
form the official and permanent journal of the Conference
4. That Rules of Order (Appendix
VI. of the Discipline) be amended:
(a I No. 4 be amended by adding
the following: Unless otherwise directed, the Report of a Committee
shall be read by its Secretary, and
its adoption moved (unless he disagrees with it) by the Chairman, who
shall also give such information regarding it as may be required.
(b)  Xo. 34 he repealed.
(3) That the Rules of Order, as
hereby amended, be the Rules of
Order of the General Conference.
T. ALBERT MOORE, Secretary.
A. CARMAN, Chairman.
antiquated machinery: if it will adapt
itself to the real problems of the day,
nothing can arrest its commanding
influence.
My interest in British Columbia is
not likely to be transient. I have
received so much kindness from its
people that 1 feel a certain oneness
with them. That kindness has been
especially welcome, coming as it did
when the shadow of a great sorrow
lay across my life. As I leave Ihe
province I do so with a profound
belief in its glorious future, and with
sincere prayer that the blessing of
God may rest, in grace and wisdom,
upon the Methodist Church, whose
grateful guest  I  have been.
W  J. DAWSON.
WHAT
DR.    DAWSON  THINKS
OF B. C.
(Reprinted from June Recorder)
I have been asked to write a brief
message to the Methodists of British
Columbia, and accept the kindly invitation. I had heard much of British
Columbia in the last four years, but
I must candidly confess that the most
glowing pictures painted by my
friends fell far short of the reality.
What words can paint its scenic
splendour? 1 have always been accustomed to consider Switzerland the
perfect gem of all natural beauty,
but I find to my astonishment that
British Columbia greatly surpasses it.
Its snow-clad heights, its glaciers,
rivers, and immense forests, its numerous and almost unexplored lakes,
its magnificent coast line, compose a
picture in which all the most wonderful elements of physical beauty,
from the most exquisite and lovely to
the most magnificent and overwhelming, are combined. The time must
surely and shortly come when the
eyes of all lovers of beauty will be
drawn toward this extraordinary
country. But its destiny is much
higher than to become the playground of the American continent.
1 see everywhere the marks of progress, the capitulation of Nature to
man. the upbuilding of empire. That
Vancouver must become a great metropolis is self-evident; but in the next
decade a dozen other great cities will
arise. It is no empty dream that
those who have already passed midlife will live to see great mercantile
fleets anchored in Vancouver, ihe inland waterways everywhere the busy
loads of commerce, the fertile soil
the home of a great nitistitude of
prosperous farmers and fruit-growers.
And it is not alone the coast that will
be the scene of this new empire. The
great inland lakes, such as Kootcnay,
will be filled with prosperous communities, and cities like Xelson will
also attain metropolitan proportions.
All this I hold to be certain. The
country is only in ils infancy. It
may almost be said that in the
world at large ils discovery has only
just happened. In the nexl few years
the great nomad army of men and
women in Search of lands thai offer
opportunity,    must    needs    invade    in
multitudes   this   land   which   offers
every possible attraction of scenery,
climate,   health,   and   reward   the   in
dustry.
And here begins the moral problem.
Xo new empire can he built on stable
foundations without a high moral
code, a dominant sense of public
honour and integrity, an appetite for
the intellectual elif, a reverence for
duty and religion; for without these
elements progress is but a false name
for greed, extravagance, and sottish
materialism.
Xo church is so well able to impregnate the general mind with these
ideals as the Methodist. It has the
power that comes from federal direction and organization, and it will be
false to all its great historic traditions
if it has not also moral fervour, and
spiritual enthusiasm. But even with
these great assets it cannot succeed
without wise, practical statesmanship,
and the spirit of adaptation. Tt must
be free to grasp occassion and wise
to adopt new methods—which after
all is nothing more than Wesley himself did for his own generation. T
would like to sec in Vancouver, and
in every large centre, an institutional
church, wide enough in its programme to meet all the social and
intellectual, as well as the directly
spiritual demands of the people. If
the Church has lost its hold, it is
usually   because   it   is   working   with
OFFICERS OF THE GENERAL
CONFERENCE AND OF ITS
COMMITTEES
GENERAL CONFERENCE
Rev. A. Carman, D.D., LL.D.,
President
Rev. T. Albert Moore, D.D.,
Secretary.
GENERAL    CONFERENCE
SPECIAL COMMITTEE
Rev. A. Carman, D.D., LL.D.,
Chairman
Rev. T. Albert Moore, D.D.,
Secretary.
AGENDA COMMITTEE
Rev. A. Carman, D.D., LL.D.,
Chairman.
Rev. T. Albert Moore, D.D.,
Secretary.
TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE
John N. Lake, Esq.,
Chairman
Rev.  T.  Albert  Moore,  D.D.,
Secretary.
NOTICE TO THE READER
Reader, if you get a free copy of
the Bulletin, accept it with our compliments. But listen! It is the first
time such a paper has been undertaken in Canada; it will run for the
full term of the General Conference,
making a careful conservative report
of the proceedings. It is costing us
a large sum of money. If you appreciate it send US in the subscription price—Only Fifty Cents—and we
will mail the paper to your address
each day.
OUR  OWN  VETERANS
How our beloved pioneers—Rob-
son, Crosby, Turner and Joseph Hall
—would have felt yesterday could
they have been present at the opening of the General Conference session in this beloved British Columbia,
bill enfeebled health keeps them away.
This is the outcome of their early
labours, of their heroism and their
wisdom. We want the General Conference to know how British Columbia loves these men, and we want the
veterans themselves to know that they
are thought of and spoken of already
a hundred times by the General Conference delegates.
We suggest the General Conference, by motion, make them corresponding members or honorary
members so that their names may
ultimately appear that way in the
Journal.
THE G. O. M.
Methodism: Grand Old Man is still
leading the host and still full of lire
and energy and insight. Albert Caiman has made a wonderful impress
upon Canadian Methodism. Wnal a
different Methodism it would seem
without his venerable presence. When
many have been taken from us may
be long be spared lo point the way
and inspire the church to her great
destiny,
COMING EVENTS
Don't miss Tuesday night's meeting in Metropolitan Church when the
fraternal delegates of British Methodism will dleivcr their greetings. Rev.
Henry Haigh, President-elect of the
Wesleyan Methodist Conference, and
Rev. Dr. Bracken of the Irish Conference,  are  the   speakers.
Anybody who has anything really
good to offer for publication, provided
it is not too long of course, is invited
to send it along to the  Editor.
Dr. Edward Everett Hale, discussing a rather finicky attack that had
been made on certain recent statements, smiled and said:—
"But who or what is blameless? ft
is like the case of the Scottish  hen.
"An old Scottish woman wished to
sell a hen to a neighbor.
" 'But tell me,' the neighbor said,
'is she a' thegither a guid bird? Has
she got nae fauts, nae fauts at a'.'
" 'Aweel. Margot,' the other old
woman admitted, 'she has got one
faut. She will lay on the Lord's day'."
Very often the kindness we show,
Is nothing but the vanity we display.
IT might be of interest to you to learn
that this paper   is  printed  with  the
approbation of the Presbyterian
Church (Old Kirk) at the corner Courtney
and Gordon streets.
You may do anything you wish provided you do not talk about it;
And talk about anything you wish provided you do not do it.
Get Your Conference
Bulletins Bound
A« Souvenirs of Vour Tip
Before  Returning
Home
Orders taken at Recorder
Booth  in   Church.
We are headquarters for Gold
Lettering  on   Leather  Goods.
All Classes of Bookbinding
O.J. B.LANE
Book-binder and Paper-ruler
614 COURTNEY  STREET
(Upstairs)
Thomas Hooper
ARCHITECT
Specialist In Church Plans. De-
siKned the General Conference
Church (Metropolitan Church,
Victoria), also Centennial Methodist Church,
OFFICES:
Five Sisters Block, Victoria
Winch  Block,   Vancouver
piston wpne
The
range that's
Built on Honor
of the best materials—
Malleable and Charcoal
Iron-the   range   that's
known the world over as a
Perfect Barer—always uniform—air-tight   oven —Lined
throughout with Purs Asbestos—
naves half your fuel bill.
The Great and Grand
Majestic
Malleable and Charcoal Iron.
has a number of exclusive features, each
one adding to Its durability and practical service, making the Majkbtio the
best range you can buy regardless of
price. That's why fifteen other uanu*
facturers try to Imitate It.
roR sals Br
POWELL   &   CO.,
Government Street
faS%f$H JqS23*3?
i fite'f
fsrf.cl
likir
I jaws?.,
Dame Burden's Tea Rooms
For
BREAKFASTS
LUNCH AND TEA
Home    made     Cakes    and
Sweets a Specialty
Rep^aion
After a Strenuous Day's Labor
VISIT
Terry's Soda Fountion
THE STANDARD OF PERFECTION
TERRY, Chemist
Cor. Fort and Douglas
THE SUN TYPEWRITER
Light, Strong and Durable
All Writing Absolutely Visible
The Sun is the Clergyman's ideal typewriter, and all who decide
to take one of them home will have a lasting and pleasant reminder
of the Convention and its associations. EVERY machine fully
guaranteed.
PRICE, COMPLETE—$50.00 TERMS ARRANGED
Call at our store and  examine this typewriter.
Opposite Spencers' Store
THOS.   PLIMLEY
1110 Government Street
Victoria, B.C.
We give a hearty welcome to all Conference delegates and trust we may have
the pleasure of meeting
them in our office.
WESCOTT & LETTS
For good investments in Real Estate
Moody Block BROAD AND YATES ST. GENERAL CONFERENCE DAILY BULLETIN
THE    GENERAL    SUPERINTENDENT'S STIRRING APPEAL
TO  B.  C.
(Continued from Page 2)
;>ast and in humility before God recount   ymir   sacrifices,  your  conflicts
.iikI your toils. Come, ye, in the
prime   of   life,   and   in   faith   in   God
peak  trustingly, firmly of your emir
,ge. vision and high resolve.   Come,
e young men and maidens, leaping
•vith generous aspiration and strong
lesirc for country, truth anil God.
Come one. come all; the spirit and
genius of the past, tin- splendid vant-
gc   ground   of   the   present   and   the
brightening,   widening   prospects   of
the future, and by the grace of God
nakc  this  Jubilee  the  clock-Stroke  of
new    era,   the   memorable   hour   of
■ffort
ami
rrander
nent.
Love   of   God
aith  in     Christ
Spirit,  and  the
iio it.     Genuine
•onal devotion to the
i,m  do it.    So can  we
loftier   achieve
ind  man   can   do
it.
and     in   the   Holy
loly   Scriptures   can
godliness    and   per
olise  of  God
enlarge   and
invigorate   our   Evangelism;   so   can
e multiply and vitalize our Christian agencies.    So can we extend  our
iismihi- and found and build our col
' ges.     May  this Jubilee  be  on  earth
and  for  heaven  a crown of rejoicing.
INTRODUCTION     AND     BRIEF
HISTORY  OF TUBERCULOSIS
[The     following
lagan.     Provincial
article    by    Dr.
Health Officer,
will be continued in installments
daily and readers of the Bulletin are
invited   to  give  it   special  attention*,
I Consumption is no less a domestic
• problem in Canada than it is fn other
uind less favoured lands. It is a pro
\)lem with which all the civilized coin
tnunitics of the world are struggling
today. It has at all limes attracted
attention because of its malignant influence Upon the lives and well-being
of the people.
Consumption is a peculiar disease.
It is as secret as it is deadly, and
gives no definite sign, until, loo often, it has taken linn hold and got,
lo more or less extent, beyond control. It has moreover Ihe assistance
of the prevailing public ignorance,
prejudice and superstition as to ils
nature, so much so that even at this
day the true knowledge as lo ils
cause and effect still remain 'obscured
by the old-fashioned fictions of former years. In late years it has forced
itself upon the notice of the authorities for the reason thai we now know
what its cause is and how it spreads:
how it may be cured and how it  can
be prevented. This knowledge places
power in our hands and the responsibility is ours if we neglect  to use it.
With Pasteur's discovery of micro-
organic life, the medical world entered upon a new epoch. Many mysteries were explained and certain dis-
eases were brought within the control of man on a rational and exact
basis.
In the year 1KK2 Koch discovered
the cause of consumption, the bacillus tuberculosis, Heretofore we were
led lo believe ii was hereditary; ur
now know that predisposition may
conic from our parents, but not the
disease. We were also told that it
came from the hand of Providence
and was inevitable What an insult
io our Creator when we so frequent
ly see indifference, ignorance and
neglect of the common ordinary laws
and cleanliness and sanitary reform
contributing so largely to the spread
of Consumption.
Koch has proved, and it is now
accepted as an absolute fact, that the
one and only cause of consumption
is a germ, that is that the consumption genu has lo enter and live and
multiply   in   Ihe   body   lo   Start   con
sumption, Here then is a fact of
overwhelming importance,— il is the
one fact around which all practical
action revolves.
Since 1KK2 thousands of scientists
have studied Ihe life of the consumption  germ,  and  as  a  result   we  know
under what condition it lives and
thrives, and how, under other conditions, it  weakens and dies.
Sunlight is ils greatest enemy, for
live minutes exposure to direct rays
will kill the germ. When il is deposited in clean, dry and well lighted
quarters it will soon fade and die,
whereas dark, moist and ill-ventilated
places will hold the germ alive and
active for lengthened periods.
(To   be   continued)
'T'gh!" spluttered Mr. Jones. "That
nut  had a worm in it."
"Here," urged a friend, offering
him a glass of water, "drink this and
wash   il   down."
"Wash il down!" growled Jones.
"Why should  I ?    Let him  walk!"
The Scapegoat
Teacher—I shall not keep you after
school, Johnnie. You may go borne
now.
Johnnie—1 don't wan't ter go home.
There's a baby just come to our
house.
Teacher—You ought to- be glad,
Johnnie.     A   dear   little  baby—
Johnnie (vehemently) — I ain't glad.-
l'a'll blame im—he. blames me for
everything.—l.ippincott's Magazine.
Glorious Kootenay
NELSON
The Capital and Centre
OF THE SCENIC AND COMMERCIAL ATTRACTIONS OF THE
DISTRICT WILL BE REMEMBERED BY THOSE WHO ATTENDED
THE CONFERENCE IN MAY LAST. THE VISITORS NOW IN
VICTORIA AT THE GENERAL CONFERENCE ARE CORDIALLY
INVITED TO RETURN TO THE EAST BY THE ARROW LAKES
AND THE CROW'S NEST PASS ROUTE AND TO STAY AT LEAST
ONE DAY AT NELSON IN PASSING.
Return Tickets Are Made Available for
This Without Extra Charge
i
i
See Jos. Patrick,  The Nelson Delegate
iT for further information write to
E. K. BEESTON,
Secretary Nelson Board of Trade
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S ADVANTAGES
BRITISH COLUMBIA is the Pacific Coast Province of Canada.
Area—395,000 square miles, or 252,800,000 acres.
Coast line—7.000 miles.
Forest and Woodland—182,000,000 acres.
Population  (estimated)—280,000, exclusive of Asiatics.
The whole of British Columbia south of 52 degrees and east of the Coast  Range
is a grazing country up to 3,500 feet, and a  farming country up to 2,500
feet, where irrigation is possible,
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S trade has increased by overnineteen million dollars in  four
years.
BRITISH COLUMBIA fisheries, one hundred and fourteen million dollars.
BRITISH COLUMBIA forests produce over twelve million dollars annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA has millions of acres of paper-making material undeveloped
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   farms   and   orchards   produce   over   eight   million   dollars
annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA has immense deposits of iron ore awaiting development,
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S coal deposits are the most extensive in  ihe  world.
The  Kootenay  coalfields alone are capable of yielding ten million tons of coal
a year for seven thousand years.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA'S area  of standing  timber  is  the largest  and  most   compact
in America.
BRITISH COLUMBIA has over ten million acres of wheal lands.
BRITISH COLUMBIA produces over two million pounds of butter annually, and
imports over four million pounds.
BRITISH COLUMBIA imports over two million dollars' worth of eggs and poultry
annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA shipped over six thousand tons of fruit in 1908, and imported
fruit to the value of two hundred thousand dollars.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   fruits—apples,  pears,   plums,   cherries,  and   peaches—are   the
finest in the world.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  fruit  has  won  the  highest  awards at   exhibitions  in   Greaf.
Britain, Eastern Canada, and the United States.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S net revenue is increasing at the rate of one million dollars
annually.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S liabilities over assets arc decreasing at the rate of over one
million dollars annually.
TO THE CAPITALIST—
The most profitable field for investment in the known  world.
TO THE MANUFACTURER—
A great wealth of raw materials.
Unsurpassed shipping facilities.
Rapidly increasing markets at home and in the new Provinces ol Saskatchewan
.ind Alberta, Mexico, Australia, and the Orient,
TO THE LUMBERMAN—
Millions of acres of the  finest  limber in  ihe  world.
Aii  ever-increasing demand  for lumber at  home and abroad.
TO THE FISHERMAN—
Inexhaustible quantities of salmon, halibut, cod. herring, ami other fish.
TO THE FRUIT GROWER—
Many   thousands  of  acres  of  land   producing  all   the   hardier   fruits,   as   well   as
peaches, grapes, apricots, melon-, nuts. etc.
TO THE DAIRYMAN—
Splendid  pasture- and high  prices  for  butter, milk,  and  cream.
TO THE WORKINGMAN—
fair wages and a reasonable working day.
TO THE POULTRYMAN—
A cash home market for poultry and eggs ai big prices,
TO THE FARMER—
Large profits from mixed  fanning and vegetabii   growing.
TO THE MINER—
Three hundred thousand square miles of unprospected mineral-bearing country
TO THE SPORTSMAN—
An infinite variety of game animals, big and small, game ti~Iu s and game birds.
TO THE TOURIST—
Magnificent   scenery.
Good hotels.
Well-equipped trains.
Palatial steamships.
TO EVERYBODY—
A healthful climate.
Inspiring surroundings.
Golden opportunities in all walks of life.
Just laws, well administered.
A   complete   modern   educational   system—free,   undenominational   primary   and
high schools.
All the conveniences of civilised life.
Health, peace, contentment, and happiness.
Information regarding B. C. and its Resources may be had by applying to the Bureau of Information, Victoria, B. C, or
the Agent General of B. C, Salisbury House, Finsbury Circus, London, England. GENERAL CONFERENCE  DAILY BULLETIN
The Best Range
For Your
Kitchen
There is only ONE BEST
in anything — Ranges or
other Kitchen Apparatus—
and we want to demonstrate
to you that for this Province
—using Soft Coal—
THE OXFORD
CHANCELLOR
is by far the LEADER IN
RANGES.
Ask
The
Drake   Hardware
Co.
YATES STREET
THE
W. H. Malkin Go.
LIMITED
Wholesale Grocers and
Specialists in Teas and
Coffees
57 WATER STREET
VANCOUVER
Packers of
"VICTORIA CROSS"
brand in all lines.
Ask your Grocer for
Victoria Cross Tea
Brown   Berries  Coffee
Daddy's Coffee
Everybody's Tea
Deckajulie Tea
OCEAN PARK
An Ideal Pacific Chatauqua —
The property comprising this subdivision
((insists of the point of perhaps the most beautiful promintory in British Columbia. The
land itself on its seaward frontage, sweeping
in a semi-circle from the southeast corner of
the land to the northwest corner, rises from
the beach in a beautiful cliff formation of from
seventy-live to one hundred and fifty feet in
height. Around the foot of this rise the new
main line of the Great Northern runs, over the
rails of which it is also expected the Northern
Pacific will run its trains.
The Beach
The Project
From Blaine on the east to Blackies' Spit on
the north there runs one of the linest beaches
in British Columbia.
Eastward toward Blaine the tide leaves a
beach nearly a mile in width. Immediately
south of the property deep water is reached
in about from one to three hundred yards.
West of the property a sand beach is left by
the receding tide, extending fully three miles
from high water mark.
The sands are of a firm character. The
water coming in over the heated sands on a
summer evening resembles an artificially heated bath rendering bathing ideal and safe.
It is proposed to make this property, naturally so well situated for the purpose, into a
residential park on the Chataqua principal.
This is the first attempt to meet the demand
for a rallying place for Christian societies in
their conventions and summer schools, and
cannot be duplicated for beauty and surrounding conveniences, of grounds and accessibility
to all the Coast and Sound cities and towns.
In order to improve the property, erect a
pavilion, and beautify the park, fifty per cent.
of the proceeds of the sale price of the lots has
been donated by the original holders, together
with a further donation by one of the promoters of ten thousand dollars.
They have already transferred their full
rights and titles to trustees, who have covenanted to hold the same in trust for the purpose for which it is intended.
The property has been subdivided, according to the plan shown in the folder, into two
parks for recreation and pavilion purposes,
together with suitable streets and 50-foot residential lots.
Proper safeguards have been made to prevent the alienation of any portion of this property from the purposes as set forth  above.
For further information consult:
Ocean Park Ass n
329 Pender St., W
Phone 6015
:OR=
Rev* R* F* Stillman ms venabies St., Vancouver
We Welcome
You
to British Columbia
We know you will enjoy
every minute of your stay
and should you like it well
enough to remain here,
would  suggest  a  visit   to  a
GURNEY-OXFORD
AGENT
and inspect the splendid
KITCHEN RANGES made
at our Factory in Toronto,
especially for this Province,
or at our Show-room.
The
Gurney Foundry
Co., Limited
566-570  Beatty Street,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Residence Telephone 122
Office Telephone 557
Lewis Hall
Doctor Dental  Surgery
JEWEL BLOCK
Cor. Yates and Douglas Streets
VICTORIA, B.C.
THIS SPACE IS  RESERVED FOR
LEESON, DICKIE & GROSS
Wholesale Merchants    -    Vancouver
Investments
IN   B.   C.   ARE   DEMANDING   WIDESPREAD ATTENTION IN ENGLAND, U. S. AND
EASTERN   CANADA
WHY?
Because we have a vast area of Agricultural Lands, Fruit Lands, Mineral Deposits, Coal and Oil
Lands and Timber Lands which are UNDEVELOPED.
We specialize in all these lines, also in investments in INSIDE BUSINESS PROPERTY
IN VANCOUVER
We   recommend   nothing   but   sound   investments.   Write us, or better still, call and see
us PERSONALLY
H. H. Stevens & Qo,
Fiscal Agents:
Portland Star Mines,
Texada Island Copper Co.
Brokers Notary Public
317 PENDER ST., WEST,
VANCOUVER, B. 6.

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