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Fort George Herald May 18, 1912

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 South Fort George
will be the centre
of railway construction activity
this season.
•*•*•■»*,
■*>-*•<•
^^fe^>.r-
ah rr	
transportation
companies make
South Fort George
headquarters.
/OL. 3, NO. 20.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C., SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1912.
$3 PER ANNUM.
-XTIV1TY IS MARKED
ON UPPER RIVER
WORK ON O.T.P.
MAY BE DELAYED
Jr. J. B. Kelly, who with his
brother arrived here Wednesday
evening from Tete Jaune Cache,
gave the Herald an interesting
account of railway construction
activity as he saw it between here
and the head of navigation. With
ithe Belgian party, he and his
brother left the Cache on May
4th en route to Fort George. Contrary to reports received here
Some time ago, Mr. Kelly states
lhat neither of the Foley, 'Welch
1 Stewart boats had been launch-
Id.   One of them, however, was
eady for the waier and he had
('sen told that she would be
unched in a couple of days.
At mile 53, six miles this side
! the Cache, tremendous activ-
is evident. Sawmills and
fachine shops were in operation
Id here the contractors had es-
Iblished a huge supply station.
|cores of teams were daily bring-
pg loads of supplies from the
nd of steel to be transported
Dwn river to the various conduction camps. Evidently mile
, i is the point chosen by the railway company for a divisional
point, as it offers better docking
facilities than can be secured at
Ithe Cache where the channel is
narrow and shallow.
At Goat River, 150 miles east
!f here, grading camps are locat-
d and steam shovels are making
he dirt fly. Contractors are putting a short tunnel through'at
[that point, the only one between
Fort George and the Cache.
Mr. Kelly is of opinion that excellent progress is being made on
lhe line from the east, and con-
Iractors have now sufficient supplies on the ground to guarantee
season of uninterrupted ac-
pvity.
CITY AND DISTRICT
E. J. Chamberlin, vice-president
and general manager of theG.T.
P., has returned to Winnipeg.
Mr. Chamberlin has been in the
east for the past few weeks considering the year's programme.
He was to have met C. M. Hays
at Montreal, and they were to
decide on the programme of construction and development  for
the G.T.P.   As it is now, Mr.
Chamberlin will return to Montreal next Wednesday to meet A.
W. Smithers, chairman of the
board of directors.    Then they
will decide on the work this year.
Mr. Chamberlin states that the
work will be somewhat late in
starting as a result of the death
of Mr, Hays, but the construction work now in progress will
be continued.   There are about
six hundred miles of grade waiting to be tracked.
Dr. Lazier has been gazetted
medical health officer for the Fort
George district.
Jack McGaghran has taken up
residence on his Giscombe preemption and expects to have at
least twenty acres under crop
this year.
CHARGED WITH
ATTEMPTED MORDER
R. M. Pallatt, divisional fire
warden, arrived from Quesnel on
Thursday with Mrs. Pallatt, who
will spend the summer with her
husband here.
The Fort George district is the
subject of an excellent illustrated
article in the April number of
"Opportunities"—the Magazine
of British Columbia.
SETTLERS RAPIDLY
ACQUIRING THE UND
One of the notable features of
the rapid development of this
district is the rush now under
way for government pre-emptions. A conservative estimate
places the number of locations
applied for during the past week
at one hundred. On Wednesday
alone twenty-four entries for preemption claims were filed.
Most of the settlers come from
the United States and are of a
distinctly desirable class. They
are evidently possessed of sufficient funds to commence operations on the land at once.
THE BAIRfHERF
HAS ARRIVED
Walter Gregg, draftsman for
Gore & McGregor, arrived on
Monday's boat. A busy season
in the surrouning country has
opened up for this well-known
firm of surveyors.
FROM BELGIUM
TO FORT GEORGE
DEMONSTRATION ORCHARD
Mr. H. Thornber, B.S., of Kam-
Bbops, assistant horticulturist of
the provincial department of agriculture, is spending some days
in the district, He intends making
personal examination and inquiry
the suitability of our soil and
climate for fruit growing.    Mr.
Thornber informs the Herald that
1 if his report is favorable the provincial government propose establishing a demonstration orchard
in the district.
Next Thursday evening Mr.
Thorn Ier will give a lecture on
the subject of fruit culture, and
everyone interested is invited to
attend. Later, if local interest
warrants, he will lecture on horticulture, agriculture or any kindred topic of interest to the settlers of this district. It is hoped
that next Thursday evening's
lecture will be well attended.
MOVEMENTS OF THE RIVER FLEET
Monday—Chilcotin arrived from Soda
Creek at 6 p.m.; mail steamer B.X. at
6.30 p.m.
Tuesday-B.X. left for Soda Creek 6
a.m.; Chilcotin for Giscombe Portage
at 4 p. m.
Wednesday—Chilcotin arrived from
Giscombe 9 p.m.
Thursday-Chilcotin left for Soda
Creek 8 a.m.; B.X. arrived from Soda
Creek 6.30 p.m., and went up the Nechaco to Hammond townsites, returning here at 9 p.m.
Saturday-B.X. left for Soda Creek
6 a.m.
Fresh milk-real cow's milk-
is now delivered daily in South
Fort George. Last Monday a herd
of a dozen milch cows arrived by
steamer Chilcotin and are now
being pastured at Six-mile Meadow. The lacteal fluid is retailed
at two bits a quart and the demand is fully up to the supply.
The owners of the herd are two
young men who recently arrived
from the east. It had been their
intention to run their herd on the
Indian reserve meadow, where
they had erected temporary buildings, but the recent order from
the Grand Trunk Pacific, allowing
the Indians the use of the fenced
enclosures for this season, upset
their plans for a location near
town.
The baseball game next Friday
between the teams of South Fort
George and the Nechacos promises to be an interesting contest.
The local team, under the coaching of Manager Forrest and Captain Close, is showing excellent
form and they promise to give
the suburbanites a warm argument over this year's possession
of Hiram Carney's cup. One of
the steamboats will probably take
the local team and a crowd of
supporters to the battleground
up the Nechaco,
Russell Peden left this morning by steamer B.X. for lower
Cariboo, taking his driving team
and buggy aboard. Herlock
Sholmes would naturally deduce
from this that Russell's destination was off the beaten stage road
and distant from the steamboat's
track. Just prior to leaving he
instructed Bronger & Flynn, the
contractors to make all haste in
completing his handsome bungalow on Fourth street south. Deduction can now be discarded and
a well-founded suspicion appears
that Mr. Peden is absent on what
the society reporter would call an
interesting mission. A wireless
received late this afternoon stated that he was seen heading for
Quesnel Forks. The organization
of a reception committee is now
proceeding and Mr, and Mrs.
Peden will receive a warm welcome.
NEW HAZELTON
OR SO. HAZELTON
Ottawa, May 11.-The gover-
nor-general-in-council has cancelled the order dated Dec. 19 of
the board of railway commissioners compelling the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway company
to place its station on the town-
site of New Hazelton, which has
been advertised in Vancouver
under the name of the "Kelly"
townsite. In ordering the cancellation of the railway board's
order the governor-general-in-
council sends it back to the board
for reconsideration.
STEWART LAKE HATCHERY
R. T. Rodd, officer in charge
of the Dominion hatchery at
Stewart Lake, has just returned
to Victoria upon the completion
of his season's work. He reports
that seven million two hundred
thousand eggs were taken and
six and a half million fry released, which, while not the largest
output of the hatchery, is regarded as a very satisfactory season's
work. Eggs were taken last
year from August 29, and the
first of the fry released on March
26, being placed in the creek,
where they will remain until Juiy,
passing thence down into Stewart
Lake, Stewart River, Nechaco,
the Fraser and finally the open
sea.
On a charge of shooting with
intent to kill, and remanded for
trial at the fall criminal assizes,
Henry B. Sealey, a man well-
known throughout Cariboo, will
leave for Kamloops jail next
week to await trial.
The shooting took place in the
Club pool hall last Wednesday
night about ten o'clock.
Sealey, who had been drinking
rather heavily for some days, had
a fancied grievance against A. E.
Forrest, one of the owners of the
pool hall, who early in the afternoon had warned Sealey against
bringing liquor into the pool hall
and drinking it there. Sealey left
the place and went to his cabin
on the river bank. About ten
o'clock in the evening he returned to the pool hall with a double-
barrelled shotgun and, throwing
open the door, raised the gun and
fired at Forrest who, luckily saw
the gun just as Sealey was about
to fire, and dropped behind the
counter of the tobacco stand. The
shot tore a hole through the partition above where Forrest had
been standing. Almost immediately Sealey fired the second barrel at a lower angle, perforating
the counter behind which Forrest
was barricaded.
Neither shot found its mark in
the man for whom it was intended, and knowing that the gun
was now empty Forrest rushed
Sealey and took the [gun from
him, after which he proceeded to
give his would-be murderer a
severe beating.
Constable McCauley, who was
several blocks away, had heard
the shots and rushed in their direction. He found Sealey on the
ground in a somewhat battered
condition due to the blows received from the man whose life he
had attempted to take, He was
at once lodged in jail.
Sealey appeared before Magistrate Heme yesterday afternoon,
having retained Mr. Montgomery
as counsel. Mr. R. C. S. Randall
conducted the case for the prosecution. Evidence was given by
several witnesses of the affair,
and at the conclusion of the hearing the magistrate committed the
prisoner for trial,
Sealey has been a resident of
South Fort George for the past
two years and, normally, is peaceful and good-natured. He is a
man of powerful physique and
has been termed the strongest
man in Cariboo, He is not an
habitual drunkard, but when on
an occasional spree is subject to
moods and has a decided penchant
for firearms, His murderous
attempt on the life of the man
who had befriended him on more
than one occasion can only be attributed to a fancied grievance
or an hallucination brought on by
over-indulgence in alcohol.
Wesley & Wiggins' new office
building on Hamilton avenue is
nearly completed. Horace Hancock is the contractor.
Two new residences are under
way this week, one for Wm.
Rowat, on Fourth street, the
other for H, W. Gross, on Laselle
avenue.
Within the next few weeks,
when passenger traffic is established between here and Tete
Jaune Cache, one may book his
passage from any of the European
points direct to Fort George via
the Grand Trunk Pacific.
On Wednesday evening there
[arrived by steamer Chilcotin a
party of six who came direct
from Belgium, Their passage
had been booked direct to Fitz-
hugh, the first divisional point
east of Tete Jaune Cache. From
FitzhugL the party came by construction train to within a few
miles of the Cache. Two of the
party were ladies, one a bride of
a few weeks.
Arriving at the Cache they
joined forces with two Edmonton
gentlemen. Messrs. J. B. and R.
B. Kelly, also bound for this district.   A boat was purchased and
provisioned  for  the trip down
stream and the party set out on
May 5th for Fort George. When
the swift waters of Grand canyon
were reached they disembarked,
unloaded their baggage and with
a line lowered the boat through
the dangerous  channel.     They
journeyed without mishap 250
miles down the Fraser to Giscombe where the Chilcotin was
making ready to return here, so
they accepted a good offer for
their boat and equipment, finishing the remaining 60 miles of
their remarkable journey on the
palatial steamboat.    The names
of the European party are Mr.
Mr, and Mrs. Louis Bontez and
11-year-old son, Mr. and Mrs. H.
Bontez and Lucien Hoolans. Mesdames Bontez, it is believed, are
the first ladies to navigate the
Fraser from Tete Jaune Cache to
Fort George.
J. G. RAMSDEN RESIGNS
J. G. Ramsden, for six years
chief inspector of the department
of Indian affairs of the Dominion
has resigned. He will accept a
position with a large corporation.
Mr, Ramsden is probably better
acquainted with the Indians than
any other man in Canada, having
travelled, in connection with his
work, from Anticosti Island to
northern British Columbia.5 Four
times he crossed James Bay in
an open boat.    Mr.  Ramsden
settled   many   most    intricate
Indian problems, and enjoyed the
full confidence of the natives.
He was instrumental in  having
the Fort George Indian Reserve
handed over to the G.T.P.  railway company, a few months ago,
for townsite and terminal pur
poses to the complete satisfaction
of the parties concerned and of
the general public.    Mr, Ramsden believes that the franchise
should be extended to many Indians and believes there will be
no improvement in their condition
until they are made to feel the
responsibilities of citizenship as
taxpayers.
APPOINTED FISHERIES INSPECTOR
Quesnel, May 16.—L. F, Champion, manager for the Cariboo
Trading Co. at 150 Mile House,
has received the appointment of
fisheries inspector for the districts
of Cariboo and Cassiar, PUBLISHED BY THE
NJ3T3EBN INTERIOR PRINTING CO. Ltd.
J. n   DANIELL. PRESIDENT
Devoted   to   the   Interests   of   Port
Oeorge and the entire Northern Interior.
J. B. DANIELL.. Editor.
On several occesions within the
List two years the Herald has
warned the public of the dangers
attending attempts by the inexperienced to run the Grand Canyon, Giscombe Rapids and other
channels on the upper Fraser,
and has suggested that the authorities, whose duty it is to safeguard human life, should cause
notices to be placed in conspicuous places on the river bank
warning strangers of their approach to danger. We are not
aware, however, that any move
has been made to give effect to
our practical suggestions, for, as
formerly, travellers descend the
river unconscious of the dangers
that beset their journey, as the
reader may learn from the news
columns of our last issue.
Survivors of the recent accident in the Grand Canyon have
related the details of the drowning of a companion, but in how
many cases does it happen that
all perish and the mute evidence
of a broken raft or canoe alone
suggest the probable fate of the
voyageurs? Against this contingency we will not offer any suggestions tending to circumscribe
the liberty of any person to choose
his own craft for the descent of
the river, be it a boat, canoe or
single log. It was this privilege,
coupled with a spirit of adventure, that enabled the pioneers of
the continent to explore the great
river basins, prospect the valleys,
establish their trading posts and
maintain communication necessary to their enterprises. We
believe, however, that a system
of registration of all departures
from the upper river, with a
numbering of their craft, could
be effected through the agency
of the police, A comparison of
the number of arrivals here
with the number of departures
from the Cache, would probably
show a difference of some import.
This system would probably give
the police more information than
immunity to the traveller from
danger of drowning, but it would
also afford some security from
possible outrages on the river, as
it would be an effective means of
observing the movements of undesirable characters, and ascertaining the identity of victims of
a-jcident or violence.
At a time when humanity has
scarce recovered from the appalling Titanic catastrophe, when
marine dei artmen ts, aroused from
1 jthargy, bestir themselves to enforce the law in respect of the
equipment of passenger-carrying
boats on inland waters and the
high seas, suiely an object no
less worthy would be served by
precautions taken to warn travellers of the dangerous points on
t lis river, and thus endeavor to
Uiminish what otherwise will be
an increasing list of victims of
accidental drowning.
' way commission, this country has
: lost an administrator and a personality whom it will be very
difficult to replace. A man of
j commanding ability, indefatigable in his work and absolutely
1 impartial in each and every one
of the very many important decisions which he was called upon
to render, he leaves a record of
achievement behind him which it
will be hard for his successor to
emulate. His loss is in large
measure a national one, for few
men in the country stood higher
in the public regard. He had
earned the admiration and respect not only of both political
parties, but of people of every
class.
Fort George
Drug Co.
Prescriptions a
Specialty
NEW BOOKS iho^A
large shipment just received
Toilet articals, Potent Medicinal.
Magaalnea,Books, Stationery,
Toilet Articles. Drum-iaUs Sundries
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The Cariboo Brotherhood was
organized recently at Ashcroft in
order to preserve and perpetuate
the history of the Cariboo district, as the early participants in
the rush to the Cariboo goldfield
in 1862 are rapidly dying out, and
without some organization to record and preserve the many important events which occurred
during that period they would be
lost to all posterity.
COUNTY COURT OF CARIBOO
 Ill
Intend Building:
?
NOW is the time to build,
whilst seasoned lumber is
obtainable. Labor conditions
are now in your favor. We
contract to design and construct your building, guaranteeing satisfaction: Call
or write us.
Bronger & Flynn
Builders and Contractors
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
While May 24 will be observed
as a holiday this year, it is officially intimated that the observance of the king's birthday, June
3, will receive more attention in
future. For over 60 years the
"queen's birthday" has been recognized as the great early season
event of the year, and it will take
many years to wean the youth of
the Dominion from the sentiment
and pleasure associated with the
anniversary of "Victoria Day."
In the death of Judge Mabee,
chairman of the Dominion rail-
The sittings of the County Court of
Cariboo will be held as under:
CLINTON-Thursday, June 6th, 1912,
at 9 a. m. ut the Court House.
150 Mile HousE-Monday, June 10th,
at 10 a. m. at the Court House.
South Fort George — Thursday,
June lath, at 4 p.m. at the Government
Oflice.
Quesnel-Saturday, June 15th, at 2
p. m. at the Court House.
RiCHFiELD-Tuesday, June 18th at 10
a. m. at the Court House.
By Order. C. W. GRAIN,
Registrar.
THE
CLUB POOL ROOM
THIRD AND   HAMILTON STS.
DAVIS & FORREST, Props.
Smokers' supplies
a specialty
Four pool tables
Splendid environments
IN THE MATTER of the Companies
Act; and IN THE MATTER of
Cooke, Peden & Company, Limited.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Cooke, Peden & Company, Limited, will
at the expiration of one  month from
the first publication hereof apply to the
Registrar of Companies for approval of
change of name trom Cooke, Peder &
Company, Limited, to "The Northern
Lumber    &    Mercantile     Company,
Limited."
Dated this 4th day of May, 1912.
E. J. AVISON,
Quesnel, B.C.
Solicitor for Cooke, Peden &
Company, Limited.
I am prepared to
Locate Pre-emptors
ON ISO ACRESOF.
Good Government Land.
WRITE FOR INFORMATION TO
N. C. Jorgensen.
P. 0. Bo< 21.
Soull Fort George, B. C,
NOTICE
To Whom it May Concern:
NOTICE is hereby given that
through arrangement with the Grand
Trunk Railway company the Fort
George Indians have the use of all
meadows and fenced enclosures for the
season. All trespassers upon same will
be prosecuted as the law directs.
W. J. McALLAN.
Indian Agent.
South Fort George, April 30, 1912.
P. G. B. BODEKER
Land Timber Cruiser
Pre-emptions Located.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Estimates Submitted.
Robert Spinks
Painting and Paperhanging
South Fort George : B.C.
Fort George, B.C. Victoria, B.C.
F. P. Burden, Mer. F. C. Green, Mgr.
Nelson, B.C., A. H. Green, Mgr.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
foil Eifineen, Dominion IB. C. Laid Suvqm
SurveyB of Lands, Mines, Townsites, Timber
Limits, Etc.
Watch
Repairing
C. H. DAVIE
Satisfaction guar
anteed
Send articleH by mail to Fort George, B.C.
PONT  BUY  ON   PAPER
We don't ask. you to purchase South Fort George lots by
making a pencil mark on a townsite plan—You would
be safe in so doing, but if skeptical
COME TO
=^
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
Investigate Our Proposition  g=
and you will find a good live town-Two banks, saw mill,
pool hall, newspaper, two general stores, splendid
hotel, bakery, stationery store, mail-boat
landing, scores of buildings,
and crowds of  satisfied  buyers
WRITE FOR INFORMATION TO
NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT CO.
172 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B C , or the resident agent,
g. e. Mclaughlin
Fourth Avenue, South Fort^George
1
Our New Stock is now on display-the finest R
ever brought to this country.    Every line is B
now complete. p
Our Prices Are Still the Lowest |
Hardware       Groceries      Boots and Shoes R
Clothing        Builders' Supplies B
!
A  =——
A      RUSSELL PEDEN
I
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W. F. COOKE
Northern Lumber Co., Limited |
Store, Oflice and Lumber Yard, South Fort Georgi
?9K9S*^2H?9SKWK«!**!9R]|S'*-i
City livery, Feed &
Sale Stables
I. A. WHITE,
PROPRIETOR,
Single and Double Driving Horses.   Saddle and Pack Horses.
New Buggies and Thoroughly Reliable Rigs.
DRAYING AND EXCAVATING DONE.
M. C. WIGGINS
farm lands      Real Estate   GARDEN TRACTS
WHI     Less than quarter mile from Indian Reserve
* aMM      (G.T.P. Townsite).  Price $150 per acre,
A ripu<C| one-quarter cash, balance six, twelve and
iml«/*awl-i» eighteen months at 6 per cent.
Settlers located on 160-acres of good Government land.       I
FOURTH ST.  -  -  SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C
t-
Real Estate Investments
If you are interested in the growing values of
Fort George Realty it will pay you to look over
my lists. 1 have made money for others and
can do the same for you,
The Pioneer Realty Specialist of the Northern interior
N. H. WESLEY
REAL ESTATE
South Fort George
^=
Fort George Hardware Co.
General Hardware and Sheet Metal Workers.
All kinds of tin and sheet Iron work done.
Camp stoves
LASELLE AVENUE
Hot air Furnaces, etc.
SOUTH PORT GEORGE.
Hotel
QUESNEL i
B.C.        »
1
Most modern up-to-date hotel in the interior of British
Columbia.
New four-storey building.  Accommodation for 120 guests ft
H  AH outside rooms—large, well-lighted and ventilated.       ^
Steam heated.
RATES $2.00 PER DAY UP    '
Weekly and monthly rates on application
I
Wire for rooms
Wire for rooms g
E. L. KEPNER, Proprietor
R
aA.
-iiilB".lj'Ji|;WW
^■^T^Wf"
■**nsjf'y '_\r,%*m,^rr' I iwimv""*     - |
Premier Roblin, of Manitoba, has
announced that the government elevators were a failure and that they would
be sold to private concerns at the end
of the present season in. August. He
declared farmers demanded government
elevators and then did not patronize
them.
Seven new Orange halls are to be
erected in various parts of Greater
Vancouver by the Vancouver Orange
Hall Company, Limited, an organization in which the shareholders are exclusively members of the Orange order.
i These halls are to cost between $10,000
j a, d $15,000 each.
The matter of the appointment of a
successor to the late judge Mabee has
not as yet engaged the attention of the
government. Two names mentioned
in connectiod with the vacancy are those
of Mr. Justice Lennox, recently appointed to the Ontario bench, and Mr.
J. Lynch Staunton, the well-known
Hamilton lawyer.
The G.T.P. is now accepting freight
and passengers for transportation from
Prince Rupert to Hazelton.   Permission
j has not yot been receivd by the railroad to use its line for traffic as far as
l the Skeena Crossing,   but trains will
Ihandle traffic from Rupert to Vanarsdal
bnd boats are plying between the latter
boint and Hazelton on the Skeena to
fomplete the trip.
,' The rumor that Mr. M. Butler, general manager of the Dominion Steel &
Coal Company, has been approacheo
--frith a view to taking the place of the
late Charles M. Hays, will not go down.
■Mr. Kelley, one of the vice-presidents
lof the system is now in Sydney, N.S.,
lit is said, for the purpose of negotiating
1 with the end in view that Mr. Butlei
[accept the position. Mr. Butler was
[deputy minister of railways before he
[accepted his present position and was
Ihonored by a C.M.G. for services
I rendered there.        ,
Railway contractors are expecting
labor troubles in,the construction camps
along the line of' the Grand Trunk Pacific between Hazelton and Fraser Lake.
T ley are making complete preparations
for any contingency that may arise.
The majority have agreed that at the
first sign of trouble they will suspend
operations indefinitely, refuse to furnish the men with food and let them
walk out of the country. Opinion here
is that the contractors can create a
situation which will give them an advantage over the laborers, for the men will
j be hundreds of miles from settlements
in some cases.
Chief Fernie and his trackers are
I keeping close on the trail of the Indian
murderers, Moses Paul and Paul Spintlam. There are those in Clinton who
incline to the belief that Spintlam has
either killed his less desperate partner
and hidden the body, or that the latter
fell a victim to the fusillade of bullets
which were fired into the brush at the
time Constable Kindness was killed.
This theory originated in the fact that
the track of only one Tnan has been
found leading from the scene of the
murder, although an hour previous
to the shooting the rancher, Truran,
who reported their whereabouts to the
olicers, was talking to both Indians.
After talking with Truran they moved
about a mile. There was ample opportunity for a quarrel over the advisability
of killing, which might culminate in the
more desperate Indian killing his partner. Superintendent Campbell went
with a posse to Pavilion Mountain to
investigate a report that two horses
had been found, which had been ridden
extremely hard, and which may furnisn
a clue to the present whereabouts of
the murderers.
Lady police officeis will soon be
patroling their beats in Vancouver,
drawing the same pay and vested with
the same authority sb a full-fledged
male officer.
In answer to a question as to whether
capable ladies, fully alive to the arduous
duties before them, could be persuaded
to join the force, Chief Chamberlin
stated that he already had two ladies in
view who were willing to act as police
officers and he believed that they were
eminently suited for the work.
It was explained by the police commissioners for the benefit of the chief,
that the duties of the lady officers
would be to keep a watchful eye on the
movements of recalcitrant girls who
were likely to fall into the clutches of
the law. Men will not have a chance
to be arrested by the lady constables,
but it is possible that the male members
of the force will be put wise to a lot of
things that may have escaped their
notice.
I   uiiiiuiuiu uiiviuuniivn   I
There are a great number of town-
site properties on the market in the
land adjoining the Indian Reservation
here. Most of the subdivided properties are owned, sold by or controlled by
the Natural Resources Security Company, Limited, of Vancouver. Their
properties comprise Lots 777, 1430,936,
1429, 937, 938, 2608, 2610 and 2507.
The South Fort George townsite, the
business and residential centre of the
district, is situated on Lots 933 and
H34. Tne Hudson's Bay property and
Lots 931 and 932, generally known
as the "Bird Addition" are not as
yet on the market. The area subdivided, and either owned or sold
on the profit sharing plan by the
Natural Resources Security Company Ltd., totals about 1800 acres.
Tbis concern has been responsible
for such development as may be
found today on a small portion of
Lot 938, the smallest of their subdivisions. Their townsites are located on a high jack-pine fiat. The
soil is gravelly, and, generally speaking, will not produce domestic vegetation. There are no wells on the
townsite, owing to its height, and
water must be brought from tbe
river. The South Fort George town-
site is a very much smaller area. It
totals about 150 acres, and is situated on the lower benches of the
Fraser River, which is navigated by
the largest steamboats throughout
the open season. The Nechaco River
townsites are not regular ports of
call, as owing to the difficulty in
navigating the Nechaco river except
in high water the boats do not call
there unless paid to do so. Lots in
some sub-divisions of the Natural Resources Security Company Limited
have not increased in value to any
material degree during the past three
years. Their initial sub-divisions
are as yet quite Indeveloped. South
Fort George is a good live town. It
has been largely built up • and developed by the pioneer element, who
settled on the site as soon as it
was placed on the market. The Late
John Houston, the veteran frontier
newspaperman, established his paper
at South Fort George in its earliest
days. The town contains over two-
thirds of the entire population of all
the inhabited townsites. It has two
banks, the Bank of British North
America and the Trader's Bank of
Canada, two sawmills, tin shop,
three large general stores, a large
theatre, a newspaper issued by the
pioneer publishers of the Cariboo
district, a licenced hotel, pool hall,
bakers, confectioners, two churches,
drug store and restaurants. It is ibe
terminus of the British Columbia
Express Company's mall steamboats
and stage line. It is the headquarters
of the Fort. George Trading and
Lumber Company's steamboat and
sawmilllng operations. Tha headquarters of the Northern Lumber Co.
merchants and sawmill operators.
It Is close proximity to the Government buildings, and is situated in
such manner that the- main development of the Indian Reservation
will benefit it more directly than
any other sites. The railways that
arc to be built from the south must
of necessity follow the Fraser River
shoreline in order to secure a water
grade, and will form a junction with
the main line of the G. T. P. near
the east end of the Indian Reserve.
Acreage close to the South Fort
George townsite Is changing hands
every day for large figures. The land
comprising the South Fort George
townsite, and all the Fraser River
properties is of excellent quality,
covered with a light growth of poplar with scattered firs'.
The foregoing resume of the town-
sites here will give the reader some
idea of the respective merits of both
townsites. The Fort George Herald
has no affiliations with either of the
exploiting companies whoBe interests appear* to be opposed. Those
who have invested in South Fort
George property, -not too far back
(rom the river, may reBt assured
that they have excellent value for
the money they have invested, owing
to the rapid growth of development
created by independent initative. If
they desire to sell they should list
their properties with one of the
local realty operators, who are constantly recording handsome profits
for investors. Lots In the townsites
of the Natural Resources /Security
Company depend for their value on
their proximity to that portion of
their property along the waterfront
at which they are trying to centralize their development. At that point
the townsite company is putting up
a number of buildings, and are trying
in every way to start a trend ot
development, having their business
centre for its radiating point. This
will hardly be* accomplished to any
satisfactory degree for the large
majority on tbelr sites, for a long
time to come. We advise no one to
purchase on the strength of their advertised statements. Intending investors in* any sub-divisions here
should bear in mind that the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway Company's
townsite will add about one thousand acres more townsite property
to the combined area offered for
habitation. The market has been
dangerously flooded already, and
bearing this in mind the careful Investor will not venture his funds In
any townsite that can not actually
claim the active and independent
development that signifies the approval ol the people on the ground.
Unless tbsy can Invest in a townsite
that Is being developed and increased in value by Independent enterprise, they had better await the
sale of the    G. T. P. property or
acres of land by pre-emption. There
are large tracts of land open for
alienation by pre-emption only, in
this district. The land is capable of
raising good crops of garden produce, bay, oats, and practically anything but fruit, which has not so far
proved a success up here, should
maintain that this district should
not be regarded as a fruit growing
country until that branch of culture
has been properly tested. This Is
naturally a mixed farming country.
Wild berries, however, are found
throughout the whole northern interior country, as far north as the
Peace River Plateaux. Wagon roads
are being built into the surrounding
country, and progress will be made
on such public works, as future circumstances demand. The Fraser and
Nechaco Rivers afford transportation
to their tributary valleys, the Fraser
particulary, being navigable for 160
miles south and 315 miles north of
tbis point. We believe that the best
way to secure a good pre-emption
is by engaging the services of one
of the reliable locators, who make a
business of locating the settler.
Some of these men have been in the
district for a long time, and can
save the land hunter time and casta
by his experience. The Herald will
be pleased to advise the settler regarding lands open for pre-emption
and the best means of obtaining
information thereof, on application.
Building materials are at hand in
large quantities. The local mills
have about three million feet of
lumber in the yards, in preparation
for the spring. Lumber costs from
$35 to $75 a thousand feet. People
intending building should consult
by letter some ot the local contractors, who, we are informed, will
be pleased to furnish all information.
The fare into the country from the
railway point, Ashcroft, fluctuates
with the seasons. During the summer
when navigation is open on the
Fraser River, May 1st. to October
31st., tbe fare amounts to $45, and
the expenses en route about $10.
This is by automobile and steamboat. The winter fare, from November 1st. to March 31st. totals $62,
with expenses ot about $15. Travel
in the winter is by sleigh. The express rate in the summer is 12} cts.
per Ib. The winter rate 20cts. The
summer Freight rate is 6cents, and
the winter rate llcents per tb.
The cost of living may be gaged
by the following scale of prices now
prevailing. This rate will be materially reduced when freight comes
down the Fraser River from Tete
Juane Cache, via the G. T. P. steel
from Edmonton. This should transpire next summer: Flour 11 cts Ib.
Sugar 14 cts.. Ib. Ham 36 cts. Ib.
Bacon 40 cts. Ib. Beans 15 cts Ib.
Rice 15 cts. ib. Dried fruits 25 cts lb.
Overalls sell for $1.25 a pair. Meat
18 cts. tb. Meals in the hotels, however, cost but 50 cents each.
The banking interest charged here
is ten per cent.
Employment in the past has been
limited to survey work, building
trades, (carpenters), loggers, steamboat crews, packers, canoe men,
land and timber cruisers, laborers
on government road work, and such
work as has been done towards tbe
development ot townsite properties.
Farm laborers are not in demand as
yet. There is no railway work here
up to the present, but during the
next season and thereafter laborers
may reach the grade from this place,
that is, after next June or July.
Wages range from $4 to $7 a day,
according to the class of labor.
Prospectors will find practically a
virgin field for their explorations
The whole district has every Indication ot being highly mineralized.
A $10,000 Shipment of
i
^ Just unpacked and placed in stock the most complete
Jr line of Boots and Shoes ever brought to the northern
m interior.   A complete range of styles for men, women and
rf children.    Such well-known^ makes as Slater's, Mc-
m Cready's, McPherson's.
V4
g
The largest and best selected stock of General
Merchandise in the Fort George District.
i Kennedy, Blair & Co.,
i
Vavavavavav.
I
Corner Second Street and Hamilton Avenue
South Fort George
i>;*-*yA>*^AXA>-^A>*^J>><(
To Travellers and Shippers!
The Steamer "CHILCOTIN" is ready to launch on the opening of the
river. She will be manned by the same careful and courteous crew as'
before.
The AUTOMOBILES of the Auto Transit Co., of Ashcroft,  will connect with the steamer at QUESNEL and SODA CREEK  and  carry
passengers over the Cariboo Road, connecting withC.P.R. at Ashcroft.
Consign shipments for FORT GEORGE and all points in the Nor-
thern Interior of British Columbia to the CARE of the STEAMER
"CHILCOTIN" at SODA CREEK.
(A thoroughly seasoned and carefully manufactured stock of LUMBER
always on hand for LOCAL or OUTSIDE deliveries.
The Fort George Trading & Lumber Co., Ld.
The PIONEERS in the NAVIGATION and LUMBER Industries on the Upper Fraser am]
Phone 11. its tributaries. Chas. E. McElroy, Manager.
TlTH SPRING everyone wants something
NEW. Try this store for the best the
market affords. We are showing a particularly
nice line of
s
CHURCH SERVICES.
ST. STEPHEN'S-Services next Sunday: 8.30, Matins and Litany; 9, Holy
Eucharist (sung); 3 p. m., Children's
Service; 7.30, Evensong and Sermon.
KNOX CHURCH-Services every Sunday evening at 7.30. C. M. Wright.
Minister.
A.P.ANDERSON
BUILDER AND
CONTRACTOR
Office and Store Fixtures.
Hamilton Ave.    South Fort George
P. A. Landry J. H. McGrboor J.F.Templeton
T. A. Kelly, Timber Department
Gore & McGregor
CIVIL ENGINEERS
British   Columbia   Land   Barreyors
Land Agents Timber Cruisers
Chancery Chambers, Langley Street, VICTORIA,
""   "" "—.162, Phone""
B.C., P.O.' Box 1
kThird „..«-..
ORGS, B. C.
McGregor Building, Third Street. SOUTH FORT
GErt"'      " "
^»A</AW^%»^-*^-**y*^**(g>*-ty-j-a>-i--*^-i-»)?^
,»S->1~***m***m***m*sm*^» u
jj Do you
contemplate
•a       oiji A Then in-
building.' z'zt
manship and get our estimate.
Danforth & McInnis
CONTRACTORS * BUILDERS.
_ Hamilton and First.
i!*y#w*S(»v«V/W*R>R*W<iR*JW(
Prints, Ginghams, Muslins,
Satins, Sateens, Silks, Etc. f
If your storekeeper has not got it, try Quesnel's Z
leading merchant
John A., Fraser
Front Street
Quesnel, B. C.
Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.
/•
"S
C. KELLY
Watchmaker
wishes to announce that after
May Ilth he will call at any
office or residence on Mondays
and Tuesdays to wind and regulate any clock, so that we may
all have the same time.
This will be done free of
charge.
Kindly leave address at the
store. I
CiiNIKAUUKS SUAI      I
IS EXPECTED SHORTLY
The report was circulated here
yestefday that one of the Foley,
Welch & Stewart boats was loading at Tete Jaune Cache for Fort
George and could be expected
here in the course of the next
few days.
Late arrivals from the Cache
say that the contractor who will
put in the concrete piers for the
bridge to span the Fraser at this
point, is awaiting transportation
of his equipment here and is prepared to commence work on arrival, As previously announced
there are five mammoth piers to
be erected to carry the structural
work for the combination traffic
and railway bridge, which will
cost in the neighborhood of a
million dollars and furnish a
year's employment to more than
a hundred men.
Manufacturers of High-Grade Confectionery
ICE CREAM and all kinds of SOFT DRINKS
Tobaccos and Cigars
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
Catering
FOURTH STREET
A
A
jj Seed Potatoes - $5.50 per 100 lbs J
'1 Carrots, Turnips, Beets, Parsnips and Onions g
jj        FRESH MEAT and RANCH EGGS our specialty.        |jS
News of New Hazelton
New Hazelton, May 10.-Construction work on the G.T.P,
railway, in this section, is being
pushed ahead as rapidly as pos
sible. At present the roads are
almost impassible for freighting
supplies, and this somewhat retards the work, but in a few days,
the roads will be in good shape
again, when supplies can be forwarded with quick despatch.
Steel on the railway, is laid as
far as Skeena Crossing bridge,
one hundred and seventy miles
east from Prince Rupert. It is
expected that passenger trains
will be running from Prince Rupert to the crossing soon. This
will be a great boon to the travelling public as passengers leaving
Prince Rupert in the morning
will be able to get to Hazelton on
the evening of the same day.
On the arrival of the train at
the crossing, passengers will go
on board steamers waiting to
carry them toSealy and Hazelton,
a distance of about fifteen miles,
there will also be motor cars to
meet the trains and carry passengers to all towns in the interior.
The roads will be good, and the
climate and scenery cannot be
beaten in all Canada, or any
where on the Pacific coast.
New Hazelton is going ahead,
the citizens are preparing for a
large influx of people the coming
summer The mining industry
is flourishing, Roche De Boulle,
Silver Cup, Silver Standard, the
Harris Groups, and several other
mines are looking better than
ever. Messrs. Angus Stewart,
D. McLeod and A, L. McHugh,
visited the Silver Standard a day
or two ago and are highly elated
over their holdings. They
brought large samples to New
Hazelton, which are on view at
the headquarters of Foley, Welch
and Stewart. These samples are
estimated to assay as high as six
to seven hundred dollars to the
ton, silver and copper.
The steel bridge crossing the
Skeena river, is expected to be
finished about the first of July,
and trains running into New
Hazelton by August next and
the snorts of the iron horse will
be welcomed by all.
TO INTENDING BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS
We invite inspection of our large and well-assorted stock of carefully
manufactured LUMBER. This Lumber was manufactured during the
summer of 1911, was carefully piled and stored for the winter, and is
now THOROUGHLY DRY and in prime condition for building, and sells
at THE SAME PRICE as any other Lumber.
Dimension, Boards, Siding, Shiplap, Ceiling, Finish
MOULDINGS and SPECIAL SAWINGS or DRESSINGS of any kind
The Fort George Trading & Lumber Co., Ltd.
THE PIONEER MILL.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C.    Phone 11.    Chas. E. McElroy, Mgr.
Our GUMLESS SPRUCE SIDING and V-JOINT will not warp, check
nor shrink endways, and contains no gum to cause the paint to peel. I
Reginald Jobson has been appointed fire warden for the district between here and the Grand
canyon. Mr, J. Loveland will
have charge of the district between the canyon and Tete Jaune,
Cache.
□
Roberts, Jones & Willson
^
a
EDWARD ROBERTS Notarf Public.     E. E. JONES.     A. J. SELWYNWIUSON, Audilot.
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS,
VALUATORS and ACCOUNTANTS.
FOR SALE: Farm Lands. Garden Tracts. Timber Limits. Mineral Claims. Valuable town lots.
LIST YOUR PROPERTIES WITH US. to-^tfitW
ERIN" FORT GEORGE, B. C.
TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS
Offices: Hamilton Avenue, South Fort George: Central Avenue, Fort George, B. C.
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPRESS
 COMPANY =—
Send for a folder
Stages
OPERATING
Autos
Send for a folder
Steamboats
From Ashcroft to Fort George, and all points in
the northern interior of British Columbia, carrying
the Royal Mail, passengers and fast freight.
The Palatial Steamer 8.X. Awaits the Arrival of the Company's Stages
FrcS^r^np?irtfyX<!;aaSa    Head Office: Ashcroft, B.C.
Choicest Seasoned Lumber\
~*_*-.--_>*___ j
We have specialized in the Lumber business, which means t
that we know this business thoroughly, and can give satis- '
faction by filling orders from a stock of the highest grades, f
We Make a Specialty of Seasoned FIR Lumber of the Best Class f
Get estimates from us on all kinds of Building Material.     \
Northern Lumber Co., Ltd. \
^   Head Oflice and Yard, South Fort George.   Branch Yard at Fort George,   h
A
Mens Clothing
and Furnishings
i
WE wish to draw your particular attention to our stock of |
Men's Clothing and Furnishings.    All our goods are [j
,2      ■ ■      men o \jtuo.....a  _■
i  especially adapted> the needs of .this country.
General Merchandise
While we direct especial attention to our Clothing line, do S
not forget that we carry a complete stock of General Mer- K
chandise-Groceries, Provisions, Boots and Shoes, Hardware u
and Building Material. B
We Can Supply All Your Wants
at the Most Reasonable Prices i
      (
I Close & Brown Co., Ltd j
'A * u
GENERAL MERCHANTS
I
a ULnuuiL ittuvuinma *
|J Lasalle and Second Street South Fort George, B.C. |
r
I 1836 |      Assets Exceed Fifty Million Doilart      | 1912
1
Tk
. Bank of British North America
Your money is safer in tbe Bank than in your house or in your
pocket. It is not tied up. You can get it out at any time without delay. NOTES discount-id. Local and Foreign Drafts bought
and sold. COLLECTIONS made promptly.   Money Orders issued.
FORT GEORGE BRANCH
J. MUNRO, ACTING MANAGER
<F
The
Little Nugget
Cafe
The most modern and best-appointed
cafe in Fort George.
FIRST-CLASS CUISINE
Meals       -       SO Cents
Short Orders a Specialty
Mrs. F. C. Nahrwald, Proprietress
Cor. Hamilton and Third
South Fort George,
AMERICAN PLAN
EXCELLENT CUISINE
^
Hotel Northern
Corner Hamilton & Third
South Fort George, B.C.
The newest and most modern
hotel in the northern interior
Rates $2.50 and $3
Monthly and weekly rates on application
Beat of winos,
liquurg and ciiturs
Albert Johnson, prop.
-J
ADVERTISE IN THE HERALD
The Average Deposit of the
Canadian People is $122.00
per Person
Saving money can be made a habit.    A portion of your weekly ot
n.nnfl.!.r   ........    A..~....'.. 1 1 1..   !_    .. 1 *.      ...Ml      „....»,   KnTII"
„   can ue inaue a  nauu.     n.   portion  ui   yuur  »t»>!*
monthly wage deposited regularly in a savings account will soon brail
you up to the average, and you will be surprised how rapidly $2 deposited
weekly will amount to enough to make a substantial payment on your
home.
home.
CAPITAL MB SURPLUS, $6,100,000       TOTAL ASSETS, S52.W
THE TRADERS RANK
•      .      Soath rort GtOrie
H. C. SEAMAN, Huwr
K
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
Bead Officio
VANCOUVER, B. C.     6=***-=
CAPITAL AUTHORIZED . . M.000,000
DIRECTORS:
R. P. McLENNAN Esq., President,
McLennan,   McFeely & Co.   Wholesale Hardware, Vancouver, B.  C.
L. W. SHATFORD Esq., M. L. A.
Vice-Pres. Merchant, Hedley, B. C.
HIS HONOR T. W.  PATERSON, Lieu-
teuant-dovernor British Columbia.
M.   B.   CAKLIN,
Cnoltnllst, Victoria, B.C.
A. ISTEL Esq.
C. S. DOUGLAS Esq.
Robert Kennedy, New Westminster.
•I. A. MITCHELL. Esq., Capita"-''
Vletorla. B. C. .
B* H. HEAPS. Esq.. E. H. Heap" J
Co., Lumber and Timber; PrpsKlent
Columbia Trust Co.. Ltd., Vancouver. B. C.
J. A. HARVEV. Esq.. K.C. formerly
o! Cranbrook.  B.C., Vancouver, »•<>■
A. L. DEWAR. General Manager.
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
FORT GEORGE BRANCH-F, LIPSCOMB, Manager.
FARM LANDS IN CENTRA!
BRITISH COLUMRIA7^
Fort George
District.
Nechaco Valley
Bulkley Valley
Skeena Valley
In every case our
lands were carefully inspected by
expert cruisers before we purchased
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY will make all these districts
accessible to all the world. Every rail laid adbs
to the value of the land
North Coast Land Co. Ltd.
General Offices: 618 to 634 Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver, Bc
London Office >   8 Old Jewry.
PAID-UP CAPITAL, .. !    7
$1,560,000.
-r-T*-¥'!gMig
\    *
\ i

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