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Fort George Herald Apr 27, 1912

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 ' V
VOL. 3, NO. 17.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. O, SATURDAY, APRIL 27, 1912.
$3 PER ANNUM.
STEAMBOAT CHILCOTIN
IS LAUNCHED TODAY
After receiving a thorough
overhauling, and resplendent in
new paint, the big steamboat
Chilcotin will be launched today.
If her machinery is working as
smoothly as expected she will
leave for Soda Creek tomorrow,
or at the latest on Monday. She
will be commanded by the veteran
Fraser river skipper, Captain
Foster, who has as first mate
Captain Martin, of last season's
Skeena river fleet. The Fort
George Trading & Lumber Co.,
owners of the Chilcotin, have
large contracts for the transporting of freight to this town and
other river points.
Word was received yesterday
i from Quesnel that the mail steam-
| boat B.X. was loading freight at
Soda Creek and would probably
leave for this point tomorrow.
This will allow of her reaching
here Monday afternoon.
The river fleet is getting off to
an early start this season, and
there promises to be big business
for every craft on the waterway.
Local merchants have enormous
stocks of goods at Soda Creek,
the foot of navigation, and en
route over the Cariboo road from
Ashcroft. One merchant has estimated this year's tonnage of incoming freight as five times
greater than last season's. Merchants are placing little dependence on the upper route for this
summer's stock, at least. Perhaps in early autumn the congestion of railway contractors'
supplies at the Cache will be relieved sufficiently to allow of the
handling of independent freight
in car lots.
PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN
SURVEYORS HERE SOON
Surveyors of the Pacific Great
Eastern railway will be here in
the course of the next few days,
according to information conveyed in a message from Victoria,
After locating the line down the
Fraser river from here, it is the
intention to send a party northward to collect thorough and reliable statistics and reports on the
nature of the country and its
agricultural possibilities, This
move is indicative of the railway
company's avowed intention to
push the road northward from
here to the Peace River country
in the near future, possibly before the completion of the line to
Vancouver.
By the terms of its charter
communication must be established between this point and
Vancouver within three years,
but no effort will be spared to
shorten the time as much as pos
sible, At North Vancouver the
surveyors are already on the line
and the work of locating camps
is under way.
Mr. J. W. Stewart, president
of the company, with Mr. D'Arcy
Tate, vice-president and general
manager, left last week for London to complete financial arrangements in connection with the
organization and construction of
the railway. Their stay in the
old country will be brief and on
their return the announcement of
the initiation of actual construction will likely be made.
CITY AND DISTRICT
James McLeod has taken over
the Club cafe on Hamilton street
and will be ready for business
early next week.
Work will be started Monday
on Mr, Russell Peden's new residence, corner Rose avenue and
5th street. Bronger & Flynn are
the contractors.
Among the passengers who
were lost on the ill-fated Titanic
was Mr. Hugo Ross, of Winnipeg,
well known in this district where
he had large land holdings.
Th% Little Nugget cafe, corner
Hamilton and Third, was opened
for business this week. Mr?,
Norwald is proprietress, The
title is a misnomer, as this is the
largest restaurant in the Cariboo,
Up-river pre-emptors are beginning to arrive here by canoe
for their semi-annual haircut and
stock of provisions. They report
an unusually mild winter which
allowed of land-clearing operations being carried on without a
stop.
APPOINTED ENGINEER
OF FORTH LINE
It is understood that Mr. John
Callaghan, assistant to Mr. B. B.
Kelliher, chief engineer of the
Grand Trunk Pacific, has accepted
the position of chief engineer of
the Pacific Great Eastern railway
offered him by Messrs. Foley,
Welch & Stewart, builders of the
line from North Vancouver to
Fort George. Mr. Callaghan is
regarded as a top-notcher in his
profession.
Survey parties will be organized and placed in the field early
next month and actual construction work will be in full swing on
the south end of the line before
the end of June. The entire
summer will be occupied in locating the line north to Fort George.
Mr. Callaghan has at various
periods of his career been in the
engineering service of the Great
Northern, Canadian Pacific and
Grand Trunk Pacific railways.
He is now in the service of the
latter company, having been for
several years in charge of con
struction of the main line west
of Edmonton.
MINISTER OF LANDS
WILLVIS1T HERE
Hon. W, R. Ross, provincial
minister of lands, will visit the
Fort George district early this
summer with the object of personally familiarizing himself with
its conditions and requirements,
and investigating on the spot the
merits of numerous controversies
over land titles that have recently arisen, in several instances
through conflicting and inaccurate private surveys.
At the same time that Minister
Ross is making personal acquaintance with New B. C, Premier
McBride and Attorney-General
Bowser will visit Prince Rupert,
the Bulkley valley and Atlin.
AUTOS TO DAWSON
The long series of experiments
by the White Pass as to the best
means of handling freight on the
overland trail to Dawson with.
motor cars is being continued.
Supt. Herbert Wheeler has tired
out an automobile or two. One
proved a great success in road
construction, and in certain light
travelling, Now a freighter it.
wanted, and president Dickcson
has purchased a motor truck in
Chicago.
It will be used in handling
freight between White Horse and
Yukon Crossing prior to tie
opening of Lake Lebarge. The
company has had "caterpillars"
|"i?'i<?ed in road construction and
fr^ightinj on thac di Lion but
t ey have r ot proved exactly what
was desired.
BASEBALL TROPHY
Hiram Carney writes from the
coast that he is sending in a
handsome silver trophy, to be
known as the Carney Cup, and
emblematic of the baseball championship of upper Cariboo. Any
team between here and Soda
Creek is eligible to compete for
the cup. Local interest has suddenly been aroused in the great
American game and a couple of
enthusiastic fans have picked
out a nice spot to place the cup
—after it is won. Meanwhile a
little organization would help a
lot in making a bid for the championship. There is plenty of the
finest talent here right now.
How about calling an organization meeting and getting ready
to start something?
Excavation has been commenced
for the new office building for
Messrs. Wesley and Wiggins on
Homilton street.
Many strange faces are seen
on the streets these days. As
the boats have not yet begun to
arrive, the supposition that the
strangers "mush" in over the
road must necessarily be the correct one. The airship theory is
scouted.
W. J. Mackay, late of the Herald staff, will establish a weekly
newspaper at Fraser Lake during
the coming summer.
Next Monday the marriage of
Mr. Will B. McArthur and Miss
Dottie Brady will take place at
the bride's home, Mud River
valley. Rev. C. M. Wright will
perform the ceremony, after
which the happy couple will come
to South Fort George to take up
residence,
Superintendent McNevin is
starting a gang of workmen
Monday on the completion of the
road from here to Mud River.
From the latter point it will be
extended to Stoney Creek. Several miles are already built in
this direction from the Sto.iey
Creek end.
A four-foot plank walk is being
laid from the Clo3eJ&]Brown Co.
store to the corner of Third
avenue. The committee appointed by the Board of Trade to take
charge of public improvements
is performing its duties in a
highly creditable manner. Many
unsightly places have been cleaned up and streets and {lanes put
in first-class condition.
With the big rush of newcomers
to arrive as soon as river navigation is under way, Proprietor
Johnson, of Hhtel Nothern is
figuring on just how to accom*
modate the incoming, throng.
Right now the large hostelry is
taxed to accommodation, so it
has been decided to erect a large
tent on the vacant space west of
the hotel. This tent will be
floored and have windows and
doors. Comfortable comp beds
will be installed and every convenience made for guests,
Charles Fetrow, one of the first
settlers in this district, has returned from Kamloops where-he
went last fall with Mrs. Fetrow
in hopes that a change of climate
would-benefit his wife's failing
health. His report that Mrs. Fetrow has not improved in health
will be regretfully received here.
She is now with her parents at
Moosomin, Sask,, the Kamloops
doctors having given up hope of
curing her tubercular trouble.
Mrs. Fetrow and her husband
came to this district five years
ago, and for two years at least
she was the only white woman
within a radius of a hundred
miles,
ARRANGING FOR NEW
DOMESFOR INDIANS
Mr. W. J. McAllan, Indian
agent for the district comprising
Fort George, Stoney Creek and
Stewart Lake, arrived here a few
days ago on a visit to his local
charges. The Dominion government, when the sale of the local
reserve to the Grand Trunk Pacific was consumated, agreed to
build each family of Indians a
new house on either of the two
other reserves in this district,
and it is chiefly for the purpose
of getting the head of each
family to declare his choice of
location that Mr, McAllan made
the present visit.
There are thirty-six families of
Indians here, and more than two-
thirds of the number have expressed their choice in favor of
the reserve about six miles up the
Fraser. The remainder will go
to the reserve a few miles up the
Nechaco.
In addition to the houses to be
built the government will erect a*
church for each village and perhaps a school or general assembly hall. The total cost of the
buildings will be about $40,000.
Plans of the structures have
recently been completed at Ottawa and an official of the department will arrive here within the
next couple of weeks to call for
tenders for the completed buildings, The Indian department
hopes to have the tribesmen with
their families located in the new
homes as early as possible, so
that the G.T.P. will not be nan-,
dicapped should they wish to demolish the old village in their
active work to begin on the reserve this year.
Mr; McAllan, who spends the
greater portion of his time between the Stoney Creek and
Stewart Lake settlements, says
that there are now three right-
of-way camps in the vicinity of
Fraser £ake. Several miles of
sub-contracts have been awarded
to the Indians, Just at present
there is a shortage of supplies at
Stoney Creek, the influx of settlers to that district having been
greater than was' expected.
RUNNING TIIE GRAND CANYON, 100 MILES UP RIVER FROM FORT GEORGE*.
"BILLY" WILLIAMSON VISITS
J. O. Williamson, of Hamilton
& Williamson, general merchants
at Stewart Lake, arrived here
Thursday afternoon, coming in
over the trail from Stoney Creek.
His visit is for the purpose of
loading supplies to be taken up
the Nechaco river on scows. He
reports a wonderful development
in his district. There will be a
large area of land under cultivation and settlers are enthusiastic
as to the outlook, Seeding commenced a week ago. The crops
last year were very encouraging
and good prices were obtained
for produce.
The scow fleet, wi h fh;  .bv.v-
a     Lake hatchery o'Ida's and
Rev. Father Coccola. the v te
missionary >ries|,\ n s
11 ti..*'-*
Mr. Williamson will be here
in July en route to Quesnel where
he will be one ot the principals
in an event of interest, announcement of which has already been
made,
If
Iff!
g I
pi
tofHWmnmiKtmmi n-»—-~ '*
FOOT GEORGE
PUBLISHED BY THE
NORTHERN INTERIOR PRINTING GO. Ud.
Devoted   to   tt
George and
ei'n
II--LL.  PRESinfiNl
c   interests   of   Fort
the entire North-
Interior.
.1. ii. DANIELL, Editor.
A PUBLIC HOSPITAL.
The robust character and industrious habits of tho citizens of
Lhe town and settlers of the district have thus far obviated the
necessity of a public hospital. In
cases where individuals have experienced the misfortune of accidents, they have been happily
able to provide for their own
care and treatment, or have been
put beyond human care by instantaneous death, as has occurred in several cases.
The necessity of a hospital is
freely admitted, but there is little
indication of any effort being
made on the part of our citizens
to supply such a necessity. In a
district of such extent as ours,
where there are numbers of men
employed at hazardous labors, as
lumbering and steamboating, in
sawmills and in blasting and
clearing roadways, men are always liable to suffer incapacitating accidents, but in such an
event there is no place where
they may be properly attended
to. It is not unlikely that if the
operators of the industries now
employing most labor were approached by a committee of citi
of timber available out of which
as good and durable a building
could be constructed. What the
settlers have done and continue;
to do should not be considered by!
the government an obstacle sol
serious as to warrant the indefi-j
nite postponement of a conveni-;
ence so much needed.
Fort Georgepescip
^       lions a
Drug-Co^ J2
NEW BOOKS Stho«.>
shipment just received
ON THE ANXIOUS SEAT.
Prince Rupert News: That Mr.
D'Arcy Tate, the astute legal adviser of the Grand Trunk Pacific
railway, should have resigned
from that position to accept that
of first vice-president of the Pacific Great Eastern railway is
another unmistakeable assurance
that the road from Vancouver to
Fort George is to be—is really
now-part and parcel of the
Grand Trunk Pacific system.
It is worth considering a moment how much this city and
port will be affected by the Grand
Trunk Pacific having two ports
or Pacific ocean terminals instead
of one. Will it not divide the
business and thus reduce by
probably one-half the traffic this
port had every reason to expect?
The situation seems menacing at
any rate. More especially so as
Foley, Welch & Stewart, who
Lave undertaken to build this
road, are starting construction
work at once. They have not to
wait for preliminary and finished
surveys, for all this work has
been done for them already by
the Grand Trunk Pacific, All
they have to do is to level a road-
large
Toilet artloala, Patent Medicines,
Mngnzlnq8,Boolts, Stallone "'
|
 KIlet^^K"lfruMrfcfe' Sundries j
r— -—n
Intend Building?
zens some arrangement could be ked on t^e surveyors' levels and
effected whereby such employers s]ap clowri tj,e steeji Under these
could pay a monthly per capita
fee for the men employed, to
provide hospital treatment in case
of accident or illness. This plan
might assist, if approved of; but
if not, there is some other arrangement that will meet with
approval, and it is possible that
the provincial government would
grant some aid if approached in
the proper manner and with a
sensible plan that could be effectively put into operation.
FRASER LAKE AGENCY.
Although now over a year since
the provincial government made
provision to open an agency at
Fraser Lake, settlers in that
section have not yet experienced
the convenience of its establishment. They have still to apply to
the agency at Hazelton for all information in regard to lands open
for settlement and still to experience the delays and inconvenience
of transacting business by mail
with an agency so distant. When
it is remembered that the semimonthly mail service from Fraser
Lake and the upper Nechaco connects at Quesnel with a semi-
weekly service to Ashcroft, from
which point the distance to be
traversed by rail and steamboat
is approximately 1000 miles, the
inconvenience of having to transact business at Hazelton is as
obvious as it is detrimental to the
settlement of the district.
Already the work of clearing
the right-of-way of the Grand
Trunk Pacific is in progress along
Fraser Lake, and grading camps
have been established at Burns
Lake, 40 miles distant. Many of
the railway workers will remain
conditions the Pacific Great Eastern may possibly be completed
before the Grand Trunk Pacific
has completed connection between Fort George and Prince
Rupert, and thus all the traffic of
Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta will be switched at Fort
George to Vancouver instead of
coming here. What are we going to do about it?
Ninety-five per cent, of all the
business of the district known ss
new Cariboo is transacted in South
Fort George, This town was
built up by the united effort ol
individual business men, who,
after looking over the deserted
paper townsites invested their
money in the town of the present
and the city of the near future.
Ninety-five per cent of this year's
arrivals, who start in business,
will follow the example of the
business pioneers of the district
and locate in the business centre
and distributing point for the
whole upper country -South Fort
George on the Fraser. Prospective merchants will not be offered
buildings rent free and other
"inducements" to locate here.
They will receive a hearty welcome from the citizens and merchants of the livest town in all
outdoors—special "inducements"
will not be required.
NOW is the time to build,
whilst seasoned lumber is
obtainable. Labor conditions
are now in your favor. We
contract to design and construct your building, guaranteeing satisfaction: Call
or write us.
Bronger & Flynn
Builders and Contractors
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
.,*^^B-aa----MBaB-aNMj
-THE
CLUB POOL ROOM
THIRD AND   HAMILTON  STS.
DAVIS & FORREST, Props.
Smokers' supplies
a specialty
Four pool tables
Splendid environments
P. A.Landry J. H. MrGitrcocm J.F.Tf.mi>i.eton
T. A. Kelly, Timber Department
Gore & McGregor
CIVIL ENGINEERS
British    Columbia   Land   Surveyon
Land ARents Timber Cruisers
Chancery Chambers, Langley Street, VICTORIA.
B.C., P.O. Box 162, Phone 684.
McGregor Building. Third Street, SOUTH FORT
GEORGE, B. C.
P. G. B. BODEKER
Land Timber Cruiser
Pre-emptions Located.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Estimates Submitted.
Fort George, B.C. Victoria, B.C.
F. P. Burden, Mgr. F. C. Green, Mgr.
Nelson, B.C., A. H. Green, Mgr.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers, Dominion & B. C. Land Surveyors
SurveyB of Lands, Mines, Townsites, Timber
Limits, Etc.
IV(|f/k|| 	
Repairing   _
C. H. DAVIE
Send articles by mail to Fort George, B.C.
The Indian, gazing into the
murky flow ot' the Fraser, comes
out with his usual spring prophecy of a "hi-yu" run of salmon
this year. Believe we heard the
same prediction last year, when
I am prepared to
Locate Pre-emptors
. ON ISO ACRES OF .
ood Government Land.
WRITE FOR INFORMATION TO
N. C. Jorgensen.
P.O. Box 21. Soulh Fort George, B. C,
'E take this opportunity to inform our many customers and the public generally that the low prices
which have prevailed in our store through the summer
months will be maintained throughout the winter.
PE have been fortunate in receiving most of our heavy
goods before the close of navigation and having our
own teams will be able to bring our goods cvar the road
at the minimum cost. '
RUSSELL PEDEN
W. P. COOKE
LIMBER CO.
Store, Oflice and Lumber Yard, South Fort George
A. WHITE,
PROPRIETOR.
Single and Double Driving Horses.   Saddle and Pack Horses.
New Buggies and Thoroughly Reliable Rigs.
DRAY1NG AND EXCAVATING DONE.
M. C. WIGGINS
Real Estate   garden tracts
FARM LANDS
rTVE<iy      Less than quarter mile from Indian Reserve
J.-Gin       (G.T.P. Townsite).   Price $150 per acre,
A-fD'E'C one-quarter cash, balance six, twelve and
iiA/-I»-.Ili3 eighteen months at 6 per cent.
Settlers located on 160-acres of good Government land.
FOURTH ST.  -  -  SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C
SLATER SHOES
I
Kennedy. Blair & Co., Ltd. R
Corner Second and Hamilton Aves.   -  South Fort George ft
Just received—a complete stock of the celebrated
SLATER SHOES—the standard shoe of America.
We have them in all the very latest styles, and
the prices are very reasonable.
Also a Full line of the Famous McPHERSON SHOES
Io^^^i^V^^'*.^V^^X^^^^^HmwhW>*T/
<r
Eight Sections
South of Fort George, between
West Lake and the Fraser
River. The Pacific & Northwestern line taps the east end
of this block.    $12 an Acre
NTH. WESLEY
REAL ESTATE South Fort George
V
Close & Brown
South Fort George, B. C.
the catch was the smallest in!
'A
many moons.    Lacking time to!H
in the district and avail them- dig up the dope on the question, IA
selves of the opportunity of preempting land if facilities be af-
iorded to secure information in
that regard.
The necessity of such an institution having been recognized by
the government, we see no reason
for procrastination in the execution of the plans. It may be true
tha'. there is no lumber available
a', that point, and to freight the
material in would render prices
prohibitive; but it cannot be denied that there is an abundance
once again we are inclined to ac-jS
cept the noble red's tip as auth-\A
oritative. A
Y/JVjrAL'AVA?/K'JZ'A*,'AiL'Ai.'J£.'AVS
\ Do y©M X
Then  in- Tt
investigate
_      our workmanship and get our estimate.
Navigation on the upper Fraser | A
A   Danforth & MgInnis
is at least a week earlier than j
last year. Two years ago the ]
river Mas open on April 20th.
CHURCH SERVICES.
ST. STEPHEN'S-Services next Sunday: 3 p. m., Children's Service; 7.30,
Evensong and Sermon.
KNOX CHURCH-Services every Sunday evening at 7.30.' C. M. Wright,
Minister.
Contractors & Builders.
Hamilton Hwl First.
NOW IS THE TIME
TO THINK OF   .   .
Your Garden |
We have just received by mail a good assortment of
A Rennie's Flower & Vegetable Seeds jj
A  . . —— i
a   All marked 1912,
b? *^# ^5 --U5 ^K y& 2^ ?R JR.?
b^^JT^^^^^^jr^^il
A. P. ANDERSON
BUILDER AND
CONTRACTOR
Office and Store Fixtures.
Hamilton Ave.    South Fort George
— I
Come in and pick yours out. |
5*W*W«5W>W*S5>W3B?W5!*B*W«Www*^''*
ft      '" ""    '"'      ■" "' "     *"" '    "    ■'■»*■■'■ ■■   ■     —■■ ■ "' ' —"
Fort George Hardware Co.
General Hardware and Sheet Metal Workers.
All kinds of tin and sheet Iron work done.
Camp stoves:
LASELLE AVENUE
Hot air Furnaces,  etc.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE.
,t*»»*,-*-*».*'l'.*,**t;d*-t**CTy..'T,MM^
»•**»
■U
\ u rat mt wiosi vines
Prepare for Opening
of Panama Canal
"They are going to spend a
hundred million dollars from San
Diego to Vancouver in preparing
for the opening of the Panama
canal.
"The Cosmos line of steamers
alone is laying down 12,000 ton
steamers to be used in the German-Panama Puget Sound trade.
The Blue Funnel line, running
ships from Liverpool to Vancouver, are building new ships for
opening of trade.
"Every steamship line of consequence in Europe, Great Britain
and the United States is rushing
construction of new ships. Railways are reorganizing service
with the idea that shipment in
future will be from the west via
the Pacific coast to the east."
This is the way J. K. Cornwall,
M.P.P., who returned to Edmonton recently from a visit to the
Pacific coast, sees the new development promised by the completion of Uncle Sam's great public work in Panama. Mr. Cornwall visited every important city
on the coast from Vancouver to
San Diego. As he sees it, the
completion of the canal means as
much to Edmonton as to any
other city in the west.
All calculations heretofore have
been made upon the understanding that the watershed of traffic
would be in the neighborhood of
Saskatoon, that being the farthest eastern point to which it
has been generally supposed that
empties could be hauled in order
to bring grain back this way for
for shipment to the coast,
"It is not empties that will go
east," says Mr. Cornwall. ' 'When
the season closes on the lakes,
under the present arrangements,
the wheat in this country is locked in. It cannot move east on
account of ice; it must move
west. But the cars that go east
from here at that time will be
coal cars loaded and paying their
own expenses east. Our eastern
limitation will be set by the distance to which Edmonton ships
coal eastward."
CONTACTORS GETTING READY.
Speaking of the railway development, Mr, Cornwall stated that
while in Vancouver he spent
some time with J. W, Stewart of
the Pacific & Great Eastern,
which is the road designed to tap
the prairies from the coast, and
he is quite satisfied that building
of the road will set an entirely
new record in railway construction. Contractors are preparing
at the present time to commence
work, not only from the coast
end, but from' the Fort George
end as well.
A CHANCE FOR EASY MONEY
Checker enthusiasts will be
glad to hear that James Moffat,
ex-coach to Hood, many times
checker champion of the Northwest Territories, is considering
the advisability of issuing a challenge to play all' and sundry of
the Cariboo checker aspirants.
We have the authority of a gentleman who for many years was
the undefeated checker manipulator on the Yukon telegraph line
and who has been giving Mr.
Moffat exhaustive tryouts, that
the latter gentleman is in first-
class shape. It is understood
that he has unlimited capital behind him and there will be no
limit to tbe bets.
Bob Robinson was 70 years old
last Sunday. He expects to reach
the three figures, and has not
taken a drink of water, straight,
for six years, —Greenwood Ledge.
way are now endeavoring to get
permission to run a regular train
all the way from Prince Rupert
to the Skeena crossing. The
demand for passenger traffic and
for freight is so great that the
company's officials are driven
wild as they are not allowed yet
to accept anything, The ballasting of the road is being rapidly
proceeded with and it will not l.e
long before the road bed will be
in pretty, good shape -for trains,
and it is reasonable to believe
that the company will be granted
some concessions in the near
future, Among the most anxious
ones for freight are the local
merchants.—Hazelton Miner.
Rev. James Turner, the pioneer
Methodist preacher, is in the hospital at Pasadena, California, suffering from severe injuries.lthat
he received by being run over by
an automobile while on his way
to church. The old-timers of
Cariboo,Donald, Nelson and other
towns all wish the veteran and
popular parson a speedy recovery.
GENERAL INFORMATION
There are a great number of town-
site properties on thc- market in the
land adjoining the Indian Reservation
here. , Wost of the subdivided properties are owned, sold by or controlled by
the Natural Resources Security Company, Limited, of Vancouver. Their
properties comprise Lots 777, 1430, 936,
1429, 937, 938, 2608, 2610 and 2507.
The South Fort George townsite, the
business and residential centre of the
district, is situated on Lots 933 and
934. The Hudson's Bay Iproperty and
Lots 931 and 932, generally known
as the "Bird Addition" are not as
yet on the market. The area subdivided, and either owned or sold
on the profit sharing; plan by the
Natural Resources Security Company Ltd., totals about 1800 acres.
This concern has been resp»nsible
for such development as may be
found today on a small portion of
Lot 938, the smallest of their subdivisions. Their townsites are located on a high jack-pine flat. The
soil iB gravelly, and, generally speaking, will not produce domestic vegetation. There are no wells on the
townsite, owing to its height, and
water must be brought from the
river. The South Fort George town-
site is a very much smaller area. It
totals about 150 acres, and is situated on the lower benches of the
Fraser River, which is navigated by
the largest steamboats throughout
the open season. The Nechaco River
townsites are not regular ports of
call, as owing to the difficulty in
navigating the Nechaco river except
in high water the boats do not call
there unless paid to do so. Lots in
some sub-divisions of the Natural Resources Security Company Limited
have not increased in value to any
material degree during the past three
yearB. Their initial sub-divisions
art as yet quite indeveloped. South
Fort Georg* is a good live town. It
has been largely built up and de-
yeloped by the pioneer element, who
settled on th* site as soon as it
was placed on th* market. The Late
John Houston, the veteran frontier
newspaperman, established his paper
at South Fort George in its earliest
days. The town contains over two-
thirds of the entire population of all
the inhabited townsites. It has two
banks, the Bank of British North
America and the Trader's Bank of
Canada, two sawmills, tin shop,
three large general stores, a large
theatre, a newspaper issued by the
pioneer publishers of the Cariboo
district, a licenced hotel, pool hall,
bakers, confectioners, two churches,
drug store and restaurants. It is ihe
terminus of the British Columbia
Express Company's mail steamboats
and stage line. It Ib the headquarters
of the Fort George Trading and
Lumber Company's steamboat and
sawmilling operations. Tha headquarters of the Northern Lumber Co.
merchants and sawmill operators.
It is close proximity to the Government buildings, and is situated in
such manner that the main development of the Indian Reservation
will benefit it more directly than
any other sites. The railways that
are to be built from the south must
of necessity follow the Fraser River
shoreline In order to secure a water
grade, and will form a junction with
the main line of the G. T. P. near
the east end of the Indian ReBerve.
Acreage close to the Soutli Fort
George townsite is changing hands
every day tor large figures. The land
comprising the South Fort George
townsite, and all the Fraser River
properties is of excellent quality,
covered with a light growth of poplar with scattered firs*.
The foregoing resume of the town-
Bites here will give the reader some
idea of the respective merits of both
townsites. The Fort George Herald
exploiting companies whose interests appear1 to be opposed. Those
who have invested in South Fort
George property, not too far back
from the river, may rest assurea
that they have excellent value for
the money they have invested, owing
to the rapid growth of development
created by independent initative. If
they desir* to sell they should liBt
their properties with one of the
local realty operators, who are con- !
stantly recqrding handsome profits '■
for Investors. Lots in the townsites
of the Natural Resources .Security i
Company depend for their value on I
their proximity to that portion of I
their property along the waterfront '
at which they are trying to contral- !
lze their development. At that point
the townsite company is putting up
a number of buildings, and are trying
in every way to start a trend of
development, having thoir business
centre for Its radiating point. This
will hardly be accomplished to any
satisfactory degree for the large
majority on their giteB, for a long
time to come. We advise no one to
purchaae on the strength of their advertised statements. Intending investors in any BUb-divislons here
should boar in mind that the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway Company's
townsite will add about one thousand acres more townsite property
to the combined area offered for
habitation. Thc market has been
dangerously Hooded already, and
bearing this in mind the careful investor will not venture his funds in
any townnite that can not actually
claim the active and independent
development that signifies the approval oi the people on the ground.
Unless they can invest in a townsite
that is being developed and increased in value by independent enterprise, they had better await the
sale of the G. T. P. property or
buy in or near the business centre
of the district.
Intending settlers can obtain 160
acres of land by pre-emption. There
are large tracts of land open for
alienation by pre-emption only, in
this district. The land is capable of
raising good crops of garden produce, hay, oats, and practically anything but fruit, which has not so far
proved a success up here, should
maintain that this district should
not be regarded as a fruit growing
country until that branch of culture
has been properly tested. This is
naturally a mixed farming country.
Wild berries, however, are found
throughout the whole northern interior country, as far north as the
Peace River Plateaux. Wagon roadB
are being built into the surrounding
country, and progress will be made
on such public works, as future circumstances demand. The Fraser and
Nechaco Rivers afford transportation
to their tributary valleys, the Fraser
particulary, being navigable for 160
miles south and 315 mileB north of
this point. We believe that the best
way to secure a good pre-emption
is by engaging tbe services of one
of the reliable locators, who make a
business of locating the settler.
Some of these men have been in the
district for a long time, and can
save the land hunter time and cash
by his experience. The Herald will
be pleased to advise the settler regarding lands open for pre-emption
and the best means of obtaining
information  thereof,  on application.
Building materials are at hand in
large quantities. The local mills
have about three million feet of
lumber in the yards, in preparation
for the spring. Lumber costs from
$35 to J75 a thousand feet. People
intending building should consult
by letter some of the local contractors, who, we are informed, will
be pleased to furnish all information.
The fare into the country from the
railway point, Ashcroft, fluctuates
with the seasons. During the summer
when navigation is open on the
Fraser River, May 1st. to October
31st., th* fare amounts to $45, and
the expenses en route about $10.
This is by automobile and steamboat. The winter fare, from November 1st. to March 31st. totals $62,
with expenses of about $15. Travel
in th* winter is by sleigh. The express rate in th* summer is 12} cts.
per lb. The winter rate 20cts. The
summer Freight rate is 6cents, and
the winter rate llcents per lb.
Th* cost of living may be gaged
by the following scale of prices now
prevailing. This rat* will be materially reduced when freight comes
down the Fraser River from Tete
Juane Cache, via th* G. T. P. steel
from Edmonton. This should transpire next summer: Flour 11 cts lb.
Sugar 14 cts. lb. Ham 35 cts. lb.
Bacon 40 cts. tb. Beans 15 cts tb.
foce 15 cts. tb. Dried fruits 25 cts tb.
Overalls sell for $1.25 a pair. Meat
18 cts. tb. Meals in the hotels, however, cost but 50 cents each.
Thc banking interest charged here
is ten per cent.
Employment in the past has been
limited to survey work, building
trades, (carpenters), loggers, steamboat crews, packers, canoe men,
land and timber cruisers, laborers
on government road work, and such
work as has been done towards the
development of townsite properties.
Farm laborers are not in demand as
yet. There is no railway work here
up to the present, but during the
next season and thereafter laborers
may reach the grade from this place,
that is, after next June or July.
Wages range from $4 to $7 a day,
according to the class of labor.
Prospectors will find practically a
virgin field for their explorations
Th* whole district has every indication of being highly mineralized.
I
To Travellers and Shippers!
The Steamer "CHILCOTIN" is ready to launch on the opening of the
river. She will be manned by the same careful and courteous crew as
before.
The AUTOMOBILES of the Auto Transit Co., of Ashcroft, will connect with tho steamer at QUESNEL  und SODA  CREEK  and carry
passengers over the Cariboo Road, connecting with C. P. It. at Ashcroft.
Consign shipments for KOItT GEORGE und all points in the Northern Interior of British Coluinimi lo the CAKE of the STEAMER
"CHILCOTIN" at SODA CREEK.
(A thoroughly Huasoned anil carefully ninnufncturwl {-tod. of LUMBER
ulwayn on hand for LOCAL or OUTSIDE ooltvaHeb.
The Fort George Trading & Lumber Co., Ld.
Tho PIONEERS in tho NAVIGATION anil LUMIIKK indmtrim on tha Unpui* Fruser and
Chas. E. McElroy, Munnt-er.
1'honu 11.
its tributarioH.
First class work only.
Reasonable prices and
prompt attention to
all are the inducements we offer.
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELLER
South Fort George
j
./
'*•*.▼> CT>0
K^WKijr-JKWwirjmwwwwww
Choicest Seasoned Lumber
We have specialized in the Lumber business, which means 3
, that we know this business thoroughly, i id c; i give satis- )S
v   faction by filling orders from a stock of tli j lr ;hes   grades.   A
We Make a Si iciali i of Reasoned FIR Lumber of the Best Cla3S \
A
A
Get estimates from us on all kinds of Building Material.      A
| Northern Lumber Co., Ltd
■i   Head Office and Yard, South Fort George.   Branch Yard at I   .1 George,   i
Hotel
B.C.
a Occidental £
W QUESNELB
S
S
g
B
K
K
r<
Most modern up-to-date hotel in the interior of British
V^   Columbia.
A   New four-storey building.   Accommodation for 120 guests
)fi   All outside rooms—large, well-lighted and ventilated.
5J   Steam heated.
A
RATES $2.00 PER DAY UP
Weekly and monthly rates onapplication
Wire for rooms
Wire for rooms
E. L. KEPNER, Proprietor
^>i3V^^iWVC^^W>s-C^^^><^>^>VV>*WV>
ooe
v
f!
•til
:■* PROVINCIAL AND GENERAL NEWS
An appropriation of $2,00(1 has been
made by the provincial government for
for the construction of sidewalks and
grading streets in New Hazelton.
jimt as much the government's duty to
protect citizena from such outrageous
treatment as irum the burglar and highway men.
Quesnel Forks has just experienced a
serious fire, which was responsible for
the wiping out of the residence of Mr.
William Stephenson, with its contents.
Robert Spinks
Painting and Paperhanging
South Fort George : B.C.
"I didn't mind paying $6 a week for
board in the camps and as for the unsanitary conditions, they could be remedied with u little trouble; but 1 certainly
did object to paying 50 cents to the contractors for an armful of straw to put
in my bunk," said a husky Irishman,
one of the strikers, who came down
trom Yale a few days ago and joined
the colony of idle strikers now at Vancouver.
Victoria claims at least one family ,
which should interest and delight ex-
president Roosevelt and which sets a !
praiseworthy example that if followed |
would have a material bearing upon the
next Dominion census,   The "family"]
consists of live, all under one y^ar of
age, twins having honored the  happy
parents  some little time ago,  to  be
f-lluwed by triplets within the past few
days.      The  tiio are all  prospective
sulfragettes and are 111 living.
Manufacturers of High-Grade Confectionery
ICE CREAM and all kinds of SOFT DRINKS
Catering Tobaccos and Cigars
FOURTH STREET
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
Steamloating on the Skeena river
-that is to say, steambtating between
Prince Kupert and Kitselas-iB practically a thing of the past. While no
dojbt there will be many a private boating trip in the future for a hundred
mileB along what is one of the finest
scenic streams in the world, the regular
schedule Bteamboat service has concluded. Just in proportion to the laying of steel eastward, the volume of
steamer borne traffic on the Skeena has
lessened. Today trainB are running to
a point beyond the canyon, and early
summer will doubtless see the iron
horse in Hazelton, about 130 miles from
Prince Rupert.
TO INTENDING BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS
We invite inspection of our large and well-assorted stock of carefully
manufactured LUMBER. This Lumber was manufactured during the
summer of lllll, was carefully piled and stored for the winter, and is
now THOROUGHLY DRY and in prime condition for building, and sells
at THE SAME PRICE as any other Lumber.
Dimension, Boards, Siding, Shiplap, Ceiling, Finish
MOULDINGS and SPECIAL SAWINGS or DRESSINGS of any kind
The Fcrt George Trading & Lumber Co., Ltd.
THE PIONEER MILL.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C.    Pnone 11.    Chas. E. McElroy, Mgr.
Our GUMLESS SPRUCE SIDING and V-IOINT will not warp, check
nor shrink endways, and contains no gum to cause the paint to peel.
Fifty-one men and women are in line
before the Lethbridge, Alberta, land
office where they will camp until homesteads are thrown open on May first.
The first in line is Carl Jones, of Philadelphia. They will have to withstand
the rain and snow storms, and one of
the three women has a baby in her
arms. "Just let us get Jim Hill to
build a railway through the country we
are after," said one of the men in line,
"and we will be millionaires some
day." During the night blankets are
extended on the sidewalks. The council of Lethbridfte is objectieg to the
sanitary conditions of locality and may
disperse the line up.
K'A
It
A
A
A
A
A
B.C.  MARKET
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Fresli and Cured Meats
Vegetables,  Butter,  Eggs, Etc.
A Poultry,
A
A
FORT GEORGE AND
Ikk -*^5 --.^v <*^v •.^^^^••^^••.^v^K ^w w* vrJ ^5 v/> <y*<v* <v* c
/——
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
nOT-gT  BUY  ON  PAPER
We don't ask you to purchase South Fort George lots by
making a pencil mark on a townsite plan—You would
be safe in so doing, but if skeptical
-.   -_3      COME TO
f SOUTH FORT GEORGE
^=a   Investigate Our Proposition
and you will find a good live town--Two banks, saw mill,
pool hall, newspaper, two general stores, splendid
hotel, bakery, stationery store, mail-boat
landing, scores of buildings,
and crowds of satisfied  buyers
WRITE FOR INFORMATION TO
NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT CO.
172 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B C , or the resident agent,
G. E. McLAUGHLIN
Fourth Avenue, South Fort^George
| 1836 |      Assets Exceed Fifty Million Dollars      | 1912 |
% Bank of British North America
Ygur money is saler in the Bank than in your house or in your
pocket. It is not tied up. You can get It out at any time without delay. NOTES discounted. Local and Foreign Drafts bought
and sold. COLLECTIONS made promptly.   Money Orders issued.
FORT GEORGE BRANCH:
J. MUNRO, ACTING MANAGER
The proposal of the Dominion government to issue silver dollars has been
deferred for the present. The late
government, at the reqnest of the people
of British Columbia principally, passed
an act authorizing the making of "cartwheels" in the Canadian mint. Dies
have been purchased in England and are
now at the mint. Hon. W. T. White,
after looking into the situation, is of the
opinion that the time is not ripe for the
issue of Canadian silver dollars, and the
making of them will be deferred. Tne
coining of five and ten-dollar gold pieces
will be proceeded with, although it is
believed that for the purpose of general
circulation gold is not likely to replace
paper money to any great extent.
Blind pigs cannot thrive in Bulkley
Valley, and it is all owing to a way the
local police have of scenting game of
that kind and running it to earth. Recently a man named Christiansen undertook to operate in a quiet way in a
secluded nook under the eave of Hudson
Bay mountain a short distance back of
Chicken Lake. But he had no more
than got his pig nicely in Rhape to
produce some easy money when along
came Chief Calkin and Special D'Egville
and confiscated the whole plant. Next
day Christianson came up for trial
before Justice of the Peace Murphy,
who, upon finding him guilty, promptly
imposed a fine of $300, or in default
nine months' imprisonment, for daring
to introduce the industry into the valley. I
After a little hesitation ihe three hun-1
dred was paid into court. And that was
the last of the first blind pig caught in
that part.
"^
o Roberts, Jones & Willson □
EDWARD RUBENS Notary Public.      E. E.JONES.      A. J. SELWYN-WILLSON. Audilor.
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS,
VALUATORS and ACCOUNTANTS.
FOR SALE: Farm Lands. Garden Tracts. Timber Limits. Mineral Claims. Valuable town lots.
LIST YOUR PROPERTIES WITH US.
RelWHicej: The Trader's Bank of Cuudi
Tht Bank of Vancouver, Fort Georie, B. C.
TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS  "ERIN" FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Offices: Hamilton Avenue, South Fort George: Central Avenue, Fort George, B. C.
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPRESS
—- COMPANY=
Send for a folder*
Stages
OPERATING
Autos
Send for a folder
Steamboats
From Ashcroft to Fort George, and all points in
the northern interior of British Columbia, carrying
the Royal Mail, passengers and fast freight.
The Palatial Steamer BX Awaits the Arrival of the Company's Stages
Head Office: Ashcroft, B.C.
 . I
Freight consigned to steumcr at Soda
Creek will be promptly forwarded.
The Average Deposit of the
Canadian People is $122.00
per Person
Saving money can be made a habit. A portion of your weekly or
monthly wage deposited regularly in a savings account will soon brine
you up to the average, and you will be surprised how rapidly $2 deposited
weekly will amount to enough to make a substantial payment on your
home.
CAPITAL IND SDRPLUS, SMCO.000       TWAl ASSETS, WWW
THE TRADERS RANK
H. C. SEAMAN, Manager
Sonth Fori OtOW
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
Head Office:
VANCOUVER. B. C.
CAPITAL AUTHORIZED • • •3.000,000
DIRECTORS:
K. P. McLENNAN Esq., President,
Mcl-emian,   McFeely & Co.    Wholesale  Hardware,   Vancouver,  B.   C.
Iy. W. SHATFORD Esq., M. L. A.
Vke-Pres. Merchant, Hcdley, B. C,
HIS HONOR T. W.  PATERSON, Ueu-
tenant-dovcrnor British Columbia.
M.   II.   CARMN,
Cnnltalist, Victoria, B.C.
A. ISTKT, Esq.
C. S. DOUGLAS Esq.
Robert Kennedy, New Westmin-
stsr
J. A. MITCHELL, Esq.. CapltslW-
Victoria. B. 0. .
E. H. HEAPS, Esq., E. H. HraPJ *
Co.. Lumber and Timber; President
Columbia Trust Co.. Ltd., Vnncouver. B. 0.
J. A. HARVEY, Esq,, K.C., formerly
ol Cranbrook, B.C.. Vancouver, B.t.
A. L. DF.WAR. General Manager.
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
FORT GEORGE BRANCH-F. LIPSCOMB, Manager.
A
"ITH SPRING everyone wants something
NEW. Try this store for the best the
market affords. We are showing a particularly
nice line of
Prints, Ginghams. Muslims^
Labor conditions in the plants of the j A
V,. S. Steel Corporation were denounced j *R
as  "a  brutal   system   of   industrial;^
slavery" in the Benate labor and edu-ljj
cation committee's report in  the pro-' f^
posed  eight-hour law for government' A
contract labor.     This government is
bound in its own defence, for its citizenship, its life, to interpose between1^
the strong and the weak," the report Vj   T-1
declares.   "No man can meet the obli-;^   J^ TOllt StT66t
gations and discharge the dutieB of citi- ^
zenship in a free government who is
broken in spirit and wrecked in body
through such individual peonage,    lt ■
%
If your storekeeper has not got it, try Quesnel's
leading merchant
FARM LANDS IN CENTRAL
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fort George
!(District.
Nechaco Valley
Bulkley Valley
Skeena Valley
In every case our
lands were carefully inspected by
expert cruisersbe-
fore we purchased
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY will make all these districts
accessible to all the world. Every rail laid adbs
to the value of the land
I
Quesnel, B. C.
Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.
North Coast Land Co. Ltd
General Offices: 619 to 624 Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver,B*'
London Oflice:   6 Old Jewry.
PAID-UP CAPITAL, ".        T       . $1,500,000.
ADVERTISE IN II HERALD
i - ..M*.A J
\
M

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