BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Fort George Herald 1912-03-30

Item Metadata

Download

Media
fgherald-1.0344943.pdf
Metadata
JSON: fgherald-1.0344943.json
JSON-LD: fgherald-1.0344943-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): fgherald-1.0344943-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: fgherald-1.0344943-rdf.json
Turtle: fgherald-1.0344943-turtle.txt
N-Triples: fgherald-1.0344943-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: fgherald-1.0344943-source.json
Full Text
fgherald-1.0344943-fulltext.txt
Citation
fgherald-1.0344943.ris

Full Text

 The season of navigation opens May 1st
Transportation will
he procurable from
Edmonton, Alberta to
Ashcroft on the C. P.
R.
•S.
rW^TlrT#/                 S'iWUp5^
r*!*adlMBU^G5
• *~^.?it§?*Iiei
ytlf***?^
''■^Z&F£&-_£*&&
^^S&^z^***
***
*±jm,
mK
This",
unrivalled for its nbk
elty, lor the scenery
en route, and for the
comfort and speed in
which such a journey
may be made
1/
VOLUME 3, NO. 12
SOUTH POBT GEORGE, B.C MARCH 30th, 19 12.
$3 PEB ANNUM
Bustling Construction Camps
Here Within Next Few Weeks
CITY AND DISTRICT
Thos. Moore, Wm.  Hunt and
Pat McCloskey arrived here on
Tuesday having "mushed" over
the pack trail  from Hazelton,
making the journey in   twelve
days.    They  are employees of
the firm of Sheedy & Smith, who
have the contract for clearing the
right-of-way from Aldermere to
Fort George.   The right-of-way
has been completed to Fraser
Lake and within the next couple
of weeks work will be commenced westward from this point to
join up with the completed line
from the Pacific.    Mr. Sheedy,
the active member of the firm,
will arrive here within the next
few days, coming over the road
from Fraser Lake via Blackwater.
The new arrivals bring word
that the grade has been extended far down the Bulkley valley
and is now at a point near Burns
Lake.
Steel from the west reached
the Skeena river crossing two
weeks ago. This information
shows that the company has made
rapid progress during the past
two months and gained three
weeks over the time in which it
was expected to reach the Skeena.
It has also been learned that in
sseking rock bottom for the piers
of the bridge to cross the river
into New Hazelton, the company
struck rock thirty feet before
they expected to, with the result
that considerable time and the
use of 10,000 barrels of cement
was saved. The piers are now
finished and in readiness for the
steel construction.
Fine weather is given as the
reason for the rapid construction
being realized on the line. The
weather during the past three
months has been unusually mild
along the line of the new railway
to the steel-laying and practically all the snow is off the ground.
FORT GEORGE BRIDGE NEXT.
All the machinery and equipment for the building of bridge
piers that was in use on the
Skeena is being shipped to Tete
Jaune Cache and will be brought
here with the opening of navigation. Work will then be commenced on the five massive piers
that are to span the Fraser at
this point.
There are two surveyed lines
crossing the Fraser from the Indian reserve here. One crosses
by way of Observation island at
the mouth of the Nechaco; the
other is some distance south of
this at a point just opposite the
mission church. At the latter site
t e channel of the river narrows
co .uderably, making the problem
of bridge construction a simple
one, By the latter line the approach to the right-of-way on
the opposite shore allows an easy
grade, and for these reasons the
opinion is general that the southern site has been chosen by the
railway contractors.
Pacific is now at a point 28 miles
west of Yellowhead Pass.
Unusual activity prevails on
the 25-mile gap separating it
from Tete Jaune Cache. The
contractors are anxious to have
the track extended without delay
to the latter place, which is the
head of navigation on the Fraser
and where they are constructing
two stern-wheel steamboats to be
used in distributing material and
supplies for the section all the
way from Tete Jaune Cache to
Fort George.
With the object of finishing
the gap before the spring freshets arrive, gangs are engaged
day and night at construction
work. The sight of carbide lights
in the deep cuts filled with laborers presents a strange spectacle
at night in that remote region.
Five hundred teams are also engaged in hauling supplies over a
sleigh road to Tete Jaune Cache
which will be the base camp all
next summer.     ;
Early spring will see the grading outfits strung along the Fraser river all the way to Fort
George.
Six passengers arrived on last evening's stage.
H. E. Cordingly, of Vancouver, was
an arrival on last evenings stage. He
takes the position of accountant for
Kennedy, Blair & Co.
J. P. Enemark, of the B. C. Market,
left on Sunday for Soda Creek to complete arrangements for shipment by
first boat of live stock bought last fall
for spring delivery.
Or. election day M. C. Wiggins presided as deputy returning officer, with
William G. Fraser as poll clerk. The
poll was held in the road superintendent's office on Second street.
THE RACE IS KEEN
FROM EASTERN ENO
From the east, railhead on the
mainline of the Grand Trunk
HIGHLY ILLUMINATING
E. H. Molstead, president of
the Fort George & Fraser Valley
Land Co., Edmonton agents for
the Hammond townsites, has the
following brilliant idea in an interview with an Edmonton paper:
"Another factor that has
cleared up the railroad situation
is the recent decision of the railway commission at Ottawa to
leave the location of the G.T.P.
station with the Fort George
board of trade. This will eliminate the pretensions of outside
townsites."
Molstead is well known here
and statements emanating from
him generally need revising. The
above statement by Molstead is
not the result of error, but absolutely untrue.
Mr. Moore, official of the provincial
land department, who spent a couple of
weeks here investigating matters connected with pre-emtion lands, left on
Monday's stage for the coast.
Sleighing is now practically a thing
of the past. In the open spaces not a
vestige of snow remains. The past
winter's snowfall was an unusually
light one and an early breakup of the
river ice is predicted.
H. Baker, freighter, arrived from
Quesnel Monday with 4000 pounds of
powder for road construction in this
locality this season. The explosives are
stored on the Collins Addition. Similar
quantities have been forwarded to Nechaco and Fraser Lake.
J. B. Daniell, editor of The Herald,
left Monday for Ashcroft and coast
cities. Mr. Daniell, as is probably well
known, is being sued ly Geo. J. Hammond, president of the Natural Resources Security Co., for criminal libel
in connection with statements made in
this paper regarding Hammoud's past
career. The trial is set for the May
assizes at Clinton.
I. A. White has acquired the interest
of A. G. Hamilton in the livery business hitherto conducted by Hamilton &
White and will carry on the business at
tbe old stand on Second street. Mr.
Hamilton goes to the farm across the
Mechaco, to which place he has already
forwarded farming implements, seed
and equipment for the spring work.
Not wishing to break off too suddenly
with the busy affairs of city life, he
promises his friends to come over and
spend Dominion Day with them.
The Era of Expansion and
Development Has Arrived
NEW SCHOOLHOUSE
AN URGEjTNECESSITY
During his recent visit here
Mr. John A. Fraser was a visitor
to the public school and made inquiries as to the number of pupils
registered. He learned that at
present there are more than 30
children of school age resident
here, but that less than half that
number are attending school owing to the crowded and unsanitary state of the schoolroom.
Mr, Fraser promised to urge
the immediate construction of a
commodious government school.
The school trustees are also in
communication with the department of education, so that the
present state of affairs promises
to be speedily remedied.
W. F. COOKE RETURNS
W. F, Cooke, of the Northern
Lumber company, who has spent
the past three months in the east,
returned to South Fort George
on last evening's stage. Mr.
Cooke, like all who have visited
outside points of late, predicts an
enormous influx of people to this
country this year. South Fort
George still hods the palm
as an investment proposition, he
says, and the demand for residence and business property will
be keen with the opening of
navigation.
Mr. Cooke was the representative of the independent interests
of this district at the recent sitting of the railway commission
at Ottawa, and promises The
Herald a full report of the proceedings at an early date.
The Bank of B.N.A. has opened a
branch in Lillooet with Mr. Jas. Cran
as manager, who is well known here.
Conservatives
Liberals . .
Socialists  .   .
40
0
2
Thursday's provincial election
resulted in a clean sweep for the
McBride government. The complete returns show that out of a
total of 42 seats the Conservatives won 40. Not a single Liberal is elected. Nanaimo and
Newcastle, true to tradition, returned Socialist members. Brewster, the lone Liberal in the last
parliament, went down to defeat
in Victoria. The opposition is
now composed of the two Socialists, Parker Williams, of Ntw-
castle, and J. Place, of Nanaimo.
The Conservative candidates
for this riding, Mr. Jno. A. Fraser
and Dr. Callanan, were returned
by good majorities. The result
of the final count of ballots had
not been received up' to noon today, but it is believed Mr. Holt,
the Liberal candidate, has lost his
deposit.
Mr. Fraser heads the list of
candidates by a large majority.
Fort George townsite, on the Nechaco, was the only polling place
to give the Liberal candidate a
■<■),'. ;».; •
■ ■ .W-;
*-**•.'
V: '•?;'
f'** '»■   '
>t«,;.
\    1
>$>♦■■  '■
M&
!§*''''•
''
.V,'"JH
Lw.T "
. Ill
fel
i^M
Br*-!
■"**v»&h
' $2m
^1
JOHN A. FRASER, M.L.A.
Re-elected to the Provincial Legislature
in Thursday's Election.
majority.   Thus did Hammond-
ville leap into fame in a day.
Here is the official count of
ballots as received up to noon today. With Chilcotin, Beaver
Pass, Stanley and Soda Creek
yet to hear from, it is conceded
that the Conservative majority
will be largely increased:
Blackwater—Fraser 6, Callanan 2,
Holt 1.
South Fort George-Fraser 42, Callanan 25, Holt 21. (Four spoiled ballots.)
Fore George-Holt 23, Fraser 19,
Callanan 11.
Quesnel-Fraser 80, Callanan 65,
Holt 57.
150-Mile House-Fraser 27, Callanan
18, Holt 12.   -
Horsefly—Fraser 11, Callanan 4,
Holt 6.
Fraser Lake-FraBer 18, Callanan 11,
Holt 3.
Quesnel Forks—Frarer 6, Callanan 5,
Holt 1.
Barkerville-Callanan 68, Fraser 18,
Holt 11.
If any uncertainty really existed in the minds of the people as
to the future of South Fort
George and its prospects as the
centre of the real activity that
is due to commence with the
opening of spring, that disbelief
has been banished by the recent
decision of the Dominion Railway
Commission in refusing the ap-
plicate of a townsite exploiting
outfit for the location of the railway station in proximity to their
galaxy of subdivisions.
The clear Cariboo air in the
vicinity of this metropolis is full
of the quintessence of optimism
and energy. Procrastination has
been relegated to the distant past,
and henceforth things are going
to happen in quick succession in
the capital of New Cariboo.
The reader may perhaps gather
from the foregoing that South
Fort George is approaching an
era of expansion and development. This is correct. Present
indications lead to the conclusion
that more permanent and substantial buildings will be erected
here the coming season than during the two year period since th©
birth of the town.
Following is a list of buildings
arranged for during the past few
days:
The Traders Bank, Hamilton
avenue. Plans are now completed for a handsome 2-storey bank
building 24x50. The upper floor
will be finished for manager's
quarters and the building and
its appointments thoroughly modern.   It will be furnace-heated,
Mr, Al. Johnson, proprietor of
Hotel Northern, has completed
plans for a large 30-room addition to his well-known hostelry.
Close & Brown will commence
shortly on the construction of a
California bungalow on Sixth St.
This residence will be, without
doubt, the finest in this section
of country. The plans are the
work of a celebrated architect.
Mr. Hilbert is constructing a
two-story building on Hamilton
avenue, a short distance west of
Hotel Northern.
Messrs. Gross, McLean and
Smith will build new residences,
those of the two last named now
being under way.
PROMISES REDISTRIBUTION
Premier McBride, in a telegram to a prominent Conservative of this district who
urged upon the premier the
need of more direct representation for Fort George, replied
as follows:
Victoria, March 26, 1912.
Yours of 8th just received on my
return to Victoria.   Question of redistribution will be taken up at an
early date. R. McBRIDE.
BOARD OF TRADE
EXECUTIVE MEETING
The executive of the Board of
held their regular meeting in the
Frehall on Monday, J. R. Campbell presiding.
Ways and means were discussed as to the best method to raise
the funds necessary for the construction of sidewalks on the
principal streets, and the matter
was finally left in the hands of a
committee composed of Messrs.
Wiggins, Seaman and the Secretary. Messrs. McLaughlin, Wiggins and the Secretary were appointed a publicity committee.
The necessity of hospital accommodation was discussed, but
no definite action was taken in
the matter. FOOT GEORGE HERALD
PUBLISHED BY THE
H03THERN INTERIOR PRINTING CO. Ltd.
J. B. DANIELL. PRE8IDENI
Devoted   to   the   interests   of   Fort
George and the entire Northern Interior.
J. B. DANIELL. Editor.
THE ELECTIONS.
The result of Thursday's elections, in which the Conservative
government was returned to
power practically without opposition, means much to the province of British Columbia and to
this district in particular. The
stamp of unanimous approval has
been placed on the progressive
policy outlined by Premier McBride, the outstanding item of
which is government aid for the
immediate construction of a line
of railway from Vancouver to
Fort George. Thursday's sweeping victory has guaranteed the
district of Fort George an early
completion of this road to the
trade centres of the coast.
Locally the election created
considerable interest, though the
return of the government candidates, Mr. John A, Fraser and
Dr. Callanan, was conceded by
all parties. The efforts of the
supporters of the lone Liberal
candidate, Mr. John Holt, were
aimed chiefly in the saving of
that gentleman's deposit, and
this was accomplished by a narrow margin. Still, the showing
made by Mr. Holt in a few polling places was surprising. Over
on the Nechaco townsites, out of
a total of 42 votes, Holt received
a majority of five. In every
other polling place throughout
Cariboo the government candidates were given a majority.
Dr. Callanan, evidently feeling
certain of his return to the legislative halls, made no campaign
whatever, and the larger vote
polled by Mr. Fraser is explained
by the vigorous campaign he
waged from one end of the district to the other.
and property owner. South Fort
George, as a town of permanency
and a field for lucrative investment, has no peer in the New
Cariboo.
The report circulated yesterday
that late Liberal candidate Holt
had been offered the position of
townsite manager for George J.
Hammond, is effectively contradicted by one in authority, who
states that a brand new "tyee"
from the Bower building is now
en route to assume the foreman-
ship. The perpetrators of this
alleged joke on Mr. Holt owe the
late Liberal candidate an abject
apology.
It is now up to the Hammond
townsite organ to claim credit
for the defeat of the government
candidates at the Hammondville
poll. In last week's issue of the
Tribune a deliberate attempt was
made to discredit Mr. Fraser, the
energetic member for this district. The attack was all the more
surprising considering the fact
that the townsite organ has received hundreds of dollars in
government patronage during
the past year.
NEW CONDITIONS.
It is confidently expected that
by diligent effort the FortGeorge-
Stoney Creek road can be opened
for traffic at the end of this season. In that event the Board of
Trade would do well to remind
the postoffice department that a
mail service will be required between here, Fraser Lake and way
points. The old routes and contracts for the delivery of mail in
these parts much change on the
advent of the G. T. P. railway,
and it must be accepted as a fact
that within twelve months we
can obtain a better mail service
over the railway, with stage or
steamboat connections on the
upper Fraser, than we can over
the Cariboo road. The attention
of the authorities, both federal
and provincial, cannot be too
persistently called to the impending changes affecting the interests of every resident of northern
Cariboo, in order that every department of the public service
may be prepared to handle with
dispatch the increased volume of
business thrust upon it by the
inauguration of transportation
facilities between this point and
the east by way of the upper
Fraser.
The resusitation and complete
rejuvenation of the Board of
Trade is a source of satisfaction
to the citizens of this thriving
trade centre. The fact that the
Board is taking up matters of
supreme moment to the town and
its welfare-hospital accommodation, and the need for more sidewalks-should arouse the interest
and support of every  resident
THE HEROIC RAFTSMEN.
A gentleman named Jones, who sells
nails and tarpaper to the good people
of Edmonton, left that place last fall
and journeyed over the new G.T.P.
construction to the end of steel en route
to Tete Jaune Cache as a point for embarkation to Fort George. Mr. Jones
came down the Fraser river on a raft
with a couple of companions, and seems
to be laboring under the impression
that he has done something very wonderful, for a thrilling story of the journey down the Fraser appears in the
current issue of the "Wide World
Magazine." The story may convey the
idea that Mr. Jones is in the Livingstone or Speak class to the distant
readers of the "truth is stranger than
fiction" magazine, but the yarn takes
us back to the controversy that raged
some years ago over the statements of
that vivid imaginator, Louis DeRouge-
mont, whose stunts on some desert isle
appeared in the "Wide World Magazine" and were so largely commented
upon.
The journey down the Fraser River
on a raft has been made so many times
that it is commonplace. If Mr. Jones
had inquired he might have learned that
many years ago, before the building of
the Canadian Pacific Railway, parties
of voyageurs even made the trip with
horses on their rafts. The sort of publicity given by the "Wide World Magazine" to such occurrences as Mr. Jones'
experience on a raft do not inspire one
with any great degree of respect for
the balance of the material gathered
in its pages from pseudo-adventurers.
The journey down the Fraser is certainly not one to be attempted by
"greenhorns." The shores of this
river are already littered with tho
cairna of the drowned, and such baldei-
dash as the article referred to may
lead to the emulation of such stunts by
men who imagine they are performing
great deeds of valor, whereas in reality
they are undertaking something the
gravity of which they do not realize in
the least.
him. A groat deal of it belongs
now to realty companies, the remainder to" private individuals and
pre-emptors. If he wishes to locate near the city, which it appears certain will grow around the
meeting place of the Fraser and
Nechaco, he must buy.
On the other hand, should he
wish to take up government land
under the pre-emption system, he
must head northward where a
tract of 250.000 acres has been
recently thrown open for this purpose by the provincial government.
The land registry for the whole
of this district has, up till lately,
been situated in Barkerville, and
there, owing to the enormous number of applications which were received and for other reasons, a
considerable amount of leeway has
to be made up. However, the government'office has now been built
on land adjoining the Hudson's
Bay store, and from it the surrounding country will in future be
administered. Officials are installed and matters are being
straightened out. considerably.
It is probable that of the large
pre-emption tract mentioned a
considerable amount will be found
to be covered by previous applications for purehase, and in a
lesser degree it may happen that
land now apparently staked will
be found to lie open.
However this may be, accurate
information may now be obtained
on the spot by the land looker.
Here as on the prairies are land
cruisers and locators. One may
try them if one wishes. Certainly
it is to their advantage to get a
man properly located. The present arrangement is one of "when
you get official notice that the land
we have shown you is available
for your purpose, pay us our fee."
Government land costs the pre-
emptor $1 per acre. He pays nothing for two years, and then 25
cents per acre for the succeeding
four years.
And of what nature is this land,
which may possibly be acquired at
the foregoing price, or that whieh
is held for sale at prices ranging
from $10 to $2"> per acre?
If you come by road from Ques
nolle to Fort George tho country
traversed will not greatly impress
you with its farming capabilities,
save here and there in patches.
Neither if you arc content to eat
your head off lounging round the
town waiting for the good green
earth to run to you, or listening to
disparaging stories, will you grow
moro hopeful.
Yet, westward of your northern
trail lies a rich farming country
around the Mud valley, and over
the big brown and green bank of
the Fraser, which looks at you
always, there lies a broad expanse
of agricultural land, both samples of that which scattered in all
awaits the coming of the plow.
The trouble, you find,  is that
everything beyond the company's
store and its fertile fields is so new
(Continued on page 3.)
Our Prices f ii Hot Advance |
E take this opportunity to inform our many customers and the public generally that the low prices
which have prevailed in our store through the summer
months will be maintained throughout the winter.
?E have been fortunate in receiving most of our heavy
goods before the close of navigation and having our
own teams will be able to bring our goods cvjr the road
at the minimum cost.'
RUSSELL PEDEN
W. F. COOKE
LUMBER CO.
Store, Office and Lumber Yard, South Fort George
►:
►:
►:
►:
|
I
HAMILTON & WHITE
PROPRIETORS
and Peed Stables
Second St.
Rigs, Saddle and Pack Horses furnished on short notice.
Draying of all kinds and excavating done. Feed of all sorts
continually kept on hand.
Terms reasonable and satisfaction guaranteed.
M. C. WIGGINS
farm lands     Real Estate  garden tracts
155 acres 6 miles above
17m*t fi -PAIMF-P on Nechaco Kiver with G. T.
1W11 »WI S^ P. survey throngh property.
Price $12.50 an acre l-3rd cash, balance 6,12 and 18 mos.
Settlers located on 160-acrea of good Government land.
FOURTH ST.  -  -  SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C
A SLATER SHOES
m "
L
Just received—a complete stock of the celebrated
SLATER SHOES-the standard shoe of America.
We have them in all the very latest styles, and
the prices are very reasonable.
Also a Full line of the Famous McPHERSON SHOES
Kennedy, Blair & Co., Ltd.
Corner Second and Hamilton Aves.   -  South Fort George
tr
im LAND, AND THOSE
WHO MAKE GOOD ON IT
(By K. Mykrs and Hugh Savage.)
There are many who have run
the gauntlet of the "knockers"
along the trail, only to find that
when automobile and steamer can
no longer carry them, their courage ebbs to a vanishing point, just
as their seeming goal at Kort
Oeorge is reached, Hut he who
has first counted the cost, and
knows oHhe conditions of life in
new lands, will likewise know that
Fort George is hut the center or
jumping-off place for the land
seeker to head for. And there,
too, begins the expensive process
of locating a suitable portion of
mother earth.
The settler will learn soon after
the steamer hrings np against the
landing that practically the whole
of the land in tlie vicinity of Fort
George, whieh is suitable for farming has already been taken up by
men who got on the scene before
I am prepared to
Locate Pre-emptors
 ON 10O ACRES OF	
Good Government Land.
WRITE FOR INFORMATION TO
N. C. Jorgensen.
t. 0. Box 21. South Fort Gwr««, B. C,
^
^
Eight Sections
South of Fort George, between
West Lake and the Fraser
River. The Pacific & Northwestern line taps the east end
of this block.    $12 an Acre
BLR WESLEY
REAL ESTATE South Fort George
 J)
\ Close & Brown
I
K'Ai.'At'AL'AL'AL'Ai'M.'^'M'M'Ai.'^IS
jj Do you
|j contemplate
A. 1        *»TI   Ho a  Then  i
«% Then in-
'r   vestigate
_i •   our workmanship antl get our estimate.
Danforth & McInnis
Contractors & Builders.
Hamilton und First.
South Fort George, B. C.
GENERAL
MERCHANTS
tC*?K*^*^^3^^jr^^*7I"J3(5^-i
A. P. ANDERSON
CABINET WORK:
Sash,
Doors
and General Wood Work:
HAMILTON AVENUE
NOW IS THE TIME
TO THINK OP   .   .
 jj
Your Garden I
We have just received by mail a good assortment of
Rennie's Flower & Vegetable Seeds
8  All marked 1912.
M
>m ~*<&*%v*vW*<w*<¥*v¥*v
Come in and pick yours out,
v <»▼# JK \^ w *W v9* &* &* --JK 3^ ^K 3^ iS^ &* JB <W *▼/
I
•A
fm'4sxxmmmmw^.'MKmw.)AXMmmw.MMw.iimummmiamitmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmwg
Fort George Hardware Co.
Ill I   L.  ——
General Hardware and Sheet Metal Workers.
All kinds of tin and sheet Iron work done.
Camp stoves:
LASELLE AVENUE
Hot air Furnaces,  etc.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE.
'.»iAmmmMmxmw.»r/4iMy:xxiisw.iKMW.mmMKXMmmmtmsmmMmmmmmiimmmtm unja umi' ««i/ *»wB-a j iu uuunueuce construction nearby
WHO MAKE GOOD ON IT before coming in. The price asked
  jis from $18 to $20 per acre.   On
(Continued from page 2.) |tne northern bank of the Nechaco
ThP town is new the *fruit trees aFe bein8 experimented
The town is new, tne,^ and Qatg look ^ ^^
and untried .^^^^^^^^——
country is new, its resources, both
mineral and agricultural, at present largely untried, and comparatively only scratched. But surely
someone must be making good,
you say, so accordingly you look
around for him.
Walk along the Fraser to the reserve and an Indian will gladly—
and for 50 cents—ferry you over
the swift stream in his Cottonwood
canoe, for the government has not
yet installed its promised ferry.
There are two of these useful institutions to be put in hereabouts,
one across the Nechaco, linking up
the trail to Giscombe and the adjacent districts, the other connecting the eastern bank of the Fraser
and giving access to the valleys
beyond.
You land at the foot of a recently constructed wagon road, and,
climbing the first steep ascent, follow the curves and undulations for
some two miles. There then appears a snug log house, with stable, chicken roost and outbuildings, all neatly fenced, and standing within a cleared patch of some
ten acres. Here dwells the man
who is making good. Let us see
what his experience has been.
He holds a purchase of 320
acres, land which up till eight
months ago looked just the same
as the surrounding country; here,
almost clear of timber, save for a
growth of willow. That fire has
in all probability swept this tract
on two occasions can be deduced
from an old growth of scorched
willow. The soil is a clay-like formation called silts, and above it
lies in a depth varying from a few
inches to one foot, a layer of vegetable loam. When plowed up
and exposed to sun this land, says
our informant, should be capable
of growing anything. Certainly
the present crops in his clearing
show goodly promise of his words
being true.
Here the timothy, millet and
clover promise feed for the winter; the frost did not touch the
potatoes, and turnips, roots of all
kinds, lettuce, parsnips, cabbage
and similar gnrden truck are all
flourishing. This settler is also
planting fruit trees. They may
bear or may not, in any case they
will afford welcome shade and
beautify the place. But with the
smaller fruits and berries more
definite results may be looked for.
The wild strawberry grows luxuriantly over the whole land and ripens, and experts aver that this is a
most promising sign.
The ground contains plenty of
moisture, the railfall in summer
being quite adequate to preclude
any irrigation methods. Our
friend is sinking a well. He went
through fourteen feet of silts, then
sixty feet of gravel, and still has
not struck water. However, a
stream exists not far away. "I
shouldn't wonder if there was not
an old river bed under that gravel," he said, "and it is possible
that some one in sinking wells may
nnd a paystreak, if conditions here
may be judged from those in Alaska. After all the streams here
head in the same direetion as docs
Williams creek, and Barkerville is
not so far away."
But to return to the land. A
further mile along the trail and
one stands overlooking a fine valley, patched here and there with
green timber, but for the most part
practically cleared by the same
agency of fire mentioned previously, and bounded by thc bold out-
bue of the Cariboo range, which
crosses the Fraser, fifteen miles
south at Fort George Canyon.
Southward again equally good
lanl is reported.
A further couple of miles will
bring one to a cluster of pre-emptors, Their holdings are green
with growing oats, which are cut
•or feed. The soil here is similar
to that we have considered, but as
one goes southward there is greater depth of black loam. Northward lies the Six Mile Lake country and in all this expanse we are
informed there arc only eleven
settlers. There are others to whom
the land has been sold and who are
probably waiting for the railway
This little survey of what anyone may actually see for himself
may be of use to the intending
settler.   At present summer frosts
! occur, having sometimes the most
peculiar effects.   For instance, on
June 19 last, out of twelve rows
of garden truck grown in a garden
of South Fort George, seven were
frosted and the other remainder
untouched.   These summer frosts
will—if one may judge by the re
suits achieved iu other newly de
veloped   countries—gradually   be
eliminated and disappear, as the
ground is cleared and opened up
to the sun.    At present, in the
woods which cover the land, the
top layer of mossy vegetation has
the same effect of keeping the subsoil cold, as is produced by wrapping up ice in a blanket.    The
trees are easily felled, as the roots
are for the most part on the surface though sometimes having a
tap root into the silts beneath. You
may just cut these roots and leave
the wind to do the rest if you will.
The silts soil may be seen on the
newly cut roads.   Fresh, it looks
like good brickmaking material,
but on the older cuts you may see
its disentegration into soil, which
everyone claims is capable of returning the very best results.
At this time of writing the work
offering in and around Fort
George is limited, and there are
enough to do it. Consequently a
man taking up lanl should be prepared to stay with it. In any case
this is the type of settler most to
be desired, as the time spent in
working out is the very period
when he can best improve his holding. Stock must be fed for from
three to four months. The winters, through cold, are dry and
healthy, wind being rare.
A reliable estimate of the
amount of money needed to bridge
over the first two years which will
elapse before returns are received
from a farm is $2,000. This, when
the settler is actually arrived on
his land. Many may do with less,
especially when construction work
on the railway begins, but it must
always be borne in mind that prairie conditions are not those of the
northern interior of British Columbia.. In any case you must buy
your land, and you will probably
have to clear it.
The possibilities of any new
land are a quantity which no man
may estimate with certainty. But
as far as one may judge, from the
strategical position occupied by
Fort George, from the promise of
the agricultural and mineral development of the district it cen*
ters, there is every likelihood that
for the type of sturdy farmer who
has made good under similar conditions, or indeed for anyone who
is prepared to go slowly and learn
as he goes, opportunity waits here
on endeavor, .' but—come well
heeled.
Fort George
Drug Co.
Prescriptions a
Specialty
NEW BOOKS Sta. A
the best
large shipment just received
Toilet articala, Patent Medicines,
Maipizines,Bue.ks, Stationery,
Toilet Articles, Drug-gists' Sundri
Intend Building?
NOW is the time to build,
whilst seasoned lumber is
obtainable. Labor conditions
are now in your favor. We
contract to design and construct your building, guaranteeing satisfaction: Call
or write us.
L
Bronger & Flynn
Builders and Contractors
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
TUP
CLUB POOL ROOM
THIRD AND  HAMILTON STS.
DAVIS & FORREST, Props.
Smokers' supplies
a specialty
Four pool tables
Splendid environments
gore & McGregor,
B. C. LAND SURVEYORS
Victoria and
Fort George, B. C.
P. G. B. BODEKER
Land Timber Cruiser
Pre-emptions Located.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Estimates Submitted.
Fort George. B.C. Victoria, B.C.
F. P. Burden, Mgr. F. C. Green, Mgr.
Nelson, B.C., A. H. Green, Mgr.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
(M Eafmtn, Dec-Miss IB. C. Usd Surrey-xi
Surveys of Lands, Mines, Townsites, Timber
Limits, Etc.
^WJlW#*h Satisfaction guar-
Repairing   **
C. H. DAVIE
Send articles by mail to Fort George, B.C.
Occidental
Hotel
QUESNEL
B.C.
Most modern up-to-date hotel in the interior of British
Columbia.
New four-storey building.  Accommodation for 120 guests
All outside rooms—large, well-lighted and ventilated.
Steam heated.
RATES $2.00 PER DAY UP
Weekly and monthly rates on>pplication
Wire for roomB Wire for rooms
E. L. KEPNER, Proprietor
PES
a
irtiser:
THE HERALD is the recognized newspaper of the New
Cariboo. The entire district
is thoroughly covered and its
influence extends far beyond
the confines of the province.
Its advertisers reap rich returns as a result of their investment in HERALD publicity, why not get on the bandwagon yourself?
Advertising Rates on Application
Tie Fort George Herald
South Fort George British Columbia GENERAL NEWS
The Hazelton Herald prints a story
of Philip  Sutton, a Skeena river Indian,  who was left to take care of
the scrv.ces while the regular pastor
was away.    Un  Sunday night Philip
was    conducting    tlie    service  when
the gasoline lights went low.   While
the congregation was singing Philip
went out with a lamp to see   wnat
was   wrung.    He stuck the lamp in
the box with the gasoline tank and
in au instant  Philip  started on  his
way   to heaven.     As   he passed the
church windows he saw Rachel weep- j
igg   aud    he changed  his  mind  and
started down for the other place, but
the ground was frozen and as a result of his sudden contact with terra
lirma Ins knee  was knociteh out   of
joint, nis wrist was sprained and the
hair was all scraped oif hie face.    He
is now just able to be around.
me Mormons, wno nave great- oow-s   »«■*•- ---
ly improved the Cardstoncouutry It is said that the order lo remove
sonth of Calgary, where the col- to Nevada has come from Presi-
onyis located, are to nu»e ina dent Smith, head oi the chmen
body back to the United States,: at Salt Lake City.
Manufacturers of High-Grade Confectionery
ICE CREAM and all kinds of SOFT DRINKS
Catering Tobaccos and Cigars
L
FOURTH STREET
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
Owiog to the developments in railway building In the northern interior, tiie department of forests and
lands has sent Mr. J. R. Martin, of
Nelson to Fort Lleorge to act as assistant to tae department in charge
of the district ftom Hazelton to Tete
Jaune Sadie. The new appointment
has been announced by Chief Inspector McKay.
Mr. Martin's duties are made necessity by the opening up of the G.
T.P. railway. His headquarters will
be at Port George, and he will inspect thc lands adjoining the right
of way to see that they are protected from lire. He will also inspect
the portable mills in the district and
the ties that are cut for the road.
Rev. Father Coccola, of the Roman Catholic church, Fort St.James
has arrived in Prince Rupert, having
made the trail by pony, p, dog team
and on snowshoes all the eight hundred odd miles between his pastorate
and Prince Rupert. Father Coccola
Is a pioneer of the church in the western wilds. Years ago he founded
the St. Eugene mission in Bast Koo-
tenay, and his experiences on the
trail are many.
G. J. Hammond, president of the
Natural Resources Security Company
Limited, of ,• ancouver B, C, is announcing to lot-holders that the company has sold' their equity in tue
agreements for sale on lots in the
townsites they have sold up the Nechaco River to date. This may mean
any of a variety of things, but to us
it points to the fact that Mr. Hammond is "getting from under". The
purchaser named is our old friend
Albert Dollenmayer, sometimes referred to as the rag-picker from Minneapolis. Mr. Dollenmayer used to
be advertising manager (or George J.
Hammond's company, and bis occupation at one time included tbe
publication of scab newspapers which
were intended to smash this company. The local man (or the Natural
Resources Security Company Ltd. explains the matter to the enquire* s by
stating that this is merely a move
to pass over the routine of collectijn
to a different department. It is a
very strange method of procedure ior
a concern that have advertised as extensively as the Bower Block in in
their faith in the future of their big
townsites, to sell these sites to a
person who is toreign to them, in
order that their collections may be
made.
Cleveland, Ohio, seems to be doing
things these days, A resolution has
been passed by the board of aldermen
urgng the coinage by the United States
goverment of a three-cent piece, the
purpose of which is to reduce the cost of
living. The Cleveland resolution says
that a three-cent piece would facilitate
the operation of a three-cent street railway fare and would be beneficial to all
by providing a smaller coin with which
to purchase articles of general use now
arbitrarily sold  for nickel.
Tenders for
Sidewalks
Fort George Trading & Lumber Co., Limited
wmmm M !■«.«•■> mum mmammammmmm
Operators of Steamers on the Fraser, Nechaco and   "chUcou™"aSa toa ™m
Stuart Rivers Manufacturers of Lumber   JjJiSfS&&Tted t0the
All Kinds of Rough and Dressed Lumber for Sale
" Bone Dry Lumber in the Yards "
Phone: One-One    Mouldings
South Fort George
CHAS. E. McELROY
Genorul Manager.
Y. *^*« *______,-. **/*h> t_____& eA> 'Ai> fA^ 'Ai- '.*a> 'A£ '■fr1 'Ai- -ft; 'A&'Ae? 'A£f _______ VV m■ —- m *■ Am. jm s\.j
|. B.C.  MARKET .
A WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 5
jj   Fresh and Cured Meats    jj
A Poultry,  Vegetables,   Butter,   Eggs, Etc. jj
9 — : g
|j FORT GEORGE    AND   SOUTH FORT GEORGE p
Roberts, Jones & Willson o
EDWARD ROBERTS Notary Public.     E. E. JONES.     A. J. SELWYM WILLSON, Auditor.
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS,
VALUATORS and ACCOUNTANTS.
FOR SALE: Farm Lands. Garden Tracts. Timber Limits. Mineral Claims. Valuable town lots.
LIST YOUR PROPERTIES WITH US. ^'EfLI^ftlW
TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS  "ERIN" FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Offices: Hamilton Avenue, South Fort George: Central Avenue, Fort George, B. C.
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPRESS
-COMPANY———
Bead for ■ folder
Bend for a folder
OPERATING
Autos     Steamboats
Stages
From Ashcroft to Fort George, and all points in
the northern interior of British Columbia, carrying
the Royal Mail, passengers and fast freight.
The Palatial Steamer B.X. Awaits the Arrival of the Company's Stages
Head Office: Ashcroft, B.C.
Freight consigned to steamer at Soriii
creek will In* promptly forwarded.
KODAKS
SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS
SEALED TENDERS will be
received for plank sidewalks by
the undersigned not later than
Wednesday next, 3rd April.
For route and other specifications apply to
H. B. CLOSE,
Sec. South Fort George
Board of Trade.    .»
Robert Spinks
Painting and Paperhanging
South Fort George : B.C.
DON'T  BUY   ON   PAPER
We don't ask you to purchase South Fort George lots by
making a pencil mark on a townsite plan—You would
be safe in so doing, but if skeptical
IT
COME TO
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
^=a   Investigate Our Proposition
and you will find a good live town--Two banks, saw mill,
pool hall, newspaper, two general stores, splendid
hotel, bakery, stationery store, mail-boat
landing, scores of buildings,
and crowds of satisfied   buyers
WRITE FOR INFORMATION TO
NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT CO.
172 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B C , or the resident agent,
g. e. Mclaughlin
Fourth Avenue, South Fort'George
We have
secured the
exclusive
agency for
the
Canadian
Kodak
Company,
and have a
complete
stock of
everything
for the
photographer.
| 1836 |      Assets Exceed Fifty Mien Dollars      |  1912
ih. Bank of British North America
Your money is safer in the Bank than in your bouse or in your
pocket. It is not tied up. You can get it out at any time without delay. NOTES discounted. Local and Foreign Drafts bought
and sold.  COLLECTIONS made promptly.   Money Orders issued.
FORT GEORGE BRANCH
L.
r
J. MUNRO, ACTING MANAGER!
The Average Deposit of the
Canadian People is $122.00
per Person
Saving money can be made a habit. A portion of your weekly or
monthly wage deposited regularly in a savings account will soon bring
you up to the average, and you will be surprised how rapidly $2 deposited
weekly will amount to enough to make a substantial payment on your
home.
CAPIT.IL AKU SGHPLUS, $6,800,000       TOTAL ASSETS, $52,000,000
THE TRADERS BANK
B. C. SEAMAN, Maaaser      ...
■oath Fort GcOrgt
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
Head Office:
VANCOUVER, B. C.
1
CAPITAL AUTHORIZED
DIRECTORS:
$3,000,«t)*
R. P. McLENNAN Esq., President,
McLennan,   McKeely & Co.    Wholesale Hardware,  Vancouver,  B.   C.
I*. W.  SHATFORD Esq., M.  L.  A.
Vice-Pres. Merchant, Hedlcy, B. C.
HIS HONOR T. W. PATERSON,  Liou-
tenant-Oovernor Bntinh Columbia.
M.  B.   CARMN.
Cnnitiilist. Victoria, B.C.
A. ISTEI, Esq.
C.  S.  DOUGLAS Esq.
Robert Kennedy,   New Westmin-
J. A. MITCHELL, Esq.. Capitalist.
Victoria, B. C.
E. H. HEAPS, Esq., E. H. Heaps ft
Co.. Lumber and Timber: President
Columbia Trust Co.. Ltd.. Vanoouver. B. C.
J. A. HARVEY, Esq.. K.C., former];
ol Cranbrook. B.C., Vaneouver, B.C.
A. L. DEWAR. General Manager.
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
Fort George Branch; F. N. DEWAR, Manager.
A
Just Drop In and Let Us Show You.
Remember we pay sncciul attention to
moil orders.
JOHN A. FRASER
Front Street, QUESNEL, B. C.
FARM LANDS IN CENTRAL
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fort George
'" District.
Nechaco Valley
Bulkley Valley
Skeena Valley
In every case our
lands were carefully inspected by
expert cruisersbe-
fore we purchased
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY will make all these districts
accessible to all the world. Every rail laid adbs
to the value of the land
North Coast Land Co. Ltd.
General Offices: 610 to 624 Metropolitan BIdg., Vancouver,B.C
London Oflice i   6 Old Jewry.
$1,606,600.
PAID-UP CAPITAL,
ADVERTISE IN IE HERALD
.uk
-M
tftt

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.fgherald.1-0344943/manifest

Comment

Related Items