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Fort George Herald May 4, 1912

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 VOL. 3, NO. 18.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C., SATURDAY,.MAY 4, 1912.
$3 PER ANNUM.
'■ourt Appoints Commission to
Investigate Hammond's Career
In the criminal  libel case
brought against J. B, Daniell,
editor of this paper, by Geo.
J, Hammond, president of the
Natural   Resources   Security
Co,, before the Supreme Court
at Clinton today, Chief Justice
Hunter allowed the application
I of the defendant counsel that
a commission be appointed by
Ithe Court to visit Chicago and
{Minneapolis to examine witnesses in substantiation of the
^tat*-»ments made in this paper
■regarding Hammond's career
I in the United States.
Clinton, B.C., May 4,-
Owing to the fact that the At-
orney-General's department had
vritten the editor of the Herald
land his counsel to the effect that
Ithe Crown would not prosecute
f the criminal libel case brought
" against the Herald by George J.
Hammond, promoter of the Fort
George townsides, and in consideration of the fact, that owing to
an error at the preliminary proceedings no one was bound over
to prosecute, Chief Justice Hunter moved to reply to a motion in
court by S. S. Taylor, K.C., that
the case could not proceed to trial.
Counsel for George J. Hammond,
the promoter and ex-Chicago
bucketshop man, succeeded in
making the Attorney-general
proceed for the Crown, in spite
of his written instructions which
were produced in court by the
defence.
Stuart Henderson, K.C, counsel for the defence, moved that a
commission be appointed by the
Court to examine witnesses in
Chicago and Minneapolis, which
application was, granted.
During the discussion of the
alleged libel considerable sensational argument was placed.  ■
The Court stated that the libel
was a gross one and must be
proven, stating that fhe Herald
had called a man a jail-bird, and
had said that his picture was in
the rogues' gallery.
Mr. Henderson for the defendant, stated that it must be borne
in mind that Mr. Hammond had
eliminated certain allegations
from the information.
There were present as counsel
for Hammond, S, S. Taylor, K.C,
and J. Lucas, son of the member
for Yale. There was also the
Hammond coterie including Jas.
Murphy, of Ashcroft, and Mait-
land, the Crown prosecutor. Geo.
J. Hammond and his brother,
Bill, were accompanied by many
witnesses amongst whom was a
certain Geo, D. Emory, at one
time a Chicago judge, who, it
was intended, would give evidence in Hammond's favor.
There were many other witnesses from the United States
and Canada.
A true bill was brought in
after a short deliberati6n, as the
duty of the grand jury as charged by the Chief Justice was to
return a true bill in the event of
publication being proven to their
satisfaction, as the article was
violently libellous until proven
true. Accommodation was arranged by the Court for the parties in council-in-chambers at
Vancouver on June 4 to decide
upon the duties of the commission to visit Minneapolis and
Chicago.
The prosecution is sparing no
expense in trying to smash the
Herald under loads of litigation
The case will come up for further consideration at the fall
assizes.
The Herald will prove to the
satisfaction of the court all the
statements made about George J.
Hammond,
A full and certified copy of the
court proceedings will be printed
in the Herald at an early date,
CITY ANO DISTRICT
L. C. Gunn left for coast cities
by today's boat. i
The services in the Knox church
tomorrow evening will be conducted by Mr. John L, McLarty,
M. A.
E. H. Burden and D. McDougall
of Green Bros,, Burden & Co.'s
survey staff, returned Tuesday
from a visit to coast cities.
After spending the winter in
Eastern Canada, George Forbes
has returned hale, hearty, corpulent and full of enthusiasm.
PREPARE FOR SETTLERS
ON LANDS OWNED BY
DUKE OHUTHERLAND
Considerable development work
1 will begin next week on the Duke
of Sutherland's land at White's
Landing, 40 miles down the Fraser from here. A large party of
men with seven or eight teams,
will commence at once the work
I of seeding, and owing to the
open nature of much of the land
a considerable acreage can be put
under crop this year.
With seeding completed the
work of erecting houses will be
proceeded with, and it is hoped
to have a house on each quarter
section of the 10,000 acres this
fall, when the first party of the
duke's colonists will arrive. During the winter the settlers will
erect additional buildings, clear
more land and prepare for a
greatly increased acreage next
year.
The Duke of Sutherland is now
in Eastern Canada. Later in the
seaspn, in company with Admiral
Lord Charles Beresford and several other distinguished ^ Britishers, he hopes to again visit this
district and make a considerable
stay.
The North Coast Land company
from whom this large block of
land was purchased, have taken
charge of this season's work on
the land, and their local representative, Mr. Russell Walker,
leaves today for White's Landing
to direct the commencement of
development work,
HENDERSON ACQUITTED
Information received from
Ashcroft announces that Mr.
Stuart Henderson, K. C, has
been honorably acquitted of the
charge of embezzlement laid
against him there by Peter Gjill-
stad, a Norwegian farmer and
client of Mr. Henderson. The
hearing in the Police Court only
occupied three minutes, it is
stated.
At the time of his arrest, Mr.
Henderson assured his friends
that there had been a mistake in
the matter. He said he would
easily be able to clear himself of
the charge on his return to Ashcroft.
I.O.O.F. ATTEND CHURCH SERVICE
The I.O.O.F. attended the
Presbyterian church last Sunday
evening in a body, the occasion
being the 93rd anniversary of the
order's establishment in America.
There were about 25 members of
the local lodge present besides a
number of visiting brethren. The
title of Rev, Mr. Wright's discourse was, The Highway to
Honor, and the sermon was listened to with rapt attention.
Mrs. McElroy, Mrs. Brewster,
Mrs. McLaughlin and Messrs.
Hancock and Thorne assisted in
the special music of the service.
David G. Rose, of Edmonton,
arrived on Monday's boat and
has made several investments in
town property xand surrounding
average, One of Mr. Rose's
investments is a double corner
on Fourth street, adjoining the
Hudson Bay property. He intends bnilding a residence on
these lots.       - »
STEAMDOATING IS
ACTIVE BN THE
FRASERWATERWAY
The mail steamer B.X., the first
arriving boat of the season, got
in at 6:30 last Monday morning.
She brought about sixty tons of
freight and had a passenger list
of twenty-five.
Asked as to the condition of the
Fort George canyon, Captain
Browne stated that there is no
longer any danger of accidents
there, providing reasonable precautions are taken. The work
done last fall by the Dominion
government in straightening the
channel and removing dangerous
boulders had made the swift passage much easier of navigation.
The B.X. left for Soda Creek
Tuesday evening and returned
last night. She, leaves for the
south again today and her skipper hopes to catch up with the
regular schedule next week, which
calls for arrival here on Monday
and Thursday.
The Chilcotin got in early this
morning with several passengers
and nearly eighty tons of freight.
She had the honor of being the
first boat through the canyon this
year.
Captain Bucey, who will, have
command of the B. C. Express
company's new steamboat, states
that she will not be ready to
launch until about the first of
June. At present the intentions
are to make a irip to Tete Jaune
Cache, after which a load of
freight will be taken up the
Nechaco to Fraser Lake.
R. M. Pallatt, divisional fire
warden, was one of the arrivals
on Monday's boat. During the
coming season Mr, Pallatt will
make his headquarters here.
R. T. Rodd, A. M. Elliott and
A. B. Mourie, arrived early in
the week from Stewart Lake
where they had been in charge
of the Dominion fish hatchery.
They left for the coast on Tuesday's boat and will return again
in the fall.
Tommy Chetwynd is acting as
travelling freight agent for the
B. C. Express company. Within
the next few weeks he will go
to Tete Jaune Cache to take
charge of his company's aflairs at
that point.
An illustration of the town's
great need of a public hospital
was afforded this week when an
Austrian pre-emptor was brought
in suffering from a painful abscess on the knee. He will probably be sent to Quesnel by today's
boat.
The following were among the
arrivals by last night boat: Harry
L. Jones, W. J. Linton, Vancouver; J. Elrich, Regina; K. Bate-
man, Calgary; P.M. Berks, Thos.
Hall, Victoria.
Local merchants are now
busily engaged in unpacking the
big shipments of goods brought
up-river since navigation opened.
McLeod & Murphy, the new
proprietors of the Club cafe,
opened for business this morning.
W. F. Cooke is still confined
to his bed in the Quesnel hospital.
The injured knee, sustained in
a fall two weeks ago, is still
causing him considerable pain.
John A. Fraser announces that
he has just incorporated his
Quesnel b'liness as a joint stock
company, under the firm name
of John A. Fraser & Co., Limited,
winh a capital stock of $100,000.
Mr. H. J, Mackie, a well-known
capitalist of Pembroke, Ont., is
registered at the Northern. He
will look over a large tract of
farm land near here with a view
to investment.
John Fountain, one of the men
who helped .put Fort George pn
the map, came down the Nechaco
from his ranch, 100 miles* west,
the other day in his dugout canoe.
He leaves shortly on a journey
up the Fraser to superintend the
surveying of his extensive timber
limits.
GRADING CAMPS NOW
WITHIN A HUNDRED
MILES OF DERE
Grading is now in progress on
the Grand Trunk Pacific one hundred miles east of here, and
within a short time right-of-way
camps will be established on both
sides of this town. This is the
information brought by Mr. L. C.
Gunn, G.T.F. engineer, who has
had charge of the line's final
survey from Tete Jaune Cache
westward to Dome Creek, halfway between the Cache and this
point. Near Dome Ureek the
workers are now engaged on a
short tunnel, the only one on the
line between the Cache and here.
Foley, Welch & Stewart's boats,
the Conveyor and Operator, are
now delivering material to the
construction camps strung out a
hundred miles east of the Cache
and within the next few days one
of the big steamboats can be
looked for on the local waterfront. While the chief supply
base will remain for this season
at Tete Jaune'Cache, it is intended to establish a depot hete for
the convenience of the contractors working in either direction,
The point to be chosen will probably be on the south end of the
Indian reservation, adjacent to
the town, where excellent deep-
water dockage is available.
While unprecedented progress
is being made on the work of
closing the last gap of the national transcontinental, there still
remains an enormous task ahead
of the contractors before the
locomotive's whistle is heard in
this immediate vicinity. Perhaps
the most gigantic piece of work
on the remaining section is the
building of the traffic bridge at
this point, the cost of which will
be born jointly by the railway
company and the provincial government. Five huge concrete
piers are to carry the structure
and work on these will be pushed
vigorously this summer. There
are two other bridges to be built
between this point and the Cache,
one at Dome Creek, the other at
Bear river.
Dome Creek promises to be' a
live place this summer. The
Northern Lumber Co., Ltd., with
headquarters here, is putting in
a sawmill of 35,000 capacity, also
a shingle mill and sash and door
factory. Foley, Welch & Steward
have agreed to bring in this large
plant over the steel to the Cache
by June 1st. Dome Creek is
situated midway between here
and the Cache, right in the choicest of the cedar timber belt. By
early summer the mill-owners expect to deliver their product in
South Fort George.
Mushroom towns with their
temporary restaurants and general stores are springing up at
several points along the line between Tete Jaune Cache and
Dome Creek, and it is estimated
that over five thousand men are
now employed on the construction headed this way from the
east.
The body of C. M. Hays, president of the Grand Trunk Pacific
Pacific railway, has been added
to the list of identified dead
picked up near the scene of the
Titanic disaster,
Z z.
i ;
M>^M«n^MWlMM.M«w
■I FORT JEOfiGE HERALD
NORTHERN INFERIOR PRINTING CO. LU*
J   B   DANIELL . PRESIDENT
Devoted   to   the   Interests   «f   Fort
Hoarse and  the entire Northern  Interior.
J. B. DANIELL,  Editor.
ROAD CONSTRUCTION.
The plans of the Department
of Public Works for the northern
division of Cariboo involve an
expenditure of $109,000, an increase of $44,000 over the vote of
last year. This we take as evidence of a better understanding
of the requirements of the district by our local representatives
and an indication that the visit of
the Hon, Mr, Taylor has been
productive of desirable results.
During the past week Road
Superintendent McNevin has
been assembling men and detailing foremen for work on the
Blackwater, Chief Lake and
Stony Creek roads, while another
party will proceed to White's
Landing to construct a road from
that point to the settlements now
being established on the lands of
the Duke of Sutherland. The
opening of this road will serve as
a means of ingress and egress
from the Fraser river, for the
present, but it is apparent that
eventually the settlers of that
section will require the construction of a road to connect them
with South Fort George. The
work planned for the Blackwater
road will be mainly repairing and
improving grades and culverts,
Every effort will be made to have
the Stony Creek road open for
traffic by the end of the season,
and of the whole program this is
of the most consequence to ourselves and our Nechaco neighbors. Nothing affecting the
interests of the whole district
has been more persistently urged
or more unanimously demanded
than the completion of this road,
and it is earnestly hoped that
neither means nor energy will be
lacking to effect such an accomplishment.
The extension of the Chief
Lake road would be sufficiently
important were it only intended
to open up the settlement of that
locality. This road, however,
will form part of any highway
that may be built into the Peace
river valley, if the most feasible
and advantageous route is to be
followed.
In the western part of the district the most important piece of
construction will be the extension
of the Fraser Lake road from the
Nechaco crossing to Francois
Lake. This extension will form
another link in the great highway that is to connect the Fraser
river valley with the Bulkley,
and will give the settlers on the
south side of Fraser Lake access
to the new town of that name.
Numerous short branches will
be opened to connect isolated
settlements with the main trunk
roads in the Stony Creek section
and ample provision is made for
repairs on roads already opened.
Trails from Fraser Lake to Stewart Lake are to be widened and
improved and a regular ferry
service maintained on the Stewart
river.
Details are lacking to enable us
to make a more complete forecast
of the season's work, but from
what we have observed it will
readily appear that a careful consideration was accorded and a
liberal provision made for tl.e
needs of the northern division of
Cariboo.
Natural Resources Security company's organ, the Tribune, seeks
to create a feeling of uncertainty
as to the disposal of the Indian
Reserve here on which will be
located the Grand Trunk Pacific
townsite and terminals. The
articles in question were evidently prepared by Hammond's press
agent in Vancouver, as diligent
search of the leading journals of
Canada has failed to reveal a lire
on the subject. ,
The Natural Resources Security
company's organ wculd have it
appear that unknown railroads
are clamoring for trackage on the
reserve, and, as one of the inspired "dispatches" reads,
"the granting of trackage on
the reserve to three or four
other roads  would  eat  up
practically all the land available there and thus prevent
the carrying out of the subdivision plan as contemplated
at G.T.P. headquarters."
The old saw about the wish being father to the thought is especially applicable to the above,
but    unfortunately  the    press
agent's dope will not stand government analysis.     Moonshine
like the  above  is intended to
catch the long-distance investor;
also to discourage any who might
be awaiting the opportunity to
put their money in the railway
company's townsite.    But primarily, and above all, it is intended
to arouse  interest in the Natural  Resources   Security   company's 1200 acres of 25-foot lots.
Fort George Indian Reserve No.
1 is, in its entirety, the property
of the Grand Trunk Pacific railway company.   On the 18th of
November, 1911, in the presence
of Chief  Indian  Commissioner
Ramsden, acting on behalf of the
Indians, Mr. T. W.McRae acepted
the reserve on behalf of the railway company for a consideration
of $125,000, one-fifth of which
was paid at the time. The transfer was made with the full knowledge and consent of both governments,
In spite of these facts the
Hammond organ and self-appointed champion of mythical
railroads, endeavors to stir up a
feeling of insecurity and unrest
just when the tide of immigration and capital is turned in this
direction.
In its hypocritical and double-
dealing style the Hammond organ
professes to be greatly exercised
over the taxation of the future
city to be built on the Indian
Reserve, and has concluded to
take up arms in the defence of
South Fort George. This would
appear the height of gallantry
were we forgetting the experience of a few weeks ago when
paid emissaries of the townsite
exploiters circulated a petition
purporting to be in the interes s
of the whole district. Later it
developed that this petition,
thoughtlessly signed by many of
our citizens, had been used as a
club in an endeavor to defeat the
aims and ambitions of this town.
Naturally the people are a trifle
suspicious of anything bearing
the N.R.S. brand.     ,
The .people of South Fort
George, comprising ninety-five
percent, of the business interests
of the whole district, are perfectly capable of managing their own
affairs. Let the Hammond organ
speak for its owner and his 1200
acres of desolation.
issued such a challerge found it
taken up he should have no remedy in law, as it was a feature of
human nature to do the thing it
was challenged against doing.
Hammond and his methods were
scorified by Toronto Saturday
Night, and he tried to bluff that
paper by starting a libel suit.
When he found that, instead of
the bluff working, Saturday Night
had dug up the story of his former schemes in the United States,
he admitted the effective manner
in which that paper had called
his bluff by dropping the suit. .
The man whe deems it necessary
to issue such a challenge must be
mightily afraid of the grounds
that exist for criticism,
r——=ri
Prescriptions a
Specialty
Fort George
Drug Oh]	
NEWB00¥st£.bt
large shipment just received
Toilet arlicals, Patent Medicines,
Mayrazinc'K.KookH, Stationery,
Toilet Articles, Druggists' Sundries
Intend Building?
Our New Stock is now on display-the finest
ever brought to this country. Every line is
now complete.
Our Prices Are Still the Lowest
Hardware       Groceries      Boots and' Shoes
Clothing        Builders' Supplies
RUSSELL PEDEN
W. F. COOKE
NOW is the time to build,
whilst seasoned lumber is
obtainable. Labor conditions
are now in your favor. We
contract to design and construct your building, guaranteeing satisfaction: Call
or write us.
Bronger & Flynn
Builders and Contractors
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
L J
-THE-
CLUB POOL ROOM
THIRD AND   HAMILTON STS.
DAVIS & FORREST, Props.
Smokers' supplies
a specialty
Four pool tables
Splendid environments
1'. A. Landuy J.H. McGregor J. F. Tempi.eton
T. A. KELLY, Timber Department
Gore & McGregor
CIVIL ENGINEERS
British   Columbia   Land   Surveyors
Land Agents Timber Cruisers
Chancery Chambers, Langley Street, VICTORIA,
B.C., P.O. Box 152, Phone 684.
McGrcg-or Buildintr. Third Street, SOUTH FOItT
GEORGE, B. C.
P. G. B. BODEKER
Land Timber Cruiser
Pre-emptions Located.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Estimates Submitted.
DESPICABLE TACTICS.
In a series of articles purporting to come from Ottawa, the
THE BLUFF CALLED.
(B.C. MiniiiK & Enginerrinff Record.)
G. J. Hammond has issued s
warning that he is going to enter
criminal libel suits against everybody "that dares to criticise his
methods in connection with the
townsite schemes of the Natural
Resources Security company. We
heard a judge of the Supreme
Court declare that if the man who
Fort George. B.C. Victoria, B.C.
F. P. Burden, Mgr. F. C. Green, Mgr.
Nelson, B.C., A. H. Green, Mtrr.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers, Dominion & B. C. Land Surveyors
Surveys of LawU, Mines, Townsites, Timber
Limits, Etc.
Northern Lnmber Co., limited
Store, Office aod Lumber Yard, South Fort George
•l.!f,!iI!,/Jf/JI5*T/JB-'-,^"-':*,*w,T'wy'w'*-*;*S!
I. A. WHITE,
PROPRIETOR,
jj   Single and Double Driving Horses.   Saddle and Pack Horses,
New Buggies and Thoroughly Reliable Rigs.
draying and excavating done.
Satisfaction Kuar-
Watch —,^—
Repairing   &i
C. H. DAVIE
Send articles by mall to Fori. Georffo, B.C.
I am prepared to
Locate Pre-emptors
. ON ISO ACRES OF .
Good Government Land.
WRITE FOR INFORMATION TO
N. C. Jorgensen.
P.O. Box 21. Soulh Fori George, B. C,
FARM LANDS
M. C. WIGGINS
Real Estate
GARDEN TRACTS
HTirW     Less than quarter mile from Indian Reserve
1L,i1       (G.T.P. Townsite).   Price $150 per acre,
AfTR17,(-Sk one"cluart-sr cash, balance six, twelve and
-A\-/-II*-I!-i» eighteen months at 6 per cent.
Settlers located on 160-acres of good -Government land.
FOURTH ST.  -  -  SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C
SLATER SHOES
Just received—a complete stock of the celebrated
SLATER SHOES-the standard shoe of America.
We have them in all the very latest styles, and
the prices are very reasonable.
Also a Full line of the Famous McPHERSON SHOES
I
S Also a hill line of the Famous McPHERSON SHOES tt
S Kennedy. Rlair & Co., Ltd. R
•^ Corner Second and Hamilton Aves.   -  South Fort George J^
I
zr-
leal Estate Investments
If you are interested in the growing values of
Fort George Realty it will pay you to look over
my lists. 1 have made money for others and
can do the same for you.
The Pioneer Realty Specialist of the Northern Interior
N. H. WESLEY
REAL ESTATE
South Fort George
— I
y*f'*-A'#4"*y/4"*y,*y>"A''*'   i
Close & Brown nSSn f
South Fort George, B. C. MERCHANTS
NOW IS THE TIME
TO THINK OF   .   .
Your Garden l
We have just received by mail a good assortment of       r>
A Rennie's Flower & Vegetable Seeds jj
^   All marked 1912.       -       -       Come in and pick yours out, i
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g**»****^*'*,***».«.*».*».**».'»'^
I Fort George Hardware Co. |
General Hardware and Sheet Metal Workers.
All kinds of tin and sheet Iron work done.
Camp stoves:
LASELLE AVENUE
Hot air Furnaces,  etc.
SOUTH PORT GEORGE.
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Ml THANH LltS IWU
MILES BELOW SURFACE
A hydrographic authority gives
the following information: The
Titanic is lying at a depth of,
roughly, 12,000 feet, or over two
miles below the surface of the
water. At this depth the pressure of the water is about two
and a half tons to the square
inch. The conditions of the pressure of water at this depth are
extraordinary. At a depth of
12,000 feet a man would bear up
on his body a weight equal to
that of twenty locomotive engines
each loaded with pig iron.
Under this enormous pressure,
the luxurious fittings of the gi-
j gantic liner would probably  be
I crushed like so much tissue paper.
The watertight doors  of   the
unflooded parts of the  vessel
j would smash like so much match
Iwood.
Strange tricks must have been
|played with the rich decorations
jmd elaborate effects of the saloon
abin. In absolute stillness in
he depths of the ocean, where
terpetual night is, the Titanic
just remain. Any attempt to
jive her is utterly out of the
uestion at a depth of this kind.
\t this depth, at which the Ti-
anic is resting, living is absolutely impossible, and only by
pome strange and mighty up-
iheaval can the lost liner ever be
fexposed again to the gaze of
Ihuman beings.
PROVINCIAL AND GENERAL NEWS
The Upper Fraser Lumber Co. will
build two sawmills at Tete Jaune Cache.
The company recently bought 281 sections of timber limits for a little over
a million dollars.
Last year the B. C. government
paid over $30,000 in bounties for the
destruction of certain birds and animals.
Bounties were paid on 73 eagles, 2,285
owls, 578 wolves, 535 cougars and
3,420 coyotes. The bounty ranges
from $2.00 to $15.00.
E. J. Chamberlin, general manager
of the Grand Trunk Pacific,  who is
mentioned as a possible successor to
C. M. Hays in the  presidency of the
r Grand Trunk, is said to be unwilling to
[ take the position.   Mr. Chamberlin has
been in Ottawa recently and his friends
[ say that he thinks there will be enough
i' for one man in the management of the
G. T. P. for some years.
C. D. Hillman, the millionaire real
estate dealer, of Seattle, has been
removed to the federal prison on McNeill
Islands, to serve a sentence of two and
one-half years' imprisonment for using
the mails to defraud. Hillman had already shavedTiis black moustache and
his hair was closely cropped.
Mr. B. B. Kelliher, chief engineer of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, arrived in Vancouver last week en route
to Prince Rupert whence he will proceed
inland to inspect the completed sections
and the section under construction as
far eastward as Bulkley Lake. He
will be accompanied by Mr. P. Welch
of Messrs. Foley, Welch & Stewart,
who have the contract for the entire
work. Mr. Kelliher came to Vancouver
via Edmonton from an inspection of
the main line as far west as Tete Jaune
Cache. His travelling companion was
M r. Colling wood Schreiber, chief government inspector. Mr. Kelliher is well
pleased at the progress of. construction
°f the line in the Yellowhead district.
The visitor is overwhelmed by the news
"f the sad fate of Mr. C. M. Hays,
president of the G. T. P., who perished
in the Titanic disaster. His officii 1
duties in recent years had brought him
in close contract with Mr. Hays.
"His death is a great blow to the
Grand Trunk System, and it will be a
difficult matter to secure a successor
with anything like the executive ability possessed by the late president.
Mr. Hays was a great optimist regarding the future of Western Canada. He had many fine qualities and
we will not soon see his like again,"
said Mr. Kelliher.
Lewis Klein, a Hungarian, who
claims to have be&n a member of the
wew of the Titanic, is under arrest in
Cleveland on  a technical  charge of
poena of the senate investigating
committee. Klein's story, interpreted
by the Austrian vice-consul, is that the
lookout in the crowsnest of the Titanic
was asleep when the collision occurred
and that members of the crew were
drunk from champagne that had been
given them by stewards serving the
late dinner party aboard.
GENERAL INFORMATION
There are a great number of town-
site properties on the market in the
land adjoining the Indian Reservation
here. Most of the subdivided properties are owned, sold by or controlled by'
the Natural Resources Security Company, Limited, of Vancouver. Their
properties comprise Lots 777, 1430, 936,
1429, 937, 938, 2608, 2610 and 2507.
The South Fort George townsite, the
business and residential centre of the
district, is situated on Lots 933 and
934. The Hudson's Bay properly nnd
Lots 931 and 932, generally known
as the "Bird Addition" are not as
yet on the market. The area subdivided, and either owned or sold
on the profit sharing plan by the
Natural Resources Security Company Ltd., totals about 1800 acres.
This concern has been responsible
for such development as may be
found today on a small portion of
Lot 938, the smallest of their subdivisions. Their townsites are located on a high jack-pine Hat. The
soil Ib gravelly, and, generally speaking, will not produce domestic vegetation. There are no wells on the
townsite, owing to its height, and
water must be brought from the
river. The South Fort George town-
site is a very much smaller area. It
totals about 150 acres, and is situated on the lower benches of the
Fraser River, which is navigated bj
the largest steamboats throughout
the open season. The Nechaco River
townsites are not regular ports of
call, as owing to the difficulty in
navigating the Nechaco river except
in high water the boats do not call
there unless paid to do so. Lots in
some sub-divisions of the Natural Resources Security Company Limited
have not increased in value to any
material degree during the past three
years. Their initial sub-divisions
ar« as yet quite indeveloped. South
Fort George is a good live town. It
has been largely built up and developed by the pioneer element, who
settled on the site as soon as it
was placed on the market. The Late
John Houston, the veteran frontier
newspaperman, established his paper
at South Fort George in its earliest
days. The town contains over two-
thirds of the entire population of all
the inhabited townsites. It has two
banks, the Bank of British North
America and the Trader's Bank of
Canada, two sawmills, tin shop,
three large general stores, a large
theatre, a newspaper issued by the
pioneer publishers of the Cariboo
district, a licenced hotel, pool hall,
bakers, confectioners, two churches,
drug store and restaurants. It is lhe
terminus of the British Columbia
Express Company's mail steamboats
and stage line. It is the headquarters
of the Fort George Trading and
Lumber Company's steamboat and
sawmilling operations. Tbe headquarters of the Northern Lumber Co.
merchants and sawmill operators.
It is close proximity to the Government buildings, and is situated in
such manner that the main development of the Indian Reservation
will benefit it more directly than
any other sites. The railways that
are to be built from tbe south must
of necessity follow the Fraser River
shoreline in order to secure a water
grade, and will form a junction with
the main line of the G. T. P. near
the east end of the Indian Reserve.
Acreage close to the South Fort
George townsite is changing hands
every day for large figures. The land
comprising the South Fort George
townsite, and all the Fraser River
properties is of excellent quality,
covered with a light growth of poplar with scattered firs.
The foregoing resume of the town-
sites here will give the reader some
idea of the respective merits of both
townsites. The Fort George Herald
has no affiliations with either of the
exploiting companies whose interests appear1 to be opposed. Those
who have invested in South Fort
George property, not too far back
from the river, may rest assurea
that they have excellent value for
the money they have invested, owing
to the rapid growth of development
created by independent initative. If
they desire to sell they should list
their' properties with one of the
local realty operators, who are constantly recording handsome profits
for investors. Lots in the townsites
of the Natural Resources (Security
Company depend for their value on
their proximity to that portion of
their property along the waterfront
at which they are trying to centralize their development. At that point
the townsite company is putting UP
a number of buildings, and are trying
in every way to start a trend of
development, having their business
centre for its radiating point. This
will hardly be accomplished to any
satisfactory degree for the large
majority on their sites, for a long
time to come. We advise no one to j
purchase on the strength of their ad-1
vertised statements. Intending investors in any sub-divisions here i
should bear in mind that the Grand I
Trunk Pacific Railway Company's
townsite will add about one thousand acres more townsite property |
to the combined area offered for I
habitation. The market has been |
dangerously     hooded    already,   and
vestor will not venture his funds in
any townsite that can not actually
claim the active and independent
development that signifies the approval ol the people on the ground.
Unless they can inveBt in a townsite
that is being developed and increased in value by independent enterprise, they had better await the
sale of the G. T. P. property or
buy in or near the business centre
of the district.
Intending settlers can obtain 160 |
acres of land by pre-emption. There ■
are large tracts of land open for
alienation by preemption only, in |
this district. The land is capable of
raising good crops of garden produce, hay, oats, and practically anything but fruit, which has not so far
proved a success up here, should
maintain that this district should
not be regarded as a fruit growing
country until that branch of culture
has been properly tested. This is
naturally a mixed farming country.
Wild berries, however, are found
throughout the whole northern interior country, as far north as the
Peace River Plateaux. Wagon roads
arc being built Into the surrounding
country, and progress will be made
on such public works, as future circumstances demand. The Fraser and
Nechaco Rivers afford transportation
to their tributary valleys, the Fraser
particulary, being navigable for 160
miles south and 315 miles north of
this point. We believe that the best
way to secure a good pre-emption
is by engaging the services of one
of the reliable locators, who make a
business of locating the settler.
Some of these men have been in the
district for a long time, and can
save the land hunter time and cash
by his experience. The Herald will
be pleased to advise the settler regarding lands open for pre-emption
and the best means of obtaining
information thereof,  on application.
Building materials are at hand in
large quantities. The local mills
have about three million feet of
lumber in the yards, in preparation
for the spring. Lumber costs from
$35 to $75 a thousand feet. People
intending building Bhould consult
by letter some of the local contractors, who, we are informed, will
be pleased to furnish all information.
The fare into the country from the
railway point, Ashcroft, fluctuates
with the seasons. During the summer
when navigation is open on the
Fraser River, May 1st. to October
31st., the fare amounts to $45, and
the expenses en route about $10.
This is by automobile and steamboat. The winter fare, from November 1st. to March 31st. totals $62,
with expenses of about $15. Travel
in th* whiter is by sleigh. The express rate in the summer is 12J cts.
per lb. The winter rate 20cts. The
summer Freight rate is 6cents, and
the winter rate llcents per lb.
The cost of living may be gaged
by the following scale of prices now
prevailing. This rate will be materially reduced when freight comes
down the Fraser River from Tete
Juane Cache, via th* G. T. P. steel
from Edmonton. This should transpire next summer: Flour 11 cts lb.
Sugar 14 cts. lb. Ham 35 cts. Ib.
Bacon 44 cts. tb. Beans 15 cts tb.
Rice 15 cts. lb. Dried fruits 25 cts Ib.
Overalls sell for $1.25 a pair. Meat
18 cts. Ib. Meals in the hotels, however, cost but 50 cents each.
The banking interest charged here
is ten per cent.
Employment in the past has been
limited to survey work, building
trades, (carpenters), loggers, steamboat crews, packers, canoe men,
land and timber cruisers, laborers
on government road work, and such
work as has been done towards the
development of townsite properties.
Farm laborers are not in demand as
yet. There is no railway work here
up to the present, but during the
next season and thereafter laborers
may reach the grade from this place,
that is, after next June or July.
Wages range from $4 to $7 a day,
according to the class of labor.
Prospectors will find practically a
virgin field for their explorations
The whole district has every indication of being highly mineralized.
CHURCH SERVICES.
ST, STEPHEN'S-Services next Sunday: 8.30, Matins and Litany; 9, Holy
Eucharist (sung); 3 p. m., Children's
Service; 7.30, Evensong and Sermon.
KNOX CHURCII-Services every Sunday evening at 7.30. C. M. Wright,
Minister.
A. P. ANDERSON
BUILDER AND
CONTRACTOR
Office and Store Fixtures.
Hamilton Ave.    South Fort George
^-^^v^^^-^^-wi
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jj Do jou
buildin
Then investigate
our work
manship and got our estimate.
Danforth & McInnis
Contuactors & Builders.
Hamilton and Firat.
i To Travellers and Shippers!
!     .The Steamer "CHILCOTIN" is ready to launch on the opening of the
-    before                    ma"        y       sam^carel'ul ""d courteous crew as
The AUTOMOBILES of the Auto Transit Co., of Ashcroft   will *■*-*,*,
nect with the steamer at QUESNEL  and SODA  CREEK  and  ca?rv"
passengers over the Cariboo Road, connecting with C.P.R   at Ashcroft
Consign shipments for FORT GEORGE and all points in the Northern Interior ofJJritish Columbia to the CARE'of "tiio STEAMER
^CHILCOTIN" atSODA CREEK." 	
(Atho™'&M
The Fort George Trading & Lumber Co., Ld.
t™EERS in * NAVtOATION n^^MBEU i„duat^, ^^
j
First class work only.
Reasonable prices and
prompt attention to
all are the inducements we offer.
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELLER
\
V.
South Fort George
Zt\W*Kw*d*^n<
\fA?AfAVAVATAT/3\?A?A?Af>lfivfA?*»\fAfA?»\?A?/3
Choicest Seasoned Lumber
►:
►:
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►:
►:
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►:
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J
We have specialized in the Lumber business, which means
that we know this business thoroughly, and can give satis
faction by filling orders from a stock of the highest grades, «.
We Make a Specialty of Seasoned FIR Lumber of the Best Class j!
Get estimates from us on all kinds of Building Material. A
Northern Lumber Co., Ltd. jj
Head Office and Yard, South Fort George.   Branch Yard at Fort George. 8
!
>:
a Occidental g
2 v QUESNEL E
Hotel        B c-     B
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Weekly and monthly rates on'application r*
Wire for rooms Wire for rooms
Most modern up-to-date hotel in the interior of British
V^   Columbia.
M   New four-storey building.   Accommodation for 120 guests
7a   All outside rooms—large, well-lighted and ventilated.
5*|   Steam heated.
A RATES $2.00 PER DAY UP
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E. L. KEPNER, Proprietor
ooe
le Herald Dice
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BASEBALL CLUB ORGANIZED
Baseball faridom of this district can
perpare for an interesting season if the ,
present enthusiasm among the adherents
of   the  game   counts   for    anything, j
Hiram Carney's    silver   trophy    em- j
blematic of the   New  Cariboo   cham-1
pionship, is the real incentive of all the
excitement and the South Fort George
team will be strong contenders for the
silverware.
An organization meeting was held
Tuesday evening in the Fireball and
officers for the ensuing season were
elected as follows:
Hon. President-T. W. Heme.
President-N. II. Wesley.
1st Vice-president-M. C. Wiggins.
2nd Vice-president-Al. Johnson.
Secretary-Frank 0'Flaherty.
Manager-A. E. Forrest.
Captain—H. B. Close.
Team Committee-J. R. Campbell,
A. E. Forrest, R. R. Walker, H. B.
Close.
Practices are being held nightly and
some first-class talent is being uncovered. Manager Forrest is sizing up
work of the players and will announce
positions in the course of the next few
days.
Manufacturers of High-Grade Confectionery
ICE CREAM and all kinds of SOFT DRINKS
Catering Tobaccos and Cigars
FOURTH STREET
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
HISTORIC DAY IN SOUTH FORT GEORGE
The Hotel Northern was on Saturday
evening the scene of a little impromptu
gathering of citizens and friends of Mr
Chas. E. McElroy, the genial manager
of the Fort George Trading & Lumbei
company, to felicitate him upon the
successful launching of the Chilcotin
for the season's work. The efficient
work of Captain Foster and his crew
who have been busy on the boat for the
last few days, was rewarded, and at
7.30 on Saturday evening the boat took
the water like a duck amid the cheers
and plaudits of surrounding hundreds.
An adjournment was made to the
Hotel Northern, where Mr. McElroy
and staff received the congratulations
of the entire community, and the several toasts were drunk and responded
to in right royal fashion. Mr. Heme,
Government Agent; Mr. Armstrong,
Hudson's Bay Co.; Mr. Munro, Bank
of B.N. A.; Mr. Seaman, Traders Bank,
and several other prominent citizens
sent appreciative telephone messages
and expressed regret at their inability
to be present.
The B, C. Government was responded
to by Mr. M. McNiven, of the Public
Works Department, and Mr. Alexander, of the local oflice staff.
Business Interests—Wm. Blair and
W. T. Kennedy.
Board of Trade-Geo. E. McLaughlin
and J. R. Campbell.
Cariboo Pioneers-A.  G.   Hamilton
and J. 0. Williamson.
Conservative Assn.—Pat Campbell.
Medical Fraternity—Dr. Lazier.
The Banking Interests—Crozier and
O'Flaherty.
Real Estate—Wesley and Wiggins.
Department of Indian Affairs-W. J.
McAllan.
Licensed Victuallers—Al. Johnson.
Mr. McElroy, who was in good vein,
replied to the congratulations.   His remarks were punctuated with sallies of
that "dry" wit and humor of which he
is a  master.     However,   one  or two
standing near him,  clearly understood
him fo say that just  as  soon  as a
special order arrives the matter will
receive attention.    May we all be in
town,    Success to the Chilcotin,  her
manager and crew.
TO INTENDING BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS
We invite inspection of our large and well-assorted stock of carefully
manufactured LUMBER. This Lumber was manufactured during the
summer of 1911, was carefully piled and stored for the winter, and S
now THOROUGHLY DRY and in prime condition for building, and sells
at THE SAME PRICE as any other Lumber.
Dimension, Boards, Siding, Shiplap, Ceiling, Finish
MOULDINGS and SPECIAL SAWINGS or DRESSINGS of any kind
The Fcrt George Trading & Lumber Co., Ltd.
THE PIONEER MILL.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C.    Phone 11.   Chas. E. McElroy, Mgr.
Our GUMLESS SPRUCE SIDING and V-JOINT will not warp, check
nor shrink endways, and contains no gum to cause the paint to peel.
V.'^4tf4^4^'tf4tf'^'^\t£'A&4^4^'Af4^'£?,f£'f$,Ap!A2',4£'A2fA2t4&142tA
"   B-C.  MARKET .
A
A
■A
I
A
A Poultry,
A
I
us
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Fresh and Cured Meats
Vegetables,  Butter,  Eggs,
FORT GEORGE
AND
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
Etc. ►:
►
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According to an estimate mado by
officials of the immigration branch of
the interior department, the immigration this year will reach the total of
400,000. This estimate is based on the
percentage of increase in the year just
closed.
BORN.
McDoNAi.D-At South Fort George, on
Wednesday, May 1st, to Mr. and Mrs.
Norman McDonald, a daughter.
MARRIED
McARTHUR-BiUPY-At the residence
of the bride's father, Mr. Thomas A.
Brady, Mud River Valley, on Monday, April 30th, Will Benton McArthur to Dot Bessie Brady.
NOTICE
To Whom it May Concern:
NOTICE is hereby given that
through arrangement with the Grand
Trunk Railway company the Fort
George Indians have the use of all
meadows and fenced enclosures for the
season. All trespassers upon same will
be prosecuted as the law directs.
W. J. McALLAN.
Indian Agent.
South Fort George, April 30, 1912.
Robert Spinks
Painting and Paperhanging
South Fort George ; B.C.
□
Roberts, Jones & Willson
UD
EDWARD ROBERTS Notary Public.     E. E. JONES.     A. j. SELWYN-WILLSON. Auditor.
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS,
' VALUATORS and ACCOUNTANTS.
FOR SALE: Farm Lands. Garden Tracts. Timber limits. Mineral Claims. Valuable town lots.
LIST YOUR PROPERTIES WITH US. ^felff;fL»K.W
TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS "ERIN" FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Offices: Hamilton Avenue, South Fort George: Central Avenue, Fort George, B. C
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPRESS
. COMPANY -
Send for ■ folder
Stages
OPERATING
Autos
Send for • folder
Steamboats
From Ashcroft to Fort George, and all points in
the northern interior of British Columbia, carrying
the Royal Mail, passengers and fast freight.
The Palatial Steamer B.X. Awaits the Arrival of the Company's Stages
^StifiS#£&SS2H!r.     Head Office: Ashcroft, B.C.
The Time
The Place
The Store K
'ITH SPRING everyone wants something
NEW. Try this store for the best the
market affords. We are showing a particularly
nice line of
Satins, Sateens, Silks, Etc.
If your storekeeper has not got it, try Quesnel's
leading merchant
John A. Fraser
A Front Street Quesnel, B. C.
DON'T  BUY   ON   PAPER
We don't ask you to purchase South Fort George lots by
making a pencil mark on a townsite plan—You would
be safe in so doing, but if skeptical
/f=
COME TO
SOUlU FORT GEORGE
^=3   Investigate Our Proposition
and you will find a good live town--Two banks, sawmill
pool hall, newspaper, two g«neral stores, splendid
hotel, bakery, stationery store, mail-boat
landing, scores of buildings,
and crowds of satisfied buyers
WRITE FOR INFORMATION TO
NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT CO.
172 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B C , or the resident agent,
G. e. Mclaughlin
Fourth Avenue, South For£George
At
Mail Obdeus Receive Prompt Attention.
v,T>V,T>VV>W>'CV>'^>5'<^'<^f*^^f*.^^-W^fi^
| 1836 |      Assets Eicwd Fifty Million Dollars      | 1912
th, Bank of British North America
Tour money is safer in tbe Bank than in your house or in your
pocket. It is not tied up. You can get it out at any time without delay. NOTES discounted. Local and Foreign Drafts bought
and Bold. COLLECTIONS made promptly.   Money Orders iBsued.
FORT GEORGE BRANCH:
J. MUNRO, ACTING MANAGER
The Average Deposit of the
Canadian People is $122.00
per Person
Saving money can be made a habit, A portion, of your weekly or
monthly wage deposited regularly in a savings account will soon bring
you up to the average, and you will be surprised how rapidly $2 deposited
weekly will amount to enough to make a substantial payment on your
home.
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS. S6.IOO.000       TOTAL ASSETS, S52,0M» I
THE TRADERS RANK
B. C. SEAMAN, Manser
•oath Fort CtOrg*
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
Head Office!
VANCOUVER, B. C.
CAPITAL AUTHORIZED - ■ M.OOO.000
DIRECTORS:
R. P. McLENNAN Esq., President,
McLennan,  McFeely fc Co.   Wholesale Hardware,  Vancouver, B.  C.
I*. W.  SHATFORD Esq., M. L. A.
Vice-Pres. Merchant, Hedley, B. C.
HIS HONOR T. W.  PATERSON. Lieutenant-Governor British Columbia.
M.  1).   CAHLIN,
Cnnltnllst. Victoria, B.C.
A. ISTEI, Esq.
C.  S. DOUGLAS Esq.
Robert Kennedy, New Westminster.
J. A. MITCHELL. Esq.. Capite-"'1.
Victoria. B. O. .
E. H. HEAPS, Esq., E. H. Heap] *
Co., Lumber and Timber: Preside"
Columbia Trust: Co.. Ltd., Vancouver. B. C.
J. A. HARVEY, Esq., K.C. It.mie.lj
ol Cranbrook, B.C.. Vancouver, »•-/•
A. L. DEWAR. Oeneral Manager.
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
FORT GEORGE BRANCH-F. LIPSCOMB, Mlhager.
FARM LANDS IN CENTRA!
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fort George
^District.
Nechaco Valley
Bulkley Valley
Skeena Valley
In every case our
lands were carefully inspected by
expert cruisersbe-
fore we purchased
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY will make all these districts
accessible to all the world. Every rail laid adbs
to the value of the land
North Coast Land Co. Ltd.
General Offices: 619 to 624 Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver, B(
London Offices   6 Old Jewry.
~        T      -        61,660,000.
PAID-UP CAPITAL,
ADVERTISE IN THE HERALD
&.^  _1
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