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Fort George Herald Aug 3, 1912

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 VOL. 3.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C, SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1912.
$3 PER ANNUM
TRANC0NT1NENTALWILLBE
IN OPERATION BYMIDDLE
OF 1914
Collingwood Schreiber, of Ottawa,
general consulting engineer of the
Dominion Government and chief government engineer of the G. T. P.,
reached Vancouver recently, He has
just completed an inspection of the
line as far aa a-point on the south
lork ol the Fraser, forty miles west
of railhead at Tete Jaune .Cache,
wliich is 5G miles beyond the summit
of Yellowhead Pass.
"I have every confidence that the
main line of the G. T. P. to Prince
Rupert will be finished and in oper- j
ation before the end of 1914. I think
it will be ready before that period,
tnit it will take some time to get the
roadbed in shape for traffic," said
Mr. Schreiber.
The crop outlook on the prairies
is excellent. I did not see any trace
ol yellow in the vast reg'.ons traversed and the production, in the event of no unfavorable conditions Intervening will be the greatest in. the
history ol Canada."
"I look lor the time not distant
when thc Chinese and other Oriental
peoples will be large consumers of
our wheat and oatmeal products. It
Is all a matter of education."
right-of-way for the G. T. p. between
Saskatoon and the Albertan capital
and is now performing the Bame
commission between Edmonton and
Hazelton. He will pro;eed westward
from here over the route of construction. Remarking on the journey
down the Fraser Mr. Bourchier said
he had seldom experienced a more
pleasant trip. Drifting down the 300
miles of river that stretches between
here, he stated, one passes slowly
through a beautiful realm of territory which could not be seen under
more favorable circumstances for observation than ofl the deck of a
drifting scow.
WESTERN END PROGRESS.
According    to a    despatch   from
Prince Rupert, the steel on the western end of the G. T. P. is now laid
to mile ill, says General  Superintendent Mehan, and the work on a
small wooden trestle bridge at that
point is about completed. After this
bridge is crossed the next big'work
is the bridge   at Seely Gulch, and
beyond the route is   comparatively
easy to Hazelton, and beyond Hazelton to   Aldermere   there   are three
single spnn steel bridges, but these
should not long delay the entry of
trains to Aldermere.
Mt Mehan says there is.a noticeable improvement in the demeanor of
the Indians. Where formerly a suspicion characterized their   attitude,
that is now giving way to the ac-
I eeptance of the coming of the white
man and his disturbing devices as a
I "■"••-er  of course, and he does not
I anticipate any prolonged sustenance
I ot the agitation over the land.
AN INCENDIARY BLAZE.
A are, apparently of incendiary
origin, was discovered by the occupants of a house on the outskirts
of town early last Friday morning.
Three women were asleep in the
house when the smoke from a fire
that had been started in a cellar
entrance awoke one of them and an
alarm was raised. Had the fire gained a few minutes more headway it
would have been impossible to save
the house. The alarm was given in
town and the fire bell rung. Fire
Chief Campbell loaded the apparatus
on a rig, and our minature fire brigade was rushed to the scene of the
blaze, which they speedily extinguished. Investigations after the fire
was under control, indicated strongly
that the fire was the work of an incendiary. It is understood that the
man who committed the dastardly
crime left fairly plain clues, and arrests are expected to follow the investigations of tbe officers.
DESERTING THE CACHE AS
A BUSINESS PHINT
Amongst those who came down
river from Tete Jaune Cache this
week, were Mr. and Mrs. A. K
Bourchier, who left here last September with a scow load of merchandise to open a store at the head
of navigation. Mr. Bourchier, after a
successful season at the Cache, has
returned to this place which will be
his future headquarters.
"Construction" he said "has now
passed through the little settlement
at Tete Jaune Cache, and the thriving construction camp ot a few weeks
ago is one of the many derelicts
left in the trail of Foley, Welch and
Stewart's great track laying machine
the Pioneer. Now the activity at the
Cache, or Mile 53, is limited to the
trans-shipment ol the construction
material from the steel which has
just crept through the Yellowhead
pass, into Foley Welch & Stewart's
big steamboats. Huge quantities of
supplies are also stored in the warehouses at that point. There warehouses are 600 fe.t in length, and
docks have been built on the river
side of them whilst the railway runs
behind. Foley, Welch & Stewart have
their headquarters at Mile 53, and
their large office force will probably
be located there until construction in
the upper Fraser country is. entirely
completed."
Mr. Bourchier holds a commission
as a Justice of the Peace, and his
duties under this commission were
by no means light at Tete Jaune
Cache. There   has been considerable
OH! YOU FOOLS!
| these
a
ANOTHER TOWNSITE.
T1|e latest townsite production in
Parts is "Willow City." This
townsite located on the east'
tjank "' the Praser, at the mouth of
the Willow River, about 25 miles
»Pi*tream. This tract has been sub-
°ivi**ed into about 2500. lots. The
f'tish Cnlumbia government have
selected their quarter of the town-
8|te. There 1*- ahollt -^ mlieB 0j
wtwfrontage on the site, which
"itches hack from the river for
Bll|1*c distance. The land is owned by
'Victoria syndicate, and is being
™(1 »y the Pacific Bond and Land
wporatlon, of Vancouver, of which
• R* MacClinton   is general  man-
I "<eer,
Tl|c Promoters claim that this will
e the point where the railroads
"'""■1 to the Peace River-will branch
" ,r'<**i the main hm 0f the Gtand
"'* Pacific, which bisects- the
"W"HlU'' ••■*<- they also claim that
'e Hudson Bay Padllc Railway has
Me've<i iand in the townsite for ter-
ml,l»l facilities.      *
BUYING RIGHT-OF-WAY.
w* Bourchier,
l-lght-of-way ,or
who is   purchasing
the Grand   Trunk
The loss of life by drowning in the waters of the Upper Praser
this summer has been appalling. Next year it will be worse. It
is time the authorities, took steps to cope with the situation.
through Alberta.
, There are only two policemen at
the Cache to act as guardians of the
peace in a mob of some three thousand men of all nations. A lot of
these men are criminals by instinct,
and under the circumstances it appears to be more by. good luck than
good administration that the government has avoided a large calendar of crime from the remote construction camps of the upper Fraser
valley.
Mr. Bourchier -came down the river
on one ot his scows. In the Grand
Canyon a man named Barnett, who
was handling the heavy steering
sweep, tas thrown overboard when
the sweep struck a rock. Barnett
took the oar with him, clinging to
it in the water where he was reached
by a line and hauled on board again.
With a partner Mr. Bourchier is
building a heavy duty gasoline boat
at Tete Jaune Cache which will be
operated by him on the navigable
rivers. He leaves on the next up-
river trip of the steamer Chilcotin
to bring his boat down.
Construction work is being pushed
with all possible speed on the haute
Fraser, and with the exception of
some difficulty that is being encountered in the driving of a long dirt
tunnel near the Goat river, progress
is as satisfactory as could possibly
be expected under present conditions.
The tunnel above referred to, where
engineering difficulties have been encountered, is situated at a point
where the exact location of the road
has been a matter of opposing opinions in the engineering staff, the location necessitating it being chosen
owing to the shortening of the line
by some two miles. Slum, or quicksand was struck after the tunnel had
been driven a few hundred feet, and
it is possible that the ground will
have to be frozen and1 the tunnel
lined with a concrete wall before the
work can be completed there.
Ifro    tt'Tlved in the cltytn4s *Mk
"' the end of steel. Mr. Bourchier
Urn.',     " the   FraBW   °n >m
I£  Is brother,    Mr. A. K. Hour-
Sr-M        s place- wno leH here last
g^to to establish
Z Jw">e Cache. Mr,
a store at
Bourchier has
Ronton TiAmt °'   the c,ty ot Bd-
'" 'or manv years, Ho bought
many
EXCURSION.
The steamer B. C. Express has
been chartered by the South Fort
George baseball club to run an excursion to the Ntcha;o river town-
site tomorrow for the ball players
and the fans of this place, who play
tomorrow against the Nechaco men
on the latter team's ground. The
ball club trusts that everyone will
take their excursion boat. The fare
is seventy-five cents for the round
trip. The game is called for four-
thirty, and the excursion boat will
leave here about three.
I. L. Peden, a brother of Mr. Russet Peden of the v Norl hern Lumber
Company here came down river from
Tete Jaune Cache this week, Mr.
Peden intends to locate here,
illicit liquor traffic in tbat section,
by bootleggers who have been supplied from Edmonton. Mr. Bourchier
states that he has been Bending down
on an average of ten prisoners a
week to Kamloops Pentt.n'iary.
These prisoners were sent by way of
Edmonton, through Alberta, down to
the C. P. R. at Calgary, and back
west to Kamloops. This trip takes
seven days. On account of the Fraser
river not being fit for safe navigation the steamboats on the upper
river are only making such trips to
distribute material along the .line of
construction, as are absolutely necessary, therefore a lot of traffic that
was intended for the rapid and comfortable down river trip from the
head of   navigation,   was   returned
PLEASED WITH PROSPECTS.
C. L. Holden, of Chicago, a prominent Illinois hotel man, was amongst the arrivals on the last boat.
Mr. Holden's visit was for the purpose ot slzeing up the situation here,
with the intention of investing in
real estate here in the near future.
Mr. Holden. like many others from
distant places, Imagined from reading tbe advertisments ot townsite
promoters, that there was only one
"Fort George", and that place was
located up the Nechaco River. Finding his mistake alter being landed
on the gravel patch up the little
river which was cited to him on tbe
Steamer B. X. whilst en route as the
genuine Fort George, he came hotfoot down to this place from where
he might properly fulfil the object of
his journey by looking over the Indian Reserve, the Husdon Bay land
and this townsite, which in hia opinion will be the town of the future,
along the Fraser. Mr. Holden thinks
it is premature as yet to mal.e any
statement regarding his tuture plans
as regards Fort George, but he intimated that when circumstances justified he would invest in this locality.
Mr. Holden praises tbe beauty of
the Indian Reserve that is being laid
out for the G. T. P. townsite, and
stated that in his opinion this place
would form a valuable continuation
of that site.
A Firemen's Ball ts to he held in
the Fort. George Theatre next Friday
evening at 8.30. The proceeds of the
dance are to be devoted to defraying
expenses, and anything over this will
go towards liquidating the liabilities
of the brigade. Tickets are tor sale
at all business houses lor $1.50.
Divisional Engineer George, who is
in charge of construction between
Flrzhugh and the Bulkley summit,
arrived here last night from tbe
head ot navigation accompanied by
Mr. Lowe, one of the government
engineers.
30 TONS OF DYNAMITE TO
BE USED IN CLEARING OB-
STRHCTIBNSIN RIVER
The work of clearing the obstructions to navigation out of the Fraser
River will commence as soon as the
stage of water permits. This is very
welcome information in ths district
where for years the safety of lives
and property has constantly been
menaced by the dangerous rocks in
the fairway of the canyon channels.
The steamer Chilcotin loaded thirty
tons of dynamite at the Grand
Canyon this week which will be used
in blowing out the canyons and
rapids this winter. About 500 cases
ot this will be used ln the Giscomb
Rapids, about 30 miles above here,
one ot the most dangerous points
tor steamboat navigation on 'he
river. A huge couaignaiint will be
used in blowing out tho many rapids
on the Nechaco river, whicn will be
cleared to permit' their navigation by large steamboats. This work
is being undertaken by the railway
contractors, who have an arrangement with the federal government
for the carrying out ol the work.
For years the government at Ottawa
have spent small appropriations on
cleaning up the river, but the work
has been ineffectually performed, and
in some instances, notably when the
district was represented by a' supporter of the late Laurier govern-
mentment, the expenditures on the
Fraser were often made the excuse
tor the expenditure ot moneys among
the gang whose activities for the
cause entitled them to participate in
the benefits of the "patronage." This
sort ot work did not result in the
cleaning up ot the river, and in many
instances the appropriations were
squandered without material results.
This was particulary evident in the
Cottonwood Canyon, 20 miles north
ot Quesnel, where an expenditure ot
about $20,000 was made in 1908, with
the net result of a trail round the
rock walls of tne canyon, which eat
up most ot tbe money and was of
very little use, and a lew rocks
blown from the channel.
Some good work has been done on
the river, however, but the expenditures have never been large„enough
at any one time to properly undertake the work ot clearing out the
obstructions in the dangerous places.
Representations have repeatedly been
made to the government with a view
to having tbe work properly undertaken in anticipation ot the time
when It would be absolutely necessary, but until the present time no
move has been made by the department ot public works at Ottawa to
this end.
There are'three points on the upper
Fraser River, above h'ere, which are
particulary dangerous to navigation
These points are the Giscomb Rapids
a stretch ot nearly seven miles ot
bad water about 20 miles up stream;
the Grand Canyon, 100 miles northeast of here, and the Goat River
Rapids, about 200 milea north-east.
At all of these points lt is absolutely necessary to successful and safe
navigation, tbat dynamite should be
freely used by experienced rock men
ln removing rocks from the steamboat channel. This work will be undertaken by expert rock men as soon
as possible.
The value of the steamboats running on the upper Fraser river now
approximates $350,000,000. Tbis valuation is being augmented all the
time by the construction ot 'new
craft. Add to this the hundreds ol
lives that are endangered in these
steamboats, in smaller power craft,
and even in canoes and on rafts, and
taking into consideration tbe roll of
drowned during the past season, and
lt will be apparent tbat tbe government at Ottawa have not undertaken
to discharge this vast obligation to
the northern Interior of British Columbia any too soon.
f*<
,       i'
■
t   V
it PAGE TWO
THE FORT ut-JKur. B.ci.t.n.v-
FORI GEORGE HERO
PUBLISHED BY THE
N33TH€BM JNTERtOB PRINTING CO. Ltd.
J. B   DANIELL. PRESIDENI
Devoted   to   the   interests   of   Fort
George ami the entire Northern Interior.
J.  B.  DANIELL. Editor.
tire, and to
danger Mr. Johnson is erecting a
large water tower which is f.d by
a gasoline pump already installed.
] Tbe new addition will add thirty
rooms to the accommodation ol the
town. Messrs Bronger & F.ynn, the
contractors for the building, state
t' at the work will be completed in
about a month from date.
The fact that the   Dominion
government have at last sanc-
THE HOUSTON MEMORIAL.
J. W. Holmes, J. A. Irving and J.
Malone composed a delegation to
tioned tlie clearing out of the up-1 the council asking for support for
per Fraser river, to render that'the Houston memorial to be built in
great stretch of navigable water-' Ne'»°" '" honor of the late John
way fit for safe navigation, is Houston, first mayor of that city.
, . , The  delegation  stated   that lt  was
not a matter   upon  which we; ,.,.,*    , , t,    -„„„*.„■„
i  ., _. .   ; proposed to build a drinking fountain
hasten to commend them. This: nm, monumei)t at Vernon and Ward
work should have been under- street8| t0 C08t in the neighborhood
taken two years ago, and had it Ll (18,000. of this amount they have
been done at that time steam- j already collected $600, all but $iso
shovels now marooned at Tete i of which was subscribed by people
Jaune Cache would be tearing a outside ot Nelson. They required
., .   ,     j, , jJ $1,200 more and suggested that the
two-thirds of one per cent, grade i'..'       . ,. .    . . % frftn ,„ on,h
,       , . ,.        j,       ..    i citv contribute at least |500, or siuh
through   tins   section  for the, gum as they ,oum, ,t ,mpoallMe t0
Grand Trunk   Pacific  Railway.i collect ln tne clty>
Martin Burrell, member for Yale-    Mayor    Amiable   appointed  Aid.
Cariboo, who is now Minister of i Glcazer as council representative to
Agriculture, hasnotdistinguished act upon the Houston memorial com-
himself by assisting in the development of this section.   Perhaps he thinks that because we
don't grow peaches up here the
country is no good,   Mr. Burrell
has only once visited the huge
section of his constituency lying
north of  the Canadian Pacific
Railway in Cariboo, and that was
in 1908, when he defeated Duncan Ross, the Liberal representative.   We never had very much
coufidence in Duncan Ross, but
we want to say that in our estimation he would have made a
Letter representative   for  this
section of country than the present incumbent, in these stirring
times.   There are but two matters which the Dominion government have the administration of
that affect the welfare of new
countries such as   this, inland
waterways or navigable rivers
and government telegraphs.   In
both of these the new section of
Cariboo has been slighted.   It is
up to Mr. Burrell to visit this
section and find out a few things
that are transpiring here.
, The   vacant-minded lad who
spills his whimperings over the
editorial columns of the   Fort
George Tribune has struck his
metre at last.   In his latest effort he spreads himself on an
allegory—using his stockyard experience to supply him with his
simile—A PIG.   There is a place
in the Bible, which we have read,
by the way, which describes an
act of the Saviour's,   Finding a
man possessed of a devil he cast
forth the evil spirit into a herd
of swine,  which ran violently
down a steep place into the sea.
History repeats itself and its local application admirably fits the
characters portrayed in the Good
Book — the devil on deck, the
herd   of   swine and the steep
place. The whole bunch are headed for destruction, but take our
tip and watch the devil make his
get-away, whist the swine run
hither and thither, seeking a way
out of the mire he has made them
stir up.
guard against Eimi'.ar hear a railroad president plead that
his stockholders should be allowed
to make seven per cent on a capitalization of a few hundred millions
more than the property is worth.
Still, one must not blame the railroad president, because behind him
is that fearful ogre, the board of
directors-that bunch of fearful ogres
to be exact—yelling for dividends.
He has a perfect right to be scared.
However, few of them voluntarily
resign.
Having thus- set forth some of the
pleasures of the life of a railroad
president who operates a ivad in
this country, and some of the difficulties and hardships, let me direct
your attention for a moment to a
railroad president who may be said
to have all the United States ra'.l-
road presidents looking like idle sons
of the very rich, whin it comes to
difficulties. I refer to the president
of the Grand Trunk railroads—all of
them; all of the trunks and the satchels and the suitcases embraced in
that system which has several divisional names, including that of the
Grand Trunk Pacific.
He has a three-cornered job and
each corner Is sharper than the
others. First off, the Grand Trunk is
Canada's very own. Also it is owned
in England. Furthermore it serves
six of these United States and is
seeking an entrance to Boston. As
Cy Warman says, it embraces the experience of being "damned Canadian"
in New England' and a "damned
Yankee" in Canada.
Canada isn't very keen on the extension of her railroad systems into
this country; nevertheless nearly one-
third ot tbe mileage of the Canadian Pacific is in the United States;
and the Grand Trunk operates five,
thousand miles in this country, while
the Canadian Northern has a line to
Deluth.
They used to say of Charles M.
Hays, the president of the Grand
Trunk, who went down on the Titan-
tic, that he was the one railroad
man on the continent who could
choose his Job; and the task, of
selecting his successor had about as
many difficulties as the successor
will have, So, when they came to
pick the man to {111 Hays' chair, the
men who had the choice considered
the list of "those mentioned" which
Includes eminent American managers,
distinguished Canadians and various
extinguished statesmen, and grabbed
one man who didn't want it. That
man was Edson J. Chamberlin, of
the Grand Trunk   Pacific, who had
f.'A
A
\
A
mlttee. The contribution was left for
the present.
Amongst the r;c.nt arrivals in
town are Mr. Wm. Livingstone and
his son, bridge contractors from the
Boundary district of the province.
Mr. Livingstone came to Fort George
to look over the situation, and perhaps to locate hereabouts. After
looking over the townsites from the
vantage point of the Nechaco river
jack-pine townsite, they came down
to the real city that is growing up
on the banks of the Fraser here and
purchased a lot, and are now engaged in building a residence upon
it. Both father and son are well satisfied at the prospects of our embryo city, and have decided to locate here.
Wm. Burnet, foreman for Contractor Bam McGoffin, was in town this
week oh business.
HOTEL ADDITION.
Work is actively proceeding on the
construction of a 30 room addition
to the Northern Hotel, on Hamilton
Avenue. Albeit Johnson, the enterprising i.roi.rietor of the Northern
Intends to make the new add tion
the most modern structure by construction and equipment, in this
section ot B. C. The walls Inside
tbe building are to te l! lath 9nd
a modern sanitary aybUm is being
Installed throughout the house. A
basement -extends under the entire
building in which a modern heiting
plant will be ins ailed. It will be remembered that the first hotel built
here by Mr. Johnson, the old Northern, whLh stood at the foot of
Fourth-   St.ett,   was demolished by
Any railroad president will tell
you he has hardest Job in the world
—tell you tearfully and with an amplitude of detail that resembles a
cost per-ton-per-mile sheet on a shipment ot prunes from Los Gatos to
I'attagumpus—and most of them
have, A railroad president is fore-
ever scared two ways: he is scared of
the men who work for him and he is
scared of the men he works. His job
Is to get dividends tor stock-holders
and his dividend getters are the men
who operate his road. Unless the
dividend getters help him get dividends' he gets it where the society
queen wears the imitation-pearl dog-
collar.
The lot ot a ra'lroad president is
not a happy one. Should you, by
any chance, attend a meeting of
these distinguished gentlemen you
will find them holding a grand lodge
ot sorrow always. No railroad president is ever cheerful. Always, no
matter what Is showing in the financial reports, he wails because some
other road took some freight away
from him; and always he finds in
whatever administration is in power
a direct assault on vested r'gbts,
which usually resolves itself into a
bitter complaint that a state or a
Government body has refused to let
him hike his rates a tew ooints
above what the traffic w.U '.ear.
"Why," he sobs, '-'cannot the Government let the poor, struggling railroads alone?" And the inquiry is
generally incited by a recent experience before his beard of directors,
who have Inquired, in a somewhat
insistent and p.netratlng m.nner,
how lt is his receipts have fallen oil
while his expenses-have increased—
and does he think they put their
money into his stocks for the fun of
putting it in?
If It were not for the men that
work for him and the men tor whom
he works thc railroad president
would have a heap of fun traveling
around in a luxurious private car
and making speeches before boards
of trade and commercial congresses.
As it is it is positively pathetic to
(Contlnutdjon pw* 3.)
on for i licence to Take
and Use Water
NOTICE is hereby given tbat I,
Francis Hoffercamp, ot South Fort
George, B. C. will apply for a licence to take and use one cubic loot
per second of water out ol Tan Creek
which flows in an easterly direction
through P. R. 1243 and empties into
Fraser River near middle of eastern
boundary of P. R. 1243. The water
will be diverted at its source in Lot
320 and will be used tor irr'gation
purposes on the land descriled as
Pre-emption Record No. 1243.
THIS NOTICE! was posted on the
ground on the 15th day ol July 1912.
The' application will te filed in the
office of the Water Recorder'or witb
the Comptroller ot Water R'gbts,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
FRANCIS HOFFERCAMP.
Applicant.
LOST
A sorrel cayouse mare, from Six-
Mile Lake, branded (X over A) on left
shoulder.
Finder will be rewarded on returning
to owner.    WILLIAM P. FRASER,
South Fort George.
July 27, 1912.
LIQUOR ACT, 1910
(Section 36.)
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the
27th day of August next, application
will be made to the Superintendent of
Provincial Police for the grant of a
licence for the sale of liquor by retail
in and upon the premises known as the
Empress Hotel, situate at South Fort
George, B.C., upon the lands described
as Lots 15 and 16, Block 10, D.L. 934.
Dated this 27th day of July, 1912.
GEORGE WARCUP,
Applicant.
Clear, Beautifully
Grained Fur and
Spruce Lumber
Our timber is cut high in the
hills, where the clear green
spruce and fir grows. It
makes superfine lumber.
Our mouldings iuclude anything listed in this line.
Our Merchandise
and groceries
are selected from the best
goods the market offers.
A few. of our exclusive liner
Carhartt's Overalls
Hartt's Boots and Shoes
Campbell's Clothes
House of Hebberlin
Tents and Flies a specialty
"for the field we excel.
XmS UU *U HtJ lo Actual experience teaches \
what you want on your trip. We have made a life study of %
this subject and our years of experience are at your disposal, tt
Call and talk the matter over.   Any hour.   Any day. S
Building Material. It will puy you to get our estimate on the material "
for your building.   We can supply you from cellar to roof. y
GENERAL BLACKSM1TH1NG \
OATS FOR SALE
1 Hern Lumber Co., limited
'A W. F. Cooke Russsl Peden
2   STORE, OFFICE AND LUMBER YARD, SOUTH FORT GEORGK
K-^v^*!'*£3**r#3l>c*P£3R9£^£«*K3R3K.*3
^T>vT>*»T>v,T><T><T>*J>»>\,»i<'
— I_ „ "
^i^.^.W/A
Remember
Mr. Merchant that your goods can reach you from Soda
Creek within 40 hours if shipped by the Royal Mail
STEAMER "B, X,"
Full particulars from our local agent
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPRESS COMPANY    I
Auto, Stage and Steamboat Owners
--- South —
Fort George
Business
Property
——Is cheaper per front foot today
than hundreds of towns in Canada that have little
or no future ahead of them by way of railway development or strategic location.
—Everyone admits that South
Fort George has a great future and nothing can
now stop it from coming into its own. Why not investigate and buy before the prices double, which
they are sure to do, in a short time?
-—We have re-listings of lots that will
pay you to ask for-they are money makers to-day.
Garden Tracts
2 1-2 acre Garden Tracts, close in, that can be bought
on easy terms, that later will become residential property,
Prices $75 to $125 an acre. $50 down and $15 a month,
Farm Lands
Some that are close, in, at $12.50 an acre.    A good buy.
Large tracts for colonization at attractive prices.
Write for particulars of what you are interested in to the
NORTHERN
DEVELOPMENT
Vancouver,
cotton Bug. I CO., LIMITED I Tc!
SOLE AGENTS South Fort George Townsite
OWNERS South Fort George Gardens
I
■wi
IwXu*-■*«*-•...
.-:**>.-,•.
ym- int »*» •»••- - —
(Continued from ptft 8.)
headquarters at Winnipeg.
chamberlin was born in the United
Statu, as was Hays. So was Sir
Thomas Shaugnessy, president ot the
,!ana(lian Pacific, by the way. New
Hampshire is Chamberlln's state, but
,ie lived there only until he was
twelve, when his father died and he
went to live witb his uncle at Bethel,
in Vermont. So he really is » Ver-
nionter; whereupon he takes Green
Mountain rank with several other
railroad presidents, Including Strong
who once headed the Santa Fe; Robinson ol the Mexican National, and
Mellon, ol the New York, New Haven
_i Hartford.
Chamberlln's first railroad work
was with the Central Vermont road,
where Mullen also served his apprenticeship; he had various positions
and showed much aptitude. Then J.
li. Booth, the big lumberman, took
note ot him. Booth owned a wilderness in Canada, and wanted to make
it less wild by cutting the timber
Irom it. He hired Chamberlin to
build a lumber line from Lake Cham-
plain to Parry Sound on Georgian
Bay. Chamberlin took the job. He
went to the front and stayed there,
sparing neither himself nor his men.
He lived in that wilderness, out in
the open, driving that road through
until he completed the task. Then
Booth named his road the Canadian
Atlantic and Chamberlin became general manager.
The Canadian Atlantic runs
through Ottawa, and seven years
ago the Grand Trunk took it over.
Chamberlin resigned and went down
to Mexico. His experience in building
that lumber road had given him a
taste lor the work. One day he was
talking with Frank W. Morse, then
in the Grand Trunk Pacific, and
Morse asked him what hej had in
mind.
"Nothing   much,"   Chamberlin replied; "but what I'd like to do would
be to build a transcontinental railroad."
Morse remembered that, and when
Morse left the Orand Trunk Pacific
to go to the   Chicago -ft Alton he
told President  Hays be knew of a
man   who could   push   ths Grand
Trunk Pacific through.
"What's his name?" asktd Hays.
"Ed Chamberlin."
Hays was familiar with Chamberlln's record, and he wired to Mexico
and asked Chamberlin to come up
ud see him. Chamberlin came up
telling the folks in Mexico ha would
•» hack in two weeks. Two months
later he appeared i« Mexico in a
Orand Trunk private car, gathered
in M« family, stowed away his pointer Pups and left to take charge of
tt* Grand Trunk Pacific. Before
Cnamberlln took hold the head-
luarters ol the Grand Trunk Pacific
h»<* been in Montreal. Chamberlin
"wed them to Winnipeg, and he
continued to live in Winnipeg* until
ne was called to Montreal to succeed
Hays. t
Chamberlin is a big burly man,
*h° is popular with railroad officials
b«t who has had his differences with
the railroad unions. He is an out-
~0' chaP and a crack wing Bhot.
He specializes in pointer dogs, has
* "■■mbcr of fine ones, and is
N'Plest when he is out in Saskat-
™e*an with dog and gun, where the
I kens are plentiful and the shoo.t-
""-* 's good. He began to save his
moi«y early and is rich.
Th« death of Charles M. Hays and
lc Promotion of B. H. Fitshugh to
lue Presidency of the Central Ver-
™"1 road, which Is the name of the
^aml Trunk's New England system,
Practically eliminated the Wabash
crow*l from the Grand Trunk ln
^"wla-the Wabash crowd that took
0|J of the   Qrand Trunk.   when lt
*as a single-track, third-rate, mori**
,   i at,fti1'. and expanded it, built it
u» and made It a big double-track
mem. They wanted to knight Hays
ll he refused. Hays remained a cit-
'«" of the United States until his
(,    h' Like!y as not, one of these
uys King   George will signify his
"'"•ngnesB to tap fl. j, Chamberlin
' a broad shoulder with a sword
ll extend, a   cordial invitation to
'm to Riaei Slr KnighW 0anadlftn
railroad
Presidents usually  have a
ce to become knights. Like'.y as
chan-
Til  t0°' " K- J- Ohamberlin'ac-
"Ms «,, title he will be the first
knight
who ever lived as a boy in
Beth »««u   ma   B.   uuy   m
nel, Vermont-whlch will be going
80n>e for Bethel.
Occidental
Hotel
QUESNEL
B.C.
Most modem up-to-date hotel in the interior of British
Columbia.
New four-storey building.  Accommodation for 120 guests
All outside rooms—large, well-lighted and ventilated.
Steam heated.
RATES $2.00 PER DAY UP
Weekly and monthly rates on application
Wire for rooms Wire for rooms
E. L. KEPNER, Proprietor
City livery, Feed &
Sale Stables'
A. WHITE,
PROPRIETOR.
Single and Double Driving Horses.   Saddle and Pack Horses.
New Buggies and Thoroughly Reliable Rigs.
DRAYING  AND  EXCAVATWG  DONE.
Robert Spinks
terl
South Fort George ; B.C.
I am prepared to
Locate Pre-emptors
__■_ OR IM AGBU OF ___
Good Government Land.
WRITE FOR INFORMATION TO
N. C. Jorgensen.
P.O. In 21. Swtk F-srt Gtwie. B. C.
P. A. Landry J. H. McGneooi. J. F. Templcton
T. A. Kelly, Timber Department
Gore & McGregor
CIVIL ENGINEERS
British   Colaabla   Imi*   Bar-reran
. Lind Agents Timber Cruisers
Chancery Clumbers, Langley Street, VICTORIA,
B.C., P.O. Box 162. Phone 6M.
McGregor Building Third Street, SOUTH FORT
GEORGE. B. C.
A.P. ANDERSON
BUILDER AND
CONTRACTOR
Office and Store Fixtures.
Hamilton Ave.    South Fort George
FORT GEORGE LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Arthur Charles Egbert McElroy, of South Fort George,
B.C., manager, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands: i
Commencing at a post planted at the
Northwest corner of Lot 4201 and
marked C. McElroy's Northeast corner,
thence south 10 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 80 chains more or
less to the Nechaco River, thence following the said river southeasterly to
the point of commencement and containing 140 acres more or less.
ARTHUR CHARLES EGBERT MCELROY.
May 6th, 1912. jujgO
CHURCH SERVICES.
ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH-lst, 3rd
and Bth Sundays in month, Holy Communion, 8 a.m.; Evensong and Sermon, 7:30 p.m. Second and 4th Sundays in month, Matins, 10:30 a.m.:
Holy Eucharist and Sermon. 11 a.m.-
Rev. R. H. Isaac. Williams, Vicar.
KNOX CHURCH-Services every Sunday evening at 7.30. C. M. Wright,
Minister.
METHODIST CHURCH - South
Fort George—Service will be
held every Sunday morning in
the Maple Leaf Theatre at 11
o'clock.   T. Griffiths,  pastor.
fw^'vw^w^'Wfw:
a Do yon contemplate ft
BUILDING?       S
<ji Then Investigate our worlmaiahip and K
tA get our estimates |>
a
2 Contractors
A and Builders
tammm
DANFORTH 4 M'lNNIS      L<
Hamilton and R
First streets   K
\
CAMCELUTION OF RESERVE
Notice is hereby given that the re*
serve existing on crown lands In the vicinity of Stuart River, situated in tbe
Cariboo district, notice of which, bearing
date December 17th, 1908, was published
In the British Columbia Gazette, dated
December, 17th, 1908, is cancelled in so
far aa the same relates to the lands
surveyed as Lots llll. 1114, 6415, 6379,
5433, 6380, 6381, 6882, 5388,5384, 6385,
6417, 6419, 6391, 5889, 6888, 5387, 6386,
5432, 5437, 5438, 5431, 5392, 5393.5394,
5395, 5396, 6397, 5421, 6424, 5403,5402,
6401, 6400, 6399, 5398, 5430, 5439,5429,
5404, 5406, 6406, 5407, 5408, 5409,5427,
5414, 5426, 5428, 5425, 6413, 5390 and
6412, all in the Cariboo District.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., 12th June, 1912.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that the reserve
existing over Crown Lands in the vicinity of
Stuart River, Cariboo, notice of which bearing
dale February Uth, 1910. was published In the
British Columbia Gautte, February 17th, 1910. Is
cancelled, is so far as the same relates to the
lands surveyed as Lots 6261, 082. 8253, 6264, 6265,
6256, 6267.6258, 6266, 6272, 6296, 6297. 6296, 6289, 6271,
6266, 6264. 6259. 6273. 6280. 6281. 6279,6274. 6260,6263,
6267.6170,6290.6296,6291,6269, 6268, 6262, 6261, 6275,
6278, 6284,6277,6276. 6285,6286,6287, 6288, 6292, 6293,
6294,6296a. 6301,6906,6300,6299, 6908, 6904, 6907,6906,
6908a and 6906, all In the Cariboo District
ROBERT A. RENWICK.
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Landa Department, .
Victoria. CC. 12th June. 1912 Jun22sepl4
IN THE MATTER of the Companies
Act; and IN THE MATTER of
Cooke, Peden & Company; Limited.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Cooke, Peden & Company, Limited, will
at the expiration of one month from
the first publication hereof apply to the
Registrar of Companies for approval of
change of name from Cooke, Peden &
Company, Limited, to "The Northern
Lumber & Mercantile Company,
Limited."      ■ -'>
Dated this 4th day of May, 1912.
E. J. AVISON,
guesnel, B.C.
ooke, Peden &
Company, Limited.
MAIL ORDERS
We do a large mail order business
and guarantee satisfaction.
Our stock of general merchandise
is large and up-to-date, which enables us to fill all orders quickly.
Give us a trial
JoHini A. Fraser
& Co., Ltd.
Front Street
Quesnel, B. C.
Prospective Builders
Are you aware that it takes less labor to build with OUR BONE DRY
LUMBER, and that the result is permanent, weatherproof and saves
repairs and fuel; also that the lumber costs no more than other lumber?
INVESTIGATE!
All Kinds of Lumber and Mouldings For Sale.
The Fort George Trailing & Lumber Co., Ltd.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C.    Phone 11.   Chas. E. McElroy, Mgr.
Pioneers in Sawmilling and Steamboating on the Upper Fraser
and Tributaries.
Our GUMLESS SPRUCE SIDING and V-JOINT will not warp, check
nor shrink endways, and contains no gum to cause the paint to peel.
(T
WESLEY & WIGGINS
REAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENTS
Farm Lande,     Timber Lands,     City Property,     Garden TracU.
Fire, Accident end Life Insurance.
TWO SECTIONS of choice land in the Salmon River valley. Price,
per acre 911
575 ACRES of land suitable for subdivision. Only one mile from
town.   Price, per acre      -     -     ■■*■'-•     ■     •     •     9S5
TEN-ACRE Garden Tract, close in. Per acre • • • 9190
Terms on this 1-4 cash, 6,12,18 months at 6 per cent.
HAMILTON AVE.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
Roberts, Jones & Willson o
UWAUMKaiatauiNk     E. E. JONES.     A. I SaWM-WOUM, Mkr.
REAL ESTATE. INSURANCE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS,
VALUATORS and ACCOUNTANTS.
pOR SALE: Farm Luis. Garden TracU. Tinker Units. Mineral Oaims. Valuble towi bis.
LIST YOUR PROPERTIES WITH US. tt*£2Mi!i£
TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS "E R I N" FORT GEORGE, B. C.
0fces.Hanultoa Avenue, Soutli F-srt George: Central Avenue, Fort Georfe, B. C
f
AMERICAN PLAN
EXCELLENT CUISINE
:^l
Corner Hamilton & Third
South Fort George. B.C.
The newest and most modern
hotel in the northern interior
Rates $2.50 and $3
Monthly aad weekly rates •■ aa-
■Ucatlea
^
Bust of wines,
liquors and cigars
Albert Johnson, prop.
J
McGAGHRAN & THORNE
Manufacturers of High-Grade Confectionery
ICE CREAM and all kinds of SOFT DRINKS
Catering Tobaccos and Cigars
FOURTH STREET
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
.■ i
'     T..-I. PAGE FOUR
"
•n        as
OfLOC\L^lSTRlCT]i
***■*» -rnirnr ■ .."iw***-*. ratum..* u*km«".tc
Frank Maehier,  a we'l known trader
of Btuart    Lake,  arrived     in  town
on Wednesday    lust   on a business
trip.  Mr.    MoBliier  stut s that croi s
in the Ktnart Lake country are looking good, and that settlers in that
section  are   pros.ering.  The Stuart
Lake country is a splendid territory,
containing mineral, good laid uud a
mflgnlflctont    system    ot    navigable
waterways. With thc advent ot railroad  transportation  immediately  to
the s:mth  the rapid development o!
that section will follow ns a matter
ot course. Already land values are on
the rise, and some talk is heard ot :
a townBite near the Hudson Hay land
there.
Glowing reports are constantly
reaching he e ot the n*;wly located
pre-emptions on the Fraser River
above here. At Tonequah Crce'i, hetween the mouth of Bear Hiver and
the Grand Canyon, the pre-emptors
are busily engaged in clearing land
and getting their locations under
cultivation. The upper F.aser river
country is a perfect paradise for the
settler. The land produces an abundance ot crop when cleared, and
transportation along the entire area
of the valley will be a Bimple problem once the steel pushes down the
located right of way towards this
point.
I
Travellers and Shippers to Fort GCOrge
and New British Columbia
Travel in comfort and Farety via the Steamer "CMlcotln" the only
oak-rlbbedlsteamerjon the route; and consign your goods lo the cart* of
ilic "Chilcotin" at Soda Creek, they will be carefully, transported Jo
their destination.
Th e Fort George Trading & Lumber Co., Ld.  j
The Pioneer Operators of Steamboats and Manufacturers of ■
Lumber on the Upper Fraser and Tributaries. |
i y(y**(*tj»<,AVA.,»-*-ay»^
VA
A
A
II
4
9.
The Auto Transit Company
Agents at ASHCROFT, B.C.
ge
General Hardware and Sheet Metal Workers.
All kinds of tin anu* sheet Iron work done.
Camp stoves
LASELLE AVKNUE
Hot air Furnaces, etc.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE.
Dr. Welch, the veteran dentiBt, wht)
has been practicing every summer in
the Cariboo district for many years
paBt, has been in town for the past
week. He will laave for the south
again on the 10th.
John W. Smith of Denver, Colorado, and W, 0. Larson, of Retina,
Sasketchewan, were.visitors here this
week. Both Bre large realty owners
looking for investments in this district.
Mrs. S. Lund, wite of Sten Lund,
of the Lund Rogers Construction Co,
ot M'nneapo'is who have a large
section of work on the G. T. P. up
the Fraser, joined her husband at
Mile 186 recently. Mr. Lund will reside here next winter.
Willis J, West, manager of the
British Columbia Express Company
arrived here on Thursday last from
a trip over the wagon road betwe n
here and Quesnel. Al Young, the well
known driver brought Mr. We-;t in
over the road. The object dl this trip
was to lay plans for the stabling of
relay horses and the solving of the
passenger accommodation problem between Quesnel and South Fort
George, in view of the sunl-weekly
mail and passenger service that is to
be in vogue this winter. Mr. West
states that the road work this summer has vastly improved the route,
'especially at Blackwater, where the
steep and dangerous grade into the
valley trom tbe south side has been
abandoned (or a well laid out descent which is now being built and
whicb w 11 be cimplet d, together
with other grade improvements, in
time for the fall and winter traffic.
A Montreal juess despatch of ro-
cent date announces that news was
received there to the effect that the
issue ot bonds for the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway we're granted by the
British Columbia Government.
This road is to be built in agreement with the G. T. P. to give connection between Vancou*.er and the
G. T. P. at Fort George.
It is announced that before the
autum (our thou and nun will be at
work on tbe line and that it will be
completed in two years' time.
A. G. Hamilton purchased a gasoline boat this week lor use let veen
his ranch and this place.
Beef, Mutton
and Veal
A
A
A
A
'4
2 FORT GEORGE
Wholesale and Retail
A
A
A
A
A
1
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
We
HAVE
THEM
ALL SIZES antl PRICES.
STOVES
WE wish to draw your particular attention to our stock of
Men's Clothing and Furnishings.   All our goods are
especially adapted to the needs of this country.
General Merchandise
While we direct especial attention to our Clothing line, do
not forget that we carry a complete stock of General Merchandise-Groceries, Provisions, Boots and Shoes, Hardware
and Building Material.
We Can Supply All Your Wants
at the Most Reasonable Prices
I
I
The B.C. MEAT MARKET!
AND
4HE-
CLUB POOL ROOM
TH1KD AND   HAMILTON STS.
DAVIS & FORREST, Props.
Smokers' supplies
a specialty
Four pool tables
Splendid environments
CARD OF THANKS.
Mrs. Irene Jordan begs to express
her thanks for the prompt action of
the South Fort George Fire Br'gade
at thc event of the fire in her residence on Thursday last. 1.
FOUND—Stray horse ahout one
week' ago. Grey and white face. No
brands. Owner can have same by
paying expenses.
GEORGE HAAS.
(For information see milkman in
town.)
South Fort George, Aug. 3, 1912.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE 5
Intend Building?
NOW is the time to build,
whilst seasoned lumber is
obtainable. Labor conditions
are now in your favor. We
contract to design and construct your building, guaranteeing satisfaction: Call
or write us.  •
Bronger & Flynn
Builders and Contractors
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
A PROMINENT VISITOR.
Edward Scalnch, of Seilach &
Hubble, came into town for a brief
visit this* weak. Giscombe Portage
is the nat <ral entrance to the Peace
River country in B. C. Someday the
government mny realize this—whin it
is too late.
Several fbhing parties have left
town lately for Six Mile La'ce. Thc
sport is excellent, we are told, at
that point. '
Firemen's Ball on Thursday n.ixt.
\
GEORGE JOHN HAMMOND.
Mr. Hammond, president ot tho
Natural Resources Security Company
Ltd., is paying a short visit to his
townsi'.e up thc Nechaco. Mr. Hammond Iibb probably sold more twenty
five foot lo'.s than any other man in
the world. This picture was ta'en
some years ago when Mr. Hammond
4
was-laying the foundation for one of
his earlier fortunes. It is the only
picture wn have of him, however.
P. G. B. BODEKER
Land Timber Cruiser
Pre-emptions Located.     '
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Estimates Submitted.
Fort George
Drug Co.
Prescriptions a
Specialty
NEW BOOKS tt.taA
large shipment just received
Toilet articals, Patent Me-llclnea,
Maguzines,BookH, Stationery,
Toilet Articles, Druggists Sundries
Satisfaction guar-
Watch
Repairing
C. H. DAVIE.
anteed
Send articles by mall to Fort George, B.C.
Fort George, B.C. Victoria, B.C.
F. P. Burden. Mgr. F. C. Green, Mgr.
Nelson, B.C., A. H. Green, Mgr.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Eiiimrs, Dmisies t B. C. lut Sunyon
Surveys of Lands, Mines, Townsites, Timber
Limits, Etc.
The
Little Nugget
Cafe
The most modern and best-appointed
cafe in Fort George.
FIRST-CLASS CUISINE
Meal*       •       60 Cents
Short Orders a Specialty
Mrs. F. C. Nahkwai.d, Proprietress
Cor. Hamilton and Third
South Port George.
1 Close & Brown Co., Ltd.
A GENERAL MERCHANTS
jj Lasalle and Second Street South Fort George, B.C.
IS -*W &t %G ^^ -^ ^& *K -S^ civ ^K 5^ •*?!> Sv v -*5K -JR <*Sv -315 ^^v^9R*^*^C%K3-R*5
| 1836 |      Assets Exceed Fifty Million Dollars      | 1912 |
The
Bank of British North America
Your money Is safer in tlie Bank than tn your bouse or ln your
pocket. It is not tied up. You can get It out at any time without delay. NOTES discounted. Local and Foreign Drafts bought
and sold. COLLECTIONS madn promptly,   Money Orders issued.
FORT GEORGE BRANCH
J. MUNRO, ACTING MANAGER
Establish a Credit for Yourself
A careful man, with a systematic savings account, will in time.of need receive
greater consideration from his banker than the man who lives up to his income.
If you have not already done so, open a systematic savings account with this
Bank. $10 deposited monthly will, at 3 per cent interest, compounded half-
yearly, within 10 years amount to nearly $1400.
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS
$6,650,000
fl Opens aa
Aeeoaat
TOTAL ASSETS
St
THE TRADERS BANK
H. C. Seaman, Manager
South Fort George, B.C.
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
Head Office:
VANCOUVER, B. C.
CAPITAL AUTHORIZED        >   - • M.-MM.OPO
DIRECTORS:
R. P. McLENNAN Esq., President,
McLennan, McFeely & Co. Wholesale Hardware, Vancouver, B. C.
Iv. W. SHATFORD Esq., M. L. A.
Vice-Pres. Merchant, Hedley, B. C.
HIS HONOR T. W. PATEttSON. Lieutenant-Governor British Columbia.
M.   1.   CAHLIN,
OnuHnlist, Victoria, B.C.
A. ISTEL Esq.
C. S. DOUGLAS Esq.
Robert Kennedy, New Westminster.
J. A. MITCHELL. Esq.. Capitalist.
Victoria. B. 0.
E. H. HEAPS, Esq., E. H. Heaps *
Co.. Lumber and Timber: President
Columbia Trust Co.. Ltd., Vancouver. B. C.
J. A. HARVEY, Esq., K.C. formerly
of Cranbrook, B.C., Vanoouver, B.C.
A. L. DEWAR. General Manager.
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
FORT GEORGE BRANCH-F. LIPSCOMB, Manager. _
FARM LANDS IN CENTRAL
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fort George
District.
Nechaco Valley
Bulkley Valley
Skeena Valley
In every case our
lands were carefully inspected by
expert criiisersbe
fore we purchased
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY will make all these districts
accessible to all the world. Every rail laid adbs
to the value of the land
North Coast Land Co. Ltd.
General Office*: 619 to 624 Metropolitan Bide Vancouver,B.<
London Oflice t   6 Old Jewry.
$1,500,000.
PAID-UP CAPITAL.
■■

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