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Fort George Herald Mar 18, 1911

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Full Text

 ORT GEOR
HERALD
Vol,
I.   No. 32.
Jaune Cache Reported Sold
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C., MARCH 18, 1911.
$3 per Annum.
Tel
iln'
is reported here that the Natural Resources Security Co. have purchased the
nunc Cache land for townsite purposes. This land lies around the mouth of
.Lennan river and extends south to Cranberry Lake.
It is owned by a Kam
loops syndicate, and is registered in the name of J. R. Hull, of that town. Other
members of the syndicate are R. F. Green, J. Fulton, G. B. Nagle and J. D. Ma-
lone,     lhe property, consisting of 3400 acres, was offered last summer for a price
stated to be $120,000.
Ihe late John Houston once held a tenth interest in this syndicate, which he
disposed of for $1000.
SOOTH FORT GEORGE THE GATEWAY TO THE PEACE RIVER VALLEY
divide"
,'il»",
territ'
the nl
ing i
ry, *''
Canyo
called
pellati
uf li"'
11.111,''
the ill
ago,
throug
which
of the
plies i
the .V<
Tilt'
estnMi
cy hei
"Oh
it wil
ami s
Frase
Tete
WCSt '
tO til'
tilC B
llC io'
tween
Gram
here,
is udi
uf th
river,
Geort
ratli
I ea. t
the
tween
thirl',
1 i
Cariboo district is at present
I 'i.iro three divisions, the Ca-
jivision,    which   comprises    a
;v  bounded on the south   by
■'.'  lecond  parallel,  ami  rcach-
,-.!, ,mi its northern bounda-
:, en()a ut    the Fort George
This    territory has    been
•i ii. Cariboo,"   nml this ap-
:  _eems appropriate, in. view
fuel   tlmt   it   comprises   the
... gold  country,  which    in
,,f    the   excitement,  years
,      the   subject of discussion
|,,,t   tbe    continent.    Quesnel,
:,: tin' centre of the division,
entire district, and still sup-
.!i;it. part ol the territory to
est of this place.
Port George Division which the
ibment of a government agen-
e will alienate   entirely   from
rihoo's" administration,    ns
1   then   be a   disti'ict distinct
eparate,  is    formed  round   the
i' river, from itB hendwaters at
Jaune    Cache,   and    continues
from this river, to Fort George
t i21th parallel.   The most fer-
tretch  of  this  territory  is    to
i.l in    the   Fraser vailey    be-
Tet.c   Jaime   Cache and     thc
I Canyon,    200   miles north of
bul as this part of the valley
l.r total reserve for a distance
ree miles on  each side of    the
little is heard of it.  At Fort
r 11.,- Praser river turns to the
from   a   genera] direction    of
and west, which it pursues   for
three    hundred   odd  miles    be-
thi. point and the Cache. For
iniiis     northeast     of    Fort
George, and twelve miles north of
the Fraser, the southern extremity
of the Peace river division is reached. This territory comprises a
greater acreage than is contained in
both the other divisions of the district, and is next in size to Cassiar,
in the divisions of the province.
The headwaters of the Peace are
found at the junction of the Parsnip
and the Finhiy rivers, which converge and form the Peace at the intersection of the 5Cth and 124th parallels. Until a very recent period
the Peace river country was a vague
territory "somewhere up north," in
the eyes of the public, and even the
most speculative colonization companies would have turned down proposals to operate in that section of
the province. A new order of things
is fast coming into existence, with
respect to the development of this
marvellously rich territory, and in
Vancouver alone colonization concerns are now applying to the government for enormous blocks of land
in the Peace river division.
A representative of The Herald was
informed by one of these companies
that they were taking up a million
acres alone. There is a reserve in
this country covering the river for
twenty miles on each side, and continuing south down the Parsnip to
Fort Oeorge. Hesidcs this provincial
reserve is the Dominion government
block of two million five hundred
thousand acres. This reserve appears about the size of a postage
stamp on maps of the province,
scaling 20 miles to the inch, and
gives some idea  of   the  tremendous
area of the Peace river division of
Cariboo.
In a report by Mr. F, C. Campbell, Provincial Government Agent,
stationed at Fort Bt. John, in the
Peace River division of the Cariboo
disti'ict in 190!), he refers to the general character of the country as follows.
The report of Mr. James Pettry,
who is well known in this district, is
also interesting proof of the undoubted fertility of the region. Mr.
Pettry reached Fort George from an
extended trip into the Peace River
last November. Mr. Pcttry's report
deals more especially with the Halfway river valley lands, a stream
which (lows into the Peace near Hudson's Hope. Part of Mr. Pettry's report reads as follows:
"The Peace river country," says
Mr. Pettry, "has been too long and
too favorably known Ior me to add
very much in this report. All our
well known geologists and government specialists have the same impression, namely, that it is determined to be the last great granary of
the Canadian northwest — in fact, it
is the last Great West.
The writer was in this country (the
Halfway River) in the months of
August, .September and October of
the present year, and has seen in the
Hudson Bay Go's., garden at Hudson's Hope and Fort John as fine
vegetables as are grown in any section, consisting of potatoes, peas,
cabbage, green corn, onions and ripe
tomatoes, and all other small vegetables. The manager of the Hudson's Bay Co.'s post told  me   that
this piece of land has raised the
same kind of vegetables for the last
22 years and has never been a failure, or had a pound of fertilizer on
it.
The Hudson's Bay Co. have raised
here as line oats as have ever been
raised in any country. The winters
in this country are not long and severe, as many people seem to think,
who have never been in this country. This, I think, is due to the
fact that the chinook winds which
come through the valley have a more
powerful effect on the immediate
country than they do on the wider
prairie. Horses range out in this
country all winter and come out in
the finest condition. The Indians in
the Findlay river country bring their
horses down here on the Halfway
river to winter them on the grass a
river to winter them, as the grass is
better and the winters shorter and
considerably warmer.
The soil in this country is like
most all other prairie country, being
of a heavy black vegetable mold or
loam, with a clay subsoil underlaid
with sand, stone and coal. I think
this country has the greatest future
as a coal producing country of any
country in Canada or the United
States, for that matter. Thirty-six
sections of coal have been located in
the vicinity of Hudson's Hope, and
the report is that it is of the finest
quality. From what I have seen I
think this is the greatest cattle section in the country, and when the
timber is cleared, which is very
light, and all it needs is a few fires
through it, then it is ready for the
A Romance of the Fur Trade
The history of a lady's fur coat is,
il one thinks    of it, full of strange
i constrasts,   A wi!J creature of   tbe
' Canadian ["rests,   a   silent     Indinu
trapper  and   his   wife, a lone Hudson's liny company trader, the half-
breed  paddlers of a "north" canoe,
the hand, of the Hudson's Bay boat
in the ice Hoes oil Ungava, the cm-
j Ji.ojees  i'f   a liritish railway    company, thi'   operatives   of a London
I lurrier - nil these mny have played
part in the making of a coat   before it mi. j,- |,cnr in the windows of
i shop in Hoi d street or on the back
I of some p, id lady of St.    James',
1 writes li. S, Wallace in the Toronto
Globe.   The fir trade is ono of the
j lew departments of modern business
about which there still  lingers    the
odor ol romance.   Other trades have
heen  revolutionized     by   nineteenth
century science; it has remained, al-
Imost  alune,   primitive in its meth-
lods.
Since the fay when "The Honor-
awe Company nf Adventurers trad-
ling into Hudson's Bay" was founded
>>' Prince Rupert it has hardly altered nt all. [n unimportant details
it mny have changed, perhaps.   The
[trade mark of   a   famous Pittsburg
Heel  works   may   now   ).<,   stnmped
| upon the Indian   traps; and the loci   Mad? in Germany" may now
Morn the   barter   that is given for
I the mrs, 1,'M
I have t!„. f0|
|They stand
Nirro-ndiiigs
Itrudcd, and
jlii.trate i ■,
11 ie slight innovations
' "f bald anachronisms.
li:'t shnrpely from the
into which they are in-
they merely serve to il-
'■ ntrast  how primitive
these are.
The life ol the hush is a closed
book to most people. A great, deal
has been written about the life of tho
wild animals that furnish the fur,
but very little has been written
about the life of the traders and the
trappers who collect it, though the
latter is a subject full of the most
romantic interest. The life of the
bush often appears on tho surface
ono of hitter trial and hardship. The
Indian trapper often goes through
trials nnd hardships that would
crush another man. He goes off in
the autumn to his winter's hunting
grounds with a single small canoe;
he sleeps all winter in a bark tepee
or in a canvas tent, when he does
not roll up in his rabbit-skin in the
snow; he travels through the bush
when the mercury is frozen in the
glass, snowshoeing with his pack
upon his back and his rifle on his
arm, through windfall and through
tangled swamp, and, worst of all,
through perilous burnt bush, where a
wilderness of charred poles sway in
the wind like the masts of countless
ships. Comfort is a thing he knows
not. He lives on pork and beans,
and Hour and tea. I lis clothes he
never change!., night or day. His
only remedy for all the ills that
flesh is heir to is a drink of .burning
painkiller. He lives and dies in
debt, and would not become solvent
if he could. A good winter may
bring him in WOO; a had winter $50.
On the whole, his life is that of
Hobbes' natural man, "nasty, poor,
mean, briittish and short." But, on
the other hand, he is quite content.
He does not feel the need of comfort or a balance in the bank; and
lie has a stoical and philosophic calm
that enables him to take with equal
mind whatever the gods may send.
He may always get, ' o argues, credit with the traders. Wny, then,
should he take thought of the morrow — what he should eat or what
he should put on?
Tbe trader's lot seems even harder,
because he has, as a rule, known better things. The Hudson's Bay traders are, with a curious unanimity,
sons of the "land of wild heath and
shaggy wood." I have heard one of
them recite with no small amount of
feeling:
"From the dim shieling of the misty
island,
Mountains divide us, and a world
of seas;
But still our   hearts   are true,   our
hearts are Highland,
And we in   dreams   behold the Hebrides."
This trader was a Scot who had
come out to Hudson Bay when a
young man, and had married an Algonquin wife, of whom he had a family of little Indians who lisped in
broken Scotch when they condescended to speak English at all.
He lived at his trading post from
January to January, receiving letters from the outside world once or
twice a year, and seeing white men
hardly oftcner. Another of the
verses he frequently repeated was:
"O, solitude, where are the charms
That sages have seen in thy face?
Better dwell in the midst of alarms
Than live in this horrible place,"
The Passing of the Fur Lands
jMagazii
■titled '
■ • i on- of "Everybody's
appears   an   article cn-
''   Bottlers' Fight for the
I, •     This   article portrays
I » American conception of the Peace
I l!"v'   The    author,    Robert
:t,|l In the case of nuth-
I,,,,'     '      '     "f    territory  never  ex-
"J   mortal  man  other    (.ban
11111 '  "'   the    Hudson's    Bay
M;i,|"<t   trading company
' w"hl tti|l ever know, criticizes
I the m
""ilmiiy severed
y.
,  , '" reason  that when n
|*ca.t.c     eh " «» H. B. 0.. has
Ifarthe "'H   throush   tho
*; ",ii'1ich uf a vast uninliahi-
|tci1 frontier
I'enti
'ry Iii
region, and [or over a
gathorotl the   fur frotn
dlans. This journey in tho time Ol
high water has taken as long as
nineteen days to accomplish. The
magnificlent steamboats which have
replaced the transportation of five
years ago, now cover this route in
two days. In those days the Indians
here loft the reservation practically
deserted   during   the   winter   months,
and hied them to their bunting
grounds, returning In the,spring with
the fur catch, to pay oil' their debt
to the "i'iunpv!iy"t Now they are a
dissolute band of huulcis that were.
They are no longor a source of revenue to the Hudson Hay people or to
any one else.
Mr Dunn refers to his experiences
in the ivr.ee River country In part.as
follows. ,, ,   . ,, ,„
"Last summer l travelled eighteen
hundred miles upon the arctic slope
of North America. 1" the Grand note] at Athabasca Landing, a hundred
miles North ol the railroad, a half-
breed girl waited on us In a P«nc0("
gown,   while a  woman    who    m gut
have I n   her mother   was holing
whiteflsh iii a tepee outside- and in
Ithe animal ,rtn,01'od the '"■' from
Isiv'ii- in ,"' "' H"r'1' ll territory,
ithe ln(," ex*ange    trade  goods  to
|tn Wolcotno tl   '""  ""''  '"'  ''xpertrd
littler  „', ,,' auver,t of the white
_Mlon iv    ,      ,ulva"|,e of a oivil-
I0'Us v., i,', ,s."ln,lH th0 death knell
I ['We yeaj-      ""', tran0'
|i|r'"'|iiivc "!."'" ''''"'i George was as
l"i the ]•,,' "''.''"de post ns those
If11' ""mi   writ    W t0clay'  "f whlch
I"'"".Iil   ;,.',.     ;;'    A"    freight    was   o   , .hiii.i.h,,
'tackea _d<        (J'"'S;"'1 "" Be°ws,  Stem wheeler that took us "I'f"
'•' ''iver by crews of In-  abuaca River towards Lease,   eia
a Standard   oil   can.
Aboard  the
I.nke, we rend a notice: "Prospectors
and others Intondlng to proceed to
the Mackenzie River district are warned against undertaking the journey
unless provided with food and necessaries sufficient to last one year";
and we read it under electric lights.
At. the settlement of Grouard on the
Lesser Slave, the white wife of a fur
trader gave us a dance. We went in
white shirts and drank a punch made
of rum nnd strychnine".
Dwelling mi the fact that the Hud-
sonjs Hay Co., factors in the Peace
Rivor do not eneourago settlers, the
author refers to these traders in
scathing paragraphs. "And into the
peace, ho writes, because it has been
proved fit for agricultural purposes,
ciiines the settler, the pioneer. The
Company deals with him, a white
man, exactly as it has always dealt
with its mongrel hunters and with
its rivals in trade. Ignorant of its
history, of its traditions of having
for generations ruled an abject
people and controlled all routes of
transportation, the settler must bear
the brunt of its lloiirbonism, whoso
inhumanity he cannot understand.
Again he soliloquises on the mental picture conjured up by the "company's" name;
"I have often wondered what sort
of an image rises up in most men's
minds to-day at the words "Hudson's Hay Company." Likely it is of
nn  Indian   clad In    beads and furs,
plow, and will be just as good a
wheat country as Alberta or any of
the prairie countries. The Hudson's
Bay Co. have a flour mill at Fort
Vermillion, on the Peace river. They
pay .$1.50 per bushel at present for
all the wheat raised in that vicinity.
During the coming summer the first
real influx of settlers into the Peace
River valley will commence.
Edmonton is organizing in an effort to gather unto herself the Peace
River trade. Fort George has by far
the best route to offer, if it were
properly opened up. For people desiring to see the Peace River country, travelling light without freight,
Fort George offers the only feasible
route. Leaving Ashcroft one may
reach Fort George in three days. —
(during the season of open navigation) — Giscombe Portage can be
reached and crossed from this point
in one day more, and embarking in a
canoe at Summit Lake, which is the
southern extremity of the Arctic
watershed in British Columbia, the
trip to Edmonton may be completed
in twenty-five days with ease by a
downstream route.
A small steamboat could run from
McLeod Lake to Hudson's Hope, and
a wagon road from Giscombe Portage to Fort McLeod, a distance of
about fifty miles, would establish for
Fort George the trade of the greatest undeveloped area of the province, until the advent of railroads
from this point into the Peace.
It would be well for the board of
trade here to take Into serious consideration the investigation of this
matter.
And yet he himself was the first to
confess that anyone who had tasted
the life of the bush could not go
back to another. "Once a Hudson's
Bay man," be said, "always a Hudson's Bay man." There is a fatal
fascination ubout the free life of the
forest that holds a man captive.
Such a one has heard the call of the
wild. To ply the paddle, to shoot
the wild duck, to hit the trail across
the virgin bush, to sleep beneath the
stars, to breathe the scent of cedar
or of pine — these things are life to
him whose blood has caught the
fever.
The labors of the traders are not
arduous. They have to sell the trappers their outfits in the autumn, and
they barter for thc peltries in the
spring. They have to sort the peltries that they buy, and transport
them by canoe or dog-train to the
nearest railway line or steamboat
wharf; and there their duties end.
The only time when they have cause
for worry is when they have to meet
with opposition. Then they have to
fight for very life. When the Northwest company set up against the
Hudson's Bay men in the beginning
of last century, there was a bitter
fight, in which trading posts were
burned and men were kidnapped, and
often blood was spilt. The mothods
of warfare now adopted are those of
commercial aggression, and they are
directed mainly against what are
called "free traders" — free lances
who set up beside the Hudson's Bay
company posts and try to win the
company's Indians over. Many a
thrilling tale might be told of the
bitter commercial tights between the
"great company" and the lonely free
traders in    the heart of the    forest
primeval. One such fight took place
a few years ago at what, for caution's sake, may be called Ghost river. A low, illiterate Dutchman set
nii in opposition to the Hudson's
Bay .ompany post, and made a bid
for the fur trade of the district. He
cut rates and made loans, and dispensed whisky, and married a chief's
daughter, with the acumen of an up-
to-date American trying to break a
ring. And, though he did not manage to make good his footing, be
gave the factor at the post a most
uncomfortable time, and made that
easy-going man bestir himself in earnest. The story of that fight enacted against the background of the
wild primeval bush, is only typical
of what is going on here and there
all over northern Canada.
Such is the life of the traders and
trappers. The rest of the story of
the fur is simply and easily told.
Early in June, when the pelts have
been gathered and sorted and cured,
the great six-fathom canoes are
brought down to the water and loaded with their precious freight. 'Ihe
"packers" (as the Indiana are called)
step in and man thwarts. The pro-
ression of canoes streams out across
the lake. With gaudy handkerchiefs
the Indian village waves a last farewell, and the fur brigade disappears
around tho bend.
The furs are shipped to Hudson
bay on to the Hudson's Bay Company's steamer, which makes an »n-
nual passage through the ice floes of
the northern channels to the far-off
shores of England. And when the
furs reach England, in the workshops of the furrier, they are made
into all kinds of furry garments to
keep warm a sheltered race.
setting traps by a lonely lake, or
driving a team of wolf dogs across
a thousand miles of snow; or of a
dour Scotchman inside the stockade
of a log fort, holding a flintlock upright on the ground as abject feathered Dog-ribs trade for it by piling
beaver skins up to its muzzle, that
titled stockholders in London may
be enriched. And such a sketch is
true enough except that since the
French bucaneor RadtBson (who never
got his due from history) flattered
Charles II of England into giving
Prince Rupert, Ihb first cousin, the
Company's charter in 1(570, wool
shirts have replaced rawhide, felt
bats have rather shamed feather
headgear, and the price of guns and
ammunition has dropped; for the
Company has always been master of
the North's history.
Mr. Dunn gives tho company no
credit nt nil for their century in tbe
wilderness. Ho finds in the trading
concern's operations only material
for vituperation. At Fort Vermillion, on the Peace, the company and
the settler clash acutely, he says.
There, on the one side, is thc ono
perfect, longest-lived example of business absolutism over men's lives; on
the other, a band of a dozen settlers
bearing the burden of generations of
future while men, nnd in latitude 58
degrees DO minutes. So far they have
been always worsted, and their feel
nigs run high.
Referring to a conversation with
the Factor of Fort Vermillion, he
begrudglngly gives the "company's"
view.
"Think of the risk we take,says
the factor, in bringing stuff into a
country like this—kerosene evaporates, sugar gets wet. If it wasn't for
the credit tbe Company gives these
fellows, they'd never have got a
start at all. And I have to make the
post pay. It costs $5,000 a year to
run it nnd Inst year it was ordered
closed, and I shouldn't have been
here now if the price of muskrats
hadn't, risen."
The Hudson Bay Company transports goods to their posts in regions
such ns the Peace River, solely for
the purpose of getting fur in exchange. They make a profit on the
fur, as well as on thc goods. If they
woro to settle their prices for cash
sales, at prices which would take
into consideration the profits made
hy thc fur acquired by their goods,
under a tariff, the prices would he
prohibitive, therefore ,until thc last
ditch has been fought, their prim-
ative transportation methods revolutionized and the oncoming rush of
home seekers alienate their lands
they will naturally struggle to keep
their supremacy over tho fur lands,
in spite of tbe vanguard of civilization which year after year drives
the fur bearing frontier further towards the Arctic. !      I
FORI GEORGE HERAL
PUBLISHED BY IHE
NORTHERN INTERIOR PRiNTiNG GO.
J, 13. DAN1-LL. PR__1D_NT
Devoted    to    the    interests    of    Fort
George and  the entire  .Willlinn  Interior.
J. B. DANIELL,  Editor,
MARCH  18,  1911.
When the Fori George Herald commenced publication last August,   we
definitely decided   i i a policy   of
exposure towards any corporations
operating on the future nf thi i plai o
i nd districl upon llm i which we i ■ n
sidered detrimental Lo the ultimate
development of this strategic point.
from its pioneer slate to a place
among the cities of Western Canada.
This policy we consistently lived
np to, and for twenty live issues of
this paper we attacked the townsites
on the Nechaco river here, as the
manner in which these properties
have been promoted in the past was
not In accordance with what we consider to be In tho public interest i,
We have no wish to retard development in any form, but we wish to
counteract the effect of advertised
statements which place before the
public on the1 outside impressions of
the situation which are entirely at
variance with the existing conditions.
Last year the situation needed our
publicity to a marked degree, as influences were at work in the railroad
country to the south, which prevented hundreds of people from visiting
this point. Added to this was a demoralized transportation service in
the early part of tbe season, when it
was most urgently needed, and it is
apparent that although Fort George
was attracting an enormous amount
of attention throughout the United
States and Canada, very little information was forthcoming from independent sources, and the public we.e
putting their money blindly into any
property which was represented in
sufficiently large type bodies,
through the advertising pages ol the
daily papers, bearing the name of
the Old Hudson's Bay post, round
which tbey realize a city will ri.-:e,
as others have risen at the pests of
this great pioneer trading corr.pa:.y
in many precedents.
During the period that we devoted
our attention towards these promotions, which operations were menacing the properties here, we stirred up an opposing element, which
found strength in the services of
some of our coast contemporaries.
This led to a fierce newspaper controversy which attracted a large
amount of attention nnd resulted in
bringing upon Fort George at large
an undesirable trend of public opinion which, created by doubt ns to
the bona fides of the respective town-
sites, was leading towards an unhealthy impression of the whole proposition.
Although the situation hero remains but slightly altered, the purchase of the Indian reserve by the G.
T. P. has removed the iast vestige of
doubt regarding the intentions of the
railroad company towards this place
and the public realizing that tho development o! tl,is point, no longer
depends upon townsite companies'
operations alone, but is endorsed by
the Grand Trunk railway. Under
these circumstances we base discontinued our campaign against oilier
properties, as we do not wish to
continue in any policy which will retard   the     Infill-     ol   | pie   exp.i led
Inn' this Btiiunicr.
The transportation problem is in
the hands ol capable and experienced
companies, and since the future of
South Fort George is long past tbe
problematical stage, we can afford
to rely upon the judgment of the
people themselves when they arrive
on tbe ground, and knowing the situation The Herald will content itself
with advocating thc personal Investigation of Intending investors ill
property ai: this point.
Our campaign has bud the effect of
producing the moderation of statements in advertising campaigns,
which has heen tbe desired result
from the first, and therofore wo lay
aside the vitriolic pen with a sign of
sonic satisfaction.
COT PEEVISH.
The Quesnel board of trade is very
peevish with the Herald because in a
recent issue ot tins paper we referred
to certain lands in their district as
"twenty-fouth class lands." The
hoard writes that, "you know as well
as we do that some of the best land
of the northern interior is around
Quesnel." We have always been
aware of this fact, and in the very
lirst issue of this paper we defended
tbe Quesnel lands generally from a
newspaper attack  against  them.
In the Quesnel district, however,
there has been much indiscriminate
staking. Thc block we had reference
to is an example. However, we understand that the worst of this land
lias hem culled out by thc principals
who en hardly he held responsible
for the work of agents who get so
much  per acre [or staking.
As Investigation has shown us that
lhe lot tor we received was forwarded
ai tlic request of the company who
'. ere pun haslng i he block of land,
.,,• caunol sec our way to relpact the
i.is! ie niii siiv printed, In \lew of
; i c lari thai Informal Ion was sup
plied lo us last summer hy Lhe Quesnel hoard of trade, showing tbat
I hey had refused lo supply these
very land operators villi a communication which was probably required
for advertising purposes.
Northern British Columbia, through
one of the passes in the northern
Rockies,
lt is also saii_ that the (.rent Northern Railway will have a line built
across Canada in a shorter time than
most people think, as Kill now practically has the rond in operation
from the coast to the Rockies and
numerous connections in the three
prnirie provinces.
"Till': TIME HAS  COME, THE
WALRUS SAID."
The scare head is familiar to irrd-
ers of "Alice in Wonderland1'', and is
therefore doubly appropriate.
Soutli Fort George is the Wonderland in this instance and the citizens
arc eust for the Alice role.
Ever since Premier McRride's visit
in August of last year, the people of
this city have been doir.g some tall
wondering regarding the location of
the government agent's offices.
The controversy regarding this
hone of contention will be well remembered by Herald readers, and we
find it a regrettable fact that in
spite of the influences and claims of
the warring elements; in spite of the
Goveruental promises; and yet again
in spite of the veneer of printer's ink
which has overlaid the whole nffair,
the public are still left to wonder on
as to whether the semi-ready contract for these buildings will be let
this year or not.
The Herald interviewed Frcmier
McBride in Victoria immediately proceeding the opening of the late Legislative session, We were assured
that a decision would be arrived at
early [n the parlimcntary proceedings
ns the matter, —so 'twas said— rested largely in tbe hands of our members. Vet, though the Provincial Parliament has risen for the year, South
Fort George is left in prccicely the
same state of wonderment towards
this all important matter, which is
the result of our Government office
fiasco, nineteen hundred and ten.
The time has certainly arrived for
the settlement of this matter, and it
should receive the immediate attention of the Govornmant. Both cur
members have laid their views before
thc Provincial Executive and the de-
cision now apparency rest." •■• 11 i.y
with the ministers in Victoria.
If the matter is allowed to meander along as it has in the past any
benefit which would accrue to this
district through the establishment of
this office will be greatly diminished,
as the first rush of the expected influx of settlers will ie obliged to
transact their business with the
Crown through the medium of a
Government Agent stationed at Barkerville,—many miles away, i ■ the
mountains of old Cariboo.
On the subject of location the
views of thc Herald coincide with
thc wishes of tbe public. They are
uncompromisingly definite, and in
advocating their location in South
Fort George we justify ur opinion
by pointing out the fact that our
choice of location is not only the
residential and business centre of the
district, hut of the entire Northern
Interior, ami although the buildings
for use in the immediate future are
understood to be but temporary
structures, pending their location on
G.T.P. townsite there is no possible
reason for locating them on 'my temporary  sile.
John \. Praser, one of our two .representatives in the Legislative Assembly is expected here shortly, and
it appear.", probable that he will
settle this matter whilst hero.
A RAILROAD TO THE
I'lOACIO   ItlVIOR.
fl
FORT GEORGE  LAND   !)!:-"!"!!'T.
Disti'ict of Cariboo.
Take notice that Coition Wright,
of Ottawa, Ont., occuiiation government official, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands: Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner ol D. L. 4300; thence east eighty
chains; thence north 20 ehains;
thence wost 20 chains; thencc nortii
about Tl chaias to the Nechaco river; thence following the meanderings
of the river up stream to point of
commencement.   GORDON   WRIGHT,
iiaie, Jan. 27, 1911.
FORT GEORGE  LANI)  DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Bsden Erskine, of
Ottawa, Ont., occupution accountant,
intends to apply for permission to
purcliase the following described
lands: Conimencing at a post iilanted at the southeast corner of D. L.
43C6; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west forty
chains; thence soutii 80 chains to
point of commencement.
ESDEN ERSKINE.
Date, Jan. 28, 1911.
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
Disti'ict of Cariboo.
Take notice that Dan Wright, of
Vancouver, B. 0., occupation axeman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted at the S. W. corner of Lot 4'Ab'A;
thence south 30 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 30 chaius;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement, and containing 210
acres, more or less.
DAN WRIGHT.
December 27, 1910.
First insertion February 18.
FORT  GEORGE  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Thomas Ross, of
Fernie, B. C, occupation lumberman
intends to apply lor permission to
purchase the following descrihed
lhr.ds: Commencing at a post planted 3 miles south of the southeast
Cr. of Lot 1606; thence 80 chains
east; thence 40 chains south; thence
80 chains west; thence 40 chains
north. THOMAS ROSS,
William West, agent.
Date, Jan. 11th, 1911.
FORT  GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Charles Howard,
of Cranbrook, II. C, occuiiation ho-
telman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a
post planted one mile south of the
southeast corner of Lot 1C07; thence
40 chailis east; thence 80 chains
south; thence 40 chains west; thence
80 chains north.
CHARLES   HOWARD.
William West, agent.
Date,  January 13th, 1911.
FORT  GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that George Bronson,
of Fernie, B. C, occupatiin lumberman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted 2 miles south of the southeast
Cr. of Lot 1C07; thence 80 chains
east; thence 40 chains south; thence
80 chains west; thence 40 chains
north. CEORGE BRONSON,
William West, agent.
Date, Jan. 14th, 1911.
Close & Brown
Smtli Fort George, B.C.
General Merchants
Just received a consignment
of Dunham, Norway, Maine
1
|
I
I
I
SNOWSHOES _
Ladles* and Men's B
^^'j^^'A^'AK.'Ai'A^'j^'A&Ati^^
All -if-ids of Roi.ch and Dressed
SFRUCF. AND  FIR
Rl'SSl-I... PEDEN, Manager
Soutii Fort George,      :
B.C.
J
K^_tt_^-^^^^^^^^^^^^S2*-^^^^^-.-_k_-£_-^_K^
jj    Garden Acreage for Sale   \
4 5 and 10-acre blocks jj
4
Subdivision of District Lots 745 and 747.    Almost immediately   b_.
low South Fort George,  traversed by the located wagon road to Quo.-u
,.  nel, on the oast side of the Fraser river.     This is guaranteed to  be 'I
H  the linest truck garden property ever ollered to the public in this (lis-1»
"   •     '     Prices low;  terms good. '
trict.
Real Estate     Timber
Farm Landa
W.F.COOKE
2nd Street South Fort George
Land Located for Purchase or Pre-emption
y     Exclusive agent South Fort George Townsite
FORT  GF.ORGI.  LAND DISTRICT.
Disti'ict of Cariboo.
Take notice that Joseph S. Dowe,
of Cranbrook, B. C, occupation laborer, intends to apply for permission to purchase thc following described lands: Commencing at a
post planted at the t_ __. Cr. of Lot
1607; .hence 40 chains east ; thence
80 chains south; 'thence 40 chains
west; thence 80 chains north.
JOSEPH  S.  DOWE,
William West, agent.
Date,  January 13th, 1911.
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice   that   Stewart Brock,
of Cranbrook,  B.  C,  hotelmau,    intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following  described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted three
miles south  of tbe southeast  corner
of Lot 1884; thence 40 chains west ;
thence    40   chains   south; thence    40
chains east; thence 40 chains north.
STEWART  BROCK,
Willinm West, agent.
Date, Jan. lGth, 1911.
FORT  GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take    notice    that    I,     Margerite
Brown, of Cranbrook, B. C, occupation married  woman,  intends to apply  for permission  to  purchase   the
following described  lands:    Commencing at a post planted at thc northwest corner of Lot 1887;   thence   80
chains south; thence 80 chains wost;
thencc  80  chains    north;   thence    80
chains east.
MARGERITE BROWN,
William Wast, agent.
Date, Jan. 27, 1911.
FORT GEORGE LANI) DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Milton A. Cory,
of Mcdecine Hat, Alta., occupation
mail clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a
post planted three miles south of the
southeast corner of Lot 1884; thenee
80 chain., east; thenee 40 eliains
south; thenee 80 clinins west; thenee
40 chains nortli.
MILTON  A. CORY,
William West, agent.
Date, Jan. 14.h, 1911.
FORT CEORCE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notiee that James H. King,
of Cranbrook, B. C, occupation physician, intends to apply for permission to purchaso the following
described lands: Commencing at a
post plnnted ut the southwest corner of Lot 1890; thenee 80 chains
soutli; thence 80 chains west; thence
80 chuins north; Ihenee 80 chains
cast..
JAMES  H.  KING,
William West, agent.
Date, Jan. 27, 1911,
iration was granted In December Insl in thc .lbcrtn Lcgisla-
i iiro, In Hi' Pence Kiver nnd Great
Western railway, providing for the
construction of a line from Edmonton In Hu' Pence River Pass, crossing
I'.ie Athabasca River at Holmes
Crossing and skirting the west end of
Lesser Slavo I iakn.
Wnnie time ago the Plnchor ('reek
Cardstone nnd Montana Railway
was authorized to build Irom the International boundary to Edmonton,
nnd thoso In close touch with railway developments here say that
these two roads nre nothing more or
less than the James .1. Hill interests working quietly in their efforts
lo beat the three great Canadian
transcontinental roads in their race
for tho Peace RIVer country,
If Ibis is a correct opinion it will
not he long before there Is a connecting link between the main line of the
(iieal Northern In the United States
and the Peace River valley, with an
extension    to the   Pacific   Coast in
ITJRT  GEORGE  LAND  DISTRICT.
Di ...rict of Cariboo.
Take nnliee that William West, of
Fort George, II. 0,, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purehase the following described
lands : Commencing at a post
planted two miles south of the S.E.
corner of Lot 1884; thence 80 chains
east; thencc 80 chains south; thence
80 chains west; thence 80 chains
north. WILLIAM  WEST.
Date,  January 13th, 1911.
FORT  GEORGE  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Robert L. Morrow, of Cranbrook, D. C, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing at a poat planted l»wo miles
south of the southeast corner of Lot
1883; thenee 40 chains west; thencc
80 chains south; thencc 40 chains
east; thence 80 chains north.
ROBERT L. MORROW,
William West, agent.
Date,  Jan. 15th,  1911,
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notiee that Frnnk W. Green,
of Cranbronk, B. O., occupation physician, intenilii to apply for permission to purchaso the following described lands: Commencing at a
post planted at the southwest corner of Lot 1890; thence 80 chains
north; thencc 80 chains west; thencc
80 chains south; thencc 80 cbains
east.
FRANK  W.  GREEN,
William West, agent.
Date, Jan. 27, 1911,
FORT GEORGE LANI) DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that James Joyce
of Cranbrook, B. c, occupation
lumberman, intends to apply for
Iiermission to purchase thc following descrihed lands' Commencing at a post planted at the southwest comer of Lot 1X87; thenre 80
chains smith; thence 80 chains west-
tbence 80 ehains north; thenee 80
chains east. JAMES   JOYCE.
William West, agent!
Date, Jan, 28,  Pill.
FORT  GEORGE LAND DISTHICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Frederick W.
Lees, of Cranbrook, B. C, occupation physician, intends to apply (or
permission to purchase the fullowing
descrihed lands: Commencing at a
post planted one mile west of the
southwest corner of Lot 1887; thence
80 chains south; thence 80 eliains
west; thence 80 chains north; tiience
80 chains east.
FREDERICK W. LEES,
William West, agent.
Date, Jan. 28, 1911.
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Fikuzo K, Futa,
of Cranbrook, B. C, occupation
lumberman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands' Commencing at a
post planted one mile south ol the
southwest corner of Lot 1887, thence
80 chains south; thence 80 chains
west; thence 80 chains north; thence
80 chains'east.
FIKUZO K. FUTA.
William West, agont.
Date, Jan. 28, 1911.
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTHICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that James Buchanan,
of Cranbrook, B. C, occupation ho-
tclmnn, intends to apply for iiermission  to purchase the following   described    lands:     Commencing   at a
post planted two miles south of the
southwest corner of Lot 1890; tiience
80   chains    south;    thence 80 eliuins
west;  thence 80 chains north; thence
SO chains cast. JAMES BUCHANAN.
W. West, agent.
Date, Jan. 28, 1911. 	
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTHICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice    that  James Mclnnis,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation   engineer,  intends to apply for permission to purchase   the   following   dosorlbed  iands:      Commencing    at   a
post planted two miles south uf the
southwest corner of Lot 1887; thence
40    chains    west;    thencc   40 rlinina
south; thence 40 chains easl, thence
4ii chains north.     JAMES McINNIS,
W. West, io "nt.
Date, Jan. 28, 1911.
FORT GEORGE  LAND DlS'lllKT.
Disti'ict of Cariboo.
Take notiee that William f rihead
Rowatt, of South Fort Goorgo, B. •'■
occupation harness maker, intends to
apply fur permission to purehase the
following described lands: t'1"11"
mencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 1532; thence
east 20 chains; thence south eighty
chains; thence west 20 chains; thencc
north 80 chains.
WILLIAM LOGHEAD ROWATT.
Date, Feb. 4, 1911.
FORT GEORGE LAND DlSTltK'T
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Mrs. Albeit Br-
sltine, of Ottawa, Out., occupaU"11
widow, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing <>t "
post planted nt the northeast corner
of D. L. 43.(1; thenco cast 40 chains
thoneo north 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; tbencc south 40 chains tt
point of commencement.
MRS. ALBERT ERSEIN^
Date, Jan. 28, 1911.  -
Firnt insertion Kohrunry 18. PAGE THREE.
Pfokt
Take
}f Noi
jlcian,
nn t1
jcrlbed
Jlantei
657;
lliii'lh
Ibains
GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo,
notice that William A. Hunt,
thlicld   Minn., occuiiation phy-
,ntends  to  apply for permis-
, purchase the following    de-
lands: Commencing at a post
i ut the N.E.  corner of Lot
hence cast 80 chains;    thence
80 chains; thence west   eighty
thenee south 80 chains.
WILLIAM   A.   HUNT.
W. West, agent.
Feb. «,  IWl. (Mcl1 ">
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Richard Herman,
of Northfield, Minn., occupation gentleman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Conimencing at a post
planted one mile east of the S. E.
corner of Lot 1038; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south eighty
chains. RICHARD HARMAN,
W.  West, agent.
Date, Feb. 10, 1911.      (mch-11)
Ifoht
Take
I     ol
Tnuii'h
illusion
lescrihe
WSt   |lb'
jOt     "'
hence s
in chali
Pill'
GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
notice thut James A.  Camp-
Nortbfield, Minn., occupation
tier, intends to apply for per-
to   purcliase    the' following
,|  lunds:    Commencing  at    a
mted ut the N.E.  corner    of
57'   tiience   east   80    chains;
.outh 80 chains; thence    west
■ thence north 80 chains.
JAMES  A.  CAMPBELL,
W.  West, agent.
I'eh. 8,  1911. (Mch 11)
ROE LAND DISTRICT.
ilrict of Cariboo.
that Mabel Miller,   of
linn.,    occuiiation    steno-
teuds  to   apply   for    per-
purchase the following de-
: Commencing at a post
mile east   of the N.  E.
t 1057;  thence cast     80
e nortli 80 chains; thence
liains;     thence   south   80
MABEL MILLER.
W. West, agent.
Date  Feb. 8, 1911. (Mch 11)
l.'lllll
Take
Eedwh
raphe
nlssio
Scribed
lante
orner
liains
■est
liains.
GEO
Dim
noti1
I luinii
1 one
of Li
them
80   ch
Ifoht george land district.
District of Cariboo.
j Take notice that Walter B. Shelden
if Redwing, Minn., occupation bookkeeper, Intends to apply for permis-
ion to purchase the following     de-
icribed lands: Commencing at a post
ilanted une mile east of   the N. E.
orner ol Lot 1057; thence east     80
liains; thence soutli 80 chains; thencc
rest  80   chains ;   tiience north     80
bains.      WALTER B.  SHELDEN.
W. West, agent.
| Date, Feb. 8, 1911. (Mch 11)
Ifoht george land district.
liistrict of Cariboo.
J Take notice that John W. Huckins,
bl   Northfield,    Minn.,     occupation
■tanker, intends to apply for permis-
lion to purchase the following     de-
icribi'd lands: Commencing at a post
planted two miles east of the N. E.
jtomcr ul Lot   1.57;  thence east   80
cbains; thenee north 80 chains; thence
Ttest SO chains; thence south   eighty
bains.       JOHN W.  HUCKINS,
W. West, ngent.
Date, Feb. 9, 1911. (Mch-11)
|F0ItT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
I Take notice that Elenoes S. Hoyt,
bl Red wm ii. .Minn., occupation manufacturer, mi ends  to  apply   for   permission to purchase the following de-
Icribed lands   Commencing at a post
Ilanted two miles east of the N. E.
lorner ol Lot  1057;  thence   cast   80
pains; thence south SO chains; thence
Vest .0 chains; thencc north   eighty
fchains.        BLENOBS S. HOYT,
W. West, agent.
Date, Feb. 9, ion. (Mch-11)
[FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
'ake notice that Henry  Vcndemey-
' ■ ul   St. Paul,   Minn.,  occupation
'?Mcr, Intends to apply for permis-
!,':""  Piire-asc   thc following   dc-
"W lands: Commencing at a post
'   "''' ",v" mil«< east of the N.E.
tha   '•','   '""   Hr,7;  thcnce  east    8U
fnains, thence north 80 chains; thence
■     SO chains; tnence south   eighty
*hatns' HENRY VENDEMEYER
Date, Feb,
W. West, ngent.
'■'   Wil. (Mch-11)
|F"l!T GEOl.
Take n.tii
Mlnneai
percham,
talon ti
frtbed I m,
plantci ii,.
IE LAND  DISTRICT,
ct of Cariboo.
'■i11 Charles A. Roach,
s,    Minn.,   occupation
intends to apply for per-
'"■chase the following de-
Commencing at a post
.,„._,,,. miles east of thc N. E.
ibains- thenc.  ""V,; ,hl'"ce   enst   80
lest ..ii       """'K0 cliainti; tht,»co
imina    'ZZ,;, ,.,,"Mlce   ,lorth   80
1"ARLES A. ROACH,
Date Fcb   .  ,Q11W- West" aBent
'"• •'■ WJX        (Mch-11)
';!;"l(l;,,; '-AND DISTRICT.
, "Nl|"'i of Cariboo,
Iiiii'inix".'/,'',.'.''l11' lleil|,y B.  Herms-
nillw  i, ' ''f01?'   Minn.', occupation
ni    ,    '" "I'ldy  for permiii-
Fr|MlandIn     ""' r"lluwi»K    dc-
■tslrt.Tit.c-.t m ",',    """"t'ueing at a post
""'th   hn  ',     l 8n  cbains;    thence
'"tins' .-.»«'   tllence     west   80
'     /.'.',,i..'',Ul s» chains.
HkNR\  II. IIERMSMIER,
..       W. West, agent.
.,     3 "ll-      (mch-11)
Dote, pei
;"('1;- I^ANI) DISTRICT.
T* ,„'.''',. ot Cariboo;
Kc,l?""  of w      "Vt  Kcnneth  Q,    Mc-
L.. , utenmi
'ly lu
ic-ld, Minn., occupa-
^ surgeon, Intends   to
'"""win,, i, f"'"" to Purchase the
JnK nt a ,Z! Z lands:   Qommen-
_Nnor 0( "l ['lanted at the   S. E.
■ ■• ""• ""iH;  thence east    80
►"'ills; .,,,„„„ _,.    u„
E*t  80     '"'""•>> 80 chains; thence
Wilis,        ttlns i    thence  north    80
"^i.rit G.MoKBNZIE,
"'ost, agent
(mch-11)
PatCi l''1'11 io, i9.I:West* ~^t
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
Disti'ict of Cariboo.
Take   notice   that    Willis    W.  Mc-
Cuire,  of  Northfield,   Minn.,   occupation jeweler,   intends   to apply    for
permission to purchase the following
described  lands:     Commencing at a
post jilanted one mile east of     the
S. E. corner of Lot 1638; thence east
80   chains;   thence   south 80 chains ;
thence west 80   chains;  thence nortii
80 chains.     WILLIS W. McGUIRB,
W.  West, agent.
Date,  Feb.   10,   1911.       (inch 11)
KORT CEORCE LAND DISTRICT,
District ol Cariboo.
Take notice that Raul N. Myers, of
St. Paul, Minn., occupation paper-
dealer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted two miles east of the S. E.
corner of Lot 1038; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south eighty
chains. PAUL N.  MYERS,
W. West, agent.
Date, Feb.  10, 1911.      (mch-11)
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Louis Dclsic, of
St. Paul, Minn., occupation banker,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted two miles east of the S. E. corner Of Lot 1038; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north eighty
chains. LOUIS  BELSIC,
W. West, agent.
Date, Feb.  10, 1911,      (mch-11)
FORT GEORGE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take  notice  that Dewitt  Craft,  of
St.  Paul,  Minn., occupation real estate, intends to apply for permission
to  purchase the    following described
lands:   Commencing at  a  post planted three miles east of the S. E. corner of Lot 1638; thence east 80 chains
thence north  80 chains; thence  west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
DEWITT  CRAFF,
W. West, agent.
Date, Feb. 10, 1911.      (mch-11)
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District ol Cariboo.
Take notice tbat William F. Repke,
of St. Paul, Minn., occupation printer,  intends   to   apply for permission
to purchase the following    described
lands:  Commeneing at a post planted three miles cast of the S. E. corner of Lot 1638; thence east   eighty
chains; thence soutii 80 chains; thence
west    80 chains;    thence   north     80
chains.        WILLIAM F. PEI'KE,
W. West, agent.
Date, Feb. 10, 1911.      (mch-11)
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that John R. Phillips,
of Northlield, Minn., occupation physician, intends to apply for permission to purchase the lollowing described lnnds: Commencing at a post
planted at thc N. E. corner of Lot
1629; thence east 80 chains; thence
nortii 80 chains; thence west eighty
chains; thence south 80 chains.
JOHN R. PHILLIPS,
W. West, agent.
Date, Feb. 11, 1911.       mch-11)
FORT GKORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that William Chappin,
of Northfield, Minn., occupation real
estate, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following descrihed lands: Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of Lot
1C29; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west eighty
chains; thence north 80 chains.
WILLIAM CHAPPIN,
W. West, agent.
Date, Feb. 11, 1911.       mch-11)
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that David M. Strong,
of Northlield, Minn., occupation physician, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands] Commencing at a post
planted one mile east of the N. E.
corner of Lot 1629; thence east eighty
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence soutli eighty
chains. DAVID M.  STRONG,
W. West, agent.
Date, Feb. II, lili I.       mc_h2J£L-
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
Disti'ict of Cariboo.
Take notice that Richard D. Var-
ret, of Northlield, Minn., occupation
lawyer, intends to apply for permission to purchnse the folowing described lands' Commencing at a post.
planted one mile east of the N. Iil.
corner of Lot 1629; tbence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thenco north 80
80 chains. RICHARD 1). V A ltith ,
W. West, agent.
Date, Feb. 11,  1911.       mch-11)
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Tnke   notice that William A. Wells,
of St. Paul, Minn., oecupatiun manufacturer,   intends  to  apply  for   permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted two miles east of the N. E.
corner of Lot 1629; thence   east   80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west   80   chains;    thence    south    80
chains.        WILLIAM A. WELLS,
W.  West, agent-
Date, Feb. 11, 1911.       mch-11)
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
.District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Spence O'Grier,
of St. Paul, Minn., occupation wholesaler, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted two miles east of the N. E.
corner of Lot 1629; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 70 chains; thence north 80
chains. SPENCER O'GRIER,
W.  West, ugent.
Date, Feb. 11, 1911.       mch-11)
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT;
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Clarence H.  Slo-
cum, of St. Paul, Minn., occupation
merchant,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following descrihed lands: Commencing at a post
planted three miles east of the N. E.
corner of Lot 1629;  thence   east   80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west   80   chains ;   thence   south    80
chains.    CLARENCE H.  SLOCUM,
W. West, agent.
Date, Feb. 11, 1911.       mch-11)
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Francis Mills,  of
St. Paul, Minn., occupation dentist,
intends  to apply for permission    to
purchase   the     following     described
lands:  Commencing at a post planted three miles cast of the N. E. corner of Lot 1629; thence east 80 chains
thence soutii  80 chains;  thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains.
FRANCIS MILLS,
W. West, agent.
Date, Feb. 11, 1911.       mch-11)
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take  notice  that George  Bell,    of
Cranbrook,   B.   C,  occupation  farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase    the    following     described
lands: Commencing at a post planted
two miles south of the S. E. corner
of Lot 1893; thence west 40 chains ;
thence south  80  chains;  thence east
40 chains;  thence north  80 chains.
GEORGE BELL,
W. West, agent.
Date Feb. 18, 1911. (mch-11)
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Ellen Margaret
Charleson, of Ottawa, Ont., occupation nurse, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted about 80 chains east of the
northeast corner of section 1, township 8, range IV., Coast District, B.
C; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north eighty
chains; thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ELLEN MARGARET CHARLESON
January 30, 1911.     ( mhll.
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Harry Parry, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation grocer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted 80 chains east of thc northeast
corner of section 1 (one), township
8 (eight), range 4 (four), Coast District, B. C; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence soutli
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
the point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
HARRY PARRY.
January 30, 1911. nihil.
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Alfred Rigley
Hodges, of Victoria, B. C, occupation physical instructor, intends to
apply for permission to purcliase tho
following described lands: Commencing at a post planted about two
miles east and half a mile north of
the N.E. corner of section 1 (one),
township 8 (eight), range 4 (four),
Coast District, II. C, thenee north
SO chains; thence west 80 chains ;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to the point of commencement, and containing 640 ares, more
or less.
ALFRED RIGLEY HODGES.
January 30, 1911. mhll.
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Alfred Hodges, of
Victoria, B. C, occupation salesman
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted at the S.W. corner of Lot 1168
(ungazetted), Cariboo district, B.C.;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 40 chains ;
thonce eaBt 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 320
acres, more or less.
ALFRED HODGES
January 30, 1911 mhll.
SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS
We have
secured the
exclusive
agency for
the
Canadian
Kodak
Company,
and have a
complete
stock of
everything
for the
photographer.
^ Just Drop In asad Let Us Show You.   I	
rrA __%
Jfl Remember we pay special attention to                           h?
uxl mail orders.                                                 H£
4 JOHN A. FEASER ►
^ Front Street, QUESNEL, B. C.              K
8 McCormick Mowers, Rakes and
A      Binders always on hand.
U HARDWARE
'4
OF ALL KINDS
| MARK   DUMOND £
4
ASHCROFT, B.C.
SA&iTS^J&fA&SJtyfJ&ZfS^
US
tA
First-Class in Every
;-if_>.'
Seventy-five Comfortable Rooms
Newly Furnished.
ccidental Hotel $
E. L. KEPNER, Proprietor
QUESNEL, B. C.
Good Tables. Corralls. Sample Rooms.
>J Banquet Hall.       Theatre Room.
hi Rates, $1.50, $2 and $2.50 per day B
rA wTivt?  ,rr.r> d/.a__C! k_^
a!r&€o.|
Sf% WM. KENNEDY, Manager       ^^^^^^^^^^
4 Cor. Second and Hamilton Aves., SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C. &
fa SPECIALS FOR THIS WEEK
8 The City K Shoe Penetang Shoe Packs
Ji at reduced prices the dry feet variety
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTHICT.
District ot Cariboo.
Tnke notice tli.it J. S. Gladwin, of
Corbin, B. C, occuiiation gentleman,
intcnil- to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: Commencing nt a pout planted about i mile north and J a mile
west from the S. W. corner of Lot
1749; thence north 80 clinins; tlicnce
west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thencc east 80 clinins to point
of commencement, containing C40
acres, more or less.
J. 3. GLADWIN,
J. N. Miller, agent.
Dnte, February IS, 1.11.   (mch-11)
FOOT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that E. J. Roberts,
Jr., of Corbin, B. O., occupation
mnnnger, intends to apply for permission to purchnso the following descrihed lnnds : Commencing at a
post planted about J mile north and
_ mile west from the S. W. corner of
Lot No. 1749; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 clinins; thence north
SO clinins; thence cast 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
E. J. ROBERTS, JR.
J. N. Miller, agent.
Dnte, Fobruary 18, 1.911,   (mch-11) CITY AND DISTRICT
i
George Forbes, who left here
last fall, writes that he will return to South Fort George shortly, bringing in a band of horses.
J. B. Daniell returned from a
three-months' visit to the commercial centres of the Pacific
coast, on the last stage.
W. F. Cooke will reach here on
the next incoming stage.
L, C. Gunn, the engineer who
has had charge of the survey between this point and .Soda creek,
of the G.T.P, branch line to Vancouver, having completed the
work, has left the services of the
railroad company and left Vancouver last month for the Peace
river country, with Anton Olson,
the well - known land cruiser,
whose headquarters have been in
the Nechaco valley for the past
four years. Mr. Gunn wil! assist
in the cruising of some 200 sq.
miles of territory recently purchased by Oscar Engen, a Saskatoon millionaire. They go in by
Edmonton.
Fred C. Johnson is expected
here again early in the season of
navigation.
The first electric light plant for
South Fort George was delivered
to The Herald recently and will
be installed in the office shortly.
It is a 10-light equipment.
The Northern Interior Brewing
Co. of Quesnel have recently put
up one hundred and fifty tons of
ice for use in the summer. The
construction of the brewery will
commence shortly. George Bru-
der of Imperial Brewery, Kamloops, will be in charge.
Last Sunday Mr. and Mrs. W. J.
DeBeck of South Fort George drove
into town by special stage on their
way to Kamloops. Mr. DeBeck, who
is manager of the Alberta Telephone
Co. at South Fort George, as well
as postmaster and merchant, has
been in poor health since his arrival
there has been ordered a change
of climate and has gone to the Tran-
ijuille Sanitoriura. Mrs. DeBeck was
one of the first women to make the
trip from Fort George on sleigh and
coach. Mr. DeBeck, who is well-
known in New Westminster, was one
of the Royal City lacrosse players.—
Asbcroft Journal.
A. G. Hamilton left on Wednesday
Ior Vancouver on legal business. He
will be uway one month.
ANOTHER TOWNSITE
A section of land at the mouth
of Dome creek was sold in Vancouver recently to some well-
known local men who, we are informed, intend to townsite the
property.
Dome creek is situated between
the Grand Canyon and Goat river, about midway between here
and Tete Jaune Cache. The land
is beautifully situated on the Fraser river, and commands a magnificent view.
The principals in the deal are
W. F. Cooke, John Fountain and
R. Peden, of South Fort George;
Oscar Engen of Saskatoon, and
S. S. Taylor, of Vancouver.
Danforth & Lee
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS
Plans furnished
Hamilton Ave., belween 1st and 2nd
BOARD OF TRADE MEETING.
The monthly meeting of thc board
of trade was held Tuesday evening in
the Conservative hall, on Fourth
street. There was a good attendance. President A. G. Hamilton was
iu the cliuir. The meeting was held
one day in advance of the usual day
of meeting, owing to the president
leaving for the coast Wednesday
morning.
The minutes of the previous meeting were approved.
A communication was received
from the Conservative association in
which a rental fee of 3.2.50 per month
was fixed for the use of the hall. A
letter was also read from W. J. McAllan, Stuart Lake Indian agency,
stating that the department of Indian affairs, acting upon the petition
oi tho board, appointed Dr. Wilson,
of Vancouver, physician to the Fort
George Indians, and that it was unfortunate thnt he had not taken up
his duties. He will not receive any
subsidy from tho department until
he does so. It was Impossible to say
if he is in receipt of any from the
provincial government but believed
not. He would be pleased if the
board could secure   a definite otate-
ment from Dr. Wilson as to whether
he is going to accept the appointment or not. The department had
been informed of his non-arrival at
Fort George.
The president of the board was instructed to interview Dr. Wilson,
while in Vancouver, and ascertain
his intentions in respect to the matter in controversy.
The publicity committee was enlarged hy the addition of Mr. P.
Campbell to the committee, which at
present stands as follows: H. C. Seaman, W. F. Cooke, P. Campbell and
.1.  V. Shnw.
The special edition to be issued by
The Herald came up for discussion
and the board was unanimous in its
endorsation of the work, and agreed
to utilize this medium in fallcitatlng
the hitherto excellent work of the
publicity committee.
-"OPT GEORGE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Edith Emily
Roberts, of South Fort George, B.
0., occupation married woman, i'i'
tends to apply for permisaion to
purchnse the following described
lnnds: Commencing at n post plnnted about one and one half m:!es
west, and nbout one mile im_—c of
the N. W. corner of Lot 1531; thence
west 30 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 30 clinins to the Nechnco river; thence following banks of river
upstream to point of commencement
and containing 1(10 acres, more or
less. Recently surveyed nnd numbered Lot 4202.
EDITH EMILY ROBERTS,
P. G. B. Bodeker, agent.
March 10, 1911. (rach-18.)
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cnriboo.
Take notice that George Henry Little, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
salesman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of Lot
1168 (ungazetted), Cariboo District,
B. C; thence soutii 80 chains; tlicnce
west 80 chains; thenee nortii 80
chains; thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, nnd containing 040 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  HENRY .LITTLE.
January 30, 1911. mhll.
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that William McGregor, of Victoria, B. O., occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands: Commencing at a
post planted at the S.E. corner of
Lot 11GS (ungazetted), Cariboo district, B. C; thence south 80 chaius;
thence east 40 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 40 chains to
the point of commencement, and containing 320 crees, more or less.
william McGregor.
January 30, 1911. mhll.
FORT GEORGE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Jessie Milton Little, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands: Commencing nt a
post planted about three miles east
and half a mile north of the S. E.
corner of section 1 (one), township
8 (eight), range 4 (four), Coast district, B. O.; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing G40 acres, more or less.
JESSIE  MILTON  LITTLE.
January 30, 1911. nihil.
FORT  GEORGE  LA.N'D DISTRICT.
District of Cariboo.
Take notice that Robert T. Alexnnder, of Fort George, occupation,
rancher, intends to apply for permission to purcliase the following descrihed lands: Commencing nt a
post planted 20 chains north from
the northwest corner of Lot 1576 ;
thence south ahout 55 chains to N.
E. corner of Cora Dodd's purohaae;
thenee west 20 chains; thenee nortii
nbout 55 ehnins; thence east twenty
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 111) acres, more or
less.
ROBERT T. ALEXANDER.
Dec.  30,   1910. (jun 21)
FORT GEORGE LAN'll  DISTRIOT.
District of Oariboo.
Take notice thnt John Faroe, of
Victoria, 11, ('., occupation teamBter,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted at the N. W. corner of Lot 2400,
Cariboo district; thence south sixty
chains to S. W. corner of Lot 2100;
thence west 40 chains to Lot 2164 ;
thence north 80 clinins to Lot 1531;
theuce east to wcsl line of Lot 1531;
thence south 20 clinins; thence east
40 chains; more or less to river;
thence south along fiver to Lot 2100;
thence went 12.79 chains to point of
commencement, containing 270 acres
more or loss.
JOHN  PA ROE,
A. H.  Sutton, ngent.
Date, Feb. £2, 1911. (Mch 4)
NOTICE.
Strayed on to the premises of Duncan McKenzie, Blackwater road, one
bay horse, marked on the right side,
with star on forehead and two white
hands. If not claimed and expenses
of feed nnd this m tice paid for, said
horse will be sold by public auction
thirty days from date of first publication of this notice.
DUNCAN McKENZIE.
Februnry 10,   1911.
LIQUOR LICENSE ACT, 11)10
Section  [Nineteen.)
Notice is hereby given thnt on thc
twenty-first day i : February next,
application will he made to the superintendent of i rovincial police (or
the grant of a license for the sale of
liquor by wholesale in and upon the
premises known as the Soutii Port
George Restaurant, situate at. South
Fort George, II. C, upon the Inn'
described as Lot numbered fourteen,
in block numbered fifteen, in DiBtrlct
Lot numbered nine hundred nml thirty-three.
A. K. BOORCH1ER.
January 21, I'M I.
OF VANCOUVER
L  —,     Head Office: VANCOUVER, B. C.     c==__
CAPITAL AUTHORIZED - - $2,000,000
I) I K B C T 0 It s :
Lcnixui, McFcely & CO., Wholesale
Hardware,  Vancouver,  ll.C.
\|. li. (■ A1: 1.1N'. Esq.. Via-President,
Capitalist,  Victoria,  B.C.
[US HONOR T. «*. 1'ATJ.RSON, I-lou-
tonnnt-li-voriio. British Columbia,
],. IV. RIlAWimn, Esq., M.I,.A.. Merchant,  11.-il. v, B.C.
\V. II. MAI.K1N, Esq.. Tho IV. II. Mal-
WliolQSnlc Grocers,
Vancoun r, B.C.
Robert Kennedy,    New Westmi_
ster. "estmin.
J.   A.   MI.V1II.I.I,,    Esq     j,.   .
Victoria,  II. C. "I'ltallst,
E.  II.  11KAPS.  R„q„   y   u   ,,
Co.,   Lumber anT Tlmi...    Z-aZ
Colninlii-i   Trust  Co..   | ,,i      .      "l
ver,   I). C. '  "    v"nco«-
.1.  ...   HARVEY,  Esq.,   |< V    < „    ,
ol Cranbrook,   ll.C.  Vancouver!   "h
A. 1„ I.F.WAR, Goneral _la'na,
GENERA-. BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
Fort George Branch; F. M. DEWAR, Manager.
MB—BM-aW
yeil
HcLie
CONTRACTOR
AND BUILDER
Estimates furnished
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C
. f   IS'&Q l      Assets Exceed Fifty Millicn Dollars      j  leio
ank of Biitish North Ameri
Your money is safer in the Hank than in your house or iu your
pocket. It is not tied up. You can get it out at any time without (Inlay. NOTES discounted. Local and Foreign Drafts bought
and sold.  COLLECTIONS made promptly.   Money Orders issued.
Fort George Branch,      L. G. M&cHaffie, Mgr.
__-_-__>_^
If you want the cheapest
and best
Vapor
$5 to $50
100 to 2000 candle power
For your business or home
Communicate with
THE TRADERS BANK OF CANADA
Head Office: - TORONTO, ONT.
Paying Oui-of-Town Accounts
Small amounts can be sent safely and at small cost by using
Bank Money Orders. Any bank in Canada (Yukon -excepted)
will cash them without charge, and they can be cashed in leading American cities.   They are sold at the following rates:
Kand under     -     -      Scents Over  .". i>. SH»     -     -     -     ....
Over$_0to»0    -     -   10 cents Over Ml io *B0     -     -     .].,.-.
< ___.it..! and Surplus - $0,850,000
H. C. SEAMAN. Manager.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE. B. C.
v_-.
Quesnel, B.C.
__J
Districts of
Fort George, Nechaco Valley, Fraser
Valley, Fulkley Valley an. Stoney Creek
Town Lots
Farm Lands
Garden Tracts
Government land for purchase
and pre-emption located.
For full  particulars apply to
Edward Roberts
Sales Agent. Notary Public.
Insurance Agent, Auctioneer
Valuator.
Offices:
South Fort George wi Fort George
Telegraphic address:
"Erin," Port George, II.C.
(^HEADQUARTERS
\
/
FOR
EORGE LANDS
YOU CAN STILL BUY
Good Land at Reasonable Prices
and On Very Reasonable Terms.  Title Perfect.
Write for further information to
North Coast Land Co. Ltd.
Or to their local sales agent, Edward Roberts,  South Fort George,
General Offices:   410, 411, 412 Winch Bide., Vancouver, 6. C.
London Office:   6 Old Jewry.
PAID-UP CAPITAL,
$1,000,000.
E
CLUB POOL ROOM
THIRD AND   HAMILTON  STS.
S-_-Gki.-."s' supplies
a specialty
Four pool tallies
Splendid envin
j   J01 BRONGER   I
9 >
i Builder and Contractor »
9 *
i       Plans and nine Prints       _
T  BUY  ON   PAPER
We don't ask you to purchase South Fort George lots by
making a pencil mark on a townsite plan   You would
be safe in so doing, but if skeptical
f~-
=_>      COME TO
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
=a    Investigate Our Proposition   c=
^
J
and you will find a good live town- Two banks, sawmill
pool hall, newspaper, two general stores,"s].Iendid
hotel, bakery, stationery store, mail-boat
landing, scores of buildings,
and crowds of satisfied   buyers
WItlTE ion IN! (I-.!.. A HON TO
NORTHERN DEVEOPMENT CO.
172 Hastings St., VANCOUVER, B. C.
Second St., SOUTII FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Furnished.
9
\ Estimates Submitted. 9
f Cor, Thapage and Second f
_ $
* SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C. f
gore & McGregor,
8, C, LAND SURVEYORS
Will have a party in the field during the whole of coming winter.
Victoria and
Fort George, B. c.
P. G. B. BODEKER
Land and Timber Cruiser
Pre-emptions Located.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C.
ESTIMATE- SUIIMI-TED.

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