BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Fort George Herald Apr 13, 1912

Item Metadata

Download

Media
fgherald-1.0344592.pdf
Metadata
JSON: fgherald-1.0344592.json
JSON-LD: fgherald-1.0344592-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): fgherald-1.0344592-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: fgherald-1.0344592-rdf.json
Turtle: fgherald-1.0344592-turtle.txt
N-Triples: fgherald-1.0344592-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: fgherald-1.0344592-source.json
Full Text
fgherald-1.0344592-fulltext.txt
Citation
fgherald-1.0344592.ris

Full Text

 /OL. 3, NO. 15.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C, APRIL 13, 1912.
$3 PER ANNUM.
1U1LDING PROGRESS
VERYWISFACTORY
Work on several new buildings
,vas commenced this week and
;he prospects are that more will
'ollow at an early date, Weather
:onditions could not be more fav-
irable and rapid progress is being
nade. Contractors report a compete shortage of factory doors
ind window sash, consequently
(lany buildings will be unfinish-
d until a supply arrives on the
rst steamboat.
Messrs. Laurie and Cook, re-
-ent arrivals from Tete; Jaune
fache, started early in the week
_. a two-story store building on
lourth street. They intend open-
Tg soon with a complete stock of
fcneral merchandise.
Bronger & Flynn, contractors,
ve finished excavating for the
\ge pool hall being built for
n. Burch on Second street, and
frpenters are now at work on
e framing of the structure.
Mrs. Norwald's new restaurant
nd rooming house on Hamilton
nd Fourth, is rapidly assuming
jiape, as is also the office build-
jig of the McArthur Investment
bmpany. Mr. Hilborn's new
■tore on Hamilton street is nearly
finished.
Architect Bronger is drawing
plans for a six-room residence to
pe erected soon for Russell Peden.
DROWNED AT QUESNEL
It is now regretfully admitted
khat Elizabeth, the 14-year-old
[laughter of James Foyle, of
Juesnel, has met death by drown-
ng in the Fraser river. A few
[ays ago she left the house to
et a pail of water from the river
Ed has not been seen since. It
supposed that the treacherous
i gave way beneath her feet
[id she was swept to her death.
Elizabeth was a particularly
ight and popular girl, and her
Jagic disappearance has cast a
(loom over the town. The great-
st sympathy is extended to the
|tricken parents.
TETE JAUNE CACHE
NOT DIVISIONAL POINT
A Winnipeg dispatch says the
Grand Trunk Pacific has decided
to abandon Tete Jaune Cache as
the first divisional point out of
Fitzhugh on account of shallow
water, and will select Smithers,
20 miles farther west, where excellent facilities for docks may
be had.
SECOND ANNIVERSARY
OF BANK OF B.N.A.
[SIDEWALK DANCE" WAS ENJOYABLE
The "sidewalk dance" held last
londay evening was one of the
nany successful affairs gotten
b by our enterprising citizens.
By "sidewalk dance" the impres-
Iion must not be conveyed that
he affair was held in the street.
ht be it from so. The Fort
jeorge theatre was the scene of
Ihe festivities and the proceeds,
mounting to $79, went to swell
he sidewalk fund which, in this
unorganized town, is devoted to
\he cause of public improvements.
The ladies of the town and the
-••mmittee in charge deserve the
Neatest credit in making the
•Hair so distinct a success. The
'ountiful and delicious refreshments furnished gratis by the fair
ex were alone worth the paltry
wo bones admission fee. Senior's
wchestra discoursed the finest of
nusic and the large number
Present thoroughly enjoyed the
pening.
Ben Baker has sold his shop
»n second street to N. H. Wesley
'id will shortly remove to the
intiex of the Club poolroom,
vhich is now being decorated and
fitted up for the tonsorial artist.
Just two years ago yesterday
the Bank of British North America established its branch in South
Fort George. At that time this
town could muster scarcely a
dozen white residents, though its
future was already assured as the
metropolis of New British Columbia. The officials desired, more
than anything else, to have the
honor of opening the first chartered bank here, and this was
accomplished underdifficultiesof
transportation that would have
appalled less intrepid pathfinders
than the two young men entrusted with the mission. Mr. L. G.
MacHaffie, now manager of the
B. N. A. 's Edmonton branch, and
Mr, J. Munro, acting local manager, were the two chosen.
Arriving at Quesnel by stage,
there remained the hundred-odd
miles of trackless forest and un-
bridged swamp between them
and this city in embryo. Pack
horses were secured and the
bank paraphernalia, including a
large sum of money in greenbacks and specie, was loaded on
the unsuspecting cayuses and the
journey begun. Five days and
nights of the most strenuous
travel imaginable, through bogs
and over fallen timber, brought
them to the site of the coming
city, and next day found them
ready for business in temporary
quarters established in Wm.
Blair's store. Later on a frame
building withtentroof was occupied by the bank.
Today the Bank of British North
America building would do credit
to a modern city, and serves to
illustrate the progress of a town
two years ago little more than a
tangled forest and today more
than three hundred miles from a
railway.
CITY AND DISTRICT
W. F. Cooke left on Monday's
stage for Quesnel. He is expected back today.
The Fraser is slowly rising and
the ice gives every indication of
an early break-up. A few more
warm days such as are now being
experienced, or a warm rain,
would open the river for navigation.
Lou Kindred, after spending
the winter in Seattle, has returned to his ranch at West Lake.
Louie says Seattle is some enterprising burg, with woman suffrage and a perpetual mayoralty
campaign, but never ajrain for
his'n.
Government Agent Heme is
giving the inmates of the "skoo-
kum "house" a practical course in
landscape gardening, incidentally
adding greatly to the appearance
of the government office grounds.
Finest thing in the world for the
noble reds.
Two special stages arrived during the week bringing passengers and express. 1 he roads are
now in a heavy condition and an
extra day at least is required to
make the journey from Quesnel.
The mail stage will probably arrive this evening.
PRINCE RUPERT'S DOCKS
The Grand Trunk Pacific has
awarded the contract for the
preliminary work on the construction of the drydock and
wharves for Prince Rupert,
amounting to $260,000. The completion of this preliminary work
will be followed by the work on
building the steel and reinforced
dry docks and wharf building,
the contract for which work has
not been awarded but which will
involve the expenditure of an
additional million and a quarter
dollars, The dry dock when completed will be the largest and
most modern in Canada, All the
material to be used will be purchased in Canada and most of it
in British Colnmbia. The creo-
soted piling will have to be purchased in the United States, as
there are not facilities for the
handling of that amount of work
in Canada.
The engagement of Mr. J. O.
Williamson, of Stewart Lake, to
Miss Violet G. Oliver, of Fraser
Lake, late of London, Eng., is
announced. The marriage will
take place at Quesnel in July.
Billy's hosts of friends in all parts
of Cariboo will take the first opportunity of congratulating him
and wishing he and his prospective bride a long and happy life.
The Conservative Association
held its regular monthly meeting
in the Fire Hall, on Thursday.
There was no business of importance dealt with. It was pointed
out, however, that a certain fee
was payable by each member, to
the fund of the central association, but as it was uncertain
whether that body was levying
on the 1909 enrollment or the
1912, it was decided to await
their communication.
TELEPHONE SYSTEM
FOR FORT ST. JAMES
Vancouver, April 12. — (Special)
Fort St. James will be connected
by telephone with Fraser Lake,
on the main line of the G.T.P.,
according to plans recently completed by local parties interested
in that district. Connections will
be made as required along the
route of the line, and the' enterprise completed this year. The
distance is about 40 miles.
CARIBOO FREIGHTERS
WANTMORE MONEY
Just when Fort George business
men thought they had practically
eliminated the Cariboo road
freighter as a factor in the transportation problem, he bobs up
serenely with a demand—a dying
request as it were—that the
present rate of 31-2 cents per
pound on freight from Ashcroft
to Soda Creek, be increased to 4
cents. Realizing that their finish
is plainly in sight the erstwhile
kings of the Cariboo are out for
"all that the traffic will bear."
It is extremely unlikely that local
merchants will contribute to this
"benefit" performance.
A mass meeting of the teamsters was held at Ashcroft last
Tuesday, when the raise in rates
was agreed upon. As a result
very little Fort George and upper
Cariboo freight is leaving the
warehouses at Ashcroft.
There were two burials in the
Indian cemetery this week. Both
were infants.
Mr. R. C. S. Randall, of the
provincial government office, returned Monday from an extended
visit in eastern Canada. Mr. Randall spent the greater portion of
his holiday in Toronto, and was
delighted with the beauties of
the Ontario capital. He is pleased, however, to return to Cariboo, where, he says, the climate,
the people and the prospects are
the best in the world. Mrs. Randall is remaining with Toronto
relatives until later in the season.
Everyone in the country knew
and admired Bobs, Jack McGaghran ' s setter dog. Bobs is no
more. Thursday afternoon while
frolicking on the river, the ice
gave way and he was engulfed.
Though only a year old, Bobs had
been taught to do almost unbelievable things and was, it is
believed, one of the most intelligent animals in the world. The
children will miss Bobs, and his
master is almost' inconsolable.
If there be a paradise for bowwows, Bobs will be found among
the brightest of the canine stars.
The work of getting the government ferries in readiness will
commence on Monday, so that
there will be no delay when the
ice goes out. The Nechaco is
clear of ice, though the water is
unusually low,
S. W, Carley arrived from Vancouver on Monday, secured a preemption and a job on Tuesday,
and went to work on Wednesday.
When spring is a little farther
advanced Mr. Carley intends
taking up residence on his land
and preparing ground for crop.
He is the right class of settler.
Mr. Charles E. McElroy, mana
ger of the Fort George Trading
& Lumber Co., returned recently
from a business trip to Vancouver. He was kept busy while at
the coast answering inquiries of
the scores who intend coming to
New British Columbia. He predicts a prosperous and active
season for the business men of
the town.
PREPARING FOR BUSY
SEASONBNTBE RIVER
The steamer Chilcotin is now
receiving her final tuning up preparatory to taking up her run as
soon as the ice will allow. Captain Foster, with first and second
engineers Townsley and Pepper,
arrived early in the week from
Quesnel and with a crew of workmen are rapidly putting the big
boat into shape. The Chilcotin
will take up the Fort George-
Soda Creek run and if conditions
warrant will mske special trips
to Tete Jaune Cache. With a
number of important changes
made in her machinery and under
the guidance of the most skilful
captain on the river, the Chilcotin should even exceed her
proud record made last season.
From Quesnel comes the report
that the mail steamer B.X. is ,
practically ready for the water
and will again be in charge of
Captain Brown, with Sam Reid
as second officer. A sister ship,
the B. C. Express, being built
particularly for the Tete Jaune
Cache route, is the last word in
river steamboats, it is said. She
will be commanded by a Skeena
river skipper.
Indications poinl to unprecedented activity on the Fraser this
summer. The regular fleet of
freight and passenger boats will
be greatly increased by the addi- ;
tion of the railway contractors'
two big steamers and ten gasoline boats. The South Fort George
riverfront will be headquarters
for the entire fleet of Fraser river
craft.
When the congestion of mercantile freight at Soda Creek has
been relieved the bulk of river
traffic will be switched to the
upper river, with Tete Jaune
Cache as the supply point. When
the steel reaches the Cache in
early June, as is now confidently
expected, the people of New
Cariboo will bid a lasting farewell to the Cariboo road freighter
and the consequent 7-cent freight
tariff from Vancouver, Goods
will be brought down-river from
the Cache at a fraction of the old
road rate, and this rate will be
gradually lessened as the steel
approaches this town,
It will in all likelihood be midsummer before Fort George commercial freight will he handled
over the Grand Trunk Pacific.
Railway contractors' supplies and
construction material will naturally take precedence over all
other goods, and an enormous
quantity is now awaiting transportation from the Cache. Once
the bulk of it has been despatched provision will doubtless be
made for the handling of all
freight offering.
Charged with having liquor in
his possession while on the Indian
Reserve, Angus McDonald appeared before Magistrate Heme
on Tuesday last, The evidence
showed that on the night previous
he had attempted to enter several of the houses in Indian village, and was considerably under
the influence of liquor. Constable
Brewster made the arrest on
being summoned by the Indians
and the liquor was found in McDonald's possession. He was
fined $100 and costs.
KELLY, THE JEWELLER
Mr, John C. Kelly, of Toronto,
arrived on Monday's stage and
will open a jewellery and watchmaking store on Second street,
in the premises formerly occupied by Ben Baker. Mr. Kelly
is a thoroughly practical jeweller
and watchmaker, and was for
years connected with the well-
known firm of Ryrie Bros. With
a complete stock of goods and a
splendid equipment of craft tools,
Mr. Kelly will no doubt find his
chosen field a lucrative and growing one.
<
1
fci FORT GEORGE HERALD
PUBLISHED BY THE
NORTHERN INTERIOR PRINTING CO. Ltd.
J. B   DANIELL, PHESIOENl
Devoted   to   the   interests   of   Fort
George and the entire Northern Interior.
llll'-,   A!inivjj.ui
J. B. DANIELL, Editor.
SETTLERS' LANDS.
The present expansion of local
trade and the increase of population will continue to advance
steadily until railway communication is established with the
east. Thereafter the improved
transportation facilities will enable farmer and lumberman to
acquire at normal cost the implements and machinery necessary
to a successful pursuit of their
respective industries. The ultimate prosperity of the district
and the stability of its population depending entirely, as it
does, upon the successful development of its resources, already
affords an interesting prospect.
The great area of land open for
pre-emption, as shown by the
figures of the lands department,
offers a tempting inducement to
homeseekers to settle in this
province.
In our own locality, however,
much of the agricultural land
easy of access and sffording the
best opportunities for improvement from its proximity to water
routes and conveniences to town,
is under reserve. No one will
deny the wisdom of setting aside
areas of vacant crown lands to
provide funds for the endowment
of the educational institutions of
the province, yet we feel that
such provision could be made in a
more satisfactory manner than
by closing to settlement the farm
lands adjacent to this town, as
has been done in the reserve
placed last August on lands north
bf the Nechaco. Settlers will now
be forced to more remote parts
and the clamor for new roads will
be heard earlier than if people
were allowed to occupy the lands
through which the Fort George-
Giscombe and Chief Lake roads
traverse. The same is true of
the reserve on either side of the
Fraser river, and extending from
the Grand Canyon to the Alberta
boundary. What disposition the
government propose to make of
the lands in this reserve we know
not, but we do know that if the
wishes of the people of this dis
trict be regarded, the land will
be thrown open for pre-emption
entirely. We will not undertake
to say that such a policy will
commend itself if its present
worth to the treasury be considered as the decisive point. Viewing the matter, however, as one
affecting an extensive section of
this district, we have no hesitation in declaring that its immediate effect would be in the interests of this district and its
ultimate result to the advantage
of the whole province.
Of the extensive territory
opened up by the Grand Trunk
Pacific railway in this province,
this will be the first to receive
the advantages of transportation.
The quiet course of the Fraser
river in these parts, with its almost imperceptible current, fa-
(Vancouv r Provinc.*.)
No man can today accurately
forecast what effect on the;
world's commerce the Panama
Canal will have, but every man j
can understand that to cut a mat- j
ter of from 5500 to 7500 miles off
the sea route between Liverpool
and Vancouver means cutting
freight rates at least in half,
while all traffic between eastern
and western continental points
will be water-borne and not rail-
borne, A line drawn from Port
Nelson on the Hudson's Bay due
south through Winnipeg, Minneapolis and down the Mississippi
to New Orleans would roughly
divide the North American con-
ent in half. That line will become
the watershed of the freight
traffic of the continent. The railways may lose their transcontinental haul, but they will immensely increase their business
from the east and west coast to
the interior, and from the interiors they will carry grain to the
coasts.
It is this that is going to bring
about a revolution in all conditions in British Columbia, and it
is over this revolution that Premier McBride and his government
will have to watch with unceasing vigilance. The development
of the future has to be anticipated before it becomes a critical
problem. Israel Zangwill has
called the United States "The
Melting Pot of the Nations," but
the melting pot of the future will
be British Columbia. It is a matter of climate and conditions.
The enormous resources in raw
material, which up to the present
have only been superficially
scratched, the vast areas of agricultural lands, the timber resources, above all, the water
power, which can be turned into
industrial channels, all these
things have to be taken into account and carefully developed
for the best interests of the
people.
PROVINCIAL AND GENERAL NEWS
Mail was recently landed in
Hazelton from Prince Rupert in
24 hours. .
Fort Georgepecip
**      tions a
DrugCo^i^
NEW BOOKS SuS."a
large shipment just received
Toilet nrticals, Patent Medicines, 1
Magazines.Books, Stationery, I
Toilet Articles, Druggists1 Sundries   ■
Intend Building?
?
NOW is the time to build,
whilst seasoned lumber is
obtainable. Labor conditions
are now in your favor. We
contract to design and construct your building, guaranteeing satisfaction: Call
or write us.
| Bronger & Flynn
Builders and Contractors
SOUTH FORT GEURGE
L
—THE=
CLUB POOL ROOM
THIRD AND   HAMILTON  STS.'
DAVIS & FORREST, Props.
Smokers' supplies
a specialty
Four pool tables
Splendid environments
gore & McGregor,
II. C. LANO SURVEYORS
Victoria and
Fort George. B. C.
P. G. B. BODEKER
Land Timber Cruiser
Pre-emptions Located.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Estimates Submitted.
Mr, D'Arcy Tate, chief coun-
of the Grand Trunk Pacific at
Winnipeg, has resigned to go to
Vancouver as vice-president and
chief solicitor of the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway, the line to be
built from Burrard Inlet to Fort
George. j
Sergt. Thompson of the Mounted Police has arrived at Dawson
from the Upper White river with
two Indian witnesses in the case
in which Enoch, an Indian, is
held for murdering Cheechaco,
another Indian. The accused
claimed his son was drowned because of the carelessness of Cheechaco with the canoe, and that
the Indian code justifies murder
on the ground of a life for a life.
Fort George, B.C. Victoria. B.C.
F. P. Burden, Mgr. F. C. Greon. Mgr.
Nelson, B.C., A. H. Green, Mgr.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers, Dominion & B. C. Land Surveyors
Surveys uf Lands, Mines, Townsites, Timber
Limits, Etc.
Satisfaction guar-
Watch
Repairing   «*
C. H. DAVIE
Send articles by mail to Fort George, B.C.
From official figures received to
date, church union between the
Presbyterian, Methodist and Congregational churches of Canada
will be favored by the Presbyterians by a proportional vote of be-
1 am prepared to
Locate Pre-emptors
. ON ISO ACRES OF.
ood Government Land.
WRITE FOR INFORMATION TO
N. C. Jorgensen.
P. 0. Bon 21. Soulh Fori George, B. C,
Uur Frices will noi Mvance
'E take this opportunity to inform our many customers and the p lblic generally that the low prices
which have prevailed in our store through the summer
months will be maintained throughout the winter.
?E have been fortunate in receiving most of our heavy
.roods before the close of navigation and having our   £
own teams will be able to bring our goods tV3r the road   $
at the minimum cost.
RUSSELL PEDEN
W. P. COOKE
LUMBER CO.
I Stored Office and Lumber Yard, South Fort George |
City Livery, Feed
I. A. WHITE,
PROPRIETOR.
Single and Double Driving Horses.   Saddle and Pack Horses.
New Buggies and Thoroughly Reliable Rigs.
DRAY1NG AND EXCAVATING DONE.
FARM LANDS
M. C. WIGGINS
Real Estate  garden tracts
npi7iy     Less than quarter mile from Indian Reserve
1,-EjH      (G.T.P. Townsite).   Price $150 per acre,
jk -fiUl^C one-quarter cash, balance six, twelve and
■A.V*mii9 eighteen months at 6 per cent.	
Settlers located on 160-acres of good Government land.
FOURTH ST.  -  -  SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C
A SLATER SHOES
<«< ————————■———
Just received—a complete stock of the celebrated
SLATER SHOES—the standard shoe of America.
We have them in all the very latest styles, and
the prices are very reasonable.
* Also a Fall line of the Famous McPHERSON SHOES
A Corner Second and Hamilton Aves.   - South Fort George
Eight Sections
South of Fort George, between
West Lake and the Fraser
River. The Pacific & Northwestern line taps the east end
of, this block.    $ 12 an Acre
N. H. WESLEY
REAL ESTATE South Fort George jj
#£g <^<A><4£^^-^*2*f*^.r^*^<^^£^£^£2^^2Ak •*•*«.,
Close & Brown
South Fort George, B. C.
tween two and three ,to one.
cilitates the development of the j Several of the western presby-
lumbering industry and affords' teries have not compiled their
splendid millsites, where the i votes yet, but this will not ma-
timber of the tributary streams'terially affect the result. Church
may be manufactured into the!union on the present proposed
lumber of commerce.   No part basis has been defeated accord-
r.'AL'M'At'M'AL'AL'AiL'Ai'Ai'M'AL'JLZt
a Do yon
Then  investigate
_      our workmanship and get our estimate.
of this new country excels the
upper Fraser valley in the extent
and variety of its resources, and
to no part is a greater or more
permanent prosperity assured if
only the government can be persuaded of the wisdom of opening
these lands to immediate settlement.
iug to the percentage wanted by
the officials. They, at the outset,
stated that the vote must be over
five to one before the. matter
could be seriously considered by
the church officials. There is no
indication of the total vote ever
reaching that proportion.
A
A   Damforth & HcInnis
I
NOW IS THE TIME
TO THINK OF  .   .
!
Your Garden \
We have just received by mail a good assortment of
Contractors & Builders.
Hamilton and First.
A. P. ANDERSON
BUILDER and
CONTRACTOR
Office and Store Fixtures.
Hamilton Ave.    South Fort George
nw.vv.w.'4i'424iX2r.'w/4iV,mm!itvxMw.MtAmmMw.KW.Mmmw.mMmw.mmmKmirMMmiAV' »1"
y   Fort George Hardware Co.
General Hardware and Sheet Metal Workers.
All kinds of tin and sheet Iron work done.
Camp stoves:
LASELLE AVENUE
Hot air Furnaces,  etc.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE.
rMn*imm-4i-4^^Mmw.'4ixw.mxwMMxnMW.Mmnui*mnMMnmmmnMnmi*Mi**aw* THE fflffl RIVER
Fitzhugh,Alta.-B. B. Kelliher,
chief engineer of the Grand Trunk
Pacific, but who for the past six
weeks has been located at Fitz-
hugh where he could personally
oversee and direct the progress
of construction west of Resplendent, the present end of steel,
has just returned from an extended trip west. He says that
rapid progress is being made all
along the line, and predicts that
navigation will open on the Fraser
river not later than May 1, or just
as soon as the ice goes out. This
will eliminate the necessity of
long team haul freighting of
supplies, heavy machinery and
tools from Tete Jaune Cache
down the river to the various
camps now in operation.
The Operator, one of the two
large freight and passenger boats
which have been under construction for the past six months, has
been completed and is now ready
to launch. As soon as this service is inaugurated there will be
a very short distance remaining
l over which supplies will be han-
|dled by team extending from Resplendent to Tete Jaune Cache,
vhere transfer will be made to
Ithe boats. By June 1 steel will
■have reached the Cache.
CONTRACTORS GET BUSY.
The Seims-Carey company of
St. Paul, which has one of the
largest contracts west of the
Cache, is now assembling equipment at various points previous
to early shipment to the base of
operations. This firm has been
holding back, it is said, awaiting
the opening of navigation on the
river. They will begin work on
the eastern end of their contract
immediately. It is estimated
there will be at least six large
freight and passenger boats on
the river during the coming summer. In addition to this a number of gasoline launches are now
being constructed. This will
greatly facilitate the movements
of engineers and other officials
connected with the work along
the line and enable them to keep
j in closer touch with the situation
\ and personally supervise the work
laid out.
P. Welch, of the firm of Foley,
Welch & Stewart, contractors,
who has charge of all the work
along the line of the G.T.P., has
arrived here, and will be responsible for increased activity. Already there are approximately
five thousand men on the work
west of here, and this number is
being daily increased.
The Grand Trunk Pacific now
has steam shovels and large
forces of men at work in Fitz-
hugh, the present western terminus of their line, grading the
yards and lining the tracks.
NEW COMPANY TO
OPERATEIN CARIDOO
R. P. Rithet and the Drexel
estate of San Francisco, have just
sold the -property of the Ward
Horsefly Gold Mining Co., Ltd.,
a hydraulic proposition on Horsefly river, lower Cariboo district,
to S, P. Dunlevy, of Vancouver,
and Robert T. Ward, of San Frar-
cisco. The new owners intend
to operate the plant this season
and a big gang of men is now on
the ground getting matters in
shape.
The property comprises a lease
of the riverbed, a discovery claim
and benches embracing 360 acres.
Testing the ground with keystone drills during the past winter, Messrs. Dunlevy and Ward,
it is said, proved it to average 75
Two years ago 100,000 cubic yards
were sluiced, the gold production
being $182,000 and the return of
the last two weeks' run was $1L-
500. The equipment comprises
three miles of 30-inch steel pipe
with a flow of 3500 miners inches,
exerting 300 pounds pressure to
the square inch, and monitors as
well as an electric lighting plant.
The water supply is derived from
Moffett creek which is a large
stream all the year round. The
new company will be a close corporation. It is styled the Horsefly River Gold Dredging & Mining Co., Ltd.
FORT GEORGE RAILWAY
WILL HELP QUESNEL
The McBride railway policy
will greatly stimulate development in the Quesnel district, according to Mr. A. W. Cameron,
manager of the Northern Crown
bank, of that town, in an interview published in a Vancouver
newspaper.
"Now that railway communis
cation with Vancouver is assured
our district will attract hundreds
of settlers and mining men, as it
has the advantage over rivals,
being 100 miles south of the Fort
Cameron. ' 'The land around the
town of Quesnel is well adapted
for mixed farming as the results
achieved for years past fully testify. Our wheat grades No. 1
Northern, while our potatoes are
not surpassed by those grown
near Ashcroft. Small fruits and
all kinds of vegetables yield prolific returns. The provincial
provincial government has compiled maps showing the areas
open for pre-emption and we have
the assurance that a land registry office will be opened shortly
at Quesnel.
"Railway facilities will also
tend to stimulate the development of lode and hydraulic mining. The Cariboo district was
once famous as a gold producer.
In the early days Quesnel had a
population of 1000, with one
chartered bank and was the center of great activity.1*!! It is now
enjoying a new lease of life. The
town has trebled in size during
the past ahree years and its citizens are looking forward with
unbounded confidence to the
future. We have a very active
board of trade, which will be
pleased to supply special information to any applicant."
SUBSCRIBE for THE HERALD
r
Jewellery and
ratch Repairing
After April 17th I will open
a Jewellery and Watch Repairing store in Ben (the
Barber's) old stand on Second Street.
Satisfaction Guaranteed
or Money Refunded
■ John C. Kelly
JEWELLER AND. WATCHMAKER
South Fort George,
B.C.
J
\ Occidental \
\     „ quesnel 5
\     Hotel BC     \
%      ■ r<
>:
:
A  Most modern up-to-date hotel in the interior of British
Vj  Columbia.
m  New four-storey building.  Accommodation for 120 guests
)y  All outside rooms—large, well-lighted and ventilated.
Steam heated.
RATES $2.00 PER DAY UP
Weekly and monthly rates on'application
Wire foe. rooms Wire for rooms
E. L. KEPNER, Proprietor
Ism
I
THE HERALD is the recognized newspaper of the New
Cariboo. The entire district
is thoroughly covered and its
influence extends far beyond
the confines of the province.
Its advertisers reap rich returns as a result of their investment in HERALD publicity, why not get on the bandwagon yourself?
Advertising Rates on Application
The Fort George Herald
South Fort George rKUHmuiL Anu ucnciutL hliu
4
The Canmlian Pacific Railway Co. announces it will send a crops of expert
engineers to Frank, Alberta, to examine
the overhanging topof Turtle mountain
with a view to report on the possibility
of dynamiting it and thus saving the
town from being again buried.
Captain Edward McCosl.rie has been
appointed as the first harbor master at
Prince Rupert. Captain McCoskrie.who
has been a resident of the nothern coast
for many years and was recently en- |
gaged as a timber inspector, is a former
master of the C. P. R. coasting steamers, his lust ship being the Amur, from j
which he retired some years to engage j
in business.
Winnipeg grain men received word that
next year the government intends to j
construct a terminal elevator at Vancouver and preliminary steps towards
securing a site will be taken this sum-1
rner. The need of speedy action to
provide for a Pacific route for export
grain from Alberta is recognized and
the goverment operation of elevators
on the Pacilic coast can be more easily
inaugurated since there are at present
no vested interests to consider.
Prince Rupert folk say: "We respectfully petition the governmenl of British
Columbia to sell all lots in the business
section of Prince Rupert owned by tl e
government at the earliest possible
moment, The position of these lota in
the business heart of Prince Rupert
renders it imperative that they should
lie sold without delay, for so long as
they remain unsold, just  so  long  will
observed that the lots remaining ""»-*■
■are an o ig the most valuable, II not
actual)} the most valuable, in the city,
The sale of such property would bring
to the provincial administration a harm-
some sum of money, close up unsignt-
ly gaps in the chief street of the city,
create new business blocks, and con-
tribute very considerably to the revenue
of the municipality of Prince Rupert.
Manufacturers of High-Grade Confectionery
ICE CREAM and all kinds of SOFT DRINKS
Catering Tobaccos and Cigars
FOURTH STREET
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
Mr. Earl Scovill, government agent
at Golden, has resigned as a result of
difficulties arising out of the election.
Mr. Scovill was a supporter of Mr. H.
E. Foster, the independent Conserative
cindilate, who defeated H. E. Parson
the regular convention nominee. It is
stated that Hon. Thomas Taylor, who
spent several days in the riding in Mr.
Parson's behalf, objected so strongly to
Mr. Scovill's activities that the latter
felt obliged to tender his resignation,
which was accepted.
Cyrus C. Warman, known the world
over as the author of the famous song,
"Sweet Marie," is being sued for alimony by his wife, Marie M. Warman,
who resides in London, Ont. Strange to
relate, it was Mrs. Warman, then a student in the academy of the Sacred Heart,
who inspired Mr. Warman to write
"Sweet Marie" some fifteen years ago.
For sometime Mr.Warman and his wife
have been living apart, and the other
day a telegram from Boston said the
writer was ill in that city. Mrs. War-
man declined to believe the story. Mr.
Warman of late years has been the
chief writer of the publicity department
of the Grand Trunk and the Grand
Trunk Pacific railway.
Fort George Trading & Lumber Co., Limited
KroiRht consigned to steiimor
"Chilcotin" lit Soda Crook will
be'carefully transported to the
point of destination.
Following an agitation for higher pay
and shorter hours, an agitation which
has been quietly going on for some
weeks among the I. W.W. men engaged
in construction camps on the C. N. R.
between Hope and Kamloops has culminated in a strike. Of 5000 men at
work it is stated that 4000 are out.
The firBt men to lay down pick and
shovel were those ehgaged by contractors Benson & Nelson which firm
has a large camp at Lytton. The men
along the line have I een receiving from
$2.60 to $3.25 for ten hours work. Their
demand is for a minimum of $3 for a
nine-hour day. This the contractors
say they will not grant.
lt is reported that the steamer Port
Simpson, which formerly was in service
on the Skeena, will be operated regularly on the, Stikine this summer by the
Hudson's Bay company. The Port
Simpson is now lying on the slips at
Digby Island. Last year she was
chartered to take a large hunting party
tj the Stikine district. The chief object of the company is to cater to the
tourist and hunting fraternities. The
steamer, which has for several years
operated on the Skeena, is a fine stern
wheeler and has accommodation for
about 200 passengers. She will connect
at Wrangel with the coast steamers and
go as far up the Stikine as Telegraph
Creek, a distance of 100 miles. The
Stikine is a very swift flowing river,
Bnd the voyage up, which takes two
and a half days, is compensated for by
the return journey, which only takes
half a day. The river is less dangerous
than the Skeena, having fewer shallows,
though there is plenty of excitement in
warping over the rilllesund through the
rapids.
The citizens of Prince Rupert have
renewed their urging upon the government that a sale be held of the remaining goverment lots within the city,which
until alienated are of course non-taxable
by the city, while constituting a provin-
Operators of Steamers on the Fraitr, Nechaco and
Stuart Rivers Manufacturers of Lumber
All Kinds of Rough and Dressed Lumber for Sale
" Bone Dry Lumber in the Yards "
Phone: One-One    Mouldings
CHAS-E- g^°MY,.iaKC,. South Fort George
Vb.crmTarIket .I
i I
fl WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 5
jj   Fresh and Cured Meats    jj
A Poultry,   Vegetables,   Butter,   Eggs, Etc. K
8 —=====^ ■^=  — ■ = $
'4 F
S FORT GEORGE    AND   SOUTH FORT GEORGE B
K ^^ ^f ^f ^W^W •Wy VW ^/ ^K ^T* &* ^W i-^rV &s <^5 ^* ^K^K -*i^V •*^V^rV^K<^W^^**>^V A
□ Roberts, Jones & Wiflson □
EDWARD ROBERTS Notary Public.      E.E.JONES.      A J SELWVN-Wri.LSON. Auditor.
REAL ESTATE. INSURANCE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS,
VALUATORS and ACCOUNTANTS.
FOR SALE: Farm Lands. Garden Tracts. Timber Limits. Mineral Claims. Valuable town lots.
LIST YOUR PROPERTIES WITH US. SXrLI^f&lW
TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS  "ERIN" FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Offices: Hamilton Avenue, South Fort George: Central Avenue, Fort George, B. C.
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPRESS
» COMPANY =
Send for a folder
Send for a folder
Stages
OPERATING
Autos     Steamboats
From Ashcroft to Fort George, and all points in
the northern interior of British Columbia, carrying
the Royal Mail, passengers and fast freight.
The Palatial Steamer B.X. Awaits the Arrival of the Company's Stages
Fr^Z^ZT^£t    Head Office: Ashcroft, B.C.
KODAKS
s
SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS
Robert Spinks
Painting and Paperhanging
South Fort George : B.C.
i
A JOHN A. FRASER
We have
secured the
exclusive
agency for
the
Canadian
Kodak
Company,
and have a
complete
stock of
everything
for the
photographer.
We don't ask you to purchase South Fort George lots by
making a pencil mark on a townsite plan—You would
be safe in so doing, but if skeptical
COME TO
$0UIH FORT GEORGE
Investigate Our Proposition   c==^
and you will find a good live town-Two banks, saw mill,
pool hall, newspaper, two general stores, splendid
hotel, bakery, stationery store, mail-boat
landing, scores' of buildings,
and crowds of  satisfied  buyers
WRITE FOR INFORMATION TO
NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT CO.
172 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B C , or the resident agent,
g. e. Mclaughlin
Fourth Avenue, South Fort^George
| 1836 |      Assets Exceed Fifty Million Dollars      | 1912 |
The Bank of British North America
Your money Ib safer in the Bank than in your house or in your
pocket. It is not tied up. You can get it out at any time without delay. NOTES discounted. Local and Foreign Drafts bought
and sold. COLLECTIONS made promptly.   Money Orders issued.
FORT GEORGE BRANCH:
J. MUNRO, ACTING MANAGER
The Average Deposit Of the
Canadian People Is $122.00
per Person
Saving money can be made a habit. A portion of your weekly or
monthly wage deposited regularly in a savings account will soon bring
you up to the average, and you will be surprised how rapidly $2-deposited
weekly will amount to enough to make a substantial payment on your
home.
CAPITAL AND SMS, SMIMM       TOTAL ASSETS, SSZ,OO0^IW
THE TRADERS RANK
H. C. SEAMAN, Manager      •        •        -       -      ■*«th Fort GcOrge
THE BANK OF VANCOUVER
-=3    Head Ots.ce:
VANCOUVER, B. C.
CAPITAL AUTHORIZED
DIRECTORS
R. P. McLENNAN Esq., President,
McLennan,   McFeely & Co.   Wholesale Hardware, Vancouver, B.  C.
I,.  W.  SIIATFORD Esq., M. L* A.
Vice-Pres. Merchant, Hedley, B. C.
HIS HONOR T. W. PATERSON.  Lleu-
tennnt-Governor Britlr.li Columbia.
M.   B.   CARLI1J, „
Cniiltnllst. Victoria, B.C.
A. ISTEL Esq.
C. S.  DOUGLAS Eiq.
M,*H,MI
Robert Kennedy,   New Westminster.
3.  A.  MITCHELL,    Esq..    Capitalist.
Victoria., B. O.
E. H. HEAPS, Esq.. E. H. Heaps A
Co.,  Lumber  and  Timber:   President
Columbia Trust Co.. Ltd.,   Vaoeou-
Ter, B. O.
J. A. HARVEY, Esq., K.C.. formerly
ot Cranbrook, B.C., Vaneouver. B.C.
A. L. DEWAR. General Manager.
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
Fort George Branch; F. N. DEWAR, Manager.
Just Drop In and Let Us Show Yon.
Remember we pay special attention to
mail orders.
Front Street, QUESNEL, B. C.
FARM LANDS IN CENTRAL
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fort George
■District.
Nechaco Valley
Bulkley Valley
Skeena Valley
In every case our
lands were carefully inspected by
expert cruisers before we purchased
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY will make all these districts
accessible to all the world. Every rail laid adbs
to the value of the land
North Coast Land Co. Ltd.
General Offices: 619 to 634 Metropolitan Bid*., Vancouver,B.C
London Office;   6 Old Jewry.
PAID-UP CAPITAL, I        T       . $1,560,600.
V -
ADVERTISE IN THE HERALD
'ji-Mtttaafes *..:•*>'»., j .
-t-t"

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.fgherald.1-0344592/manifest

Comment

Related Items