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Fort George Herald Dec 21, 1912

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VOL. 3, NO. 16.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21. 1912.
$3 PER ANNUM    {
■inHN A. FRASER, M.P.P.. VISITS
Mr. John A. Fraser, M.P.P.,
will address a public meeting
of the residents of this district
on Monday evening, Dec. 23rd,
in the Fort George Theatre.
The chair will be taken at 8
o'clock sharp. The public are
cordially invited. Seats will
be reserved for ladies.
John A. Fraser, M.P.P., drove
I into town an Thursday 7. last for
the purpose of visiting this portion of his constituency andjas-
tertaining the requirements of
i people he so ably represents.
nr. Fraser tells The Herald that
ie has travelled over 7000 miles
;his summer in the interests of
this district.   He anticipates a
rather prolonged session of the
brovincial parliament after the
forthcoming convention.   There
i a great deal'of railway legislation to go before the house, and
nany important matters in relation to the vast development of
\\te busiest province in the Do-
ninion of Canada.
Mr. Fraser deserves the com-
nendation of his constituents for
Ihe capable and energetic manner
n which he carries out the responsibilities resting upon him.
STONEY CREEK IS
SRORTf SUPPLIES
Dave Hoy, the well-known
rancher of Milne's Landing, arrived in town this week over the
Stoney Creek sleigh road with a
freight outfit He states that the
road is in poor condition owing to
the light snowfall. Mr. Hoy
brought in a load of hay for sale.
He sold the whole load here at
going rate of $100 a ton.
The Stoney Creek section, Mr.
Hoy states, is very short of supplies. Settlers in that locality
have been advised that there is a
similar shortage at this place,
and they are, therefore, freighting over the longer and more
difficult Quesnel road. The light
snowfall has added to the difficulty of the transportation problem at this time of year, and the
wagon road between Quesnel and
Fraser Lake is lined with the
caches of the freighters who
have had to cut down their loads.
The trip between Milne's Landing, 70 miles up the Nechaco
river from this place, is made by
Mr, Hoy in two and a half days,
Ik Northern Interior Printing
Conpanr, Ltd., takes this opportunity of wishing readers of THE
HERALD A Happy Christinas.
GROWTH OF THE B.X. COMPANY
«2 >»
°3
Hi
RETURNS FROM
GOOD LAND
John A. Fruer, M. P. P.
[is colleague exists to all portions
the district other than his
I me town, Barkerville,  as a
ther mythical person who lacks
sam.
Whilst on the subject of Mr.
'aser, The Herald wishes to
kethe opportunity to deny a
ort circulated by a young and
^sponsible promoter's lackey
rough the medium of a town-
i house organ, to the effect that
Fraser is interested in the
prthem Interior Printing Co.,
He is not. Mr. Fraser was
erested in the first newspaper
Jiture which the publishers of
» Paper engaged in. That was
Quesnel in the year 1908. His
west in the venture was trans-
rcedtothe Northern Interior
Ming Co., Ltd., when that
n«em was formed in 1910, and
'stock was purchased by John
I -Darnell on December 16,1911.
I transfer should be found
the books of the registrar of
"t stock companies in Victoria.
i are sorry Mr. Fraser is not
}h us still,
r«e Herald has in hand a new
epnone directory for the Fort
wire & Alberta Telephone &
pctncCo. We note the large
casein the number of phones
«e our presses last issued the
•ctoryayearago.
INCORPORATjqN MEETING
A public meeting will be held
on Tuesday evening, Dec. 24th,
in the Fire Hall, at 8.30 p. m. to
discuss means for carrying on
the incorporation movement here.
The statutory petitions for the
incorporation of the town arrived
here this week and will shortly
be circulated amongst the property holders. It is hoped that
the meeting will be thoroughly
representative, as questions of
importance to the forthcoming
municipality are to be discussed,
NO MOREJOUNTY
A circular has been issued by
the provincial secretary in Victoria to government agents and
justices of the peace stating that
after the first of the year no more
bounty will be paid on big-horned
owls. The government have been
paying a Lounty of two dollars a
head on these hooting nuisances
for some time past. That a great
many birds have been destroyed
in the period is proven by the
fact that the government have
paid out about eighteen thousand
dollars in bounty checks.
BOXINGMATCH
Professor Morris, of South Fort
George, an English professional
boxing master, is the promoter of
a sporting event which promises
to be the first of a series, ln announcing a boxing carnival to be
held in the Fort George Theatre
on December 26th. The program
is advertised to include two preliminary events and a main ten-
round bout between two 140-
pound boxers named George Allen
and Jack Cronin. This event is
scheduled as a ten-round bout.
The two preliminaries will be
four round bouts, McMillan vs.
Southern and Howard vs, Hunter.
il NEW TOWNSITE
A deal was closed here this
week, through the office of
a local realty company, transferring an area of about 450 acres
of land at Giscombe Portage from
Messrs. Hubble & Seebach to a
Toronto realty company called
the British Empire Land company. One of the principals of
this company is Mr. James Anderson, who has heavy timber
interests on the Willow river and
who has visited this section from
time to time for the past six
years. It is the intention of the
purchasers to subdivide this land,
or a portion of it, into town lots.
About one hundred acres will bt
surveyed immediately.
Giscombe Portage appears to
be a natural point for a townsite,
commanding as it does the low
altitude pass between the Pacific
and the Arctic watersheds. At
Giscombe Portage on the Fraser
river, 30 miles north of here, the
waters that flow into the Pacific
ocean and into the Arctic sea are
divided only by a twelve-mile
strip of land.
This is a story about a man and
some land. We do not wish our
readers to take this as an example
of ~what'r investments in land
afford in this section of the country, but it shows the marvellous
returns! from good agricultural
land in this northern country at
the'present'time.'and when it is
stated that the market price for
hay'is'now $100 per ton and oats
8 cents.' per Jpound this will be
more readily understood.
A couple of years ago a Nechaco valley rancher named Milne
purchased sixteen acres of choice
land, adjoining his pre-emption,
from a land company. He paid
$16 an acre for the land. He
purchased a threshing outfit and
a binder, brought this heavy
machinery in from the railroad
and paid for the threshing outfit,
the binder and the land with the
proceeds of one season's oat crop
from the sixteen acres. This
man now charges one cent per
pound for threshing his neighbors' crops, and $4 an acre for
cutting them,
In the year 1864 an enterprising man named F. J. Barnard
started a stage line to carry passengers, express and freight into
the Cariboo country. That was
in the days when the Barkerville
region was keeping the world
agape with the reports of the
gold discoveries. Barnard's stage
line is today the splendidly-equipped transportation system of the
British Columbia Express Company, The latter company took
over the old stage business from
Steve Tingley, one of Barnard's
drivers, who later bought his old
employer out Mr, Tingley now
lives in Ashcroft and visits the
Cariboo country yearly. He owns
ranches all along the Cariboo
road and is one of the best known
pioneers in the province,
The Victoria "Chronicle" of
March 15th, 1864, bore the following advertisement telling of
the inception of the Cariboo
stage line:
NORTBERNILDHBER COMPANY HOCKEY TROPHY
The British Columbia Express
Company are increasing the
capacity of their road-carrying
equipment next spring by the
purchase of two new Winton Six
cars.
EXPRESS
Mid
FREIGHT
PASSENGER STAGE LINE
The undersigned   respectfully  announce*
that he ia about to place a regular line of
Passenger States between
YALE.  LILLOOET   and   ALEXANDRIA
until the Steamer ENTERPRISE ■hall commence her regular trips between
SODA CREEK AND'QUESNELLE CITY
when the stages will connect with her at the
Lower Landing.
THE FIRST COACH will leave Yale for
Alexandria on Monday, tne 21st Instant, connecting at Clinton with those from Lillooet.
Full particulars of the time of arrival and
departure of these coaches will be published
as soon as arrangements are completed, and
every effort will be made to'render the connection between the upper and lower river
steamers as perfect as possible.
F. J. BARNARD.
Yale. B.C.. March 10th. 1864.
The first match of the Hockey
Cup series will be held on the
rink on Christmas Day at 3
o'clock between South Fort
George and Fort George. The
new rink is now completed and
represents a great expenditure of
energy by the enterprising gentlemen who are responsible for
it. The rink is 140 feet in length
by 65 feet in width. It is about
twice the size of last year's rink.
The rules governing the Northern Lumber & Mercantile Company's cup follow:
Hockey teams eligible to compete for
the cup must be teams from the Cariboo diatrict, comprising players in that
diltrict before November 1,1912.
No player is allowed to play with
more than one team during a season.
Rules governing the competition to
be the official Stanley Cup rules with
the following exceptions: (a) Teams
are to be comprised of seven men; (b)
▲ game ii to constitute an hour's actual
play, divided into two 30-minute periods
with an interval of 10 minutes for half-
time; (c) The official off-side rule of
O.H.A. to govern all games.
The schedule as drawn up for the
season 1912-13, in the northern part of
the district, to comprise a series of five
games, the greatest number of games
won to count for the standing.
The referees for the games to be
chosen by the captains of the competing teams, and must be elected at least
48 hours before a game.
In case of a disagreement in choosing
the referee, the Trustee shall name
one to act.
The referee for a game to be chosen
from the official referees appointed for
the season, viz., G. E. McLaughlin,
F. P. Burden.
In the final game the team drawing a
bye, or not in competition during the
season, shall be the visiting team.
The home team pays 35 per cent, of
the visiting team's expenses.
The final series to comprise two
games, the greatest number of goals to
count.
The steamer Enterprise quoted
in the advertisement was later
taken up the Fraser river from
Soda Creek to serve as a link in
a transportation system to give
access to the Omineca country.
After tremendous difficulties the
pioneer steamboat was navigated
from Soda Creek to Stewart Lake.
She was abandoned in theTachie
river, a small stream which runs
out of Stewart Lake.
The big transportation system
which started with the appearance of the above advertisement
so many years ago is here worthy
of mention. The British Columbia Express Company, as a transportation concern feeding a rail-
roadless country, is a wonderful
organization. Down at their
headquarters in Ashcroft recently The Herald was given the opportunity of looking into thn
equipment and plant necessary
to keep the system in working
order, To begin with, the company owns 285 head of stock. Its
rolling stock includes sixty stages
and six six-cylinder Winton cars.
It delivers mail twice weekly into
Fort George, Barkerville and all
way points, as well as many
points in the Chilcotin and Lillooet country. In Ashcroft the
company has machine shops,
huge stables and storehouses,
granaries and carriage shops, and
furnish employment for 150 men.
CBMSTHAS TREE
A Christmas tree has been arranged by the ladies of the town
for the benefit of the many children of South Fort (Jeorge. The
Christmas tree party will be held
in the Fort George Theatre on
the evening of December 27th, at
7.30 o'clock. The ladies have
worked with a great deal of energy and enterprise to make the
affair an enjoyable one for the
little folk, and the largest success
is sure to attend their efforts, PAGE TWU
'
I
'      t
f
FORI GEORGE HERftLO
Ltd.
advanced stage of land speculation found in Canada today. Miss
Laut has undoubtedly given the
situation careful study, and her
article will be appreciated by all
unprejudiced people for its broad
grasp of a condition of affairs
whcih only diligent study can
permit one to write upon with
recognized authority. Miss Laut
sounds a note of warning. Such
Some years ago the government I writings are appropriate to the
times. The business of inflating
land values must some day reach
a climax; the ultimate vendor
will be the lucky man, but the
man who holds the agreement-
for-sale when the market breaks
and a panic starts in the land pit
will face the ruin wrought by the
bursting of the bubble.
PUBLISHED BY THE
NORTHS INTERIOR PRINTING GO,
J. B. DANIELL. PRESIDENT
Devoted   to   the   Interests   of   F
George and the entire Northern Interior.
Subscription $3.00 a year.
J. B. DANIELL. Editor.
Hi»r wn-.- j :.-■■-  if***m«-iJrwrWT71^"""
in Victoria issued an order-in-
council preventing the killing of
beaver throughout the northland.
The order-in-council applied impartially to white men and Indians alike. Through the intervention of the gentleman who
was in charge of the New Caledonia ol British Columbia, dis
tiictof the Hudson's Bay Company, however, the government
were induced to rescind the order
in so far as it applied to the Indians, for the Hudson's Bay official, knowing the circumstances
of these people's lives, realized
the great hardship which the
action of the government wrought
amongst them. Later the order-
in-council was re-enforced, and
no concessions were made to the
Indians, and this is the status of
the case today.
In our opinion there has never
been a more unjust demand made
upon the poor indolent survivors
of their decaying race than that
the Northern Indians should
cease to kill beaver. Until about
six years ago the Indians of the
Northern Interior lived the Indian life. They fished in the
summer time, catching, drying
and storing food for themselves
and their dogs, and trapping in
the winter. Beaver bore the
same relation to the food supply
of the Indian in the winter woods
that the salmon did in the summer time when he fished on the
rivers. The Indians do not
slaughter beaver promiscuously;
rather they farm them systematically. They eat the flesh and
sell the skins. For generations
the same bands of Indians have
hunted their territory for the
succeeding breeds of beaver, and
year after year, in spite of the
fluctuations in the returns of
other furs in the trading posts,
the beaver catch has maintained
a surprisingly even record.
The Indians respect the white
men's law, The edict has prevented the killing of beaver, but
under such restrictions the red
men grow discontented, They
do not want to live different lives
from those of their forefathers;
they are too indolent and unreliable to enter new fields of industry which have come to the
north country with the development of railway building; they
are hunters in their natural condition, and it does not redound
to the credit of Attorney-General
Bowser, a man big enough and
broad-minded enough to take the
common-sense attitude towards
the Ministerial association and
four-flush reformers which he recently assumed in Vancouver,
that he should maintain in force
and effect a law which works a
useless hardship upon a declining
race of aborigines.
From a western standpoint, one
of the most interesting recommendations in the report of the
Public Service Commission is that
which deals with the salaries of
employees. We believe that
everyone will admit that a minimum salary of $75 per month is
about right, in view of the cost
of living in this part of the country. It will also commend itself
to most people that the question
of fitness should be the prime
consideration in the matter of
advancement. The commission
did not spend much time in the
west, but it seems to have grasped the essentials of what we believe made for efficient public
service, and if its recommendations are followed out we may
look forward to seeing an increase
in the appreciation of the public
for the manner in which the government business is undertaken.
-Colonist.
give an abundant supply of resin
which can be used in the distillation of turpentine. Bull pine
when tapped for resin under the
ordinary cup and gutter system,
yields two-thirds the amount obtained from the pine trees in
Georgia and Florida, where the
production of turpentine is a
long established industry. Some
enterprising individual now has
an opportunity to start a new
industry in this great province,
in which there is so much bull
pine.
That the'government is making haste slowlywith the Hudson
Bay railway is evidenced by the
minister of railways at Ottawa
recen tl y. He said that Port Nelson had been finally decided as
the bay terminus of the railway
which would be 418 miles long.
As yet only fifty miles of road is
graded and no steel is laid. The
number of men at work on the
construction is now down'to 150.
The government has yet made no
arrangements for the operation
of a steamship line between Hudson Bay and British ports.
Under the heading, "Will Canada be Americanized?" the Sydney Daily Telegraph asks: "How
long can a community of eight
million resist the enormous attractive features of a contiguous
nation of nearly a hundred million? The recent overwhelming
defeat of the Laurier government
on the reciprocity issue has been
held to demonstrate that Canada
would not consent to absorption
by her powerful neighbor, that
she will not consent now and that
she will always refuse."
Some few weeks ago there appeared in the "Saturday Evening
Post" an article written by one
of the cleverest women journalists on the North American continent, Agnes C, Laut. Miss Laut
was for some time a staff correspondent for Toronto Saturday
Night, and her articles on western topics which appeared in that
paper aroused wide interest. The
recent article from her pen in the
Post is perhaps her most interesting literary contribution. It
deals, under the caption "Will
Canada's Boom Last?" with the
British Columbia having^cap-
t.ured all the honors in sight on
the American continent for fruit,
has now duplicated its triumph
in Europe, having won the gold
medal of the Royal Horticultural
Society of England for the best
exhibit at that society's big show
which is one of the greatest
events of the year in London.
The growth of the Canadian
postal business is indicated in the
annual report of the postmaster-
general, A surplus of over one
million three hundred thousand
dollars is recorded. The number
of postoffices is 13859, an increase
of 534; postal note offices increased by 569, money order offices by
172, and savings bank offices by
21.
NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant
tn Section 3 of thc Munfcipaltles Incorporation
Ast the owners of the land within the. following
described limita, to wit; witnin the limits of Lots
983 and 984, Cariboo District, in the Province of
British Columbia, intend one month after the
dute hereof to present to the Lieulenant-Oover-
nor-in-Council a petition asking for the* Incorporation of the 8«id lands as a City Municipality
under the corporate name of the City ot bouth
Prince George.
Dated thisffind day of November. 1912.
J. B. DANlfc.Lb.
WANTED
150 HEAD of horses, cattle or dairy
stock to winter. Good sheds for stabling if required.
For further information apply to
REEDER & ROSS, Soda Creek P.O.
CHURCH SERVICES.
ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH-lst, 3rd
and 5th Sundays in month, Holy Communion, 8 a.m.; Evensong and Sermon, 7:30 p.m. Second and 4th Sundays in month, Matins, 10:30 a.m.:
Holy Eucharist and Sermon. 11 a. m. —
Rev. R. H. Isaac.  Williams, Vicar.
KNOX CHURCH-Services every Sunday at 3:30 during winter. Sunday-
school at 2:30. C. M. Wright, Minister.
THE HERALD for
Fine Job Printing
THE NORTHERN LUMBER & MERCANTILE COMPANY, UM1TED
W. P. Cooke Geo. E. McLaughlin RUS8el p^
 Our
Lumber and Merchandise
—Stock is Comfilete—
We have an especially good stock
of Winter Clothing and Bedding,
You cannot afford to overlook our
stock of Boots, Shoes and Rubbers
when buying.
Remember, we have had a great deal of experience in outfitting parties for the field, and excel io
Estimates cheerfully given for all material
going into your building.
OATS FOR SALE. STEAMBOAT OPERATORS,
The
>rthem Lumber & Mercantile
Company. Limited
i
ACREAGE FOR SALE
Subdivision of
Lot 483
This property is situated within one mile of the
Railway Depot and terminal yards, right across the
railway and traffic bridge of the Port George G. T,
P. townsite and Indian Reserve.
 It is the choicest property in the district and the best buy on the market today.
Because it was the first established post of the H. B, Co., 60
years ago,
Because it was the first selected pre-emption by the early
settlers.
Because it is like Strathcona to Edmonton.
 Then why buy twenty-five foot lots when you can get 11-2 acres for
half the price and within closer radius of the G. T. P. Depot
Sole Agent, W. B. DEAN, Calgary, Alta.
Local Agents, Roberts, Jones & Willson
South Fort George, B.C.
The bull pine that grows in
Central British Columbia,   will
..THE HERALD for fine Job Prmtn*- to
DEF1NL5 DUUNUAniLd
Mr R P. Bishbp, B. C. L. S., and his
party have just returned to Victoria
Sfter spending the summer and autumn
in definitely determinin* the boundaries
5 several northern distrieto and ax-
ploring and mapping parts of the Inter-
ior that have hitherto been virtually
unknown.
The party left Victoria in May, pro-
ceeding via Ashcroft "to Hancevllle.
which point was chosen as the supply
depot Commencing at the intersection
of the 52th parallel and 124th meridian,
Mr Bishop divided his party, placing
half of it in charge of Mr. Michael
Haney, B. C. L. S., who proceeded
run north on the 124th meridian, con
tinuingasfar as peasiWe during the
kjjjob, to resume in the spring.
Mr. Bishop and his force travelled
north up the Nasco River to the inter-
sectis* of the 58rd parallel and 124th
meridian, determined by Mr. Haney,
whom they again met at this point.
Thenee Mr. Bishop ran west along the
63rd parallel to within ten miles of
Alcatcho, Where work was knocked off.
Among the many geographical facto determined by Mr. Bishop during the season's operations were the following:
Tsumian Lake proves to be antlrely
west of the 124th meridian.
The 124th meridian forms the boundary line between Lillooet district and
j isnge 2, Coast district.
All east of the 124th meridian and
north of the 52nd parallel is in Cariboo
district.
The 63rd parallel forms the boundary
between Coast ranges 3 and 4.
A large expanse of country lying east
I of the 124th meridian and between the
I* Slit and 62nd parallels was explored
[ and authentically mapped.
Mr. Bishop and his party will resume
work in the same country in the spring.
HON BAY IAD
LOOM IIS WAY
Ottswa, Ont., Dec. 12.-It appears in
! the Canada Gazette that the Hudson
i Bay railway will apply to parliament
for an act extending the time estimate
it may complete its  railway from a
point near Killsquit in the head of Dean
I Channel or Bella Coola.
Tbence it will nm in a northeasterly
| direction to s point at or near Elcatcho
lake, thence in the same direction by
the valley of the upper and lower Nechaco rivers and Carp lake, to a point
at or near Fort McLeod or by Bella
I Coola valley in an easterly direction by
I the Nazco river, Blackwater and Mud
I river valleys to a point on tbe Nazeo
I river at or near Fort George.
In a northerly direction it will go to a
I point at or near Fort McLeod; also a
■■branch line from either of the above
j lines to a point at or near Fort George,
[thence in a northeasterly direction from
"ort McLeod by the Misitchinka river
i Pine river pass, thence in an easterly
airection to a point on the Athabasca
rtver near Fort McMurray.
The eonpany also applies for power
io increase its capital stock to twenty-
fnvs million dollars.
Ottawa, Dec. 6.-An important west-
■»m railway deal is said to hav* just
l»«en clos.4 whereby the Canadian Pa-
|*.nc Rajiw.y has acquired -at an expenditure said to be over two million,
Ithe charter of the Vancouver, West-
Piuisur * Yukon Railway, as -well as
Ijome valuable waterfront property on
Ithe north shore of Burrard Inlet.
I Behind the apaprently simple state-
IhH-nt of the acquirement df the V. TV.
I*Y. charter by the C. P. R. lies the
■rumored intention of the pioneer Can-
l»«i«n, transcontinental to stasia march
|»its.rivals, the GrandTrurfk and the
■Unadian Northern, and secure access
■» he rich Peace River country and the
■Wrist tributary to Fort George. For
■we acquirement of the V., W. ft Y.
|wntr carries with it the possession
■« «n approved railway route from Fort
iworge to North Vancouver, and thence
lfon"ec!m* with iu own extensive Unas
|vthe Termin"l City, while from North
■ Vancouver it would have a route approv
■« from North Vancouver eastward to
■""P Cove on the North Arm of Bur-
|*»rd inlet.
>y
*>
Occidental g
-_ QUESNEL K
Hotel        b.c.    r<
To Outsiders
Reliable information given on
Miythlng in Fort George dis-
tri«t- Property looked after.
Real estate reference Al.
*• S PINKS
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C. '
d
Most modern up-to-date hotel in the interior of British
Columbia.
New four-storey building. Accommodation for 120 guests
All outside rooms—large, well-lighted and ventilated.
Steam heated.
RATES $2,00 PER DAY UP
Weekly and monthly rates on application
Wire for rooms Wire for rooms
E. L. KEPNER, Proprietor
Gty Livery, Feed &
iSSUlG    WfcwlMCS PROPRIETOR.
Single and Double Driving Horses.   Saddle and Pack Horses.
New Buggies and Thoroughly Reliable Rigs.
DRAYING AND EXCAVATING DONE.
RIGHT-OF-WAY MEN
WANTED
Men for cutting right-of-way by the'acre, west of Mud
River.   Good prices.   Work all winter;
Apply
QEORGE HARDIE,
South Fort George, B. C.
The
Little Nugget
Cafe
The most modern «nd best-appointed
cafe in Fort George.
FIRST-CLASS CUISINE
SO Cents
Short Orten'aSBpectaltjr
Mrs. F.C. Nahkwald, Proprietress
Cor. Hamilton,and Third
South Fort George.
Intend Building?
NOW is the time to build,
whilst seasoned lumber is
obtainable. Labor conditions
are now in your favor. We
contract to design and construct your building, guaranteeing satisfaction: Call
or write us.
Bronger & Ftynn
Builders and Contractors
SOUTH FORT GEORGE
Fresh
Meats
Beef
Mutton
and
Veal
Wholesale and retail
THE B. G. MEAT MARKET
FORT GEOIGE AND
SODTH FORTOEORGE
P. G. B. BODEKER
Land Timber Cruiser
Pre-emptions Located.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B. C.
■simatss SnsmiriD.
Robert Spinks
Painting and Pa
South Fort George : B.C.
P.A.Landby J. H. McGregor J. F. Temfleton
T. A. K.ILI.Y, Timber Department
Gore & McGregor
CIVIL ENGINEERS
British   ColanabU   Land   Surveyor*
Land Agenta Timber Cruisers
Chancery Chambere, Langley Street, VICTORIA,
B.C., P.O. Box 162, Phone 684.
McGregor Building. Third Street. SOUTH FORT
GEORGE, B. C.
A.P.ANDERSON
BUILDER and
CONTRACTOR
Office and Store Fixtures.
Hamilton Ave.    South Fort George
Do you contemplate f<
BUILDING?      I
Then investigate our workmanship and R
gat our estimates K
DANFORTH & M'INNIS ,   L<
Contractors i Hamilton and R
and Builders 1 First -.treats   fc
MS5WWW>W.e1
■roTO'«m><TO-'.TOr.ro-v
Fort George, B.C. Victoria, B.C.
F. P. Burden, Mgr. F. C. Green, Mgr.
Nelson, B.C., A. H. Green, Mgr.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
M Eajanrs, DttaUM a I. C. Uad Smtjw
Surreys of Lands, Mines, Townsites, Timber
Limits, Etc.        	
THE-
CLUB POOL ROOM
THIRD AND  HAMILTON STS.
DAVIS & FORREST, Props.
Smokers' supplies
a specialty
Four pool tables
Splendid environments
We do a large mail order business
and guarantee satisfaction.
Our stock of general merchandise
is large and up-to-date, which enables us to fill all orders quickly.
Give us a trial
John A. Fraser
& Co., Ltd.
2 Front Street Quesnel, B. C.
Prospective Builders
Are you aware that it takes less labor to build with OUR BONE DRY
LUMBER, and that the result is permanent, weatherproof and saves
repairs and fuel; also that the lumber costs no more than other lumber?
INVESTIGATE!
All Kinds of Lumber and Mouldings For Sale.
The Fart George Trading & Lumber Co., Ltd.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE, B.C.    Phone 11.   Chas. E. McElroy, Mgr.
Pioneers in Sawmilling and Steamboating on the Upper Fraser
and Tributaries.
Our GUMLESS SPRUCE SIDING and V-JOINT will not warp, check
nor shrink endways, and contains no gum to cause the paint to peel.
<F
REAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENTS
Farm Lands,     Timber Lands,      City Property,      Garden Tracts.
Fire, Accident and Life Insurance.
Acreage-— Garden Tracts
HAMILTON AVE.     ....      SOUTH FORT GEORGE
^
w
o Roberts, Jones & Willson o
EDWARDROBCRTSVatirrPabac.     t.E.JONES.     A.J.SELWYNWIIXSON, iVattar.
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS,
VALUATORS and ACCOUNTANTS.
FOR SALE: Faro Lands. Garden Tracts. Timber Limits. Mineral Claims. Valuable town lots.
LIST YOUR PROPERTIES WITH US. f^^S^tSXt
TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS  "E R I N" FORT GEORGE, B. C.
Offices: Hamilton Avenue, South Fort George: Central Avenue, Fort George, B. C
f-
AMERICAN PLAN
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Northern
Corner Hamilton & Third
South Fort George, B.C.
The newest and most modern
hotel in the northern interior
Rates $2.50 and $3
Monthly and weekly rates oa aa*
plication
Beat of wines,
liquors and cigars
Albert Johnson, w.
J
li
ft
Christmas Confectionery
A complete stock of Confectionery for the holiday season-OUR OWN MAKE.
Catering Tobaccos and Cigars
HAMILTON AVENUE
SOUTH FORT GEORGE TAUri ruun
•
r   1
\
f
ft
*•
Gfe^isTioli
I TarlFff" *""""
.-mi-r* -' vcrrny»*nirKJ?OJBCSD
John A. Fraser, M.P.P. is registered
at the Hotel Nor'hern.
Barney Keegan, the well known timber cruiser, intends to start ranching
on some land he owns near town.
There are a great many festivities
planned for Christmas in social circles.
Mr. Close and Mr. Wesley are both
giving parties to the little ones.
FORT GEORGE DRUG CO.
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
ChriStHiaS       A superb assortment  has
arrived and inspection is
Cards ****•
Toilet articles, Patent Meiilcines        Druggkta' Sundries       MegaJines, Books, Stationer
The new jail accommodation was finished this week by Contractors Bronger
and Flynn. The addition provides for
the accommodation of sixteen prisoners.
W. A. Rollin3 will b2 leaving Crar,.
brook shortly for the Nech co Valley,
where, in conjunction with several
other Cranbrook men and others, he
will engage in cattle ranching on an
extensive scale. Messrs. W. A. & Vic.
Rollins already hold a large block of
excellent range land in the Nechaco
Valley, and this, with additional area
they purpose leasing or purchasing,'
they expect to havo as fine a cattle
range as there is in the province. Mr.
W. A. Rollins is no tenderfoot when it
comes to cattle ranching. He knows
that business from early training, and
with the fine grazing lands at their disposal, he anticipates a right good and
prosperous future.
ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH
Christmas Day.
Evensong & Sermon 3 p. m.
St. Stephen's Day   (Thursday)   Holy
Communion 8 a. m.
Holy Innocents' Day (Saturday) Holy
Communion 11 a. m.
PROPOSED AUTO ROAD
A projected road that when built will
give excellent opportunity for a magnificent motor car touring route is the
proposed continuation of the Barkerville wagon road to the Fraser river at
the mouth of Goat river where this
road would connect theC.P R. with the
G.T.P. This road is already completed
as far as Bear Lake, 21 miles from
Barkerville, and a continuation of about
50 miles will connect it with the Fraser
river, making a total length of about
360 miles. The scenery and pictur-
esqueness of the old Barkerville country
would attract a great travel to the
route, and the Bear Lake section is one
of the greatest big game territories in
the world.|
A report was made in the fall of this
year on the uncompleted section by a
government engineer, and this report
shows that the road can be built with
a maximum grade of five per cent.
-\
FARM LANDS IN CENTRAL
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
I
1
I
Fort George
District.
Nechaco Valley
Bulkley Valley
Skeena Valley
In every case our
lands were carefully inspected by
expert cruisersbe-
fore we purchased
THE GRANDjTRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY will make all these districts
accessible to all the world. Every rail laid adds
to the value of the land
North Coast Land Co. Ltd.
General Offices: 619 to 624 Metropolitan Bids., Vancouver,B.C
London Office:   6 Old Jewry.
I        T       .        $1,500,000.
THE NORTHERN INTERIOR CLUB
The Northern Interior Club, an
organization backed up by the
business element of South Fort
George, is now in process of being incorporated under the Companies Act. The club will take
temporary quarters and will establish itself as the leading club
of the Northern Interior as soon
as the incorporation papers an
received from Bowser, Reid &
Wallbridge, who have the matter
in hand for the organizers. The
necessity of such an institution
has long been felt here, and the
announcement of the realization
of the project will undoubtedly
be received with pleasure,
Jim Flynn, the fighting fireman of
Pueblo, destroyer of white hopes innumerable, was himself eliminated from
the roster of championship possibilities
among the palefaces in the arena at
Vernon last week when Luther Mc-
Carty, the young giant from Springfield, Mo., pounded his countenance out
of all shape and beat the fireman so
badly that thc referee had to stop the
onesided contest out of deference to the
wishes of the spectators. The battle
ended in the sixteenth round after
Flynn had gone down twice. Flynn
took a terrific beating. He never had
a chance against the Missouri "white
hope."
SJThe Hudson's Bay Company have
8 >me forty tons of freight at New
Hazelton for their post at Fort Fraser
aid as soon as snow comes they will
start freighting to that point. This is
the first time that any freighting has
been undertaken from the western et .tl
to Fort Fraser, but the railway contractors have cut many new roads and
these, with the new government roads
and trails will enable the company Io
get through in faster time and at a
smaller cost than around by the Ques
"     route.
L
PAID-UP CAPITAL,
I
CLOSE & BROWN CO.
LIMITED
General Merchants
South Fort George, B.G.
G. T. P. & P. G. E.
Railway Construction
Headquarters
will be on the Fraser River waterfront, adjoining South Fort George, with the opening of
spring. This spells good times in this immediate neighborhood. Buy a Lot this spring
while they are cheap, and take your profits in
the early summer.
Also 2 1-2 acre Garden Tracts close in.
Write for details.
The Northern Development
Company, Limited
The British Colombia Express Co.
(Formerly Barnard's Express)
Owners and operators of Autos, Stages and
Steamboats, extend to both the Oldtimer and
Newcomer of the Cariboo district
Christmas Greetings
and good wishes for a prosperous New Year.
1864,        Nearly Half a Century on the Road       1912.
1836 I     AneU Eiccti fifty MilEw DtJUrt
1912
The
Bank of British North America
Tour money Is safer In tb* Bank than in your house or ln your
pocket. It it not tied up. You can cat it out at any time without delay. NOTES discounted. Local and Forslcn Drafts bouiht
and sold. COLLECTIONS made promptly.   Money Orders issued.
FORT GEORGE BRANCH.
J. HUNRO. ACTING MANAGE!
403-404 Carter-Cotton Building
VANCOUVER, B.C.
000
fE make a specialty of Fine Commercial Job
Printing. Our plant is the most modern in
Central British Columbia, and our prices compare
most favorably with Coast figures. Your orders will
receive our best attention and will be delivered
promptly.   No job too big, none too small.
WE EXCEL IN TWO-COLOR PRINTING,
TEE FORT GEORGE HERALD
The Royal Bank of Canada
With which ia united
The Traders Bank of Canada
INCORPORATED 1869
Capital paid up     -     -     • .   •     ■     ■     •     $12,400,000
Surplus     ■" 11,400,000
Total Assets     •     -   .* 179,900,000
Head Oflice     -       -       -       -     Montreal. Que.
H. C. Seaman, Manager South Fort George, B.C.
Fort George Hardware Co.
General Hardware and Sheet Metal Workers.
All kinds of tin and sheet Iron work done.
Camp stoves
LASELLE AVENUE
Hot air Furnaces, etc.
SOUTH FORT GEORGE.
Willow River
Grand Trunk Pacilic Hallway
Calls It "a Town of Importance,"
Adding—
"The establishment of this new town (on the
Fraser and Willow rivers) marks a chapter in the
development of British Columbia. It is outward
evidence that each day sees the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway pushing farther west and that the
riches of an inland empire are, for the first time,
becoming available. That portion of British Columbia west of the Rocky Mountains and east of the
coast range and drained by the Fraser. Nechaco,
Stuart. Salmon and Willow Rivers, hold the centre
of the stage in one of earth's greatest dramas-the
development of Western Canada. Approximately
midway between Edmonton and Prince. Rupert, a
territory virtually 700 miles long and 600 miles
wide will contribute to the upbuilding of this new
town.
Do not delay, Write today for maps and printed
matter, giving fullest information.
Pacific Bond & Land Corporation, Lid.
Joint Owners and Sole Agents (D. L, 788.)
517 Pacific Bid., Vancouver, B.C.
Local Representative, L. M, Bower.

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