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The Evening World Oct 4, 1901

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 V
7^7r^TiK&^^^/W^*,
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Vol. I, No^
ROSSLAND, B. C„ FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1901.
I     20 Per Gent
I Discount CASH Sale!
m*.
C\ LL Leather Footwear in our large stock
f3*are now selling at 20 PER CENT DISCOUNT FOR CASH ONLY. This sale is to
make room for our large stock of RUBBER
SHOES which are now on the road.
3'
3
1 GO. LA'-ONDE
• ...The,..    ~?
Shoeman.
QUICK WORK-
PROMPT DELIVERY.
Red Star St. -age & Transfer Co.
Moves 01 Jtores Any Old Thing.
Does All' .Inds of Team Work.
fo
fo
fo
fo
fo
fo
Sells Seap^-
Four For
or split <
Phono.
and Tamarac Wood  Any Length.
If you want wood that will burn
call at the old stand.     Tonus cash.
W. H. PRY, Manager.
r
____________k____L_____fc_a' _______ ____________________________ ______IA____I I
ifl.fl.MfiT.WWil.WW1..1
VOU WANT
s .asateosT?
Wc have some lines of Women's Oxford Ties in black
and tan, also Misses and Children's tan shoes, which
we are offering at and below cost in order to clear
out the entire lot before winter.
W. F. McNEILL
Next to the Postoffice.     /
in_iuiiuiwuii_iuitwi____iiw__i_____i_.i__iui__i__m
W fjfjrv w mm WWm W999 W ***J "s^.^ W^^ SJ**™ ^n^W^^tmM W a.^ W^rW W^rW ^rWW W^rW *tTWW W^rm VW W^rW *w*srW ■
1 ASTONISHED I
»—— ti
There are three things which astonish those
unacquainted with our stock ot UP-TO-
DATE DRY GOODS.
jj {QUALITY. BEAUTY AND PRICE j
We Received Today:
l
Black Venetian Cloth, 58
inches wide, for Tailor-
Tailor-Made Suits in Ox
Made Suits	
ford Grey,special price,
 S14
Only Six nice Black and
Navy Rainy Day Skirt
The new  56-in.   Beaver
at SB
Cloth for   rainy   day
CALL AND  SEE  THEM
McARTHUR & HARPER
105 Columbia Avenue.
Rossland Hotel -wc
Finest Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
0.M.F0X&C0
Teas and Coffees.
Crockery and Glassware
HEADQUARTERS
SALOON.
Cor. Washington St. and First Ave.
WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE
Good Cigars and Case
Goods a Specialty:::::::
C. 0. TALBERT
Wall Paper and Palnta.
See Daniels and Chambers (or   the
atest designs in  wall   paper  and the
bast quality of paints.   Phone V. & N
182. tt.
King Edward.
London, Oct. 4.—Sir Francis
Laking, King Edwards physician,
went to Balmoral yesterday. His
majesty is reported to be suffering
from an attack of rheumatism, but
went for a drive during the after
noon.
New Appointment.
Washington, Oct. 4.—The president today appointed Martin B.
Cowan marshal of the United
States consular port of Chee Fo,
China.
TWENTY-
FOUR OUT
Mlssourians Who Have Had
Enough of Smelter
Smoke.
Mr. Frecheville has been at
Northport all yesterday and today
making a oomplete inquiry into
the working of the plant with nonunion labor. With the knowledge
of Mr. Frecheville's presence at the
smelter the World's correspondent
sends the following statement this
afternoon:
"Number five furnace—the old
reliable—froze up at midnight and
was out of use until 5:30 this
morning, when the men managed
to get it started again. Yesterday
ten of the new men at work on the
high line went out on strike and
quit their jobs. They were bothered by the smoke from the newly
fired roast heaps and demanded $3
for a ten-hour day. They _were
working twelve hours and were offered $2.70 for ten hours, but refused and walked out.
"Six men working on the roast
heaps for $2.70 per twelve hours
demanded $3 and, on being refused, they quit work and are out
today.
"In the feed room yesterday
eight men went out on strike, making in all twenty-four men who
have quit the smelter plant within
the last twenty-four hours.
"The smoke from the newly
lighted roast heaps bothers the
green hands greatly and there is a
lot of grumbling and dissatisfaction
among the whole of them. When
pay day comes (Oct. 10) a lot more
of the men brought up here will go
south. They say they have had
enough of the "easy job."
OREGON
LIBELLED
Passengers Ask for $215,-
500 Damages-Bad Food
and Overcrowding.
Seattle. Oct. 4.—The passengers
of the steamship Oregon on her
last trip from Nome instituted a
libel suit against the vessel yesterday in the federal court.
The aggregate of the damages
demanded iB $215,500, the first
class passengers each asking $800
and the second class $500. There
are 305 libelants and their petition
'covers 725 pages. It is said to be
one of the most voluminous papers
of the kind ever filled in the court.
The chief causes alleged for the
suit are: That the rudder of the
vessel was in a defective condition
when she sailed; that the supply
of provisions was unsuflicient and
that she carried more passengers
than the number allowed by her
license.
BEAMISH TO GO
Handcuffed and Led Along
the Streets.
AN ONNECESSARY HUMILIATION
Judge Leamy* Upholds the  Police
Magistrate's Finding—A Petition Is Started.
The Beamish appeal case from
the findings of the police magistral. Boultbee in which Beamish
was sentenced to two months imprisonment, in connection with
Horn incident in August last,
came up before county court Judge
Leamy without a jury at 10o'clock
this morning in the court house.
The seatB reserved for the public
on the floor of the corrt room and
in the gallery were all occupied by
an interested audience throughout
the trial.
Beamish retained the services
of C. E. Gillan aB counsel and the
prosecution was conducted by Hon.
T. Mayne Daly as at the first
trial.
Horn went into the box as the
first witness for the crown and retold his story, being subjected to a
sharp cross examination by Mr.
Gillan without eliciting anything
particularly new. The other witness who had previously testified
in the police court followed in due
course, and the court adjourned at
12:30 for lunch, resuming at 2
u'clock.
No evidence waB called for the
defence but Mr. Gillan made a
lengthy address to the court lasting over an hour.
Judge Leamy said in delivering
his judgment that he would not
disturb the finding of the magistrate and he lectured Police Officer
McDonald for his action in connection with the matter and also
found fault with all the men who
had been concerned in the affair.
Beamish attempted to speak but
the court refused to hear him and
he was taken in charge by Chief
ef Police Vaughn, hand-cuffed and
led through the streets to the city
jail. This last act has called out
a number of remonstrances from
those who witnessen it. The desire to humiliate Beamish seems to
have been so strong that the step
alluded to was taken.
Horn swore in his evidence that
Police Magistrate Boultbee pointed
out Beamish to him in the crowd,
and named him, otherwise he
woulk not have known who Beamish was.
Both Beamish and Colistro will
be taken over to Nelson tomorrow.
A petition to the minister of justice
setting out the facts of both cases is
being prepared this afternoon, and
will be circulated for signature and
sent on to Ottawa at once, asking
for executive clemency. H^
Hot  Roast Beef   served with
glass oi beer at the Alhambra.
Hub Cancer.
every
Copenhagen, Oct. 4.—The newspapers have today revived the
rumor that King Edward is in
a serious condition from cancer of
the tongue.
Died et Greenwood.
Played With the dun.
Chatham, Oct. 4.—Willis Allan
and George Moore, boys six years
old, got hold of a loaded rifle today,
and while playing with it the gun
Was discharged, tbe bullet lodging
in the back of young Allan's head.
August C. Nelson, a former resilient of Rossland, died last evening
at the Greenwood hospital from injuries received a few dayB ago by a
fall in the Knob Hill mine. Mr.
Nelson was an Odd Fellow, also a
member      of     the Rossland
Miners' Union. It is understood
hiB remains will be interred at
Greenwood. He leaves a wife and
family who were at his bedside
when death claimed its victim.
Hot Weinerwurst served with every
glass of beer at the Alhambra,
COLUMBIA
WINS CUP
Shamrock II Came In First
but Lost on Time Allowance.
Columbia won the yacht raoe today by a very narrow margin on
time allowance, Shamrock II having crossed the winning line first.
The wind was fresh at the start,
but gradually failed, there being
only sufficient breeze to allow the
boats to cover the course within
the time limit.
The course was a fifteen mile
beat to windward and return, and
although the cup defender started
first the Shamrock went around
the turning buoy ahead of her rival,
the time at the turn being Shamrock, 12.48.48; Columbia, 12.49.35.
The British boat was never
headed on the home run, and pass*
ed over the winning line ahead of
the Columbia, but the latter followed sufficiently close to win on time
allowance.    ,
This ends the series, Columbia
winning the cup in three straight
races.
We have a large stock of grapes
for jelly making; 85c a box. Paulson Bros.'
EXTREME
PENALTY
Comment on Colistro C se
-There Should Be One
Law for All.
Referring to the Colistro case the
Nelson Trihune says editorially
this morning:
"The extreme penalty of the law
has been meted out to a man name-
oil Colistro for violating one of the
sections of a law passed by the parliament of Canada. Another law
passed by the same parliament lias
been trampled underfoot repeatedly,
yet, as far as heard from, noonehoe
been punished for violating it.
Is there one interpretation of the
law for poor and uneducated men,
like Colistro of Rossland, and another interpretation for the representatives of the rich and powerful,
like Bernard Macdonald? If there
is, it is time to make sweeping
changes in the officials who are
paid to enforce the laws without
fear or without favor.
Price Five Cents.
Fatal Railway Collison.
Sherbrooke, Quebec, Oct. 4.—A
fatal collision occured on the Quebec Central railway at Thedford
Mines yesterday morning, resulting in the instant death of the
engineer James Atto and Fireman
Dean and the mail clerk, name
unknown as yet, on the down passenger train.
SAN FRANCISCO
Battle to Down the|Unlons
Is Over.
MEN HAVE WON THEIR FIGHT
The Right to Organize Admitted—
What the Unions Contended for
—Message From Rossland.
A mighty struggle in San Fran-
cisco has been going on since May
last between organized labor and
organized capital. The fight is
over and after many weary dayi, .
labor has won and reluctantly
wrung an admission of its rights
from its opponents.
Early in August the labor council of San Francisco issued a state
ment selling out plainly what was
contended  for   by the  workmen.
The statement stated among
other facts the following:
"A mighty struggle is going on
in San Francisco and vicinity between organized labor and organized capital. The latter, organized
in the Employers' association, haa
through its spokesman, an attorney, announced that the trades
unions must be disrupted. It has
followed up that dictum by acts.
It is a secret organization. Ita
main weapon ia the refusal of aup-
plies to union houses. Again ahd
again employers desiring toemploy
union men have been forced to
discharge them or close their business.    ... -
Organized labor has declared
that it will never surrender the
right to organize. We could not
do otherwise. Without our unions we would be an easy prey to
the greed of our employers. Our
trade union is our bulwark against
greed, injustice and tyranny."
From the outset it will be seen
that a bold attempt was made to
break up the unions and not only
to prevent the employment of union men but to coerce all branches
of business, which in any way gave
employment to members of any
union. In the settlement which
has now been arrived at,this insane
scheme has been dropped out of
sight and the union has won a substantial victojy after a hard   fight.
The Hossland Trades and Labor
council last night wired the following congratulatory message
to their San Francisco brethern.
RoBsland, B. C.Oot. 3rd, 1901.
Ed. Rosenbery, Sec. San Francisco Labor council, 927 Market St.
San FrtCncisco, Cal.
Rossland British Columbia labor
organizations join in congratulations on your successful settlement
of greatest labor struggle in the history of the west. Your success
will greatly strengthen our cause
here and encourage ua in our
effort for the same ends.
W. L. McDonald, Prei.
John McLaren, Sec., Rossland
Trades and Labor Council.
Clam Chowder free day and  night at
thc Alhambra.
A Doctor Dead.
St. Thomas.Ont., Oct. 4.—Dr. T.
W. Duncumb, a prominent physician, dropped dead in his office
last night.
Only Two Left.
Halifax, Oct. 4.—Later returns
today do not change the result in
the elections of yesterday. There
are only two Conservatives in a
house of thirty-eight and one of
these is in doubt. THE EVENING WORLD, ROSSLAND B. C, OCTOBER 4, 1901
The Evening World
By.lhe World Publishing Company.
Pabllshed da ily In Miner*' Union hall, Ross-
land, In the Interest of organised labor in Britiah
Columbia.
Bntered at the Roaaland, B. C. postoffice for
tranamlMiou through the analla, May i, 1901, aa
second daia reading matter.
, SUBSCRIPTION RATBS-Fift. centa per
aaaonth ortsfee, year, invariable in advance, Advertising   ratna made known on  application.
Addreaa  all  communications   to  Jamea H.
Fletcher, Manager, P. O. box 558, Roaaland, B. C
THE YACHT RACE.
Sir. Thomas Lipton will not lift
the coveted America'* cup this
season, but he succeeded in making the holders of the trophy exceedingly uncomfortable for a
while. In the race yesterday the
Shamrock sailed under the conditions which her owner declared
she required to really test her racing qualities and with these conditions in a perfectly fair race she
was squarely beaten by the Colunv
bia.
The .Shamrock started first but
her rival was over the line before
the two minutes had elapsed and
on the run home from the second
turning buoy on the last leg of the
triangular course she passed the
British boat and crossed the line
an easy winner.
The only explanation possible
is that the Columbia is the better
and the faster boat of the two,
and Sir Thomas, while pluckily
standing by, and praising his captain and his splendid crew, sorrowfully admits the defeat. Of all
the contests for the cup, the present one has been clearly the best.
The best of good feeling has prevailed, the course haB been kept
clear, and the best boat has won,
but there has been no recurrence
of some of the unpleasant features
of former races and one result is
certain, a prompt challenge for
next year.
Canada holds the championship
yachting cup for the great lakes
, and for the half raters, both fairly
wrested from the big republic and
■ince the old country has failed to
win back the blue ribbon of the
seas we should have a try for the
trophy.
THE LAW.
Judge Leamy has decided that
he cannot interfere with the police
magistrate's decision in the Colistro case, and the convicted man
must serve out his sentence of two
months in the Nelson jail.
The law has been dealt out
harshly in Colistro's case, and very
naturally former cases here have
been referred to, and the sentences
given, compared. The most signal
instance occurred about two years
ago. An accident happened on
Washington street, a laborer being
killed by the cave-in of the sewer
then in the course of construction
on that thoroughfare, i Pending
the inquest following the accident
a well-known lawyer here who had
been retained by the relatives of
the deceased visited the scene of
the killing, and while he was in
the excavation with his head just
on the level, the contractor who
was constructing the sewer rushed
at the lawyer and most brutally
kicked him about the head until he
dropped insensible and nearly
killed. The assault, was a most
brutal one, without the slightest
provocation or imaginable excuse.
At the trial which followed a judge
of the supreme court of British Columbia first sentenced the contractor who had been found guilty
of assault, with attempt to kill, to
two years imprisonment, but owing
to "representations" the learned
judge reconsidered his judgment,
and the contractor was allowed to
go free on payment of $100 fine, or
practically unpunished.
All the facts in connection with
the case in question are undisputed
and are well remembered in Rossland.   Is it to  be  wondered that
people today are apt to reeall the
circumstances in connection with
the case ended yesterday?
There are still some other aspects
of the administration of the law
here which calls for sharp comment. The prosecution of the Colistro case was carried on for the
crown by the standing solicitor for
the  Le   Roi    Mining    company.
From the evidence already given
in the Geiser case, and from men
who have been recently employed
by the Le Roi companies outside of
Rossland, it is clear that the most
gross" misrepresentations have all
along been made of the real situation here in order to induce workingmen to come to the camp, and
in addition ths plain terms of the
Alien Labor Act have been openly
and defiantly broken, and for the
past two months workers have been
run into Rossland against the law
and without any concealment of
the fact, the Geiser scheme being
practically abandoned as useless
for the purpose for which it was
tried.
If Colistro must serve his term
out, shall the greater law breaker
go free and unpunished, with liberty to continue to violate the Alien
Labor,Act, or will the Dominion
government fairly enforce one of
its own enactments?
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
Sir Thomas Shaughnessy has
now bo many letters to his name
that he will soon talk of the Imperial favor as a subsidy of so
many alphabetical characters to the
mile.
The- London B. C. Mining Review says: "We understand that
Mr. Blackstock will probably remain in London until Mr. Mackintosh arrives from British Columbia."
One the phenomena of the nineteenth century was the enormous
increase in the European stock.
When the century opened the
population of European countries
and people of European origin was
170,000,000. At the opening of
the twentieth century it is 510,-
000,000. The danger of a yel
low or black domination has thus
passed.
This city never before has
seen so many feminine unionists
in a parade. In some respects
thiB was the most significant
feature of the day. The increaS'
ing tendency of women to organize may indicate increased efficiency
on their part and a better opportunity to command as good
pay as men for an equal amount
of work. It is to be hoped ite
promise in both respects will be
fulfilled.—Chicago Tribune.
Latterly corporations have been
allowed to break the laws of the
country with impunity when
strikes have been in progress
while the utmost severity has been
practiced against those workmen,
who, maddened by some sense of
injustice and wrong, have stepped
across the line that divides the
law-abiding citizen from the criminal. If the Labor party had
only this one object, of securing
equal justice for all citizens alike,
its existence would be amply justified.—Nanaimo Herald.
Don't forget the prunes. A few
days more and the price will advance.   Paulson Bros.
PORTO RICO
LUMBER CO.
V. 8: N. Tel.
in. P.O. box
89a. Ofhce	
aud Yards—
Third Ave-
nueandWash
ington street
Op. RedMt.
Depot	
Rough and Dressed
Lumber,Shingles,
Mouldings and A-l
White Pine Lumber Always in Stoek
Mill at Porto Rico Siding, Tarda at
Roaaland and Nelson. Head office at N*i-
eon, B. C. We carry a complete stock of
Coast Flooring, Celling, Inside Finish
Turned Work, Hashes anil Doors. BpecUl
order work will lacrlve prompt allcnllrm
LOOK HERE!
Your credit is good for New
and Second-Hand Goods on
THE INSTALLMENT PLAN
—AT—
Glazan's
Furniture Store
Bedroom Sets from $12 to $15,
Yum Yum Springs, $2.65.
Woven Wire Springs, $1.75.
Sport Springs, copper wire, $3:00.
Wove Toy Mattress, $2.50,
Satin top all wove mattresses.
Jumbo Mattresses, tufted, double-top,
all wove.
One Spring and Mattress from $1.00
to $2.00.
New Beds $2.00.
Rocking Chairs from $1.00 to $3.00.
Dinner Pails 26c.
Granite Fails 60c.
Candlesticks, plain, 25c; Improved
Ideal, 50c; Montana, 50c; Solid Steel,
50c to 75c.
These prices will last only 30 days.
..ROSSLAND..
CONFECTIONERY STORE
Next to the Grand Union hotel,
receives consignments of Out
Flowers every day. For the
choicest of hot house blossoms
call and see them. Orders for
weddings, banquets, etc., a
specialty.   Charges reasonable.
BATH  &   FOX,   Proprietors.
'ine GRAND UNION HO-
TEL it is easily seen,
Is splendidly run by Proprietor Green;
Buy one glass of beer and a
free lunch you'll get,
Such as sometimes you've
heard of but not often met.
Neat and clean furnished
rooms can always be had
At such low prices as will make
the workingman ^lad.
a Col. Ave.
Geo. H. Green, Prop
The Shortest, Quickest
and Best.
St. Paul, Minneapolis,
Chicago, Toronto,
Montreal, New York,
and all Eastern points.
Seattle, Tacoma,
Vancouver, Victoria,
and all Pacific Coast points.
EAST BOUND. M^
Leave Spokane 9:15 a. m.
WIST BOUND.
Leave Spokane.. 7:15 a.m. and 8:00 p.m
AU connections made in Union depot
For full particulars, folders, etc.,
call on or address
H. BRANDT, C.P.A.,
701 W. Riverside, Spokane
H. P. Brown, Agent,
Rossland, B. C.
Canadian
DIRECT ROUTE,
EAST
TORONTO
BUFFALO
OTTAWA
MONTREAL
NEW YORK
WEST
VANCOUVER
^   VICTORIA
SEATTLE
PORTLAND
SAN FRANCISCO
THI=/^___.
N0FFMMJ0HSE
Best 25c Meal
in town.
Miners Checks Cashed Free
of Charge at All Hours.
HARRY MclNTOSH, Proprietor.
Spokane Falls & Northern
NELSON & FT. SHEPPARD RY.
Red Mountain Ry,
The only all-rail route between all points eaat
neri and south to Roaaland, Nelaon, and all intermediate points, connecting at Spokane with
the Great Northern, Nonherai VsvAtc and O. R.
O.N.CO.
Connects at Rossland itlth the Canadian Pacific Ry. for fioundtiy c.eek points.
Connects at Ifevera Falls with stage dally lbr
Republic.
Buffet-ervic* on trains between Spokane and
Northport.
EFFECTIVE MAY ?
Leave. Arrive.
9:00 a. m.       Spokane 7:35 p. m.
12:25 a. m.       Rossland.       4:10 p.m.
10:10 a. nt. Nelson. 6:05 p. m.
H. A. JACKSON,
General Passenger Agt,
Spokane, Waah.
H. P. BROWN,
Agent, Roaaland. H. C.
TO any customers who patronized us
all the time while they have been
at work, and especially to those with
families, we beg to announce that we will
trust them to all the goods they may
need during the strike and will wait for the payi
until they start to', work again and be able to
pay. To those who need other stuff, such as
Groceries, etc., which we do not carry, and cannot get credit elsewhere, we will give them orders, on which they can get all they want on
our account until the trouble is all settled.
This'is a bona fide offer, which fact can be readily proven whenj_ oocasion makes it necessary.
THE PEOPLES' STORE
CLIFTON CORNER.
B. BANNETT,
*********************** **t
LOOK HERE I
Talk   about getting  a  Good
Meal, just try one at tbe
| St. Charles Hotel {
Kverythln* comfortable at the
St. Charles. Good music In the
evening free. Good Wine,Whisky
and Cigars, for money	
*******t*****************i.
P. BURNS & CO.
WHOLESALE   MARKETS
Rossland, Nelson, Trail,Sandon,Revelstoke,Green-
wood, Grand Forks and Vancouver.
RETAIlr-MARKETS-Rossland, Trail, Nelson, Ymir, Kaslo
Sandon, New Denver, Silverton, Cascade City, Grand Forks,
Greenwood, Phoenix, Midway, Camp   McKinney,
Revelstoke, Ferguson and Vancouver.
Fish.  Game and  Poultry in Season, Sausages of All Kinds.
WM. DONALD, Manager Rossland Branch
ALL  KINDS   OF   pRY
W©0D
W. F. LINGLE
Office at City Bakery
Phone 149.
IMPERIAL LIMITED||
100 HOURS
VANCOUVER TO MONTREAL
Steamship servioe^from Vancouver, Skagway, Hawaii, ^Australia,
China and Japan.
For Fursther Particulars apply'to
A. C. McArthur, Depot Agt.
A. B. MACKENZIE, City Agt
Rossland, B. C.
J, B. CARTER, D. P. A.
Nelson, B. O.
E.|F^Coyle|A' G. P. A
Vancover. B. C
THE:
Real Situation.
Rossland, B. C, Sept. 5th, 1901.
To the Citizens and Business Mm of Rossland and Vicinity and to the General Public:
The Le Roi mine manager has been circulating a report that the strike here is practically at an end and the mines are about to resume. This report has been taken up by their
organ, the Morning Miner, and sent out over the country as a true report of the situation in
Rossland. We have made a careful analysis of the situation here and believe that no impartial reader can see much reason for the joyful enthusiasm which Mr. Bernard Macdonald
and his paper profess to feel.
For three and one-half months the strike has been in force at Northport. The greatest claim Macdonald or Kadish have ever made during that time is that they have been
able to operate two of the five furnaces at the smelter. It is only a question of simple arithmetic to see that if it takes three and one-half months to start two furnaces, it will take
eight and three-fourths months before they can have the smelter in operation. Now, if it
takes eight and three fourths months to the 500 men necessary to start the smelter
it will take twice that many, or seventeen and one-half months* to secure 1000 men for the
mines in Rossland. Or, at the end of twenty-six and one-half months, if Macdonald has the
same success he claims to have had thus far at the smelter, he will be in a position to work
the mines.
No one can deny or dispute that Bernard Macdonald has left no stone unturned to
secure men for the smelter at Northport. He has cast his drag net over the states of Minnesota, Colorado, California, Oregon, Missouri, Montana, or, practically, over the entire
country west of the Mississippi river, and has been able to start but two of the five furnaces
at the Northport smelter. This is the success he boasts. He claims the strike is at an end.
It has only begun.
So far we have taken as true his statements that he has two furnaces in operation at
Northport. We wished to prove how futile are his statements by his own evidence.
The real truth is he has never had two furnaces in successful operation at one time for 24
hours. They have produced no matte for shipment up till August 25. He claims to have
shipped one carload on August it. That it was the highest in value of any shipment made.
The records of the railroad at Northport fail to show any trace of matte shipments on
or about August 21, If any shipment was made it was via the Columbia river route and
rests at the bottom ot the river.
He also claims to be able to start the mines in Rossland. Apparently he does" not
realize there is an alien act in Canada, for of the 30 employes now at the mines all but two
have been brought here in direct violation of this law and will be deported inside of two
weeks. He has in eight weeks been able to secure but two scabs in Canada. Now, if the
Canadian people should; to his surprise, enforce their laws.'even if it does hurt the feelings
of Bernard Macdonald, how long will it take to start the mines at the ratio of two every
eight weeks?   And as yet there is not a miner in the lot.
We are not deceiving the miners of Rossland by false promises. We hope for an
honorable settlement of the difficulties here. The sooner the better it will suit the union
miners of Rossland. But if it is necessary to continue this fight to its final end the union
miners and smeltermen will stand shoulder to shoulder for carrying on the fight.
This war was forced on these unions. We entered the struggle full of a belief in the
justice of our cause and confident of our ability to carry it successfully to an end. This belief has never been shaken for an instant, and certainly is not when we consider the almost
unbroken line of successes which have thus far attended our efforts.
EXECUTIVE BOARD
ROSSLAND MINERS' UNION No. 38, W. F. M 1 HE EVENING WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, OCTOBER 4, 1901
PATHETIC
INCIDENT
Three Inseparable Dublin
Lads Who Were Killed
in the Boer War.
London, Oct. 4,—A pathetic; incident of the Boer war iB narrated by
tho parents of Trooper 01 iffe, of
the 74th (Dublin) Company of Imperial Yeomanry. In childhood
Oliffe and two comrades, Bonynge
and McLean, attended the same
Sunday school, and for twelve
years the trio belonged to the Boys'
Brigade attached to Trinity church,
Dublin. So greatly were the three
attached to each other that they
vowed never to be separated in
spite of all obstacles.
Time only cemented their friendship, and when manhood was
reached they were still inseparable. So, when the Imperial
Yeomanry-were being recruited in
Dublin the gallant trio determined
to enlist and fight for their country
in South Africa.
Together they embarked, together they took part in the Bame
engagements, and when the attack
on the convoy was made at Roci-
kooppies on August 24th together
the three young Irishmen defended
the convoy, fighting shoulder to
shoulder, till at length they fell
mortally wounded, and now all
three share the same resting place
under the same veldt.
'"Oi'll draw up an agreement so
thot there won't be any mistake,'
sez he.
,r,AH roight,' sez Oi.
"He done ut, an' we both signed.
" 'Me fir-rst guess is Jones,' sez
he.
" 'Wrong,' soz Oi.
" 'Me second guess is Goldstein,'
sez he.
 Tis not,' bbz Oi.
•' 'Oi have one more gues.
comin'," _ez he.
" 'Yez have,' sez Oi.
'• 'Me last guess is Murphy,' sez
he.
'"Bedad you're roight!'" sez Oi.
"Oi wonder how he told?" said
Mrs. Murphy.
"He wor a great mind reader.
He told me _o himself. lit wor
worth th' money!"
Anon.
Forty-pound boxes of pears $1.50
per box at Paulson Bros. tf.
Alhambra Hotel
$1 a day and up.
Free Lunch from I la.m. to 2 p.m.
BILL OF FABE:
I Hot Roast Beef,   Mashed Potatoes
Pork and Beans,     Clam Chowder
Hot 01am Chowder served day or night
BEER 5c A GLASS.
Killed aat tho Rambler.
Kaslo, Oct. 4.—Tom Tresea, a
hole shooter at the Rambler-Cariboo mine, was almost instantly
killed by delaying too long after
firing a round of charges. His
partner, known as "Dutch Jack,"
was blown 20 feet and was found
unconscious within two feet of the
edge of the main shaft, down which
he might have fallen several hundred feet. He is not badly injured.
Tresea's body was mangled. No
blame is attached to anyone, the
accident resulting from the men's
recklessness.
A Mind Header.
"He wor a great mon," said Patrick.
"Who wor?" asked Mrs. Murphy.
"Th' mon, I, met tonight. Oi
wor in Casey's when he said to me:
" 'Oi'll bet yez th' drinkB an' a
dollar thot I can guess your name
in three guesses.'
" 'Done,' sez I.
rAAAAAA_l_aAAA_.A*.Aa*_.A      m*aa\A
m\m¥WWVm'W*wwmwW*wmWWW*vWWW   WT
STRIKE
NOT SETTLED.
Whereas agents of
the mining companies
have circulated the report that the strike
existing at this place
is settled and -work is
to be resumed at the
mines, we wish to
state that this -report
is false and thereis no
probability of a settlement of the strike for
some time to come.
We advise all men
looking for employment to keep away
from Rossland, or
Northport or vicinity.
Executive Board,
Rossland Miners' Union No.
38, W. P. M. a
m. m.   _fc _A __■■____■ f- __. Am   ^-A_fc._A._fc._^A__L    AAAA4Z
PV WWW WW w w vww www
ii_a_4a___ii__i___i__ja(i_utaA_iai_aaaiiiii
WHAT   HAVE
YOU IN	
FRUITS
Is a question asked by many who have not any fruit
put up for winter use. We have a nice assortment
of good quality in Crawford Peaches, Plums, Prunes,
aB well as other fruits. Tomatoes, ripe and green,
Egg Plant,Green Peppers,Crab Apples in a day or two
SO#_^"*____r'C   <___. f  tf^CDsC Successor to
TT/wlZ  OOI   U/TC   Empey Bros
Jwwwwwww.wwwwwt
Seals and
Rubber
Stamps
Manufactured to Order on Short
Notioe at the World office,
V^-.
Labor Union Directory.
Ofilicers and Meetings.
WESTERN FEDERATION
OF MINERS-Edward Boyce
president, Denver.Colorado;
James Wilkes, vice-president, Nelson. British Columbia; Wm. C. Haywood,
secretary-treasurer, Denver,
Col.; Executive Board, John
C. Williams, Grass Valley,
Cal.; Phillip Bowden,Butte,
Mont,; Thos. B. Sullivan,
Leadville, Col.; John Kelly,
Burke, Idaho; Chas. H.
Moyer, Lead City, S. Dakota; James A. Baker, Slocan
City, B. C.
DISTRICT UNION no. 6,
W. F. M.-- Jas. Wilkes, Pres.
Nelson; Rupert Bulmer,vice-
president, Rossland; Alfred
Parr, secretary-treasurer,
Ymir.
MINERS' UNION No. <6.
Western Federation of
miners—meets every Wednesday evening at 7.30, p.
m. in Miners' Union Hall.,
Frank Woodside, Secretary
Rupert  Bulmer,  President.
NEW DENVER MINEPS
Union No. 07, W. F. M.
Meets every Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock in Union
hall. T. J. Lloyd, Pres., H.
J. Byrnes, Seqj
PHOENIX MINERS UN-
ion No. 8, W. F. M. Meets
every Saturday evening at
7:30 o'clock in Miners' hall.
Henry Heidman, Pres., Jno.
Riordan, Sec.
YMIR JVHNERS UNION
No. 85:,-W. F. M., meets
every Wednesday evening
at 8 o'clock in Miners' Union hall. W. B. Mclsaac,
Fres., Alfred Parr, Sec.
SLOCAN CITY MINERS
Union No. 62, W, F. M.
Meets every Wednesday
evening at 7:30 in Miners'Union hall. James Nixon, Pres.,D. B. O'Neail, Sec.
NELSON MINERS UNION
No. 06, W. F. M. Meets
every Saturday evening at
7:30 o'clock. John McPherson, Pres., James Wilks.Sec.
Visiting brothers cordially
invited.
GREENWOOD MINERS UNION
No. 22, W. F. M., meets every
Saturday evening in Union hall.
Geo. P. Dougherty, PreB., M.
Kane, Sec
TRADES AND LABOR
COUNCIL—Meets every second and fourth Tuesday in
each month at 7.30 P. M, in
Miners' Union Hall. President, W.L.McDonald. Ad
dress all communications to
Secretary-Treasurer, P. O.
box 784.
ROSSLAND FEDERAL
Labor Union No. 19. Meets
every Monday evening at
8:00 in Miners' Union hall.
T. H. Reed, Pres., J. V. Ingram, Sec.
TYPOGRAPHICAL      UNION No. 335,—Meets on the
last Sunday of each month
at the Miners' Union Hall.
Jj Barkdoll,    Sec;    Wm.
Poole, Presid
CARPENTERS   &   JOINERS   UNION—meets every
Friday of each week at 7.
30 p. m. in   Miners' Union
Hall. John McLaren, Pres.;
W. R. Baker, Sec,
PAINTERS' UNION, No.
123, painters and decorators
of America.meets inBeatty's
Hall, on second and foprth
Tuesday of each month. R.
C. Arthur, Pres.; W. S.
Murphy, Sec.
JOURNEYMEN TAILORS
Union of America. Meets
first Monday in^each month
in Miners' Union hall. S.
Graham president, L. A.
Fairclough secretary, P. O.
box 314.
NEWSBOYS' UNION, No 3
—meet in Miners' Union
Hall on the first and third
Saturdays of each month,
at9a.m. Mike Guydotti,
Pres.
SUBSCRIBE
=POR THE=
IEVENING-!
WORLD
It is the Official Organ of Organized  Labor  throughout
the Kootenays  and no
home   is   complete
without it.
mi
SOB
50 -Cents -50
PER MONTH
is the price asked, this surely
being within the reach of all.
lilPMiifilillE'lflli^^
THOSE  WHO 00 ADVERTISING
Should not forget that the only way
to reach the People is through
the columns of the
Evening World
l!l!l@l@l!l!!gl!l!lg@j^^
JOB WORK.
In this branch of our business we do
everything  from a visiting card
to a three-sheet poster.
iiiiiiiiiMm
WE ALSO MAKE
RUBBER - STAMPS - AND - SEALS
Give Us a Call !..■
li
m
THE EVENING WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, OCTOBER 4, 1901.
STOCK MARKETS
Interest in Winnipeg Unabated.
MINOR MENTION.
SIXTEEN  THOUSAND  SHARES
The Latest Quotations and Sales
Locally and on the Toronto
Market.
Interest in Winnipeg shares con
tinues. ThiB morning 8500 shares
sold on the exchange around 9Jc and
the stock was in demand at that
figure. Rambler-Cariboo remains
firm at 49c and 1000 shares sold
today.
In all 16,000 shares were tran-
ferred here at the morning session
of the board.
Appended will be found today's quotations and sales here and
in Toronto.
Today's Toronto Quotations.
War Eagle	
CentreStar	
Iron Mask ,
Bambler-Cariboo...
Giant	
California	
Republic	
Payne	
Winnipeg        11 9
Toronto sales today   included
3600 Noble Five at 9^c, 1000 North
Star at 34_c, 1000 Golden Star at
3.o.
_sked
Bid
15
13
51
48
20
15
67
48
5
4
3
20
17
Today's Local  Quotations
ASked
Ab* Lincoln         S
American Boy _    ">
Athabasca . 4 °°
B. C. Gold Pielda        3
Big Three        »M
Black TaU       '°%      9-.
California         t 4
Canadian Gold Fields         6 4
Cariboo (Camp McKinney) 0 as]
CentreStar  49
Crows Nest Pass Coal |So 00   {7200
DecrTrailNo. 1        3 -Y,
Bid
8
Bvening SU r (Assess, paid)...
Otant  	
Golden Crown Minea, Lim...
Homestake (Assess, paid)	
Iron Mask. (Assess, paid)	
Iro   Colt	
III..	
Jumbo	
Xing (Oro Denoro)	
Knob ' 111	
LonePne	
Monte Chrlsto	
Montreal Gold Fielda	
Morning Glory	
Morrison	
Mountain Mon	
RobleFlve	
Morth Star (Kast Kootenay)..
Jtorelty.,	
Old Ironsides	
fayne	
Peoria Minea	
Prlnceaa Mand..
n
3
3
3«
4
*7
10
33
2
85
■ambit
bler-Carlboo	
aepubllc ••	
Kossland Bonanza G. M. Jt 8. Co.
St. Blmo Consolidated	
Sullivan	
Spiteec Gold Mlnea t 5
Tamarac (Kenneth) Assess, paid.
Tom Thumb	
Via Aada	
Virginia	
War Basle Consolidated	
Waterloo	
White Bear	
Winnipeg	
derlnl	
•K
20
»A
*\
75
,5H
1%
is
48X
3
25
5"
«__
lo)i        9
00   I 4 50
5 I
13«       "A
3 'X.
3
Wonderii
Today's Sales:
Winnipeg,500, 500,500, 500, 9ic,
600, 9c, 1000, 5000, 9|c; Rambler
Cariboo, 1000, 49c; Morning Glory,
6000,2ic; American Boy, 500, 94c;
Cariboo, Camp McKinney, 1000,
24c.   Total sales, 16,000 shares.
All our fancy biscuits to be closed
ont at 16c per pound. Paulson
Bros.
J L. Whitney & Co.
MINING  BROKERS.
B. 0. and Washington Stocks a specialty
47 Colombia avenue.
ESTABLISHED 1896
The Reddin-Jackson Co.
__ln_ite4   X___.toJ__.ty
STOCK BROKERS
Money Loaned on Real Estate.
Richard Plewman
Stock  Broker
Bank of Montreal Building
V.&N. Phone la
ORDE & CO..
Mining Stocks, Real
Estate, Fire Life and
Accident iMurance.....
126O0I. Ave.,Opal block. Telephone 61
Hon. Willam Mulock, postmaster-general, is at Hot Springs, Arkansas. . He will not resign his
place in the cabinet if he regains
his health.
Ralph Smith, M. P., and A. W.
Puttee, M. P. of Winnipeg, have
been at Ottawa regarding the enforcement of the Alien Labor act.
They are now on their way west.
Roy Clarke has completely recovered from his recent illness and
will superintend the resumption of
work on the I. X. L„ which will
start in the next ten days.
Clark Wallace, M. P., is a little
better but is still in a serious condition.
A. Sanderson left today for a
trip to Salt Lake city and other
places in the states.
The duke is off enjoying himself
shooting in Manitoba and tho
duchess is stopping at Banff today.
T. G. Holt, president of the Winnipeg has gone to Nelson on his
way to Vancouver.
The jury in the Sifton murder
case at London, Ont. disagreed and
were dismissed.
S. H. C. Miner of the Granby
Company, accompanied by his
wife and (laugher left for Montreal
at noon today.
Alfred Parr, of Ymir, secretary
of District Association No. 6, W.
P. M., aiso a member of the executive board of the District association, and J. W. Murphy, attorney for the Western Federation
of Miners, are in the city on business commected with the Feder
a tion.
Vancouver Won.
Vancouver, Oct. 4.-—There was
great rejoicing in Vancouver last
night Y. M. C. A. lacrosBe team
winning from the New Westminster champions on their own
grounds by a score of three to two,
The game was rough but the play
was brilliant on both sides.
COAL MEN
ON STRIKE
Six Thousand   Employes
Threaten to Quit Work-
Union or Non-Union.
Scranton, Pa., Oct. 4.—A strike
by all the men employed in the
mines of the New York & Scranton
Coal company controlled by the
New York, Ontario & Western
railway in threatened today. By
it 6000 employees will be made
idle.
On Tuesday 700 men struck at
the Pine Brook shaft against working with men who could not show
their union cards, when these men
obtained cards the committee reported all ready for work, but general superintendent Brecnan kept
the mine closed, locking the men
out. The executive board of District No. 1, Mine Workers, is in
session considering the matter.
HOTEL  ARRIVALS.
KOOTKNAT.
Roy H. Clarke, Spokane.
Mrs. A. Ingle and son, Trail.
Emmie G. Buller, Trail.
Wm. Lockhart and wife, city,
Don't forget the prunes. A few
days more and the price will advance.   Paulson Bros.
NOTICE.
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned on or before October
18th, 1901, for the following:
One New Parker Shot Gun.
One New Savage Rifle.
One New Camera, manufactured
by the Rochester Optical company.
The above are now at the Customs House.
B. R. McDonald,
Collector of Customs.
LOOK HERE!
Your credit is good for New
and Second-Hand Goods on
THE INSTALLMENT PLAN
—AT—
Glazan's
Furniture Store
K(Wi "I> ROSSLAND LODGB NO ll,
• *\JP JL » K. ot P., meets every Friday
night at 8 o'clock lu Odd Bellow's hall, Queen
street.   Visiting brothers are always welcome.
HARRY MARTIN, C C.
Procter joiner, k. ol R. and S
Bedroom Sets from $12 to $16,
Yum Yum Springs, $2.65.
Woven Wire Springe. $1.75.
■Sport Springs, copper wire, $3:00.
Wove Toy Mattress, $2.50.
Satin top all wove mattresses.
Jumbo Mattresses, tufted, double-top,
all wove.
One Spring and Mattress from (1,00
to $2.00.
New Beds $2.00.
Rocking Chairs from $1.00 to $3.00.
Dinner Paits 25c.
Granite Fails 50c.
Candlesticks, plain, 26p.j Improved
Ideal, 50o; Montana, 50c; Solid Steel,
60c to 75c.
These prices will last only 30 days.
..ROSSLAND..
CONFECTIONERY STORE
Next to the Grand Union hotel,
receives consignments of Out
Flowers every day. For the
choicest of hot house blossoms
call and Bee them. Orders ior
weddings, banquets, etc., a
specialty.   Charges reasonable.
BATH  A.   FOX,   Proprietors.
The GRAND UNION HOTEL it is easily seen,
Is splendidly run by Proprietor Green;
Buy one glass of beer and a
free lunch you'll get,
Such as sometimes you've
heard of but not often met
Neat and clean furnished
rooms can always be had
At such low prices as will make
the workingman _(lad.
21 Col. Ave.
Geo. H- Green, Prop
NOTICE
NOTICE is herebv given that 60 days
alter ilatu I shall upiily to the Chief
Couunissionei of Lands and Works Ior
permission to purcha.. 640 acres ol land,
more or less, in the Y tie district, and
described as follows: Commencing at a
po t about r.ne quarter of a mile norlh
erly from Iron creek, thence westerly
80 chains, thence northerly 80 chains
thence easterly 80 chains, thence .outre
erly 80 chains to point of commencement
C. A. COFFIN
Witness:   A. Q. Creelman.
Kossland, B. C, 9th September, A. D.
Iqoi, 9-9-2_n
Fashionable Dressmaking.
Ladies who desire a perfect fit and
finish in the latent styles should call at
Mrs. Pippy's Dressmaking Parlors,
Queen St, First house north of Ooluni'
bia avenue.
Le Roi
LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLES
John F. Linbu.fr, Prop.
Washington St., Op. Hoffman House
Best Turnouts-Only Cab in City
Phone—V. & N. 39, Columbia 88.
Postoffice Box 136.
Richard Altman
GENERAL REPAIRING.
WANTED:
Old Rubber Boots, Shoes,
Brass and Copper.
Washington street, opposite Hotel Allan
V. «tN. Tel.
III. P.O. box
89a. Office	
and Yards—
Third Ave-
nueandwaah
Ington Btreet
Op. Redlft.
Depot	
PORTO RICO
LUMBER CO.
TiTM _J_j__BB
Rough and Dressed
Lumber,Shingles,
Mouldings and A-l
White Pine Lumber Always in Stoek
Mill at Porto Rico Biding, Yartla et
Roaaland and Nelaon, Head office at Nei-
aon, B. C. We carry a complete Block of
Coaat Flooring, Celline, Inaide Finish.
TurneriWork.Kaahesanif Doors. Special
order work will aecelTC prompt atteatloa
Fd TJI PRATRRNAL ORDER OP
. V t. Pj. RAOLKS, Rossland Aerie,
No. IO, Regular meetings evtry Thursday even-
ngs, 8 p. m, Ragles Hall, Miners' Union Bldg.
Thos. FiUmaurice, W. P.
E, Daniel, W. Secretary.
*#****############*##***#*
Ia dT\ rr3 Independent Order] ol Good
• ^_J.VT. A . Templare meets every
Thursday Kvening in the Lecture Room of the
Baptist cnurch Members of the order visiting
the oity will be cordially welcomed.
O. J. B, LANK, W. H, CRRITZ,
C. I. Secretary.
Ifl A Tjl Meets In Odd Fellows Hall
.\J.\J.P . on Queen Street, between
First and Second avenues. Regular meetings
each Monday night, visiting brothers are cordially invited to attend and register within 30
days.
W.8. Murphy, Sec, li. B Bridglord, N. G
Rossland Cigar Factory.
Why not patronize a home in<
dutery? It will assist Union labor
and keep the money at home. Ask
for a Crown Grant or W. B. Cigar
when yoa buy.
Collis & Co.,for fine commercial print
ingj   doll up 'phone 88. tf
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
, .  0
- *#
A FEW SWELL BLOCKS %
STRICTLY UP-TO-DATE #
0
.•New..
ehristy Hats
Just Arrived.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
00000000*****0************
ON SALE MONDAY
f
0
0
0
0
0
Hunter  Brothers*
For Rent—Three-room furnished house with city water. Apply
to J. L. Whitney & Co.
Get Your Papers
and magazines at the  Poeto ffice  New
Stand.   A full line of  stationerv alway
on  hand.     Agency  for  the Evbninq
Wobld
0
0
O
T
T
R
N
E
E
Q
C
B
U
s
T
N
O
S
H
J
m IN CASH, I
 FREE  *
0
I
s t n o s|H|j —FREE-
I ' We will give the above reward to any person who will correctly arrange thef
I above letters to spell the narueBof three Canadian cities. Use each letter but j
once.  Try it. We will positively give the money away, and you may be the J
1 'fortunate person.   Should there be more than 1 set of correct answers, thef
1 1 money will be divided equally. For instance should 5 persons send in correct A
answers, each will receive $40; should 10 persons send in correct answers, j
I 'each will receive $20 ; twenty persona, $10 each.   We do this to introduce!
, lour firm and goods we handle as quickly as possible. SEND NO MONEY j
WITH YOUR AN8WER.   This is a FREE contest.   A p
I ' Those who have not received anything (rom other contests, t
EMPIRE SUPPLY CO., ORILLIA. CANADA."
A post card will do.
b, try this one.
Keep Your
Eye on Meteor
i!!l|ji!llK
METEOR
is the new high-grade mining
camp in the south half of the Col-
ville Reservation, seven miles west of the Columbia river, eight miles southwest of Daisy and 28
miles hy good road from Meyers Palls. The town-
site is in the centre of tne rich aggregation of
mines comprising the Meteor, Stray Dog, White
Swan and Given groups, all of which are working
in high-grade shipping ore. A great number of
very promising properties are opening up in the
vicinity. It is surrounded by a splendid agricultural, fruit growing and stook raising country,
unequalled in the northwest, and has a splendid
supply of timber for building and mining purposes, together with unlimited water power near
It has already, besides a store, a number of buildings in course of erection, and a telephone service,
saw mill, etc., will be in operation within a short
time. Meteor is a high-grade camp of the real
Leadville type, the ores mined being gold, silver,
lead and copper. Picked assays have given as high
as $140,000 to the ton, the average of the camp
being about $35. You can't afford to forget Meteor.
Now is  your time to  get in at bed-rock prices.
i
Meteor is Sure to be a Rich Camp
i
L©TS ^25 to $150 LOTS
|g|g!Ig|g]g|!g|g|g|!IU^
""^   FTV¥?"D~lVrQ    One-half cash and the balance in two equal pay-   ^
X. JjJ J_iJjX»5,'"ments at three and sixmo nths, without interest
For full particulars call on or address
G. W. HERRON,
Meteor, Washington.
W   -mttPXt.7    .   m-t±.        ;..  *    ;     ,.     OHWJMM

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