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The Evening World Oct 1, 1901

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 THE  EVENING
WORLD
- £ t^H^S^ity
-ru&so*/.
Vol. I, No. wt&P I J,
ROSSLAND, B. C„ -MfitWSAY, OCTOBER i, ioot.
Price Five Cents.
^inmttrinmmwwwwwmfmitrwwwnfwmwwnrw^
20 Per eent
I Discount eaSH Sale!!
&
LL Leather Footwear in our largo stock
wo now selling at 20 PER CENT DISCOUNT FOB CASH ONLY. This sale is to
make room for our large stock of RUBBER
SHOES which are now on the road.
\GO. LALONDE
iiUliiliillttitiltiUiUIUiUlitll._ii.IUIUIr.iU_U.t4iUlt.iM
VinwV*ffliniflww*ww*wwVnwlVVVwwWwwwnMw>'ww>WwlwllVwBPaiia ifllfaiiii
...The.n
Shoeman.
QUICK WORK-
PROMPT DELIVERY.
| Red Star Storage & Transfer Co. *
Moves or Stores Any Old Thing.
Does All Kinds of Team Work.
Sells Seasoned Fir and Tamarac Wood Any Length.
Four Foot $4.50. If you want wood that will burn
or split give ua a call at the old stand.     Terms cash.
Phone 8.
W. H. FRY, Manager.
£ DO YOU WANT
I SHOES at COST?
We have some lineBof Women's Oxford Ties in blaek
and tan, also Misses and Children's tan shoes, which
we are offering at and below cost in order to clear
out the entire lot before winter.
W. F. McNEILJ
: Next to the Postoffice.
iiiwuiiiiiiiUiUiUiiiiUiiiiUiiiiUiUiiiiUiiiiUi
WWW9  ^w nivtiitiflnfifiwiwfvwi wwwvwvHmmpfiniitiii
3
astonished!
\    ™a_aa«aMa_________________aia_______________________*.-_'^______________»a^__    yfa
There are three things which astonish those W
unacquainted  with  our   stock   ot   UP-TO- 5K
DATE DRY GOODS. JJ
(QUALITY, BEAUTY AND PRICE) |
We Received Today:       f
New French Flannels.
Tailor-Made Suits in Oxford Grey,special price,
 014
The new 56-in. Beaver
Cloth for rainy day
Skirts, per yd $2
Black Venetian Cloth, 58
inohcs wide, for Tailor-
Made Suits	
Only Six nice Black and
Navy Rainy Day Skirt
at $fi|
CALL AND  SEE  THEM
MgARTHUR & HARPER
105 Columbia Avenue.
ti
ti
ti
ti
ti
ti
ti
ti
ti
Rossland Hotel ■&«•
Finest Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
0.M.F0X&C0
Teas and Coffees.
Crockery and Glassware
HEADQUARTERS
SALOON.
. Cor. Washington St. and First Ave.
WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE
Good Cigars and Case
Goods a Specialty:::::::
C. 0. TALBERT
Wall Papar and Palnta.
See Daniels and Chambers for   the
atest designs  in  wall   paper  and the
best quality of paints.   Phone V. & N
182. tf,
A drifting rage REPLY TO MR. FRECHEVILLE
Contest   Called   Off   for
Want of Wind.
SHAMROCK HAD A GOOD LEAD
Next Race Will Be on Jhursday—
Time of Start and at First
Turning Buoy.
The race today was called off
after nearly three hours had
elapsed, there being no possible
chance of either boats covering the
course within the time limit of five
hours.
At the lime of the start there
was hardly enough wind to fill out
the sails of the racers, and all
morning the wind was very light
and shifting continually.
The official time at the start was
given as follows:
Shamrock .11.00.22
Columbia 11.00.10
The American thus having obtained the windward berth and
twelve seconds start.
The course, was a triangular one,
starting and ending at the Sandy
Hook lightship, each leg of the
triangle is ten miles, and the first
turning buoy of the course was not
cleared until nineteen minutes of
three when the Shamrock managed
to start off on the second leg at
2.41.36. The Columbia turned at
2.47.44, or three minutes and
twenty seconds] behind corrected
time. ,
When the race was called off
shortly after three o'clock the Clo-
umbia had gained somewhat on
her rival, and both boats were
heading for the second mark about
one-half of the course having been
covered.
The next race will take place on
Thursday over a similar course to
that sailed today.
LONDON IS
LIFELESS
Depression Caused by the
War Paralyzes Intellectual Activity.
London, Eng., October 1.—
There are few subjects under
discussion in the press. The
changes are still being rung' upon
the competition in the steel trade
and the centralizing movement in
the copper and tobacco industries.
Arthur Chamberlain has introduced new liconsing proposals at Birmingham, which are exciting serious discussion among radical temperance men.
There is little life in public
controversies, even the extremists
of the church congress, meeting
next week at Brighton, seem to
have proclaimed a hollow truce,
and Mr. Morley, Sir Henry Camp-
bell-Bannerman, Mr. Asquith, and
Sir Edward Grey, in their approaching campaign in Scotland,
are likely to only fight over again
the faction feuds of distracted Liberalism. The depression caused
by a wearisome war seems to paralyze all intellectual activity.
Letter From the Miners Union to
the Le Roi Director.
GORRECT VERSION OFTHE SITUATION
The Eight-Hour Law and the Rate of Wages-Provincial Taxes-All Other Mines Pay the Scale-
Conference in 1900-Other Points Noted.
Don't think that you are going
to get the worst of it just because
we are offering our photos at such
reduced priced'. We guarantee
them better than you can get anywhere else in tbe Kootenays, or
money refunded.   Carpenter & Co.
Concerning the strike situation
a statement said to have the approval of Mr. Frecheville appeared
in the Rossland Miner this morning and in this issue of the World,
appears the reply of the union
men, which was handed to Mr.
Frecheville this afternoon.
Rossland, B. C. Sept. 30,1901.
R. J. Frecheville, Esq..
Rossland   Great   Western  Mines,
Ltd., Rossland, B. C.
Dear Sir:
We wish to acknowledge receipt
of your communication of this date
and the copy of your resume of the
situation here Which you kindly
forwarded to us. After carefully
considering all the points in detail
presented in the document, we
cannot but believe that the decision of your directors to make no
concessions to our request was
brought about through a mistaken impression of the situation
in   Rossland.
We wish to submit for your consideration the points in which we
believe the directors have received
a mistaken impression. We have
enumerated in each section what
we believe to be a more correct
version of the situation.
T.
At the time of the enforcement
of the eight hour law by the Province of British Columbia the miners were not working on a ten hour
basis. The system prevailing in
British Columbia and the adjoining states of the United States
was as follow: Ten hours constituted a days work on the day
shift except on Saturday when
nine hours constituted a days work.
Nine hours was a days work on
the night shift except Saturday
night. On Saturday night
eight hours was a shift, the
two crews working alternately two
weeks day shift and two week night
shift.
A careful calculation will show
the average hours per week per
man to have been sixty five and
one half hours for each seven days,
or slightly over nine hours per
day. However' there was a large
proportion then working eight
hours, it being the rule that in all
shafts and other places where from
bad air or water, the condition,
were unusually uncomfortable for
the miners, eight hours constituted
a dayB work. The proportion wai-
at least 10 per cent of the underground employes who were working eight hours before passage
of the eight hour law. These
would lower the average days
work of the whole mine to a very
slight fraction over nine hours per
day.
Also before the eight hour system was adopted, it was customary
for the men to go underground and
come to the surface on the time of
the company, that is their time
was in force from the time they
left the surface until they came to
the surface, having completed their
shift under the present system in
Rossland, the eight hours now
worked includes only time actually
employed in the mine. Where
formerly a man left the surface at
7 a. m. he now leaves the surface
in time to be at his place of work
at 7 a. m., which still further lowers the loss of time to the company
by enforcement of eight hour law.
We believe a careful computation
of this loss of time will demonstrate
it to be not two hours per day, but
the average reduction by the enforcement of the eight hour law
was about three-fourths of a hour
for each shift.
II.
The tax on output of mines was
increased on all mines of British
Columbia, and in no camp except
Rossland has it been used as an
argument for reduction of wages.
Ill, IV, V.
Are answered by the answer to
section one, there was no straight
ten hour system in the Rossland
mines at any time.
VII, VIII.
There was n»«ontract system in
Rossland at this time, but a few
isolated contracts were worked, but
by mutual consent of the union
and the eompanies, the straight
wage system was adopted.
IX, X, XI, XII.
There has never been any strike
ordered by the Rossland Miners
till the one in force at the present.
In February, 1900, the mines were
partially closed down, and the
managers of the principal companies announced tbey would be
only operated under the contract
system. On hearing the representations of the officials of the
Dominion and Provincial government, and having the written declarations of the mine managers
that the contract system would not
be used to lower the wago scale
and that the prices for contracts
would be such that miners could
make the regular scale of wages or
better, and on their representations
the Miners' Union accepted the
system proposed and the mines
were opened.
XVI.
(a) In our demands in regard
to muckers wages we only ask the
scale of wages paid in all mining
.amps of this section and in some
mines in the Rossland camp.
(c) Says that the hours for
blacksmiths bo reduced one hour
per day, reading as though it
included all blacksmiths whereas
it includes only one half the blacksmiths, those employed on the day
shift.
(d) This demand is only for
a continuance of a privilege which
had always been in force at this
camp till February Hth, 1901,
and had been promised to be continued by the managers at the
time of the adoption of the contract system. It is in no sense a
demand for free access to the companies property but only to such
parts whero the men congregate
while off duty and in no way
could be considered to mean a
right to go under ground or in the
offices of any place about the
works where it could interfere with
any of the work about the mine.
(e) We have never insisted in
any demands that the Smeltermen's union at Northport should
interfere with the companies right
to discharge employes for any reason whatever, except when discharged for being a member of the
union.
XVII.
Reads that the union ordered a
strike without submitting the demands to the manager. We bed
in April, 1901, asked both the managers of the principal minea in
Rossland to meet a committee
from the Miners union to discuss
some way in which tbe condition!
could be adjusted. The managers
ignored our request to be allowed
to present our grivances and we
were compelled to order the strike
with out a conference by whioh
the gritviin.es might have been
adjusted.
XIX.
In regard to accessibility, climate, etc, these factors are as potent or more potent in favor of the
mining companies than to the
men, especially' as mining companies in isolated regions and
whioh operations are hindered by
severity of climate and lack of water, fuel, transportation, etc. all
pay the scale of wages asked by
the miners of Rossland.
Also the managers have stated
that there has been a long contemplated plan to reduce wages in
Rossland, which is evidenced by
the scale of wages submitted, in
which wages of one-half of the tim-
bermen in the mines are reduced
from $3.50 to $3.00 per day.
In conclusion we would state
that we believe a careful consideration of the attached explanation
and "-", ^mic;>blp desire by both
parties to come to some understanding, would lead to some
measures by which affairs could be
adjusted on a permanent and satisfactory basis to both parties.
Executive Committee,
Rossland Miners' Union No. 38,
W. F. M.
F. E. Woodside, Secretary.
Forty-pound boxes of pears $1.60
per box at Paulson Bros. tf.
BOTHA MADE
AN ATTACK
British Lost one   Officer
and Eleven Hen Besides
Many Wounded.
Durban, Natal, Oct. 1.—A foroe
of 115 Boers commanded by general Botha made an attack which
lastou all «...;■ long, on Sept 2Gtii,
on Portitala, oil 'be border of Zululand. The burgers were repulsed but at a very heavy coat to the
garrison, whose losses were 1 officer and 11 men killed, and 5 officers and 38 men wounded. In
additin, 63 men are missing, of
number many are believed to have
been killed or wounded. The Boer
commandant, Opperman, and 19
burghers are known to have been
killed.
Hot Weinerwurst .erred with every
glasi of beer at the Albambra.
MORE TR0U LE.
Now   The   rail   Kilter   Textile   Worker.
Will Strike.
Fall River, Mass., Oct. 1—At a
meeting here today of the Textile
counoil, at which every union in
this city was represented, it waa
unanimously agreed to order a
strike if the manufacturers refused
to grant the five per cent increase
in wages demanded recently. THE EVENING WORLD, ROSSLAND, 8. C, OCTOBER t, 1901
The Evening World
By.the World Publishing Company.
rabllsheddallyln Miners' Union hall, Rossland, ln the Interest of organised labor ln British
OdassabU.
Entered at the Rowland, B. C. postoffice for
transmission through the mails, May I, igol, sa
second class reading matter.
SUBSCRIPTION RATBS-Fift. cents per
■sonth or J^oo year, invariable in advance, Advertising   ratns made known on application.
Addreas   all   communications   to   James H.
Fletcher, Manager, P. O. box 55», Rossland, B. C
MUZZLE THE MINER.
Down at Colville yesterday with
a view subsequently of arriving
at a settlement of the difficulties
in the Northport smelter a sawoff
was arranged between Attorney
Murphy of Denver, representing
the smelter unionmen, and the
lawyer for the Le R/>i company.
The union, it will be remembered,
had half a dozen cases against
Kadish, Lamb, and other employes
of the Le Roi company, for openly
carrying fire arms and for other
gross violations of the law. The
smelter company also had some
alleged charges against the union
men based on the allegations made
in the injunction proceedings.
All these cases .came up for trial
yesterday and by mutual consent
each side withdrew its charges and
refused to prosecute.
Commenting on the position taken the Spokesman yesterday said:
"Underlying the dismissal of the
several defendants presumably
there is a settlement of the labor
difficulties and the announcement
of results will no doubt come forth
as soon as it is know that all parties have kept faith in all matters
of settlement of the criminal
cases."
In order to help on a settlement
at the smelter Mr. Bernard Macdonald's private property, the
Rossland Daily Miner says this
morning with reference to the joint
withdrawl of the cases.
"This is a striking commentary
on all the wild talk that has been
indulged in as to the law-breaking
tendencies of the new smelter
staff." ThiB is one way of bringing about an understanding between the contending parties and
it in line with all the efforts for
peace and prosperity put forward
by the Miner since the trouble began. If Mr. Frecheville hopes to
get a satisfactory settlement before
he leaves the camp he should muzzle the Miner forthwith or that
charming publication will unquestionable prolong the dispute and
prevent the possibility of any adjustment.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
The revenue of Canada has increased in thenty years from $29,-
000,000 to $51,000,000, the imports
from $103,300,000 to $189,600,000,
the exports from $89,200,000 to
$191,800,000, the railway mileage
from 7000 to 17,000, the railway
earnings from $27,000,000 to $70,-
000.000, the assets of the chartered
banks from $198,000,000 to $440,-
000,000.
The successful prosecution of
Geiser, the American contractor, by
the miners' union, shows that the
alien labor law is not a dead letter
if the men concerned care to enforce
it. That does not alter the fact
that the government should prosecute such cases. It should be left
to no individual or corporation to
enforce the law of the land. That
is one of the first duties of government.—Kootenay Mail.
It is reported from Ottawa that
Mr. Ralph Smith, M. P., may be
made minister of labor. If it is
intended to maintain a portfolio of
labor, we do not know any one
who could bring to bear upon the
discharge of its duties a better
spirit and a wider knowledge of
the subject than Mr. Smith, and
the Colonist will very heartily con
gratulate him if   such   promotion
comes his way.—Colonist.
If two parties have a dispute
about property, the courts arbitrate the matter and the partieB to
the affair must abide by the decision, whether they like it or not;
but when a great corporation on
the one hand and workers on the
other have a dispute the fogies Bay
that the courts have no jurisdiction to adjust the matter, but
should stand'to one side and see
fair play only and let them fight it
out, if it turns the country into
insurrection and possibly civil
warl Compulsory arbitration is
all right where property is con-
concerned—that's different! Men
are not worthy the attention of a
court. They are only playthings
for the rich private owners.—
Lardeau Eagle.
Excursion   Bates to   New   Westminster.
For Provincial Exhibition to
New Westminster, B. C, October
1st to 4th, the Canadian Pacific
railway will issue round trip tickets
from Revelstoke at $12.30.
TicketB on sale Sept. 29.th, 30th,
Oct. 1st, and 2nd, good for return
till Oct. 7th. tf
All our fancy biscuits to be closed
out at 15c per pound. Paulson
BroB.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is herebv given that 6o days
after date I shall apply to the Chief
Commissionet of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase 640 acres of land,
more or less, in the Yale district, and
descrihed as follows: Commencing at a
poet ahout one-quarter of a mile northerly from Iron creek, tbenee westerly
80 chains, thence northerly 80 chains,
thence easterly 80 chains, thence southerly 80 chains to point of commencement
C. A. COFFIN.
Witness:   A. Q. Crkelmah.
Rossland,- B. C, 9th September, A. D.
iqoi, 9-9-2m
Le Roi
LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLES
John F. Linear?, Prop.
Washington St., Op. Hoffman House
Best Turnouts-Only Cab in City
Phone—V. & N. 39, Columbia 38.
Postoffice Box 136.
Richard Altman
GENERAL REPAIRING.
Locks, Guns and Sewing Machines
Sharpening of every description
Guns and 22 short   and long cartridges for sale.
Washington street, opposite Hotel Allan
Alhambra Hotel
$1 a day and up.
Free Lunch from 11 a.m.to 2 p.m.
DIM. OP FA UK:
Hot Roast Beef,   Mashed Potatoes
Pork and Beans,      Clam Chowder
Hot Clam Chowder served day or night
BEER 5c A GLASS.
V.&N. Tel.
III. P.O. box
B.a. Oflice	
snd Yards-
Third Ave-
nu-nndWnsli
Ington street
Op. Red Mt.
Depot	
PORTO RICO
LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
Rough and Dressed
Lumber.Shingles,
Mouldings and A-l
White Pine Lumber Always in Stoek
Mill st Porto Rico sidinif, Yards at
Rossland aud Nelson, Head office at Nelson, B. C, We carry a complete stock or
Coast Mooring, Ceiling, Inside Finish,
Turned Work, Baahrs nnd imoi.. Special
order work will receive prompt attention
LOOK HERE!
Your credit is good for New
and Second-Hand Goods on
THE INSTALLMENT PLAN
—AT—
Glazan's
Furniture Store
Bedroom Sets from $12 to $16,
Yum Yum Springs, $2.65.
Woven Wire Springs, $1.75.
Sport Springs, copper wire, $8:00.
Wove Toy Mattress, $2.50.
Satin top all wove mattressen.
Jumbo Mattresses, tufted, double-top,
all wove,
One Spring and Mattress from $1,00
to $2.00.
New Beds $2.00..
Kockinn Chairs from jtl.00 to $3.00.
Dinner Pails 25c.
Granite Fails 50c.
Candlesticks, plain, 26. ; Improved
Ideal, 50c; Montana, 50c; Solid Steel,
60c to 75c.
These prices will last only 30 days.
..ROSSLAND..
CONFECTIONERY STORE
Next to the Grand Union hotel,
receives consignments of Cut
Flowers every day. For the
choicest of hot house blossoms
call and see them. Orders for
Tedding", banquets, etc., a
specialty.   Charges reasonable.
BATH  &   FOX.   Proprietors.
The GRAND UNION  HO
TEL it is easily seen,
Is splendidly run by Proprietor Green;
Buy one glass of beer and a
free lunch you'll get,
Such  as   sometimes   you've
heard of but not often met.
Neat   and   clean    furnished
rooms can always be had
At such low prices as 'will make
the workingman _{lad.
21 Col. Ave,
Geo. H. Green, Prop
The Shortest, Quickest
and Best.
-TO-
St. Paul, Minneapolis,
Chicago, Toronto,
Montreal, New York,
and all Eastern points.
Seattle, Tacoma,
Vancouver, Victoria,
and all Pacific Coast points.
EAST BOUND.
Leave Spokane 9:16 a. m
WEST HOUND.
Leave Spokane ..7:15 a.m. and 8:00 p.m
All connections made in Union depot
For full particulars, folders, etc.,
call on or address
H. BRANDT, G.P.T.A..
701 W. Riverside, Spokane
H. P. Brown, Agent,
Ros.land, li. C.
Canadian o
Pacific Hy.
DIRECT  ROUTE.
EAST WEST
TORONTO VANCOUVER
BUFFALO VICTORIA
OTTAWA SEATTLE
MONTREAL PORTLAND
ItEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO
IMPERIAL LIMITED
100 HOURS
VANCOUVER TO MONTREAL
Steamship service"from Vancouver, Skagway, Hawaii, ^Australia,
China and Japan.
For Fursther Particulars apply to
A. C. McArthur, Depot Agt.
A. B. MACKENZIE, City Agt
Rossland, B. C.
J. 8. CARTER, D. P. A.
Nelson, B. O.
E.|J.;Coyle A G. P. A
Vancover. B. C»
TAKE YOUR MEALS
IN A COOL PLACE.
THE
Hoffman House
Is the Spot.   Everything First-
Class and Quick Service
at the
HOFFMAN HOUSE.
Spokane Falls & Northern
NELSON & FT. SHEPPARD RY.
Red Mountain Ry,
The only all-rail route between all points eaat
west and south to Rossland, Nelson, and all intermediate points, connecting at Spokane with
Ihe Great Northern, Norihe. ia Pacific and O. R.
&N. Co.
Connects at Rossland with the Canadian Pacific Ry. for Boundaty Creek points.
Connects at Mevers Palls with stage dally for
Republic.
Itufl-t service 011 trains between Spokane and
Northport.
EFFECTIVE MAY 5
Leave. Arrive.
9:00 a. m.        Spokane 7:3; p. m.
12:25 a.m.       Rossland.        4:10 p.m.
9:15 a. m. Nelson. 7:15 p. m.
H. A. JACKSON,
General Passenger Agt,
Spokane, Wash.
H. P. BROWN,
Agent, Roaaland, B. C
*********** *******♦♦♦♦»*.
LOOK HERE1
Talk  about getting  a  Good
Meal, just try one at tne
St. Charles Hotel
Everything comfortable at the
St. Charles. Good music in the
evening free. Good Wine,whisky
and Cigars for money	
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4♦♦♦♦♦»
NOTICE!
TO any customers who patronized ub
all the time while they have been
at work, and especially to those with
families, we beg to announce that we will
trust them to all the gootjB they may w/ '"'
need during the strike and will wait for tho pay
until they start to work again and ho able to
pay. To those who need other stuff, such as
Groceries, etc., which we do not carry, and cannot got credit elsewhere, wc will give them orders, on which they can get all tlioy want on
our account until the trouble is all Bettled.
This'is a bona fide offer, which fact can be readily proven when_ occasion makes it necessary.
THE PEOPLES' STORE
CLIFTON  CORNER.
B. BANNETT,
P. BURNS & CO.
WHOLESALE   MARKETS
Rossland, Nelson, Trail,Sandon,Revelstoke,Green-
wood, Grand Forks and Vancouver.
RETAIL MARKETS-Rossland, Trail, Nelson, Ymir, Kaslo
Sandon, New Denver, Silverton, Cascade City, Grand Forks,
Greenwood, Phoenix, Midway, Camp   McKinney,
Revelstoke, Ferguson and Vancouver.
Fish,   Game and  Poultry ln Season, Sausages of All Kinds.
WM. DONALD, Manager Rossland Branch
ALL  KINDS   OF   DRY
WOOD
W. P. LINGLE
Office at City Bakery
Phone  149.
THE:
Real Situation.
V
Rossland, B. C, Sept. 5th, 1901.
To the Citizens and Business Men of Rossland and Vicinity and to the General Public .-
The LeRoi mine manager has been circulating a report that the strike here is practically at an end and the mines are about to resume. This report has been taken up by their
organ, the Morning Miner, and sent out over the country as a true report of thc situation in
Rossland. We have made a careful analysis of the situation here and believe that no impartial reader can see much reason for the joyful enthusiasm which Mr. Bernard Macdonald
and his paper profess to feel.
For three and one-half months the strike has been in force at Northport. The greatest claim Macdonald or Kadish have ever made during that time is that they have been
able to operate two of the five furnaces at the smelter. It is only a question of simple arithmetic to see that if it takes three and one-half months to start two furnaces, it will take
eight and three-fourths months before they can have the smelter in operation. Now, if it
takes eight and three fourths months to raise the 500 men necessary to start the smelter
it will take twice that many, or seventeen and one-half months, to secure 1000 men for the
mines in Rossland. Or, at the end of twenty-six and one-half months, if Macdonald has the
same success he claims to have had thus far at the smelter, he will be in a position to work
the mines.
No one can deny or dispute that Bernard Macdonald has left no stone unturned to
secure men for the smelter at Northport. He has cast his drag net over the stages of Minnesota, Colorado, California, Oregon, Missouri, Montana, or, practically, over the entire
country west of the Mississippi river, and has been able to start but two of the five furnaces
at the Northport smelter. This is the success he boasts. He claims the strike is at an end.
It has only begun.
So far we have taken as true his statements that he has two furnaces in operation at
Northport. We wished to prove how futile are his statements by his own evidence.
The real truth is he has never had two furnaces in successful operation at one time for 24
hours. They have produced no matte for shipment up till August 25. He claims to have
shipped one carload on August 21. That it was the highest in value of any shipment made.
The records of the railroad at Northport fail to show any trace of matte shipments on
or about August 21, If any shipment was made it was via the Columbia river route and
rests at the bottom ot the river. /
He also claims to be able to start the mines in Rossland. Apparently he .does not
realizethere is an alien act in Canada, for of the 30 employes now at the mines all but two
have been brought here in direct violation of this law and will be deported inside of two
weeks. He has in eight weeks been able to secure but two scabs in Canada. Now, if the
Canadian people should, to his surprise, enforce their laws, even if it does hurt the feelings
of Bernard Macdonald, how long will it take to start the mines at the ratio of two every
eight weeks?   And as yet there is not a miner in the lot.      v
We are not deceiving the miners of Rossland by false promises. We hope for an
honorable settlement of the difficulties here. The sooner the better it will suit the union
miners of Rossland. But if it is necessary to continue this fight to its final end the union
miners and smeltermen will stand shoulder to shoulder for carrying on the fight.
This war was forced on these unions. We entered the struggle full of a belief in the
justice of our cause and confident of our ability to carry it successfully to an end. This belief has never been shaken for an instant, and certainly is not when we consider the almost
unbroken line of successes which have thus far attended our efforts.
EXECUTIVE BOARD
ROSSLAND MINERS' UNION No. 38, W. F. M THE EVENING WORLD. ROSSLAND, B. C, OCTOBER i, rgoi
BOSS SKIPPERS
The Men at the Tiller and
the Wheel.
CAPTAINS SYCAMORE AND BARR
Pair Are Well Watched-Barr Was
Born in Scotland—Has Sailed
in Many Races.
Capt. Sycamore, of the Shamrock, known as "Wicked Willie,"
lias the well-earned reputation of
being the most skilful and daring
sea jockey to be found anywhere
in Europe.
He is strongly in favor of abandoning the arrangement which
allows each boat two clear minutes
in which to get started. He thinks
the flying start, now almost universal in yacht racing, is preferable.
He thinks it preferable because
he knows his prowess as a sea
jockey. He is full of crafty manoeuvres to jiose his boat first over
the line. He believes his crew to
be smarter than that possessed by
his American rival. He remembers the work done by his sailors
on Shamrock I. at the starts, and
this time he wants his crew to do
a little better. So ho wants a flying start.
Captain Sycamore is a weather-
beaten salt, with bold, rugged face,
eyes set wide apart, denoting great
intelligence, a heavy-set jaw, denoting tenacity, and the broad-
shouldered, big-statured figuro of a
sea captain.
Captain Charles Barr, tho man
who guides the Columbia for the
second time in her contest for the
cup, is an American by adoption.
He was born in Scotland thirty-
five years ago. His reputation as
a racing skipper is the best. He
followed a seafaring life along the
English coast several years. He
sailed many races in American
waters under foreign colors. In
1893 he took charge of the Nava-
hoe and aftf rwards of the Vigilant.
He steered the Columbia when she
held the cup against Shamrock I.
His faith in the yacht is unbounded. "She is the fastest thing that
ever went by sail power," he says.
Captain Barr is an expert on racing rules. He is courageous and
cool-headed, and for hit. quickness
to accept any legitimate advantage in a race is known as the
"jockey of the seas."
HOTEL ARRIVALS.
KOOTENAY.
Henry Roy, city.
Mrs. Ana Jones, Trail.
T. W. Brown, Trail.
% J. Peterson, Trail.
Wm. Munter, Trail.
•Mrs. K. O'Brien, Trail.
Miss It. Rigncy, Trail.
J. McDonald, Trail.
R. B. McCamon, Trail.
W. J. Devitt, Trail.
T. E. Filer, Trail.
G. C. Moyo, Nelson.
Fred Kirkham, Winnipeg.
MrB. 1). D, Skelton, Tacoma.
Carlysle JoneB, Onondaga mine.
D. Davis, Camp McKinney.
Mrs. 1).  Davis antj son, Camp
McKinney.
\V. M>Specler, Onondaga mine.
Miss Kate Madden, Greenwood.
Charles E. Beasley, Nelson, B. C
J. C. Garvin, Spokane.
A. C. Mesker, Midway.
T. B. Lewis, Revelstroke.
E. H. Lewis and wife, Trail.
Mrs. Hanna, Trail!
Mi.s Emma Degagne, Trail.
All sizes of photos at nearly half
regular price. Carpenter & Co,
Fashionable Dressmaking.
 r—
Ladies who desire a perfect fit and
finish in ihe lateet stylus should call at
Mrs. Pippy's Dressmaking Parlors,
Queen St, first house norlh of Coluni
bia avenue.
**********************  ***
STRIKE
NOT SETTLED.
Whereas agents of
the mining companies
have circulated the report that the strike
existing at this place
is settled and work is
to be res-umed at the
mines, we wish to
state that this report
is false and thereis no
probability of a settlement of the strike for
some time to come.
We advise all men
looking for employment to keep away
from Rossland, or
Northport or vicinity.
Executive Board,
Rossland Miners' Union No.
38, W. F. M.
♦♦ ♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦**************
WHAT   HAVE     * —   - - - *~^   —
YOU IN	
FRUITS
la a question asked hy many who have not any fruit
put up for winter use. We have a nice assortment
of good quality in Crawford Peaches, Plums, Prunes,
as well as other fruits. Tomatoes, ripe and green,
Egg Plant,Green PepperB,Crab Applet) in a day or two
SO If"** CT' O   OTA imD CT Successor to
rKlKmSlZ.   OO/   \mJf\LZ   Empey Bros
a.
r
i
Seals and
Rubber
Stamps
Manufactured to Order on Short
Notioe at the World office,
Labor Union Directory.
Offiiccrs and Meetings.
WESTERN FEDERATION
OF MINERS-Edward Boyce
president,Denver,Colorado;
James Wilkes, vice-president, Nelson, British Columbia; Wm. C. Haywood,
secretary-treasurer, Denver,
Col.; Executive Board,[ohn
C. Williams, Grass Valley,
Cal.; Phillip Bowden,Butte,
Mont,; Thos. B. Sullivan,
Leadville, Col.; John Kelly,
Burke, Idaho; Chas. H.
Moyer, Lead City, S. Dakota; James A. Baker, Slocan
City, B. C.
DISTRICT UNION no. 6,
W. F. M.- Jas. Wilkes, Pres.
Nelson; Rupert Bulmer.vice-
president, Rossland; Alfred
Parr, secretary-treasurer,
Ymir.
MINERS' UNION Mo. %6,
Western Federation of
miners—meets every Wednesday evening at 7.30, p.
m. in Miners' Union Hall.,
Frank Woodside, Secretary
Rupert Bulmer,  President.
NEW DENVER MINEPS
Union No. 07, W. F. M.
Meets every Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock in Union
hall. T. J. Lloyd, Pres., H.
J. Byrnes, Sec.
PHOENIX MINERS UN-
ion No. 8, W. F. M. Meets
every Saturday evening at
7:30 o'clock in Miners' hall.
James W. Barry, Pres., Jno.
Riordan, Sec.
YMIR MINERS UNION
No. 85, W. F. M., meets
every Wednesday evening
at 8 o'clock in Miners' Union hall. W. B. Mclsaac,
Pres., Alfred Parr, Sec.
SLOCAN CITY MINERS
Union No. 62, W, F. M.
Meets every Wednesday
evening at 7:30 in Miners' Union hall. James Nixon, Pr<_s.,D. B. O'Neail.Sec.
NELSON MINERS UNION
No. gb, W. F. M. Meets
every Saturday evening at
7:30 o'clock. John McPherson, Pres., James Wilks,Sec.
Visiting brothers cordially
invited.
GREENWOOD MINERS UNION
No. 22, W. P. M.,   meets  every'
Saturday evening in Union hall.
Geo. F.   Dougherty,   Pres.,   M.
Kane, Sec.
TRADES AND LABOR
COUNCIL—Meets every second and fourth Tuesday in
each month at 7.30 P. M, in
Miners' Union Hall. President, W.L.McDonald. Ad
dress all communications to
Secretary-Treasurer, P. O.
box 784.
ROSSLAND FEDERAL
Labor Union No. 19. Meets
every Monday evening at
8:00 in Miners' Union hall.
TH. Reed, Pres., J.V.Ingram, Sec.
TYPOGRAPHICAL      UNION  No. 335,—Meets on the
last Sunday of each month
at the Miners' Union Hall.
J. Barkdoll,    Sec;     Wm.
Poole, Presid
CARPENTERS    &    JOINERS   UNION—meets every
Friday of each week at 7.
30 p. m. in   Miners' Union
Hall. John McLaren, Pres.;
W. R. Baker, Sec,
PAINTERS' UNION, No.
123, painters and decorators
of America.meets inBeatty's
Hall, on second and foprth
Tuesday of each month. R.
C. Arthur, Pres.; W. S.
Murphy, Sec.
JOURNEYMEN TAILORS
Union of America. Meets
first Monday in^each month
in Miners' Union hall. S.
Graham president, L. A.
Fairclough secretary, P. O.
box 314.
NEWSBOYS' UNION, No 3
—meet in Miners' Union
Hall on the first and third
Saturdays of each month,
at 9 a.m. Mike Guydotti,
Pres.
SUBSCRIBE
=FOR THE:
EVENING
WORLD
It is the Official Organ of Organized   Labor  throughout   *
the Kootenays  and  no
home   is   complete
without it.
50 - Cents - 50
PER MONTH
is the price asked, this surely
being within the reach of all.
THOSE  WHO  DO  ADVERTISING
Should not forget that the only way
to reach the People is through
the columns of the
Evening World
JOB  WORK.
Iii this branch of our business we do
everything   from  a visiting card
to a three-sheet poster.
IHM31
WE ALSO MAKE
RUBBER - STAMPS - AND - SEALS
Give Us a Call ____
THE EVENING WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, OCTOBER ., tqbt.
STOCK MARKETS
Minor mention.
Winnipeg in   Great   Demand Today.
THIRTEEN THOUSAND SHARES
The Latest Sales and  Quotations
Here and on the Toronto
Market.
The demand for Winnipeg
around 10c was the feature of the
market this morning, 13,000 shares
changed hands and the market
closed strong at the figure sold.
Rambler-Cariboo sold at 49c,
and in all 19,000 shares of stock
were transferred.
Appended will be found today's quotations and sales here and
in Toronto.
Teday's Toronto Quotations.
Asked Bid
War Eagle       13 —11
CentreStar       46 46.i
IronMask        15 11
Rambler-Cariboo....      63 47
Giant         4
California         h%. 4
Republic         3
Payne        1H% 17
Winnipeg        10 9
Toronto sales today   included:
500 Centre Star at 46c, 1500 Winnipeg at 9_c, 500 Deer Trail at 2gc
Today's Local  Quotations:
Asked      Bid
Abe Lincoln         5
Americen Boy        10
Athabasca % 4 00
BX
B. c. Gold Melds        3
BlgThree         2H
Black Tail 0% 0%
California  6 4
Canadian Gold Pielda        6 4
Cariboo (Camp McKinney)       25 22A
CentreStar       47 43
Crows Nest Pass Coal J80 00   »;_ 00
Deer Trail No. 2        3 2%
Blearing Star (Assess, paid)..
Golden Crown Mines, Urn	
Homestake (Assess, paid)	
Iron Mask (Assess, paid)	
Iro    Colt	
XXI,	
Jumbo	
King (Oro Denoro)	
Knob   Ul	
LonePne	
Monte Christo	
Montreal Gold Fields	
Morning Glory	
Morrison	
Mountain Lion	
Noble Five	
North Star (East Kootenay)	
Novelty	
Old Ironsides	
Payne	
Peoria Mlnea	
Princess Mind	
8iailp , 
ambler-Cariboo	
Republic	
Koealand Bonanza G. M. & 8. Co.
St. Elmo Consolidated	
Sullivan	
Spitzee Gold Minea $
Tamarac (Kenneth) Assess, paid.
Tom Thumb	
Van Anda	
Virginia	
War Bacle Consolidated	
Waterloo	
White Bear	
i
2'A
5
3A
3
>«
3\l
4
1%
37
20
10
SH
35
25
2
a
85
75
15
X
2
■X
as
18
51
48X
3
3
2H
10K
9X
5 00  J
4 5"
5
3
n%
"5_
3
_8
Dr. Reddick and Dr. Sinclair
were in Nelson this morning.
Fifteen men were killed in the
Extension coal mine diaster yesterday.
The Duke and Duchess of York
were given a cordial reception at
Vancouver yesterday.
Walter Wilson left today for
Arizona.
A. H. MaeNeill, K. C, is in
Nelson on legal business.
Thha Lewis investigation waB
continued all this morning and
asternooh before the police magistrate and counsel for the prosecution was just making his presentation of the caBe to the court as
the Would goes to press.
THE ATHABASCA.
Work Will Not Be Returned In the Near
Future—No Control of the Venus.
The Nelson Tribune says: "For
the past few days the rumor has
been persistently circulated that
the deal by which the Athabasca
company was to secure control of
the Venus property has fallen
through. While it has not been
possible to verify the rumor, it has
received some confirmation from
the circumstance that the Athabasca management has decided
upon removing a quanity of stores
from the mine to Nelson. This is
taken to mean that there is no
prospect of the company resuming work either on the Athabasca
or the Venus within the immediate future.
Hot  Roast Beef served with   every
ttlass of beer at the Alhatubra.
EVADING
ALIEN LAW
More Men From Joplin.Mo.,
Brought to Northport—
Later Are Sent Here.
Winnipeg..
Wonderful.,
Hi
IX
9Y4
Today's Sales:
Winnipeg, 500, 500, 9fc, 500'
500, 500,500 10c; 5000, 5000, 10c;
Princess Maud, 5000, ljc; Rambler-
Cariboo, 1000, 49c. Total sales,
19,000.
If you want peaches by the box
or pound, we have lots of them.
Paulson Bros, tf
We  have   lots of  fine   Italian
prunes on hand.   PaulBon Bros, tf
J L. Whitney & Co.
MINING  BROKER8.
B. 0. snd Washington Stocks a specialty
47 Columbia avenue.
E8TABLI8HED 1896
The Reddin-Jackson Co.
i______t»a  __ia.-bu_.ty
STOCK BROKERS
Money Loaned on Real Estate.
Riehard Plewman
Stock   Broker
Bank of Montreal Building
V.&N. Phone ts
ORDE &CO..
Mining Stocks, Real
Estate, Fire Life and
Accident Insurance	
ia* Col. Ave., Opnl blot k. Telephone 61
Northport, Wash., Oct. 1.—A
special train of three Great Northern passenger coaches arrived here
on Saturday afternoon with 99
strike breakers from Joplin, Mo.,
on board. The train, was run directly to the works of the Northport
Smelting and Refining company
and the men were unloaded there
without noteworthy incident. This
makes the third shipment from
Joplin, and with the men brought
in from Leadville, Col., and Keswick, Cal., a total of about 350 men
have been imported by the company since the beginning of the
strike. A great many men have
come in singly and in small
groups not under the charge of the
smelter employment agents. While
there is no way of arriving at the
exact nnmber of these arrivals it
can not be much less than 300, or
a grand total of 650 new men in tho
past ten weeks. As tho Alien
Labor Law makes it unsafe for the
company to send new men directly
through to the mines at Rossland,
they aro put to work in the plant
here and as soon as they got a few
dollars ahead they quit work and
go to Rossland. In this way
the mines are rapidly securing a
force of men, notwithstanding the
unfavorable Alien Labor Law
which the unions haye relied on to
keep contract labor out of British
Columbia.
THE METHOD
TO FOLLOW
New Zealand's   Way   of
Settling Industrial
Disputes.
In industrial disputes in New
Zealand the method is as follows:
First try—By boards of conciliation, both sides fairly represented.
Second try—Failing agreements
by conciliation, the court of arbitration, whose findings are binding
and duly enforced by law.
Since the New Zealand act
became law (August, 1894), 210
cases of disputes have been settled.
A few were withdrawn.
Twenty-four cases settled by
agreement.
One hundred and nine cases
came before the board of conciliation.
Sixty-eight cases came before
court of arbitration.
Conciliation board award accepted in 28 cases out of 109—
remainder sent on to arbitration
court.
Public results—Fair settlements;
industrial peace; no strikeB.
Canada has courts ofconciliation
and has provided facilities for
voluntary arbitration, but New
Zealand crowns the edifice by its
authoritative arbitration court.
It will be observed that in New
Zealand opportunity for reflection
is provided by having all cases
go first through the courts of conciliation; which takes a good deal
off the edge of the charge that in
New Zealand the arbitration act
is an arbitrary act, It comes in—
in the interest of the whole public
—only as the court of last resort;
bnt when necessary, it gets thero
and does itB work well.
Clam Chowder free day and   _i)tht  at
thc AlhambrA.
A NEW LINE
FOR INGRAM
Employing Strike Breakers
at Winnipeg—Trouble
All Over Here,
Carpenter's   photos    speak    for
themselves. Bestcabinetsonly $2.50
NOTICE.
Tenders will be received by tho
undersigned on or before October
18th, 1901, for the following:
One New Parker Shot Gun.
One New Savage Rifle.
One New Camera, manufactured
by the Rochester Optical company.
The above are now at the Customs House.
B. R. McDonald,
Collector of Customs.
Ex-Chief Ingram, formerly of
the Rossland polico force, but who
was discharged by the commissioners last spring, has adopted an
entirely new line of business.
According to the Winnipeg
"Voice," the labor organ of that
city, the ex-chief has been busily
engaged for some weeks trying to
induce strike breakers to come to
Rossland and work the mines here.
The "Voice" says that the ex-chief
had a letter from Bernard Macdonald authorizing him to employ
men and he (the ex-chief)announced
that the strike was all over here
and that there would bo no moro
difficulty. Ingram is expected to
arrive hero this evening.
I'uroliaal.d the Opnl.
Miss Sarah Conway has purchased the Opal lodging house and
will be pleased to accommodate all
in need of lodging. The rooms are
neat and comfortable and moderate
prices trill be charged.
V. & N. Tel.
lit. P.O. box
89a. Oflice	
nnd Yards—
Third Ave
nueandWaah
ington street
Op. Red lit.
Depot ,...
PORTO RICO
LUMBER CO.
X.IMOTED ^^^^^^^
Rough and Dressed
Lumber.Shingles,
Mouldings and A-l
White Pine Lumber Always in Stoek
HIU nt Porto Rico Biding, Verdi at
Rob. land aud Nelson, Head office at Nelson, B. C. We carry a complete stock ot
Coaat flooring, Cellini, Inside Finish.
TurnedWork. Bashe*and Door*. Special
Older Work will iecd*e prompt atteutloaa
Kf\Tl* T>     ROSSLAND LODGE NO 31,
. VJaV   a. t K. ol P., meets every Friday
night at 8 o'clock in Odd Rellow's hall, Queen
street.   Visiting brothers are always welcome.
Harry Martin, C C
Procter Joiner, K. ol R. and S
Fd      T?     FRATERNAL   ORDER   OF
.   VJ.   J__. EAGLES,    Rossland   Aerie,
No, IO, Regular meetings every Thursday even-
ugs, 8 p. m, Eagles Hall, Miners' Union Bldg.
Thos. Fitzmaurice, W. P.
H, Daniel, W. Secretary.'
I/~l f-t ry. Independent Order] ol Good
• \_r.VJT» X . Templars meets every
Thursday Evening in the Lecture Room of the
Baptist church Members of the order visiting
the city will be cordially welcomed.
O. J.B, LANE, W. H. CREITZ,
C. I. Secretary,
In A W Meets ln Odd Fellows Hall
• V /.v/.l • on Queen Street, between
First and Second avenues. Rrgular meetings
each Monday night. Visiting brothers are cordially invited to attend,aud register within 30
days.
W.S. Murphy, Bee, M. B Bridglord, N. G
Rossland Cigar Factory.
Why not patronize a home in-
dntsry? It will assist Union labor
and keep the money at home. Ask
for a Crown Grant or W. B. Cigar
when you bay.
Collis & Co., for fine commercial print
ing]   Coll up'phone 88. tf
For Rent—Three-room furnished house with city water. Apply
to J. L. Whitney & Co.
Get Your Papers
_nd magazines at the Post, ffice New
Stand. A full line of stationery alway
on band. Agency for the Evening
World
!     ..New..     !
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
ehristy Hats
Just Arrived.
J A FEW SWELL BLOCKS       ■
# STRICTLY UP-TO-DATE 0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
ON SALE MONDAY
0
0
0
0
_____________________________________________________________________________       *
| Hunter  Brothers f
0
0
O
T
T
R
N
E
E
Q
C
B
U
s
T
N
O
S
H
J
win CASH,,
—FREE— l
i'
I	
i»|8|T|N|Q|8|H|J|  FREE'
I     Wewill give the above reward toanyperson who will correctly arrnngethef
i I above letters to spell, the names of three Canadian cities. Use each letter but j
once. Try it. We will positively give the money away, and you may bo the J
I fortunate person. Should there be more than 1 Bet 01 correct answers, the I
I in. >noy will be divided equally. For instance Bhould 5 persons send in correct j
answers, each will receive $40; should 10 persons send in correct answers, \
I each will receive $20 ; twenty persons, $10 each. We do this to introduce^
1 lour Arm and goods we handle na quickly as possible.   SEND NO MONEYS
.WITH YOUR ANSWER.   This is a FREE contest.   A poBt card vi
I ' Those who have not received anything from other contests, try tills one.
< 1-%^^^%-EMPIRE SUPPLY CO., ORILLIA, CANADA/
Keep Your
Eye on Meteor
1
METEOR
is the new high-grade mining
camp in the south half of the Col-
ville Reservation, seven miles west of the Columbia river, eight miles southwest of Daisy and 28
miles by good road from Meyers Falls. The town-
site is in the centre of tne rich aggregation of
mines comprising the Meteor, Stray Dog, White
Swan and Given groups, all of whioh are working
in high-grade shipping ore. A great number of
very promising properties are opening up in the
vioinity. It is surrounded by a splendid agricultural, fruit growing and stook raising country,
unequalled in the northwest, and has a splendid
supply of timber for building and mining purposes, together with unlimited water power near
It has already, besides a store, a number of buildings in course of erection, and a telephone service,
saw mill, etc., will be in operation within a short
time. Meteor is a high grade camp of the real
Leadville type, the ores mined being gold, silver,
lead and copper. Pioked assays have given as high
as $140,000 to the ton, the average of the camp
being about $35. You can't afford to forget Meteor.
Now is your time to get in at bed-rook prices.
Meteor is Sure to be a Rich Camp
LO iS $25 to $150
LOTS
fa \WLkWfflmini\\\i@^
&m   n^T^TJlVTQ    One-half cash and the balance in two equal pay-   «fS
55«    X JjJ JAlTXO""ments at three and sixmo nths , without interest   8£g
5§$3   For full particulars call on or address v. figf
G.W. HERRON,
Meteor, Washington.

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