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The Evening World Oct 11, 1901

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 V
Vol. I, No.*?* vC".
*r
ROSSLAND, B. C„
Rtfit
20 Per Gent     j
^^. _. /»<_%£_*.! C?mml*ma^
mm
* Discount eftSH Sale!
at
CM LL Leather Footwear in our largo Block
C>are now Belling at 20 PER CENT DISCOUNT FOR CASH ONLY. This sale is to
make room for our large stock of RUBBER
SHOES which are now on the road.
3
3
ICO. LALONDE
...The,,.    ^
Shoeman. ^
QUICK WORK-
PROMPT DELIVERY.
Red Star Storage & Transfer Co_ *
Moves or Stores Any Old Thing.
Does All Kinds of Team Work.
Sells Seasoned Fir and Tamarac Wood Any Length.
Four Foot $4,60. If you want wood that will hum
or split give us a call at the old stand.     Terms cash.
fo
fo
i\
Phone 8.
W. H. FRY, Manager. T
| DO YOU WANT |
I SHOES at COST? 1
We have some lines of Women's Oxford Ties in black
and tan, also Misses and Children's tan shoes, which
we are offering at and below cost in order to clear
out the entire lot before winter.
3
w. f. mcneill
iJUiUJttl
3
Next to the Postoffice. 3
.ittiUJUiUiiUUiUiUiUiUiUiiimiUR
fo
fo
r9-&9
New
Fall Coats j
..In the Very..    §
Latest Styles
MgARTHUR & HARPER'S I
The Leading Dry Goods Store.
ti
ti
ti
FRIDAY, OCTOBER n, 1901.
Got Five Yean.
O.M.F0X&CO
Teas and Coffees.
Crockery and Glassware
HEADQUARTERS
SALOON.
Cor. Washington St. and First Ave.
WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE
Good Cigars and Case
Goods a Specialty:::::::
C. 0. TALBERT
Wall Papor and Palnta.
Bee Daniels and Chambers for   the
a test designs  in   wall   paper  and the
belt quality ot paints.   Phone V. & N
18*. It
Chatham, Ont., Oct. II.—Harry
Cameron was sentenced to five
years in the Kingston penitentiary
for passing counterfeit money.
(lottlni Hotter
i:-l
Kingston, Ont., Oot.   ll- - ' *■>•
cipal Grant  is  steadily   imp
ing.
A "Bee" Suit.
Hamilton, Oct. 10.—W, B. Brock
of Lynden hag entered an action
against hit neighbor, R. L. Patterson, to restrain the latter from
keeping an unlimited number of
bees, which he declares have made
life for his family and live stock a
misery the pait year.
Hot Boast Beef   served with every
glass ot beer at the Alhambra
NORTHPORT
SMELTER
RALPH SMITH,M.P.
The Dominion Trades and
Labor Congress.
IARGEST EVER HELD IN CANADA
hat Has Been Accomplished—Why
I He Accepted the Presidency-
Canadian Federation.
j
Company Sued by a Scab
Gatherer-Did His
Best.
Spokane, Oct. 11.—8. H. Doyle
says the Northport Smelting and
Refining company engaged him
to hire men to work in theimellcr,
agreed to pay him a reasonable
compensation therefor and then
did not keep the agreement. He
sues for $508.50.
Doyle says' he was engaged as
agent on July 11 last. He was instructed to hire men in St. Paul,
Minneapolis and Duluth and to
ship them to the smelter. He
says the agreement included his
board at hotels, railway fare and
necessary expenses. Doyle figures
his July expenses at $142 and August at $328.50. He only worked
two months. He considers $180
reasonable compensation.
Hot Weinernurst served with every
glass of beer at the Alhambra,
GARMENT
WORKERS
Operatives Win at Boston
Vest Makers to Go
Out.
Boston.Oct. 11.—The backbone of
the garment workers' strike in this
city was apparently broken today,
when 21 contractors adopted the
new bill of prices and filed their
bonds to put it into effect, while 21
others signed and will file their
bonds tomorrow.
This will send 2150 operatives
back to work in the morning. The
state board of arbitration had declined to interfere.
The vest makers employed by
five contractors voted tonight to
strike tomorrow owing to the failure
to secure an advance of two cents
per garment for operatives and
pressmen and one cent for basters.
Ralph Smith, M. P., has just relumed       to      Nanaimo      from
residing over the Dominion Trades
?md Labor congress at Brandford.
Speaking of the results of   the
' :ongress, Mr. Smith said to the
lerald that perhaps the most im-
lortant work was the proposal to
naugurate a Canadian Federation
. >f Labor. A special committee was
ippoinled   to inquire   thoroughly
. nto the feasibility of the proposition and will report it at the next
annual  meeting of the Congress,
%hen no doubt the matter will be
laken   up   enthusiastically,    and
whilst it is   not   intended at the
present time to interfere with the
international  unions   having connections   with the A. P. of L. arrangements will doubtless be made
to make it   advantageous for all
Canadian  unions to be affiliated
Sitli the Canadian Federation as
ell.
A great many other general resolutions were paseed suggesting
legislation for the benefit of the
laboring men of Canada which will
without doubt receive the careful
consideration of parliament at its
next session.
In general it was the largest
Labor Congress ever held in Canada, seventy delegates being present, five of these being from British
Columbia which was more than
double ever sent from the province
before, two from Nelson, one from
Rossland.oue from Phoenix undone
from Nanaimo. Fourteen unions
affiliated with the Congress during
the past year, an increase of nearly
donble the per capita tax of former
years.
Asked abouthis re-election to the
presidency, which was received in
Nanaimo with some surprise aB it
was understood he was not tostand
for the position again, Mr. Smith
explained that he expressed himself at the Congress as greatly in
favor of the selection of a man from
Central Canada, aB he would then
be moro in touch with the general
secretary, which was most important. In spite of this, however, the
Congress was persistent in urging
the position on him, and as it
seemed unanimously satisfactory to
the delegates ho accepted their decision, as he was perfectly willing
to act in any oapacity in the interests of labor.
RARE STAMPS.
111(1. Price Paid For Old Bit. of SUmp-
•d Paper.
London, Oct. 11,—At a sale of
rare postage stamps here a Canadian 12-penny black, issued in
1851, sold for £61, a new Brunswick shilling mauve, for £36, a
Nova Scotia shilling, purple, for
JE36, and a Newfoundland two-
peny, scarlet, for £49.
ROSSLAND
LIBERALS
The Alien Labor Act Wi 1
Come Up on Tuesday-
Other Business.
The RoBsland Liberal association
held its annual meeting laBt evening and elected ils officers for the
year. Important resolutions iu
favor of conducting the provincial
campaign on strictly party lines
and on the immediate necessity
of holding a provincial convention
were also carried.
The position of the party in
Rossland at the present time and
the alien labor act and its enforcement by the government now occupied the attention of the meeting to a great extent.
It ih said, that the position of the
association on tho enforcement of
the law in question would be finally decided at a special meeting lo
be held on Tuesday evening next
when a warm debate may be expected.
The following officers were elected.
Rt. Hon. Sir Wilfrid Laurier,
honorary president.
W. A. Galliher, Hon. vice-preBi-
dent.
J. A, Macdonald, president.
R. W. Grigor,|first vice-president.
A. H. Dutton, second vice president.
J. H. Young, third vice-president.
Thomas Parker, secretary-treasurer.
Executive committee—W. Hart-
McHarg, D. N. McTavish, Dr.
Kerr, W.J. Whiteside, Dr. Kenning, C. O. Lalonde, Dr. Sinclair
and J. M. Martin.
CLARKE WALLACE
Tribute to the Late Member at Vancouver.
AN ORANGE DEMONSTRATION
The Funeral at Woodbridge—Special
Service at Vancouver on Next
Sunday.
Toronto, Oct. 11.—The funeral
of the Hon. Clarke Wallace takes
place at Woodbridge at 2 oclock
Saturday afternoon. It will be
entirely under the direction of the
Orange Grand Lodge of Ontario.
It is expected that it will be .the
largest ever seen in Canada, and
will be attended by friends and
representatives of the order from
all parts of the Dominion. The
executive of the grand lodge of
Ontario west has ordered all grand
county and district lodge officers
to appear in official regalia and
that all other brethern wear mourning.
Vancouver, Oct. 11.—On receipt
of news of the death of N. Clarke
Wallace,the executive for the grand
lodge for British Columbia of the
L. O. L., met and decided to hold
a memorial service at the city hall
on Sunday afternoon. A handsome floral tribute from the grand
lodge will be placed on the casket.      	
THE COTTON
STRIKERS
Hinges  on   Majority   or
Unanimous Vote in Ordering Strike.
Fall River, Mass., Oct. 11.—The
question as to whether or not there
will be a strike in the cotton mills
in this city on account of the refusal of manufacturers to grant a
five per cent increase in wages,
was re-opened tonight. A misunderstanding in regard to tho unanimous or majority vote existing
among the unions was the reason
assigned by the textile council for
postponing the strike for two weeks
from last Monday.
The spinners tonight voted that
their delegate to the council shall
insist that only a unanimous vote
shall bring about a strike.
Price Five Cents..
* ——T*
POOR MISS STONE
«■.. •
Great Anxiety as to the
Lady's Fate.
A FORMER TRAGEDY RECALLED
How the Brigands Killed Four Cap-
'.   tives in 70 When Pursued    !.
by Troops.
London, Oct. 11.—Withr	
to the announcement tbat Turkish
and Bulgarian troops are surround1-
ing the abductors of Miss Stone
the Globe says it considers that
unless the movement is suspended
until she is safe out of the bands
of the brigands it will infallibly
end in a repetition of the tragedy
of Greece during the year 1870,
when Lord Muncaster and a party
were captured.
Lord Muncaster was released in
order to negotiate for a ransom o!
£25,000. Then, as now, an attempt was made to surround the
brigands, with the result that four
gentlemen of the party were
murdered.
Lord and Lady Muncaster and a
party of English travelers were
seized by Greek brigands April
11th, 1870, at Oropas, near Marathon. Lord Muncaster and the
ladiee of the party were sent to
treat for the £25,000 demanded as
ransom, with a free pardon for the
brigands. The latter were surrounded by titoops and in retreating, April 21st,' killed M*: Vyner,"
Mr. Lloyd, Mr. Herbert, and Count
Deboyl.
The incident caused great excitement, especially as influential
persons were charged with con-
nix ii nee at brigandage. Several of
the- brigands were killed and aeven
were captured, tried and condemned May .23rd, of the same year.
On June 20th, 1870, five of the
brigands were executed.
Clam Chowder free day and   night at
the Alhambra.
FISHERMEN
ON TRIAL
The Marooning Case   at
Vancouver-Hard to
Get a Jury.
Vancouver, Oct. 11.—The Japanese marooning case in which Rogers and Desplain are charged with
being two of apartyof30or40white
liBhermen who kidnapped nine
Japanese fishermen during the
strike on the Fraser river and marooned them on Bowen island, proceeded all day yesterday before Mr.
Justice Druke. An hour was taken
up in impanelling the jury and the
entire list of available jurymen
was gone over twice before this was
done.
Tlie crown feared that if union
men sat on the . jury their well-
known dislike of Japanese as
laborers might prejudice them.
It seemed impossiblle for theorown
to secure any but workingmen on
the jury, however.
During the day the defence did
not attempt to prove that the Jap-
enese were not marooned, but tried
to break down the evidence of the
nine Japanese as to the identity of
the prisoners. All nine Japs
swore positively, that they recognized Rogers and- Desplain as the
men who boBBcd the marooning
party. THE EVENING WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C„ OCTOBER , r, 1901
i
The Evening World
By the World Publishing Company.
published du ily in Miners' Union hall, Roaaland, in the Intercut of organized labor in Britiah
Columbia.
r_ta_ned at the Rosaland, B. C. postoffice for
transmission through the mails, May l.lgoi, aa
iccond clau reading matter.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES-Fllly centa per
Month or Js>oo year, invariable iu advance, Ad-
•ftlalng   ratna made known on  application.
Addreaa 'all communications to Jamea H.
Fletcher, Manager, P. O. box 558, Rossland, B. C
idea of the lot, ia roughly, Judge
McMahon's estimate as given to
to the London jury in the Sifton
murder trial.
Japan is willing to go a great
deal of trouble to prevent the emigration of her people to British
Columbia. Give British Columbia
a free hand, and the dusky islanders will need no large amount of
persuasion to remain at home.
THE EXPERT.
The testimony of expert witnesses in either civil or criminal
proceedings has called forth a great
deal of adverse criticism.
In the Sifton murder case at
London last week the presiding
judge told the jurors in his summing up, that the expert evidence
of some twenty doctors who had
testified during the trial was of no
consequence, and that they could
safely eliminate it altogether in
their consideration of the case.
It is rarely that a judge speaks
•o plainly and, as the jury subsequently disagreed, standing eight
for and four against conviction,
they evidently were not unanimous
in following the judge's, expressed
views.
There is little doubt that the
flat contradiction in the medical
testimony during the trial in
question caused at least four, of the
twelve "good men and true," to
give the accused the benefit of the
doubt created in their minds by the
conflicting views of the doctors and
consequently the whole case will
have to be gone over again at the
next London assizes.
In commenting on the Sifton
trial and expert testimony generally, the Toronto Globe gays editor-
ally.
"The subject, has been much discussed in the United States, both
Among the lawyers and doctors,
and various remedies proposed.
Perhaps the only effectual remedy
will be an amendment of the law
of evidence excluding expert evidence altogether in criminal cases,
except when called upon by the
oourt and paid out of public
funds."
Doctors, of course, are by no
means the only experts who differ
in, and out of the witness box. In
tke Centre Star-Iron Mask suit
here in Rossland, two years ago,
we had the beginning of a fine object lesson showing how easily and
conclusively eminent mining experts could differ on a given state
of facts, the facts being the geological formation of Red mountain.
The experts of only one side were
beard, the case being adjourned
and, finally setled out of court before the Iron Mask experts testified,
but those who followed the case
had at least a fair idea what
would probably be sworn to.
In theory expert witnesses are
supposed to be impartial, and to
be called in to assist the court in
unravelling diffioultquestions. In
practice, however, eaoh side produces ita own experts, whose views
are perfectly well known to the
learned gentlemen of the long
robe beforehand and the true i_-
lue at stake is not unfrevuently
smothered as a result.
Experts are invariably costly
witnesses and the poor litigant is of*
ten at a great disadvantage in not
being able to employ learned gentlemen to support his contention
as againBt a wealthy opponent.
Possibly the suggestion of the
Globe might be made to apply to
civil as well a criminal actions
with good results.
Premier Dunsmuir has given another interview in which he says
he is not tired of politics nor will he
resign. He adds that every one of
his pledges have been carried out
except that of taking Helmoken into the cabinet. Portfolios were
offered to Vancouverites but were
refused for good reasons. Brown
was taken into tbe cabinet as a disinterested supporter of legislation
for tho good of the country, not as
a Martinite.
A London broker, writing at the
close of last month, says the mining market has been depressed tbis
week by the news of renewed
activity of the Boers and by tbe
series of small reverses experienced
by the British. Nobody had expected a general surrender of the
Boers on September 15, but no one
supposed that their forces would
exhibit such practical proofs of
their disinclination to surrender.
The South African section has
quite lost the strong tone it was
beginning to exhibit and operations in the market seem to be
suspended again for a time. Other
sections of the market have been
depressed in sympathy. A very
unexpected fall in copper shares
has also occurred. The fall was
chiefly in Rio Tintos, but Anacondas were also affected. The selling
is mostly from France and the
cause is not very clearly understood here.
LOOK HERE!
Your credit is good for New
and Second-Hand Goods on
THE INSTALLMENT PLAN
—AT—
Glazan's
Furniture Store
Bedroom Sets from $12 to $15,
Yum Ynm Springs, $2.65.
Woven Wire Springs, $1.75.
Sport Springs, copper wire, :f_:00.
Wove Toy Mattress, $2.60.
Satin top all wove mattresses.
Jumbo Mattresses, lulled, double-top,
all wove.
One Spring and Mattress from $1,00
to $2.00.
New Beds $2.00.
Rocking Chairs from .1.1)0 to $3.00.
Dinner Pails 25c.
Granite Pails 60c.
Candle SiickH, plain, 25c; .Improved
Ideal, 50c; Montana, 50c; Solid Steel,
50 c to 75c.
These prices will last only 30 days.
THE.
HOFFMALHOUSE
Best 25c Meal
in town.
Miners Checks Cashed Free
of Charge at All Hours.
HARRY MclNTOSH, Proprietor.
V.&N. Tel.
in. F.O. box
«9i. Office	
and Yards—
ffhlrd Ave-
inicandWaah
ingtou street
Op. Ked lit.
Depot ,...
PORTO RICO
LUMBER CO.
XaX-UI.XTaZ.a-I ^^^^^^^^
Rough and Dressed
Lumber,Shingles,
Mouldings and A-l
White Pine Lumber Always in Stoek
Mill at Porto Rico Biding, Yards at
Rossland and Nelson, Head office ut Nelson, B. C. We carry n complete stock of
Coast Flooring, Ceiling, Inside Finish,
Turned Work, Sashttf and Ijoors. Special
order work will receive prompt attention
Spokane Falls & Northern
NELSON & FT. SHEPPARD RY.
Red Mountain Ry,
The only all-rail route between all points east
weat and aouth to Roaaland, Nelson, and all Intermediate points, connecting at Spokane with
the Great Northern, Northern pacific aud O. K.
&N. Co.
Connects at Ros°land v. '.Hi the Canadian Pacific Ry. for Boundary C   . k points.
Connects at Mcvert P. . . with stage dally tin
Republic.
Bunet service on trains between Spokane and
Northport.
EFFECTIVE MAY ?
Leave. Arrive.
9:00 a. m.       Spokane 7:35 p. ni.
12:25 a, m.       Rossland.        4:10 p. m.
10:10 a; m. Nelson. 6:05 p. m.
H. A. JACKSON,
General Passenger Agt,
Spokane, Wash.
H. P. BROWN,
Airent, Rosaland. B. C
NOTICE!
Fashionable Dressmaking.
Ladies who desire a perf.ct fit and
finish in the latest styles should call at
Mrs. Pippy's Dressmaking Parlors,
Queen St, First house north of Columbia avenue.
Russian influence in Manchuria
is said to be working in opposition
to American interests, particularly
in regard to petroleum. A press
dispatch states that the Russian
administrator at Lalien-VVah has
refused tp permit Americans to
build warehouse, for the storage of
kerosene produced in this country,
his idea being to exclude American
oil irom Manchuria.
*******'■**
St. Charles Hotel
is being renovated from
top to bottom and as soon
as this is accomplished
will be again open to tho
public	
Charles Ehlers, Prop.
trf***********************.1
TO any customers who* patronized us
all the time while they have been
at work, and especially to those with
tamilies, we beg-to announce that we will
trust them to all the goods they may
need during the strikejand will wait for the- payi *
until they start to work again and be ablo to
pay. To those who need other stuff, such as
Groceries, etc., whioh we do not carry, and 'cannot get credit elsewhere, we will give them orders, on which they can get all they want on
pur account until the trouble is all settled.
This is a bona fide offer, which fact can bo readily proven when occasion makes it necessary.
THE PEOPLES' STORE
CLIFTON  CORNER.
B. BANNETT,
ALL  KINDS   OF   DRY
W. F. LINGLE
Office at City Bakery
Phone  149.
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE
EVENING WORLD
50 CENTS PER MONTH.
THE:
A test of American coal is to be
used on the French Cruiser D'Es-
trees, which escorted the Duke and
Duchess of York to Quebec. The
cruiser has filled her bunkers at
at the port of New York, and goes
from there to the French West
Indies. The D'Estrees is a steel-
sheathed cruiser of the third class,
and has a speed of twenty knots.
The Shortest, Quickest
and Best.
Real Situation.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
Tbe Chinese court is returning to
Pekin, They will probably find
that two or three things were mislaid during their absence.
The lawyer, the liar, and the
expert witness, arranged in arithmetical progression as tho layman's
The London correspondent of the
Engineering and Mining Journal
of New York, writing to his paper
under date of Sept. 24 says. I
mentioned a week or two ago that
the new controllers of the Le Roi
company had decided not to elect a
new board of directors until the
general meeting to be held after
the receipt of Mr, R. J. Frecheville's repprt, in the meantime
electiagonly Mr.. Frecheville to
the board. There were thus only
three directors—M<r. Hill, Mr. Andrew and R. J. Frecheville. Mr.
Andrew has found it necessary to
go to America in connection with
his steel business, so that there is
only Mr. Hill left in England. It
has been thought best therefore to
elect another director in the person
of Mr. Charles S. Stafford. The
outside public does not know anything about Mr. Stafford, beyond
the fact that he is a director .of
the Kalgurli Oold Mining company, one of the earliest companies
formed to work in Hannans district. He is also connected in conjunction with Mr. Patrick Comis-
key in operations in British Col-
bia. No doubt his knowledge of
British Columbia conditions will
be of assistance to the board.
St. Paul, Minneapolis,
Chicago, Toronto,
Montreal, New York,
and all Eastern points.
-TO-
Seattle, Tacoma,
Vancouver, Victoria,
and all Pacific Coast points.
EAST HOUND.
Leave Spokane 9:15 a.' tn.
WEST HOUND.
Leave Spokane..7:15 a.m.and 8:00p.m.
All connections made in Union depot
For full particulars, folders, etc.,
null on or address
H. BRANDT, C.P.A..
701 W. Riverside, Spokane
H. P. Brows, Agent,
Rossland, B. C.
CANADIAN
DIRECT  ROUTE,
EAST WEST
Th* Kleolric  Laundry.
We still do business at the same
old stand, and will welcome the
patronage of all union men. Our
work is first-class' 6-t
i
TORONTO
BUFFALO
OTTAWA
MONTREAL
NEW YORK
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA
SEATTLE
PORTLAND
SAN FRANCISCO
IMPERIAL LIMITED ||
100  HOURS
VANCOUVER TO MONTREAL
Steamship service^from Vancouver, Skagway, Hawaii, ^Australia,
China and Japan.
For Fnrsther Particulars apply'to
A. C. McArthur, Depot Agt.
A. B. MACKENZIE, City Agt
Rossland, li. C.
J. S. CARTER, D. P. A.
Nelson, B.C.
E.JJ.JCoyleA' G. P. A
Vancover. B. O
Rossland, B. C, Sept. 5th, iqoi.
To the Citizens and Business Men of Rossland and Vicinity and to the General Public:
The Le Roi mine manager has been circulating a report that the strike here is practically at an end and the mines are about to resume. This report has been taken up by their
organ, the Morning Miner, and sent out over the country as a true report of the situation in
Rossland. We have made a careful analysis of the situation here and believe that no impartial reader can see much reason for the joyful enthusiasm which Mr. Bernard Macdonald
and his paper profess to feel.
For three and one-half months the strike has been in force at Northport. The greatest claim Macdonald or Kadish have ever made during that time is that they have been
able to operate two of the five furnaces at the smelter. It is only a question of simple arithmetic to see that if it takes three and one-half months to start two furnaces, it will take
eight and three-fourths months before they can have the smelter in operation. Now, if it
tabes eight and three fourths months to secure the 500 men necessary to start the smelter
it will take twice that many, or seventeen and one-half months, to secure 1000 men for the
mines in Rossland. Or, at the end of twenty-six and one-half months, if Macdonald has the
same success he claims to have had tilths far at the smelter, he will be in a position to work
the mines.
No one can deny or dispute that Bernard Macdonald has left no stone unturned to
secure men for the smelter at Northport. He has cast his drag net over the states of Minnesota, Colorado, California, Oregon, Missouri, Montana, or, practically, over the entire
country west of the Mississippi river, and has been able to start but two of the five furnaces
at the Northport smelter. This is the success he boasts. He claims the strike is at an end.
It has only begun.
So far we have taken as true his statements that he has two furnaces in operation at
Northport. We wished to prove how futile are his statements by his own evidence.
The real truth is he has never had two furnaces in successful operation at one time for 24
hours. They have produced no matte for shipment up till August 25. He claims to have
shipped one carload on August 21. That it was the highest in value of any shipment made.
The records of the railroad at Northport fail to show any trace of matte shipments on
or about August 21, If any shipment was made it was via the Columbia river route and
rests at the bottom of the river.
He also claims to be able to start the mines in Rossland. Apparently he does not
realize there is an alien act in Canada, for of the 30-eraployes now at the mines all but two
have been brought here in direct violation of this law and will be deported inside of two
weeks. He has in eight weeks been able to secure but two scabs in Canada. Now, if the
Canadian people should, to his surprise, enforce their laws, even if it does hurt the feelings
of Bernard Macdonald, how long will it take to start the mines at the ratio of two every
eight weeks?   And as yet there is not a miner in the lot.
We are not deceiving the miners of Rossland by false promises. We hope for an
honorable settlement of the difficulties here. The sooner the better it will suit the union
miners of Rossland. But if it is necessary to continue this fight to its final end the union
miners and smeltermen will stand shoulder to shoulder for carrying on the fight.
This war was forced on these unions. We entered the struggle full of a belief in the
justice of our cause and confident of our ability to carry it successfully to an end. This belief has never been shaken for an instant, and certainly is not when we consider the almost
unbroken line of successes which have thus far attended our efforts.
EXECUTIVE. BOARD
j ROSSLAND MINERS' UNION No. 38, W. F. M THE EVENING WORLDrf ROSSLAND, B. C, OCTOBER ir, 1901
A LARGE SMELTER
New Concern to Be Built
Near Seattle.
B. C. ORES WILL BE BOUGHT
An   Up-to-Date   and    Economical
Plant-Construction Will Be
Rushed.
HOTEL ARRIVALS.
C. A. Burton, Grand Forks. -
W. S. Burton, Grand Porks.
E. Johnson, Portland, Ore.
G. J. Donovan, Spokane.
J. L. Dealy, Sumpter, Ore,
Miss Croll, Midway.
Mrs. Reney, Spokane.
H. W. G. Jackson, city.
J. G. Billings, Greenwood.
We have a large stock of grapes
(or jelly making; 85c a box. Paulson Bros.
Work on the installation ol one
of the largest smelting plants on
the Pacific coaBt will begin within
tho next two months at Darring
ton. It will cost betweon $126,000
and $200,000. and will be put In hy
the Pacific Smelting Company, a
concern capitalized at 11,000,000.
The plant will have a capacity of
250 tons a day, which will be in-
creas d to 500 tons when it be-,
comes established.
The chief backers of the enterprise are Colorado syndicates,
among whom are Col. fl. T. Bradford, president of the Standard
Smelting Company, of that state,
and V. M. Perkins, attorney for the
Missouri Trust Company. Senator
Reeves, of Minnesota, is also one of
the financial backers.
The plant as planned will be
modern in every detail, and the
concern will have offices in Seat-
city. It iB intended to make Seattle the money center of the company and all purchasing and sell-
inn will be done there.
The company contemplates constructing its own water power electric plants to run the concentrator.
Modern sampling works, too, will
bo put in. The smelter will be a
hot-blast pyretio and will use fifty
per cent, less coke than -other furnaces. The ores will be burned in
the furnaces and the old method of
heap roasting will not be employed.
Tho sulphur in the ores will be
utilized as fuel. The concern contemplates the construction of a lead
stack when it is required by the
development of the country.
The chief source of the ore for
the smelter will he the Darrington
district, but it is planned to secure
contracts with mines in Alaska,
Eastern Washington, British Columbia and other districts. The
Forrest mine in the Darrington
district has been leased by members of the company, and they have
agreed to furnish the smelter with
about eighty-five per cent, of the
amount which it will handle at
first.
Tin. lllg Four.
Manager Lawler has arranged
with the Red Mountain railway to
at once construct a spur from the
main line to Tunnel No. 2, for
s'lipping purposes.
Richard Altman
GENERAL REPAIRING.
WANTED:
Old Rubber Boots, Shoes,
Brass and Copper.
I.  _
Washington street.oppopite Hotel Allan
*********************  **
STRIKE
HOT SETTLED.
Whereas agents of
the mining companies
have circulated the report that the strike
existing at this place
is settled and work is
to be resumed at the
mines, we wish to
state that this report
is fake and thereis no
probability of a settlement of the strike for
some time to come.
We advise all men
looking for employment to keep away
from Rossland, or
Northport or vicinity.
Executive Board,
Rossland Miners' Union No. X
38, W. F. M. i
** ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*
WHAT   HAVE
YOU IN.
FRUITS
Is a question asked by many who have not any fruit
put up for winter use. We have a nice assortment
of good quality in Crawford Peaches, Plums, Prunes,
as well as other fruits. Tomatoes, ripe and green,
Egg I'lant,Green Peppers,Crab Apples in a day or two
S RICE'S STORE
I
Successor to
Empey Bros
•«ft«****M***«4«6*«***$*«
S
s
%
%
-nttmajm.
Seals and
Rubber
Stamps
Manufactured to Older on Short
Notioe at the World office,
V.
Labor Union Directory.
Offiicers and Meetings.
WESTERN FEDERATION
OF MINERS-Edward Boyce
president,Denver,Colorado;
James Wilkes, vice-president, Nelson. British Columbia; Wm. C. Haywood,
secretary-treasurer, Denver,
Col.; Executive Board,[ohn
C. Williams, Grass Valley,
Cal.; Phillip Bowden,Biltte,
Mont,; Thos. B. Sullivan,
Leadville, Col.; John Kelly,
Burke, Idaho; Chas. H.
Moyer, Lead City, S. Dakota; James A. Baker, Slocan
City, B. C.
DISTRICT UNION no. 6,
W. F. M.- Jas. Wilkes, Pres.
Nelson; Rupert Bulmer ,vice-
presidentk Rossland; Alfred
Parr, secretary-treasurer,
Ymir.
MINERS' UNION Mo. <6,
Western Federation of
miners—me.ets every Wed
nesday evening at 7.30, p.
m. in Miners' Union Hall.,
Frank Woodside, Secretary
Rupert  Bulmer,  President
NEW DENVER MINEPS
Union No. 07, W. F. M
Meets every Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock in Union
hall. T. J. Lloyd, Pres., H.
J. Byrnes, Sec.
PHOENIX MINERS UN-
ion No. 8, W, F. M. Meets
every Saturday evening at
7:30 o'clock in Miners' hall.
Henry Heidman, Pres., }no.
Riordan, Sec.
YMIR MINERS UNION
No. 85, W. F. M., meets
every Wednesday evening
at 8 o'clock in Miners' Union hall. W. B. Mclsaac,
Pres., Alfred Parr, Sec.
SLOCAN CITY MINERS
Union No. 62, W, F. M.
Meets every Wednesday
evening at 7:30 in Miners' Union'hall. James Nixon, Pres.,D. B. O'Neail.Sec.
NELSON MINERS UNION
No. gb, W. F. M. Meets
every Saturday evening at
7:30 o'clock. John McPherson, Pres., James Wilks.Sec.
Visiting brothers cordially
invited.
GREENWOOD MINERS UNION
No. 22, W. F. M., meets every
Saturday evening in Union hall.
Geo. F. Dougherty, Pres., M.
Kane, Sec.
TRADES AND LABOR
COUNCIL—Meets every second and fourth Tuesday in
each month at 7.30 P. M, in
Miners' Union Hall. President, W.L.McDonald. Ad
dress all communications to
Secretary-Treasurer, P. O.
box 784.
ROSSLAND FEDERAL
Labor Union No. 19. Meets
every Monday evening at
8:00 in Miners' Union hall.
Ti H. Reed, Pres., J.V.Ingram, Sec.
TYPOGRAPHICAL      UNION  No. 33s,—Meets on the
last Sunday of each month
at the Miners' Union Hall.
}t Barkdoll,    Sec;    Wm.
Poole, Presid
CAPPENTERS    &    JOINERS   UNION—meets every
Friday of each week at 7.
30 p. m. in   Miners' Union
Hall. John McLaren, Pres.;
W. R. Baker, Sec,
PAINTERS' UNION, No.
123, painters and decorators
of America,meets in Beatty's
Hall, on second and foprth
Tuesday of each month. R.
C. Arthur, Pres.; W. S.
Murphy, Sec.
JOURNEYMEN TAILORS
Union of America. Meets
first Monday in'each month
in Miners' Union hall. S.
Graham president, L. A.
Fairclough secretary, P. O.
box 314.
NEWSBOYS' UNION, No 3
—meet in Miners' Union
Hall on the first and third
Saturdays of each month,
at 9 a. m. Mike Guydotti,
Pres.
SUBSSRIBE
==POR THEs
iEVENINOrl
WORLD
It is the Official Organ of Organized  Labor  throughout
the Kootenays  and  no
home   is   complete
without it.
50 - Cents - 50
PER MONTH
is the price asked, this surely
being within the reach of all.
wimm
THOSE  WHO DO ADVERTISING
Should not forget that the only way
to reach the People is through ^
the columns of the
Evening World
liig|@l!lgl!!£3i!lgji^
JOB WORK.
In this branch of our business we do
everything   from  a visiting card
to a three-sheet poster.
@l_aiiai!i!i!igiiiiiiig^
WE ALSO MAKE
RUBBER - STAMPS - AND - SEALS
\^,yW*\\lMs\\l\W
Give Us a Call THE EVENING WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, OCTOBER u, iqoi.
!
'. t
STOCK MARKETS
Business Is Dull on the
Stock Exchange.
FORTY-FIVE HUNDRED SHARES
Prices Are All a Little Lower—No
Eastern Quotations—Latest Local Sales and Quotations.
MINOR MENTION.
Centre Star sold here at 43c
this morning, 1000 shares going at
that figure. Winnipeg sold at
9c and Rambler-Cariboo remains
firm around 50c with no sales.
Business on and off theexchange
was very quiet today and there was
little or no change in the stock
list.
Toronto is still celebrating but
the exchange will hold a session
tomorrow morning.
Today's Local   Quotations:
Asked      Bid
Abe Lincoln  S
American Boy _ ■» 9
Athabasca I 4 00
■. C. Gold Pielda  3
Big Three  aK
Black Tall  10). 9%
California  6 4
Canadian Gold Pielda  5   . 3%
Cariboo (Camp McKinney) 7 *>
CeatreBUr  46 40
Crows Nest Pass Coal J80 00   J72 00
Deer Trail No. a  3 2%
Duaulee	
livening Star (Assess, paid)  5
Slant  3). 2a
Golden Crown Mini a, Lira        3H a
Homestake (Assess, paid)  2 A l
Iron Mask (Assess, paid)  16 ntf
ITO   Colt  1
IX L  ao
Jumbo  10
ling (Oro Denoro)	
Knob    Ul	
LonePne  5 3K
Monte Christo  ] l}_
1   Montreal Gold Pielda	
, Morning Glory  itl
Morrlaon    4 i%
Mountain Lion  30 20
HoblePive  10 8)4
North Slar (Enst Kootenay)  33 aj
Novelty  2 a
Old Ironsides  85 73
Payne.  17
PeoriaMinea  X
Princess M Mid  lK
Clip  33 »
mbler-Carlboo  31 49M
Bepubllc  3
Roaaland Bonanza G. M. 8t S. Oo. ]
St. Slmo Consolidated  2%
Sullivan    toy. 9
Bpltzee Gold Mlnea f 5 00  | 4 50
Tamarac (Kenneth) Asaesa. paid.       3 1
Tom Thumb  13K "H
Van Anda         3 iii
Virginia        j i)_
War Eagle Consolidated  13
Waterloo        1 A
White Bear        3 ix
Winnipeg        a% 7*
Wonderful         4 a
Today's Sales:
Centre Star, 1000, 43c; Winnipeg, 2000, 9c; Black Tail, 1500,
rljc.   Total Bales, 4500 shares.
Yesterday was pay day in
Phoenix camp.
Thirteen of Kitchener's scouts
have been captured in a Boer ambush.
The Arlington mine, near Slocan
City, is now the largest shipper in
Slocan district.
Nelson will have an association'
rifle   match    next    week.    Good
prizes are offered.
Smith Curtis, M. P. P., is expected here from the coast tonight
or tomorrow.
Kdward Finch, a former resident
of Rossland and very well known
here, is in town on a short visit.
J. Roderick Robertson of Nelson,
and Walter Aldridge of the Trail
smelter, were on Columbia avenue
this morning.
The I. O. G. T. grand lodge at
Vancouver yesterday passed resolutions favoring the proper enforcement of the liquor laws of the province.
W. H. Simpson & Co., grocers,
are moving from their old stand on
Second avenue to the premises on
the south side of Columbia avenue
west, regently vacated by Linton
Br 38,
According tQ the morning paper
one of tbe Le Roi farmers named
Wells fell in the shaft at the 800-
foot level yesterday, and was injured, but not very seriously.
The Trackman's Advance Advocate for October published at St.
Louis by the Brotherhood of Railway Trackmen of America has
been received,
Vancouver Liberals elected their
officers last night and will meet
again on October 24th, when resolutions favoring Federal party
lines will be introduced and
passed upon.
Kf.Xi* T*     ROSSLAND LODGE I
. \JP   L . K. ol P., meets every ]
Forty-pound boxes of pears $1.50
per box at Paulson Bros. tf.
Got a Decision.
Kansas City, Oct. 11.—George
Qreen of San Francisco got the decision over Tommy Ryan in the
sixth ronnd in a bout at a local
club last night.
Dobell Better,
Quebec, Oct. 11.—Hon. R. R.
Dobell has about recovered from
his illness and is able to be about
again.
NOTICE.
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned on or before October
18th, 1901, for the following:
One New Parker Shot Gun.
One New Savage Rifle.
One New Camera, manufactured
by the Rochester Optical company
The above are now at the Customs House.
B. R. McDonald,
Collector of Customs
J L. Whitney & Co.
MINING   BROKERS.
B. 0. and Washington Stocks • specialty
47 Colombia avenue.
Richard Plewman
Stock   Broker
Bank of.Montreal Building
V.&N. Phone la
ORDE &CO..
Mining Stocks, Real
Estate, Tire Life and
Accident Insurance.....
«60o_. An. Opal block. Telephoned
All our fanoy biscuits to be closed
out at 15o per pound. Paulson
Bros,
The Supreme Court.
The case of Manly vs. Mackintosh, continued from yesterday
occupied the attention of Mr. Justice Walkem almost all today.
The evidence was finished at
the lunch hour today and at 4 p.
m. this afternoon, Mr. Macdonald was just concluding the final
address of counsel to the court.
Keaolutloas of   Condolence.
Phoenix, B. C, Oct. 8th, 1901.
At the regular meeting of the
Phoenix Miners, Union No. 8, held
on Oct. 5th, 1901, the following
resolutions were adopted.
Whereas, on the morning of
Sept. 30th, 1901, it was the will of
Almighty God to remove from our
midst Brother J. W. Wheateley.
Resolved—That by the death of
Brother Wheateley, Phoenix Miners' union has lost an old and
trusted member and his parents
an affectionate son. Be it fur.
ther
Resolved—That we extend to
his parents our heartfelt sympathy
in this their sad bereavement and
great lost,
That our oharter be draped for a
period of thirty days and that a
copy of these resolusions be published in the Miners magazine, the
Evkning Would and Labor Journal, and spread upon the minutes
of our union.
John Riokdan, Sec.
Phoenix Miners' Union No. 8.
Don't forget the prunes.    A few
days more and the price will ad
vance.   Paulson Bros.
NOTICE.
NOTICE li herebv given that 6o days
after date I shsll apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase 640 acres of land,
more or less, in the Yale district, and
described as follows: Commencing at a
post about one-quarter of a mile northerly from Iron creek, thence westerly
80 chains, thenoe northerly 80 chains,
thence easterly 80 chains, thence southerly 80 chains to point of commencement
C. A. COFFIN.
Witness:  A.G.Ckiklmam.
Rowland, B. C, 4th September, A. D.
iqoi. 9-9 2m
The Shortest, Quickest
and Best.
St. Paul, Minneapolis,
Chicago, Toronto,
Montreal, New York,
and all Eastern points.
Seattle, Tacoma,
Vancouver, Victoria,
and all Pacific Coast points.
EAST BOUND.
Leave Spokane si :16 a. m,
WEST BOUND.
Leave Spokane. .7:15 a.m. am. 8:00 p.m,
All connections made in Union depot
NO ai,
 every Friday
night at 8 o'clock In Odd HellOw's hall.  Queen
etreet.   Waiting brothers nre always welcome.
Harry Martin, c. C.
Proctkr Joinkr. K. ol R. and S
IF      f\      TTI     FRATERNAI,   ORDER   OF
* .    V t.    Pa. _• AOI.EB,    Kossluud   Aerie,
No, io, Regular meetings tviry Thursday eveu-
ngs, t p. m, Eagles Hall. Miners'  Union Bldg.
Thos. Fitzmaurice, W. P.
H, Daniel. W. Secretary.
If\ IT* HP Independent Order; ol Good
• t_..VT.X. Templars meets every
Thursday Evening in the Lecture Room or the
Baptist church Members or the order visiting
the city will be cordially welcomed.
O. J. B, I.ANE, W.H. CREITZ,
C. I. Secretary,
If* (\ 1? sleets in Odd Fellows Hnll
.\J.\J.F . on Queen Street, between
First and Second avenues. Regular meetings
each Monday night. Visiting brothers nre cordially invited to attend aud register within 30
days.
W.8, Murphy, Sec, M. B Bridglord, N. G
Rutland Cigar Factory.
For full particulars, (olders, ef. „
call on or address
H. BRANDT, C.P.A.,
701 W. River, id., Spokane
H. P. Brown, Agent,
Rossland, B. C.
Canadians^
^Pacific «y.
DIRECT  ROUTE.
EAST WEST
TORONTO VANCOUVER
BUFFALO VICTORIA
OTTAWA SEATTLE
MONTREAL PORTLAND
NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO
IMPERIAL LIMITED
100 HOURS
VANCOUVER TO MONTREAL
Steamship service from Vancou<-
ver, Skagway, Uuwaii, Australia,
China anil Japan.
For Fursther Particulars npply'to
A. C. McArthur, Depot Agt.
A. B. MACKENZIE, City Agt
Kossland, It. C.
J. S. CARTER, D. P   A.
Nels.n   B.C.
E.J.;Cojle A'G. P. A
Vancover. B. C*
..ROSSLAND..
CONFECTIONERY STORE
Next to the Grand Union hotel,
receives consignments of Cut
Flowers every day. For the
choicest of hot house b!os.oms
call and see them. Orders for
•weddinge, banquets, etc., a
specialty.   Charges reasonable.
BATH  &   FOX.  Proprietors.
Le Roi
LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLES
John F. Unburn, Prop,
Washington St., Op. Hoffman House
Best Turnouts-Only Cab in City
Phone—V. & N. 39, Columbia 38.
Postoffice Box ISO
Alhambra Hotel
$1 a day and up.
Free Lunch from 11 a.m.to 2 p.m.
BILL op fare:
Hot Roast Beef,   Mashed Potatoes
Pork and Beans,      Clam Chowder
Hot Clam Chowder served day or night
BEER 5c A GLASS.
The GRAND UNION HOTEL it is easily seen,
Is splendidly run by Proprietor Green;
,Buy one glass of beer and a
free lunch you'll get,
Such as sometimes you've
heard of but not often met.
Neat and clean furnished
rooms can always be had
At such low prices as will make
the workingman _jlad.
Geo. H< Green Prop,
Why not patronize a home in-
dutsry? It will assist Union lahor
and keep the money at homo. Ask
for a Crown Grant or W. B. Cigai
when you buy.
Collis & Co.,for fine commercial piim
ingfl   Coll up 'phone 88. tf
Fob Rent—Three-room furnished houBe with city water. Apply
to J. L. Whitney & Co.
Gat Your Papers
nnd magazines at the Pcftcffice New
Stand. A full line of statiooeiv alway
on hand. Agency for the Evening
World
00000000****0*000000000000.
I Underwear! I
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0-
0
0
0
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED AND
PLACED IN STOCK OUR NEW
FALL LINE OF MEN'S AND BOYS'
UNDERWEAR
SEE OUR WINDOW
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
* Hunter  Brothers *
P. BURNS & CO.
WHOLESALE   MARKETS
Rossland, Nelson, Trail,Sandon,Revelstoke,Green-
wood, Grand Forks and Vancouver.
RETAIL  MARKETS—Rossland, Trail, Nelson, Ymir, Kaslo
Sandon, New Denver, Silverton, Cascade City, Grand Forks,
Greenwood, Phoenix, Midway, Camp   McKinney,
Revelstoke, Ferguson and Vancouver.
Fish.   Game and  Poultry in Season, Sausages of All Kinds.
WM. DONALD, Manager Rossland Branch
aaCoL An.
Keep Your
Eye on Meteor
!lj^l!IB{l|gj!I!M@|gH
METEOR
is the hew high-grade mining
oamp in the sonth half of the Col-
ville Reservation, seven miles west of the Columbia river, eight miles southwest of Daisy and 28
miles by good road from Meyers Falls. The town-
site is in the centre of tne rich aggregation of
mines comprising the Meteor, Stray Dog, White
Swan and Given groups, all of which are working
in high-grade shipping ore. A great number of
very promising properties are opening up in the
vicinity. It is surrounded by a splendid agricultural, fruit growing and stock raising country,
unequalled in the northwest, and has a splendid
supply of timber for building and mining purposes, together with unlimited water power near
It has already, besides a store, a number of buildings in course of erection, and a telephone service,
saw mill, etc., will be in operation within a short
time. Meteor is a high grade camp of the real
Leadville type, the ores mined being gold, silver,
lead and copper. Picked assays have given as high
as $140,000 to the ton, the average of the oamp
being about $35. You can't afford to forget Meteor.
Now is your time to  get in at bed-rock prices.
Meteor is Sure to be e Rich Camp
LOTS
FROM        ¥   |g%fO
$25 to $150  L*V/ 1 O
m
fill   nm^DIV/rG    One-half cash and the balance in two equal pay-   j^fjjjj
Jj|?|    X JjiiilTXeO""ments at three and sixmo nths, without interest   UxS
For full particulars oall on or address *" M
G. W. HERRON.
Meteor, Washington.
I

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