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The Evening World Sep 25, 1901

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Array <±AuiXccr%
EVENING   WORLD
^jy
Vol. I, No. 12
ROSSLAND, B. C„ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, iqoi.
Price Five Cents.
*3....™™trmw.™^
e ten
r"    *
JlffftE have received
rW a great nssorl-
ment of the well-
known
W. I. DOUGIASS
SHOES
of Brockton, Musb.
You aro invitptl to
como and see the goods
=3
TS
...The...   ^
Shoeman. rs
ICO. LALONDE
fo
fo
fo
fo
QUICK WORK.
PROMPT DELIVERY.
Red Star Storage & Transfer Co.
Moves or Stores Any Old Thing.
Does All Kinds of Team Work.
Rolls Seasoned Fir and Tamarac Wood Any Length.
Four Foot $1.50. If you want wood that will burn
or split give us a call at tho old stand.     Terms cash.
Phone 8.
.S^SS^****^*;**
W. H. FRY, Manager.
fo
fo
fo
fo
fo
fo
lluupui'.Fruiua-.
Miss M. A. Hooper and Mr. Albert Fraser wore quietly married
nt St. Andrew's church this morning by. Rev. J. Millen Robinson.
Messrs. Carpenter and Morrison
acted ub ushers on the occasion
and afler partaking of tho wedding
breakfast at the residence oi the
bride's parents the happy
couple left for their honeymoon
trip to the coast on the 12.25
train.
Tlie bride was charmingly attir-
in a most becoming pearl grey costume and carried a lovely boquet of
white roses.
Mr. and Mrs. Fraser will reside
in Phoenix on thoir return from
the trip.
LINE IS FINISHED
Wire Stretched From Ashcroft to Dawson.
FIRST MESSAGE SENT OVER
Wholly Within Canadian Territory-
British Columbia and the Yukon Joined.
A School Holiday.
The council of public instruction
has declared Monday next Sept.
30th a public holiday in all schools
on the mainland in British Columbia in honor of the visit of the
Duke and Duchess ot York.
^miummium^nfnf^mmmmnrmmmMMnMfiu^
SHOES-SCHOOL-SHOES
3
I    STRONG AND DURABLE    |
1 LOWEST PRICES %
I w. f. mcneill i
i; Next to the Postotliee. __
fiiummnuuiUiiuuaniniiuiiuiniiiiummiiiiuiUMiinu^
PORTO RICO
LUMBER CO. i
YACHT RACE
TOMORROW
Shamrock IJ a Dangerous
Competitor—What Her
Owner Says.
__X_v__T_323
V. ft N.  Trl.
III. r.O. box
_)». OIHcr	
ami Yards—
Thi nl Avi'
niu;nmUV_Kh
i:i;lini Ktrret
ip. K«l Mt.
Depot	
Rough and Dressed
Lumber.Shingles,
Mouldings and A-l
White Pine Lumber Always in Stoek
Mill nt J'orto Rico Sklin(f, Vnids nt
KOMlnnd audNelanu, Bead office KStt;
non, B. 0. Wt carry n complete stock ol
loast FlonriiiK. Ceilinir. Insi.le 1'iiilsli.
TurnedWork. SivslicKnnil Doors, special
order work will receive prompt atleulioti
Alhambra Hotel
$1 a day and up.
Free Lunch from 11 a.m.to 2 p.m.
BILL OF r'AHK.:
Hot Roast Beef,   Mashed Potatoes
Pork and Beans,     Olanj Ohowder
Hot Clam Chowder served day or nig it
BEER 5c A GLASS.
********************** •♦*
STRIKE
NOT SETTLED,    j
Whereas agents  of
the mining companies
have circulated the report  that the   strike
existing at this place
is settled and work is .
to be resumed at the \
mines,   we    wish   to 1
state that this report *
is false and there is no
probability of a settlement of the strike for
some   time  to   come.
We advise   all   men
looking  for   employment  to  keep   away
from     Rossland,    or
Northport or vicinity.
Executive Board,
•
RoSsland Minors' Union  No. |
88, W. B. M. i
I********** *********** *•*
Rossland Hotel-
Spell-
mnu, l'rop
Fineet Wines. Uquora and Cigars.
QJ.FOX&CO
GROCERS
Teas and Coffees.
Crockery and Glassware
HEADQUARTERS
SALOON.
Cor. Washington St. and First Ave.
WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE
Good Cigars and Casts
Goods a Specially:::::::
C. 0. TALBERT
Now York, Sept. 25.—Tbe latest
cup winner io admittedly a dangerous rival—if indeed she does not
lift the cup. George L. Watson,
the designer of Shamrock II in
speaking to tbe Associated Press
correspondent said today:
"Tbe Shamrock II. is about the
limit of this type of racing machine, and in my opinion it is a
very bad type,at that. Both boats
are absolutely alike in type, and
the differences aro those of detail
only. They are racing machines
pure and simple, and beyond tbe
purpose for which they were built,
which is to sail for tho America's
cup, tbey aro of absolutely no value.
No yacbtman of my acquaintance on either sidoof the Atlantic
would bo foolish enough to adopt
a yacht of this type as a cruising
vessel. He could not enter any of
our harbors, and tho immense
draught would be a handicap under all circumstances, Again, a
yacht of this type would bo of no
value as a racing boat on the
other side; our measurement rule
would preclude her winning in any
of the open races. In my opinion,
tbe Shamrock is of value only for
the purpose for which she was
built."
Commenting upon the prospect
of thc challenger winning the cup,
Sir Thomas Lipton is quoted as
saying: "I don't want to talk too
much about the matter before thc
races aro sailed. I do believe,
liowi ver, that we have tho fastest
yacht ever built on either side of
tlie ocean. Sho is perfectly attuned, and hor trials during tho
past two weeks have proved to me
that she is oven better than when
she sailed her preliminary trials
in the Solent and on the Clyde.
Wo expect to win. I have only
ono regret—it is tbat the late
president can not be herc to see the
international contest in whioh, I
believo, he would have been keenly
interested."
Tho initial race on Thursday
next will he watched with the
keenest interest by all yachting-
men the world over.
Vancouver, Sept. 25.—The first
message over the new telegraph
wire to Dawson was put through
yesterday afternoon at 5 o'clock.
This line has been formally declar
ed open for business from 11 o'clock
this morning. The message sent to
day was from Governor Ross of the
Yukon Territory, who is now here
to his legal adviser in Dawson, H.
P. Clements, instructing him regarding important matters.
The line begins at Ashcroft,
thence to Quesnelle the old government line is used. From Quesnelle
to Bennett, the line is in ■ British
Columbia. . Prom Bennett lo
Dawson the line is in Yukon Territory.
A TEMPERANCE MOVF.
Sluill   (lie   Law   on   Sunday    tilotllly be
Kitftirce,).—A Vole lo l,o  Tukoti.
Wall Paper and Palntr.
See  Daniels and  Chambers  'or   tbe
atest design*  In  will   paper   nnl  'he
best quality ol ) aints.   Phone V &  N
182. tf,
If you want poaches by the box
or pound, wc have lots of them.
Paulson Bros, tf
excursion    ltlitr* to    New    Westminster.
For Provincial Exhibition to
New Westminster, B. C, October
1st to 4th, the Canadian Pacific
railway will issue round trip tickets
from Revelstoke at $12.30.
Tickets on sale Sept. 29th, 80th,
Oct. 1st, and 2nd, good for return
till Oct. 7th. tf
Tho temperance people in Rossland have deeidod to petition the
city council to submit thc question
as to whether or not the law respecting the closing of all bars on
Sunday should be enforced, to a
popular vote, at tho municipal
election in January next.
Rev. J. Milieu Robinson and
Rev. A. iM. Sanford together with
Messrs. Creitz, Shaw, Foster, and
Heard are the active members of
tho temperance body engaged in
the move.
Rev. Mr. Robinson thinks that
the absolute closing of the bars on
Sunday would do much toward the
proper observance of that day, and
he is of the opinion that the law
should be strictly enforced.
THEY WANT
MORE MEN
Railways Complain of the
Scarcity of Laborers-
Rapid Progress.
Both the railroads now heading
for Republic are making very good
progress despite a scarcity of men,
says the Republic Miner. From
Curlew to Republic the Great
Northern is making the dirt fly and
before the winter storms sot in all
grading between those points will
be finished with the exception of
tho heavy rock work.
Tho Great Northern grade follows the shore line of the lake
pretty close while the Republic &
Grand Forks line may bo seen high
up along the hill side on the
western side of tho lako.
The Republic & Grand Forks
railway has sub-contracted the en-
tiro line and the sub-contractors
aro bestiring themselves as thoir
agreement call for the completion
of tho work by Dec. 1st. Among
the recent contracts was a half
mile of rock work to J. W. Palmer
in addition to his former contract
for one mile near the Valley mine.
Kiuinii Uoliliniin ll«l_ns_«l.
Chicago, Sept. 25.—Emma Goldman is now a free women. Tbe attorney of this city informed Magistrate I'rindiville tbat the superior
court bad freed the men named as
her co-conspirators, and that there
was no ovidonco againBl her.
Carpenter's   photos    speak    for
themselves. Bestcabinetsonly $2.50
COUNCIL
MEETING
MADE 55 INCHES
Freethy and Bradshaw Distance Rossland Team.
DRILL TONIGHT FOR BIG STAKE
'II Records Again Broken at Spokane-Went Clean Through the
Block -Another Contest.
Two  Weeks'   Work   Disposed of—Accounts
Passed.
Don't think that you are going
to get the worst of it just because
we are offering our photos at such
reduced prices. We guarantee
them better than you can get anywhere else in the Kootenays, or
money refunded.   Carpenter & Co.
Tho absentees at last night's
meeting of the city council were
Aldermen Roll and Hamilton.
The following accounts were
passed and ordered to be paid.
Finance committee, $160.39: fire,
water and IsgfTt, $876.6j); Board of
Works,$205.85; health and relief,
.40.30. Making a total of 688.6]
for the past fortnight.
Chief Guthrie applied for 100
feet of hose for the chemical apparatus and the host: will be supplied.
John Dean asked that the side
walk on Columbia ave west of tbe
new post ollice should be repaired
and the street tidied up. The city
auditor certified lo the correctness
of tbe city books.
Tbe Board of Works will confer
with the rector of St. George's
church over a suggestion of bis that
a portion of Columbia cemetery
should be set. apart for the burial
of members of his congregation.
Thomas Long has boon given
brevet rank in the service.of the
corporation without an increase
of pay.
Spokane, Wash., Sept. 25.—Walter Bradshaw and Joseph Freethy,
the Butte team yesterday smashed
all records in the second day of the
drilling contest.
At 52 inches they broke through
the bottom of the block and taking
a dulled drill ran a new liole three
inches before the fifteen minutes
elapsed.
Their record of 55 inches raised
the record made the day previous
by Ross and McLeod of British
Columbia four inches.
The two teams named above will
compete for a bet of $1000 at 8:30
tonight.
The judges of tho contest were
David O'Neill, Peter Joyce and
Thomas Ryan. Van V. Do Lash-
mutt was timekeeper.
Of the six teams expected for the
contest but five entered. The
team from Sumpter, Ore., was unable to attend. The learns com-
peling yesterday wore the Butte,
Mont., team, composed of James
Freethy, who, with Joseph Davey,
made a record hero five years ago,
Tlnd writer Bradsrinnv and the
Unburn, Idaho, team, composed of
Patterson and Cummings.
POLITICAL
SITUATION
Next   Provincial Election
Will Be on Straight
Party Lines.
Vancouver, Sept.25.—G. M.jMaxwell, M. P., said this morning that
the present political situation indicated certain that tho next provincial election would be run on
party lines. He says, in that
event, he will take a prominent
part in tbe provincial campaign,
but adds that be has no intention
of resigning from the Dominion
bouse.
Ross A Howard are opening a
foundry here this week which is
the largest in the province.
An Oil! -  tan Uoli. .
Hamilton, Sept. 25— "Uncle"
Adam Misenor is dead at Toronto,
aged 83 years. He had lived in
this vicinity for eighty  years.
TWO MORE
LAID OFF
The "Farmers" Going on
Hospital Shift with Great
Regularity.
Unless the farmers now at work
in some of tho Lo Roi mines learn
their work quicker and better than
they are now doing the major portion of the scab outfit will be doing
time in Ihe hospital.
This n omii g about 80'clo'Ck two
of the green bands were put at
work unloading the timber cars
out at the Black Bear compressor
yard, and at the very start the
pair came to violent and utter
grief.
In pulling out the stakes which
held tho load in place they managed in some way to start tho timbers rolling, and both men fell under the logs. Blake wno was ono
of the team was badly hurt about
the logs, while his companion in
trouble, BellWoody was still more
severely injured, being hurl about
the head. Tho second man was
taken first to tho Sisters' hospital
where his wounds were dressed,
and later lo the scab hospital on
the hill which has recently been
opened by the company.
PreildMit'i DHUgtiter In  i.u.-k.
New York, Sept. 25.—A special
to tlie World from Boston says:
"Word reached Boston today that
by lhe will of Nathaniel Hawthorne Cusack, who died in Washington. I). C.,011 August28rd, President Roosevelt's oldest daughter
Alice, who was much liked by
Cusack, is said to receive .100,000
by the will." THE EVENING WORLD. ROSSLAND,  B. C, SEPTEMBER 25, iqoi
The Evening World
By the World Publlshlnif Company
?_bll»h_d d_ lly In Miners' Union hall, Roaaland. In the Interwt of oruanlaed labor ln British
Columbia.
Haitered at the Roaaland, B. C. poatoflice for
tranamisalon through the malla, May 1,1901. aa
necond claas reading mailer.
SUBSCRIPTION RATKS-Filly cenla per
month or |s*oo year, Invariable in advance, Ad-
ve-tlalng   ratna made known on   application.
Addreaa   all   communications    to   James H.
Wetcher, Manner, _ . O. boi 553. Koaslnnd, U. C
<fDFflQM
THE ALIEN LABOR LAW.
Writing in the labor department
of the Sunday Colonist T. H.
Twigg savs that the fining of Al
Geiser by Rossland's police magistrate of $550 for two breaches of
the Alien Labor act does not prove
that the act is workable, but
"merely shows the uselessness
of the measure," as the
defendant will appeal to the
supreme court and later to the
privy council. "The law," adds the
writer, "is a Dominion one and if
it iB not workable the Dominion
government should be asked to
amend it."
It is extremely difficult to follow the reasoning of Mr. Twigg in
the matter. What he alleges
makes it very clear that the provincial attorney-general was bound
to take up the prosecution agninst
these powerful corporations who
can appeal from court to court and
so defy the law, The convictions
obtained by private prosecution
demonstrates that the sections of
the act appealed to are quite workable so far as they go,but the costs
incurred in maintaining the law
should -not be thrown upon the
shoulders of private individuals,
and if Attorney-General Eberts
had done his duty his department
would have assumed the prosecution in the lirst instance.
The deportation clause in the
act is a totally different matter, ft
being wholly under the jurisdiction of the Dominion minister of
justice. Mr. Eberts was never
asked to enforce that provision, hut
the fact that a private citizen
could prosecute for a summary
conviction, as was done in the
Geiser case hy W. L. McDonald, is
no excuse whatever for the nonintervention of Provincial Attorney-General Eberts, who so readily
came to the rescue of the mining
companies in a technical assault
case here last month.
ARBITRATION.
If the law of compulsory arbitration was in force in British Columbia at the present time, how
long would the present difficulties
under which Rossland has been
more or less suffering from for the
past eighteen months have lasted?
One of the great benefits which
would have resulted not only to
those directly interested, but to the
public at large, would have heen
the non-cessation of work.had both
parties to the existing struggle
been compelled to submit their respective cases to a fairly constituted tribunal.
Business would have gone on as
usual and there would have been
no disturbance in the normal condition of affairs. Further than
this, the whole facts of the case
would have been submitted tinder
oath and the onlooker would have
been able to judge for himself
which side should justly be entitled to his support and sympathy.
The companies would have been
saved an enormous money loss and
the wage earner would have gone
on getting his pay, while the disputed points were being disposed
of by the arbitration court.
These facts being undisputed,
why should the companies so
strongly resist the principles of
compulsory arbitration? Is it because that they fear that the real
facts of the case would not support
tbe many contentions raised in sup
port of their views? If not will they
state the reason for their violent opposition to a measure which would
bo clearly work for the public good
in all industrial disputes.
Surely it would be better to adopt a reasonable meanB of arriving
at a fair and just settlement in disputes of this kind than to attempt
the obliteration of unionism by
foolish bluster, and the parading
of legal damage'suits in order to
try and frighten the worker into
line.
It is a remarkable instanco of
human perversion to find the Le
Roi companies in the present instance concentrating all their energies, on the one hand to crushing
the life out of the unions by appealing to the law courts for damages, injunctions and other such
claims, and on the other hand to
practically attempting to evade
the clear provisions of the alien
labor act.
We do not imagine that as the
facts broaden out and the real
state of the case becomes better
known the companies can
expect public sympathy in support
of their avowed contention.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
Goldwin Smith says: "It should
be libelous to couple anarchy with
socialism."
Great wars and "great indnstrial
battles" are alike demoralizing and
costly. We should be done with
barbarism of all sorts. This century should be a century of reason.
—Post Dispatch.
Henry Bratnober should apply
to Samuel Robins of the New Vancouver Coal company and find out
how well recognition of the union
has worked for the past ten years
at Nanaimo on the property managed by Mr. Robins and employing 1'iOO miners. Tho manager's
sworn evidence is obtainable.
Your credit is good  for New
and Second-Hand Goods on
THE INSTALLMENT PLAN
—AT—
Glazan's
Furniture Store
Furniture,  Stoves,  Springs,   Mattresses, Linoleum,   Oil Cloth,
Granitewave.Tlhwn re, Dinner  Pails,   Crockery,
Lamps,    Candle
Sticks and all
kinds of
HOUSEHOLD GOODS.
The highest price p»id (or secondhand goods. Do not sell before you call
and see me. For lull parlicub.rs inquire of
SAMUEL GLAZAN.
..ROSSLAND..
CONFECTIONERY STORE
Ntit to the Grand Union hotel,
receive!) consignments of Out
Flowers every day. For thc
choicest of hot house blossoms
call and see them. Orders lor
■veddings, banquets, etc., a
specialty.   Charges reoeonab!..
BATH   ei   FOX.   Proprietors.
The GRAND .UNION HOTEL it is easily seen,
Is splendidly run by Proprietor Green;
Buy one glass of beer and a
free lunch you'll get,
Such as sometimes you've
heard of but not often met.
Neat and clean furniahed
rooms can always be had
At such low prices as ,vill make
the workingman ^lad.
mc. Avff   Geo, H' Green, Prop
The continuance of the Rossland
strike cannot but bring to the sur- |
face something not "yet known to
the general public. Can it be that
the Rossland mines are of too poor
a character lo pay as high a wage
as mines of other districts; or is it
because of some mistake of management, that the strike is prolonged as a sort of excuse to the
shareholders for sins of commission
or omission?—Colonist.
"The C. P. R. trackmen are not
wise in their generation," was a
borrowed phrase used in the early
days of the struggle. To this kind
of illogical reasoning and bad
judgment, may be attributed the
drawing out of the strike beyond
all reasonable time, to the detriment of the men and company
alike. Had the press pursued a
wiser course and used its powerful
influence in advocating a settlement by way of conciliation and
arbitration, what an amount of ill-
will, loss of time and money would
have been saved all concerned.
All sizes of photos at nearly half
regular price. Carpenter & Co.
NOTICE-
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 daya
after date I shall apply to the Chief
Commissionct of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase 640 acres ol land,
more or lees, in the Yale district, and
described as follows: Commencing at a
poet about one-quarter of a mile northerly frpm Iron creek, thence westerly
80 chains, thence northerly 80 chains,
thence easterly 80 chains, thence southerly 80 chains to point of commencement
C. A. COFFIN.
Witness:   A. G. Creelman.
Rossland, B. C„ yth September, A. D.
iqoi, D-.-2m
Richard Altman
GENERAL REPAIRING.
Locks, Guns and Sewing Machines
Sharpening of every description
Guns and 22 short   and long cartridges for sale.
Washington street, opposite Hotel Allan
The Shortest, Quickest
and Best.
HA_. I IfUSl BflMtLu
IN A COOL PUCE.
THE
Hoffman Ho:;se
Is the Spot;   Every.Iiiiig First-
Class anil Quick Service
ai the
HOFFMAN HOUSE.
Spokane Falls & Northern
NELSON & FT. SHEPrARD RY.
Red Mountain By,
The only nil rail route between nl' points enst
nw nnd south to Russland, NelHOti nnd alt intermediate points, connecting Ht Bpukatic with
Hit; Great Northern, Nor hert. pcclfic nml 0. K.
& N. Co.
Connects at Rosslflttd with.1} tho Canadlau Pf-
clfic Ry. foi Boundary Creek points.
Connects at LVfevers I'slis with stage dally fur
Republic,
Buffet service on trains between Bp^Uaheand
Northport.
EFFECTIVE MAY 5
Leave.
9:00 a. m.
12:25 a. m,
9:15 a. m.
Spokane
Rossland.
Nelson.
Arrive.
7:3. P- m-
4:10 p. ni.
7:15 p. m.
H.  A. JACKSON,
General Passenger Agi,
Spokane, Wn.ll.
H. P. BROWN,
AEent, Rosslnwl. R. C.
Talk   about Retiing   a   Good
ileal, just iry one at tlie
****** 4*-***************'   '**
\LOOK  HERE!t
i - -t
l St. Charles Hotel j
I Everything comfortable   nl Hit- *
j* St. Clmrlc_.   Oood anisic In the J
Y evening hee. Oood Win.,Whisky *
T and Cigars lor money  *
**************************
,00m'
aJajM____BBB_______B___BHg___
TO any customers who  patronized  us ^if/ fH
all tho time while they have been   ?^f| fm
at work, ancl  especially to  those   with     10  jf
I'unilies, we bog lo announce that wo will    tW     k
trust them to all  the goods Ihey may
need during the strike nnd will wait for the pay '
until they start to work again jnd  be able to
pay.   To those who  need  other stuff, such   as
Groceries, etc., which wo do nol curry, nnd cannot get credit elsewhere, we will  give  thera pr-
dors, on which they oan  get all  (bey  want  on,
our account until   the   trouble   is   nil Bottled.
Thtsjis :i bona fidp offer, which fact can bo readily proven when occasion  makos il.  necessary.    /
THE PEOPLES' STORE       J
"■<*-
CLIFTON   CORNER.
B. BANNETT.
■>.
*sW.
-'.%___►■'
-t$*ux-.jtt0k  _
bC3l & lllu,
Jl&lQi!1'''™'-
aamKaV    '
HE BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS' UNION STAMP
Is used by TfrSE J. D. -IMB CO., Limited, upon all
their manufacture of Coots and Slices. No strikes, cessation
of work or labor difficulties promote thc highest possible production of perfect workmanship. In thus consulting the interests
ni the consumer we urge that you EJi£i_/_/._
he
AG
E
re____K»«_R__u_____«__n__H-
■_■
CAAn.0
 TO	
St. Paul, Minneapolis,
Chicago, Toronto,
Montreal, New JTOrk,
and all Eastern points.
Seattle, Tacoma,
Vancouver, Victoria,
and all Pacific Coast points.
KAST DOUKD,
Lenve Spokane II |16 a. m.
WliNT BOUND.
Leave Spokane..7:10 a.m.and8:00p,no,
All connections made In Union depot
For lull par t'cu lata, folders, etc.,
rail on or addreas
Jl. BRANDT, il.i'.T.A.,
701 W. Riverside, Spokane
H. P. Bisown, Agent,
Rossland, II. C.
Canadian
v Pacific
DIRECT   ROUTE.
EAST
TORONTO
BUFFALO
OTTAWA
MONTREAL
NEW YORK
WEST
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA
SEATTLE
PORTLAND
SAN FRANCISCO
IMPERIAL LIMITED
100  HOURS
VANCOUVER TO MONTREAL
Steamship service from Vancouver, Skagway, Hawaii, ^Australia,
China and Japan.
For Fursther Particulars apply to
A. C. McArthur, Depot Agt.
A. B. MACKENZIE, City Agt
Rossland, 13. C.
J. 8. CARTER, D. P. A.
Nelson, 11. 0.
£. I.;CoylelA G. P. A
Vancover. B, C
Rossland, B. C, Sept .sth, 1901.
To the Citizens and Business Men of Rossland anil Vit inity and to the G neral Public:
The LeRoi mine managi r has been circulating a report that the-strike here is practically at an end and the mines are about to resume This reporl lias Ueen taken uji by their
organ, the Morning Miner, and s"nt: out over the country as a true report of the situation in
Rossland. We have made a careful analysis of the situation here and believe that.no impartial reader can see much reason for ihe joyful enthusiasm which i\lr. Bernard Macdonald
and his paper profess to feel.
For three and one half months lhe strike has been in force at Northport. The greatest claim Macdonald or Kadish have £ver made during that time is that they have been
able to operate two of the (ive furnaces at the smelter. It is only a question of simple arithmetic to see that if it takes three and one-half months to start two furnaces, it. will take
eight and three-fourths months before they-can have the smelter in operation. Now, if it
takes eight and three fourths months lo rais: the 500 men necessary to start the smeller,
it will take twice that many, pr seventeen and one-half months, to secure iooo men for the
mines in Rossland. Or, at the end of twenty-six and one-half months, if Macdonald has the
same success he claims to have had thus far at the smelter, he will be in a position to work
the mines.
No one can deny or dispute that Bernard Macdonald has left no stone unturned to
secure men for the smelter at Northport. He has cast his drag net over the states of Minnesota, Colorado, California, Oregon, Missouri, Montana, or, practically, over the entire
country west of the Mississippi river, and has been able to start but two of the live furnaces
at the Northport smelter. This is the success he boasts- 1 Ie claims the strike is at an end.
It has only begun.
So far we have, taken as true his statements that he has two furnaces in operation at
Northport. We wished lo prove how futile are his statements by his own evidence.
The real truth is he has never had two furnaces in successful operation at one time for 24
hours. They have produced no matte for ^shipment up till August 25, lie claims to have
shipped one carload on August 21. That it was the highest in value of any shipment made.
The records of the railroad at Northport fail to show any trace of matte shipments on
or about August 21, If any shipment was made it was via the Columbia river route and
rests at the bottom ot the river.
He also claims to be able to start the mines in Rossland. Apparently he does not
realize there is an alien act in Canada, for of the 30 employes now at the mines all but two
have been brought here in direct violation of this law and will be deported inside of two
weeks. He has in eight weeks been able to secure but two scabs in Canada. Now, if the
Canadian people should, to his surprise, enforce their laws, even if it does hurt the feelings
of Bernard Macdonald, how long will it take to start tiie mines at the ratio of two every
eight weeks?   And as yet there is not a miner in the lot.
We are not deceiving the miners of Rossland by false promises. We have every reason to hope that by October 1, igol, Bernard Macdonald's name will only remain in Rossland as an unpleasant memory. We hope for an honorable settlement of the difficulties
here. The sooner the better it will suit the union miners of Rossland. But if it is necessary
to continue this fight to its final end the union miners and suieltermen will stand shoulder to
shoulder for carrying on the light!
This war was forced on these unions. We entered lhe Struggle full of a belief in the
justice of our cause and confident of our ability to carry it: successfully to an end. This belief has never been shaken for an instant, and certainly is not when we consider the almost
unbroken line of successes which have thus far attended our efforts,
EXECUTIVE BOARD
ROSSLAND MINERS' UNION No. 38, W. F. M THE EVENING WORLD. ROSSLAND, B. C. SEPTEMBER 25, rgoi
HIDDEN
TREASURE
Expedition   Being  Fitted
Out  at Victoria-Will
Sail Shortly.
Victoria, Sept. '25.—According to
a dispatch from here to tho Ladysmith Loader, a party of Victoria
men including one or two well-
known mariners, arc making a
most careful preparation to fit out
an expedition which will leave for
Cocos Island, throe hundred miles
off the coast of Nicaragua in the!
Pacific ocean, to make a final effort
to find the long lost treasure buried
about tbe middle of the nineteenth
century hy the state officials of
Nicaragua, during the revolution.
The members of the party, who decline to allow their names to be
published just now, say that tbey
have come, upon some further information tbat will enable tbem
to recover the treasure if it I.e
there at all. They are perfectly
confident that tho treasure has
never boon removed, and smile at
the story of tho searches that have
been made for it, both by private
individuals and by tho crew of II.
M. S. Amphion two or three years
ago. Tho party will fit out a
largo schooner now in thc harbor,
and expect to leave for tho island
about tho end of tho year. Tlioy
are spending lots of money lo outfit the vessel, and intend to stay at
the island until Ihey have made a
complete and thorough search of
every part of it. Some members
of the party have heen on the island before and are well acquainted wilh the local conditions.
Why not .work   for   that state of
affairs in British Columbia?
New Zealand has just, voluntarily, raised the wages of the railway employes an additional $100,-
000 per year without increasing
freight charges and at tho same
time, reduced passenger rates.
Why,not apply the idea here, in
the future, beginning with the
CoasW'Kootenay road?
Barbers in New Zealand must be
paid ..13.70 per week of 54 hours
Of course the best men command
moro than that. Secured without
a strike, by compulsory arbitration.
How would that suit tho "ton-
eorials" here?
Coal miners in New Zealand,
from now on, must he paid from
six to eight shillings a ton, according to class of work, with fixed
conditions as to tramways, etc.
How would compulsory arbitration
suit our British Columbia miners
in Nanaimo?
Six decisions in the arbitration
courts in Now Zealand wore handed down in April, May and June,
without work stopping for one day.
How does that compare with tho
annoyance to the public, and the
trouble to all concerned, including
loss of wages, caused by tho C. P.
R. strike, tho fishermen's strike,
and the Rossland strike?
The government in Now Zealand
is a Labor Government. Compulsory arbitration has been in
force seven years. If it wasn't satisfactory to the most of tho people,
would a Labor Government bo able
to remain in power?
There is lots of talk ahout public
ownership of raflroads and all public utilites. Why not have public
ownership of the government?
Wo   have   lots  of   fine   Italian
prunes onliand.    Paul, on Bros,  t
WHY NOT?
N.'\v   /.Minimi   Arbitration—Ar   Applied
in BillNli Columbia.
New Zealand has a compulsory
arbitration law, and has had no
strikes or lockouts for seven years.
Kxcu.hIihi to Son   l'ruiirl..o.
On account of the Episcopal
Church mooting the Canadian Pacific railway will sell round trip
tickets to San Francisco, via Portland and Shasta route, at 150.60,
September '2.S to '27th. Corresponding reductions from all Kootenay
points. For full particulars apply
to local agents.
J. S. Carter. D.P.A., Nelson,   tf
All our fancy biscuits to be closed
oul at 15c per pound. Paulson
Bros.
Seals and
Rubber
Stamps
Mannfactui*ed to Order on Short
Notice at the World office,
0000********0*0000****000*
0 0
0
0
0
0
J. L. WHITNEY & CO., t
0
0 df
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0,
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Mines	
Mininq Stocks,
Real Estate.
tsSaaatmmaaa^imtse**^^
Standard Stocks Bought and Sold.
1 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
J 0
0
0
0
0
0
.£. V. & N. Telephone 118       Columbia and Queen ^
0 0
00000000*****0************
Labor Union Directory.
Offiicers and Meetings.
WESTERN FEDERATION
OF MINERS-Eclwarcl Boyce
president, Den ver.Colorado;
James Wilkes, vice-president, Nelson, British Columbia; Wm. C. Haywood,
secretary-treasurer, Denver,
Col.; Executive Board,|<>hn
C. Williams, Grass Valley,
Cal.; Phillip Bowden,Butte,
Mont,; '1 hos, B. Sullivan,
Leadville, Col.; John Kelly,
Burke, Idaho; Chas. H.
Moyer, Lead City, S. Dakota; "|ames A. Baker, Slocan
' City, B. C.
DISTRICT UNION no. 6,
W. F. M.-- Jas. Wilkes, Pres.
Nelson; Rupert Bttlmer.vice-
prosident, Rossland; Alfred
Pair, secretary-treasurer,
Ymir.
MINERS' UNION No. .6,
Western Federation of
miners—meets every Wednesday evening at 7.30, p.
m. in Miners' Union Hall.,
Frank Woodside, Secretary
Rupert   Bulmer,  President.
NEW DENVER MINERS
Union No. 07. W. F. M.
Meets every Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock in Union
hall. T. J. Lloyd, Pres., H.
J. Byrnes, Sec.
PHOENIX MINERS UN-
ion No. 8, W. F. M. Meets
every Saturday evening at
7:30 o'clock in Miners' hall.
James W. Barry, Pres., ]no.
Riordan, Sec.
YMIR MINERS UNION
No. 85, W. F. M., meets
every Wednesday evening
at 8 o'clock in Miners' Union hall. W. B. Mclsaac,
Pres., Alfred Parr, Sec.
SLOCAN CITY MINERS
Union No. 62, W, F. M.
Meets every Wednesday
evening at 7:30 in Miners' Union hall, lames Nixon, Pres.,D. B. O'Neail.Sec.
NELSON MINERS UNiON
No. 90, W. F M. Meets!
every Saturday evening at
7:30 o'clock. John McPherson, Pres , James Wilks.Sec!
Visiting brothers cordially
invited.
GREENWOOD MINERS UNION'
No.'22, W. F. M., meets every!
Saturday evening in Union hall.!
Geo. P. Dougherty, Pros., M.
Kane, Sec.
TRADES AND LABOR
COUNCIL-Meets every second and fourth Tuesday in
each month at 7.30 P. M, in
Miners' Union Hall. President, W.L.McDonald. Ad
dress all communications to
Secretary-Treasurer, P. O.
box 784.
ROSSLAND FEDERAL
Labor Union No. 19. Meets
every Monday evening at
8:00 in Miners' Union hall.
T. H.Reed, Pres., J. V. Ingram, Sec.
TYPOGRAPHICAL      UNION   No. 335,—Meets on the
last Sunday of each month
at the  Miners' Union Hall.
J:' Barkdoll,    Sec;     Wm.
Poole, Presid
CAPPLNTERS    &    JOIN-1
ERS   UNION—meets every]
Friday of each week  at  "].'■
30 p.m.  in   Miners'  Union
Hall. John McLaren, Pres.;!'
W. R. Baker, Sec,
PAINTERS' UNION, No.!
123, painters and decorators'
of America,meets inBcatty's
Hall, on second and foprth
Tuesday of each month. R.'
C. Arthur, Pres.; W. S.j
Murphy, Sec.
JOURNEYMEN TAILORS;
Union of America. , Meets:
lirst Monday in each month
in Miners' Union hall. S.
Graham president, L A.
Fairclougn secretary, P. ().
box 314.
NEWSBOYS' UNION, No 3
—meet in Miners' Union
Hall on the first and third
Saturdays of each month,
al 9 a. m. Mike Guydotti,
Pres.
ffi£.-F
It is the Official Organ of Organized   Labor  throughout
the Kootenays  and  no
home    is   complete
without it.
icIli.iiliciiiellSlftJXjj
50
is the price asked, tbis surely
being within the reach ol all.
Ha1®
iiHIifiUlE
smwm
finUCDTKII
THOSE
Should not forget that the only way
to reach the People is through-
the columns of the
1 }
1% \pi IU
Ttf
:%■■■:.-'_._    0
In this branch of our business we do
everything   from  a visiting  curd
to a three-sheet poster.
spills
WE ALSO MAKE
RUBBER -
-AND-
J.».» *■*____•:..
EaSIEJEUBJiaJ,
m^ 1
IB!iillllli!l@i!!ili^
:_B«aris_W5^^iTr^i';-v_w*™^^^ ^*-^::.T3"^**swt«aa_c'_ir^ ,;;•;
it
■ THE EVENING WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, SEPTEMBER 25, iqoi.
STOCK MARKETS
A Dull Day on the Local
Exchange.
CENTRE STAR GOES BOOMING
The Latest Quotations  and Sales
Locally and on the Toronto
Market.
Only two stocks were dealt witli
this morning on the Rossland
stock exchange and the feature of
the market was the continued rise
in Centre Star stock, 3500 shares
of which sold at 47 Jc and 48o, the
stock closing firm at 50c asked and
47c bid TheToronto prices being 48c
and 42c. No reason has been assigned for the steady rise in these
shares but apparently there is a
move of some sort being made.
The other shares on the list
showed little or no change today
except in the case of the North
Star which showed a heavy drop.
Appended will be found today's quotations and sales here and
in Toronto.
Today's Toronto Quotations.
Asked      Bid
War Eagle	
Centre Star	
Iron Mask	
Kambler-Carihoo ...
Giant	
California	
Republic.	
Payne	
Winnipeg	
14
48
19
50
.
5
4
17
9
12%
42
12
45
4
3
15
6
Toronto sales today included:
5000 C. G. F. S. at 4|c, 2500 Payne
at 10c-
Today's Local   Quotations:
Asked
Abe I.iucoln        8_J
American Boy       io
Athabasca $ 4 00
B. C. Gold Hields         3
Big Three         2%
Black Tail        lutf
California         _
Canadian Gold Fields         6
Cariboo (Camp McKinney)       21
CentreStar       50
Crows Nest Pass Coal |8o 00
Bid
4
4
4'A
18
,     47
.72 00
Deer Trail No.
Dundee   	
-Evening Star (Assess, paid)
Olaut	
Golden Crown Mines, Lttn
Homestake (Assess, paid)..
Iron Mask (Assess, paid}...
Iro- Colt	
Ill	
Jumbo	
King (Oro Denoro)	
Knob    HI	
LoneP ne	
Monte Christo	
Montreal Gold Fields	
Morning Glory	
Morrison	
Mountain I,ion	
Noble Five	
North Star (Hast Kootenay)       35
Novelty         2
Old Ironsides       8s
Payne	
Peoria Mines	
Princess M-nid         2
Suilp       2*
ambler-Cariboo	
Republic	
Kossland Ilonauza U. M. fi S. Co.
St. Elmo Consolidated	
Sullivan	
Spitzee  Gold Mines  f 5 00   f 4 50
Tamarac (Kenneth) Assess, paid.        3 3
Tom Thumb       ij}_      n>
Van Anda         . ti
Virginia         3 ,
War Kagle Consolidated       ij 10
Waterloo         1 1
White Bear         3 ,i
5J»«t!KF,     o«    si
Wonderful         4 2
Today's Sales:
Centre Star, 500, 1000, 47.C,
2000, 48c; Black Tail, 5500, 10^0.
Total sales, 8500 shares.
5
3«
iVa
6
3
3Y.
3
30
4=
3
2'A
13
i'A
<>"i
MINOR MENTION.
Relatives in Vancouver are arranging an for investigation of the
death of William Young, whom
they declare was murdered in Lillooet.
Dr. Sinclair has further evidences
that smallpox is increasing in
Washington.
C. D. Rand, of Grand Forkscame
in last night.
Last week the Rambler-Cariboo
Bhipped 84 tons of ore, valued at
$9981.
William Henderson, Dominion
Government architect, will be
called upon to settle the dispute
over the Nelson federal building
between tho local architect and the
contractor.
Mr. Mrs. D. J. Fitzgerald left on
the noon train for the south today.
At the Prospectors' Exchange in
Nelson is a portion of a mastodon's
tooth, weighing seven pounds. It
was found on Vancouver Island in
a hill of glaoial drift.
Martin J. Egan is accompanying
the Royal party across the continent as the representative of the
Associated Psess. Martin received
his first lesson in newspaper work
from his brother "Col." Jack now
of the Nelson Miner.
WILL NOT
INTERVENE
Czar's Purpose Regarding
the Boers as Viewed
in London.
KILL_ Grippe, Cough,
Cold, Fever and all
DISEASE GERMS	
SNOW IN
ALBERTA
Loss of Uncut Grain Will
Be Heavy-Storm Still
in Progress.
Word was received in Nelson
yesterday by some of the wholesalers that owing to the heavy
snowstorm that had then lasted
forty-eight hours and showed no
signs of abatement, throughout
Northern Alberta, deliveries of
wheat and grains from Edmonton
and towns in that section of country would be indefinitely postponed.
It is not known yet how much
grain was still uncut when the
storm came, but the amount iB be
lieved to have been considerable.
London, Sept. 25.—In London
the speech of President Louhcrt
when proposing the health of the
Czar and Czarina at Uelheny, Sat-1
urday, is in no way regarded as an
indication of the intention on the
part of the Russian emperor lo interfere in South African affairs.
Even in Paris reflection seemed
to have convinced many that there
was little in the words of President
Loubct and that beyond a confirmation of the Franco-Russian
alliance little has heen achieved by
the visit of the sovereign.
MEASUREMENTS TAKEN.
Shamrock   Gives    tho   Columbia   Little
Time Allowance.
New York, Sept. 25.—The official
measurement of the challenger
Shamrock II and the defender Columbia were made public at the
New York Yacht Club. The result waa in the nature of a surprise,
for it showed that the Shamrock,
which is tho larger boat so far as
sail area and displacement are concerned, allows only 13 seconds to
the Columbia over the course on
which the contests for the America
cup are to be sailed.
Both boats were measured with
men on board. The difference in
the sailing length of the two boats
is 1.435 feet. This computed on
the time allowance of the New
York Yacht club rules, give the
Columbia an allowance of 43 seconds in a thirty mile course.
GOODEVE'S COMP. SYRUP
HYPOPHOSPHITES
Produce Health Germs
A word to the wise is sufficient.
Goodeve  Bros.
Druggists and Stationers.
£flr*It pays to deal with Goodeve Bro.
K(\l«?   m>      KOSSLAND LODGE NO   2T,
• v/JF   X • K. ol £., meets every 1'rMny
lllgb. :it 8 o'clock in Odd l.cl'ow's  ball,   Ojii_(._i
street.   Visiting brothers are nlwavs welcome
Makky Martin, c. c.
I'ROCTKK JOINKR,   K. of R, BUd 8
1?      {\      T?     PRATKRNAI,
1 •   \ /•   Vj* BAOLRS,   Ro!
OHUKR   OK
:«la.n1    Aoi<\
No. 10, Regular meetings eviry Thursday even-
tigs, S pj m, iCagles Hall. Miners' Union Bldg,
Thos, DiUiusurlcft, w. i*.
11, Daniel, w. Secretary.
If\ fi   HP    Independent Order] ol Good
• \ J»VT» J. •   Templars      meets      every
Thursday Evening In the Lecture Room of the
Baptist Church      Members ol the order visiting
the city will he cordially welcomed.
O.J. B, LANE, W. H, OREITZ,
C. I. Secretary.
I.O.O.F.
Meets in Odd   Fellows   Hall
on Queen street, between
First and Secure, avenues. RpguTar mretiugs
each Monday night, Visiting brothers are cordially tuvilea to attend and register within 30
da vs.
W.S, Murphy. Sec, M. 11 Brldgfatd, N G
c^r.'riUinwuv
1 ".-jcis_i^.-j-}'_."_rr:.'
P. BURNS & CO.
WHOLESALE    MARKETS
Rossland, Nelson, Trail,Sandon,Rcvelstoke.Green-
vvood, Grand Forks and Vancouver.
RETAIL   MARKETS-Kossland, Trail,   Nelson, Ymir,  Kaslo
Sandon, New Denver, Silverton, Cascade City, Grand Forks,
Greenwood,  Phoenix,  Midway, Camp   McKinney,
Revelstoke,  Ferguson  and  Vancouver.
Fish.   Game and   Poultry ln Season,  Sausages of  All Kinds.
WM. DONALD, Manager Rossland Branch
itc_n>-_v__a_______n____^7*__~x__rc__>»*
at City Bakery
l'hone 149.
The Evening World
£3
50c per Month by Carrier.
F011 Rent—Three-room furnished house with city water. Ajiply
to J. L, Whitney & Co.
Get Your Papers
and magazines at lliB  Postofflce   New
Stand.   A full lino of stationery alway
on   hand.      Agency   for   Ihe   F.vknino
Woriu
Rossland Cigar Factory.
Why not patronize a homo in-
diitsry? II will assist Union Inhor
and keep the money at homo. Ask
for a Crown Grant or W. B. Cigar
when you buy.
Col'is & Co.,for line cpmmsrolal print
inii,   Coll up 'plume 88. ti
Di.il in thu   w.r.
THE B.C. DRILLERS
Larger and cheaper than ever
this season. Jumbo water melons
at Paulson Bros. tf
J L. Whitney & Co.
MINING   BROKERS.
B. O. and Washington Stocks a specialty
47 Columbia avenue.
ESTABLISHED 1806
The Reddin-Jackson Co.
IjlraltoA   Xd.<_T____t;jr
STOCK BROKERS
Money Loaned on Real Estate.
Richard Plewman
Stock   Broker
Bank of^Montreal Building
V. & N. Phone 82
ORDE & CO.,
Mining Stocks, Real
Estate, Fire Life and
Acoident Insurance	
126 Ool. Ave., Opal block. Telephone 61
Tho Mau Who UJil Sa Well :it   _ pokiane--
Prevluus Jtevordi.
W. M. Ross and George S. McLeod, the British Columbia drillers,
an no accidental team, but have a
long record of contests covering
drilling championship meets in
several Btates. Both were athletes
before they were drillers. Tho
practice of Scotch games and the
handling of the weights in field
contests   likely founded tho phys-
Montreal, Sept. 25. Canadian
scout 87,591 (John M. Dougall) \tSM
was killed at Duster's [took on i RcW.
Sept. 15. Sergeant James Walsh
and Sergeant John F. Lustlove I jRjBSj
Wood are dangerously ill of enteric iKj£3
fever at Pretoria.
HOTEL   ARRIVALS.
EOOTENAV.
N.    Jones,
Carlyle    N.    Jones,   Onondago
mine.
W. H. Olin, Spokane.
A. W. Sayles, Spokane.
R. L. Ford, Spokane.
H. P. Brown, city.
J. W. Tunstall, Jr., Nelson.
R. A. Shelton, Mace, Idaho.
Kxcunaluii tu Sun  Fritneiiico.
On account   of   the   Episcopal
Church meeting the Canadian Pa-
ioal ability that broke the record cific railway will sell round trip
Monday night. Mr. Robb is a miner
from the Rawhide mine in Phoenix
and Mr. McLeod was a blacksmith
for three years at thc Star mine in
Sandon. While in California Ross
held the coast record in the 16-
pound hammer throw without the
turn, at 103 feet, and had a record
of 44 feet six inches in putting the
16-pound shot. McLeod won a
shot putting contest in KaBlo, B.C.,
with the big put of 43 feet 8J
inches. All of these records mark
the men as high class athletes.
In speaking of other drilling contests he had been in with Mr. Ross,
Mr. McLeod said: "At Nelson
this year on the Fourth of July we
drilled for a cup and the championship of British Columbia. After
eight minutes' drilling we split the
rock, having drilled 29 1-18 inches.
The other team had withdrawn.
In Phoenix on Labor Day we drilled against five teams and won by
Beveral inches with a depth of 43
inches."
Show Opem Today.
Cranbrook Sept, 25.—East
Kootertay's first annual mineral,
agricultural and industrial exhibition opens here at 1 o'clock this
afternoon. Everything promises
that it will be a success.
tickets to San Francisco, via Portland and  Shasta route, at .$..0.00, i
September 23 to 27lh.  Correspond- ^ „
ing  reductions from  all  Kootenay  jSKi
points.    For full particulars apply SffiS
met
to local agents.
J. S. Cai.i'eh. D.P.A
Nelson.
!'j is the new high-grade mining
il oamp in the south half of tho Col-
ville Reservation, seven miles west of the Columbia river, eight miles southwest of Daisy and 28
miles by good road from Meyers Fails. The town-
site is in the centre of tne rich aggregation of
mines comprising the Meteor, Stray Dog, "White
Swan and Given groups, all of which are working
in high-grade shipping ore. A great number of
very promising properties are opening up in the
vicinity. It is surrounded by a splendid agricultural, fruit g;rowing and stock raising country,
unequalled in the northwest, and has a splendid
supply of timber for building and mining purposes, together with unlimited water power near
It has already, besides a store, a number of buildings in course of erection, ancl a telephone service,
saw mill, etc., will be in operation within a short
time. Meteor is a high grade camp of the real
Leadville type, the ores mined being gold, silver,
lead and copper. Picked assays have given as high
as $140,000 to the ton, the average of the camp
being about $35. You can't aiibrd to forget Meteor.
Now is  your timo to   get in at bed-rock prices.
notice.
NOTICE'is hereby given Hint fin day* ?M§*
alter date I slinll apply to tha Chi< I r^io
Commissiouci ol Lands and Works lor I JjSjS*
permission to purchase640 acres ol lnnd,: 2_*"__
more or less, in the Yilc district, and j mSs*
described as follows: Commencing nt _ K>/,c
poBt about one-quarlcr of a mile north-' fScte.
erly from Iron creek, Ihence westerly I cgftljn
80 chains, thence northerly 80 chains, j J*r?-»
thence easterly 80 chains, thence Eouth-! ^4£S*
erly 80 ehains to point ol commencement
C. A. COFFIN.
Witness:   A. G. Ckkki.man.
Rossland, 15. C, oth September. A. D.
Iqoi, ill! "in
Meteor is Sure fo be a Rich Gamp
Richard Altmanjirl
GENERAL REPAIRING,     }|»j
Locks, Guns and Sewing Machines
FKOM
$25 to $150
''     One-half cash and the balance in two equal pay-
£5"""ments at three and six months , without interest
Sharpening of every description
Guns and 22 short   and long cartridges for Bale.
Washington street, opposite Hotel Allan
m
m
mi
_&
For full particulars call on or address
G. W. HERRON,
Meteor, 'Washington.
__t_i_34_^_8_&&&9_

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